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Sample records for kupffer cell blockade

  1. Pathogenesis of Kupffer Cells in Cholestatic Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keisaku; Hall, Chad; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2016-09-01

    Kupffer cells are the resident macrophages in the liver. They are located in hepatic sinusoid, which allows them to remove foreign materials, pathogens, and apoptotic cells efficiently. Activated Kupffer cells secrete various mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, to initiate immune responses, inflammation, or recruitment of other liver cells. Bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery in rodents is often studied as an animal model of cholestatic liver disease, characterized by obstruction of bile flow. BDL mice show altered functional activities of Kupffer cells compared with sham-operated mice, including elevated cytokine secretion and impaired bacterial clearance. Various mediators produced by other liver cells can regulate Kupffer cell activation, which suggest that Kupffer cells orchestrate with other liver cells to relay inflammatory signals and to maintain liver homeostasis during BDL-induced liver injury. Blocking or depletion of Kupffer cells, an approach for the treatment of liver diseases, has shown controversial implications. Procedures in Kupffer cell research have limitations and may produce various results in Kupffer cell research. It is important, however, to reveal underlying mechanisms of activation and functions of Kupffer cells, followed by hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. This review summarizes present Kupffer cell studies in cholestatic liver injury. PMID:27452297

  2. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  3. Effective delivery of chemotherapeutic nanoparticles by depleting host Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Yamada, Keiichi; Hashimoto, Shinji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Ryoko; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2012-11-15

    Although chemotherapeutic nanoparticles would confer various advantages, the majority of administrated nanoparticles are known to be spoiled by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Intending to more effectively deliver therapeutic nanoparticles to target regions in vivo, host RES, especially Kupffer cells in the liver, have been depleted ahead of drug administration. To demonstrate this hypothesis, clodronate liposomes were preinjected into BALB/c nude mice for depletion of Kupffer cells 2 days before, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) at the doses of 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg was administered. As a result, doxorubicin accumulation in the liver was decreased from 36 to 26% injected dose/organ by the Kupffer cells depletion, and consequently, the plasma concentration of doxorubicin was significantly enhanced threefold (from 11 to 33 μg/mL) on day 1 at 1.25 mg/kg-dose group. Doxorubicin accumulation in the tumor was increased from 0.78 to 3.0 μg/g-tissue on day 3, and tumor growth inhibition by Doxil was significantly boosted (tumor volumes from 751 to 482 mm(3) on day 24) by the Kupffer cells depletion. In conclusion, Kupffer cells depletion by clodronate liposomes enhanced the plasma concentration and antitumor effects of Doxil, and would be widely applicable for various clinical cancer chemotherapies using nanoparticles. PMID:22362271

  4. Kupffer cell structure in the juvenile Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus.

    PubMed

    van Wilpe, Erna; Groenewald, Hermanus Bernardus

    2014-01-01

    The morphology of Kupffer cells was examined in the liver of the juvenile Nile crocodile using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Pleomorphic Kupffer cells were located in the sinusoids, in the space of Disse, in the hepatic parenchyma and often connected adjacent sinusoids. The cell surfaces were irregular due to the presence of filopodia and lamelliapodia with phagocytosis of white blood cells, red blood cells and thrombocytes being evident. The cells were in close contact with endothelial cells and pit cells in the sinusoidal lumen and with stellate cells in the space of Disse. The cytoplasm contained large phagosomes comprising a combination of ceroid pigment, melanosomes and siderosomes. The nuclei were often indented and eccentrically placed due to the presence of the phagosomes. Conspicuous clusters of membrane-bound tubular organelles with a filamentous or crystalline interior were observed in the cytoplasm. The clusters were sometimes separated into smaller groups around phagosomes. A clear zone existed between the limiting membrane and the interior of these tubular organelles with the electron-dense interior profiles being, respectively, circular, angular or divided. The tubular organelles have not previously been described in Kupffer cells and possibly represent lysosomes with specialized functions. Mitochondria, microtubules, Golgi profiles, granular and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and a few cytoplasmic lipid droplets were also present. The presence of the tubular organelles and the occurrence of the Kupffer cells in different locations in the liver of the juvenile Nile crocodile are indicative of particularly active and mobile cells. PMID:24142864

  5. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-11-15

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  6. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  7. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. PMID:24074569

  8. Contribution of programmed cell death receptor (PD)-1 to Kupffer cell dysfunction in murine polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Huang, Xin; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Chen, Yaping; Hutchins, Noelle A; Ayala, Alfred

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that coinhibitory receptors appear to be important in contributing sepsis-induced immunosuppression. Our laboratory reported that mice deficient in programmed cell death receptor (PD)-1 have increased bacterial clearance and improved survival in experimental sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In response to infection, the liver clears the blood of bacteria and produces cytokines. Kupffer cells, the resident macrophages in the liver, are strategically situated to perform the above functions. However, it is not known if PD-1 expression on Kupffer cells is altered by septic stimuli, let alone if PD-1 ligation contributes to the altered microbial handling seen. Here we report that PD-1 is significantly upregulated on Kupffer cells during sepsis. PD-1-deficient septic mouse Kupffer cells displayed markedly enhanced phagocytosis and restoration of the expression of major histocompatibility complex II and CD86, but reduced CD80 expression compared with septic wild-type (WT) mouse Kupffer cells. In response to ex vivo LPS stimulation, the cytokine productive capacity of Kupffer cells derived from PD-1-/- CLP mice exhibited a marked, albeit partial, restoration of the release of IL-6, IL-12, IL-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and IL-10 compared with septic WT mouse Kupffer cells. In addition, PD-1 gene deficiency decreased LPS-induced apoptosis of septic Kupffer cells, as indicated by decreased levels of cleaved caspase-3 and reduced terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells. Exploring the signal pathways involved, we found that, after ex vivo LPS stimulation, septic PD-1-/- mouse Kupffer cells exhibited an increased Akt phosphorylation and a reduced p38 phosphorylation compared with septic WT mouse Kupffer cells. Together, these results indicate that PD-1 appears to play an important role in regulating the development of Kupffer cell dysfunction seen in sepsis. PMID:27288425

  9. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-11-15

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. - Highlights: • Kupffer cells increase in the liver of SIV-infected macaques. • Increased proliferation and apoptosis of Kupffer cells occurs in SIV infection. • Productively infected cells are rarely detected in the liver. • The liver is not a major site for SIV replication.

  10. The Role of IL-1 Family Members and Kupffer Cells in Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanhui; Hu, Jianjun; Yu, Xiaolan; Guan, Wen; Lu, Huili; Yu, Yan; Yu, Yongsheng; Zang, Guoqiang; Tang, Zhenghao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) family and Kupffer cells are linked with liver regeneration, but their precise roles remain unclear. IL-1 family members are pleiotropic factors with a range of biological roles in liver diseases, inducing hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as liver regeneration. Kupffer cells are the main source of IL-1 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), the key members of IL-1 family. This systemic review highlights a close association of IL-1 family members and Kupffer cells with liver regeneration, although their specific roles are inconclusive. Moreover, IL-1 members are proposed to induce effects on liver regeneration through Kupffer cells. PMID:27092311

  11. Biphasic control of polymorphonuclear cell migration by Kupffer cells. Effect of exposure to metabolic products of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Fainsilber, Z.; Feinman, L.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of the Kupffer cells in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction seen in alcoholic hepatitis, rat liver Kupffer cells were cultured and exposed to products of ethanol metabolism. The resultant supernatants were tested to study their ability to stimulate or inhibit polymorphonuclear cell chemotaxis. Kupffer cells produced increased chemokinetic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; when incubated with soluble products of microsomal peroxidation, the Kupffer cells engendered more chemokinetic activity than that produced by untreated Kupffer cells. When Kupffer cells were incubated with acetaldehyde, the chemokinetic activity that appeared in the supernatant did not differ from control. Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear cells was not observed when the Kupffer cell supernatants were tested by checkerboard analysis.

  12. PEGylated IL-10 Activates Kupffer Cells to Control Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ivan H.; Van Hoof, Dennis; Abramova, Marina; Bilardello, Melissa; Mar, Elliot; Jorgensen, Brett; McCauley, Scott; Bal, Harminder; Oft, Martin; Van Vlasselaer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a multifunctional cytokine that exerts potent context specific immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive effects. We have investigated the mechanism by which PEGylated rIL-10 regulates plasma cholesterol in mice and humans. In agreement with previous work on rIL-10, we report that PEGylated rIL-10 harnesses the myeloid immune system to control total plasma cholesterol levels. We have discovered that PEG-rMuIL-10’s dramatic lowering of plasma cholesterol is dependent on phagocytotic cells. In particular, PEG-rHuIL-10 enhances cholesterol uptake by Kupffer cells. In addition, removal of phagocytotic cells dramatically increases plasma cholesterol levels, suggesting for the first time that immunological cells are implicitly involved in regulating total cholesterol levels. These data suggest that treatment with PEG-rIL-10 potentiates endogenous cholesterol regulating cell populations not currently targeted by standard of care therapeutics. Furthermore, we show that IL-10’s increase of Kupffer cell cholesterol phagocytosis is concomitant with decreases in liver cholesterol and triglycerides. This leads to the reversal of early periportal liver fibrosis and facilitates the restoration of liver health. These data recommend PEG-rIL-10 for evaluation in the treatment of fatty liver disease and preventing its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In direct confirmation of our in vivo findings in the treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with PEG-rMuIL-10, we report that treatment of hypercholesterolemic cancer patients with PEG-rHuIL-10 lowers total plasma cholesterol by up to 50%. Taken together these data suggest that PEG-rIL-10’s cholesterol regulating biology is consistent between mice and humans. PMID:27299860

  13. Hepatic Tumor Metastases Cause Enhanced PEGylated Liposome Uptake by Kupffer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Masami; Fujiwara, Yukako; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells in livers bearing tumor metastases were found to have promoted tumor invasion and exacerbated the metastasis. This implies that the function of Kupffer cells might differ between animals bearing hepatic metastases and those that are healthy. Kupffer cells are considered responsible for the accumulation of liposomes in the liver. In this study, we hypothesized that the alteration in the function of Kupffer cells by hepatic metastasis would also affect the biodistribution of liposomes following intravenous administration. The hepatic accumulation and the blood concentration of PEGylated liposomes were compared between healthy mice and tumor-bearing mice. We noted that hepatic accumulation and elimination from the blood were significantly accelerated in tumor-bearing mice, indicating that our hypothesis was correct. In the tumor-bearing mice, the proportion of Kupffer cells taking up liposomes was significantly increased. Intravenous injection of oxaliplatin (l-OHP) containing PEGylated liposomes decreased the fraction of Kupffer cells, but this administration caused no injury to the hepatocytes. These results suggest that PEGylated liposomes containing l-OHP may have the potential to treat metastatic hepatic cancer-not only via the direct killing of the cancer cells but also via a reduction in tumor-supportive Kupffer cells. PMID:26830481

  14. Kupffer cell activation after no-flow ischemia versus hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Farhood, Anwar

    2002-07-15

    Kupffer cell-derived oxidant stress is critical for reperfusion injury after no-flow ischemia. However, the importance of Kupffer cells as source of reactive oxygen formation is unclear in a hemorrhagic shock model. Therefore, we evaluated Kupffer cell activation after 60 or 120 min of hemorrhage and 90 min of resuscitation (HS/RS) in pentobarbital-anesthetized male Fischer rats. Plasma glutathione disulfide (GSSG) as indicator for a vascular oxidant stress showed no significant changes after HS/RS. Plasma ALT activities were only moderately increased (100-200 U/L). Kupffer cells isolated from postischemic livers did not generate more superoxide than cells from sham controls. In contrast, the 10-fold increase of plasma GSSG and the 9-fold higher spontaneous superoxide formation of Kupffer cells after 60 min of hepatic no-flow ischemia followed by 90 min of reperfusion demonstrated the activation of Kupffer cells in this experimental model. Plasma ALT activities (1930 +/- 240 U/L) indicated severe liver injury. These results demonstrate a fundamental difference in the degree of Kupffer cell activation between the two models of warm hepatic ischemia. Our findings suggest that different therapeutic strategies are necessary to ameliorate the initial injury after low flow ischemia (hemorrhage) compared to cold (transplantation) or warm (Pringle maneuver) no-flow ischemia. PMID:12106817

  15. Repopulation of murine Kupffer cells after intravenous administration of liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T.; Naito, M.; Moriyama, H.; Umezu, H.; Matsuo, H.; Kiwada, H.; Arakawa, M.

    1996-01-01

    Kupffer cells were selectively eliminated in mice by the intravenous administration of liposome-entrapped dichloromethylene diphosphonate. At 5 days, small peroxidase-negative and acid-phosphatase-weakly-positive macrophages appeared, increased in number, and differentiated into peroxidase- and acid-phosphatase-positive Kupffer cells. Repopulating small macrophages actively proliferated, and the number of Kupffer cells returned to the normal level by day 14. The numbers of macrophage precursors in the liver as detected by the monoclonal antibodies ER-MP20 and ER-MP58 increased after liposome-entrapped dichloromethylene diphosphonate injection. ER-MP58-positive cells proliferated and differentiated into ER-MP20-positive cells and eventually into BM8-positive Kupffer cells in the liver. Bone-marrow-derived ER-MP58-positive cells were also detectable in the liver and differentiated into ER-MP20-positive cells, but they did not become BM8-positive macrophages. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA expression was enhanced in the liver 1 day after injection. The administration of macrophage colony-stimulating factor did not shorten the period of Kupffer cell depletion but increased the number and the proliferative capacity of repopulating Kupffer cells. These findings implied that repopulating Kupffer cells are derived from a macrophage precursor pool in the liver rather than from bone-marrow-derived monocytes. Local production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the liver plays a crucial role in the differentiation, maturation, and proliferation of Kupffer cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 11 Figure 13 Figure 12 Figure 18 PMID:8863675

  16. Bimodal role of Kupffer cells during colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shu Wen; Ager, Eleanor I; Christophi, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are resident liver macrophages that play a crucial role in liver homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Evidence suggests KCs have both stimulatory and inhibitory functions during tumor development but the extent of these functions remains to be defined. Using KC depletion studies in an orthotopic murine model of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases we demonstrated the bimodal role of KCs in determining tumor growth. KC depletion with gadolinium chloride before tumor induction was associated with an increased tumor burden during the exponential growth phase. In contrast, KC depletion at the late stage of tumor growth (day 18) decreased liver tumor load compared with non-depleted animals. This suggests KCs exhibit an early inhibitory and a later stimulatory effect. These two opposing functions were associated with changes in iNOS and VEGF expression as well as T-cell infiltration. KC depletion at day 18 increased numbers of CD3 (+) T cells and iNOS-expressing infiltrating cells in the tumor, but decreased the number of VEGF-expressing infiltrating cells. These alterations may be responsible for the observed reduction in tumor burden following depletion of pro-tumor KCs at the late stage of metastatic growth. Taken together, our results indicate that the bimodal role of KC activity in liver tumors may provide the key to timing immunomodulatory intervention for the treatment of CRC liver metastases. PMID:23792646

  17. Endocytosis of heat-denatured albumin by cultured rat Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, A.; Knook, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Purified Kupffer cells were obtained by centrifugal elutriation of sinusoidal cells isolated by pronase treatment of the rat liver. The endocytosis of radioactively labeled heat-aggregated colloidal albumin (CA /sup 125/I) was investigated in maintenance cultures of the purified Kupffer cells. The endocytic capacity of the cells was studied during 4 days of culture. Maximum uptake was observed after 24 hr of culture, with a gradual decline during the following days. When the uptake was measured after incubation with increasing concentrations of CA /sup 125/I, a saturation effect was observed. This finding and the observed high rate of uptake are strong indications that receptor sites on the cell membrane are involved in the mechanism of endocytosis. The uptake of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitors fluoride and antimycin A, indicating that endocytosis of CA /sup 125/I is dependent on energy derived from both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. The mechanism of internalization may also require the action of microfilaments as well as intact microtubules, since both cytochalasin B and colchicine inhibited the uptake of CA /sup 125/I. The intracellular degradation of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was strongly inhibited by chloroquine but not by colchicine. The degradation of ingested CA /sup 125/I occurred within the Kupffer cell lysosomes.

  18. The renin angiotensin system regulates Kupffer cells in colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shu Wen; Ager, Eleanor I; Neo, Jaclyn; Christophi, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    Blockade of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) can inhibit tumor growth and this may be mediated via undefined immunomodulatory actions. This study investigated the effects of RAS blockade on liver macrophages (Kupffer cells; KCs) in an orthotopic murine model of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Here we showed that pharmacological targeting of the RAS [ANG II (31.25 µg/kg/h i.p.), ANG-(1-7) (24 µg/kg/h i.p.) or the ACE inhibitor; captopril (750 mg/kg/d i.p.)] altered endogenous KC numbers in the tumor-bearing liver throughout metastatic growth. Captopril, and to a lesser extent ANG-(1-7), increased KC numbers in the liver but not tumor. KCs were found to express the key RAS components: ACE and AT1R. Treatment with captopril and ANG II increased the number of AT1R-expressing KCs, although total KC numbers were not affected by ANG II. Captopril (0.1 µM) also increased macrophage invasion in vitro. Additionally, captopril was administered with KC depletion before tumor induction (day 0) or at established metastatic growth (day 18) using gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3; 20 mg/kg). Livers were collected at day 21 and quantitative stereology used as a measure of tumor burden. Captopril reduced growth of CRC liver metastases. However, when captopril was combined with early KC depletion (day 0) tumor growth was significantly increased compared with captopril alone. In contrast, late KC depletion (day 18) failed to influence the anti-tumor effects of captopril. The result of these studies suggests that manipulation of the RAS can alter KC numbers and may subsequently influence progression of CRC liver metastases. PMID:23792575

  19. Interactions between macrophage/Kupffer cells and hepatocytes in surgical sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the role of Kupffer cell/macrophage interactions with hepatocytes in modulating liver function during infections using direct in vitro cocultivation of rat macrophages or Kupffer cells with rat hepatocytes. Protein synthesis was assayed as a sensitive indicator of integrated hepatocellular function by measuring {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into hepatocyte protein. Septic stimuli such as lipoploysaccharide and killed bacteria were added to cocultures of hepatocytes and macrophages or Kupffer cells and the responses compared to hepatocytes alone. Information about the types of proteins synthesized by hepatocytes under various culture conditions was determined using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. These experiments showed that septic stimuli alter the amount and type of protein synthesized by hepatocytes and had no direct effect on hepatocytes in the absence of macrophages or Kupffer cells. The mediator(s) appears to be a heat labile, soluble monokine(s) which is distinct from interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor. The important role of Kupffer cells/macrophages in mediating alterations in hepatocellular function in sepsis may ultimately improve patient care.

  20. Central Insulin Action Activates Kupffer Cells by Suppressing Hepatic Vagal Activation via the Nicotinic Alpha 7 Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kumi; Tanida, Mamoru; Nagata, Naoto; Inaba, Yuka; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Toshinai, Koji; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling, which suppresses the gene expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. The vagus nerve plays an important role in this centrally mediated hepatic response; however, the precise mechanism underlying this brain-liver interaction is unclear. Here, we present our findings that the vagus nerve suppresses hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling via α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAchR) on Kupffer cells, and that central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling by suppressing vagal activity. Indeed, central insulin-mediated hepatic IL-6/STAT3 activation and gluconeogenic gene suppression were impeded in mice with hepatic vagotomy, pharmacological cholinergic blockade, or α7-nAchR deficiency. In high-fat diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice, control of the vagus nerve by central insulin action was disturbed, inducing a persistent increase of inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that dysregulation of the α7-nAchR-mediated control of Kupffer cells by central insulin action may affect the pathogenesis of chronic hepatic inflammation in obesity. PMID:26947072

  1. [Isolation and purification of primary Kupffer cells from mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Luo, Qingbo; Lu, Xiuxian; Zheng, Daofeng; He, Diao; Wu, Zhongjun

    2016-08-01

    Objective To isolate and purify Kupffer cells (KCs) from BALB/c mice by an efficient method of low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherence. Methods The mouse liver tissue was perfused in situ and digested with 0.5 g/L collagenase type IV in vitro by water bath. Then, through the low-speed centrifugation, KCs were separated from the mixed hepatocytes, and purified by rapid adherent characteristics. Finally, the production and activity of KCs obtained by this modified method were compared with those isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. We used F4/80 antibody immunofluorescence technique to observe morphological features of KCs, flow cytometry (FCM) to detect the expression of F4/80 antibody and the ink uptake test to observe the phagocytic activity. Moreover, using FCM, we evaluated the expressions of molecules associated with antigen presentation, including major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD40, CD86 and CD68 on the surface of KCs subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) modeling. And, ELISA was conducted to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production of the cultured KCs following H/R. Results The yield of KCs was (5.83±0.54)×10(6) per mouse liver and the survival rate of KCs was up to 92% by low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherent method. Compared with Percoll density gradient centrifugation [the yield of KCs was (2.19±0.43)×10(6) per liver], this new method significantly improved the yield of KCs. F4/80 immunofluorescence showed typical morphologic features of KCs such as spindle or polygon shapes and FCM identified nearly 90% F4/80 positive cells. The phagocytic assay showed that lots of ink particles were phagocytosed into the isolated cells. KC H/R models expressed more MHC II, CD40 and CD86 and produced more TNF-α participating in inflammation. Conclusion The efficient method to isolate and purify KCs from BALB /c mice has been successfully established. PMID:27412929

  2. Kupffer cells-dependent inflammation in the injured liver increases recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chen; Lai, Fobao; Zhu, Pengxi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Jinghua; Yang, Yang; Gao, Lu; Ye, Fei; Zhao, Qiudong; Li, Rong; Han, Zhipeng; Wei, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) repair tissue injury and may be used to treat immune associated diseases. In carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury murine model, we administered MSCs. When MSCs were transmitted to young and old mice with liver injury, more MSCs were recruited in old mice. In old mice, inflammation, characterized by TNF-α and IL-6, was increased due to hyper-activation and hyper-function of Kupffer cells. Blocking Kupffer cells decreased MSCs migration in old mice. In vitro, Kupffer cells isolated from old mice secreted more inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Thus, hyper-activation of Kupffer cells in old mice increased recruitment of MSCs after their therapeutic administration. PMID:26716516

  3. Mammary-carcinoma cells in mouse liver: infiltration of liver tissue and interaction with Kupffer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, E.; Dingemans, K. P.; Van de Pavert, I. V.; Van den Bergh-Weerman, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Interactions between TA3 mammary-carcinoma cells and liver cells were studied with the electron microscope in mouse livers that had been perfused with a defined medium containing the tumour cells. Infiltration of liver tissue by the TA3 cells proceeded in the following steps. First, numerous small protrusions were extended through endothelial cells and into hepatocytes. Next, some cells had larger processes deeply indenting hepatocytes. Finally a few tumour cells became located outside the blood vessels. Two variant cell lines, TA3/Ha and TA3/St, differing in cell coat and surface charge, did not differ in the extent of infiltration. TA3/Ha cells were often encircled by thin processes of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells). Encircled cells were initially intact, but later some of them degenerated. These observations suggest that TA3/Ha cells were phagocytized by the Kupffer cells. Encirclement appeared to be inhibited after only 30 min, when many cells were still partly surrounded. Encirclement of TA3/St was much less frequent. After injection of tumour cells intra-portally in vivo, similar results were obtained, which demonstrated the validity of the perfused liver model. TA3/Ha cells formed much fewer tumour nodules in the liver than TA3/St cells. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:687522

  4. Cross-Activating Invariant NKT Cells and Kupffer Cells Suppress Cholestatic Liver Injury in a Mouse Model of Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Duwaerts, Caroline C.; Sun, Eric P.; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO.) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO. in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO., and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury. PMID:24260285

  5. Cross-activating invariant NKT cells and kupffer cells suppress cholestatic liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Duwaerts, Caroline C; Sun, Eric P; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO (.) ) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO (.) in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO (.) , and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury. PMID:24260285

  6. Colloidal carbon stimulation of Kupffer cells triggers Nrf2 activation in the isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Bárbara; Vargas, Romina; Castillo, Iván; Videla, Luis A

    2012-06-01

    Activation of transcription factor Nrf2 was investigated in the isolated perfused rat liver infused with 0.5 mg of colloidal carbon (CC)/ml for 5-15 min to stimulated Kupffer cell function. Infusion of CC enhanced liver O(2) consumption over basal levels, with a time-dependent increase in CC-induced O(2) uptake, at constant rates of CC phagocytosis by Kupffer cells, as assessed histologically, and adequate viability conditions of the livers, as shown by the marginal (0.34 %) total sinusoidal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux over intrahepatic LDH activity. Under these conditions, cytosolic protein levels of Nrf2 (Western blot) and inhibitor of Nrf2 Keap1 progressively declined by CC infusion, those of nuclear Nrf2 increased, leading to enhancement in the nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 ratios. It is concluded that the respiratory burst of CC-stimulated Kupffer cells triggers Nrf2 activation in the perfused liver, a response that may afford cellular protection under pro-oxidant conditions underlying Kupffer cell stimulation. PMID:22461194

  7. Effect of allyl alcohol on hepatic transporter expression: Zonal patterns of expression and role of Kupffer cell function

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah N.; Tatis-Rios, Cristina; Augustine, Lisa M.; Goedken, Michael J.; van Rooijen, Nico; Cherrington, Nathan J.; Manautou, José E.

    2015-01-01

    During APAP toxicity, activation of Kupffer cells is critical for protection from hepatotoxicity and up-regulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (Mrp4) in centrilobular hepatocytes. The present study was performed to determine the expression profile of uptake and efflux transporters in mouse liver following treatment with allyl alcohol (AlOH), a periportal hepatotoxicant. This study also investigated the role of Kupffer cells in AlOH hepatotoxicity, and whether changes in transport protein expression by AlOH are dependent on the presence of Kupffer cells. C57BL/6J mice received 0.1 ml clodronate liposomes to deplete Kupffer cells or empty liposomes 48 h prior to dosing with 60 mg/kg AlOH, i.p. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by plasma ALT and histopathology. Hepatic transporter mRNA and protein expression were determined by branched DNA signal amplification assay and Western blotting, respectively. Depletion of Kupffer cells by liposomal clodronate treatment resulted in heightened susceptibility to AlOH toxicity. Exposure to AlOH increased mRNA levels of several Mrp genes, while decreasing organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps) mRNA expression. Protein analysis mirrored many of these mRNA changes. The presence of Kupffer cells was not required for the observed changes in uptake and efflux transporters induced by AlOH. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed enhanced Mrp4 staining exclusively in centrilobular hepatocytes of AlOH treated mice. These findings demonstrate that Kupffer cells are protective from AlOH toxicity and that induction of Mrp4 occurs in liver regions away from areas of AlOH damage independent of Kupffer cell function. These results suggest that Kupffer cell mediators do not play a role in mediating centrilobular Mrp4 induction in response to periportal damage by AlOH. PMID:19371622

  8. Effect of allyl alcohol on hepatic transporter expression: Zonal patterns of expression and role of Kupffer cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, Sarah N.; Tatis-Rios, Cristina; Augustine, Lisa M.; Goedken, Michael J.; Rooijen, Nico van; Cherrington, Nathan J.; Manautou, Jose E.

    2009-04-01

    During APAP toxicity, activation of Kupffer cells is critical for protection from hepatotoxicity and up-regulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (Mrp4) in centrilobular hepatocytes. The present study was performed to determine the expression profile of uptake and efflux transporters in mouse liver following treatment with allyl alcohol (AlOH), a periportal hepatotoxicant. This study also investigated the role of Kupffer cells in AlOH hepatotoxicity, and whether changes in transport protein expression by AlOH are dependent on the presence of Kupffer cells. C57BL/6J mice received 0.1 ml clodronate liposomes to deplete Kupffer cells or empty liposomes 48 h prior to dosing with 60 mg/kg AlOH, i.p. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by plasma ALT and histopathology. Hepatic transporter mRNA and protein expression were determined by branched DNA signal amplification assay and Western blotting, respectively. Depletion of Kupffer cells by liposomal clodronate treatment resulted in heightened susceptibility to AlOH toxicity. Exposure to AlOH increased mRNA levels of several Mrp genes, while decreasing organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps) mRNA expression. Protein analysis mirrored many of these mRNA changes. The presence of Kupffer cells was not required for the observed changes in uptake and efflux transporters induced by AlOH. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed enhanced Mrp4 staining exclusively in centrilobular hepatocytes of AlOH treated mice. These findings demonstrate that Kupffer cells are protective from AlOH toxicity and that induction of Mrp4 occurs in liver regions away from areas of AlOH damage independent of Kupffer cell function. These results suggest that Kupffer cell mediators do not play a role in mediating centrilobular Mrp4 induction in response to periportal damage by AlOH.

  9. Effects of glycine on phagocytosis and secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Wen; Yun, Ke-Ming; Han, De-Wu; Xu, Rui-Ling; Zhao, Yuan-Chang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects and mechanisms of action of glycine on phagocytosis and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro. METHODS: Kupffer cells were isolated from normal rats by collagenase digestion and Percoll density gradient differential centrifugation. After culture for 24 h, Kupffer cells were incubated in fresh Dulbecco's Modification of Eagle’s Medium containing glycine (G1: 1 mmol/L, G2: 10 mmol/L, G3: 100 mmol/L and G4: 300 mmol/L) for 3 h, then used to measure phagocytosis by a bead test, TNF-α secretion after lipopolysaccharide stimulation by radioactive immunoassay, and microfilament and microtubule expression by staining with phalloidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or a monoclonal anti-α tubulin-FITC antibody, respectively, and evaluated under a ultraviolet fluorescence microscope. RESULTS: Glycine decreased the phagocytosis of Kupffer cells at both 30 min and 60 min (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). The numbers of beads phagocytosed by Kupffer cells in 30 min were 16.9 ± 4.0 (control), 9.6 ± 4.1 (G1), 12.1 ± 5.7 (G2), 8.1 ± 3.2 (G3) and 7.5 ± 2.0 (G4), and were 22.5 ± 7.9 (control), 20.1 ± 5.8 (G1), 19.3 ± 4.8 (G2), 13.5 ± 4.7 (G3) and 9.2 ± 3.1 (G4) after 60 min. TNF-α secretion by Kupffer cells in G1 (0.19 ± 0.03), G2 (0.16 ± 0.04), G3 (0.14 ± 0.03) and G4 (0.13 ± 0.05) was significantly less than that in controls (0.26 ± 0.03, P < 0.01), and the decrease in secretion was dose-dependent (P < 0.05). Microfilaments of Kupffer cells in G2, G3 and G4 groups were arranged in a disorderly manner. The fluorescence densities of microtubules in G1 (53.4 ± 10.5), G2 (54.1 ± 14.6), G3 (64.9 ± 12.1) and G4 (52.1 ± 14.2) were all lower than those in the controls (102.2 ± 23.7, P < 0.01), but the decrease in microtubule fluorescence density was not dose-dependant. CONCLUSION: Glycine can decrease the phagocytosis and secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro, which may be related to the changes in the expression of

  10. Radioprotective effect of kupffer cell depletion on hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Xing; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Hu, Wei-Xu

    2015-05-01

    Radiation-induced liver injury remains a clinical problem and data suggest that sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) are an important target. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before exposure would protect SECs from radiation-induced injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously injected 24 h before irradiation with Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) (10 mg/kg body weight). Three groups of animals were treated: 1. control group (saline and sham irradiation); 2. GdCl3 + 30 Gy radiation group and 3. 30 Gy radiation only group. Specimens were collected at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after completion of each treatment. Liver tissue was assessed for inflammatory cytokine expression and radiation-induced SEC injury based on serum hyaluronic acid (HA) level, apoptosis and ultrastructural and histological analyses. The results showed that radiation exposure caused apoptosis of SECs, but not hepatocytes. Inflammatory cytokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression, was significantly attenuated in the GdCl3 + 30 Gy radiation group, compared with the 30 Gy radiation-only group (P < 0.05). The GdCl3 + radiation-treated rats exhibited significantly lower levels of HA and SEC apoptosis than the radiation-treated only rats at early time points, and radiation-induced liver injury was also attenuated. In conclusion, we hypothesize that selective Kupffer cell inhibition by gadolinium chloride was shown to reduce apoptosis in SECs caused by irradiation of the live and protected the liver against radiation-induced injury. PMID:25897555

  11. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christa Y; Molina, Ramon M; Louzada, Andressa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs) have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV) administration. Materials and methods First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively. Results We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, refecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes) delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of hepatocyte damage and marginated neutrophils were observed in the liver. Conclusion Administration of ZnO ENPs transiently inhibited Kupffer cell phagosomal motility and later induced hepatocyte injury, but did not alter bacterial clearance from the blood or killing in the liver, spleen, lungs, or kidneys. Our data show that

  12. Diminished organelle motion in murine Kupffer cells during the erythrocytic stage of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bellows, Charles F.; Molina, Ramon M.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitized erythrocytes are ingested by murine hepatic macrophages during malaria infection. We non-invasively monitored how this altered the motion of intracellular phagosomes in Kupffer cells using magnetometry. Submicrometric γFe2O3 particles were injected prior to malaria infection. They were cleared from the blood, primarily by Kupffer cells, and retained within their phagosomes. The mice were periodically magnetized. After removing this external magnet, the aligned iron particles created a remnant magnetic field (RMF) which then decayed (relaxation), reflecting the motion of particle-containing phagosomes. After baseline measurements of relaxation, the mice were injected intravenously with Plasmodium chabaudi-parasitized or normal murine red blood cells (RBCs). During the next 15 days, relaxation measurements, parasitaemia and haematocrit values were monitored. At 6 days post injection with 3 × 107 parasitized RBCs, relaxation rates had decreased. At this time, all mice had parasitaemias greater than 58 per cent and haematocrits less than 20 per cent. At day 7, while the parasitaemias were declining, the rate of relaxation continued to decrease. Throughout the experiment, relaxation remained constant in animals injected with normal RBCs. Electron microscopy revealed Kupffer cells filled with damaged and parasitized erythrocytes, and haemoglobin degradation pigment. We conclude that ingestion and metabolism of parasitized erythrocytes by liver macrophages during malaria infection decreases their organelle motion with likely consequences of compromised host defences. PMID:21068031

  13. Kupffer cell-mediated exacerbation of methimazole-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Akai, Sho; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Oda, Shingo; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Methimazole (MTZ), an anti-thyroid drug, is known to cause liver injury in humans. It has been demonstrated that MTZ-induced liver injury in Balb/c mice is accompanied by T helper (Th) 2 cytokine-mediated immune responses; however, there is little evidence for immune responses associated with MTZ-induced liver injury in rats. To investigate species differences in MTZ-induced liver injury, we administered MTZ with a glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO), to F344 rats and subsequently observed an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which are associated with hepatic lesions. The hepatic mRNA expression of innate immune-related genes significantly increased in BSO- and MTZ-treated rats, but the change in Th2-related genes was not much greater than the change observed in the previous mouse study. Moreover, an increase in Kupffer cells and an induction of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins were accompanied by an increase in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression, indicating that Kupffer cell activation occurs through HMGB1-TLR4 signaling. To elucidate the mechanism of liver injury in rats, gadolinium chloride, which inactivates the function of Kupffer cells, was administered before BSO and MTZ administration. The gadolinium chloride treatment significantly suppressed the increased ALT, which was accompanied by decreased hepatic mRNA expression related to innate immune responses and ERK/JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Kupffer cell-mediated immune responses are crucial factors for the exacerbation of MTZ-induced liver injury in rats, indicating apparent species differences in the immune-mediated exacerbation of liver injury between mice and rats. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26177832

  14. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  15. Gadolinium chloride, a Kupffer cell inhibitor, attenuates hepatic injury in a rat model of chronic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Zandieh, Ali; Payabvash, Seyedmehedi; Pasalar, Parvin; Morteza, Afsaneh; Zandieh, Basira; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to elucidate the effect of Kupffer cells inhibition on hepatic injury induced by chronic cholestasis. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham operation and were treated with either saline solution or gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3), a specific Kupffer cell inhibitor, 20 mg/kg i.p. daily). Serum and liver samples were collected after 28 days. Direct and total bilirubin concentrations and serum enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) increased following BDL (p < 0.01). On the contrary to bilirubin concentrations and AST activity, GdCl(3) partially prevented the elevation in ALP, ALT and GGT enzyme activities (p < 0.05). GdCl(3) alleviated lipid peroxidation (reflected by malondialdehyde [MDA] concentration) and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (i.e. catalase and glutathione peroxidase) in liver samples after BDL (p < 0.05). Fibrosis, ductular proliferation and portal inflammation were also scored in liver samples. Among morphological changes appeared following BDL (i.e. marked fibrosis, portal inflammation and ductular proliferation); only ductular proliferation was not alleviated by GdCl(3). Therefore, Kupffer cells inhibition has beneficial effects against the development of hepatic injury induced by chronic cholestasis. PMID:21339256

  16. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors protect against alcoholic liver disease by regulating Kupffer cell polarization in mice.

    PubMed

    Louvet, Alexandre; Teixeira-Clerc, Fatima; Chobert, Marie-Noële; Deveaux, Vanessa; Pavoine, Catherine; Zimmer, Andreas; Pecker, Françoise; Mallat, Ariane; Lotersztajn, Sophie

    2011-10-01

    Activation of Kupffer cells plays a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Because cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2) display potent anti-inflammatory properties, we investigated their role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease, focusing on the impact of CB2 on Kupffer cell polarization and the consequences on liver steatosis. Wild-type (WT) mice fed an alcohol diet showed an induction of hepatic classical (M1) and alternative (M2) markers. Cotreatment of alcohol-fed mice with the CB2 agonist, JWH-133, decreased hepatic M1 gene expression without affecting the M2 profile. In keeping with this, genetic ablation of CB2 enhanced hepatic induction of M1 gene signature and blunted the induction of M2 markers. CB2 also modulated alcohol-induced fatty liver, as shown by the reduction of hepatocyte steatosis in JWH-133-treated mice and its enhancement in CB2-/- animals. Studies in isolated Kupffer cells and cultured macrophages further demonstrated that CB2 inhibits M1 polarization and favors the transition to an M2 phenotype. In addition, conditioned-medium experiments showed that preventing M1 polarization in CB2-activated macrophages protects from lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mediated the anti-inflammatory effects of CB2 receptors. Indeed, alcohol-fed mice treated with JWH-133 showed increased hepatic expression of macrophage HO-1, as compared to vehicle-treated counterparts. In keeping with this, JWH-133 induced HO-1 expression in cultured macrophages, and the HO-1 inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin, blunted the inhibitory effect of JWH-133 on lipopolysaccharide-induced nuclear factor-kappa B activation and M1 polarization. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that CB2 receptors display beneficial effects on alcohol-induced inflammation by regulating M1/M2 balance in Kupffer cells, thereby reducing hepatocyte steatosis via paracrine interactions between Kupffer cells and hepatocytes. These data identify CB2

  17. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  18. Toll Like Receptor 4 Dependent Kupffer Cell Activation and Liver Injury in a Novel Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Anderson, Aimee L.; Devereaux, Michael W.; Fillon, Sophie A.; Harris, J. Kirk; Lovell, Mark A.; Finegold, Milton J.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with intestinal failure who are parenteral nutrition (PN)-dependent may develop cholestatic liver injury and cirrhosis (PN-associated liver injury: PNALI). The pathogenesis of PNALI remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that intestinal injury with increased intestinal permeability combined with administration of PN promotes LPS-TLR4 signaling dependent Kupffer cell activation as an early event in the pathogenesis of PNALI. We developed a mouse model in which intestinal injury and increased permeability were induced by oral treatment for 4 days with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) followed by continuous infusion of soy lipid-based PN solution through a central venous catheter for 7 (PN/DSS7d) and 28 (PN/DSS28d) days. Liver injury and cholestasis were evaluated by serum AST, ALT, bile acids, total bilirubin, and by histology. Purified Kupffer cells were probed for transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PN/DSS7d mice showed elevated portal vein LPS levels, evidence of hepatocyte injury and cholestasis, and increased Kupffer cell expression of IL6, TNFα, and TGFβ. Serological markers of liver injury remained elevated in PN/DSS28d mice associated with focal inflammation, hepatocyte apoptosis, peliosis, and Kupffer cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. PN infusion without DSS pre-treatment or DSS pre-treatment alone did not result in liver injury or Kupffer cell activation. Suppression of the intestinal microbiota with broad spectrum antibiotics or ablation of TLR4 signaling in TLR4 mutant mice resulted in significantly reduced Kupffer cell activation and markedly attenuated liver injury in PN/DSS7d mice. Conclusion These data suggest that intestinal-derived LPS activates Kupffer cells through TLR4 signaling in early stages of PNALI. PMID:22120983

  19. Kupffer cell proliferation and glucan-induced granuloma formation in mice depleted of blood monocytes by strontium-89

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Naito, M.; Takahashi, K. )

    1990-03-01

    In mice with prolonged severe monocytopenia induced by selective irradiation of the bone marrow with the bone-seeking isotope 89Sr, the proliferative capacity of Kupffer cells was studied by immunohistochemistry with an anti-mouse macrophage monoclonal antibody, F4/80, ultrastructural peroxidase (PO) cytochemistry, and tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) autoradiography. The number and 3HTdR uptake of Kupffer cells were significantly increased in the splenectomized mice after severe monocytopenia had continued for more than 4 wk, and almost all the Kupffer cells showed a localization pattern of PO activity similar to that of resident macrophages in the liver of normal mice. In the glucan-induced granuloma formation in similar monocytopenic mice, Kupffer cells proliferated, conglomerated, and transformed into epithelioid cells, which fused together to become multinuclear giant cells. These results suggest that Kupffer cells are a self-renewing population by their own cell division and can participate actively in granulomatous inflammations in severely monocytopenic and intact mice.

  20. Activation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes in Kupffer cells in hepatic ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Yeon; Kim, Seok-Joo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasome activation by danger signals in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is responsible for the sterile inflammatory response. Signals triggering formation and activation of the inflammasome involve the generation of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to examine the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation and the involvement of reactive oxygen species in hepatic I/R. I/R induced the formation of nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat containing family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) and absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasomes and the subsequent serum release of interleukin 1β. Pannexin-1 inhibitor and anti-cathepsin B antibody attenuated I/R-induced inflammasome activation and hepatic injury. The expression of the thioredoxin-interacting protein gene and the interaction between NLRP3 and the thioredoxin-interacting protein increased after I/R. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine significantly attenuated protein conversion of interleukin 1β after hepatic I/R. Moreover, pannexin-1 protein expression and cathepsin B release were strongly attenuated by N-acetylcysteine. The depletion of Kupffer cells with gadolinium chloride markedly decreased NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome expression and activation of their signaling pathways, and also reduced the level of caspase-1 protein in F4/80-positive cells. Our findings suggest that reactive-oxygen-species-mediated activation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes leads to I/R-induced inflammatory responses in which Kupffer cells play a crucial role. PMID:25327779

  1. Liver innate immune cells and insulin resistance: the multiple facets of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Jager, J; Aparicio-Vergara, M; Aouadi, M

    2016-08-01

    Obesity, which affects 600 million adults worldwide, is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and insulin resistance. Current therapies for these metabolic disorders include weight management by lifestyle intervention or bariatric surgery and pharmacological treatment with the aim of regulating blood glucose. Probably because of their short-term effectiveness, these therapies have not been able to stop the rapidly rising prevalence of T2D over the past decades, highlighting an urgent need to develop new therapeutic strategies. The role of immune cells, such as macrophages, in insulin resistance has been extensively studied. Major advances have been made to elucidate the role of adipose tissue macrophages in these pathogeneses. Recently, anti-inflammatory drugs have been suggested as an alternative treatment for T2D, and clinical trials of these agents are currently ongoing. In addition, results of previous clinical trials using antibodies against inflammatory cytokines, which showed modest effects, are now being rigorously re-evaluated. However, it is still unclear how liver macrophages [termed Kupffer cells (KCs)], which constitute the major source of macrophages in the body, contribute to the development of insulin resistance. In this review, we will discuss the present understanding of the role of liver immune cells in the development of insulin resistance. We will particularly focus on KCs, which could represent an attractive target for the treatment of metabolic diseases. PMID:26864622

  2. Establishment of c-myc-immortalized Kupffer cell line from a C57BL/6 mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Chisato; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated in several mammalian species, a novel procedure to obtain liver-macrophages (Kupffer cells) in sufficient numbers and purity using a mixed primary culture of hepatocytes. In this study, we applied this method to the C57BL/6 mouse liver and established an immortalized Kupffer cell line from this mouse strain. The hepatocytes from the C57BL/6 adult mouse liver were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion method and cultured in T25 culture flasks. Similar to our previous studies, the mouse hepatocytes progressively changed their morphology into a fibroblastic appearance after a few days of culture. After 7-10 days of culture, Kupffer-like cells, which were contaminants in the hepatocyte fraction at the start of the culture, actively proliferated on the mixed fibroblastic cell sheet. At this stage, a retroviral vector containing the human c-myc oncogene and neomycin resistance gene was introduced into the mixed culture. Gentle shaking of the culture flask, followed by the transfer and brief incubation of the culture supernatant, resulted in a quick and selective adhesion of Kupffer cells to a plastic dish surface. After selection with G418 and cloning by limiting dilutions, a clonal cell line (KUP5) was established. KUP5 cells displayed typical macrophage morphology and were stably passaged at 4-5 days intervals for more than 5 months, with a population doubling time of 19 h. KUP5 cells are immunocytochemically positive for mouse macrophage markers, such as Mac-1, F4/80. KUP5 cells exhibited substantial phagocytosis of polystyrene microbeads and the release of inflammatory cytokines upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Taken together, KUP5 cells provide a useful means to study the function of Kupffer cells in vitro. PMID:25379377

  3. Cytochrome P4502E1 inhibitor, chlormethiazole, decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in rat Kupffer cells with ethanol treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the role of Cytochrome P4502E1 in sensitizing Kupffer cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation after ethanol induction. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a liquid ethanol diet, control diet or ethanol diet supplemented with CYP2E1 inhibitor, chlormethiazole (CMZ), for 4'week...

  4. Oxidative products from alcohol metabolism differentially modulate pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Wenliang; Sun, Xinguo; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2016-09-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a vital role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic steatohepatitis. The present study was to determine the role of alcohol-induced oxidative stress in modulating cytokine production. A rat model of alcohol consumption was used to determine alcohol-induced hepatic cytokine expression. Chronic alcohol exposure caused lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the livers of Wistar rats. The role of oxidative stress in regulating cell type-specific cytokine production was further dissected in vitro. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependently upregulated TNF-α, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and CINC-1 in Kupffer cells-SV40, whereas TNF-α dose-dependently induced CINC-1, IP-10, and MIP-2 expression in H4IIEC3 hepatoma cells. An additive effect on cytokine production was observed in both Kupffer cells-SV40 and hepatocytes when combined hydrogen peroxide with LPS or TNF-α, respectively, which was associated with NF-κB activation and histone H3 hyper-acetylation. Unexpectedly, an inhibitory effect of 4-hydroxynonenal on cytokine production was revealed in LPS-treated Kupffer cells-SV40. Mechanistic study showed that 4-hydroxynonenal significantly enhanced mRNA degradation of TNF-α, MCP-1, and MIP-1α, and decreased the protein levels of MCP-1 in LPS-stimulated Kupffer cells-SV40 through reducing the phosphorylation of mRNA binding proteins. This study suggests that Kupffer cells and hepatocytes express distinct pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in response to alcohol intoxication, and oxidative products (4-hydroxynonenal) differentially modulate pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production via NF-κB signaling, histone acetylation, and mRNA stability. PMID:27314544

  5. Bone marrow-derived monocytes give rise to self-renewing and fully differentiated Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Charlotte L.; Zheng, Fang; De Baetselier, Patrick; Martens, Liesbet; Saeys, Yvan; De Prijck, Sofie; Lippens, Saskia; Abels, Chloé; Schoonooghe, Steve; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Beschin, Alain; Guilliams, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages are thought to be exclusively derived from embryonic progenitors. However, whether circulating monocytes can also give rise to such macrophages has not been formally investigated. Here we use a new model of diphtheria toxin-mediated depletion of liver-resident Kupffer cells to generate niche availability and show that circulating monocytes engraft in the liver, gradually adopt the transcriptional profile of their depleted counterparts and become long-lived self-renewing cells. Underlining the physiological relevance of our findings, circulating monocytes also contribute to the expanding pool of macrophages in the liver shortly after birth, when macrophage niches become available during normal organ growth. Thus, like embryonic precursors, monocytes can and do give rise to self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages if the niche is available to them. PMID:26813785

  6. Arachidonic acid stimulates TNFα production in Kupffer cells via a reactive oxygen species-pERK1/2-Egr1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cubero, Francisco Javier; Nieto, Natalia

    2012-07-15

    Kupffer cells are a key source of mediators of alcohol-induced liver damage such as reactive oxygen species, chemokines, growth factors, and eicosanoids. Since diets rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids are a requirement for the development of alcoholic liver disease, we hypothesized that polyunsaturated fatty acids could synergize with ethanol to promote Kupffer cell activation and TNFα production, hence, contributing to liver injury. Primary Kupffer cells from control and from ethanol-fed rats incubated with arachidonic acid showed similar proliferation rates than nontreated cells; however, arachidonic acid induced phenotypic changes, lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxides, and superoxide radical generation. Similar effects occurred in human Kupffer cells. These events were greater in Kupffer cells from ethanol-fed rats, and antioxidants and inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism prevented them. Arachidonic acid treatment increased NADPH oxidase activity. Inhibitors of NADPH oxidase and of arachidonic acid metabolism partially prevented the increase in oxidant stress. Upon arachidonic acid stimulation, there was a rapid and sustained increase in TNFα, which was greater in Kupffer cells from ethanol-fed rats than in Kupffer cells from control rats. Arachidonic acid induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of early growth response-1 (Egr1), and ethanol synergized with arachidonic acid to promote this effect. PD98059, a mitogen extracellular kinase 1/2 inhibitor, and curcumin, an Egr1 inhibitor, blocked the arachidonic acid-mediated upregulation of TNFα in Kupffer cells. This study unveils the mechanism whereby arachidonic acid and ethanol increase TNFα production in Kupffer cells, thus contributing to alcoholic liver disease. PMID:22538404

  7. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis. PMID:27437939

  8. The activation of Epimedium polysaccharide-propolis flavone liposome on Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunpeng; Ren, Meimei; Hou, Weifeng; Guo, Chao; Tong, Dewen; Ma, Lin; Zhang, Weimin; He, Mengmeng; Song, Xiaoping

    2015-11-20

    Epimedium polysaccharide-propolis flavone liposome (EPL), a potent immunological pharmaceutical preparation, was investigated for the immunomodulatory activity on Kupffer cells (KCs) in vitro. The results showed that EPL could significantly induce the secretion of chemokines (RANTES and MCP-1), promote the production of nitric oxide and induced nitric oxide synthase, improve the pinocytic and phagocytic activity of KCs, promote the mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-1β, and enhance the expression of costimulatory molecules (CD11b and CD68) in KCs compared with Epimedium polysaccharide-propolis flavone (EP) at 30-7.5μg/mL. In addition, the abilities of KCs on stimulating lymphocytes proliferation and antigen presenting were significantly enhanced after stimulated with EPL compared with EP. These results suggested that EPL could activate KCs and possessed the stronger immunomodulatory effect, which provided the theoretical basis for further studying the mechanism of EPL on improving the immune response. PMID:26344320

  9. Rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cell-mediated mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aflatoxin B sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, P.; Schlemper, B.; Molitor, E.; Platt, K.L.; Seidel, A.; Oesch, F. )

    1990-08-01

    The ability of isolated rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cells to activate benzo(a)pyrene (BP), trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo(a)pyrene (DDBP), trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (DDCH), and aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) to mutagenic metabolites was assessed by means of a cell-mediated bacterial mutagenicity assay and compared with the ability of parenchymal cells to activate these compounds. Endothelial and Kupffer cells from untreated rats were able to activate AFB{sub 1} and DDBP; DDBP was activated even in the absence of an NADPH-generating system. Pretreating the animals with Aroclor 1254 strongly enhanced the mutagenicity of the dihydrodiol, whereas the mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} showed a slight increase. BP and DDCH were only activated by endothelial and Kupffer cells isolated from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Parenchymal cells form untreated animals activated all four carcinogens tested; Aroclor 1254 enhanced the parenchymal cell-mediated mutagenicity of BP and DDCH but did not affect that of DDBP and clearly reduced that of AFB{sub 1}. The reduced mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} correlates with the decrease in the amount of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone formed when testosterone was incubated with parenchymal cell microsomes from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats (compared with microsomes from untreated animals): the formation of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone is specifically catalyzed by cytochrome P-450h, a hemoprotein thought to be involved in the activation of AFB{sub 1}. These results show that not only rat liver parenchymal cells, but also endothelial and Kupffer cells, activated several carcinogens to mutagenic metabolites.

  10. Graptopetalum Paraguayense Ameliorates Chemical-Induced Rat Hepatic Fibrosis In Vivo and Inactivates Stellate Cells and Kupffer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li-Jen; Chang, Chia-Chuan; Yang, Chih-Hsueh; Hsieh, Shur-Jong; Wu, Yi-Chin; Lai, Jin-Mei; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Background Graptopetalum paraguayense (GP) is a folk herbal medicine with hepatoprotective effects that is used in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects of GP on experimental hepatic fibrosis in both dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)- and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury rats. Methods Hepatic fibrosis-induced rats were fed with the methanolic extract of GP (MGP) by oral administration every day. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical assays, and Western blot analysis were performed. The effects of MGP on the expression of fibrotic markers and cytokines in the primary cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and Kupffer cells, respectively, were evaluated. Results Oral administration of MGP significantly alleviated DMN- or CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis. High levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, prothrombin activity and mortality rates also decreased in rats treated with MGP. There were significantly decreased hydroxyproline levels in therapeutic rats compared with those of the liver-damaged rats. Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression were all reduced by incubation with MGP in primary cultured rat HSCs. Furthermore, MGP induced apoptotic cell death in activated HSCs. MGP also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat Kupffer cell activation by decreasing nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production, and increasing interleukin-10 expression. Conclusions The results show that the administration of MGP attenuated toxin-induced hepatic damage and fibrosis in vivo and inhibited HSC and Kupffer cell activation in vitro, suggesting that MGP might be a promising complementary or alternative therapeutic agent for liver inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:23335984

  11. LXRα represses LPS-induced inflammatory responses by competing with IRF3 for GRIP1 in Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chun-Mu; He, Kun; Li, Pei-Zhi; Liu, Zuo-Jin; Zhu, Xi-Wen; Ou, Zhi-Bing; Ruan, Xiong-Zhong; Gong, Jian-Ping; Liu, Chang-An

    2016-06-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) in the nucleus play important roles in lipid metabolism and inflammation. The mechanism of LXR regulation of the LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inflammatory signaling pathway remains to be elucidated. C57/BL6 mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, T0901317 (a LXRs agonist), LPS and T0901317+LPS. Additionally, Kupffer cells isolated from male C57/BL6 mice were divided into the same four groups. A decreased amount of inflammatory cells infiltrated the portal areas and the hepatic sinusoids in the livers of mice in the T0901317+LPS group than in those of mice in the LPS group. In the T0901317+LPS group, the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were lower, while the serum level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) was higher. In vitro, Kupffer cells pretreated with T0901317 for 24h presented reduced TNF-α, interferon-beta (IFN-β) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) levels, while the IL-10 level increased; however, the mRNA and protein expression levels of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) were not significantly reduced. The co-IP data illustrated that LXRα bound to GRIP1 specifically in the T0901317+LPS group, while less IRF3 was bound to GRIP1 in the T0901317+LPS group than in the LPS group. Furthermore, the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB was decreased by pretreating Kupffer cells with T0901317 for 24h. These results suggest that activated LXRα competes with IRF3 for GRIP1 binding, thus repressing IRF3 and NF-κB transcriptional activity and inhibiting the inflammatory response initiated by LPS in Kupffer cells. PMID:27085678

  12. Kupffer Cells Protect Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells from Fas-Dependent Apoptosis in Sepsis by Down-Regulating gp130

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Noelle A.; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Borgerding, Joshua N.; Ayala, Carol A.; Ayala, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction is a key feature of multiple organ injury, the primary cause of fatality seen in critically ill patients. Although the development of EC dysfunction in the heart and lung is well studied in sepsis, it remains unclear in the liver. Herein, we report that liver sinusoidal ECs (LSECs; defined as CD146+CD45−) exhibit increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54) and Fas in response to sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). By using magnetically enriched LSEC (CD146+) populations, we show evidence of marked apoptosis, with a twofold decline in viable LSECs in CLP animals compared with sham controls. These changes and increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels were all mitigated in septic Fas−/− and Fas ligand−/− animals. Although we previously reported increased numbers of Fas ligand expressing CD8+ T lymphocytes in the septic liver, CD8+ T-cell deficiency did not reverse the onset of LSEC apoptosis/damage. However, Kupffer cell depletion with clodronate liposomes resulted in greater apoptosis and Fas expression after CLP and a decrease in glycoprotein 130 expression on LSECs, suggesting that STAT3 activation may protect these cells from injury. Our results document a critical role for death receptor–mediated LSEC injury and show the first evidence that Kupffer cells are essential to the viability of LSECs, which appears to be mediated through glycoprotein 130 expression in sepsis. PMID:23306157

  13. Iron- and inflammation-induced hepcidin gene expression in mice is not mediated by Kupffer cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lou, Dan-Qing; Lesbordes, Jeanne-Claire; Nicolas, Gaël; Viatte, Lydie; Bennoun, Myriam; Van Rooijen, Nico; Kahn, Axel; Renia, Laurent; Vaulont, Sophie

    2005-05-01

    Hepcidin, a recently discovered iron regulatory peptide, is believed to inhibit the release of iron from absorptive enterocytes and macrophages. Liver hepcidin synthesis is induced in vivo by iron stores and inflammation. The molecular basis of the regulation of hepcidin gene expression by these effectors in hepatocytes is currently unknown, although there is strong evidence that indirect mechanisms are involved. The aims of this study were to gain insight into these mechanisms and to determine to what extent other liver cell types are responsible for transducing the signal by which hepcidin expression is regulated in mouse hepatocytes. For this, we depleted Kupffer cells by injection of liposome-encapsulated clodronate and then studied iron- and inflammation-induced hepcidin gene expression. In addition, we directly evaluated the role of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) by using IL-6-deficient mice. Our results show that iron is able to induce hepcidin gene expression independently of Kupffer cells in the liver and circulating IL-6. In contrast, we show that hepcidin gene induction by inflammation is also independent of Kupffer cells, but involves, at least partly, IL-6. In conclusion, these results show that two independent regulatory pathways control hepcidin gene expression and suggest that hepatocytes play a key role in the regulation of hepcidin gene expression by sensing iron and inflammatory signals. PMID:15793843

  14. Characterization of the Inflammasome in Human Kupffer Cells in Response to Synthetic Agonists and Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zannetti, Claudia; Roblot, Guillaume; Charrier, Emily; Ainouze, Michelle; Tout, Issam; Briat, François; Isorce, Nathalie; Faure-Dupuy, Suzanne; Michelet, Maud; Marotel, Marie; Kati, Semra; Schulz, Thomas F; Rivoire, Michel; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Luangsay, Souphalone; Alatiff, Omran; Henry, Thomas; Walzer, Thierry; Durantel, David; Hasan, Uzma

    2016-07-01

    The liver is the largest gland in the human body and functions as an innate immune organ. Liver macrophages called Kupffer cells (KC) constitute the largest group of macrophages in the human body. Innate immune responses involving KC represent the first line of defense against pathogens in the liver. Human monocyte-derived macrophages have been used to characterize inflammasome responses that lead to the release of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, but it has not yet been determined whether human KC contain functional inflammasomes. We show, to our knowledge for the first time, that KC express genes and proteins that make up several different inflammasome complexes. Moreover, activation of KC in response to the absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasome led to the production of IL-1β and IL-18, which activated IL-8 transcription and hepatic NK cell activity, respectively. Other inflammasome responses were also activated in response to selected bacteria and viruses. However, hepatitis B virus inhibited the AIM2 inflammasome by reducing the mRNA stability of IFN regulatory factor 7, which regulated AIM2 transcription. These data demonstrate the production of IL-1β and IL-18 in KC, suggesting that KC contain functional inflammasomes that could be important players in the innate immune response following certain infections of the liver. We think our findings could potentially aid therapeutic approaches against chronic liver diseases that activate the inflammasome. PMID:27226092

  15. Gliotoxin causes apoptosis and necrosis of rat Kupffer cells in vitro and in vivo in the absence of oxidative stress: Exacerbation by caspase and serine protease inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Kristin; Stolz, Donna B.; Nalesnik, Michael; Watkins, Simon C.; Kamath, Ravindra; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims A potential application of gliotoxin therapy for liver fibrosis was suggested by its apoptotic effect on fibrogenic activated stellate cells. We investigated if gliotoxin exerts similar effects on hepatic macrophages Kupffer cells. Methods Effects of gliotoxin on Kupffer cells isolated from the normal liver and in vivo following its administration to CCl4–induced cirrhotic rats were studied. Results Gliotoxin caused apoptosis of cultured Kupffer cells, the effect being apparent at 0.3 μM concentration within 1 hour; longer incubation caused necrosis. This effect was associated with mitochondroial cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation and ATP depletion. Interestingly, inhibition of caspase-3 and serine proteases accelerated and augmented gliotoxin-induced cell death via necrosis. Gliotoxin stimulated nuclear translocation of NFκB, and phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2 and JNK MAP kinases, but these signaling molecules were not involved in gliotoxin-induced death of Kupffer cells. In vivo administration of gliotoxin to cirrhotic rats caused apoptosis of Kupffer cells, stellate cells and hepatocytes. In control rats, the effect was minimal on the nonparenchymal cells and not apparent on hepatocytes. Conclusions In the fibrotic liver, gliotoxin nonspecifically causes death of hepatic cell types. Modification of gliotoxin molecule may be necessary for selective targeting and elimination of activated stellate cells. PMID:17466404

  16. Kupffer cells and activation of endothelial TLR4 coordinate neutrophil adhesion within liver sinusoids during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Braedon; Jenne, Craig N; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Kubes, Paul

    2013-12-01

    A key pathological feature of the systemic inflammatory response of sepsis/endotoxemia is the accumulation of neutrophils within the microvasculature of organs such as the liver, where they cause tissue damage and vascular dysfunction. There is emerging evidence that the vascular endothelium is critical to the orchestration of inflammatory responses to blood-borne microbes and microbial products in sepsis/endotoxemia. In this study, we aimed to understand the role of endothelium, and specifically endothelial TLR4 activation, in the regulation of neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Intravital microscopy of bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that TLR4 expression by non-bone marrow-derived cells was required for neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Furthermore, LPS-induced neutrophil adhesion in liver sinusoids was equivalent between wild-type mice and transgenic mice that express TLR4 only on endothelium (tlr4(-/-)Tie2(tlr4)), revealing that activation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to initiate neutrophil adhesion. Neutrophil arrest within sinusoids of endotoxemic mice requires adhesive interactions between neutrophil CD44 and endothelial hyaluronan. Intravital immunofluorescence imaging demonstrated that stimulation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to induce the deposition of serum-derived hyaluronan-associated protein (SHAP) within sinusoids, which was required for CD44/hyaluronan-dependent neutrophil adhesion. In addition to endothelial TLR4 activation, Kupffer cells contribute to neutrophil recruitment via a distinct CD44/HA/SHAP-independent mechanism. This study sheds new light on the control of innate immune activation within the liver vasculature during endotoxemia, revealing a key role for endothelial cells as sentinels in the detection of intravascular infections and coordination of neutrophil recruitment to the liver. PMID:24113769

  17. Histones activate the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Kupffer Cells during Sterile Inflammatory Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Chen, Hui-Wei; Evankovich, John; Yan, Wei; Rosborough, Brian R.; Nace, Gary W.; Ding, Qing; Loughran, Patricia; Beer-Stolz, Donna; Billiar, Timothy R.; Esmon, Charles T.; Tsung, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Cellular processes that drive sterile inflammatory injury after hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are not completely understood. Activation of the inflammasome plays a key role in response to invading intracellular pathogens, but mounting evidence suggests it also plays a role in inflammation driven by endogenous danger-associate molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules released after ischemic injury. The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is one such process, and the mechanism by which its activation results in damage and inflammatory responses following liver I/R is unknown. Here we report that both NLRP3 and its downstream target Caspase-1 are activated I/R and are essential for hepatic I/R injury as both NLRP3 and Caspase-1 KO mice are protected from injury. Furthermore, inflammasome-mediated injury is dependent on Caspase-1 expression in liver non-parenchymal cells. While upstream signals that activate the inflammasome during ischemic injury are not well characterized, we show that endogenous extracellular histones activate the NLRP3 inflammasome during liver I/R through Toll-like Receptor-9 (TLR9). This occurs through TLR9-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species. This mechanism is operant in resident liver Kupffer cells, which drive innate immune responses after I/R injury by recruiting additional cell types, including neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. These novel findings illustrate a new mechanism by which extracellular histones and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome contribute to liver damage and activation of innate immunity during sterile inflammation. PMID:23904166

  18. TREM2 governs Kupffer cell activation and explains belr1 genetic resistance to malaria liver stage infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Lígia Antunes; Rodrigues-Duarte, Lurdes; Rodo, Joana; Vieira de Moraes, Luciana; Marques, Isabel; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium liver stage infection is a target of interest for the treatment of and vaccination against malaria. Here we used forward genetics to search for mechanisms underlying natural host resistance to infection and identified triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) and MHC class II molecules as determinants of Plasmodium berghei liver stage infection in mice. Locus belr1 confers resistance to malaria liver stage infection. The use of newly derived subcongenic mouse lines allowed to map belr1 to a 4-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 17 that contains the Trem2 gene. We show that Trem2 expression in the nonparenchymal liver cells closely correlates with resistance to liver stage infection, implicating TREM2 as a mediator of the belr1 genetic effect. Trem2-deficient mice are more susceptible to liver stage infection than their WT counterparts. We found that Kupffer cells are the principle cells expressing TREM2 in the liver, and that Trem2−/− Kupffer cells display altered functional activation on exposure to P. berghei sporozoites. TREM2 expression in Kupffer cells contributes to the limitation of parasite expansion in isolated hepatocytes in vitro, potentially explaining the increased susceptibility of Trem2−/− mice to liver stage infection. The MHC locus was also found to control liver parasite burden, possibly owing to the expression of MHC class II molecules in hepatocytes. Our findings implicate unexpected Kupffer–hepatocyte cross-talk in the control Plasmodium liver stage infection and demonstrate that TREM2 is involved in host responses against the malaria parasite. PMID:24218563

  19. Kupffer cells modulate hepatic fatty acid oxidation during infection with PR8 influenza.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N; Singh, Larry N; Chatterji-Len, Milani; Zerfas, Patricia M; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; McGuire, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    In response to infection, patients with inborn errors of metabolism may develop a functional deterioration termed metabolic decompensation. The biochemical hallmarks of this disruption of metabolic homeostasis are disease specific and may include acidosis, hyperammonemia or hypoglycemia. In a model system previously published by our group, we noted that during influenza infection, mice displayed a depression in hepatic mitochondrial enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that this normal adaptation may extend to other metabolic pathways, and as such, may impact various inborn errors of metabolism. Since the liver is a critical organ in inborn errors of metabolism, we carried out untargeted metabolomic profiling of livers using mass spectrometry in C57Bl/6 mice infected with influenza to characterize metabolic adaptation. Pathway analysis of metabolomic data revealed reductions in CoA synthesis, and long chain fatty acyl CoA and carnitine species. These metabolic adaptations coincided with a depression in hepatic long chain β-oxidation mRNA and protein. To our surprise, the metabolic changes observed occurred in conjunction with a hepatic innate immune response, as demonstrated by transcriptional profiling and flow cytometry. By employing an immunomodulation strategy to deplete Kupffer cells, we were able to improve the expression of multiple genes involved in β-oxidation. Based on these findings, we are the first to suggest that the role of the liver as an immunologic organ is central in the pathophysiology of hepatic metabolic decompensation in inborn errors of metabolism due to respiratory viral infection. PMID:26319418

  20. Vanillin suppresses Kupffer cell-related colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity in isolated perfused rat liver: anti-inflammatory implications.

    PubMed

    Galgani, José E; Núñez, Bárbara; Videla, Luis A

    2012-12-01

    The inhibition of NADPH oxidase has become a potential therapeutic target for oxidative stress-related diseases. We investigated whether vanillin modifies hepatic O(2) consumption associated with Kupffer cell functioning. The influence of vanillin on Kupffer cell functioning was studied in isolated perfused rat liver by colloidal carbon (CC) infusion (0.5 mg ml(-1)), concomitantly with sinusoidal efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as an organ viability parameter. CC infusion increased the rate of O(2) consumption of the liver above basal values, an effect that represents the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells. However, CC-dependent respiratory burst activity was suppressed by previous infusion of 2 mM vanillin. Vanillin did not affect the liver CC uptake rate and liver sinusoidal efflux of LDH efflux. These findings, elicited by vanillin, were reproduced by the well-established NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. In conclusion, vanillin suppresses the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells as assessed in intact liver, which may be associated with the inhibition of macrophage NADPH oxidase activity. Such a finding may have relevance in conditions underlying Kupffer cell-dependent up-regulation of the expression and release of pro-inflammatory mediators by redox-dependent mechanisms. PMID:23007174

  1. Activation of Kupffer Cells Is Associated with a Specific Dysbiosis Induced by Fructose or High Fat Diet in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferrere, Gladys; Leroux, Anne; Wrzosek, Laura; Puchois, Virginie; Gaudin, Françoise; Ciocan, Dragos; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Naveau, Sylvie; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Cassard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The increase consumption of fructose in diet is associated with liver inflammation. As a specific fructan substrate, fructose may modify the gut microbiota which is involved in obesity-induced liver disease. Here, we aimed to assess whether fructose-induced liver damage was associated with a specific dysbiosis, especially in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). To this end, four groups of mice were fed with normal and HFD added or not with fructose. Body weight and glucose sensitivity, liver inflammation, dysbiosis and the phenotype of Kupffer cells were determined after 16 weeks of diet. Food intake was increased in the two groups of mice fed with the HFD. Mice fed with HFD and fructose showed a higher infiltration of lymphocytes into the liver and a lower inflammatory profile of Kupffer cells than mice fed with the HFD without fructose. The dysbiosis associated with diets showed that fructose specifically prevented the decrease of Mouse intestinal bacteria in HFD fed mice and increased Erysipelotrichi in mice fed with fructose, independently of the amount of fat. In conclusion, fructose, used as a sweetener, induced a dysbiosis which is different in presence of fat in the diet. Consequently, the activation of Kupffer cells involved in mice model of HFD-induced liver inflammation was not observed in an HFD/fructose combined diet. These data highlight that the complexity of diet composition could highly impact the development of liver lesions during obesity. Specific dysbiosis associated with the diet could explain that the progressions of liver damage are different. PMID:26731543

  2. Kupffer Cell Activation by Ambient Air Particulate Matter Exposure May Exacerbate Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Hui; Fiel, M. Isabel; Sun, Qinghua; Guo, Jinsheng; Gordon, Ronald E.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Friedman, Scott L.; Odin, Joseph A.; Allina, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Due to increased obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most prevalent liver disease in the United States. NAFLD is considered a component of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of disorders that also includes diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, arteriosclerosis, and hypertension. Exposure to ambient air particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 µm (PM2.5) is a risk factor for arteriosclerosis as well as lung disease, but its effect on NAFLD is unknown. PM2.5 induces pulmonary dysfunction via toll-like receptor activation on alveolar macrophages. Toll-like receptor activation of Kupffer cells, resident hepatic macrophages, and subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokine production have been shown to play a key role in NAFLD progression. We hypothesized that PM2.5 exposure is a significant risk factor for progression of NAFLD. Thus, following exposure of male C57BL/6 mice fed high fat chow to concentrated air particulate matter (CAPs) or filtered air for 6 wk, progression of NAFLD was evaluated by standardized histological assessment of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. In mice fed high fat chow, the hepatic inflammatory grade (3.00 ± 0.00 vs. 1.50 ± 0.71, p < 0.001) and fibrosis stage (1.00 ± 0.00 vs. 0.60 ± 0.52, p = 0.023) were both significantly higher in mice exposed to CAPs versus filtered air, respectively. Increased numbers of Kupffer cells contained PM in CAPs-exposed mice (2.00 ± 0.94 vs. 0.20 ± 0.42, respectively, p < 0.001). PM exposure increased IL-6 secretion up to seven fold in a dose-dependent manner by isolated wild-type but not TLR4−/− Kupffer cells (p < 0.050). Conclusion: Ambient PM2.5 exposure may be a significant risk factor for NAFLD progression. PMID:19908945

  3. Thyroid hormone-induced cytosol-to-nuclear translocation of rat liver Nrf2 is dependent on Kupffer cell functioning.

    PubMed

    Videla, Luis A; Cornejo, Pamela; Romanque, Pamela; Santibáñez, Catherine; Castillo, Iván; Vargas, Romina

    2012-01-01

    L-3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T(3)) administration upregulates nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in rat liver, which is redox-sensitive transcription factor mediating cytoprotection. In this work, we studied the role of Kupffer cell respiratory burst activity, a process related to reactive oxygen species generation and liver homeostasis, in Nrf2 activation using the macrophage inactivator gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3); 10 mg/kg i.v. 72 h before T(3) [0.1 mg/kg i.p.]) or NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (1.5 mmol/L added to the drinking water for 7 days before T(3)), and determinations were performed 2 h after T(3). T(3) increased nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 content ratio and levels of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase, and thioredoxin (Western blot) over control values, proteins whose gene transcription is induced by Nrf2. These changes were suppressed by GdCl(3) treatment prior to T(3), an agent-eliciting Kupffer-cell depletion, inhibition of colloidal carbon phagocytosis, and the associated respiratory burst activity, with enhancement in nuclear inhibitor of Nrf2 kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/Nrf2 content ratios suggesting Nrf2 degradation. Under these conditions, T(3)-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) response was eliminated by previous GdCl(3) administration. Similar to GdCl(3), apocynin given before T(3) significantly reduced liver Nrf2 activation and HO-1 expression, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor eliciting abolishment of colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity without altering carbon phagocytosis. It is concluded that Kupffer cell functioning is essential for upregulation of liver Nrf2-signaling pathway by T(3). This contention is supported by suppression of the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells and the associated reactive oxygen species production by GdCl(3) or apocynin given prior to T(3), thus hindering Nrf2 activation. PMID:22649286

  4. SR-A and SREC-I Are Kupffer and Endothelial Cell Receptors for Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Pasquale; Vetrini, Francesco; Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Grove, Nathan C; Bertin, Terry; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors can mediate long-term, high-level transgene expression from transduced hepatocytes with no chronic toxicity. However, a toxic acute response with potentially lethal consequences has hindered their clinical applications. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and Kupffer cells are major barriers to efficient hepatocyte transduction. Understanding the mechanisms of adenoviral vector uptake by non-parenchymal cells may allow the development of strategies aimed at overcoming these important barriers and to achieve preferential hepatocyte gene transfer with reduced toxicity. Scavenger receptors on Kupffer cells bind adenoviral particles and remove them from the circulation, thus preventing hepatocyte transduction. In the present study, we show that HDAd particles interact in vitro and in vivo with scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) and with scavenger receptor expressed on endothelial cells-I (SREC-I) and we exploited this knowledge to increase the efficiency of hepatocyte transduction by HDAd vectors in vivo through blocking of SR-A and SREC-I with specific fragments antigen-binding (Fabs). PMID:23358188

  5. The role of Kupffer cells in glucan-induced granuloma formation in the liver of mice depleted of blood monocytes by administration of strontium-89

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, M.; Takahashi, K. )

    1991-05-01

    In order to elucidate the role of Kupffer cells in granuloma formation in the liver of mice under a condition of severe monocytopenia induced by administration of strontium-89, granulomas were produced by particulate glucan injection and examined histopathologically, immunohistochemically, by ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography, and in culture experiments. Hepatic granulomas were smaller, less numerous, and more irregularly shaped in the monocytopenic mice than in the control mice. The granulomas were composed of multinuclear giant cells, epithelioid cells, Kupffer cells, and T lymphocytes, but not monocytes or granulocytes. Kupffer cells were heavily labeled with ({sup 3}H)thymidine in the monocytopenic mice, particularly just before the stage of granuloma formation, and then clustered in the liver sinusoids. At 8 days, they formed granulomas, transformed into epithelioid cells, and transformed further into multinuclear giant cells. Although the culture of liver cell suspensions prepared from the livers of monocytopenic mice sustained diffuse proliferation of macrophages on a monolayer of mouse stromal cell line (ST2), no monocyte/macrophage colonies were formed. From these results, it is reasonable to conclude that Kupffer cells alone are activated in a condition without a supply of monocytes from peripheral blood; proliferate and cluster in the hepatic sinusoids; transform into peroxidase-negative macrophages, epithelioid cells, and multinuclear giant cells; and participate in granuloma formation in loco together with T lymphocytes.

  6. A standardized aqueous extract of Anoectochilus formosanus ameliorated thioacetamide-induced liver fibrosis in mice: the role of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Bin; Chuang, Hin-Ru; Yang, Li-Chan; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Anoectochilus formosanus is used in traditional folk medicine as an hepatoprotective agent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a standardized aqueous extract of A. formosanus (SAEAF) on thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver fibrosis. An in vitro study showed that the inhibitive effect of kinsenoside, a major component of SAEAF, on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion from Kupffer cells might be derived at least partly from downregulation of LPS-receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Hepatic fibrosis was produced by TAA (200 mg/kg, i.p.) 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Mice in the three TAA groups were treated daily with distilled water and SAEAF (1.0, 0.2 g/kg) via gastrogavage throughout the experimental period. The mice that received the SAEAF treatment had significantly reduced plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, relative liver weights, and hepatic hydroxyproline contents. A histological examination also confirmed that SAEAF reduced the degree of fibrosis caused by TAA treatment. RT-PCR analysis showed that SAEAF treatment reduced mRNA expression of collagen (alpha1)(I), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, TLR4, and TNF receptor 1. An immunohistochemical examination also indicated that SAEAF reduced the number of CD68-positive cells (macrophages). In conclusion, oral administration of SAEAF significantly reduced TAA-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice, probably through inhibition of hepatic Kupffer cell activation. PMID:20378990

  7. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reid, D T; Reyes, J L; McDonald, B A; Vo, T; Reimer, R A; Eksteen, B

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies. PMID:27454866

  8. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reid, D. T.; Reyes, J. L.; McDonald, B. A.; Vo, T.; Reimer, R. A.; Eksteen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies. PMID:27454866

  9. TNFα-Mediated Liver Destruction by Kupffer Cells and Ly6Chi Monocytes during Entamoeba histolytica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Thomas; Ittrich, Harald; Jacobs, Thomas; Heeren, Joerg; Tacke, Frank; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is a focal destruction of liver tissue due to infection by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica). Host tissue damage is attributed mainly to parasite pathogenicity factors, but massive early accumulation of mononuclear cells, including neutrophils, inflammatory monocytes and macrophages, at the site of infection raises the question of whether these cells also contribute to tissue damage. Using highly selective depletion strategies and cell-specific knockout mice, the relative contribution of innate immune cell populations to liver destruction during amebic infection was investigated. Neutrophils were not required for amebic infection nor did they appear to be substantially involved in tissue damage. In contrast, Kupffer cells and inflammatory monocytes contributed substantially to liver destruction during ALA, and tissue damage was mediated primarily by TNFα. These data indicate that besides direct antiparasitic drugs, modulating innate immune responses may potentially be beneficial in limiting ALA pathogenesis. PMID:23300453

  10. Kupffer Cell Transplantation in Mice for Elucidating Monocyte/Macrophage Biology and for Potential in Cell or Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Simone; Bhargava, Kuldeep K; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Zanolini, Diego; Palestro, Christopher J; Santambrogio, Laura; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2016-03-01

    Kupffer cells (KC) play major roles in immunity and tissue injury or repair. Because recapitulation of KC biology and function within liver will allow superior insights into their functional repertoire, we studied the efficacy of the cell transplantation approach for this purpose. Mouse KC were isolated from donor livers, characterized, and transplanted into syngeneic recipients. To promote cell engraftment through impairments in native KC, recipients were preconditioned with gadolinium chloride. The targeting, fate, and functionality of transplanted cells were evaluated. The findings indicated that transplanted KC engrafted and survived in recipient livers throughout the study period of 3 months. Transplanted KC expressed macrophage functions, including phagocytosis and cytokine expression, with or without genetic modifications using lentiviral vectors. This permitted studies of whether transplanted KC could affect outcomes in the context of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity or hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Transplanted KC exerted beneficial effects in these injury settings. The benefits resulted from cytoprotective factors including vascular endothelial growth factor. In conclusion, transplanted adult KC were successfully targeted and engrafted in the liver with retention of innate immune and tissue repair functions over the long term. This will provide excellent opportunities to address critical aspects in the biogenesis, fate, and function of KC within their native liver microenvironment and to develop the cell and gene therapy potential of KC transplantation. PMID:26773351

  11. Purinergic signaling via P2X7 receptor mediates IL-1β production in Kupffer cells exposed to silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shuji; Negishi, Yusuke; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Takenouchi, Takato; Kitani, Hiroshi; Takeda, Ken

    2014-07-01

    There is extensive evidence that nanoparticles (NPs) cause adverse effects in multiple organs, including liver, though the mechanisms involved remain to be fully established. Kupffer cells are macrophages resident in the liver, and play important roles in liver inflammation induced by various toxic agents, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Interleukin-1 (IL-1) family members IL-1α,β are released from LPS-primed macrophages exposed to NPs, including silica NPs (SNPs), via activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 inflammasomes. Here, we investigated the mechanism of production of IL-1β via activation of inflammasomes in mouse Kupffer cell line KUP5, focusing on the role of purinergic signaling via P2X7 receptor. IL-1β production by LPS-primed KUP5 cells exposed to SNPs was increased dose-dependently, and was greatest in response to SNPs with a diameter of 30 nm (SNP30), as compared with 70-nm and 300-nm SNPs (SNP70 and SNP300). ATP release was also highest in cells exposed to SNP30. Treatment of LPS-primed KUP5 cells with ATP also induced a high level of IL-1β production, similar to that induced by SNP30. IL-1β production was significantly inhibited by apyrase (an ecto-nucleotidase) and A438079 (a P2X7 antagonist/ATP-release inhibitor). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was confirmed in cells exposed to SNP30. In conclusion, ATP released from P2X7 receptor in response to stimulation of KUP5 cells with SNP30 induces ROS production via cell-membrane NADPH oxidase. The ROS causes activation of inflammasomes, leading to caspase-1-dependent processing of IL-1β. PMID:24685903

  12. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids decrease mortality and Kupffer cell prostaglandin E2 production in a rat model of chronic sepsis.

    PubMed

    Barton, R G; Wells, C L; Carlson, A; Singh, R; Sullivan, J J; Cerra, F B

    1991-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that substitution of omega-3 fat for dietary omega-6 fat would reduce mortality and decrease Kupffer cell prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in a rat model of chronic sepsis. Rats were fed via gastrostomy for 12 days with isonitrogenous, isocaloric diets containing 15% of calories as either safflower oil (omega-6) or a 10:1 mixture of menhaden oil (omega-3) and safflower oil. After five days of feeding, animals received an intra-abdominal abscess of defined bacterial content. Survivors were killed on post-laparotomy day 6 in conjunction with liver perfusion and protease liver digestion for Kupffer cell isolation. Kupffer cell PGE2 production was measured by radioimmunoassay after 18 hours of cell culture and again after stimulation with 0 LPS, 10 ng/ml LPS, and 10 micrograms/LPS. Mortality was decreased in menhaden oil-fed animals compared with safflower oil-fed animals (16% vs. 35%). Kupffer cell PGE2 production was decreased in menhaden oil-fed animals at 18 hours (354 +/- 54 vs. 570 +/- 95 pg/0.1 ml; p = 0.09) and after stimulation with 10 micrograms/ml LPS (140 +/- 41 vs. 288 +/- 45 pg/0.1 ml; p = 0.03) compared with safflower oil-fed animals. PMID:2056540

  13. Non-Canonical Wnt Predominates in Activated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells, Influencing HSC Survival and Paracrine Stimulation of Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Laura; Mann, Jelena; Mann, Derek A.

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt system is highly complex and is comprised of canonical and non-canonical pathways leading to the activation of gene expression. Our aim was to examine changes in the expression of Wnt ligands and regulators during hepatic stellate cell (HSC) transdifferentiation and assess the relative contributions of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathways in fibrogenic activated HSC. The expression profile of Wnt ligands and regulators in HSC was not supportive for a major role for β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signalling, this verified by inability to induce Topflash reporter activity in HSC even when expressing a constitutive active β-catenin. We detected expression of Wnt5a in activated HSC which can signal via non-canonical mechanisms and showed evidence for non-canonical signalling in these cells involving phosphorylation of Dvl2 and pJNK. Stimulation of HSC or Kupffer cells with Wnt5a regulated HSC apoptosis and expression of TGF-β1 and MCP1 respectively. We were unable to confirm a role for β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt in HSC and instead propose autocrine and paracrine functions for Wnts expressed by activated HSC via non-canonical pathways. The data warrant detailed investigation of Wnt5a in liver fibrosis. PMID:26566235

  14. Failure to demonstrate a major role for Kupffer cells and radiosensitive leukocytes in immunoglobulin-mediated elimination of Trypanosoma musculi

    SciTech Connect

    Kongshavn, P.A.; Shaw, K.; Ghadirian, E.; Ulczak, O. )

    1990-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that elimination of parasitemia in Trypanosoma musculi infection is brought about by immunoglobulin G2a antibodies, C3, and an effector cell. Experiments were designed to identify the putative effector cell by using several approaches. Infected C5-deficient or C5-sufficient mice treated with silica particles or given 900 rads of radiation 3 days earlier effectively eliminated trypanosomes following administration of immune plasma (IP). Silica-treated, noninfected mice given T. musculi preincubated with IP also cleared the parasites. Radiolabeling studies revealed that uptake of the cleared trypanosomes by the liver in normal mice was relatively low and fell only slightly (19%) in silica-treated mice. In contrast, uptake of radiolabeled sheep erythrocytes by the liver was normally much higher and fell drastically (7%) in silica-treated mice. Mice were then immunocompromised by 900 rads of radiation, silica particles, and anti-platelet serum combined before IP-sensitized trypanosomes were given. Leukocyte and platelet counts were both reduced by 95% and sheep erythrocyte uptake by the liver fell from 77 to 5%; however, greater than 99% of the injected trypanosomes were cleared in these mice and uptake of radiolabeled trypanosomes by the liver was similar to that of normal mice. Lastly, in anesthetized mice in which Kupffer cells were excluded surgically from the circulation, greater than 99% of the IP-sensitized trypanosomes disappeared rapidly from the blood. Only 7% of the radiolabel was found in the liver versus 60% in sham-operated mice. The results are interpreted as showing that hepatic Kupffer cells play a minor role in the immune elimination of T. musculi. Likewise, radiosensitive leukocytes and platelets are unlikely to be sole candidates for the putative effector cell that mediates a cure of murine trypanosomiasis.

  15. Suppression of Kupffer cell function prevents cadmium induced hepatocellular necrosis in the male Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Sauer, J M; Waalkes, M P; Hooser, S B; Kuester, R K; McQueen, C A; Sipes, I G

    1997-08-15

    Exposure of humans to toxic metals and metalloids is a major environmental problem. Many metals, such as cadmium, can be hepatotoxic. However, the mechanisms by which metals cause acute hepatic injury are in many cases unknown. Previous reports suggest a major role for inflammation in acute cadmium induced hepatotoxicity. In initial experiments we found that a non-hepatotoxic dose of cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2.0 mg/kg, i.v.) markedly increased the clearance rate of colloidal carbon from the blood, which is indicative of enhanced phagocytic activity by Kupffer cells (resident hepatic macrophages). Thus. the objective these studies was to determine the involvement of Kupffer cells in cadmium induced liver injury by inhibiting their function with gadolinium chloride (GdCl3). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered GdCl3 (10 mg/kg, i.v.) followed 24 h later by a single dose of CdCl2 (3.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, i.v.). Twenty four hours after CdCl2 administration animals were killed and the degree of liver toxicity was assessed using plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as well as light microscopy. Cadmium chloride administration produced multifocal hepatocellular necrosis and increased plasma ALT activity. Pretreatment with GdCl3 significantly reduced both the morphological changes and hepatic ALT release caused by CdCl2. However, the protection was specific to the liver, and did not alter CdCl2 induced testicular injury, as determined by histopathological damage. In many cases, the inducible cadmium-binding protein, metallothionein (MT) is often an essential aspect of the acquisition of cadmium tolerance in the liver. Although cadmium caused a dramatic induction of hepatic MT (32-fold), GdCl3 caused only a minor increase (2-fold). Combined CdCl2 and GdCl3 treatment did not induce levels to an extent greater than CdCl2 alone. As expected, GdCl3 also caused a slight increase in the amount of cadmium associated with the liver. In cultured hepatocytes isolated from GdCl3

  16. Nucleation of platelets with bloodborne pathogens on Kupffer cell precedes other innate immunity and contributes to bacterial clearance

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Connie H. Y.; Jenne, Craig N.; Petri, Björn; Chrobok, Navina L.; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Using intravital imaging of the liver, we unveil a collaborative role for platelets with Kupffer cells (KCs) in eradicating bloodborne bacterial infections. Under basal conditions, platelets via glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) formed transient “touch-and-go” interactions with von Willebrand factor (vWF) constitutively expressed on KCs. Bacteria, such as Bacillus cereus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), were rapidly caught by KCs and triggered platelets to switch from “touch-and-go” to sustained GPIIb-mediated adhesion on the KC surface to encase the bacterium. Infected GpIbα−/− mice demonstrated increased endothelial and KC damage, leading to increased fluid leakage, significant polycythemia and rapid mortality. This study identifies a novel surveillance mechanism of intravascular macrophage by platelets that rapidly converts to a critical host response against bloodborne bacteria. PMID:23770641

  17. SiO2 nanoparticle-induced impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism in hepatocytes directly and through a Kupffer cell-mediated pathway in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yang; Chen, Qingqing; Ding, Tingting; Sun, Jiao

    2014-01-01

    The liver has been shown to be a primary target organ for SiO2 nanoparticles in vivo, and may be highly susceptible to damage by these nanoparticles. However, until now, research focusing on the potential toxic effects of SiO2 nanoparticles on mitochondria-associated energy metabolism in hepatocytes has been lacking. In this work, SiO2 nanoparticles 20 nm in diameter were evaluated for their ability to induce dysfunction of mitochondrial energy metabolism. First, a buffalo rat liver (BRL) cell line was directly exposed to SiO2 nanoparticles, which induced cytotoxicity and mitochondrial damage accompanied by decreases in mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, enzymatic expression in the Krebs cycle, and activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV. Second, the role of rat-derived Kupffer cells was evaluated. The supernatants from Kupffer cells treated with SiO2 nanoparticles were transferred to stimulate BRL cells. We observed that SiO2 nanoparticles had the ability to activate Kupffer cells, leading to release of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species from these cells and subsequently to inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity in BRL cells. PMID:24959077

  18. Effect of CD16a, the surface receptor of Kupffer cells, on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIU-YUN; WU, LUN; LI, SHENG-WEI; ZHOU, WEN-BO; WANG, MENG-YUAN; ZUO, GUO-QING; LIU, CHANG-AN; DING, XIONG

    2016-01-01

    FcγRIIIa (CD16) is a low-affinity Fc receptor of IgG. As the idio-binding receptor of IgG Fc, it plays an important role in the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of natural killer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of Kupffer cells (KCs) and the expression of their surface receptor FcγRIIIa in hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, we also aimed to observe the functional mechanism of FcγRIIIa. Immunohistochemical analysis was employed to study KCs and FcγRIIIa. In order to explore the role of FcγRIIIa in the growth of cancer cells, KCs and H22 tumor cells were co-cultured in different serum. The mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and FcγRIIIa were analyzed by RT-qPCR; the TNF-α and FcγRIIIa protein expression levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that the number of Kuppfer cells in cancerous tissues (21.6±7.8) was lower than those in para-cancerous (68.8±9.1) tissues and adjacent normal hepatic tissues (62.0±1.9) (P<0.01); this decreased with the reduction in the differentiation degree of cancer (P<0.05). FcγRIIIa-positive cells were similar in morphology to KCs, and their distributive tendency was coincident (P<0.05). The increase in CD16a mRNA levels in the group treated with immune serum was 3.9-, 4.9- and 3.9-fold greater than that in the ordinary serum group at different time points, and CD16a protein expression also markedly increased (P<0.05). However, these effects were inhibited by the addition of anti-IgG Fc serum (P<0.05). The results of the present study suggested that FcγRIIIa resided in KCs, and it contributed to the inhibition of the growth of liver tumor cells. PMID:27082928

  19. P2X7 receptor-NADPH oxidase axis mediates protein radical formation and Kupffer cell activation in carbon tetrachloride-mediated steatohepatitis in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Saurabh; Rana, Ritu; Corbett, Jean; Kadiiska, Maria B; Goldstein, Joyce; Mason, Ronald P

    2012-05-01

    While some studies show that carbon tetrachloride-mediated metabolic oxidative stress exacerbates steatohepatitic-like lesions in obese mice, the redox mechanisms that trigger the innate immune system and accentuate the inflammatory cascade remain unclear. Here we have explored the role of the purinergic receptor P2X7-NADPH oxidase axis as a primary event in recognizing the heightened release of extracellular ATP from CCl(4)-treated hepatocytes and generating redox-mediated Kupffer cell activation in obese mice. We found that an underlying condition of obesity led to the formation of protein radicals and posttranslational nitration, primarily in Kupffer cells, at 24h post-CCl(4) administration. The free radical-mediated oxidation of cellular macromolecules, which was NADPH oxidase and P2X7 receptor-dependent, correlated well with the release of TNF-α and MCP-2 from Kupffer cells. The Kupffer cells in CCl(4)-treated mice exhibited increased expression of MHC Class II proteins and showed an activated phenotype. Increased expression of MHC Class II was inhibited by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin , P2X7 receptor antagonist A438709 hydrochloride, and genetic deletions of the NADPH oxidase p47 phox subunit or the P2X7 receptor. The P2X7 receptor acted upstream of NADPH oxidase activation by up-regulating the expression of the p47 phox subunit and p47 phox binding to the membrane subunit, gp91 phox. We conclude that the P2X7 receptor is a primary mediator of oxidative stress-induced exacerbation of inflammatory liver injury in obese mice via NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanisms. PMID:22343416

  20. Re-evaluation of thin layer chromatography as an alternative method for the quantification of prostaglandins from rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Sabine; Jungermann, Kurt; Schieferdecker, Henrike L

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to conventionally used immunoassays, thin layer chromatography (TLC)--by prelabeling of cells with radioactive arachidonic acid (AA)--allows to differentiate between cellularly built and added prostanoids and thus to investigate feedback effects of prostanoids on their own release. PGD2, TXB2 and PGE2 released from zymosan-stimulated Kupffer cells were separated with distinct RF-values, corresponding to those of the pure substances. Quantification of PGD2 and PGE2 gave comparable results with TLC and immunoassays, but measurement in the presence of added prostanoids was only possible with TLC. Moreover TLC was superior to immunoassays in having a longer linear range while being comparably sensitive. Cellularly built TXB2 in its radioactively labeled form was not detectable by TLC. Inhibition of TXB2 release by externally added AA or technical artifacts were excluded, suggesting that the cellular AA-pools used for prostaglandin and thromboxane synthesis differ in their accessibility for added AA. Thus, TLC is a simple, sensitive and precise method for the quantification of cellularly built prostaglandins but not of thromboxane even in the presence of added prostanoids. PMID:15789620

  1. Erythrophagocytosis by Liver Macrophages (Kupffer Cells) Promotes Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Fibrosis in a Rabbit Model of Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Otogawa, Kohji; Kinoshita, Kohji; Fujii, Hideki; Sakabe, Masahide; Shiga, Ryoko; Nakatani, Kazuki; Ikeda, Kazuo; Nakajima, Yuji; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Makiko; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Hato, Fumihiko; Kawada, Norifumi

    2007-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive fibrotic disease, the pathogenesis of which has not been fully elucidated. Here, we report a molecular aspect of this disease elucidated using rabbits fed a cholesterol-rich high-fat diet and exhibiting insulin resistance. The liver in this model showed steatohepatitis with fibrosis and high mRNA expression for some cytokines, heme oxygenase-1, transforming growth factor-β1, and collagen α1(I). Erythrocytes isolated from the model showed marked fragility and the externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the membrane and were frequently engulfed by Kupffer cells/macrophages in the hepatic sinusoids. Expression of milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor (EGF)-factor 8, a PS-binding protein, was augmented in the liver. In culture, RAW 264.7 cells engulfed erythrocytes oxidized by tert-butyl hydroperoxide, a process that was inhibited by anti-milk fat globule-EGF-factor 8 antibody. In addition, PS-positive erythrocytes appeared entrapped in the model liver in ex vivo perfusion experiments. Finally, in specimens from NASH patients, the aggregation of erythrocytes in inflammatory hepatic sinusoids was notable. These results indicate that the engulfment of PS-externalized, apoptotic signal-positive, erythrocytes by hepatic macrophages may lead to the deposition of iron derived from hemoglobin in the liver and be involved in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis. PMID:17322381

  2. Targeting Kupffer cells in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: Why and how?

    PubMed Central

    Lanthier, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development are under investigation in an era of increased prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Previous findings have pointed to the role of adipose tissue, adipose tissue macrophages and their secretory products in the development of a chronic inflammatory status inducing insulin resistance and a higher risk of liver steatosis called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The activation of resident macrophages [Kupffer cells (KC)] and the recruitment of blood derived monocytes/macrophages into the diseased liver have now been identified as key elements for disease initiation and progression. Those cells could be activated through gut flora modifications and an altered gut barrier function but also through the internalization of toxic lipid compounds in adjacent hepatocytes or in KC themselves. Due to the role of activated KC in insulin resistance, fibrosis development and inflammation amplification, they became a target in clinical trials. A shift towards an anti-inflammatory KC phenotype through peroxisome proliferator activator-receptorδ agonists, an inhibition of macrophage recruitment through anti-C-C chemokine receptor 2 action and a specific blocking of internalization of toxic lipoxidation or glycation compounds into KC by galectin-3 receptor inhibitors are now under investigation in human NASH. PMID:26380042

  3. Kupffer cells suppress perfluorononanoic acid-induced hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α expression by releasing cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Zou, Shanshan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Cui, Ruina; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jiayue; Dai, Jiayin

    2012-10-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) have been demonstrated to play a role in the regulation of intra-hepatic lipid metabolism through the synthesis and secretion of biologically active products. The involvement of KCs in the disturbance of lipid metabolism that induced by perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), a known agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), was investigated in this study. Rats were exposed to PFNA or PFNA combined with gadolinium chloride, an inhibitor of KCs, for 14 days. PFNA exposure dose-dependently increased absolute and relative liver weights, induced triglyceride accumulation, up-regulated the expression of both SERBP-1c and PPARα, and stimulated the release of TNFα and IL-1β. Inactivation of KCs markedly lowered TNFα and IL-1β level, enhanced PFNA-induced expression of PPARα and its target genes, and reduced liver triglyceride levels. In vitro, PFNA-induced expression of PPARα in primary cultured hepatocytes was suppressed by recombinant rat TNFα and IL-1β. However, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway prevented this. Transient transfection and promoter analysis further revealed that these two cytokines and NF-κB were coordinately involved in the suppression of PPARα promoter activity. Our data demonstrate that TNFα and IL-1β released from KCs following PFNA exposure can suppress the expression of PPARα via NF-κB pathway, which partially contribute to the evident accumulation of triglycerides in rat liver. PMID:22648072

  4. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takuto; Miyazaki, Motoyasu; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki; Jimi, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF) and low-biofilm formers (L-BF). These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections. PMID:27376326

  5. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Takuto; Miyazaki, Motoyasu; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki; Jimi, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF) and low-biofilm formers (L-BF). These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections. PMID:27376326

  6. Mainstream cigarette smoke accelerates the progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by modulating Kupffer cell-mediated hepatocellular apoptosis in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Surim; Kim, Jong Won; Yun, Hyejin; Choi, Seong-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hyub; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lim, Chae Woong; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Bumseok

    2016-08-10

    Cigarette smoking in adolescents is considered to be a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of mainstream cigarette smoke (MSCS) on the progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in adolescents. Three-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed either a methionine and choline-deficient plus high fat (MCDHF) diet for 6 weeks. Each group was exposed to MSCS (300, 600 ug/L) or fresh air for 2h per day during the first 3 weeks of MCDHF diet feeding. MSCS increased MCDHF diet-induced NASH by increasing serum ALT/AST levels, steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Furthermore, MSCS was associated with the degree of oxidative stress and hepatocellular apoptosis in NASH mice, but not prominent in controls. In vitro, cigarette smoke extract (CSE) activated Kupffer cells (KCs) to release inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress, which induced hepatocellular apoptosis. In conclusion, MSCS exposure accelerates the progression and severity of NASH by modulating KC-mediated hepatocellular apoptosis. Our results support the regulation of CS in adolescents with steatohepatitis. PMID:27180087

  7. Amphiphilic core–shell nanoparticles containing dense polyethyleneimine shells for efficient delivery of microRNA to Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuojin; Niu, Dechao; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yao, Yuan; Li, Pei; Gong, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery approach to transfer exogenous genes into macrophages is still a great challenge. Current gene delivery methods often result in low cellular uptake efficiency in vivo in some types of cells, especially for the Kupffer cells (KCs). In this article, we demonstrate that amphiphilic core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of well-defined hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cores and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) shells (denoted as PEI@PMMA NPs) are efficient nanocarriers to deliver microRNA (miRNA)-loaded plasmid to the KCs. Average hydrodynamic diameter of PEI@ PMMA NPs was 279 nm with a narrow size distribution. The NPs also possessed positive surface charges up to +30 mV in water, thus enabling effective condensation of negatively charged plasmid DNA. Gel electrophoresis assay showed that the resultant PEI@PMMA NPs were able to completely condense miRNA plasmid at a weight ratio of 25:1 (N/P ratio equal to 45:1). The Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry results showed that the PEI@PMMA/miRNA NPs displayed low cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis activity against the KCs. The maximum cell transfection efficiency reached 34.7% after 48 hours, which is much higher than that obtained by using the commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000 (1.7%). Bio-transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the PEI@PMMA NPs were mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of the KCs. Furthermore, when compared to the control groups, the protein expression of target nuclear factor κB P65 was considerably inhibited (P<0.05) both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate that the PEI@PMMA NPs with a unique amphiphilic core–shell nanostructure are promising nanocarriers for delivering miRNA plasmid to KCs. PMID:27366061

  8. Large-pore mesoporous silica nanospheres as vehicles for delivering TRAF3-shRNA plasmids to Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyong; Guo, Shipeng; Zhang, Wenfeng; Niu, Dechao; Gong, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The currently available techniques for transferring exogenous genes into macrophages, especially the targeted import of exogenous genes into Kupffer cells (KCs) in vivo, are inefficient and achieve only low targeting. Novel Large-Pore Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres (LPMSNs) may be a promising gene transfection agent for KCs because of their superior biodegradation and hypotoxic characteristics, as well as their ability to retain the biological function of KCs and the high loading-rate of exogenous plasmid. LPMSNs were able to completely adsorb shRNA-TRAF3 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-3) plasmid at a mass ratio as low as 30:1, and exhibited a low cytotoxicity for KCs. LPMSNs were detected in KC cytoplasm in vitro, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that they were present only in KCs in liver tissue in vivo. The max KC transfection efficiency with LPMSNs was 34.8± 0.07%, as evaluated using flow cytometry, and the protein and mRNA levels of TRAF3 were significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by shRNA-TRAF3 plasmid transfection after 24 h in vitro and 48 h in vivo. In conclusion, KC targeted transfection was achieved successfully by LPMSNs carrying shRNA-TRAF3 plasmids in vitro and vivo. The protein and mRNA levels of TRAF3 were suppressed significantly. These results suggest that LPMSNs are a promising vehicle for delivering exogenous genes into KCs in vitro and vivo. PMID:26631959

  9. Altered Endothelin-1 Signaling in Production of Thromboxane A2 in Kupffer Cells from Bile Duct Ligated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew M; Zhang, Jian X

    2009-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs), the liver resident macrophages accounting for 80–90% of the total population of fixed tissue macrophages in the body, not only play a key role in host defense via removing particulate materials from the portal circulation, but may also contribute to the pathogenesis of various liver diseases. We have previously demonstrated that KCs play an important role in controlling portal hypertension and hepatocellular injury via releasing thromboxane A2 (TXA2) in early fibrosis induced by one-week bile duct ligation (BDL). Production of TXA2 is controlled by cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) that is activated by the interaction of entothelin-1 (ET-1) with its G-protein coupled ET receptor B (ETBR). However, the signaling pathways that contribute to the ET-1-induced activation of cPLA2 and production of TXA2 in KCs in the normal healthy or injured livers are not yet clear, which are investigated in the present study using isolated KCs from one-week BDL or sham rats. The pharmacological inhibition of cPLA2 or chelation of intracellular calcium abrogated the ET-1 induction of TXA2 from KCs. Compared to those from sham rats, KCs from BDL animals displayed a significantly enhanced responsiveness of p38 MAPK to ET-1, increased ETBR and Gαi subunit but decreased Gαq and Gα11 expression. Inhibition of ERK1/2 or Gq signaling abrogated significantly the ET-1 induction of TXA2 in sham KCs but only slightly in BDL KCs. In contrast, inhibition of p38 MAPK and Gi signaling markedly attenuated the ET-1 induction of TXA2 in BDL KCs but had no effect in sham KCs. Lastly, inhibition of PLC or PKC abrogated ET-1 induction of TXA2 in KCs from both sham and BDL groups. The hepatic stress (such as BDL) induces significant modifications in the receptor and intermediates of ET-1 signaling in KC and subsequently alters ET-1 signaling mechanisms, particularly a shift from Gq induced signaling to Gi induced signaling, in the activation of cPLA2 and production of TXA2 in

  10. Curative Effects of Thiacremonone against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Hepatic Failure via Inhibition of Proinflammatory Cytokines Production and Infiltration of Cytotoxic Immune Cells and Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Ri; Ban, Jung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Lee, Yong Moon; Yoon, Yeo Pyo; Eum, So Young; Jeong, Heon Sang; Yoon, Do-young; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2013-01-01

    High doses of acetaminophen (APAP; N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) cause severe hepatotoxicity after metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 2E1. This study was undertaken to examine the preventive effects of thiacremonone, a compound extracted from garlic, on APAP-induced acute hepatic failure in male C57BL/6J. Mice received with 500 mg/kg APAP after a 7-day pretreatment with thiacremonone (10–50 mg/kg). Thiacremonone inhibited the APAP-induced serum ALT and AST levels in a dose-dependent manner, and markedly reduced the restricted area of necrosis and inflammation by administration of APAP. Thiacremonone also inhibited the APAP-induced depletion of intracellular GSH, induction of nitric oxide, and lipid peroxidation as well as expression of P450 2E1. After APAP injection, the numbers of Kupffer cells, natural killer cells, and cytotoxic T cells were elevated, but the elevated cell numbers in the liver were reduced in thiacremonone pretreated mice. The expression levels of I-309, M-CSF, MIG, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-7, and IL-17 were increased by APAP treatment, which were inhibited in thiacremonone pretreated mice. These data indicate that thiacremonone could be a useful agent for the treatment of drug-induced hepatic failure and that the reduction of cytotoxic immune cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine production may be critical for the prevention of APAP-induced acute liver toxicity. PMID:23935693

  11. Integrin antagonists prevent costimulatory blockade-resistant transplant rejection by CD8(+) memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, W H; Haridas, D; Wagener, M E; Song, M; Kirk, A D; Larsen, C P; Ford, M L

    2012-01-01

    The success of belatacept in late-stage clinical trials inaugurates the arrival of a new class of immunosuppressants based on costimulatory blockade, an immunosuppression strategy that disrupts essential signals required for alloreactive T-cell activation. Despite having improved renal function, kidney transplant recipients treated with belatacept experienced increased rates of acute rejection. This finding has renewed focus on costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and specifically the role of alloreactive memory T cells in mediating this resistance. To study the mechanisms of costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and enhance the clinical efficacy of costimulatory blockade, we developed an experimental transplant system that models a donor-specific memory CD8(+) T-cell response. After confirming that graft-specific memory T cells mediate costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection, we characterized the role of integrins in this rejection. The resistance of memory T cells to costimulatory blockade was abrogated when costimulatory blockade was coupled with either anti-VLA-4 or anti-LFA-1. Mechanistic studies revealed that in the presence of costimulatory blockade, anti-VLA-4 impaired T-cell trafficking to the graft but not memory T-cell recall effector function, whereas anti-LFA-1 attenuated both trafficking and memory recall effector function. As antagonists against these integrins are clinically approved, these findings may have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:21942986

  12. Integrin antagonists prevent costimulatory blockade-resistant transplant rejection by CD8+ memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitchens, W. H.; Haridas, D.; Wagener, M. E.; Song, M.; Kirk, A. D.; Larsen, C. P.; Ford, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The success of belatacept in late-stage clinical trials inaugurates the arrival of a new class of immunosuppressants based on costimulatory blockade, an immunosuppression strategy that disrupts essential signals required for alloreactive T cell activation. Despite having improved renal function, kidney transplant recipients treated with belatacept experienced increased rates of acute rejection. This finding has renewed focus on costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and specifically the role of alloreactive memory T cells in mediating this resistance. To study mechanisms of costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and enhance the clinical efficacy of costimulatory blockade, we developed an experimental transplant system that models a donor-specific memory CD8+ T cell response. After confirming that graft-specific memory T cells mediate costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection, we characterized the role of integrins in this rejection. The resistance of memory T cells to costimulatory blockade was abrogated when costimulatory blockade was coupled with either anti-VLA-4 or anti-LFA-1. Mechanistic studies revealed that in the presence of costimulatory blockade, anti-VLA-4 impaired T cell trafficking to the graft but not memory T cell recall effector function, whereas anti-LFA-1 attenuated both trafficking and memory recall effector function. As antagonists against these integrins are clinically approved, these findings may have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:21942986

  13. Kupffer Cells Support Hepatitis B Virus-Mediated CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion via Hepatitis B Core Antigen-TLR2 Interactions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Sun, Rui; Xu, Long; Yin, Wenwei; Chen, Yongyan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Lian, Zhexiong; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence is a fundamental process in chronic HBV infection and a key factor in all related liver diseases; however, the mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. We studied the role of TLR2 in HBV persistence using a well-established HBV-carrier mouse model generated by hydrodynamically injecting a phospho-adeno-associated virus/HBV1.2 plasmid into mice. We found that a genetic deficiency in TLR2 improves HBV elimination, whereas activating TLR2 led to more stable HBV persistence, suggesting that TLR2 activation is critical in HBV persistence. Furthermore, we noted that TLR2 activation could inhibit CD8(+) T cell function, causing the exhaustion phenotype in HBV-carrier mice, because TLR2 deficiency might rescue CD8(+) T cell function in a cellular adoptive experiment. TLR2 expression on Kupffer cells (KCs) was upregulated in HBV-carrier mice, which accounts for HBV persistence, because the difference in anti-HBV immunity between HBV-carrier wild-type and Tlr2(-/-) mice did not exist after KC depletion. In addition, similar to TLR2 deficiency, after KC depletion, CD8(+) T cells were more efficiently activated in HBV-carrier mice, leading to rapid HBV elimination. KCs produced more IL-10 upon TLR2 activation in response to direct hepatitis B core Ag stimulation, and the elevated IL-10 inhibited CD8(+) T cell function in HBV-carrier mice, because IL-10 deficiency or anti-IL-10R treatment resulted in CD8(+) T cells with stronger antiviral function. In conclusion, KCs support liver tolerance by inducing anti-HBV CD8(+) T cell exhaustion via IL-10 production after TLR2 activation by hepatitis B core Ag stimulation. PMID:26304988

  14. Stereological assessment of sexual dimorphism in the rat liver reveals differences in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells but not hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ricardo; Lopes, Célia; Malhão, Fernanda; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Fonseca, Sónia; Lima, Margarida; Gebhardt, Rolf; Rocha, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    There is long-standing evidence that male and female rat livers differ in enzyme activity. More recently, differences in gene expression profiling have also been found to exist; however, it is still unclear whether there is morphological expression of male/female differences in the normal liver. Such differences could help to explain features seen at the pathological level, such as the greater regenerative potential generally attributed to the female liver. In this paper, hepatocytes (HEP), Kupffer cells (KC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC) of male and female rats were examined to investigate hypothesised differences in number, volume and spatial co-localisation of these cell types. Immunohistochemistry and design-based stereology were used to estimate total numbers, numbers per gram and mean cell volumes. The position of HSC within lobules (periportal vs. centrilobular) and their spatial proximity to KC was also assessed. In addition, flow cytometry was used to investigate the liver ploidy. In the case of HEP and KC, differences in the measured cell parameters were observed between male and female specimens; however, no such differences were detected for HSC. Female samples contained a higher number of HEP per gram, with more binucleate cells. The HEP nuclei were smaller in females, which was coincident with more abundant diploid particles in these animals. The female liver also had a greater number of KC per gram, with a lower percentage of KC in the vicinity of HSC compared with males. In this study, we document hitherto unknown morphological sexual dimorphism in the rat liver, namely in HEP and KC. These differences may account for the higher regenerative potential of the female liver and lend weight to the argument for considering the rat liver as a sexually dimorphic organ. PMID:26892301

  15. Kupffer cells potentiate liver sinusoidal endothelial cell injury in sepsis by ligating programmed cell death ligand-1

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Noelle A.; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yvonne; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Ayala, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    PD-1 and PD-L1 have been reported to provide peripheral tolerance by inhibiting TCR-mediated activation. We have reported that PD-L1−/− animals are protected from sepsis-induced mortality and immune suppression. Whereas studies indicate that LSECs normally express PD-L1, which is also thought to maintain local immune liver tolerance by ligating the receptor PD-1 on T lymphocytes, the role of PD-L1 in the septic liver remains unknown. Thus, we hypothesized initially that PD-L1 expression on LSECs protects them from sepsis-induced injury. We noted that the increased vascular permeability and pSTAT3 protein expression in whole liver from septic animals were attenuated in the absence of PD-L1. Isolated LSECs taken from septic animals, which exhibited increased cell death, declining cell numbers, reduced cellular proliferation, and VEGFR2 expression (an angiogenesis marker), also showed improved cell numbers, proliferation, and percent VEGFR2+ levels in the absence of PD-L1. We also observed that sepsis induced an increase of liver F4/80+PD-1+-expressing KCs and increased PD-L1 expression on LSECs. Interestingly, PD-L1 expression levels on LSECs decreased when PD-1+-expressing KCs were depleted with clodronate liposomes. Contrary to our original hypothesis, we document here that increased interactions between PD-1+ KCs and PD-L1+ LSECs appear to lead to the decline of normal endothelial function—essential to sustain vascular integrity and prevent ALF. Importantly, we uncover an underappreciated pathological aspect of PD-1:PD-L1 ligation during inflammation that is independent of its normal, immune-suppressive activity. PMID:23766529

  16. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  17. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  18. Facilitating T Cell Infiltration in Tumor Microenvironment Overcomes Resistance to PD-L1 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haidong; Wang, Yang; Chlewicki, Lukasz K; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Jingya; Liang, Wei; Wang, Jieyi; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-03-14

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapies fail to induce responses in the majority of cancer patients, so how to increase the objective response rate becomes an urgent challenge. Here, we demonstrate that sufficient T cell infiltration in tumor tissues is a prerequisite for response to PD-L1 blockade. Targeting tumors with tumor necrosis factor superfamily member LIGHT activates lymphotoxin β-receptor signaling, leading to the production of chemokines that recruit massive numbers of T cells. Furthermore, targeting non-T cell-inflamed tumor tissues by antibody-guided LIGHT creates a T cell-inflamed microenvironment and overcomes tumor resistance to checkpoint blockade. Our data indicate that targeting LIGHT might be a potent strategy to increase the responses to checkpoint blockades and other immunotherapies in non-T cell-inflamed tumors. PMID:26977880

  19. Time course investigation of PPAR{alpha}- and Kupffer cell-dependent effects of WY-14,643 in mouse liver using microarray gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Courtney G.; Kosyk, Oksana; Bradford, Blair U.; Ross, Pamela K.; Burns, Amanda M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Qu Pingping; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2007-12-15

    Administration of peroxisome proliferators to rodents causes proliferation of peroxisomes, induction of {beta}-oxidation enzymes, hepatocellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, with chronic exposure ultimately leading to hepatocellular carcinomas. Many responses associated with peroxisome proliferators are nuclear receptor-mediated events involving peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}). A role for nuclear receptor-independent events has also been shown, with evidence of Kupffer cell-mediated free radical production, presumably through NAPDH oxidase, induction of redox-sensitive transcription factors involved in cytokine production and cytokine-mediated cell replication following acute treatment with peroxisome proliferators in rodents. Recent studies have demonstrated, by using p47{sup phox}-null mice which are deficient in NADPH oxidase, that this enzyme is not related to the phenotypic events caused by prolonged administration of peroxisome proliferators. In an effort to determine the timing of the transition from Kupffer cell-to PPAR{alpha}-dependent modulation of peroxisome proliferator effects, gene expression was assessed in liver from Ppar{alpha}-null, p47{sup phox}-null and corresponding wild-type mice following treatment with 4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-pyrimidynylthioacetic acid (WY-14,643) for 8 h, 24 h, 72 h, 1 week or 4 weeks. WY-14,643-induced gene expression in p47{sup phox}-null mouse liver differed substantially from wild-type mice at acute doses and striking differences in baseline expression of immune related genes were evident. Pathway mapping of genes that respond to WY-14,643 in a time- and dose-dependent manner demonstrates suppression of immune response, cell death and signal transduction and promotion of lipid metabolism, cell cycle and DNA repair. Furthermore, these pathways were largely dependent on PPAR{alpha}, not NADPH oxidase demonstrating a temporal shift in response to peroxisome proliferators. Overall, this

  20. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI

    PubMed Central

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L.; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K.; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 106 cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production. PMID:26491234

  1. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 10(6) cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production. PMID:26491234

  2. Kupffer cell inactivation by carbon monoxide bound to red blood cells preserves hepatic cytochrome P450 via anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects exerted through the HMGB1/TLR-4 pathway during resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Shigeru; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Maeda, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishima, Yu; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2015-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions for controlling hemorrhaging induce systemic ischemia reperfusion, resulting in a decrease in hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels. Carbon monoxide (CO), when bound to red blood cells (CO-RBC) has the potential to protect the hepatic CYP protein to produce a resuscitative effect in a hemorrhagic shock rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which CO-RBC resuscitation from a massive hemorrhage protects against a decrease in hepatic CYP. In the early phase (∼1h) after a hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, hepatic CYP protein levels were significantly decreased with increasing hepatic free heme levels, but were maintained by a pre-treatment of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a Kupffer cell inhibitor, and Trolox, an anti-oxidant agent, as well as CO-RBC resuscitation. Under these conditions, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from activated Kupffer cells was increased, but this increase was suppressed by CO-RBC resuscitation. At a late phase (6∼24h), CYP mRNA levels decreased after hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, but not in the case of CO-RBC resuscitation. The increases in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels were decreased by CO-RBC resuscitation via the suppression of the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) and the expression of the high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1). Hepatic CYP protection after a hemorrhage and CO-RBC resuscitation can be attributed to the inactivation of Kupffer cells, resulting in the suppression of ROS production in the early phase and the suppression of inflammatory cytokine production via the TLR-4/HMGB-1signal pathway in the late phase. PMID:26232728

  3. Kupffer cell depletion attenuates leptin-mediated methoxamine-stimulated portal perfusion pressure and thromboxane A2 release in a rodent model of NASH-cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Yi-Tsau; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lee, Shou-Dong; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2012-12-01

    Cirrhotic portal hypertension is characterized by increased hepatic oxidative stress, AA (arachidonic acid)-derived TXA(2) (thromboxane A(2)) release and exaggerated hepatic response to the α-adrenergic agonist MTX (methoxamine). Besides promoting hepatic fibrosis, the role of hyperleptinaemia in the modulation of vascular response in NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) rat livers remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to explore the possible links between hyperleptinaemia and the disarrangement in the hepatic microcirculation. NASH-cirrhosis with hyperleptinaemia was induced in lean rats by feeding with an HF/MCD (high-fat/methionine-choline-deficient) diet. Portal haemodynamics, various substances, protein and mRNA expression and PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acid) composition were measured. Finally, the effects of leptin pre-infusion on TXA(2) release and concentration-PPP (portal perfusion pressure) curves in response to MTX were evaluated by simultaneously pre-treatment with the Kupffer cell inactivators GdCl(3) (gadolinium chloride) or EC (encapsulated clodronate), the TXS (TXA(2) synthase) inhibitor furegrelate, the TP receptor (TXA(2) receptor) antagonist SQ29548 and the dual TXS/TP receptor antagonist BM567. In HF/MCD+leptin-lean rats, cirrhosis-induced PPP and MTX hyper-responsiveness were associated with increased hepatic TXA(2) production, TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances) levels and the AA (arachidonic acid)/n-3 PUFA ratio, and up-regulation of hepatic leptin, FAS (fatty acid synthase), NADPH oxidase subunits, TXS, TP receptor, TGFβ(1) (transforming growth factor β(1)) proteins and mRNAs. Pre-infusion of leptin significantly enhanced MTX-stimulated PPP elevation and TXA(2) release, which were attenuated by GdCl(3) and EC pre-treatment. Concomitantly pre-incubation with BM567, but not furegrelate or SQ29548, significantly abolished the leptin-enhanced MTX-stimulated increase in PPP in NASH-cirrhotic rats. Hyperleptinaemia

  4. Subanesthetic Isoflurane Reduces Zymosan-Induced Inflammation in Murine Kupffer Cells by Inhibiting ROS-Activated p38 MAPK/NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Lei; Li, Nan-lin; Li, Jun-tang; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ya-li; Wang, Ling; Yi, Jun; Wang, Ling; Bian, Jie-fang; Chen, Jiang-hao; Yuan, Shi-fang; Wang, Ting; Lv, Yong-gang; Liu, Ning-ning; Zhu, Xiao-shan; Ling, Rui; Yun, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Volatile anesthetic isoflurane (ISO) has immunomodulatory effects. The fungal component zymosan (ZY) induces inflammation through toll-like receptor 2 or dectin-1 signaling. We investigated the molecular actions of subanesthetic (0.7%) ISO against ZY-induced inflammatory activation in murine Kupffer cells (KCs), which are known as the resident macrophages within the liver. We observed that ISO reduced ZY-induced cyclooxygenase 2 upregulation and prostaglandin E2 release, as determined by western blot and radioimmunoassay, respectively. ISO also reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, IL-6, high-mobility group box-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. ISO blocked the ZY-induced nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor- (NF)-κB p65. Moreover, ISO attenuated ZY-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation partly by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS); the interregulation that ROS activated p38 MAPK followed by NF-κB activation was crucial for the ZY-induced inflammatory responses in KCs. An in vivo study by peritoneal injection of ZY into BALB/C mice confirmed the anti-inflammatory properties of 0.7% ISO against ZY in KCs. These results suggest that ISO ameliorates ZY-induced inflammatory responses in murine KCs by inhibiting the interconnected ROS/p38 MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:25147596

  5. Chronic Ethanol Feeding Modulates Inflammatory Mediators, Activation of Nuclear Factor-κB, and Responsiveness to Endotoxin in Murine Kupffer Cells and Circulating Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, Elsie; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κBEGFP reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner. PMID:24623963

  6. Effects of the in vitro administered ethanol and lipopolysaccharide toxin on membrane properties, intracellular free calcium and phagocytic function of isolated rat kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Victorov, A.; Smith, T.; Abril, E.; Hamlin, E.; Earnest, D. )

    1991-03-11

    Low concentrations of ethanol slightly stimulated phagocytosis of cultured Kupffer cells (KC), producing practically no effect on membrane microviscosity and cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}. On the contrary, high concentrations of ethanol significantly suppressed phagocytic function, increased fluidity of membrane lipids and caused a sustained rise in (Ca{sup 2}){sub i}; above the resting level of 41-85 nM. Treatment of KC with colchicine and cytochalasin B dramatically destructurized the plasma membrane lipids. Short term preincubation of KC with high doses of alcohol stimulated the disordering effects of both drugs, suggesting direct interaction of ethanol with microtubule and microfilament structures. The authors hypothesize that ethanol impairs phagocytosis of KC by concerted actions on membrane lipid fluidity, cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} and functioning of cytoskeleton. On the other hand, incubation of KC with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced no changes in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}; or plasma membrane fluidity but reduced by several fold the fluidizing effect of subsequently added ethanol. They suggested that low doses of LPS, by activating second messengers other than Ca{sup 2+}, alter the functioning of the cytoskeleton and cause reorganization of the plasma membrane thus making KC membranes more resistent to the fluidizing action of ethanol and partially restoring the phagocytic function.

  7. Chronic ethanol feeding modulates inflammatory mediators, activation of nuclear factor-κB, and responsiveness to endotoxin in murine Kupffer cells and circulating leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Maraslioglu, Miriam; Oppermann, Elsie; Blattner, Carolin; Weber, Roxane; Henrich, Dirk; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo; Lehnert, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κB(EGFP) reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1 β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner. PMID:24623963

  8. Mercury-Selenium Relationships in Liver of Guiana Dolphin: The Possible Role of Kupffer Cells in the Detoxification Process by Tiemannite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lailson-Brito, José; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Andrade, Leonardo; Azevedo, Alexandre de Freitas; Fragoso, Ana Bernadete; Vidal, Lara Gama; Costa, Marianna Badini; Bisi, Tatiana Lemos; Almeida, Ronaldo; Carvalho, Dario Pires; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Top marine predators present high mercury concentrations in their tissues as consequence of biomagnification of the most toxic form of this metal, methylmercury (MeHg). The present study concerns mercury accumulation by Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis), highlighting the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Liver samples from 19 dolphins incidentally captured within Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil) from 1994 to 2006 were analyzed for total mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), total organic mercury (TOrgHg) and selenium (Se). X-ray microanalyses were also performed. The specimens, including from fetuses to 30-year-old dolphins, comprising 8 females and 11 males, presented high THg (0.53–132 µg/g wet wt.) and Se concentrations (0.17–74.8 µg/g wet wt.). Correlations between THg, MeHg, TOrgHg and Se were verified with age (p<0.05), as well as a high and positive correlation was observed between molar concentrations of Hg and Se (p<0.05). Negative correlations were observed between THg and the percentage of MeHg contribution to THg (p<0.05), which represents a consequence of the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Accumulation of Se-Hg amorphous crystals in Kupffer Cells was demonstrated through ultra-structural analysis, which shows that Guiana dolphin is capable of carrying out the demethylation process via mercury selenide formation. PMID:22860072

  9. Mercury-selenium relationships in liver of Guiana dolphin: the possible role of Kupffer cells in the detoxification process by tiemannite formation.

    PubMed

    Lailson-Brito, José; Cruz, Renato; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Andrade, Leonardo; Azevedo, Alexandre de Freitas; Fragoso, Ana Bernadete; Vidal, Lara Gama; Costa, Marianna Badini; Bisi, Tatiana Lemos; Almeida, Ronaldo; Carvalho, Dario Pires; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Top marine predators present high mercury concentrations in their tissues as consequence of biomagnification of the most toxic form of this metal, methylmercury (MeHg). The present study concerns mercury accumulation by Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis), highlighting the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Liver samples from 19 dolphins incidentally captured within Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil) from 1994 to 2006 were analyzed for total mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), total organic mercury (TOrgHg) and selenium (Se). X-ray microanalyses were also performed. The specimens, including from fetuses to 30-year-old dolphins, comprising 8 females and 11 males, presented high THg (0.53-132 µg/g wet wt.) and Se concentrations (0.17-74.8 µg/g wet wt.). Correlations between THg, MeHg, TOrgHg and Se were verified with age (p<0.05), as well as a high and positive correlation was observed between molar concentrations of Hg and Se (p<0.05). Negative correlations were observed between THg and the percentage of MeHg contribution to THg (p<0.05), which represents a consequence of the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Accumulation of Se-Hg amorphous crystals in Kupffer Cells was demonstrated through ultra-structural analysis, which shows that Guiana dolphin is capable of carrying out the demethylation process via mercury selenide formation. PMID:22860072

  10. Mononuclear cell complement receptor blockade in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aghbar, M N; Neuberger, J; Williams, R; Eddleston, A L

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood monocyte and lymphocyte receptors for Fc and C3b fragments were examined in vitro in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases using sheep red blood cells coated with anti-SRBC IgG1 (to detect Fc receptors) and with anti-SRBC IgM and complement (to detect C3b receptors). The number of C3b receptors detected on 100 monocytes was significantly lower in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (23.0 +/- 12.0, mean +/- 1 SD) compared with normal controls (57.4 +/- 16.9) and other chronic liver disease (HBsAg negative chronic active hepatitis 62.0 +/- 17.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 50.9 +/- 4.0), while the number of Fc receptors detected on 100 monocytes was not significantly different in all the groups (primary biliary cirrhosis 72.8 +/- 28.6, chronic active hepatitis 74.7 +/- 14.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 58.0 +/- 13.5 and normal controls 69.6 +/- 19.9). When mononuclear cells isolated from normal individuals were pre-incubated with serum from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis before testing their receptor function there was a significant reduction in the number of C3b receptors detected per 100 monocytes (27.6 +/- 10.8) compared with pre-incubation with normal serum (72.0 +/- 18.0). This reduction in C3b-receptor function was again observed when the serum used for pre-incubation was depleted of circulating immune complexes; but when complement was further depleted from these sera, the number of C3b-receptors detected after pre-incubation was similar to normal values (64.0 +/- 11.8). Lymphocyte receptors showed a similar pattern of results. This implies a specific C3b receptor blockade on monocytes and lymphocytes from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis which appears to be because of blocking by serum factor(s) including complement fragments. PMID:3155513

  11. PD-L1 blockade synergizes with IL-2 therapy in reinvigorating exhausted T cells

    PubMed Central

    West, Erin E.; Jin, Hyun-Tak; Rasheed, Ata-Ur; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Ha, Sang-Jun; Tan, Wendy G.; Youngblood, Ben; Freeman, Gordon J.; Smith, Kendall A.; Ahmed, Rafi

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory receptor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) plays a major role in functional exhaustion of T cells during chronic infections and cancer, and recent clinical data suggest that blockade of the PD-1 pathway is an effective immunotherapy in treating certain cancers. Thus, it is important to define combinatorial approaches that increase the efficacy of PD-1 blockade. To address this issue, we examined the effect of IL-2 and PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade in the mouse model of chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. We found that low-dose IL-2 administration alone enhanced CD8+ T cell responses in chronically infected mice. IL-2 treatment also decreased inhibitory receptor levels on virus-specific CD8+ T cells and increased expression of CD127 and CD44, resulting in a phenotype resembling that of memory T cells. Surprisingly, IL-2 therapy had only a minimal effect on reducing viral load. However, combining IL-2 treatment with blockade of the PD-1 inhibitory pathway had striking synergistic effects in enhancing virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses and decreasing viral load. Interestingly, this reduction in viral load occurred despite increased numbers of Tregs. These results suggest that combined IL-2 therapy and PD-L1 blockade merits consideration as a regimen for treating human chronic infections and cancer. PMID:23676462

  12. CTLA-4 blockade plus adoptive T cell transfer promotes optimal melanoma immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mahvi, David A.; Meyers, Justin V.; Tatar, Andrew J.; Contreras, Amanda; Suresh, M.; Leverson, Glen E.; Sen, Siddhartha; Cho, Clifford S.

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to the treatment of advanced melanoma have relied on strategies that augment the responsiveness of endogenous tumor-specific T cell populations (e.g., CTLA-4 blockade-mediated checkpoint inhibition) or introduce exogenously-prepared tumor-specific T cell populations (e.g., adoptive cell transfer). Although both approaches have shown considerable promise, response rates to these therapies remain suboptimal. We hypothesized that a combinatorial approach to immunotherapy using both CTLA-4 blockade and non-lymphodepletional adoptive cell transfer could offer additive therapeutic benefit. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with syngeneic B16F10 melanoma tumors transfected to express low levels of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus peptide GP33 (B16GP33), and treated with no immunotherapy, CTLA-4 blockade, adoptive cell transfer, or combination immunotherapy of CTLA-4 blockade with adoptive cell transfer. Combination immunotherapy resulted in optimal control of B16GP33 melanoma tumors. Combination immunotherapy promoted a stronger local immune response reflected by enhanced tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte populations, as well as a stronger systemic immune responses reflected by more potent tumor antigen-specific T cell activity in splenocytes. In addition, whereas both CTLA-4 blockade and combination immunotherapy were able to promote long-term immunity against B16GP33 tumors, only combination immunotherapy was capable of promoting immunity against parental B16F10 tumors as well. Our findings suggest that a combinatorial approach using CTLA-4 blockade with non-lymphodepletional adoptive cell transfer may promote additive endogenous and exogenous T cell activities that enable greater therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25658614

  13. CD47 Blockade Triggers T cell-mediated Destruction of Immunogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Pu, Yang; Cron, Kyle; Deng, Liufu; Kline, Justin; Frazier, William A.; Xu, Hairong; Peng, Hua; Fu, Yang-Xin; Xu, Meng Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells mediated by CD47-specific blocking antibodies has been proposed to be the major effector mechanism in xenograft models. Using syngeneic immunocompetent tumor models, we reveal that in the therapeutic effects of CD47 blockade depend on dendritic cell (DC) but not macrophage cross-priming of T cell responses in immunocompetent mice. The therapeutic effects of anti-CD47 antibody therapy were abrogated in T cell-deficient mice. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of CD47 blockade required expression of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, but neither MyD88 nor TRIF, in CD11c+ cells, suggesting that cytosolic sensing of DNA from tumor cells is enhanced by anti-CD47 treatment, further bridging the innate and adaptive responses. Notably, the timing of administration of standard chemotherapy markedly impacted the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses by CD47 blockade. Together, our findings indicate that CD47 blockade drives T cell-mediated elimination of immunogenic tumors. PMID:26322579

  14. C5a anaphylatoxin as a product of complement activation up-regulates the complement inhibitory factor H in rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Schlaf, Gerald; Nitzki, Frauke; Heine, Ines; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Schieferdecker, Henrike L; Götze, Otto

    2004-11-01

    The 155-kDa complement regulator factor H (FH) is the predominant soluble regulatory protein of the complement system. It acts as a cofactor for the factor I-mediated conversion of the component C3b to iC3b, competes with factor B for a binding site on C3b and C3(H2O) and promotes the dissociation of the C3bBb complex. The primary site of synthesis is the liver, i.e. FH-specific mRNA and protein were identified in both hepatocytes (HC) and Kupffer cells (KC). Previous studies in rat primary HC and KC had shown that the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma influences the balance between activation and inhibition of the complement system through up-regulation of the inhibitory FH. In this study we show that C5a, as a product of complement activation, stimulates the expression of FH-specific mRNA and protein in KC and thus induces a negative feedback. Quantitative-competitive RT-PCR showed an approximate threefold C5a-induced up-regulation of FH. ELISA analyses revealed a corresponding increase in FH protein in the supernatants of KC. The up-regulation of FH was completely inhibited by the C5a-blocking monoclonal antibody 6-9F. Furthermore, an involvement of LPS and IFN-gamma was excluded, which strongly indicates a direct effect of C5a on the expression of FH in KC. PMID:15376195

  15. Kupffer-cell-expressed transmembrane TNF-α is a major contributor to lipopolysaccharide and D-galactosamine-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Zhou, Wenjing; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Meng; Jiang, Yaping; Jiang, Rui; Ba, Hongping; Li, Cheng; Wang, Jing; Yin, Bingjiao; Gong, Feili; Li, Zhuoya

    2016-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α exists in two bioactive forms, a 26-kDa transmembrane form (tmTNF-α) and a 17-kDa soluble form (sTNF-α). sTNF-α has been recognized as a key regulator of hepatitis; however, serum sTNF-α disappears in mice during the development of severe liver injury, and high levels of serum sTNF-α do not necessarily result in liver damage. Interestingly, in a mouse model of acute hepatitis, we have found that tmTNF-α expression on Kupffer cells (KCs) significantly increases when mice develop severe liver injury caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-gal), and the level of tmTNF-α expression is positively related to the activity of serum transaminases. Therefore, we hypothesized that KC-expressed tmTNF-α constitutes a pathomechanism in hepatitis and have explored the role of tmTNF-α in this disease model. Here, we have compared the impact of KCs(tmTNFlow) and KCs(tmTNFhigh) on acute hepatitis in vivo and ex vivo and have further demonstrated that KCs(tmTNFhigh), rather than KCs(tmTNFlow), not only exhibit an imbalance in secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, favoring inflammatory response and exacerbating liver injury, but also induce hepatocellular apoptosis via tmTNF-α and the expression of another pro-apoptotic factor, Fas ligand. Our data suggest that KC(tmTNFhigh) is a major contributor to liver injury in LPS/D-gal-induced hepatitis. PMID:26267221

  16. Survivin blockade sensitizes rhabdomyosarcoma cells for lysis by fetal acetylcholine receptor-redirected T cells.

    PubMed

    Simon-Keller, Katja; Paschen, Annette; Hombach, Andreas A; Ströbel, Philipp; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Vincent, Angela; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Hoppe, Florian; Leuschner, Ivo; Stegmaier, Sabine; Koscielniak, Ewa; Leverkus, Martin; Altieri, Dario C; Abken, Hinrich; Marx, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Cellular immunotherapy may provide a strategy to overcome the poor prognosis of metastatic and recurrent rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) under the current regimen of polychemotherapy. Because little is known about resistance mechanisms of RMS to cytotoxic T cells, we investigated RMS cell lines and biopsy specimens for expression and function of immune costimulatory receptors and anti-apoptotic molecules by RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, IHC, and cytotoxicity assays using siRNA or transfection-modified RMS cell lines, together with engineered RMS-directed cytotoxic T cells specific for the fetal acetylcholine receptor. We found that costimulatory CD80 and CD86 were consistently absent from all RMSs tested, whereas inducible T-cell co-stimulator ligand (ICOS-L; alias B7H2) was expressed by a subset of RMSs and was inducible by tumor necrosis factor α in two of five RMS cell lines. Anti-apoptotic survivin, along with other inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family members (cIAP1, cIAP2, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein), was overexpressed by RMS cell lines and biopsy specimens. Down-regulation of survivin by siRNA or pharmacologically in RMS cells increased their susceptibility toward a T-cell attack, whereas induction of ICOS-L did not. Treatment of RMS-bearing Rag(-/-) mice with fetal acetylcholine receptor-specific chimeric T cells delayed xenograft growth; however, this happened without definitive tumor eradication. Combined blockade of survivin and application of chimeric T cells in vivo suppressed tumor proliferation during survivin inhibition. In conclusion, survivin blockade provides a strategy to sensitize RMS cells for T-cell-based therapy. PMID:23562272

  17. Blockade of the Programmed Death-1 Pathway Restores Sarcoidosis CD4+ T-Cell Proliferative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Nicole A.; Celada, Lindsay J.; Herazo-Maya, Jose D.; Abraham, Susamma; Shaginurova, Guzel; Sevin, Carla M.; Grutters, Jan; Culver, Daniel A.; Dworski, Ryszard; Sheller, James; Massion, Pierre P.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Johnson, Joyce E.; Kaminski, Naftali; Wilkes, David S.; Oswald-Richter, Kyra A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Effective therapeutic interventions for chronic, idiopathic lung diseases remain elusive. Normalized T-cell function is an important contributor to spontaneous resolution of pulmonary sarcoidosis. Up-regulation of inhibitor receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand, PD-L1, are important inhibitors of T-cell function. Objectives: To determine the effects of PD-1 pathway blockade on sarcoidosis CD4+ T-cell proliferative capacity. Methods: Gene expression profiles of sarcoidosis and healthy control peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analyzed at baseline and follow-up. Flow cytometry was used to measure ex vivo expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 on systemic and bronchoalveolar lavage–derived cells of subjects with sarcoidosis and control subjects, as well as the effects of PD-1 pathway blockade on cellular proliferation after T-cell receptor stimulation. Immunohistochemistry analysis for PD-1/PD-L1 expression was conducted on sarcoidosis, malignant, and healthy control lung specimens. Measurements and Main Results: Microarray analysis demonstrates longitudinal increase in PDCD1 gene expression in sarcoidosis peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed increased PD-L1 expression within sarcoidosis granulomas and lung malignancy, but this was absent in healthy lungs. Increased numbers of sarcoidosis PD-1+ CD4+ T cells are present systemically, compared with healthy control subjects (P < 0.0001). Lymphocytes with reduced proliferative capacity exhibited increased proliferation with PD-1 pathway blockade. Longitudinal analysis of subjects with sarcoidosis revealed reduced PD-1+ CD4+ T cells with spontaneous clinical resolution but not with disease progression. Conclusions: Analogous to the effects in other chronic lung diseases, these findings demonstrate that the PD-1 pathway is an important contributor to sarcoidosis CD4+ T-cell proliferative capacity and clinical outcome. Blockade of the PD-1 pathway may be a

  18. Blockade of β-cell KATP channels by the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Charles E.; Kim, Wook; Liu, Qing-Rong; Lupica, Carl R.; Doyle, Máire E

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been demonstrated to be active in the pancreatic β-cell. However the effects of the endocannabinoids (ECs) on insulin secretion are not well defined and may vary depending on the metabolic state of the β-cell. Specifically it is not known whether the effects of the ECs occur by activation of the cannabinoid receptors or via their direct interaction with the ion channels of the β-cell. To begin to delineate the effects of ECs on β-cell function, we examined how the EC, 2-AG influences β-cell ion channels in the absence of glucose stimulation. The mouse insulinoma cell line R7T1 was used to survey the effects of 2-AG on the high voltage activated (HVA) calcium, the delayed rectifier (Kv), and the ATP-sensitive K (KATP) channels by whole cell patch clamp recording. At 2 mM glucose, 2-AG inhibited the HVA calcium (the majority of which are L-type channels), Kv, and KATP channels. The channel exhibiting the most sensitivity to 2-AG blockade was the KATP channel, where the IC50 for 2-AG was 1μM. Pharmacological agents revealed that the blockade of all these channels was independent of cannabinoid receptors. Our results provide a mechanism for the previous observations that CB1R agonists increase insulin secretion at low glucose concentrations through CB1R independent blockade of the KATP channel. PMID:22609205

  19. Autoregulation by eicosanoids of human Kupffer cell secretory products. A study of interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta, and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Roland, C R; Goss, J A; Mangino, M J; Hafenrichter, D; Flye, M W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Methods employed previously to analyze the secretory behavior of rodent Kupffer cells (KC) were used to examine the human KC's secretory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: As the resident hepatic macrophage, the KC resides at the interface between the portal and systemic circulations. Consequently, this cell may play an integral role in the immune response to antigens and bacteria in the sinusoid. Study of cytokine production by the KC has relied predominantly on the rat as the source of these cells. Whether human KCs respond similarly to rat KCs after LPS stimulation has been a matter of speculation. METHODS: Kupffer cells obtained from seven human livers were tested under conditions identical to those used to study rat KCs. Kupffer cells rested for 12 hours after isolation were stimulated with LPS (2.5 micrograms/mL). Arginine concentration in the culture medium varied from 0.01 to 1.2 mM. To examine the role of eicosanoids, parallel culture wells received indomethacin (10 microM). Culture supernatants were assayed for interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and nitric oxide. RESULTS: Similar to the rat KC, LPS-stimulated human KCs released IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, and PGE2. However, unlike rat KCs, nitric oxide could not be detected, regardless of whether the human KCs were exposed to LPS, interferon-gamma (INF-gamma), or LPS + IFN-gamma. Similar to rat KCs, indomethacin prevented PGE2 release while significantly upregulating TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6, but not TGF-beta, consistent with an autoregulatory control of eicosanoids over proinflammatory cytokines. As has been shown in the rat, physiologic levels of L-arginine (0.01 mM) significantly enhanced LPS-induced PGE2 secretion relative to the response in medium containing standard L-arginine concentration (1.2 mM); however, unlike the rat KC, the human

  20. Blockade of maitotoxin-induced oncotic cell death reveals zeiosis

    PubMed Central

    Estacion, Mark; Schilling, William P

    2002-01-01

    Background Maitotoxin (MTX) initiates cell death by sequentially activating 1) Ca2+ influx via non-selective cation channels, 2) uptake of vital dyes via formation of large pores, and 3) release of lactate dehydrogenase, an indication of cell lysis. MTX also causes formation of membrane blebs, which dramatically dilate during the cytolysis phase. To determine the role of phospholipase C (PLC) in the cell death cascade, U73122, a specific inhibitor of PLC, and U73343, an inactive analog, were examined on MTX-induced responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Results Addition of either U73122 or U73343, prior to MTX, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cell death cascade (IC50 ≈ 1.9 and 0.66 μM, respectively) suggesting that the effect of these agents was independent of PLC. Addition of U73343 shortly after MTX, prevented or attenuated the effects of the toxin, but addition at later times had little or no effect. Time-lapse videomicroscopy showed that U73343 dramatically altered the blebbing profile of MTX-treated cells. Specifically, U73343 blocked bleb dilation and converted the initial blebbing event into "zeiosis", a type of membrane blebbing commonly associated with apoptosis. Cells challenged with MTX and rescued by subsequent addition of U73343, showed enhanced caspase-3 activity 48 hr after the initial insult, consistent with activation of the apoptotic program. Conclusions Within minutes of MTX addition, endothelial cells die by oncosis. Rescue by addition of U73343 shortly after MTX showed that a small percentage of cells are destined to die by oncosis, but that a larger percentage survive; cells that survive the initial insult exhibit zeiosis and may ultimately die by apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:11825342

  1. Stromal cell-derived CSF-1 blockade prolongs xenograft survival of CSF-1-negative neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Dietmar; Zins, Karin; Sioud, Mouldy; Lucas, Trevor; Schäfer, Romana; Stanley, E. Richard; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of tumor–host interactions that render neuroblastoma (NB) cells highly invasive are unclear. Cancer cells upregulate host stromal cell colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) production to recruit tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and accelerate tumor growth by affecting extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. By coculturing NB with stromal cells in vitro, we showed the importance of host CSF-1 expression for macrophage recruitment to NB cells. To examine this interaction in NB in vivo, mice bearing human CSF-1-expressing SK-N-AS and CSF-1-negative SK-NDZ NB xenografts were treated with intratumoral injections of small interfering RNAs directed against mouse CSF-1. Significant suppression of both SK-N-AS and SK-N-DZ NB growth by these treatments was associated with decreased TAM infiltration, matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-12 levels and angiogenesis compared to controls, while expression of tissue inhibitors of MMPs increased following mouse CSF-1 blockade. Furthermore, Tie-2-positive and -negative TAMs recruited by host CSF-1 were identified in NB tumor tissue by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. However, host-CSF-1 blockade prolonged survival only in CSF-1-negative SK-N-DZ NB. These studies demonstrated that increased CSF-1 production by host cells enhances TAM recruitment and NB growth and that the CSF-1 phenotype of NB tumor cells adversely affects survival. PMID:19711348

  2. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  3. [THE EXCESS OF PALMITIC FATTY ACID IN FOOD AS MAIN CAUSE OF LIPOIDOSIS OF INSULIN-DEPENDENT CELLS: SKELETAL MYOCYTES, CARDIO-MYOCYTES, PERIPORTAL HEPATOCYTES, KUPFFER MACROPHAGES AND B-CELLS OF PANCREAS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-02-01

    In phylogenesis, becoming of biologicalfunctions and biological reactions proceeds with the purpose ofpermanent increasing of "kinetic perfection ". The main role belongs to factors ofphysical, chemical and biological kinetics, their evaluation using systemic approach technique under permanent effect of natural selection. The late-in-phylogenesis insulin, proceeded with, in development of biological function of locomotion, specialization of insulin-dependent cells: skeletal myocytes, syncytium of cardiomyocytes, subcutaneous adipocytes, periportal hepatocytes, Kupffer's macrophages and β-cells of islets of pancreas. The insulin initiated formation of new, late in phylogenesis, large pool of fatty cells-subcutaneous adipocytes that increased kinetic parameters of biological function of locomotion. In realization of biological function of locomotion only adipocytes absorb exogenous mono unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in the form of triglycerides in composition of oleic and palmitic lipoproteins of very low density using apoE/B-100 endocytosis. The rest of insulin-dependent cells absorb fatty acids in the form of unesterified fatty acids from associates with albumin and under effect of CD36 of translocase offatty acids. The insulin in all insulin-depended cells inhibits biological reaction of lipolysis enhancing contributing into development of lipoidosis. The insulin expresses transfer offatty acids in the form of unsaturated fatty acids from adipocytes into matrix of mitochondria. The insulin supplies insulin-dependent cells with substrates for acquiring energy subject to that in pool of unsaturated fatty acids in adipocytes prevails hydrophobic palmitic unsaturated fatiy acid that slowly passes into matrix through external membrane ofmitochondria; oxidases of mitochondria so slowly implement its β-oxidation that content of exogenous palmitic unsaturatedfatty acid can't be higher than phylogenetic, physiological level - 15% of all amount offatty acids

  4. Effective impairment of myeloma cells and their progenitors by blockade of monocarboxylate transportation

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Derek James; Nakamura, Shingen; Amachi, Ryota; Hiasa, Masahiro; Oda, Asuka; Tsuji, Daisuke; Itoh, Kohji; Harada, Takeshi; Horikawa, Kazuki; Teramachi, Jumpei; Miki, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Toshio; Abe, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells robustly expel lactate produced through enhanced glycolysis via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and maintain alkaline intracellular pH. To develop a novel therapeutic strategy against multiple myeloma (MM), which still remains incurable, we explored the impact of perturbing a metabolism via inhibiting MCTs. All MM cells tested constitutively expressed MCT1 and MCT4, and most expressed MCT2. Lactate export was substantially suppressed to induce death along with lowering intracellular pH in MM cells by blockade of all three MCT molecules with α-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamate (CHC) or the MCT1 and MCT2 inhibitor AR-C155858 in combination with MCT4 knockdown, although only partially by knockdown of each MCT. CHC lowered intracellular pH and severely curtailed lactate secretion even when combined with metformin, which further lowered intracellular pH and enhanced cytotoxicity. Interestingly, an ambient acidic pH markedly enhanced CHC-mediated cytotoxicity, suggesting preferential targeting of MM cells in acidic MM bone lesions. Furthermore, treatment with CHC suppressed hexokinase II expression and ATP production to reduce side populations and colony formation. Finally, CHC caused downregulation of homing receptor CXCR4 and abrogated SDF-1-induced migration. Targeting tumor metabolism by MCT blockade therefore may become an effective therapeutic option for drug-resistant MM cells with elevated glycolysis. PMID:26384349

  5. CD4 T Cell Depletion Substantially Augments the Rescue Potential of PD-L1 Blockade for Deeply Exhausted CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Provine, Nicholas M.; Blass, Eryn

    2015-01-01

    In various models of chronic infections and cancers, blockade of the inhibitory programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) pathway has been shown to be promising at restoring immune function. However, there is not a complete understanding of the factors that influence responsiveness to programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade. In particular, it is currently unclear whether the efficacy of PD-L1 blockade is dependent on the stage of disease. In a model of chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in mice, we show that exhausted CD8 T cells during the late stage of infection are refractory to rescue by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, PD-L1 blockade during the late stage of infection resulted in a biased expansion of PD-1+ CTLA-4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) over antiviral CD8 T cells. Although previous studies have shown that Treg ablation can enhance the immune rescue by PD-L1 blockade, this regimen may induce lethal autoimmunity. In this report, we show that PD-L1 blockade together with CD4 T cell depletion effectively rescued deeply exhausted CD8 T cells and enhanced antiviral control during the late stage of chronic infection without any associated mortality. These data demonstrate the pleiotropic effects of anti–PD-L1 therapy on both virus-specific CD8 T cells and Tregs, and suggest a novel strategy for effectively rescuing deeply exhausted CD8 T cells. PMID:26116499

  6. Blockade of immunosuppressive cytokines restores NK cell antiviral function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Peppa, Dimitra; Micco, Lorenzo; Javaid, Alia; Kennedy, Patrick T F; Schurich, Anna; Dunn, Claire; Pallant, Celeste; Ellis, Gidon; Khanna, Pooja; Dusheiko, Geoffrey; Gilson, Richard J; Maini, Mala K

    2010-01-01

    NK cells are enriched in the liver, constituting around a third of intrahepatic lymphocytes. We have previously demonstrated that they upregulate the death ligand TRAIL in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB), allowing them to kill hepatocytes bearing TRAIL receptors. In this study we investigated whether, in addition to their pathogenic role, NK cells have antiviral potential in CHB. We characterised NK cell subsets and effector function in 64 patients with CHB compared to 31 healthy controls. We found that, in contrast to their upregulated TRAIL expression and maintenance of cytolytic function, NK cells had a markedly impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ in CHB. This functional dichotomy of NK cells could be recapitulated in vitro by exposure to the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, which was induced in patients with active CHB. IL-10 selectively suppressed NK cell IFN-γ production without altering cytotoxicity or death ligand expression. Potent antiviral therapy reduced TRAIL-expressing CD56(bright) NK cells, consistent with the reduction in liver inflammation it induced; however, it was not able to normalise IL-10 levels or the capacity of NK cells to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ. Blockade of IL-10 +/- TGF-β restored the capacity of NK cells from both the periphery and liver of patients with CHB to produce IFN-γ, thereby enhancing their non-cytolytic antiviral capacity. In conclusion, NK cells may be driven to a state of partial functional tolerance by the immunosuppressive cytokine environment in CHB. Their defective capacity to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ persists in patients on antiviral therapy but can be corrected in vitro by IL-10+/- TGF-β blockade. PMID:21187913

  7. CXCR3 Blockade Inhibits T Cell Migration into the Skin and Prevents Development of Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenpeng; Xing, Luzhou; Cerise, Jane; Wang, Eddy Hsi Chun; Jabbari, Ali; de Jong, Annemieke; Petukhova, Lynn; Christiano, Angela M; Clynes, Raphael

    2016-08-15

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease of the hair follicle that results in hair loss of varying severity. Recently, we showed that IFN-γ-producing NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T cells actively infiltrate the hair follicle and are responsible for its destruction in C3H/HeJ AA mice. Our transcriptional profiling of human and mouse alopecic skin showed that the IFN pathway is the dominant signaling pathway involved in AA. We showed that IFN-inducible chemokines (CXCL9/10/11) are markedly upregulated in the skin of AA lesions, and further, that the IFN-inducible chemokine receptor, CXCR3, is upregulated on alopecic effector T cells. To demonstrate whether CXCL9/10/11 chemokines were required for development of AA, we treated mice with blocking Abs to CXCR3, which prevented the development of AA in the graft model, inhibiting the accumulation of NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T cells in the skin and cutaneous lymph nodes. These data demonstrate proof of concept that interfering with the Tc1 response in AA via blockade of IFN-inducible chemokines can prevent the onset of AA. CXCR3 blockade could be approached clinically in human AA with either biologic or small-molecule inhibition, the latter being particularly intriguing as a topical therapeutic. PMID:27412416

  8. Immune Checkpoint Blockade to Improve Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for Adoptive Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kodumudi, Krithika N.; Siegel, Jessica; Weber, Amy M.; Scott, Ellen; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Pilon-Thomas, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has been associated with improved survival in cancer patients. Within the tumor microenvironment, regulatory cells and expression of co-inhibitory immune checkpoint molecules can lead to the inactivation of TIL. Hence, there is a need to develop strategies that disrupt these negative regulators to achieve robust anti-tumor immune responses. We evaluated the blockade of immune checkpoints and their effect on T cell infiltration and function. We examined the ability of TIL to induce tumor-specific immune responses in vitro and in vivo. TIL isolated from tumor bearing mice were tumor-specific and expressed co-inhibitory immune checkpoint molecules. Administration of monoclonal antibodies against immune checkpoints led to a significant delay in tumor growth. However, anti-PD-L1 antibody treated mice had a significant increase in T cell infiltration and IFN-γ production compared to other groups. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded TIL from tumors of anti-PD-L1 antibody treated mice led to a significant delay in tumor growth. Blockade of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints could be an effective strategy to improve TIL infiltration and function. PMID:27050669

  9. PD-L1 Blockade Differentially Impacts Regulatory T Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals Depending on Plasma Viremia

    PubMed Central

    Peligero, Cristina; Argilaguet, Jordi; Güerri-Fernandez, Roberto; Torres, Berta; Ligero, Carmen; Colomer, Pilar; Plana, Montserrat; Knobel, Hernando; García, Felipe; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway has emerged as a potential therapy to restore impaired immune responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Most reports have studied the impact of the PD-L1 blockade on effector cells and neglected possible effects on regulatory T cells (Treg cells), which play an essential role in balancing immunopathology and antiviral effector responses. The aim of this study was to define the consequences of ex vivo PD-L1 blockade on Treg cells from HIV-infected individuals. We observed that HIV infection led to an increase in PD-1+ and PD-L1+ Treg cells. This upregulation correlated with disease progression and decreased under antiretroviral treatment. Treg cells from viremic individuals had a particularly high PD-1 expression and impaired proliferative capacity in comparison with Treg cells from individuals under antiretroviral treatment. PD-L1 blockade restored the proliferative capacity of Treg cells from viremic individuals but had no effect on its suppressive capacity. Moreover, it increased the viral production in cell cultures from viremic individuals. This increase in viral production correlated with an increase in Treg cell percentage and a reduction in the CD4/Treg and CD8/Treg cell ratios. In contrast to the effect of the PD-L1 blockade on Treg cells from viremic individuals, we did not observe a significant effect on the proliferative capacity of Treg cells from individuals in whom viremia was controlled (either spontaneously or by antiretroviral treatment). However, PD-L1 blockade resulted in an increased proliferative capacity of HIV-specific-CD8 T cells in all subjects. Taken together, our findings suggest that manipulating PD-L1 in vivo can be expected to influence the net gain of effector function depending on the subject’s plasma viremia. PMID:26633181

  10. PD-L1 Blockade Differentially Impacts Regulatory T Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals Depending on Plasma Viremia.

    PubMed

    Peligero, Cristina; Argilaguet, Jordi; Güerri-Fernandez, Roberto; Torres, Berta; Ligero, Carmen; Colomer, Pilar; Plana, Montserrat; Knobel, Hernando; García, Felipe; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway has emerged as a potential therapy to restore impaired immune responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Most reports have studied the impact of the PD-L1 blockade on effector cells and neglected possible effects on regulatory T cells (Treg cells), which play an essential role in balancing immunopathology and antiviral effector responses. The aim of this study was to define the consequences of ex vivo PD-L1 blockade on Treg cells from HIV-infected individuals. We observed that HIV infection led to an increase in PD-1+ and PD-L1+ Treg cells. This upregulation correlated with disease progression and decreased under antiretroviral treatment. Treg cells from viremic individuals had a particularly high PD-1 expression and impaired proliferative capacity in comparison with Treg cells from individuals under antiretroviral treatment. PD-L1 blockade restored the proliferative capacity of Treg cells from viremic individuals but had no effect on its suppressive capacity. Moreover, it increased the viral production in cell cultures from viremic individuals. This increase in viral production correlated with an increase in Treg cell percentage and a reduction in the CD4/Treg and CD8/Treg cell ratios. In contrast to the effect of the PD-L1 blockade on Treg cells from viremic individuals, we did not observe a significant effect on the proliferative capacity of Treg cells from individuals in whom viremia was controlled (either spontaneously or by antiretroviral treatment). However, PD-L1 blockade resulted in an increased proliferative capacity of HIV-specific-CD8 T cells in all subjects. Taken together, our findings suggest that manipulating PD-L1 in vivo can be expected to influence the net gain of effector function depending on the subject's plasma viremia. PMID:26633181

  11. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  12. The multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib enhances glycolysis and synergizes with glycolysis blockade for cancer cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Tesori, Valentina; Piscaglia, Anna Chiara; Samengo, Daniela; Barba, Marta; Bernardini, Camilla; Scatena, Roberto; Pontoglio, Alessandro; Castellini, Laura; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Pani, Giovambattista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Although the only effective drug against primary hepatocarcinoma, the multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib (SFB) usually fails to eradicate liver cancer. Since SFB targets mitochondria, cell metabolic reprogramming may underlie intrinsic tumor resistance. To characterize cancer cell metabolic response to SFB, we measured oxygen consumption, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ATP content in rat LCSC (Liver Cancer Stem Cells) -2 cells exposed to the drug. Genome wide analysis of gene expression was performed by Affymetrix technology. SFB cytotoxicity was evaluated by multiple assays in the presence or absence of metabolic inhibitors, or in cells genetically depleted of mitochondria. We found that low concentrations (2.5–5 μM) of SFB had a relatively modest effect on LCSC-2 or 293 T cell growth, but damaged mitochondria and increased intracellular ROS. Gene expression profiling of SFB-treated cells was consistent with a shift toward aerobic glycolysis and, accordingly, SFB cytotoxicity was dramatically increased by glucose withdrawal or the glycolytic inhibitor 2-DG. Under metabolic stress, activation of the AMP dependent Protein Kinase (AMPK), but not ROS blockade, protected cells from death. We conclude that mitochondrial damage and ROS drive cell killing by SFB, while glycolytic cell reprogramming may represent a resistance strategy potentially targetable by combination therapies. PMID:25779766

  13. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J. S.; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Hiley, Crispin T.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U.; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A.; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Hadrup, Sine R.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy–induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  14. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J S; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A; Birkbak, Nicolai J; Hiley, Crispin T; Watkins, Thomas B K; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D; Shukla, Sachet A; Wu, Catherine J; Peggs, Karl S; Chan, Timothy A; Hadrup, Sine R; Quezada, Sergio A; Swanton, Charles

    2016-03-25

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8(+)tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy-induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  15. Blockade of glucagon signaling prevents or reverses diabetes onset only if residual β-cells persist

    PubMed Central

    Damond, Nicolas; Thorel, Fabrizio; Moyers, Julie S; Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M; Powers, Alvin C; Herrera, Pedro L

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon secretion dysregulation in diabetes fosters hyperglycemia. Recent studies report that mice lacking glucagon receptor (Gcgr-/-) do not develop diabetes following streptozotocin (STZ)-mediated ablation of insulin-producing β-cells. Here, we show that diabetes prevention in STZ-treated Gcgr-/- animals requires remnant insulin action originating from spared residual β-cells: these mice indeed became hyperglycemic after insulin receptor blockade. Accordingly, Gcgr-/- mice developed hyperglycemia after induction of a more complete, diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced β-cell loss, a situation of near-absolute insulin deficiency similar to type 1 diabetes. In addition, glucagon deficiency did not impair the natural capacity of α-cells to reprogram into insulin production after extreme β-cell loss. α-to-β-cell conversion was improved in Gcgr-/- mice as a consequence of α-cell hyperplasia. Collectively, these results indicate that glucagon antagonism could i) be a useful adjuvant therapy in diabetes only when residual insulin action persists, and ii) help devising future β-cell regeneration therapies relying upon α-cell reprogramming. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13828.001 PMID:27092792

  16. Blockade of glucagon signaling prevents or reverses diabetes onset only if residual β-cells persist.

    PubMed

    Damond, Nicolas; Thorel, Fabrizio; Moyers, Julie S; Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M; Powers, Alvin C; Herrera, Pedro L

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon secretion dysregulation in diabetes fosters hyperglycemia. Recent studies report that mice lacking glucagon receptor (Gcgr(-/-)) do not develop diabetes following streptozotocin (STZ)-mediated ablation of insulin-producing β-cells. Here, we show that diabetes prevention in STZ-treated Gcgr(-/-) animals requires remnant insulin action originating from spared residual β-cells: these mice indeed became hyperglycemic after insulin receptor blockade. Accordingly, Gcgr(-/-) mice developed hyperglycemia after induction of a more complete, diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced β-cell loss, a situation of near-absolute insulin deficiency similar to type 1 diabetes. In addition, glucagon deficiency did not impair the natural capacity of α-cells to reprogram into insulin production after extreme β-cell loss. α-to-β-cell conversion was improved in Gcgr(-/-) mice as a consequence of α-cell hyperplasia. Collectively, these results indicate that glucagon antagonism could i) be a useful adjuvant therapy in diabetes only when residual insulin action persists, and ii) help devising future β-cell regeneration therapies relying upon α-cell reprogramming. PMID:27092792

  17. CD28/CTLA-4/B7 costimulatory pathway blockade affects regulatory T-cell function in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Isabel; Kasran, Ahmad; Cremer, Jonathan; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Boon, Louis; Van Gool, Stefaan W; Ceuppens, Jan L

    2015-06-01

    Naïve T cells require B7/CD28 costimulation in order to be fully activated. Attempts to block this pathway have been effective in preventing unwanted immune reactions. As B7 blockade might also affect Treg cells and interfere with negative signaling through membrane CTLA-4 on effector T (Teff) cells, its immune-modulatory effects are potentially more complex. Here, we used the mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS), EAE, to study the effect of B7 blockade. An effective therapy for MS patients has to interfere with ongoing inflammation, and therefore we injected CTLA-4Ig at day 7 and 9 after immunization, when myelin-reactive T cells have been primed and start migrating toward the CNS. Surprisingly, B7 blockade exacerbated disease signs and resulted in more severe CNS inflammation and demyelination, and was associated with an enhanced production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IFN-γ. Importantly, CTLA-4Ig treatment resulted in a transient reduction of Ki67 and CTLA-4 expression and function of peripheral Treg cells. Taken together, B7 blockade at a particular stage of the autoimmune response can result in the suppression of Treg cells, leading to a more severe disease. PMID:25727069

  18. CD27 Agonism Plus PD-1 Blockade Recapitulates CD4+ T-cell Help in Therapeutic Anticancer Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ahrends, Tomasz; Bąbała, Nikolina; Xiao, Yanling; Yagita, Hideo; van Eenennaam, Hans; Borst, Jannie

    2016-05-15

    While showing promise, vaccination strategies to treat cancer require further optimization. Likely barriers to efficacy involve cancer-associated immunosuppression and peripheral tolerance, which limit the generation of effective vaccine-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Because CD4(+) T cells improve CTL responsiveness, next-generation vaccines include helper epitopes. Here, we demonstrate in mice how CD4(+) T-cell help optimizes the CTL response to a clinically relevant DNA vaccine engineered to combat human papillomavirus-expressing tumors. Inclusion of tumor-unrelated helper epitopes greatly increased CTL priming, effector, and memory T-cell programming. CD4(+) T-cell help optimized the CTL response in all these aspects via CD27/CD70 costimulation. Notably, administration of an agonistic CD27 antibody could largely replace helper epitopes in promoting primary and memory CTL responses, acting directly on CD8(+) T cells. CD27 agonism improved efficacy of the vaccine without helper epitopes, more so than combined PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade. Combining CD27 agonism with CTLA-4 blockade improved vaccine-induced CTL priming and tumor infiltration, but only combination with PD-1 blockade was effective at eradicating tumors, thereby fully recapitulating the effect of CD4(+) T-cell help on vaccine efficacy. PD-1 blockade alone did not affect CTL priming or tumor infiltration, so these results implied that it cooperated with CD4(+) T-cell help by alleviating immune suppression against CTL in the tumor. Helper epitope inclusion or CD27 agonism did not stimulate regulatory T cells, and vaccine efficacy was also improved by CD27 agonism in the presence of CD4(+) T-cell help. Our findings provide a preclinical rationale to apply CD27 agonist antibodies, either alone or combined with PD-1 blockade, to improve the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines and immunotherapy generally. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2921-31. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020860

  19. Telmisartan Induced Inhibition of Vascular Cell Proliferation beyond Angiotensin Receptor Blockade and PPARγ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Koichi; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Ho, Christopher; Kurtz, Theodore W; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the ability of ARBs with PPARγ agonist activity (telmisartan and irbesartan), and ARBs devoid of PPARγ agonist activity (eprosartan and valsartan), to inhibit vascular cell proliferation studied in the absence of angiotensin II stimulation. Telmisartan and to a lesser extent irbesartan, inhibited proliferation of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose dependent fashion whereas eprosartan and valsartan did not. To investigate the role of PPARγ in the antiproliferative effects of telmisartan, we studied genetically engineered NIH3T3 cells that express PPARγ. Pioglitazone inhibited proliferation of NIH3T3 cells expressing PPARγ, but had little effect on control NIH3T3 cells that lack PPARγ. In contrast, telmisartan inhibited proliferation equally in NIH3T3 with and without PPARγ. Valsartan failed to inhibit proliferation of either cell line. In addition, telmisartan inhibited proliferation equally in aortic smooth muscle cells derived from mice with targeted knockout of PPARγ in smooth muscle and from control mice whereas valsartan had no effect on cell proliferation. Telmisartan but not valsartan, reduced phosphorylation of AKT but not ERK otherwise induced by exposure to serum of either quiescent human smooth muscle cells, quiescent mice smooth muscle cells lacking PPARγ or quiescent CHO-K1 cells lacking AT1 receptor. In summary, the antiproliferative effect of telmisartan in the absence of exogenously supplemented angiotensin II involve more than just AT1 receptor blockade and do not require activation of PPARγ. It might be postulated that inhibition of AKT activation is a mechanism mediating the antiproliferative effects of telmisartan including in cells lacking AT1 receptors or PPARγ. PMID:19822796

  20. Pathogen Stimulation History Impacts Donor-Specific CD8(+) T Cell Susceptibility to Costimulation/Integrin Blockade-Based Therapy.

    PubMed

    Badell, I R; Kitchens, W H; Wagener, M E; Lukacher, A E; Larsen, C P; Ford, M L

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the quantity of donor-reactive memory T cells is an important factor in determining the relative heterologous immunity barrier posed during transplantation. Here, we hypothesized that the quality of T cell memory also potently influences the response to costimulation blockade-based immunosuppression. Using a murine skin graft model of CD8(+) memory T cell-mediated costimulation blockade resistance, we elicited donor-reactive memory T cells using three distinct types of pathogen infections. Strikingly, we observed differential efficacy of a costimulation and integrin blockade regimen based on the type of pathogen used to elicit the donor-reactive memory T cell response. Intriguingly, the most immunosuppression-sensitive memory T cell populations were composed primarily of central memory cells that possessed greater recall potential, exhibited a less differentiated phenotype, and contained more multi-cytokine producers. These data, therefore, demonstrate that the memory T cell barrier is dependent on the specific type of pathogen infection via which the donor-reactive memory T cells are elicited, and suggest that the immune stimulation history of a given transplant patient may profoundly influence the relative barrier posed by heterologous immunity during transplantation. PMID:26228897

  1. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels inhibits invasion of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    MOHAMMED, FATIMA H.; KHAJAH, MAITHAM A.; YANG, MING; BRACKENBURY, WILLIAM J.; LUQMANI, YUNUS A.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are membrane proteins which are normally expressed in excitable cells but have also been detected in cancer cells, where they are thought to be involved in malignancy progression. In this study we examined the ion current and expression profile of VGSC (Nav1.5) in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (MCF-7) and silenced (pII) breast cancer cells and its possible influence on their proliferation, motility and invasion. VGSC currents were analysed by whole cell patch clamp recording. Nav1.5 expression and localization, in response to EGF stimulation, was examined by western blotting and immunofluorescence respectively. Cell invasion (under-agarose and Matrigel assays), motility (wound healing assay) and proliferation (MTT assay) were assessed in pII cells in response to VGSC blockers, phenytoin (PHT) and tetrodotoxin (TTX), or by siRNA knockdown of Nav1.5. The effect of PHT and TTX on modulating EGF-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 was determined by western blotting. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) was determined using a fluorometric-based activity assay. The level of various human proteases was detected by using proteome profiler array kit. VGSC currents were detected in pII cells, but were absent in MCF-7. Nav1.5 showed cytoplasmic and perinuclear expression in both MCF-7 and pII cells, with enhanced expression upon EGF stimulation. Treatment of pII cells with PHT, TTX or siRNA significantly reduced invasion towards serum components and EGF, in part through reduction of P-ERK1/2 and proteases such as cathepsin E, kallikrein-10 and MMP-7, as well as total MMP activity. At high concentrations, PHT inhibited motility while TTX reduced cell proliferation. Pharmacological or genetic blockade of Nav1.5 may serve as a potential anti-metastatic therapy for breast cancer. PMID:26718772

  2. Molecular blockade of VEGFR2 in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Adham, Sirin A. I.; Sher, Ifat; Coomber, Brenda L.

    2010-01-01

    Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) is the most lethal neoplasm affecting the female genital tract, characterized by overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and growth as ascites. Anti-VEGF strategies are currently used in EOC therapy with promising results; however, molecular targeting of specific VEGF receptors on the cancer cells themselves has not been explored to date. We previously demonstrated activation of a VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling loop in EOC cells supports their survival in suspension, and short-term pharmacological inhibition of this loop increased EOC cell apoptosis in vitro. Here, we stably knocked down VEGFR2 in OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 EOC cells using short hairpin RNA, an RNA interference strategy that could potentially overcome chemoresistance arising with angiogenic inhibitors. Unexpectedly, we observed an induction of more aggressive cellular behavior in transfected cells, leading to increased growth in mouse xenografts, enhanced accumulation of ascites, increased VEGF and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) expression and decreased expression of adhesion proteins, notably cadherins and integrins. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathways do not appear to be involved in the upregulation of NRP-1 message in VEGFR2 knockdown cells. Supporting our mouse model, we also found a significant increase in the ratio between NRP-1 and VEGFR2 with increasing tumor grade in 80 cases of human EOC. The change in EOC behavior we report here occurred independent of the angiogenic response and speaks to the direct impact of VEGF blockade on the cancer cells themselves. Our findings highlight the possible confounding events that may impact the usefulness of RNAi in a therapeutic setting for disrupting EOC cell survival in ascites. PMID:20195243

  3. Monocrotaline pyrrole-induced endothelial cell megalocytosis involves a Golgi blockade mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mehul; Patel, Kirit; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2005-04-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids initiate disease in the lung (pulmonary hypertension), liver (veno-occlusive disease and cirrhosis), and kidneys (afferent arteriolar block and mesangiolysis) by inducing a megalocytotic phenotype in target endothelial and parenchymal cells. A "hit-and-run" type of exposure to the bioactive pyrrolizidine results, within 2-3 days, in enlarged cells with large nuclei and enlarged Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum, while the cells remain in G2/M block. In the present study, we recapitulated monocrotaline pyrrole (MCTP)-induced megalocytosis in cultures of bovine pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC), human Hep3B hepatocytes, human type II-like alveolar epithelial cells (A549), and human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) and investigated the subcellular mechanism involved. There was an inverse relationship between reduction in caveolin (Cav)-1 levels and stimulation of promitogenic STAT3 and ERK1/2 cell signaling. In megalocytotic PAEC, the Golgi scaffolding protein GM130 was shifted from membranes with heavy density to those with a lighter density. This lighter Golgi fraction was enriched for hypo-oligomeric Cav-1, indicating dysfunctional trafficking of cargo. Immunofluorescence imaging studies confirmed the trapping of Cav-1 in a GM130-positive Golgi compartment. There was an increase in Ser25 phosphorylation of GM130 (typically a prelude to Golgi fragmentation and mitosis) and increased association between pGM130, cdc2 kinase, and Cav-1. Nevertheless, megalocytotic MCTP-treated cells showed reduced entry into mitosis upon stimulation with 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), reduced 2-ME-induced Golgi fragmentation, and a slowing of Golgi reassembly after nocodazole-induced fragmentation. These data suggest that a disruption of the trafficking and mitosis sensor functions of the Golgi may represent the subcellular mechanism leading to MCTP-induced megalocytosis ("the Golgi blockade hypothesis"). PMID:15561761

  4. Ex Vivo Costimulatory Blockade to Generate Regulatory T Cells From Patients Awaiting Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guinan, E C; Cole, G A; Wylie, W H; Kelner, R H; Janec, K J; Yuan, H; Oppatt, J; Brennan, L L; Turka, L A; Markmann, J

    2016-07-01

    Short-term outcomes of kidney transplantation have improved dramatically, but chronic rejection and regimen-related toxicity continue to compromise overall patient outcomes. Development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) as a means to decrease alloresponsiveness and limit the need for pharmacologic immunosuppression is an active area of preclinical and clinical investigation. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory effects of end-stage renal disease on the efficacy of various strategies to generate and expand recipient Tregs for kidney transplantation are incompletely characterized. In this study, we show that Tregs can be successfully generated from either freshly isolated or previously cryopreserved uremic recipient (responder) and healthy donor (stimulator) peripheral blood mononuclear cells using the strategy of ex vivo costimulatory blockade with belatacept during mixed lymphocyte culture. Moreover, these Tregs maintain a CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo) surface phenotype, high levels of intracellular FOXP3 and significant demethylation of the FOXP3 Treg-specific demethylation region on allorestimulation with donor stimulator cells. These data support evaluation of this simple, brief Treg production strategy in clinical trials of mismatched kidney transplantation. PMID:26790369

  5. Tetrandrine induces lipid accumulation through blockade of autophagy in a hepatic stellate cell line.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Nishito, Yukina; Nakai, Naomi; Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Nagao, Masaya

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy, or autophagy, is a cellular response in which unnecessary cytoplasmic components, including lipids and organelles, are self-degraded. Recent studies closely related autophagy to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a process critical in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. During HSC activation, cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are degraded as autophagic cargo, and then cells express fibrogenic genes. Thus, inhibition of autophagy in HSCs is a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating liver fibrosis. We found that tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Stephania tetrandra, induced lipid accumulation, a phenotype associated with quiescent HSCs, through blockade of autophagy in the rat-derived HSC line HSC-T6. Tetrandrine inhibited autophagic flux without affecting lysosomal function. A phenotypic comparison using siRNA knockdown suggested that tetrandrine may target regulators, involved in fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes (e.g., syntaxin 17). Moreover, perilipin 1, an LD-coated protein, co-localized specifically with LC3, a marker protein for autophagosomes, in tetrandrine-treated HSC-T6 cells. This suggests a potential role for perilipin 1 in autophagy-mediated LD degradation in HSCs. Our results identified tetrandrine as a potential tool for prevention and treatment of HSC activation. PMID:27270032

  6. NK cell killing of AML and ALL blasts by Killer-Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) negative NK cells after NKG2A and LIR-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Godal, Robert; Bachanova, Veronika; Gleason, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Yun, Gong H.; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R.; McGlave, Philip B.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Although NK cell alloreactivity has been dominated by studies of KIR, we hypothesized that NKG2A and LIR-1, present on 53±13% and 36±18% of normal NK cells, plays a role in NK cell killing of primary leukemia targets. KIR− cells, which comprise nearly half of the circulating NK cell population, exhibited tolerance to primary leukemia targets, suggesting signaling through other inhibitory receptors. Both AML and ALL targets could be rendered susceptible to lysis by fresh resting KIR− NK cells when inhibitory receptor-MHC class I interactions were blocked by pan-HLA antibodies demonstrating that these cells were functionally competent. Blockade of a single inhibitory receptor resulted in slight increases in killing, while combined LIR-1 and NKG2A blockade consistently resulted in increased NK cell cytotoxicity. Dual blockade of NKG2A and LIR-1 led to significant killing of targets by resting KIR− NK cells showing that this population is not hyporesponsive. Together these results suggest that alloreactivity of a significant fraction of KIR− NK cells is determined by NKG2A and LIR-1. Thus strategies to interrupt NKG2A and LIR-1 in combination with anti-KIR blockade hold promise for exploiting NK cell therapy in acute leukemia. PMID:20139023

  7. Mechanisms of endothelial cell protection by blockade of the JAK2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Neria, Fernando; Caramelo, Carlos; Peinado, Héctor; González-Pacheco, Francisco R; Deudero, Juan J P; de Solis, Alain J; Fernández-Sánchez, Ruth; Peñate, Silvia; Cano, Amparo; Castilla, María Angeles

    2007-03-01

    Inhibition of the JAK2/STAT pathway has been implicated recently in cytoprotective mechanisms in both vascular smooth muscle cells and astrocytes. The advent of JAK2-specific inhibitors provides a practical tool for the study of this pathway in different cellular types. An interest in finding methods to improve endothelial cell (EC) resistance to injury led us to examine the effect of JAK2/STAT inhibition on EC protection. Furthermore, the signaling pathways involved in JAK2/STAT inhibition-related actions were examined. Our results reveal, for the first time, that blockade of JAK2 with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG490 strongly protects cultured EC against cell detachment-dependent death and serum deprivation and increases reseeding efficiency. Confirmation of the specificity of the effects of JAK2 inhibition was attained by finding protective effects on transfection with a dominant negative JAK2. Furthermore, AG490 blocked serum deprivation-induced phosphorylation of JAK2. In terms of mechanism, treatment with AG490 induces several relevant responses, both in monolayer and detached cells. These mechanisms include the following: 1) Increase and nuclear translocation of the active, dephosphorylated form of beta-catenin. In functional terms, this translocation is transcriptionally active, and its protective effect is further supported by the stimulation of EC cytoprotection by transfectionally induced excess of beta-catenin. 2) Increase of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)/CD31 levels. 3) Increase in total and phosphorylated AKT. 4) Increase in phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3alpha/beta. The present findings imply potential practical applications of JAK2 inhibition on EC. These applications affect not only EC in the monolayer but also circulating detached cells and involve mechanistic interactions not previously described. PMID:17035297

  8. Blockade of FLT4 suppresses metastasis of melanoma cells by impaired lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Hong, Seok-Ho; Shin, Minsang; Heo, Hye-Ryeon; Jang, In Ho

    2016-09-16

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells via lymphatic vessels affects the relapse of tumor patients. New lymphatic vessel formation, including lymphangiogenesis, is promoted in the tumor environment. The lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C can mediate lymphatic vessel formation and induce tumor metastasis by binding with FLT4. In melanoma, metastasis via lymphatics such as lymph nodes is one of the main predictors of poor outcome. Thus, we investigated whether blockade of FLT4 can reduce metastasis via the suppression of lymphatic capillaries. Proliferative lymphatic capillaries in melanoma were estimated by immunohistochemistry using FLT4 antibody after the injection of the FLT4 antagonist MAZ51. The numbers of tumor modules in metastasised lungs were calculated by gross examination and lymphatic related factors were examined by qRT-PCR. MAZ51 injection resulted in the suppression of tumor size and module number and the inhibition of proliferative lymphatic vessels in the intratumoral region in the lung and proliferating melanoma cells in the lung compared to those of untreated groups. Additionally, high FLT4 and TNF-alpha were detected in melanoma-induced tissue, while lymphatic markers such as VEGF-C, FLT4 and Prox-1 were significantly decreased in MAZ51 treated groups, implying that anti-lymphangiogenesis by MAZ51 may provide a potential strategy to prevent tumor metastasis in melanoma and high number of lymphatic capillaries could be used diagnosis for severe metastasis. PMID:27507214

  9. STAT3 blockade enhances the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agents by eradicating head neck stemloid cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Zhi-Li; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Huang, Cong-Fa; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Signaling transducer and activator 3 (STAT3) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) have garnered huge attention as a therapeutic focus, based on evidence that they may represent an etiologic root of tumor initiation and radio-chemoresistance. Here, we investigated the high phosphorylation status of STAT3 (p-STAT3) and its correlation with self-renewal markers in head neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Over-expression of p-STAT3 was found to have increased in post chemotherapy HNSCC tissue. We showed that blockade of p-STAT3 eliminated both bulk tumor and side population (SP) cells with characteristics of CSCs in vitro. Inhibition of p-STAT3 using small molecule S3I-201 significantly delayed tumorigenesis of spontaneous HNSCC in mice. Combining blockade of p-STAT3 with cytotoxic drugs cisplatin, docetaxel, 5-fluorouracil (TPF) enhanced the antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo with decreased tumor sphere formation and SP cells. Taken together, our results advocate blockade of p-STAT3 in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs enhance efficacy by improving CSCs eradication in HNSCC. PMID:26556875

  10. STAT3 blockade enhances the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agents by eradicating head neck stemloid cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Zhi-Li; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Huang, Cong-Fa; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Signaling transducer and activator 3 (STAT3) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) have garnered huge attention as a therapeutic focus, based on evidence that they may represent an etiologic root of tumor initiation and radio-chemoresistance. Here, we investigated the high phosphorylation status of STAT3 (p-STAT3) and its correlation with self-renewal markers in head neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Over-expression of p-STAT3 was found to have increased in post chemotherapy HNSCC tissue. We showed that blockade of p-STAT3 eliminated both bulk tumor and side population (SP) cells with characteristics of CSCs in vitro. Inhibition of p-STAT3 using small molecule S3I-201 significantly delayed tumorigenesis of spontaneous HNSCC in mice. Combining blockade of p-STAT3 with cytotoxic drugs cisplatin, docetaxel, 5-fluorouracil (TPF) enhanced the antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo with decreased tumor sphere formation and SP cells. Taken together, our results advocate blockade of p-STAT3 in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs enhance efficacy by improving CSCs eradication in HNSCC. PMID:26556875

  11. New models of pulmonary hypertension based on VEGF receptor blockade-induced endothelial cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolls, Mark R.; Mizuno, Shiro; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima; Farkas, Laszlo; Drake, Jennnifer I.; Al Husseini, Aysar; Gomez-Arroyo, Jose G.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Bogaard, Herman J.

    2012-01-01

    In spite of treatment, severe angioproliferative pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a disease characterized by great morbidity and shortened survival. New treatment strategies for patients with PAH are needed, and after drug development, preclinical studies are best conducted in animal models which present with pulmonary angio-obliterative disease and right heart failure. A rat model of severe pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure, described a decade ago, continues to be investigated and provide insight into the nature of the lung vascular lesions and mechanisms of cardiac adaptation to an altered lung circulation. This rat model is based on the combination of VEGF receptor blockade with Su5416 and chronic hypoxia; use of this pulmonary hypertension induction strategy led to developing the concept of apoptosis-dependent compensatory vascular cell growth. Although, often employed in experimental designs, chronic hypoxia is not necessary for the development of angio-obliterative pulmonary hypertension. Left pneumonectomy combined with Su5416 also results in severe pulmonary hypertension in normoxic conditions. Similarly, the immune insufficiency component of severe PAH can be modeled in athymic rats (lacking T-lymphocytes). In these rats housed under normoxic conditions, treatment with the VEGFR receptor blocker results in angioproliferative pulmonary hypertension; cardiopulmonary disease in these animals can be prevented by immune reconstitution of regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Finally, chronic hypoxia can be replaced with another stimulator of HIF-1α: Ovalbumin (Ova). Immunization of rats with Ova increases lung tissue HIF-1α protein expression, and in Su5416-treated rats causes lethal pulmonary hypertension. Finally, we postulate that these models may also be useful for “reverse translation”; that is, the mechanisms of lung vascular cell death and growth and the modifying influences of immune and bone marrow cells that have been identified

  12. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Synergize With Costimulation Blockade in the Inhibition of Immune Responses and the Induction of Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tibell, Annika; Ljung, Karin; Saito, Yu; Gronlund, Anna; Osterholm, Cecilia; Holgersson, Jan; Lundgren, Torbjörn; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Corbascio, Matthias; Kumagai-Braesch, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy and costimulation blockade are two immunomodulatory strategies being developed concomitantly for the treatment of immunological diseases. Both of these strategies have the capacity to inhibit immune responses and induce regulatory T cells; however, their ability to synergize remains largely unexplored. In order to study this, MSCs from C57BL/6 (H2b) mice were infused together with fully major histocompatibility complex-mismatched Balb/c (H2d) allogeneic islets into the portal vein of diabetic C57BL/6 (H2b) mice, which were subsequently treated with costimulation blockade for the first 10 days after transplantation. Mice receiving both recipient-type MSCs, CTLA4Ig, and anti-CD40L demonstrated indefinite graft acceptance, just as did most of the recipients receiving MSCs and CTLA4Ig. Recipients of MSCs only rejected their grafts, and fewer than one half of the recipients treated with costimulation blockade alone achieved permanent engraftment. The livers of the recipients treated with MSCs plus costimulation blockade contained large numbers of islets surrounded by Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. These recipients showed reduced antidonor IgG levels and a glucose tolerance similar to that of naïve nondiabetic mice. Intrahepatic lymphocytes and splenocytes from these recipients displayed reduced proliferation and interferon-γ production when re-exposed to donor antigen. MSCs in the presence of costimulation blockade prevented dendritic cell maturation, inhibited T cell proliferation, increased Foxp3+ regulatory T cell numbers, and increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. These results indicate that MSC infusion and costimulation blockade have complementary immune-modulating effects that can be used for a broad number of applications in transplantation, autoimmunity, and regenerative medicine. PMID:25313200

  13. Blockade of Retinol Metabolism Protects T Cell-Induced Hepatitis by Increasing Migration of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sun; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Suh, Yang-Gun; Byun, Jin-Seok; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Seo, Wonhyo; Jeong, Jong-Min; Choi, Won-Mook; Kim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Keun-Gyu; Jeong, Won-Il

    2015-11-01

    Retinols are metabolized into retinoic acids by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (Raldh). However, their roles have yet to be clarified in hepatitis despite enriched retinols in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Therefore, we investigated the effects of retinols on Concanavalin A (Con A)-mediated hepatitis. Con A was injected into wild type (WT), Raldh1 knock-out (Raldh1(-/-)), CCL2(-/-) and CCR2(-/-) mice. For migration study of regulatory T cells (Tregs), we used in vivo and ex vivo adoptive transfer systems. Blockade of retinol metabolism in mice given 4-methylpyrazole, an inhibitor of ADH, and ablated Raldh1 gene manifested increased migration of Tregs, eventually protected against Con A-mediated hepatitis by decreasing interferon-γ in T cells. Moreover, interferon-γ treatment increased the expression of ADH3 and Raldh1, but it suppressed that of CCL2 and IL-6 in HSCs. However, the expression of CCL2 and IL-6 was inversely increased upon the pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ADH3 and Raldh1 in HSCs. Indeed, IL-6 treatment increased CCR2 expression of Tregs. In migration assay, ablated CCR2 in Tregs showed reduced migration to HSCs. In adoptive transfer of Tregs in vivo and ex vivo, Raldh1-deficient mice showed more increased migration of Tregs than WT mice. Furthermore, inhibited retinol metabolism increased survival rate (75%) compared with that of the controls (25%) in Con A-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that blockade of retinol metabolism protects against acute liver injury by increased Treg migration, and it may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to control T cell-mediated acute hepatitis. PMID:26537191

  14. Poxvirus-based active immunotherapy synergizes with CTLA-4 blockade to increase survival in a murine tumor model by improving the magnitude and quality of cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Foy, Susan P; Mandl, Stefanie J; Dela Cruz, Tracy; Cote, Joseph J; Gordon, Evan J; Trent, Erica; Delcayre, Alain; Breitmeyer, James; Franzusoff, Alex; Rountree, Ryan B

    2016-05-01

    The dramatic clinical benefit of immune checkpoint blockade for a fraction of cancer patients suggests the potential for further clinical benefit in a broader cancer patient population by combining immune checkpoint inhibitors with active immunotherapies. The anti-tumor efficacy of MVA-BN-HER2 poxvirus-based active immunotherapy alone or in combination with CTLA-4 checkpoint blockade was investigated in a therapeutic CT26-HER-2 lung metastasis mouse model. MVA-BN-HER2 immunotherapy significantly improved the median overall survival compared to untreated controls or CTLA-4 blockade alone (p < 0.001). Robust synergistic efficacy was achieved with the combination therapy (p < 0.01). Improved survival following MVA-BN-HER2 administration was accompanied by increased tumor infiltration by HER-2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). These tumor-specific CTL had characteristics similar to antiviral CTL, including strong expression of activation markers and co-expression of IFNγ and TNFα. Combination with CTLA-4 blockade significantly increased the magnitude of HER-2-specific T cell responses, with a higher proportion co-expressing TNFα and/or IL-2 with IFNγ. Furthermore, in mice treated with MVA-BN-HER2 (alone or in combination with CTLA-4 blockade), the inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS) protein was expressed predominantly on CD4 and CD8 effector T cells but not on regulatory T cells (Treg). In contrast, mice left untreated or treated solely with CTLA-4 blockade harbored elevated ICOS(+) Treg, a phenotype associated with highly suppressive activity. In conclusion, poxvirus-based active immunotherapy induced robust tumor infiltration by highly efficient effector T cells. Combination with CTLA-4 immune checkpoint blockade amplified this response resulting in synergistically improved efficacy. These hypothesis-generating data may help elucidate evidence of enhanced clinical benefit from combining CTLA-4 blockade with poxvirus-based active immunotherapy. PMID

  15. Blockade of pathological retinal ganglion cell hyperactivity improves optogenetically evoked light responses in rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, John M.; Degenaar, Patrick; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes visual impairment and eventual blindness. Retinal prostheses are the best currently available vision-restoring treatment for RP, but only restore crude vision. One possible contributing factor to the poor quality of vision achieved with prosthetic devices is the pathological retinal ganglion cell (RGC) hyperactivity that occurs in photoreceptor dystrophic disorders. Gap junction blockade with meclofenamic acid (MFA) was recently shown to diminish RGC hyperactivity and improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of RGC responses to light flashes and electrical stimulation in the rd10 mouse model of RP. We sought to extend these results to spatiotemporally patterned optogenetic stimulation in the faster-degenerating rd1 model and compare the effectiveness of a number of drugs known to disrupt rd1 hyperactivity. We crossed rd1 mice with a transgenic mouse line expressing the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) in RGCs, allowing them to be stimulated directly using high-intensity blue light. We used 60-channel ITO multielectrode arrays to record ChR2-mediated RGC responses from wholemount, ex-vivo retinas to full-field and patterned stimuli before and after application of MFA, 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18BGA, another gap junction blocker) or flupirtine (Flu, a Kv7 potassium channel opener). All three drugs decreased spontaneous RGC firing, but 18BGA and Flu also decreased the sensitivity of RGCs to optogenetic stimulation. Nevertheless, all three drugs improved the SNR of ChR2-mediated responses. MFA also made it easier to discern motion direction of a moving bar from RGC population responses. Our results support the hypothesis that reduction of pathological RGC spontaneous activity characteristic in retinal degenerative disorders may improve the quality of visual responses in retinal prostheses and they provide insights into how best to achieve this for optogenetic prostheses

  16. Terminal Complement Blockade after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is Safe without Meningococcal Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jodele, Sonata; Dandoy, Christopher E; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Myers, Kasiani C; El-Bietar, Javier; Nelson, Adam; Wallace, Gregory; Teusink-Cross, Ashley; Davies, Stella M

    2016-07-01

    Eculizumab inhibits terminal complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and is now used as a first-line therapy in these diseases. Eculizumab is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) because of an increased risk of meningococcal infections in persons without adequate functional complement. Administration of meningococcal vaccine is required at least 2 weeks before administering the first dose of eculizumab, and this advice is included in the product label. Eculizumab use for treatment of TMA in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients brings a significant dilemma regarding REMS required meningococcal vaccination. TMA after HSCT usually occurs within the first 100 days after transplantation when patients are severely immunocompromised and are not able to mount a response to vaccines. We evaluated 30 HSCT recipients treated with eculizumab for high-risk TMA without meningococcal vaccine. All patients received antimicrobial prophylaxis adequate for Neisseria meningitides during eculizumab therapy and for 8 weeks after discontinuation of the drug. Median time to TMA diagnosis was 28 days after transplant (range, 13.8 to 48.5). Study subjects received a median of 14 eculizumab doses (range, 2 to 38 doses) for HSCT-associated TMA therapy. There were no incidences of meningococcal infections. The incidences of bacterial and fungal bloodstream infections were similar in patients treated with eculizumab (n = 30) as compared with those with HSCT-associated TMA who did not receive any complement blocking therapy (n = 39). Our data indicate that terminal complement blockade in the early post-transplant period can be performed without meningococcal vaccination while using appropriate antimicrobial prophylaxis until complement

  17. Blockade of pathological retinal ganglion cell hyperactivity improves optogenetically evoked light responses in rd1 mice.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John M; Degenaar, Patrick; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes visual impairment and eventual blindness. Retinal prostheses are the best currently available vision-restoring treatment for RP, but only restore crude vision. One possible contributing factor to the poor quality of vision achieved with prosthetic devices is the pathological retinal ganglion cell (RGC) hyperactivity that occurs in photoreceptor dystrophic disorders. Gap junction blockade with meclofenamic acid (MFA) was recently shown to diminish RGC hyperactivity and improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of RGC responses to light flashes and electrical stimulation in the rd10 mouse model of RP. We sought to extend these results to spatiotemporally patterned optogenetic stimulation in the faster-degenerating rd1 model and compare the effectiveness of a number of drugs known to disrupt rd1 hyperactivity. We crossed rd1 mice with a transgenic mouse line expressing the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) in RGCs, allowing them to be stimulated directly using high-intensity blue light. We used 60-channel ITO multielectrode arrays to record ChR2-mediated RGC responses from wholemount, ex-vivo retinas to full-field and patterned stimuli before and after application of MFA, 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18BGA, another gap junction blocker) or flupirtine (Flu, a Kv7 potassium channel opener). All three drugs decreased spontaneous RGC firing, but 18BGA and Flu also decreased the sensitivity of RGCs to optogenetic stimulation. Nevertheless, all three drugs improved the SNR of ChR2-mediated responses. MFA also made it easier to discern motion direction of a moving bar from RGC population responses. Our results support the hypothesis that reduction of pathological RGC spontaneous activity characteristic in retinal degenerative disorders may improve the quality of visual responses in retinal prostheses and they provide insights into how best to achieve this for optogenetic prostheses

  18. Regeneration of Cation-Transport Capacity in HeLa Cell Membranes After Specific Blockade by Ouabain

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Gerald L.; Cook, John S.

    1972-01-01

    The cardiac glycoside, ouabain, inhibits alkali-cation transport in HeLa cells. It binds to 0.75 × 106 sites per cell, and the half-time for its dissociation is 16 hr. After partial blockade by ouabain, the cell generates new ouabain-binding sites, with total restoration of transport in 10% of a cell cycle(∼3 hr). This recovery requires protein synthesis and appears to be a response to altered cell-electrolyte content, since growth of cells in media with low K+ concentration enhances the titer of the transport enzyme in a fashion similar to the effect of ouabain. Totally blocked cells do not recover. PMID:4506784

  19. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Morgan, Clifford; Sandler, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd) in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells (Id2-kd N2a) failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy. PMID:26079374

  20. ST2 blockade reduces sST2-producing T cells while maintaining protective mST2-expressing T cells during graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jilu; Ramadan, Abdulraouf M.; Griesenauer, Brad; Li, Wei; Turner, Matthew J.; Liu, Chen; Kapur, Reuben; Hanenberg, Helmut; Blazar, Bruce R.; Tawara, Isao; Paczesny, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a devastating complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We previously identified high plasma soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) as a biomarker of the development of GVHD and death. sST2 sequesters interleukin (IL)-33, limiting its availability to T cells expressing membrane-bound ST2 (mST2) [Th2 cells and ST2+FoxP3+regulatory T cells]. Here, we report that blockade of sST2 in the peri-transplant period with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (anti-ST2 mAb) reduced GVHD severity and mortality. We identified intestinal stromal cells and T cells as major sources of sST2 during GVHD. ST2 blockade decreased systemic interferon-γ, IL-17, and IL-23 but increased IL-10 and IL-33 plasma levels. ST2 blockade also reduced sST2 production by IL-17–producing T cells while maintaining protective mST2-expressing T cells, increasing the frequency of intestinal myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and decreasing frequency of intestinal CD103 dendritic cells. Finally, ST2 blockade preserved graft-versus-leukemia activity in a model of GFP+MLL-AF9 acute myeloid leukemia. Our findings suggest that ST2 is a therapeutic target for severe GVHD, and that the ST2/IL-33 pathway could be investigated in other T-cell mediated immune disorders with loss of tolerance. PMID:26446957

  1. ST2 blockade reduces sST2-producing T cells while maintaining protective mST2-expressing T cells during graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilu; Ramadan, Abdulraouf M; Griesenauer, Brad; Li, Wei; Turner, Matthew J; Liu, Chen; Kapur, Reuben; Hanenberg, Helmut; Blazar, Bruce R; Tawara, Isao; Paczesny, Sophie

    2015-10-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a devastating complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We previously identified high plasma soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) as a biomarker of the development of GVHD and death. sST2 sequesters interleukin-33 (IL-33), limiting its availability to T cells expressing membrane-bound ST2 (mST2) [T helper 2 (TH2) cells and ST2(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells]. We report that blockade of sST2 in the peritransplant period with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (anti-ST2 mAb) reduced GVHD severity and mortality. We identified intestinal stromal cells and T cells as major sources of sST2 during GVHD. ST2 blockade decreased systemic interferon-γ, IL-17, and IL-23 but increased IL-10 and IL-33 plasma levels. ST2 blockade also reduced sST2 production by IL-17-producing T cells while maintaining protective mST2-expressing T cells, increasing the frequency of intestinal myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and decreasing the frequency of intestinal CD103 dendritic cells. Finally, ST2 blockade preserved graft-versus-leukemia activity in a model of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive MLL-AF9 acute myeloid leukemia. Our findings suggest that ST2 is a therapeutic target for severe GVHD and that the ST2/IL-33 pathway could be investigated in other T cell-mediated immune disorders with loss of tolerance. PMID:26446957

  2. PD-1 Blockade Can Restore Functions of T-Cells in Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Lina; Chen, Xue; Liu, Aichun; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Xiuchen; Yan, Shujie; Liu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV+DLBCL) is an aggressive malignancy that is largely resistant to current therapeutic regimens, and is an attractive target for immune-based therapies. Anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibodies showed encouraging anti-tumor effects in both preclinical models and advanced solid and hematological malignancies, but its efficacy against EBV+DLBCL is unknown. Herein, we performed experiments using co-culture system with T cells and lymphoma cell lines including EBV+DLBCL and EBV-DLBCL [including germinal center B-cell like (GCB)-DLBCL and non-GCB-DLBCL] in vitro. We show that lymphoma cells augmented the expression of PD-1 on T cells, decreased the proliferation of T cells, and altered the secretion of multiple cytokines. However, through PD-1 blockade, these functions could be largely restored. Notbaly, the effect of PD-1 blockade on antitumor immunity was more effective in EBV+DLBCL than that in EBV-DLBCL in vitro. These results suggest that T-cell exhaustion and immune escape in microenvironment is one of the mechanisms underlying DLBCL; and PD-1 blockade could present as a efficacious immunotherapeutic treatment for EBV+DLBCL. PMID:26361042

  3. Effects of interferon-α-transduced tumor cell vaccines and blockade of programmed cell death-1 on the growth of established tumors.

    PubMed

    Omori, R; Eguchi, J; Hiroishi, K; Ishii, S; Hiraide, A; Sakaki, M; Doi, H; Kajiwara, A; Ito, T; Kogo, M; Imawari, M

    2012-09-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has strong antitumor effects, and IFN-α gene therapy has been used clinically against some cancers. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the combination of IFN-α-transduced tumor cell vaccines and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) blockade, and investigated the mechanisms of the antitumor effects of the combined therapy. A poorly immunogenic murine colorectal cancer cell line, MC38, was transduced to overexpress IFN-α. In a therapeutic model, parental tumor-bearing mice were inoculated with MC38-IFNα cells and an anti-PD-1 antagonistic antibody. Analyses of immunohistochemistry and tumor-specific lysis were performed. The outgrowth of the established tumors was significantly reduced in mice treated with the combination of IFN-α and anti-PD-1. Immunohistochemical analyses of the therapeutic model showed marked infiltration of CD4(+) cells and CD8(+) cells in the established MC38 tumors of mice treated with both IFN-α and anti-PD-1. Significant tumor-specific cytolysis was detected when splenocytes of mice that were treated with both IFN-α and anti-PD-1 were used as effector cells. These results suggest that blockade of the PD-1 PD-ligand enhanced the Th1-type antitumor immune responses induced by IFN-α. The combination of IFN-α gene-transduced tumor cell vaccines and PD-1 blockade may be a possible candidate for a cancer vaccine for clinical trials. PMID:22790963

  4. Blockade of DNA methylation enhances the therapeutic effect of gefitinib in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-You; Wu, Jian-Zhong; Cao, Hai-Xia; Ma, Rong; Wu, Jian-Qiu; Zhong, Yue-Jiao; Feng, Ji-Feng

    2013-05-01

    The sensitivity of lung cancer to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has been found to be associated with mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR. However, not all mutations are sensitive to gefitinib. While CpG island methylation in the promoter region of the EGFR gene and transcriptional silencing are common in solid tumors, the role of the EGFR gene promoter methylation in affecting resistance to TKIs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains unknown. In this study, we examined the correlation between EGFR gene promoter methylation and the therapeutic effect of gefitinib in NSCLC cells. Three NSCLC cell lines with different EGFR mutation statuses and levels of sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs were used in this study: H1650 (del E746-A750), H1299 (wild-type EGFR) and PC-9 (del E746-A750). Cells were treated with gefitinib or 5-aza-2'-deoxy cytidine (5-aza-CdR), a methylation inhibitor, alone or in combination. Subsequently, the methylation status of the EGFR gene promoter was examined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Cell survival and apoptosis assays were performed using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and flow cytometry. In addition, western blot analysis and quantitative real-time PCR were used to examine the expression levels of EGFR protein and mRNA. Our study showed that the promoter region of the EGFR gene in PC-9 cells was unmethylated, and that the cells were sensitive to gefitinib. By contrast, the promoter region of the EGFR gene in the H1650 and H1299 cells was methylated, and the cells were resistant to gefitinib. Of note, the combination treatment with 5-aza-CdR and gefitinib further enhanced the growth inhibitory effects and led to the induction of apoptosis, while a significant reduction in the expression of EGFR protein and mRNA was observed in the H1650 and H1299 cells. These results suggest that blockade of DNA methylation may enhance the antitumor effects of EGFR-TKIs and gefitinib in NSCLC cells

  5. Destruction of tumor vasculature and abated tumor growth upon VEGF blockade is driven by proapoptotic protein Bim in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Naik, Edwina; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse; Merino, Delphine; Lin, Ann; Cook, Michele; Coultas, Leigh; Bouillet, Philippe; Adams, Jerry M; Strasser, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    For malignant growth, solid cancers must stimulate the formation of new blood vessels by producing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), which is required for the survival of tumor-associated vessels. Novel anticancer agents that block VEGF-A signaling trigger endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis and vascular regression preferentially within tumors, but how the ECs die is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that VEGF-A deprivation, provoked either by drug-induced tumor shrinkage or direct VEGF-A blockade, up-regulates the proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3)-only Bcl-2 family member Bim in ECs. Importantly, the tumor growth inhibitory activity of a VEGF-A antagonist required Bim-induced apoptosis of ECs. These findings thus reveal the mechanism by which VEGF-A blockade induces EC apoptosis and impairs tumor growth. They also indicate that drugs mimicking BH3-only proteins may be exploited to kill tumor cells not only directly but also indirectly by ablating the tumor vasculature. PMID:21646395

  6. Exploring Kupffer's Vescicle Through Self Propelled Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundy, Kassidy; Dasgupta, Agnik; Amack, Jeff; Manning, M. Lisa

    Early development is an important stage in the formation of functional, relatively healthy organisms. In zebrafish embryos, a transient organ in the tailbud called Kupffer's Vescicle (KV) is responsible for the initial left-right (L-R) asymmetry that results in asymmetric organ and tissue placement in the adult zebrafish. Originating as a collection of symmetrically organized monociliated cells, the KV experiences a shift in cell shapes over time that leaves more cells on the anterior or top side of the KV. This arrangement helps to generate a stronger counter-clockwise fluid flow across the anterior side of the organ, which is required for L-R asymmetry. In seeking to understand the source of the shape changes occurring within the KV, we simulate a Self Propelled Particle (SPP) model that includes parameters for cell polarization and speed. We model the KV as a large particle moving in a straight line with constant velocity to mimic the physical forces of the notochord acting on this organ, and we model the surrounding tailbud cells as smaller, slower active particles with an orientation that changes over time due to rotational noise. Our goal is to calculate the forces exerted on the KV by the surrounding tissue, to see if they are sufficient to explain the shape changes we observe in the KV that lead to L-R asymmetry.

  7. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  8. Predictive Efficacy Biomarkers of Programmed Cell Death 1/Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand Blockade Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Na; Fu, Li-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of immune check-point molecule, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) have attracted much attention in cancer immunotherapy recently due to their durable antitumor effects in various malignances, especially the advanced ones. Unfortunately, only a fraction of patients with advanced tumors could benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy, while others still worsened. The key to this point is that there are no efficient biomarkers for screening anti-PD-1/PD-L1-sensitive patients. In this review, we aim at summarizing the latest advances of anti-PD-1/PDL1 immunotherapy and the potential predictive efficacy biomarkers to provide evidences for identifying anti-PD-1/PDL1- sensitive patients. The present article also includes the patent review coverage on this topic. PMID:26916881

  9. GD2-specific CAR T Cells Undergo Potent Activation and Deletion Following Antigen Encounter but can be Protected From Activation-induced Cell Death by PD-1 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Yu, Wenbo; Dotti, Gianpietro; Yvon, Eric S; Christo, Susan N; Hayball, John D; Lewis, Ian D; Brenner, Malcolm K; Brown, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have shown great promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies but more variable results in the treatment of solid tumors and the persistence and expansion of CAR T cells within patients has been identified as a key correlate of antitumor efficacy. Lack of immunological "space", functional exhaustion, and deletion have all been proposed as mechanisms that hamper CAR T-cell persistence. Here we describe the events following activation of third-generation CAR T cells specific for GD2. CAR T cells had highly potent immediate effector functions without evidence of functional exhaustion in vitro, although reduced cytokine production reversible by PD-1 blockade was observed after longer-term culture. Significant activation-induced cell death (AICD) of CAR T cells was observed after repeated antigen stimulation, and PD-1 blockade enhanced both CAR T-cell survival and promoted killing of PD-L1(+) tumor cell lines. Finally, we assessed CAR T-cell persistence in patients enrolled in the CARPETS phase 1 clinical trial of GD2-specific CAR T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Together, these data suggest that deletion also occurs in vivo and that PD-1-targeted combination therapy approaches may be useful to augment CAR T-cell efficacy and persistence in patients. PMID:27019998

  10. Blockade of irradiation-induced autophagosome formation impairs proliferation but does not enhance cell death in HCT-116 human colorectal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    DE ALBUQUERQUE-XAVIER, ANA CRISTINA; BASTOS, LILIAN GONÇALVES R.; DE FREITAS, JULIO CESAR MADUREIRA; LEVE, FERNANDA; DE SOUZA, WALDEMIR FERNÁNDEZ; DE ARAUJO, WALLACE MARTINS; WANDERLEY, JOÃO LUIZ MENDES; TANAKA, MARCELO NEVES; DE SOUZA, WANDERLEY; MORGADO-DÍAZ, JOSÉ ANDRÉS

    2012-01-01

    This work was undertaken to gain further information on the molecular mechanisms underlying autophagosome formation and its relation with tumor cell survival in response to radiation in colon cancer. A human colon cancer cell line, HCT-116, was examined with respect to cell survival after blockade of irradiation-induced autophagosome formation by pharmacological interference. Autophagosome formation was confirmed using a kinetic study with incorporated bovine serum albumin gold-conjugate (BSA-Au) analyzed by electron microscopy and an autophagosome-associated LC3B antibody measured by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Annexin V/PI double staining was used to monitor cell death by apoptosis, and cell cycle profiles by flow cytometry. Ionizing radiation (IR) promoted autophagosome formation in the HCT-116 IR-surviving cells. Pharmacological interference showed that PI3K/Akt and Src were involved in early stages of autophagosome formation. IR alone decreased cell proliferation by arresting cells in the G2/M phase, and pharmacological interference of autophagosome formation decreased proliferation, but did not affect cell survival. Also, our data suggest that decreased proliferation caused by PI3K and Src inhibitors could be through S phase cell cycle delay. Our results clearly indicate that blockade of IR-induced autophagosome formation impairs proliferation but does not enhance cell death in colon cancer cells. PMID:22246348

  11. Dual blockade of EGFR and c-Met abrogates redundant signaling and proliferation in head and neck carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Stabile, Laura P.; Gubish, Christopher T.; Gooding, William E.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Siegfried, Jill M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is usually fatal, and innovative approaches targeting growth pathways are necessary to effectively treat this disease. Both the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met pathways are overexpressed in HNSCC and initiate similar downstream signaling pathways. c-Met may act in consort with EGFR and/or be activated as a compensatory pathway in the presence of EGFR blockade. Experimental Design Expression levels of EGFR and c-Met were determined by Western analysis in HNSCC cell lines and correlated with anti-tumor responses to inhibitors of these pathways. Results Combining the c-Met inhibitor PF2341066 with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib abrogated HNSCC cell proliferation, invasion and wound healing significantly more than inhibition of each pathway alone in HNSCC cell lines. When both HGF and the EGFR ligand, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α), were present in vitro, P-AKT and P-MAPK expression were maximally inhibited by targeting both EGFR and c-Met pathways, suggesting that c-Met or EGFR can compensate when phosphorylation of the other receptor is inhibited. We also demonstrated that TGF-α can induce phosphorylation of c-Met over 6-fold by 8 hours in the absence of HGF, supporting a ligand-independent mechanism. Combined targeting of c-Met and EGFR resulted in an enhanced inhibition of tumor volumes accompanied by a decreased number of proliferating cells and increased apoptosis compared to single agent treatment in vivo. Conclusions Together these results suggest that dual blockade of c-Met and EGFR may be a promising clinical therapeutic strategy for treating HNSCC. PMID:21622718

  12. VLA-4 blockade promotes differential routes into human CNS involving PSGL-1 rolling of T cells and MCAM-adhesion of TH17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneider-Hohendorf, Tilman; Rossaint, Jan; Mohan, Hema; Böning, Daniel; Breuer, Johanna; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Gross, Catharina C.; Flanagan, Ken; Sorokin, Lydia; Vestweber, Dietmar; Zarbock, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this study is the characterization of human T cell blood–brain barrier migration and corresponding molecular trafficking signatures. We examined peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid immune cells from patients under long-term anti–very late antigen-4 (VLA-4)/natalizumab therapy (LTNT) and from CNS specimens. LTNT patients’ cerebrospinal fluid T cells exhibited healthy central-/effector-memory ratios, but lacked CD49d and showed enhanced myeloma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) expression. LTNT led to an increase of PSGL-1 expression on peripheral T cells. Although vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VLA-4 receptor) was expressed at all CNS barriers, P-selectin (PSGL-1-receptor) was mainly detected at the choroid plexus. Accordingly, in vitro experiments under physiological flow conditions using primary human endothelial cells and LTNT patients’ T cells showed increased PSGL-1–mediated rolling and residual adhesion, even under VLA-4 blockade. Adhesion of MCAM+/TH17 cells was not affected by VLA-4 blocking alone, but was abrogated when both VLA-4 and MCAM were inhibited. Consistent with these data, MCAM+ cells were detected in white matter lesions, and in gray matter of multiple sclerosis patients. Our data indicate that lymphocyte trafficking into the CNS under VLA-4 blockade can occur by using the alternative adhesion molecules, PSGL-1 and MCAM, the latter representing an exclusive pathway for TH17 cells to migrate over the blood–brain barrier. PMID:25135296

  13. Suppression of experimental myasthenia gravis, a B cell-mediated autoimmune disease, by blockade of IL-18.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Maiti, P K; Raveh, L; Souroujon, M C; Fuchs, S

    2001-10-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production and IL-12-driven Th1 phenotype polarization. Increased expression of IL-18 has been observed in several autoimmune diseases. In this study we have analyzed the role of IL-18 in an antibody-mediated autoimmune disease and elucidated the mechanisms involved in disease suppression mediated by blockade of IL-18, using experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) as a model. EAMG is a T cell-regulated, antibody-mediated autoimmune disease in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. Th1- and Th2-type responses are both implicated in EAMG development. We show that treatment by anti-IL-18 during ongoing EAMG suppresses disease progression. The protective effect can be adoptively transferred to naive recipients and is mediated by increased levels of the immunosuppressive Th3-type cytokine TGF-beta and decreased AChR-specific Th1-type cellular responses. Suppression of EAMG is accompanied by down-regulation of the costimulatory factor CD40L and up-regulation of CTLA-4, a key negative immunomodulator. Our results suggest that IL-18 blockade may potentially be applied for immunointervention in myasthenia gravis. PMID:11641240

  14. Differential Impact of PD-1 and/or Interleukin-10 Blockade on HIV-1-Specific CD4 T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Barblu, Lucie; Kwon, Douglas S.; McMullen, Ashley; Brennan, Thomas; Ahmed, Rafi; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigen persistence in chronic infections and cancer upregulates inhibitory networks, such as the PD-1 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) pathways, that impair immunity and lead to disease progression. These pathways are attractive targets for immunotherapy, as demonstrated by recent clinical trials of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer patients. However, in HIV-1 infection not all subjects respond to inhibition of either pathway and the mechanistic interactions between these two networks remain to be better defined. Here we demonstrate that in vitro blockade of PD-L1 and/or IL-10Rα results in markedly different profiles of HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell restoration. Whereas PD-L1 blockade leads to balanced increase in gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-2, and IL-13 secretion, IL-10Rα blockade preferentially restores IFN-γ production. In viremic subjects, combined PD-L1/IL-10Rα blockade results in a striking 10-fold increase in IFN-γ secretion by HIV-1-specific CD4 T cells that is not observed in subjects with spontaneous (elite controllers) or therapy-induced control of viral replication. In contrast to the dramatic increase in IFN-γ production, concurrent blockade has a marginal additive effect on IL-2 production, IL-13 secretion, and HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell proliferation. IFN-γ produced by Thelper cells upregulates PD-L1, HLA I/II, and IL-12 expression by monocytes. The effect of combined blockade on IFN-γ was dependent on reciprocal reinforcement through IL-12. These studies provide crucial information on the different immunoregulatory qualities of PD-1 and IL-10 in progressive disease and link exhausted virus-specific CD4 T cells and monocytes in the regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 secretion. IMPORTANCE Infection with HIV results in most people in uncontrolled viral replication and progressive weakening of the body defenses. In the absence of antiviral therapy, this process results in clinical disease, or AIDS. An important reason why HIV continues to multiply is

  15. Eradication of metastatic mouse cancers resistant to immune checkpoint blockade by suppression of myeloid-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, KiBem; Skora, Andrew D.; Li, Zhaobo; Liu, Qiang; Tam, Ada J.; Blosser, Richard L.; Diaz, Luis A.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2014-01-01

    Impressive responses have been observed in patients treated with checkpoint inhibitory anti–programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) or anti–cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) antibodies. However, immunotherapy against poorly immunogenic cancers remains a challenge. Here we report that treatment with both anti–PD-1 and anti–CTLA-4 antibodies was unable to eradicate large, modestly immunogenic CT26 tumors or metastatic 4T1 tumors. Cotreatment with epigenetic-modulating drugs and checkpoint inhibitors markedly improved treatment outcomes, curing more than 80% of the tumor-bearing mice. Functional studies revealed that the primary targets of the epigenetic modulators were myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). A PI3K inhibitor that reduced circulating MDSCs also eradicated 4T1 tumors in 80% of the mice when combined with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Thus, cancers resistant to immune checkpoint blockade can be cured by eliminating MDSCs. PMID:25071169

  16. PLK1 blockade enhances therapeutic effects of radiation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the mitotic phase

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Minoru; Yoshimura, Michio; Kobayashi, Minoru; Morinibu, Akiyo; Itasaka, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation depends on the cell cycle phase; therefore, its pharmacological manipulation, especially the induction of cell cycle arrest at the radiosensitive mitotic-phase (M-phase), has been attempted for effective radiation therapy. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase that functions in mitotic progression, and is now recognized as a potential target for radiosensitization. We herein investigated whether PLK1 blockade enhanced the cytotoxic effects of radiation by modulating cell cycle phases of cancer cells using the novel small molecule inhibitor of PLK1, TAK-960. The TAK-960 treatment exhibited radiosensitizing effects in vitro, especially when it increased the proportion of M-phase cells. TAK-960 did not sensitize cancer cells to radiation when an insufficient amount of time was provided to induce mitotic arrest. The overexpression of a PLK1 mutant, PLK1-R136G&T210D, which was confirmed to cancel the TAK-960-mediated increase in the proportion of mitotic cells, abrogated the radiosensitizing effects of TAK-960. A tumor growth delay assay also demonstrated that the radiosensitizing effects of TAK-960 depended on an increase in the proportion of M-phase cells. These results provide a rational basis for targeting PLK1 for radiosensitization when considering the therapeutic time window for M-phase arrest as the best timing for radiation treatments. PMID:26503893

  17. Blockade of CD26-mediated T cell costimulation with soluble caveolin-1-Ig fusion protein induces anergy in CD4{sup +}T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, Kei; Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 ; Uchiyama, Masahiko; Department of Computational Intelligence and System Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 ; Hatano, Ryo; Takasawa, Wataru; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao; Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639

    2009-08-21

    CD26 binds to caveolin-1 in antigen-presenting cells (APC), and that ligation of CD26 by caveolin-1 induces T cell proliferation in a TCR/CD3-dependent manner. We report herein the effects of CD26-caveolin-1 costimulatory blockade by fusion protein caveolin-1-Ig (Cav-Ig). Soluble Cav-Ig inhibits T cell proliferation and cytokine production in response to recall antigen, or allogeneic APC. Our data hence suggest that blocking of CD26-associated signaling by soluble Cav-Ig may be an effective approach as immunosuppressive therapy.

  18. The antimalarial amodiaquine causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade sensitizing human melanoma cells to starvation- and chemotherapy-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shuxi; Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Park, Sophia L; Vonderfecht, Amanda A; Jacobs, Suesan L; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of autophagic-lysosomal function has recently emerged as a promising strategy for chemotherapeutic intervention targeting cancer cells. Repurposing approved and abandoned non-oncological drugs is an alternative approach to the identification and development of anticancer therapeutics, and antimalarials that target autophagic-lysosomal functions have recently attracted considerable attention as candidates for oncological repurposing. Since cumulative research suggests that dependence on autophagy represents a specific vulnerability of malignant melanoma cells, we screened a focused compound library of antimalarials for antimelanoma activity. Here we report for the first time that amodiaquine (AQ), a clinical 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial with unexplored cancer-directed chemotherapeutic potential, causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade in melanoma cells that surpasses that of its parent compound chloroquine. Monitoring an established set of protein markers (LAMP1, LC3-II, SQSTM1) and cell ultrastructural changes detected by electron microscopy, we observed that AQ treatment caused autophagic-lysosomal blockade in malignant A375 melanoma cells, a finding substantiated by detection of rapid inactivation of lysosomal cathepsins (CTSB, CTSL, CTSD). AQ-treatment was associated with early induction of energy crisis (ATP depletion) and sensitized melanoma cells to either starvation- or chemotherapeutic agent-induced cell death. AQ displayed potent antiproliferative effects, and gene expression array analysis revealed changes at the mRNA (CDKN1A, E2F1) and protein level (TP53, CDKN1A, CCND1, phospho-RB1 [Ser 780]/[Ser 807/811], E2F1) consistent with the observed proliferative blockade in S-phase. Taken together, our data suggest that the clinical antimalarial AQ is a promising candidate for repurposing efforts that aim at targeting autophagic-lysosomal function and proliferative control in malignant melanoma cells. PMID:24113242

  19. Natural killer cell killing of acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor-negative natural killer cells after NKG2A and LIR-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Godal, Robert; Bachanova, Veronika; Gleason, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Yun, Gong H; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; McGlave, Philip B; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2010-05-01

    Although the study of natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity has been dominated by studies of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), we hypothesized that NKG2A and LIR-1, present on 53% +/- 13% and 36% +/- 18% of normal NK cells, respectively, play roles in the NK cell killing of primary leukemia targets. KIR(-) cells, which compose nearly half of the circulating NK cell population, exhibit tolerance to primary leukemia targets, suggesting signaling through other inhibitory receptors. Both acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia targets were rendered susceptible to lysis by fresh resting KIR(-) NK cells when inhibitory receptor-major histocompatibility class I interactions were blocked by pan-HLA antibodies, demonstrating that these cells are functionally competent. Blockade of a single inhibitory receptor resulted in slightly increased killing, whereas combined LIR-1 and NKG2A blockade consistently resulted in increased NK cell cytotoxicity. Dual blockade of NKG2A and LIR-1 led to significant killing of targets by resting KIR(-) NK cells, demonstrating that this population is not hyporesponsive. Together these results suggest that alloreactivity of a significant fraction of KIR(-) NK cells is mediated by NKG2A and LIR-1. Thus strategies to interrupt NKG2A and LIR-1 in combination with anti-KIR blockade hold promise for exploiting NK cell therapy in acute leukemias. PMID:20139023

  20. Three-dimensional flow in Kupffer's Vesicle.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Johnson, T D; Baker, D I; Smith, D J; Lopes, S S

    2016-09-01

    Whilst many vertebrates appear externally left-right symmetric, the arrangement of internal organs is asymmetric. In zebrafish, the breaking of left-right symmetry is organised by Kupffer's Vesicle (KV): an approximately spherical, fluid-filled structure that begins to form in the embryo 10 hours post fertilisation. A crucial component of zebrafish symmetry breaking is the establishment of a cilia-driven fluid flow within KV. However, it is still unclear (a) how dorsal, ventral and equatorial cilia contribute to the global vortical flow, and (b) if this flow breaks left-right symmetry through mechanical transduction or morphogen transport. Fully answering these questions requires knowledge of the three-dimensional flow patterns within KV, which have not been quantified in previous work. In this study, we calculate and analyse the three-dimensional flow in KV. We consider flow from both individual and groups of cilia, and (a) find anticlockwise flow can arise purely from excess of cilia on the dorsal roof over the ventral floor, showing how this vortical flow is stabilised by dorsal tilt of equatorial cilia, and (b) show that anterior clustering of dorsal cilia leads to around 40 % faster flow in the anterior over the posterior corner. We argue that these flow features are supportive of symmetry breaking through mechano-sensory cilia, and suggest a novel experiment to test this hypothesis. From our new understanding of the flow, we propose a further experiment to reverse the flow within KV to potentially induce situs inversus. PMID:26825450

  1. Blockade of Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Increases Sensitivity to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Yang, Su-Qing; An, She-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Su, Jian; Xie, Zhi; Gou, Lan-Ying; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem-like cell (CSC) maintenance; both processes can result in tumor progression and treatment resistance in several types of human cancer. Hh cooperates with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in embryogenesis. We found that the Hh signaling pathway was silenced in EGFR-TKI-sensitive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, while it was inappropriately activated in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells, accompanied by EMT induction and ABCG2 overexpression. Upregulation of Hh signaling through extrinsic SHH exposure downregulated E-cadherin expression and elevated Snail and ABCG2 expression, resulting in gefitinib tolerance (P < 0.001) in EGFR-TKI-sensitive cells. Blockade of the Hh signaling pathway using the SMO antagonist SANT-1 restored E-cadherin expression and downregulate Snail and ABCG2 in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells. A combination of SANT-1 and gefitinib markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and proliferation in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that hyperactivity of Hh signaling resulted in EGFR-TKI resistance, by EMT introduction and ABCG2 upregulation, and blockade of Hh signaling synergistically increased sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs in primary and secondary resistant NSCLC cells. E-cadherin expression may be a potential biomarker of the suitability of the combined application of an Hh inhibitor and EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLCs. PMID:26943330

  2. Blockade of Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Increases Sensitivity to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Yang, Su-Qing; An, She-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Su, Jian; Xie, Zhi; Gou, Lan-Ying; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem-like cell (CSC) maintenance; both processes can result in tumor progression and treatment resistance in several types of human cancer. Hh cooperates with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in embryogenesis. We found that the Hh signaling pathway was silenced in EGFR-TKI-sensitive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, while it was inappropriately activated in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells, accompanied by EMT induction and ABCG2 overexpression. Upregulation of Hh signaling through extrinsic SHH exposure downregulated E-cadherin expression and elevated Snail and ABCG2 expression, resulting in gefitinib tolerance (P < 0.001) in EGFR-TKI-sensitive cells. Blockade of the Hh signaling pathway using the SMO antagonist SANT-1 restored E-cadherin expression and downregulate Snail and ABCG2 in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells. A combination of SANT-1 and gefitinib markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and proliferation in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that hyperactivity of Hh signaling resulted in EGFR-TKI resistance, by EMT introduction and ABCG2 upregulation, and blockade of Hh signaling synergistically increased sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs in primary and secondary resistant NSCLC cells. E-cadherin expression may be a potential biomarker of the suitability of the combined application of an Hh inhibitor and EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLCs. PMID:26943330

  3. Gefitinib induces lung cancer cell autophagy and apoptosis via blockade of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, ZHONG-QUAN; YU, ZHONG-YANG; LI, JIE; OUYANG, XUE-NONG

    2016-01-01

    Gefitinib is a selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor, which inhibits tumor pathogenesis, metastasis and angiogenesis, as well as promoting apoptosis. Therefore, gefitinib presents an effective drug for the targeted therapy of lung cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms by which gefitinib induces lung cancer cell death remain unclear. To investigate the effects of gefitinib on lung cancer cells and the mechanism of such, the present study analyzed the effect of gefitinib on the autophagy, apoptosis and proliferation of the A549 and A549-gefitinib-resistant (GR) cell lines GR. The regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was also investigated. Acridine orange staining revealed that gefitinib induced autophagy of A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. In addition, gefitinib promoted apoptosis and inhibited proliferation of A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. Furthermore, western blot analysis demonstrated that gefitinib treatment led to the downregulation of PI3K, AKT, pAKT, mTOR and phosphorylated-mTOR protein expression in A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. LY294002 blocked the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy and apoptosis of A549 cells, however, no synergistic effect was observed following combined treatment with gefitinib and LY294002. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that gefitinib promotes autophagy and apoptosis of lung cancer cells via blockade of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which leads to lung cancer cell death. PMID:27347100

  4. The Effect of Therapeutic Blockades of Dust Particles-Induced Ca²⁺ Signaling and Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-8 in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Hee; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are the first barrier of defense against respiratory pathogens. Dust particles as extracellular stimuli are associated with inflammatory reactions after inhalation. It has been reported that dust particles induce intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which subsequently increases cytokines production such as interleukin- (IL-) 8. However, the study of therapeutic blockades of Ca(2+) signaling induced by dust particles in human bronchial epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated how to modulate dust particles-induced Ca(2+) signaling and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 expression. Bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM10 dust particles and subsequent mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and reactive oxygen species signal. Our results show that exposure to several inhibitors of Ca(2+) pathway attenuated the PM10-induced Ca(2+) response and subsequent IL-8 mRNA expression. PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression were attenuated by several pharmacological blockades such as antioxidants, IP3-PLC blockers, and TRPM2 inhibitors. Our results show that blockades of PLC or TRPM2 reduced both of PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression, suggesting that treatment with these blockades should be considered for potential therapeutic trials in pulmonary epithelium for inflammation caused by environmental events such as seasonal dust storm. PMID:26640326

  5. ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic effects via impaired endothelial cell function and blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Huang, Jingjia; Li, Jijia; Qin, Xiyuan; Tang, Xiaoning; Jin, Fang; Chen, Shali; Jiang, Chuanming; Zou, Zizheng; Peng, Kunjian; Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Jianting; Luo, Junli; Liu, Suyou; Luo, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic strategy against cancer. In this study, we reported that ZLM-7, a combretastain A-4 (CA-4) derivative, exhibited anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ZLM-7 induced microtubule cytoskeletal disassembly. It decreased VEGF-induced proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation in endothelial cells, which are critical steps in angiogenesis. In vivo, ZLM-7 significantly inhibited neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and reduced the microvessel density in tumor tissues of MCF-7 xenograft mouse model. ZLM-7 also displayed comparable antiangiogenic and anti-tumor activities associated with the lead compound CA-4, but exhibited lower toxicity compared with CA-4. The anti-angiogenic effect of ZLM-7 was exerted via blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling. ZLM-7 treatment suppressed the expression and secretion of VEGF in endothelial cells and MCF-7 cells under hypoxia. Further, ZLM-7 suppressed the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and its downstream signaling mediators including activated AKT, MEK and ERK in endothelial cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic activities by impairing endothelial cell function and blocking VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling, suggesting that ZLM-7 might be a potential angiogenesis inhibitor. PMID:26967559

  6. Improvement of Chicken Primordial Germ Cell Maintenance In Vitro by Blockade of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Endogenous Activity.

    PubMed

    Pérez Sáez, Juan M; Bussmann, Leonardo E; Barañao, J Lino; Bussmann, Ursula A

    2016-06-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the undifferentiated progenitors of gametes. Germline competent PGCs can be developed as a cell-based system for genetic modification in chickens, which provides a valuable tool for transgenic technology with both research and industrial applications. This implies manipulation of PGCs, which, in recent years, encouraged a lot of research focused on the study of PGCs and the way of improving their culture. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that besides mediating toxic responses to environmental contaminants plays pivotal physiological roles in various biological processes. Since a novel compound that acts as an antagonist of this receptor has been reported to promote expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, we conducted the present study with the aim of determining whether addition of an established AHR antagonist to the standard culture medium used nowadays for in vitro chicken PGCs culture improves ex vivo expansion. We have found that addition of α-naphthoflavone in culture medium promotes the amplification of undifferentiated cells and that this effect is exerted by the blockade of AHR action. Our results constitute the first report of the successful use of a readily available AHR antagonist to improve avian PGCs expansion, and they further extend the knowledge of the effects of AHR modulation in undifferentiated cells. PMID:27253627

  7. Implication of combined PD-L1/PD-1 blockade with cytokine-induced killer cells as a synergistic immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ruixuan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Wenbo; Chang, Jinjia; Wu, Zheng; Liu, Xinyang; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent a realistic approach in cancer immunotherapy with confirmed survival benefits in the context of metastatic solid tumors. However, therapeutic effects are limited to a fraction of patients. In this study, immune-resistance elements and ideal combination therapies were explored. Initially, phenotypic analysis was performed to document CD3, CD56, NKG2D, DNAM-1, PD-L1, PD-1, CTLA-4, TIM-3, 2B4, and LAG-3 on CIK cells. Upon engagement of CIK cells with the tumor cells, expression of PD-1 on CIK cells and PD-L1 on both cells were up-regulated. Over-expression of PD-L1 levels on tumor cells via lentiviral transduction inhibited tumoricidal activity of CIK cells, and neutralizing of PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis could enhance their tumor-killing effect. Conversely, blockade of NKG2D, a major activating receptor of CIK cells, largely caused dysfunction of CIK cells. Functional study showed an increase of NKG2D levels along with PD-L1/PD-1 blockade in the presence of other immune effector molecule secretion. Additionally, combined therapy of CIK infusion and PD-L1/PD-1 blockade caused a delay of in vivo tumor growth and exhibited a survival advantage over untreated mice. These results provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for simultaneous PD-L1/PD-1 pathways blockade along with CIK infusion as a novel immunotherapy for unresectable cancers. PMID:26871284

  8. Activation patterns of embryonic chick hind-limb muscles following blockade of activity and motoneurone cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Landmesser, L T; Szente, M

    1986-01-01

    Motoneurone cell death and spontaneous embryonic motility were blocked in chick embryos by daily in ovo injections of d-tubocurarine from stage 28-36 (E5-10). Isolated spinal cord-hind-limb preparations were prepared from these embryos and movement sequences in response to electrical stimulation of the thoracic cord were assessed, after drug wash-out, by electromyogram (e.m.g.) or muscle-nerve recordings. In embryos in which complete blockade of lumbar motoneurone cell death was later confirmed histologically, flexor and extensor motoneurone pools were found to be activated in alternating bursts as occurs in control embryos. Thus the development of the basic cord circuits responsible for these patterns of motoneurone activation does not require motoneurone cell death. Partial blockade of motoneurone cell death by guanosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic GMP) was also without effect on muscle activation patterns. In ovo injection of d-tubocurarine or alpha-bungarotoxin in doses sufficient to block embryonic motility was found to have a direct effect on the spinal cord, preventing the patterned activation of motoneurone pools in alternating bursts. Cords removed from treated embryos behaved similarly to cords in which these drugs were applied acutely in the bath. Minor changes in muscle activation patterns that occurred with chronic drug treatment were also observed in acutely treated cords and appear to be a direct and persistent effect of the drugs on cord circuits. It is possible to conclude that cholinergic circuits within the chick lumbar cord play a role in the normal patterned activation of flexor and extensor motoneurone pools. Systemically applied drugs can have access to these circuits, indicating a need for caution when interpreting the results of drugs applied in this manner to developing embryos. We also conclude that neither the activation of motoneurones in patterned bursts, nor the afferent feed-back from the movements that result, are required to form the

  9. Blockade of STAT3 in T Cells Inhibits Germinal Center Reactions against Intranasal Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Garam; Chung, Yeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the developmental mechanisms of humoral immunity against intranasal antigens is essential for the development of therapeutic approaches against air-borne pathogens as well as allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation. Follicular helper T (Tfh) cells expressing CXCR5 are required for humoral immunity by providing IL-21 and ICOS costimulation to activated B cells. However, the regulation of Tfh cell responses against intranasal antigens remains unclear. Here, we found that the generation of Tfh cells and germinal center B cells in the bronchial lymph node against intranasal proteinase antigens was independent of TGF-β. In contrast, administration of STAT3 inhibitor STA-21 suppressed the generation of Tfh cells and germinal center B cells. Compared with wild-type OT-II T cells, STAT3-deficient OT-II T cells transferred into recipients lacking T cells not only showed significantly reduced frequency Tfh cells, but also induced diminished IgG as well as IgE specific for the intranasal antigens. Co-transfer study of wild-type OT-II and STAT3-deficient OT-II T cells revealed that the latter failed to differentiate into Tfh cells. These findings demonstrate that T cell-intrinsic STAT3 is required for the generation of Tfh cells to intranasal antigens and that targeting STAT3 might be an effective approach to ameliorate antibody-mediated pathology in the lung. PMID:27133258

  10. Blockade of CTLA-4 on CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells abrogates their function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Read, Simon; Greenwald, Rebecca; Izcue, Ana; Robinson, Nicholas; Mandelbrot, Didier; Francisco, Loise; Sharpe, Arlene H; Powrie, Fiona

    2006-10-01

    Naturally occurring CD4+ regulatory T cells (T(R)) that express CD25 and the transcription factor FoxP3 play a key role in immune homeostasis, preventing immune pathological responses to self and foreign Ags. CTLA-4 is expressed by a high percentage of these cells, and is often considered as a marker for T(R) in experimental and clinical analysis. However, it has not yet been proven that CTLA-4 has a direct role in T(R) function. In this study, using a T cell-mediated colitis model, we demonstrate that anti-CTLA-4 mAb treatment inhibits T(R) function in vivo via direct effects on CTLA-4-expressing T(R), and not via hyperactivation of colitogenic effector T cells. Although anti-CTLA-4 mAb treatment completely inhibits T(R) function, it does not reduce T(R) numbers or their homing to the GALT, suggesting the Ab mediates its function by blockade of a signal required for T(R) activity. In contrast to the striking effect of the Ab, CTLA-4-deficient mice can produce functional T(R), suggesting that under some circumstances other immune regulatory mechanisms, including the production of IL-10, are able to compensate for the loss of the CTLA-4-mediated pathway. This study provides direct evidence that CTLA-4 has a specific, nonredundant role in the function of normal T(R). This role has to be taken into account when targeting CTLA-4 for therapeutic purposes, as such a strategy will not only boost effector T cell responses, but might also break T(R)-mediated self-tolerance. PMID:16982872

  11. Inhibitory mechanism of tranilast in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation, due to blockade of PDGF-BB-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinji; Matsuda, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kazunao; Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Hashimoto, Hisakuni; Umemura, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    We have previously reported that tranilast, an anti-allergic drug, prevented the experimental intimal thickening in the rat and mouse femoral arteries and its effect may be exerted through the inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. However, its inhibitory mechanism has yet to be understood. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of tranilast on platelet-derived growth factor BB-homodimer (PDGF-BB) mediated signal transduction pathways in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). Growth responses to PDGF-BB were measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation or cell counting. Activation of DNA synthesis and augmentation of cell proliferation stimulated by PDGF-BB in quiescent cultures of CASMCs were inhibited by tranilast in a concentration-dependent manner. Western blot analysis of lysates from CASMCs with an anti-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase antibody revealed that tranilast (10–300 μM) inhibited MAP kinase activation by PDGF-BB in a concentration-dependent manner. Tranilast also reduced PDGF-BB-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180 kDa band, corresponding in mass to the PDGF β-receptor, as shown by immunoblots using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Receptor-binding study with [125I]-PDGF-BB on CASMCs showed that tranilast (10–1000 μM) inhibited the specific binding of PDGF-BB to cell surface receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed that pretreatment with 300 μM tranilast decreased the maximum binding capacity (Bmax) from 27.6 to 18.0 fmol 106 cells−1 without affecting binding affinity (Kd≈0.15 nM), indicating a non-competitive inhibition of the receptor binding. These results suggest that the suppression of human CASMC growth by tranilast might be at least partly due to blockade of PDGF-BB-receptor binding. PMID:10807667

  12. Characterization of Diabetogenic CD8+ T Cells: IMMUNE THERAPY WITH METABOLIC BLOCKADE.

    PubMed

    Garyu, Justin W; Uduman, Mohamed; Stewart, Alex; Rui, Jinxiu; Deng, Songyan; Shenson, Jared; Staron, Matt M; Kaech, Susan M; Kleinstein, Steven H; Herold, Kevan C

    2016-05-20

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is caused by the killing of insulin-producing β cells by CD8+T cells. The disease progression, which is chronic, does not follow a course like responses to conventional antigens such as viruses, but accelerates as glucose tolerance deteriorates. To identify the unique features of the autoimmune effectors that may explain this behavior, we analyzed diabetogenic CD8+ T cells that recognize a peptide from the diabetes antigen IGRP (NRP-V7-reactive) in prediabetic NOD mice and compared them to others that shared their phenotype (CD44(+)CD62L(lo)PD-1(+)CXCR3(+)) but negative for diabetes antigen tetramers and to LCMV (lymphocytic choriomeningitis)-reactive CD8+ T cells. There was an increase in the frequency of the NRP-V7-reactive cells coinciding with the time of glucose intolerance. The T cells persisted in hyperglycemic NOD mice maintained with an insulin pellet despite destruction of β cells. We compared gene expression in the three groups of cells compared with the other two subsets of cells, and the NRP-V7-reactive cells exhibited gene expression of memory precursor effector cells. They had reduced cellular proliferation and were less dependent on oxidative phosphorylation. When prediabetic NOD mice were treated with 2-deoxyglucose to block aerobic glycolysis, there was a reduction in the diabetes antigen versus other cells of similar phenotype and loss of lymphoid cells infiltrating the islets. In addition, treatment of NOD mice with 2-deoxyglucose resulted in improved β cell granularity. These findings identify a link between metabolic disturbances and autoreactive T cells that promotes development of autoimmune diabetes. PMID:26994137

  13. GnRH Episodic Secretion Is Altered by Pharmacological Blockade of Gap Junctions: Possible Involvement of Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pinet-Charvet, Caroline; Geller, Sarah; Desroziers, Elodie; Ottogalli, Monique; Lomet, Didier; Georgelin, Christine; Tillet, Yves; Franceschini, Isabelle; Vaudin, Pascal; Duittoz, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Episodic release of GnRH is essential for reproductive function. In vitro studies have established that this episodic release is an endogenous property of GnRH neurons and that GnRH secretory pulses are associated with synchronization of GnRH neuron activity. The cellular mechanisms by which GnRH neurons synchronize remain largely unknown. There is no clear evidence of physical coupling of GnRH neurons through gap junctions to explain episodic synchronization. However, coupling of glial cells through gap junctions has been shown to regulate neuron activity in their microenvironment. The present study investigated whether glial cell communication through gap junctions plays a role in GnRH neuron activity and secretion in the mouse. Our findings show that Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-expressing glial cells located in the median eminence in close vicinity to GnRH fibers expressed Gja1 encoding connexin-43. To study the impact of glial-gap junction coupling on GnRH neuron activity, an in vitro model of primary cultures from mouse embryo nasal placodes was used. In this model, GnRH neurons possess a glial microenvironment and were able to release GnRH in an episodic manner. Our findings show that in vitro glial cells forming the microenvironment of GnRH neurons expressed connexin-43 and displayed functional gap junctions. Pharmacological blockade of the gap junctions with 50 μM 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid decreased GnRH secretion by reducing pulse frequency and amplitude, suppressed neuronal synchronization and drastically reduced spontaneous electrical activity, all these effects were reversed upon 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid washout. PMID:26562259

  14. Blockade of MUC1 expression by glycerol guaiacolate inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, J S; Colon, J; Madero-Visbal, R; Isley, B; Konduri, S D; Baker, C H

    2010-10-01

    We sought to determine whether administration of glycerol guaiacolate at an optimal biological dose inhibits human breast cancer cell growth. Human breast cancer MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 cells were treated with glycerol guaiacolate and the therapeutic efficacy and biological activity of this drug was investigated on breast cancer cell growth. MCF-7 cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of overectamized female athymic nude mice. Ten days later, animals were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of glycerol guaiacolate for six weeks. Tumor size and volume was monitored and immunohistochemistry analysis on MUC1, p21 and ki-67 was performed. Glycerol guaiacolate decreased breast cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, decreased cell migration, and caused G1 cell cycle arrest. Our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate inhibits MUC1 protein and mRNA expression levels and significantly increased p21 expression in human breast cancer cells as well as induced PARP cleavage. Similarly, glycerol guaiacolate inhibited breast tumor growth in vivo as well as enhanced p21 expression and decreased breast tumor cell proliferation (ki-67 expression). Collectively, our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate decreased MUC1 expression and enhanced cell growth inhibition by inducing p21 expression in breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that glycerol guaiacolate may provide a novel and effective approach for the treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:21184665

  15. Blockade of TNF-α signaling benefits cancer therapy by suppressing effector regulatory T cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Li-Yuan; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Mahalingam, Jayashri; Su, Shih-Huan; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Chien-Hao; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Shi-Ming; Sheen, I-Shyan; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Effector but not naive regulatory T cells (Treg cells) can accumulate in the peripheral blood as well as the tumor microenvironment, expand during tumor progression and be one of the main suppressors for antitumor immunity. However, the underlying mechanisms for effector Treg cell expansion in tumor are still unknown. We demonstrate that effector Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor CD8+ T cells is tumor-nonspecific. Furthermore, TNFR2 expression is increased in these Treg cells by Affymetrix chip analysis which was confirmed by monoclonal antibody staining in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and murine models. Correspondingly, increased levels of TNF-α in both tissue and serum were also demonstrated. Interestingly, TNF-α could not only expand effector Treg cells through TNFR2 signaling, but also enhanced their suppressive activity against antitumor immunity of CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, targeting TNFR2 signaling with a TNF-α inhibitor could selectively reduce rapid resurgence of effector Treg cells after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion and markedly inhibit the growth of established tumors. Herein, we propose a novel mechanism in which TNF-α could promote tumor-associated effector Treg cell expansion and suggest a new cancer immunotherapy strategy using TNF-α inhibitors to reduce effector Treg cells expansion after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion. PMID:26451304

  16. miR-23a blockade enhances adoptive T cell transfer therapy by preserving immune-competence in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Regina; Sampson, John H; Li, Qi-Jing; Zhu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT), the antitumor efficacy of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs) has been limited by tumor-induced immunosuppression. We have demonstrated that miR-23a blockade in tumor-specific CTLs conferred resilience to TGFβ-mediated immunosuppression, resulting in superior tumor control. Our studies highlight miR-23a in tumor-specific CTLs as a clinically relevant target to enhance ACT. PMID:25949909

  17. Bax siRNA promotes survival of cultured and allografted granule cell precursors through blockade of caspase-3 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, S S; Desfeux, A; Aubert, N; Falluel-Morel, A; Fournier, A; Laudenbach, V; Vaudry, H; Gonzalez, B J

    2008-06-01

    Transplantation of neuronal precursor cells (NPCs) into the central nervous system could represent a powerful therapeutical tool against neurodegenerative diseases. Unfortunately, numerous NPCs die shortly after transplantation, predominantly due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using a culture of cerebellar neuronal precursors, we have previously demonstrated protective effect of the neuropeptide PACAP, which suppresses ceramide-induced apoptosis by blockade of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The main objective of this study was to determine whether Bax repression can promote survival of NPCs allotransplanted into a host animal. In vivo and ex vivo experiments revealed that C2-ceramide increases Bax expression, while PACAP reverses this effect. In vitro tests using cerebellar NPCs demonstrated that the Bax-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) could reduce their death and caspase-3 cleavage within the first 24 h. BrdU-labelled NPCs were subjected to transfection procedure with or without siRNA introduction before using for in vivo transplantation. Twenty-four hours after, the allografted NPCs containing siRNA showed significantly reduced level of caspase-3 cleavage, and the volume of their implants was almost twofold higher than in the case of empty-transfected precursors. These data evidence an important role of Bax in life/death decision of grafted NPCs and suggest that RNA interference strategy may be applicable for maintaining NPCs survival within the critical first hours after their transplantation. PMID:18323863

  18. Blockade of MerTK Activation by AMPK Inhibits RPE Cell Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Suofu

    2016-01-01

    Timely removal of shed photoreceptor outer segments by retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) plays a key role in biological renewal of these highly peroxidizable structures and in maintenance of retina health. How environmental stress cause RPE cell dysfunction is undefined however. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimer of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, maintains energy homeostasis by limiting energy utilization and/or promoting energy production when energy supply is compromised. Intriguingly, AMPK has been shown to be important in functions of RPE cells. In this mini-review, the role and mechanisms of AMPK in controlling RPE cell phagocytosis are discussed. PMID:26427488

  19. CD28 family of receptors on T cells in chronic HBV infection: Expression characteristics, clinical significance and correlations with PD-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zong-Sheng; Hao, You-Hua; Zhang, E-Juan; Xu, Chun-Li; Zhou, Yun; Zheng, Xin; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the overall clinical expression characteristics of the cluster of differentiation (CD)28 family receptors [CD28, inducible T-cell co-stimulator, programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator] on T cells in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), analyze the correlations among these receptors and the clinical parameters, and to investigate the effects of PD-1 blockade on the receptor expression profiles, T-cell function and other biological effects. The expression characteristics of the CD28 family of receptors, the effects of PD-1 blockade on the receptor expression profiles and the levels of interferon (IFN)-γ were investigated in the T cells of patients with CHB. In addition, the transcription factor, T-box 21 (T-bet) and GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3) mRNA expression levels were investigated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with CHB. The expression levels of the CD28 family receptors in the T cells of patients with CHB demonstrated distinct characteristics, for example levels of PD-1 and CTLA-4 on CD4 T cells and ICOS, PD-1, and BTLA on CD8 T cells were increased in cells from patients with CHB compared with those from the healthy individuals. A significant positive correlation was demonstrated among the serum HBV DNA titers and the levels of PD-1 on CD8+ T cells with the highest expression of PD-1 corresponding to viral levels >106 IU/ml. A significant positive correlation was observed between the serum HBV DNA titers and the expression levels of BTLA on CD8+ T cells with the highest expression of BTLA corresponding to viral levels >106 IU/ml. PD-1 blockade altered the expression profiles of CD28 family receptors in the T cells of patients with CHB, partly enhanced T cell function and increased the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 mRNA in PBMCs. Thus, CD28 family receptors are potential clinical indicators for the rapid

  20. Blockade of TRPM7 Channel Activity and Cell Death by Inhibitors of 5-Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiang-Chin; Xie, Jia; Zhang, Zheng; Su, Li-Ting; Yue, Lixia; Runnels, Loren W.

    2010-01-01

    TRPM7 is a ubiquitous divalent-selective ion channel with its own kinase domain. Recent studies have shown that suppression of TRPM7 protein expression by RNA interference increases resistance to ischemia-induced neuronal cell death in vivo and in vitro, making the channel a potentially attractive pharmacological target for molecular intervention. Here, we report the identification of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors, NDGA, AA861, and MK886, as potent blockers of the TRPM7 channel. Using a cell-based assay, application of these compounds prevented cell rounding caused by overexpression of TRPM7 in HEK-293 cells, whereas inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase and 15-lipoxygenase did not prevent the change in cell morphology. Application of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors blocked heterologously expressed TRPM7 whole-cell currents without affecting the protein's expression level or its cell surface concentration. All three inhibitors were also effective in blocking the native TRPM7 current in HEK-293 cells. However, two other 5-lipoxygenase specific inhibitors, 5,6-dehydro-arachidonic acid and zileuton, were ineffective in suppressing TRPM7 channel activity. Targeted knockdown of 5-lipoxygenase did not reduce TRPM7 whole-cell currents. In addition, application of 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE), the product of 5-lipoxygenase, or 5-HPETE's downstream metabolites, leukotriene B4 and leukotriene D4, did not stimulate TRPM7 channel activity. These data suggested that NDGA, AA861, and MK886 reduced the TRPM7 channel activity independent of their effect on 5-lipoxygenase activity. Application of AA861 and NDGA reduced cell death for cells overexpressing TRPM7 cultured in low extracellular divalent cations. Moreover, treatment of HEK-293 cells with AA861 increased cell resistance to apoptotic stimuli to a level similar to that obtained for cells in which TRPM7 was knocked down by RNA interference. In conclusion, NDGA, AA861, and MK886 are potent blockers of the TRPM7 channel

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor blockade elicits a stable metabolic shift in tumor cells: therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Indraccolo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of tumors differs remarkably from that of normal tissues, but whether this is a stable feature of tumor cells is largely unknown. Recent findings by independent teams indicate that antiangiogenic drugs cause a metabolic shift in tumor cells that is associated with increased malignancy. These results suggest therapy-driven evolutionary dynamics of tumor metabolism that could be therapeutically targeted. PMID:27308579

  2. Mutational landscape determines sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in non–small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Snyder, Alexandra; Kvistborg, Pia; Makarov, Vladimir; Havel, Jonathan J.; Lee, William; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Phillip; Ho, Teresa S.; Miller, Martin L.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Moreira, Andre L.; Ibrahim, Fawzia; Bruggeman, Cameron; Gasmi, Billel; Zappasodi, Roberta; Maeda, Yuka; Sander, Chris; Garon, Edward B.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Schumacher, Ton N.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, which unleash a patient’s own T cells to kill tumors, are revolutionizing cancer treatment. To unravel the genomic determinants of response to this therapy, we used whole-exome sequencing of non–small cell lung cancers treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody targeting programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). In two independent cohorts, higher nonsynonymous mutation burden in tumors was associated with improved objective response, durable clinical benefit, and progression-free survival. Efficacy also correlated with the molecular smoking signature, higher neoantigen burden, and DNA repair pathway mutations; each factor was also associated with mutation burden. In one responder, neoantigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses paralleled tumor regression, suggesting that anti–PD-1 therapy enhances neoantigen-specific T cell reactivity. Our results suggest that the genomic landscape of lung cancers shapes response to anti–PD-1 therapy. PMID:25765070

  3. Growth inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer cells by AP-1 blockade using a cJun dominant-negative mutant.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Kinoshita, I; Kikuchi, J; Yamazaki, K; Nishimura, M; Birrer, M J; Dosaka-Akita, H

    2008-03-11

    cJun, a major constituent of AP-1 transcription factor transducing multiple mitogen growth signals, is frequently overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of AP-1 blockade on the growth of NSCLC cells using a cJun dominant-negative mutant, TAM67. Transiently transfected TAM67 inhibited AP-1 transcriptional activity in NSCLC cell lines, NCI-H1299 (H1299), A549 and NCI-H520 (H520). The colony-forming efficiency of H1299 and A549 was reduced by TAM67, while that of H520 was not. To elucidate the effects of TAM67 on the growth of H1299, we established H1299 clone cells that expressed TAM67 under the control of a doxycycline-inducible promoter. In the H1299 clone cells, the induced TAM67 inhibited anchorage-dependent growth by promoting G1 cell-cycle block, but not by apoptosis. The induced TAM67 decreased the expression of a cell-cycle regulatory protein, cyclin A. TAM67 also inhibited anchorage-independent growth of these cells. Furthermore, TAM67 reduced growth of established xenograft tumours from these cells in nude mice. These results suggest that AP-1 plays an essential role in the growth of at least some of NSCLC cells. PMID:18283312

  4. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  5. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Edalat, Lena; Stegen, Benjamin; Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M

    2016-03-22

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  6. Multiple myeloma causes clonal T-cell immunosenescence: identification of potential novel targets for promoting tumour immunity and implications for checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Suen, H; Brown, R; Yang, S; Weatherburn, C; Ho, P J; Woodland, N; Nassif, N; Barbaro, P; Bryant, C; Hart, D; Gibson, J; Joshua, D

    2016-08-01

    Tumour-induced dysfunction of cytotoxic T cells in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) may contribute to immune escape and be responsible for the lack of therapeutic efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade. We therefore investigated dysfunctional clonal T cells in MM and demonstrated immunosenescence but not exhaustion as a predominant feature. T-cell clones were detected in 75% of MM patients and their prognostic significance was revalidated in a new post-immunomodulatory drug cohort. The cells exhibited a senescent secretory effector phenotype: KLRG-1+/CD57+/CD160+/CD28-. Normal-for-age telomere lengths indicate that senescence is telomere independent and potentially reversible. p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase, p16 and p21 signalling pathways known to induce senescence were not elevated. Telomerase activity was found to be elevated and this may explain how normal telomere lengths are maintained in senescent cells. T-cell receptor signalling checkpoints were normal but elevated SMAD levels associated with T-cell inactivation were detected and may provide a potential target for the reversal of clonal T-cell dysfunction in MM. Low programmed death 1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 expression detected on T-cell clones infers that these cells are not exhausted but suggests that there would be a suboptimal response to immune checkpoint blockade in MM. Our data suggest that other immunostimulatory strategies are required in MM. PMID:27102208

  7. EGFR blockade enriches for lung cancer stem-like cells through Notch3-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Arasada, Rajeswara Rao; Amann, Joseph M.; Rahman, Mohammad A; Huppert, Stacey S.; Carbone, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are the most common actionable genetic abnormalities yet discovered in lung cancer. However, targeting these mutations with kinase inhibitors is not curative in advanced disease and has yet to demonstrate an impact on potentially curable, early-stage disease, with some data suggesting adverse outcomes. Here, we report that treatment of EGFR-mutated lung cancer cell lines with erlotinib, while showing robust cell death, enriches the ALDH+ stem-like cells through EGFR-dependent activation of Notch3. Additionally, we demonstrate that erlotinib treatment increases the clonogenicity of lung cancer cells in a sphere-forming assay, suggesting increased stem-like cell potential. We demonstrate that inhibition of EGFR kinase activity leads to activation of Notch transcriptional targets in a gamma secretase inhibitor sensitive manner and causes Notch activation. leading to an increase in ALDH high+ cells. We also find a kinase-dependent physical association between the Notch3 and EGFR receptors and tyrosine phosphorylation of Notch3. This could explain the worsened survival observed in some studies of erlotinib treatment at early-stage disease, and suggests that specific dual targeting might overcome this adverse effect. PMID:25125655

  8. Blockade of TRPM8 activity reduces the invasion potential of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Ohkubo, Tsuyako; Ikebe, Tetsuro; Yamazaki, Jun

    2012-05-01

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP)-channel family are expressed in cancer cells. One, cold/menthol-sensitive TRPM8, is reportedly an important player in carcinogenesis in human prostate cancer, although its involvement in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) remains unclear. The present immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR results revealed intense TRPM8 expression in two SCC cell lines, HSC3 and HSC4, derived from the human tongue. Menthol, icilin, and a more specific TRPM8 agonist (WS-12) induced non-specific cation currents, with Ca2+ permeability being greater than that of Na+ or K+. The novel TRPM8 antagonist RQ-00203078 (RQ) profoundly reduced such agonist-induced cation currents. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging revealed that menthol induced both intracellular Ca2+ release and store-operated Ca2+ entry, with RQ inhibiting each effect. To assess the possible pathophysiological role of TRPM8 in oral SCC, we performed motility and invasion assays, and gelatin zymography. Menthol augmented the migration and invasion abilities of both HSC3 and HSC4 cells by potentiating MMP-9 activity. RQ suppressed all of these effects. These results may aid understanding of the pathophysiological implications of TRPM8 channels in the oral SCC cells, support TRP proteins as valuable targets for pharmaceutical intervention, and inform the targeting of oral SCC in which the prognosis is poor. PMID:22267123

  9. Immune Checkpoint Blockade: A New Era for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Califano, Raffaele; Kerr, Keith; Morgan, Robert David; Russo, Giuseppe Lo; Garassino, Marina; Morgillo, Floriana; Rossi, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Despite better understanding of it's molecular biology, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a challenging disease to treat. Unfortunately, treatment options are still very limited and prognosis for advanced disease is poor. Immune surveillance plays a crucial role in a host's defence against tumour cells, and this is particular relevant for lung cancer due to it's high somatic mutational load, which increases the chances for the immune system to recognize cancer cells as 'non-self'. Novel immunotherapies are emerging as an effective treatment for this disease. In this review, we present the data on immune checkpoint inhibitors for NSCLC, describing their mechanism of action, data efficacy from recent clinical trials, and strategies to select patients more likely to benefit from these agents. PMID:27484062

  10. Combined blockade of signalling pathways shows marked anti-tumour potential in phaeochromocytoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Nölting, Svenja; Garcia, Edwin; Alusi, Ghassan; Giubellino, Alessio; Pacak, Karel; Korbonits, Márta; Grossman, Ashley B

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no completely effective therapy available for metastatic phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas. In this study, we explore new molecular targeted therapies for these tumours, using one more benign (mouse phaeochromocytoma cell (MPC)) and one more malignant (mouse tumour tissue (MTT)) mouse PCC cell line –both generated from heterozygous neurofibromin 1 knockout mice. Several PCC-promoting gene mutations have been associated with aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1 and RAS/RAF/ERK signalling. We therefore investigated different agents that interfere specifically with these pathways, including antagonism of the IGF1 receptor by NVP-AEW541. We found that NVP-AEW541 significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at relatively high doses but led to a compensatory up-regulation of ERK and mTORC1 signalling at suboptimal doses while PI3K/AKT inhibition remained stable. We subsequently investigated the effect of the dual PI3K/mTORC1/2 inhibitor NVP-BEZ235, which led to a significant decrease of MPC and MTT cell viability at doses down to 50 nM but again increased ERK signalling. Accordingly, we next examined the combination of NVP-BEZ235 with the established agent lovastatin, as this has been described to inhibit ERK signalling. Lovastatin alone significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at therapeutically relevant doses and inhibited both ERK and AKT signalling, but increased mTORC1/p70S6K signalling. Combination treatment with NVP-BEZ235 and lovastatin showed a significant additive effect in MPC and MTT cells and resulted in inhibition of both AKT and mTORC1/p70S6K signalling without ERK up-regulation. Simultaneous inhibition of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1/2 and ERK signalling suggests a novel therapeutic approach for malignant PCCs. PMID:22715163

  11. PD-1 Blockade with Pembrolizumab in Advanced Merkel-Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nghiem, Paul T.; Bhatia, Shailender; Lipson, Evan J.; Kudchadkar, Ragini R.; Miller, Natalie J.; Annamalai, Lakshmanan; Berry, Sneha; Chartash, Elliot K.; Daud, Adil; Fling, Steven P.; Friedlander, Philip A.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Lundgren, Lisa; Margolin, Kim; Mitchell, Alan; Olencki, Thomas; Pardoll, Drew M.; Reddy, Sunil A.; Shantha, Erica M.; Sharfman, William H.; Sharon, Elad; Shemanski, Lynn R.; Shinohara, Michi M.; Sunshine, Joel C.; Taube, Janis M.; Thompson, John A.; Townson, Steven M.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Cheever, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Merkel-cell carcinoma is an aggressive skin cancer that is linked to exposure to ultraviolet light and the Merkel-cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Advanced Merkel-cell carcinoma often responds to chemotherapy, but responses are transient. Blocking the programmed death 1 (PD-1) immune inhibitory pathway is of interest, because these tumors often express PD-L1, and MCPyV-specific T cells express PD-1. METHODS In this multicenter, phase 2, noncontrolled study, we assigned adults with advanced Merkel-cell carcinoma who had received no previous systemic therapy to receive pembrolizumab (anti–PD-1) at a dose of 2 mg per kilogram of body weight every 3 weeks. The primary end point was the objective response rate according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.1. Efficacy was correlated with tumor viral status, as assessed by serologic and immunohistochemical testing. RESULTS A total of 26 patients received at least one dose of pembrolizumab. The objective response rate among the 25 patients with at least one evaluation during treatment was 56% (95% confidence interval [CI], 35 to 76); 4 patients had a complete response, and 10 had a partial response. With a median follow-up of 33 weeks (range, 7 to 53), relapses occurred in 2 of the 14 patients who had had a response (14%). The response duration ranged from at least 2.2 months to at least 9.7 months. The rate of progression-free survival at 6 months was 67% (95% CI, 49 to 86). A total of 17 of the 26 patients (65%) had virus-positive tumors. The response rate was 62% among patients with MCPyV-positive tumors (10 of 16 patients) and 44% among those with virus-negative tumors (4 of 9 patients). Drug-related grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 15% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS In this study, first-line therapy with pembrolizumab in patients with advanced Merkel-cell carcinoma was associated with an objective response rate of 56%. Responses were observed in patients with virus-positive tumors

  12. VEGF Blockade Enables Oncolytic Cancer Virotherapy in Part by Modulating Intratumoral Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Currier, Mark A; Eshun, Francis K; Sholl, Allyson; Chernoguz, Artur; Crawford, Kelly; Divanovic, Senad; Boon, Louis; Goins, William F; Frischer, Jason S; Collins, Margaret H; Leddon, Jennifer L; Baird, William H; Haseley, Amy; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Hendrickson, Brett W; Brekken, Rolf A; Kaur, Balveen; Hildeman, David; Cripe, Timothy P

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the host response to oncolytic viruses is important to maximize their antitumor efficacy. Despite robust cytotoxicity and high virus production of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) in cultured human sarcoma cells, intratumoral (ITu) virus injection resulted in only mild antitumor effects in some xenograft models, prompting us to characterize the host inflammatory response. Virotherapy induced an acute neutrophilic infiltrate, a relative decrease of ITu macrophages, and a myeloid cell-dependent upregulation of host-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-VEGF antibodies, bevacizumab and r84, the latter of which binds VEGF and selectively inhibits binding to VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) but not VEGFR1, enhanced the antitumor effects of virotherapy, in part due to decreased angiogenesis but not increased virus production. Neither antibody affected neutrophilic infiltration but both partially mitigated virus-induced depletion of macrophages. Enhancement of virotherapy-mediated antitumor effects by anti-VEGF antibodies could largely be recapitulated by systemic depletion of CD11b+ cells. These data suggest the combined effect of oHSV virotherapy and anti-VEGF antibodies is in part due to modulation of a host inflammatory reaction to virus. Our data provide strong preclinical support for combined oHSV and anti-VEGF antibody therapy and suggest that understanding and counteracting the innate host response may help enable the full antitumor potential of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:23481323

  13. Blockade of CD47 ameliorates autoimmune inflammation in CNS by suppressing IL-1-triggered infiltration of pathogenic Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiangguo; Zhang, Yi; Han, Chaofeng; Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Xiongfei; Tian, Jun; Liu, Yiqi; Ding, Yuanyuan; Liu, Juan; Wang, Chunmei; Guo, Zhenhong; Yang, Yongguang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    The migration of Th17 cells into central nervous system (CNS) tissue is the key pathogenic step in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. However, the mechanism underlying the pathogenic Th17 cell migration remains elusive. Here we report that blockade of CD47 with CD47-Fc fusion protein is effective in preventing and curing EAE by impairing infiltration of Th17 cells into CNS. However, CD47 deficiency does not directly impair the migration of Th17 cells. Mechanistic studies showed that CD47 deficiency inhibited degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in proteasome of macrophages by Src activation and led to the increased nitric oxide (NO) production. Then NO suppressed inflammasome activation-induced IL-1β production. This lower IL-1β reduces the expression of IL-1R1 and migration-related chemokine receptors on CD47(-/-) Th17 cells, inhibiting the ability of Th17 cells to infiltrate into the CNS of CD47(-/-) mice and therefore suppressing EAE development. In vivo administration of exogenous IL-1β indeed promoted the infiltration CD47(-/-) Th17 cells into CNS and antagonized the protective role of CD47 deficiency in EAE pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate a potential preventive and therapeutic application of CD47 blockade in controlling EAE development. PMID:26994903

  14. Control of Toxoplasma reactivation by rescue of dysfunctional CD8+ T-cell response via PD-1–PDL-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Rajarshi; Gigley, Jason P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Khan, Imtiaz A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we document that Toxoplasma gondii differentiation and reactivation are mediated by systemic CD8 T-cell dysfunction during chronic infection. We demonstrate that CD8+ T-cell exhaustion occurs despite control of parasitemia during early-chronic toxoplasmosis. During later phases, these cells become exhausted, leading to parasite reactivation and mortality. Concomitant with increased CD8+ T-cell apoptosis and decreased effector response, this dysfunction is characterized by a graded elevation in expression of inhibitory receptor PD-1 on these cells in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissue. Blockade of the PD-1–PDL-1 pathway reinvigorates this suboptimal CD8+ T-cell response, resulting in control of parasite reactivation and prevention of mortality in chronically infected animals. To the best of our knowledge, this report is unique in showing that exposure to a persistent pathogen despite initial control of parasitemia can lead to CD8+ T-cell dysfunction and parasite reactivation. PMID:21576466

  15. Residual Neuromuscular Blockade.

    PubMed

    Plummer-Roberts, Anna L; Trost, Christina; Collins, Shawn; Hewer, Ian

    2016-02-01

    This article provides an update on residual neuromuscular blockade for nurse anesthetists. The neuromuscular junction, pharmacology for producing and reversing neuromuscular blockade, monitoring sites and methods, and patient implications relating to incomplete reversal of neuromuscular blockade are reviewed. Overall recommendations include using multiple settings when employing a peripheral nerve stimulator for monitoring return of neuromuscular function and administering pharmacologic reversal when the train-of-four ratio is below 0.9. PMID:26939390

  16. Targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells with colony stimulating factor-1 receptor blockade can reverse immune resistance to immunotherapy in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Lesokhin, Alexander; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) promotes immunosuppression by direct action on effector T cells and Tregs and through recruitment, expansion and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Targeting of MDSCs is clinically being explored as a therapeutic strategy, though optimal targeting strategies and biomarkers predictive of response are presently unknown. Maturation and tumor recruitment of MDSCs are dependent on signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase CSF-1R on myeloid cells. Here, we show that MDSCs are the critical cell population in IDO-expressing B16 tumors in mediating accelerated tumor outgrowth and resistance to immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant drug, we show that inhibition of CSF-1R signaling can functionally block tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and enhance anti-tumor T cell responses. Furthermore, inhibition of CSF-1R sensitizes IDO-expressing tumors to immunotherapy with T cell checkpoint blockade, and combination of CSF-1R blockade with IDO inhibitors potently elicits tumor regression. These findings provide evidence for a critical and functional role for MDSCs on the in vivo outcome of IDO-expressing tumors. PMID:27211548

  17. Degron protease blockade sensor to image epigenetic histone protein methylation in cells and living animals.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Foygel, Kira; Devulapally, Rammohan; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2015-01-16

    Lysine methylation of histone H3 and H4 has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in treating various cellular diseases. The availability of an in vivo assay that enables rapid screening and preclinical evaluation of drugs that potentially target this cellular process will significantly expedite the pace of drug development. This study is the first to report the development of a real-time molecular imaging biosensor (a fusion protein, [FLuc2]-[Suv39h1]-[(G4S)3]-[H3-K9]-[cODC]) that can detect and monitor the methylation status of a specific histone lysine methylation mark (H3-K9) in live animals. The sensitivity of this sensor was assessed in various cell lines, in response to down-regulation of methyltransferase EHMT2 by specific siRNA, and in nude mice with lysine replacement mutants. In vivo imaging in response to a combination of methyltransferase inhibitors BIX01294 and Chaetocin in mice reveals the potential of this sensor for preclinical drug evaluation. This biosensor thus has demonstrated its utility in the detection of H3-K9 methylations in vivo and potential value in preclinical drug development. PMID:25489787

  18. Degron Protease Blockade Sensor to Image Epigenetic Histone Protein Methylation in Cells and Living Animals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methylation of histone H3 and H4 has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in treating various cellular diseases. The availability of an in vivo assay that enables rapid screening and preclinical evaluation of drugs that potentially target this cellular process will significantly expedite the pace of drug development. This study is the first to report the development of a real-time molecular imaging biosensor (a fusion protein, [FLuc2]-[Suv39h1]-[(G4S)3]-[H3-K9]-[cODC]) that can detect and monitor the methylation status of a specific histone lysine methylation mark (H3-K9) in live animals. The sensitivity of this sensor was assessed in various cell lines, in response to down-regulation of methyltransferase EHMT2 by specific siRNA, and in nude mice with lysine replacement mutants. In vivo imaging in response to a combination of methyltransferase inhibitors BIX01294 and Chaetocin in mice reveals the potential of this sensor for preclinical drug evaluation. This biosensor thus has demonstrated its utility in the detection of H3-K9 methylations in vivo and potential value in preclinical drug development. PMID:25489787

  19. CSF1/CSF1R Blockade Reprograms Tumor-Infiltrating Macrophages and Improves Response to T Cell Checkpoint Immunotherapy in Pancreatic Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Knolhoff, Brett L.; Meyer, Melissa A.; Nywening, Timothy M.; West, Brian L.; Luo, Jingqin; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Goedegebuure, S Peter; Linehan, David C.; DeNardo, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy generally offers limited clinical benefit without coordinated strategies to mitigate the immunosuppressive nature of the tumor microenvironment. Critical drivers of immune escape in the tumor microenvironment include tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which not only mediate immune suppression but also promote metastatic dissemination and impart resistance to cytotoxic therapies. Thus, strategies to ablate the effects of these myeloid cell populations may offer great therapeutic potential. In this report, we demonstrate in a mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that inhibiting signaling by the myeloid growth factor receptor CSF1R can functionally reprogram macrophage responses that enhance antigen presentation and productive anti-tumor T cell responses. Investigations of this response revealed that CSF1R blockade also upregulated T cell checkpoint molecules, including PDL1 and CTLA4, thereby restraining beneficial therapeutic effects. We found that PD1 and CTLA4 antagonists showed limited efficacy as single agents to restrain PDAC growth, but that that combining these agents with CSF1R blockade potently elicited tumor regressions, even in larger established tumors. Taken together, our findings provide a rationale to reprogram immunosuppressive myeloid cell populations in the tumor microenvironment under conditions that can significantly empower the therapeutic effects of checkpoint-based immunotherapeutics. PMID:25082815

  20. CSF1/CSF1R blockade reprograms tumor-infiltrating macrophages and improves response to T-cell checkpoint immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer models.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Knolhoff, Brett L; Meyer, Melissa A; Nywening, Timothy M; West, Brian L; Luo, Jingqin; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Goedegebuure, S Peter; Linehan, David C; DeNardo, David G

    2014-09-15

    Cancer immunotherapy generally offers limited clinical benefit without coordinated strategies to mitigate the immunosuppressive nature of the tumor microenvironment. Critical drivers of immune escape in the tumor microenvironment include tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which not only mediate immune suppression, but also promote metastatic dissemination and impart resistance to cytotoxic therapies. Thus, strategies to ablate the effects of these myeloid cell populations may offer great therapeutic potential. In this report, we demonstrate in a mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that inhibiting signaling by the myeloid growth factor receptor CSF1R can functionally reprogram macrophage responses that enhance antigen presentation and productive antitumor T-cell responses. Investigations of this response revealed that CSF1R blockade also upregulated T-cell checkpoint molecules, including PDL1 and CTLA4, thereby restraining beneficial therapeutic effects. We found that PD1 and CTLA4 antagonists showed limited efficacy as single agents to restrain PDAC growth, but that combining these agents with CSF1R blockade potently elicited tumor regressions, even in larger established tumors. Taken together, our findings provide a rationale to reprogram immunosuppressive myeloid cell populations in the tumor microenvironment under conditions that can significantly empower the therapeutic effects of checkpoint-based immunotherapeutics. PMID:25082815

  1. PD-1 blockade attenuates immunosuppressive myeloid cells due to inhibition of CD47/SIRPα axis in HPV negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guang-Tao; Bu, Lin-Lin; Huang, Cong-Fa; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Chen, Wan-Jun; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) play key roles in the tumor immune suppressive network and tumor progression. However, precise roles of programmed death-1 (PD-1) in immunological functions of MDSCs and TAMs in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we show that PD-1 and PD-L1 levels were significantly higher in human HNSCC specimen than in normal oral mucosa. MDSCs and TAMs were characterized in mice and human HNSCC specimen, correlated well with PD-1 and PD-L1 expression. αPD-1 treatment was well tolerated and significantly reduced tumor growth in the HNSCC mouse model along with significant reduction in MDSCs and TAMs in immune organs and tumors. Molecular analysis suggests a reduction in the CD47/SIRPα pathway by PD-1 blockade, which regulates MDSCs, TAMs, dendritic cell as well as effector T cells. Hence, these data identify that PD-1/PD-L1 axis is significantly increased in human and mouse HNSCC. Adoptive αPD-1 immunotherapy may provide a novel therapeutic approach to modulate the micro- and macro- environment in HNSCC. PMID:26573233

  2. The mechanism of PDT-induced electrical blockade: the dependence of time-lapse localization of talaporfin sodium on the cell death phenotypes in rat cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Matsuo, H.; Suenari, T.; Miyoshi, S.; Takatsuki, S.; Ogawa, S.; Arai, T.

    2009-02-01

    We have proposed a new type of atrial fibrillation treatment with the early state photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which the interval time between the photosensitizer injection and irradiation is shorter than that in conventional way. We had demonstrated the acute electrical blockade by the PDT with talaporfin sodium and a red (670 nm) diode laser in ex vivo and in vivo experiment using rat normal myocardial tissue. The previous study of intracellular Ca2+ concentration measurement in rat cardiac myocytes during the PDT indicated that Ca2+ influx induced by the plasma membrane damage might be the main cause of the acute reaction of myocardial tissue. We found that the cell damage of cardiac myocytes triggered by the PDT was mainly influenced by the site where the photosensitizer exists. In this study, we examined the relationship between the sites of talaporfin sodium existing and cell death phenotypes in response to the PDT, in order to clarify the mechanism of the acute electrical blockade induced by the PDT in myocardial tissue. The talaporfin sodium fluorescence was observed after the various incubation times to visualize the time-lapse intracellular photosensitizer localization. The distribution of the photosensitizer was dependent on the incubation time. The change in intracellular Ca2+ concentration during the PDT was examined with a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator by a high-speed Nipkow confocal laser microscope (CSU-X1, Yokogawa Electric Company). We obtained the Ca2+ dynamics during the PDT which can explain the PDT-induced cell death pathways. We concluded that the Ca2+ influx induced by plasma membrane damage is the possible mechanism of the electrical blockade by the early state PDT.

  3. Kinetics of Alloantigen-Specific Regulatory CD4 T Cell Development and Tissue Distribution After Donor-Specific Transfusion and Costimulatory Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Satomi, Miwa; Baran, William Bracamonte; Gan, Ewa Jankowska; Workman, Andrea Szymczak; Workman, Creg J.; Vignali, Dario Angelo Alberto; Burlingham, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of donor-side regulation toward recipient antigens on graft outcome is poorly understood. Methods Because this influence might be due in part to the accumulation of tissue-resident memory T cells in the donor organ, we used a standard murine tolerization model (donor-specific transfusion plus CD40L blockade) to determine the kinetics of development and peripheralization of allospecific regulatory T cell in lymphoid tissues and liver, a secondary lymphoid organ used in transplantation. Results We found that donor-specific transfusion and CD40L blockade leads to a progressive and sustained T regulatory allospecific response. The cytokines IL10, TGFβ, and IL35 all contributed to the regulatory phenomenon as determined by trans vivo delayed hypersensitivity assay. Unexpectedly, an early and transient self-specific regulatory response was found as well. Using double reporter mice (forkhead box p 3 [Foxp3]-yellow fluorescent protein, Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 [Ebi3]-TdTomRed), we found an increase in Foxp3+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells paralleling the regulatory response. The Ebi3+ CD4 T cells (IL35-producing) were mainly classic Treg cells (Foxp3+CD25+), whereas TGFβ+ CD4 T cells are mostly Foxp3-negative, suggesting 2 different CD4 Treg cell subsets. Liver-resident TGFβ+ CD4 T cells appeared more rapidly than Ebi3-producing T cells, whereas at later timepoints, the Ebi3 response predominated both in lymphoid tissues and liver. Conclusions The timing of appearance of donor organ resident Treg cell subsets should be considered in experiments testing the role of bidirectional regulation in transplant tolerance.

  4. Regulatory T Cell-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Immune Suppression by CD28/B7 and CD40/CD40L Costimulation Blockade.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Isabel; Verbinnen, Bert; Van Gool, Stefaan; Ceuppens, Jan L

    2016-07-15

    Blocking of costimulatory CD28/B7 and CD40/CD40L interactions is an experimental approach to immune suppression and tolerance induction. We previously reported that administration of a combination of CTLA-4Ig and MR1 (anti-CD40L mAb) for blockade of these interactions induces tolerance in a fully mismatched allogeneic splenocyte transfer model in mice. We now used this model to study whether regulatory T cells (Tregs) contribute to immune suppression and why both pathways have to be blocked simultaneously. Mice were injected with allogeneic splenocytes, CD4(+) T cells, or CD8(+) T cells and treated with MR1 mAb and different doses of CTLA-4Ig. The graft-versus-host reaction of CD4(+) T cells, but not of CD8(+) T cells, was inhibited by MR1. CTLA-4Ig was needed to cover CD8(+) T cells but had only a weak effect on CD4(+) T cells. Consequently, only the combination provided full protection when splenocytes were transferred. Importantly, MR1 and low-dose CTLA-4Ig treatment resulted in a relative increase in Tregs, and immune suppressive efficacy was abolished in the absence of Tregs. High-dose CTLA-4Ig treatment, in contrast, prevented Treg expansion and activity, and in combination with MR1 completely inhibited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation in a Treg-independent manner. In conclusion, MR1 and CTLA-4Ig act synergistically as they target different T cell populations. The contribution of Tregs to immune suppression by costimulation blockade depends on the concentration of CTLA-4Ig and thus on the degree of available CD28 costimulation. PMID:27288533

  5. Sustained in vivo blockade of α₁-adrenergic receptors prevented some of stress-triggered effects on steroidogenic machinery in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Janjic, Marija M; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Drljaca, Dragana M; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Bjelic, Maja M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2013-07-15

    This study was designed to systematically analyze and evaluate the effects of in vivo blockade of α₁-adrenergic receptors (α₁-ADRs) on the stress-induced disturbance of steroidogenic machinery in Leydig cells. Parameters followed 1) steroidogenic enzymes/proteins, transcription factors, and cAMP/testosterone production; 2) the main hallmarks of stress (epinephrine, glucocorticoids); and 3) transcription profiles of ADRs and oxidases with high affinity to inactivate glucocorticoids. Results showed that sustained blockade of α₁-ADRs prevented stress-induced 1) decrease of the transcripts/proteins for main steroidogenic CYPs (CYP11A1, CYP17A1); 2) decrease of Scarb1 and Hsd3b1 transcripts; 3) decrease of transcript for Nur77, one of the main activator of the steroidogenic expression; and 4) increase of Dax1 and Arr19, the main steroidogenic repressors in Leydig cells. In the same cells, the expression of steroidogenic stimulatory factor Creb1, StAR, and androgen receptor increased. In this signaling scenario, stress-induced stimulation of Adra1a/Adra1b/Adrbk1 and Hsd11b2 (the unidirectional oxidase with high affinity to inactivate glucocorticoids) was not changed. Blockade additionally stimulated stress-increased transcription of the most abundantly expressed ADRs Adra1d/Adrb1/Adrb2 in Leydig cells. In the same cells, stress-decreased testosterone production, the main marker of Leydig cells functionality, was completely prevented, while reduction of cAMP, the main regulator of androgenesis, was partially prevented. Accordingly, the presented data provide a new molecular/transcriptional base for "fight/adaptation" of steroidogenic cells and new molecular insights into the role of α₁-ADRs in stress-impaired Leydig cell steroidogenesis. The results are important in term of wide use of α₁-ADR selective antagonists, alone/in combination, to treat high blood pressure, nightmares associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, and disrupted sexual health. PMID

  6. Immune checkpoint blockade reveals the stimulatory capacity of tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells in late-stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Flies, Dallas B; Higuchi, Tomoe; Harris, Jaryse C; Jha, Vibha; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Adams, Sarah F

    2016-08-01

    Although immune infiltrates in ovarian cancer are associated with improved survival, the ovarian tumor environment has been characterized as immunosuppressive, due in part to functional shifts among dendritic cells with disease progression. We hypothesized that flux in dendritic cell subpopulations with cancer progression were responsible for observed differences in antitumor immune responses in early and late-stage disease. Here we identify three dendritic cell subsets with disparate functions in the ovarian tumor environment. CD11c+CD11b(-)CD103(+) dendritic cells are absent in the peritoneal cavity of healthy mice but comprise up to 40% of dendritic cells in tumor-bearing mice and retain T cell stimulatory capacity in advanced disease. Among CD11c+CD11b+ cells, Lair-1 expression distinguishes stimulatory and immunoregulatory DC subsets, which are also enriched in the tumor environment. Notably, PD-L1 is expressed by Lair-1(hi) immunoregulatory dendritic cells, and may contribute to local tumor antigen-specific T cell dysfunction. Using an adoptive transfer model, we find that PD-1 blockade enables tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells to promote disease clearance. These data demonstrate that antitumor immune capacity is maintained among local dendritic cell subpopulations in the tumor environment with cancer progression. Similar dendritic cell subsets are present in malignant ascites from women with ovarian cancer, supporting the translational relevance of these results. PMID:27622059

  7. Serum Glutamate Levels Correlate with Gleason Score and Glutamate Blockade Decreases Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion and Induces Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koochekpour, Shahriar; Majumdar, Sunipa; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Attwood, Kristopher; Scioneaux, Ray; Subramani, Dhatchayini; Manhardt, Charles; Lorusso, Giovanni D.; Willard, Stacey S.; Thompson, Hillary; Shourideh, Mojgan; Rezaei, Katayoon; Sartor, Oliver; Mohler, James L.; Vessella, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose During glutaminolysis, glutamine is catabolized to glutamate and incorporated into citric acid cycle and lipogenesis. Serum glutamate levels were measured in patients with primary prostate cancer (PCa) or metastatic castrate-resistant PCa (mCRPCa) to establish clinical relevance. The effect of glutamate-deprivation or blockade by metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1)-antagonists was investigated on PCa cells’ growth, migration, and invasion to establish biological relevance. Experimental Design Serum glutamate levels were measured in normal men (n = 60) and patients with primary PCa (n = 197) or mCRPCa (n = 109). GRM1 expression in prostatic tissues was examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Cell growth, migration, and invasion were determined using cell cytotoxicity and modified Boyden chamber assays, respectively. Apoptosis was detected using immunoblotting against cleaved caspases, PARP and γ-H2AX. Results Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated significantly higher serum glutamate levels in Gleason score ≥ 8 than in the Gleason sscore ≤ 7 and in African Americans than in the Caucasian Americans. African Americans with mCRPCa significantly higher serum glutamate levels than those with primary PCa or benign prostate. However, in Caucasian Americans, serum glutamate levels were similar in normal research subjects and patients with mCRPC. IHC demonstrated weak or no expression of GRM1 in luminal acinar epithelial cells of normal or hyperplastic glands, but high expression in primary or metastatic PCa tissues. Glutamate deprivation or blockade decreased PCa cells’ proliferation, migration, and invasion and led to apoptotic cell death. Conclusions Glutamate expression is mechanistically associated with and may provide a biomarker of PCa aggressiveness. PMID:23072969

  8. Co-Stimulatory Blockade of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 Balance in Transplantation: Impact on Memory T Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Ville, Simon; Poirier, Nicolas; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    CD28 and CTLA-4 are prototypal co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory cell surface signaling molecules interacting with CD80/86, known to be critical for immune response initiation and regulation, respectively. Initial “bench-to-beside” translation, two decades ago, resulted in the development of CTLA4-Ig, a biologic that targets CD80/86 and prevents T-cell costimulation. In spite of its proven effectiveness in inhibiting allo-immune responses, particularly in murine models, clinical experience in kidney transplantation with belatacept (high-affinity CTLA4-Ig molecule) reveals a high incidence of acute, cell-mediated rejection. Originally, the etiology of belatacept-resistant graft rejection was thought to be heterologous immunity, i.e., the cross-reactivity of the pool of memory T cells from pathogen-specific immune responses with alloantigens. Recently, the standard view that memory T cells arise from effector cells after clonal contraction has been challenged by a “developmental” model, in which less differentiated memory T cells generate effector cells. This review delineates how this shift in paradigm, given the differences in co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signal depending on the maturation stage, could profoundly affect our understanding of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 blockade and highlights the potential advantages of selectively targeting CD28, instead of CD80/86, to control post-transplant immune responses. PMID:26322044

  9. Blockade of Glucocorticoid-Induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-Receptor-Related Protein Signaling Ameliorates Murine Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Modulating Follicular Helper T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Feng, Dingqi; Wei, Yancai; Tian, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Rui, Ke; Lu, Liwei; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor-receptor-related protein (GITR) and its ligand (GITRL) are critically involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, but the role of GITRL/GITR signaling in modulating CD4(+) follicular helper T (Tfh) cell response during autoimmune arthritis remains largely unclear. We showed that splenic Tfh cells from mice with collagen-induced arthritis expressed higher levels of GITR compared with non-Tfh cells. In vitro, GITRL treatment markedly enhanced the percentage and number of Tfh cells. The administration of GITR fused to fragment crystallizable of IgG protein in mice with collagen-induced arthritis suppressed the Tfh cell response, resulting in ameliorated disease severity, and reduced production of autoantibody and the number of autoantibody-secreting cells in both the spleen and bone marrow. Together, these results indicate that blockade of GITR signaling can ameliorate arthritis progression mainly by modulating the Tfh cell response. PMID:27106763

  10. Tasquinimod modulates tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the antitumor immune response to PD-L1 blockade in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakhlé, Jessica; Pierron, Valérie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Plas, Pascale; Thiongane, Amath; Meyer-Losic, Florence; Schmidlin, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The infiltration of myeloid cells helps tumors to overcome immune surveillance and imparts resistance to cancer immunotherapy. Thus, strategies to modulate the effects of these immune cells may offer a potential therapeutic benefit. We report here that tasquinimod, a novel immunotherapy which targets S100A9 signaling, reduces the immunosuppressive properties of myeloid cells in preclinical models of bladder cancer (BCa). As single anticancer agent, tasquinimod treatment was effective in preventing early stage tumor growth, but did not achieve a clear antitumor effect in advanced tumors. Investigations of this response revealed that tasquinimod induces an increase in the expression of a negative regulator of T cell activation, Programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). This markedly weakens its antitumor immunity, yet provokes an “inflamed” milieu rendering tumors more prone to T cell-mediated immune attack by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, the combination of tasquinimod with an Anti-PD-L1 antibody enhanced the antitumor immune response in bladder tumors. This combination synergistically modulated tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, thereby strongly affecting proliferation and activation of effector T cells. Together, our data provide insight into the rational combination of therapies that activate both innate and adaptive immune system, such as the association of S100A9-targeting agents with immune checkpoints inhibitors, to improve the response to cancer immunotherapeutic agents in BCa. PMID:27471612

  11. Tuning of AKT-pathway by Nef and its blockade by protease inhibitors results in limited recovery in latently HIV infected T-cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Colin, Laurence; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Bouchat, Sophie; Varin, Audrey; Larbi, Anis; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Kabeya, Kabamba; Vanhulle, Caroline; Delacourt, Nadège; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Coquard, Laurie; Borch, Alexandra; König, Renate; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stephane; Rohr, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Fulop, Tamas; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Akt signaling plays a central role in many biological processes, which are key players in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. We found that Akt interacts with HIV-1 Nef protein. In primary T cells treated with exogenous Nef or acutely infected with Nef-expressing HIV-1 in vitro, Akt became phosphorylated on serine473 and threonine308. In vitro, Akt activation mediated by Nef in T-cells was blocked by HIV protease inhibitors (PI), but not by reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). Ex vivo, we found that the Akt pathway is hyperactivated in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from cART naïve HIV-1-infected patients. PBLs isolated from PI-treated patients, but not from RTI-treated patients, exhibited decreased Akt activation, T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production. We found that PI but not RTI can block HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected J-Lat lymphoid cells stimulated with various stimuli. Using luciferase measurement, we further confirmed that Nef-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latency in 1G5 cells was blocked by PI parallel to decreased Akt activation. Our results indicate that PI-mediated blockade of Akt activation could impact the HIV-1 reservoir and support the need to further assess the therapeutic use of HIV-1 PI in order to curtail latently infected cells in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:27076174

  12. Tuning of AKT-pathway by Nef and its blockade by protease inhibitors results in limited recovery in latently HIV infected T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Colin, Laurence; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Bouchat, Sophie; Varin, Audrey; Larbi, Anis; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Kabeya, Kabamba; Vanhulle, Caroline; Delacourt, Nadège; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Coquard, Laurie; Borch, Alexandra; König, Renate; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stephane; Rohr, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Fulop, Tamas; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Akt signaling plays a central role in many biological processes, which are key players in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. We found that Akt interacts with HIV-1 Nef protein. In primary T cells treated with exogenous Nef or acutely infected with Nef-expressing HIV-1 in vitro, Akt became phosphorylated on serine(473) and threonine(308). In vitro, Akt activation mediated by Nef in T-cells was blocked by HIV protease inhibitors (PI), but not by reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). Ex vivo, we found that the Akt pathway is hyperactivated in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from cART naïve HIV-1-infected patients. PBLs isolated from PI-treated patients, but not from RTI-treated patients, exhibited decreased Akt activation, T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production. We found that PI but not RTI can block HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected J-Lat lymphoid cells stimulated with various stimuli. Using luciferase measurement, we further confirmed that Nef-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latency in 1G5 cells was blocked by PI parallel to decreased Akt activation. Our results indicate that PI-mediated blockade of Akt activation could impact the HIV-1 reservoir and support the need to further assess the therapeutic use of HIV-1 PI in order to curtail latently infected cells in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:27076174

  13. Disabling Immune Tolerance by Programmed Death-1 Blockade With Pidilizumab After Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Results of an International Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Philippe; Nagler, Arnon; Weller, Edie A.; Devine, Steven M.; Avigan, David E.; Chen, Yi-Bin; Kaminski, Mark S.; Holland, H. Kent; Winter, Jane N.; Mason, James R.; Fay, Joseph W.; Rizzieri, David A.; Hosing, Chitra M.; Ball, Edward D.; Uberti, Joseph P.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Mapara, Markus Y.; Gregory, Stephanie A.; Timmerman, John M.; Andorsky, David; Or, Reuven; Waller, Edmund K.; Rotem-Yehudar, Rinat; Gordon, Leo I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint pathway may be usurped by tumors, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), to evade immune surveillance. The reconstituting immune landscape after autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (AHSCT) may be particularly favorable for breaking immune tolerance through PD-1 blockade. Patients and Methods We conducted an international phase II study of pidilizumab, an anti–PD-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with DLBCL undergoing AHSCT, with correlative studies of lymphocyte subsets. Patients received three doses of pidilizumab beginning 1 to 3 months after AHSCT. Results Sixty-six eligible patients were treated. Toxicity was mild. At 16 months after the first treatment, progression-free survival (PFS) was 0.72 (90% CI, 0.60 to 0.82), meeting the primary end point. Among the 24 high-risk patients who remained positive on positron emission tomography after salvage chemotherapy, the 16-month PFS was 0.70 (90% CI, 0.51 to 0.82). Among the 35 patients with measurable disease after AHSCT, the overall response rate after pidilizumab treatment was 51%. Treatment was associated with increases in circulating lymphocyte subsets including PD-L1E–bearing lymphocytes, suggesting an on-target in vivo effect of pidilizumab. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of clinical activity of PD-1 blockade in DLBCL. Given these results, PD-1 blockade after AHSCT using pidilizumab may represent a promising therapeutic strategy in this disease. PMID:24127452

  14. Giant Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Wen, Z. C.; Wei, H. X.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the Coulomb blockade voltage can be made to depend strongly on the electron spin in a thin magnetic granular layer inserted in the middle of an insulating layer of a tunnel junction. This strong spin dependence is predicted from the spin-dependent inter-granular conductance through any of the following effects within the granular layer, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), or GMR through a polymer spacer. The resulting Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance (CBMR) ratio can exceed the magnetoresistance ratio of the granular layer itself by orders of magnitude. Unlike other magenetoresistance effects, the CBMR effect does not require magnetic electrodes.

  15. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; de Girolamo, Laura; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPARγ and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPARγ/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPARγ target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal a role for HDACs in orchestrating osteo-differentiation of hASCs at transcriptional level, and might provide new insights into the modulation of hASCs-based regenerative therapy. PMID:23085045

  16. Enhancement of Muscle T Regulatory Cells and Improvement of Muscular Dystrophic Process in mdx Mice by Blockade of Extracellular ATP/P2X Axis.

    PubMed

    Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Baldassari, Simona; Assereto, Stefania; Fruscione, Floriana; Pistorio, Angela; Panicucci, Chiara; Volpi, Stefano; Perruzza, Lisa; Fiorillo, Chiara; Minetti, Carlo; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Grassi, Fabio; Bruno, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Infiltration of immune cells and chronic inflammation substantially affect skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In the immune system, extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) released by dying cells is sensed as a danger associated molecular pattern through P2 purinergic receptors. Specifically, the P2X7 subtype has a prominent role in regulating immune system physiology and contributes to inflammasome activation also in muscle cells. Here, we show that in vivo blockade of the extracellular ATP/P2X purinergic signaling pathway by periodate-oxidized ATP delayed the progression of the dystrophic phenotype and dampened the local inflammatory response in mdx mice, a spontaneous mouse model of dystrophin deficiency. Reduced infiltration of leukocytes and macrophages and decreased expression of IL-6 were revealed in the muscles of periodate-oxidized ATP-treated mdx mice. Concomitantly, an increase in Foxp3(+) immunosuppressive regulatory T cells was observed and correlated with enhanced myofiber regeneration. Moreover, we detected reduced concentrations of profibrotic cytokines, including transforming growth factor-β and connective tissue growth factor, in muscles of periodate-oxidized ATP-treated mdx mice. The improvement of inflammatory features was associated with increased strength and reduced necrosis, thus suggesting that pharmacologic purinergic antagonism altering the adaptive immune component in the muscle infiltrates might represent a promising therapeutic approach in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:26465071

  17. Cutting edge: blockade of the CD28/B7 costimulatory pathway inhibits intestinal allograft rejection mediated by CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Newell, K A; He, G; Guo, Z; Kim, O; Szot, G L; Rulifson, I; Zhou, P; Hart, J; Thistlethwaite, J R; Bluestone, J A

    1999-09-01

    The effect of blocking the CD28/B7 costimulatory pathway on intestinal allograft rejection was examined in mice. Murine CTLA4Ig failed to prevent the rejection of allografts transplanted into wild-type or CD4 knockout (KO) mice but did inhibit allograft rejection by CD8 KO recipients. This effect was associated with decreased intragraft mRNA for IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha and increased mRNA for IL-4 and IL-5. This altered pattern of cytokine production was not observed in allografts from murine CTLA4Ig-treated CD4 KO mice. These data demonstrate that blockade of the CD28/B7 pathway has different effects on intestinal allograft rejection mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and suggest that these T cell subsets have different costimulatory requirements in vivo. The results also suggest that the inhibition of CD4+ T cell-mediated allograft rejection by CTLA4Ig may be related to down-regulation of Th1 cytokines and/or up-regulation of Th2 cytokines. PMID:10452966

  18. Blockade of CCR7 leads to decreased dendritic cell migration to draining lymph nodes and promotes graft survival in low-risk corneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hos, D; Dörrie, J; Schaft, N; Bock, F; Notara, M; Kruse, F E; Krautwald, S; Cursiefen, C; Bachmann, B O

    2016-05-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is essential for migration of mature dendritic cells (DCs) to the regional lymph nodes, and it has been shown that blocking of CCR7 improves graft survival after high-risk corneal transplantation in vascularized recipient corneas. However, it is so far unknown whether blocking of CCR7 reduces migration of DCs from the avascular cornea to the draining lymph nodes and whether this leads to improved graft survival also in the low-risk setting of corneal transplantation, which accounts for the majority of perforating transplantations performed. Therefore, in this study, pellets containing Freund's adjuvant and bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugated to Alexa488 fluorescent dye were implanted into the corneal stroma of BALB/c mice to analyze antigen uptake by corneal DCs and their migration to the regional lymph nodes. After pellet implantation, mice were either treated by local administration of a CCR7 blocking fusion protein that consisted of CCL19 fused to the Fc part of human IgG1 or a control-IgG. In vivo fluorescence microscopy showed uptake of Alexa488-conjugated BSA by corneal DCs within 8 h. Furthermore, analysis of single cell suspensions of draining lymph nodes prepared after 48 h revealed that 2.1 ± 0.3% of CD11c(+) cells were also Alexa488(+). Importantly, DC migration was significantly reduced after topical administration of CCL19-IgG (1.2 ± 0.2%; p < 0.05). To test the effect of CCR7 blockade on graft rejection after allogeneic low-risk keratoplasty, corneal transplantations were performed using C57BL/6-mice as donors and BALB/c-mice as recipients. Treatment mice received two intraperitoneal loading doses of CCL19-IgG prior to transplantation, followed by local treatment with CCL19-IgG containing eye drops for the first two weeks after transplantation. Control mice received same amounts of control-IgG. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that in the CCL19-IgG treated group, 76% of the grafts survived through the end

  19. Costimulation-Adhesion Blockade is Superior to Cyclosporine A and Prednisone Immunosuppressive Therapy for Preventing Rejection of Differentiated Human Embryonic Stem Cells Following Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Bruno C.; Ransohoff, Julia D.; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Riegler, Johannes; Ebert, Antje; Kodo, Kazuki; Gong, Yongquan; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Dey, Devaveena; Kooreman, Nigel G.; Diecke, Sebastian; Zhang, Wendy Y.; Odegaard, Justin; Hu, Shijun; Gold, Joseph D.; Robbins, Robert C.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives are attractive candidates for therapeutic use. The engraftment and survival of hESC derivatives as xenografts or allografts require effective immunosuppression to prevent immune cell infiltration and graft destruction. Objective To test the hypothesis that a short-course, dual-agent regimen of two costimulation-adhesion blockade agents can induce better engraftment of hESC derivatives compared to current immunosuppressive agents. Methods and Results We transduced hESCs with a double fusion reporter gene construct expressing firefly luciferase (Fluc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), and differentiated these cells to endothelial cells (hESC-ECs). Reporter gene expression enabled longitudinal assessment of cell engraftment by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Costimulation-adhesion therapy resulted in superior hESC-EC and mouse EC engraftment compared to cyclosporine therapy in a hindlimb model. Costimulation-adhesion therapy also promoted robust hESC-EC and hESC-derived cardiomyocyte (hESC-CM) survival in an ischemic myocardial injury model. Improved hESC-EC engraftment had a cardioprotective effect after myocardial injury, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Mechanistically, costimulation-adhesion therapy is associated with systemic and intra-graft upregulation of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (TIM3) and a reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine profile. Conclusions Costimulation-adhesion therapy is a superior alternative to current clinical immunosuppressive strategies for preventing the post-transplant rejection of hESC derivatives. By extending the window for cellular engraftment, costimulation-adhesion therapy enhances functional preservation following ischemic injury. This regimen may function through a TIM3-dependent mechanism. PMID:24038578

  20. Sprouty2 Suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Human Lens Epithelial Cells through Blockade of Smad2 and ERK1/2 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuan; Chen, Xiaoyun; Qin, Yingyan; Qu, Bo; Luo, Lixia; Lin, Haotian; Wu, Mingxing; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of anterior subcapsular cataract (ASC) and capsule opacification. In mouse lens, Sprouty2 (Spry2) has a negative regulatory role on TGFβ signaling. However, the regulation of Spry2 during ASC development and how Spry2 modulates TGFβ signaling pathway in human LECs have not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that Spry2 expression level is decreased in anterior capsule LECs of ASC patients. Spry2 negatively regulates TGFβ2-induced EMT and migration of LECs through inhibition of Smad2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Also, blockade of Smad2 or ERK1/2 activation suppresses EMT caused by Spry2 downregulation. Collectively, our results for the first time show in human LECs that Spry2 has an inhibitory role in TGFβ signaling pathway. Our findings in human lens tissue and epithelial cells suggest that Spry2 may become a novel therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of ASC and capsule opacification. PMID:27415760

  1. Vesicular uptake blockade generates the toxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde in PC12 cells: relevance to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Sullivan, Patti; Cooney, Adele; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Rachel; Gross, Daniel J; Holmes, Courtney; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2012-12-01

    Parkinson's disease entails profound loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals, decreased vesicular uptake of intraneuronal catecholamines, and relatively increased putamen tissue concentrations of the toxic dopamine metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). The objective of this study was to test whether vesicular uptake blockade augments endogenous DOPAL production. We also examined whether intracellular DOPAL contributes to apoptosis and, as α-synuclein oligomers may be pathogenetic in Parkinson's disease, oligomerizes α-synuclein. Catechols were assayed in PC12 cells after reserpine to block vesicular uptake, with or without inhibition of enzymes metabolizing DOPAL-daidzein for aldehyde dehydrogenase and AL1576 for aldehyde reductase. Vesicular uptake was quantified by a method based on 6F- or (13) C-dopamine incubation; DOPAL toxicity by apoptosis responses to exogenous dopamine, with or without daidzein+AL1576; and DOPAL--induced synuclein oligomerization by synuclein dimer production during DOPA incubation, with or without inhibition of L-aromatic-amino-acid decarboxylase or monoamine oxidase. Reserpine inhibited vesicular uptake by 95-97% and rapidly increased cell DOPAL content (p = 0.0008). Daidzein+AL1576 augmented DOPAL responses to reserpine (p = 0.004). Intracellular DOPAL contributed to dopamine-evoked apoptosis and DOPA-evoked synuclein dimerization. The findings fit with the 'catecholaldehyde hypothesis,' according to which decreased vesicular sequestration of cytosolic catecholamines and impaired catecholaldehyde detoxification contribute to the catecholaminergic denervation that characterizes Parkinson's disease. PMID:22906103

  2. Testing chemotherapeutic agents in the feather follicle identifies a selective blockade of cell proliferation and a key role for sonic hedgehog signaling in chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guojiang; Wang, Hangwei; Yan, Zhipeng; Cai, Linyan; Zhou, Guixuan; He, Wanzhong; Paus, Ralf; Yue, Zhicao

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents induce complex tissue responses in vivo and damage normal organ functions. Here we use the feather follicle to investigate details of this damage response. We show that cyclophosphamide treatment, which causes chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice and man, induces distinct defects in feather formation: feather branching is transiently and reversibly disrupted, thus leaving a morphological record of the impact of chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the rachis (feather axis) remains unperturbed. Similar defects are observed in feathers treated with 5-fluorouracil or taxol but not with doxorubicin or arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C). Selective blockade of cell proliferation was seen in the feather branching area, along with a downregulation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) transcription, but not in the equally proliferative rachis. Local delivery of the Shh inhibitor, cyclopamine, or Shh silencing both recapitulated this effect. In mouse hair follicles, those chemotherapeutic agents that disrupted feather formation also downregulated Shh gene expression and induced hair loss, whereas doxorubicin or Ara-C did not. Our results reveal a mechanism through which chemotherapeutic agents damage rapidly proliferating epithelial tissue, namely via the cell population-specific, Shh-dependent inhibition of proliferation. This mechanism may be targeted by future strategies to manage chemotherapy-induced tissue damage. PMID:25233072

  3. Loss of oxidative defense and potential blockade of satellite cell maturation in the skeletal muscle of patients with cancer but not in the healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Johns, Neil; Schilb, Alain; Degen, Simone; Degen, Martin; Langen, Ramon; Schols, Annemie; Glass, David J; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Greig, Carolyn A; Jacobi, Carsten; Fearon, Kenneth Ch; Ross, James A

    2016-08-01

    Muscle wasting in old age or cancer may result from failed myofiber regeneration and/or accelerated atrophy. This study aimed to determine from transcriptomic analysis of human muscle the integrity of the cellular stress response system in relation to satellite cell differentiation or apoptosis in patients with cancer (weight-stable (CWS) or weight-losing (CWL)) or healthy elderly (HE) when compared with healthy middle-aged controls (HMA). 28 patients with cancer (CWS: 18 and CWL: 10), HE: 21 and HMA: 20 underwent biopsy of quadriceps muscle. The expression of transcription factors for muscle regeneration (Pax3, Pax7 and MyoD) was increased in CWS and HE compared with HMA (p≤0.001). In contrast, the expression of the late myogenic differentiation marker MyoG was reduced in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p≤0.0001). Bax was significantly increased in CWS, CWL and HE (p≤0.0001). Expression of the oxidative defense genes SOD2, GCLM, and Nrf2 was decreased in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p≤0.0001). There is evidence for blockade of satellite cell maturation, upregulation of apoptosis and reduced oxidative defense in the muscle of cancer patients. In the healthy elderly the potential for differentiation and oxidative defense is maintained. PMID:27454226

  4. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress. PMID:26458459

  5. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; Girolamo, Laura de; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2-PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Runx2/PPAR{gamma} target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma}. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPAR{gamma} and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPAR{gamma}/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPAR{gamma} target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal

  6. The Blockade of IL6 Counterparts the Osmolar Stress-Induced Apoptosis in Human Conjunctival Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hee-Jung; Byun, Yong-Soo; Mok, Jee-Won

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of hyperosmolarity on cell survival/apoptosis of conjunctival epithelial cells and evaluate the possible role of IL6, Wong-Kilbourne derivative of Chang conjunctival cell line (WKD) was used in this study. Confluent cells were incubated under different osmolarity (290 mOsm and 500 mOsm) with or without neutralizing IL6 antibody (50 ng/mL). The expression of IL6 level was measured in the supernatant of each conditioned medium. Cell viability/apoptosis assay was performed using Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) and Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). Western blot was conducted to measure the abundance of apoptotic markers and IL6 related downstream signaling pathway. The concentration of IL6 showed time-dependent increase in cells treated with 500 mOsm. Although apoptosis of WKD cell is increased in treated 500 mOsm for 24 h, apoptosis reduced in WKD cell treated 500 mOsm with anti-IL6 for 24 h. Anti-IL6 inhibited the activation of JAK-STAT signaling pathway, which was induced by hyperosmolarity. Hyperosmolar condition induced apoptosis in conjunctival epithelial cells, along with increase of IL6 production. IL6 neutralizing antibody inhibited apoptosis and JAK-STAT signaling in hyperosmolar condition. These findings suggested that IL6 may be involved in apoptotic change and in hyperosmolarity. PMID:27555966

  7. CXCL13 blockade disrupts B lymphocyte organization in tertiary lymphoid structures without altering B cell receptor bias or preventing diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel A; Kendall, Peggy L

    2010-08-01

    Lymphocytes that invade nonlymphoid tissues often organize into follicle-like structures known as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs). These structures resemble those found in spleen or lymph nodes, but their function is unknown. TLOs are recognized in many autoimmune diseases, including the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes. In some cases, TLOs have been associated with the B lymphocyte chemoattractant, CXCL13. Studies presented in this article show that CXCL13 is present in inflamed islets of NOD mice. Ab blockade of this chemokine unraveled B lymphocyte organization in islet TLOs, without reducing their proportion in the islets. These chaotic milieus contained B lymphocytes with the same distinct repertoire of B cell receptors as those found in mice with well-organized structures. Somatic hypermutation, associated with T-B interactions, was not impaired in these disorganized insulitis lesions. Finally, loss of B lymphocyte organization in islets did not provide disease protection. Thus, B lymphocytes infiltrating islets in NOD mice do not require the morphology of secondary lymphoid tissues to support their role in disease. PMID:20574003

  8. Organized chaos in Kupffer's vesicle: how a heterogeneous structure achieves consistent left-right patterning.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Montenegro-Johnson, T D; Lopes, S S

    2014-01-01

    Successful establishment of left-right asymmetry is crucial to healthy vertebrate development. In many species this process is initiated in a ciliated, enclosed cavity, for example Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in zebrafish. The microarchitecture of KV is more complex than that present in the left-right organizer of many other species. While swirling flow in KV is recognized as essential for left-right patterning, its generation, nature and conversion to asymmetric gene expression are only beginning to be fully understood. We recently [Sampaio, P et al. Dev Cell 29:716-728] combined imaging, genetics and fluid dynamics simulation to characterize normal and perturbed ciliary activity, and their correlation to asymmetric charon expression and embryonic organ fate. Randomness in cilia number and length have major implications for robust flow generation; even a modest change in mean cilia length has a major effect on flow speed to due to nonlinear scaling arising from fluid mechanics. Wildtype, and mutant embryos with normal liver laterality, exhibit stronger flow on the left prior to asymmetric inhibition of charon. Our discovery of immotile cilia, taken with data on morphant embryos with very few cilia, further support the role of mechanosensing in initiating and/or enhancing flow conversion into gene expression. PMID:25454897

  9. Organized chaos in Kupffer's vesicle: How a heterogeneous structure achieves consistent left-right patterning

    PubMed Central

    Smith, DJ; Montenegro-Johnson, TD; Lopes, SS

    2014-01-01

    Successful establishment of left-right asymmetry is crucial to healthy vertebrate development. In many species this process is initiated in a ciliated, enclosed cavity, for example Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in zebrafish. The microarchitecture of KV is more complex than that present in the left-right organizer of many other species. While swirling flow in KV is recognized as essential for left-right patterning, its generation, nature and conversion to asymmetric gene expression are only beginning to be fully understood. We recently [Sampaio, P et al. Dev Cell 29:716–728] combined imaging, genetics and fluid dynamics simulation to characterize normal and perturbed ciliary activity, and their correlation to asymmetric charon expression and embryonic organ fate. Randomness in cilia number and length have major implications for robust flow generation; even a modest change in mean cilia length has a major effect on flow speed to due to nonlinear scaling arising from fluid mechanics. Wildtype, and mutant embryos with normal liver laterality, exhibit stronger flow on the left prior to asymmetric inhibition of charon. Our discovery of immotile cilia, taken with data on morphant embryos with very few cilia, further support the role of mechanosensing in initiating and/or enhancing flow conversion into gene expression. PMID:25454897

  10. Double Blockade of Glioma Cell Proliferation and Migration by Temozolomide Conjugated with NPPB, a Chloride Channel Blocker.

    PubMed

    Park, Miri; Song, Chiman; Yoon, Hojong; Choi, Kee-Hyun

    2016-03-16

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary malignant brain tumor. Temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapeutic agent combined with radiation therapy, is used as a standard treatment. The infiltrative nature of glioblastoma, however, interrupts effective treatment with TMZ and increases the tendency to relapse. Voltage-gated chloride channels have been identified as crucial regulators of glioma cell migration and invasion by mediating cell shape and volume change. Accordingly, chloride current inhibition by 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate (NPPB), a chloride channel blocker, suppresses cell movement by diminishing the osmotic cell volume regulation. In this study, we developed a novel compound, TMZ conjugated with NPPB (TMZ-NPPB), as a potential anticancer drug. TMZ-NPPB blocked chloride currents in U373MG, a severely invasive human glioma cell line, and suppressed migration and invasion of U373MG cells. Moreover, TMZ-NPPB exhibited DNA modification activity similar to that of TMZ, and surprisingly showed remarkably enhanced cytotoxicity relative to TMZ by inducing apoptotic cell death via DNA damage. These findings indicate that TMZ-NPPB has a dual function in blocking both proliferation and migration of human glioma cells, thereby suggesting its potential to overcome challenges in current glioblastoma therapy. PMID:26711895

  11. GVHD after haploidentical transplantation: a novel, MHC-defined rhesus macaque model identifies CD28− CD8+ T cells as a reservoir of breakthrough T-cell proliferation during costimulation blockade and sirolimus-based immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Weston P.; Srinivasan, Swetha; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Singh, Karnail; Sen, Sharon; Hamby, Kelly; Deane, Taylor; Stempora, Linda; Beus, Jonathan; Turner, Alexa; Wheeler, Caleb; Anderson, Daniel C.; Sharma, Prachi; Garcia, Anapatricia; Strobert, Elizabeth; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Crenshaw, Timothy; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Ward, Thea; Song, Mingqing; Horan, John; Larsen, Christian P.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a major histocompatibility complex–defined primate model of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and have determined the effect that CD28/CD40-directed costimulation blockade and sirolimus have on this disease. Severe GVHD developed after haploidentical transplantation without prophylaxis, characterized by rapid clinical decline and widespread T-cell infiltration and organ damage. Mechanistic analysis showed activation and possible counter-regulation, with rapid T-cell expansion and accumulation of CD8+ and CD4+ granzyme B+ effector cells and FoxP3pos/CD27high/CD25pos/CD127low CD4+ T cells. CD8+ cells down-regulated CD127 and BCl-2 and up-regulated Ki-67, consistent with a highly activated, proliferative profile. A cytokine storm also occurred, with GVHD-specific secretion of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-18, and CCL4. Costimulation Blockade and Sirolimus (CoBS) resulted in striking protection against GVHD. At the 30-day primary endpoint, CoBS-treated recipients showed 100% survival compared with no survival in untreated recipients. CoBS treatment resulted in survival, increasing from 11.6 to 62 days (P < .01) with blunting of T-cell expansion and activation. Some CoBS-treated animals did eventually develop GVHD, with both clinical and histopathologic evidence of smoldering disease. The reservoir of CoBS-resistant breakthrough immune activation included secretion of interferon-γ, IL-2, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and IL-12/IL-23 and proliferation of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 immunoglobulin-resistant CD28− CD8+ T cells, suggesting adjuvant treatments targeting this subpopulation will be needed for full disease control. PMID:20833977

  12. MAP Kinase Inhibition Promotes T Cell and Anti-tumor Activity in Combination with PD-L1 Checkpoint Blockade.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Peter J R; Cheung, Jeanne; Yang, Yagai; McNamara, Erin; Hong, Rebecca; Moskalenko, Marina; Gould, Stephen E; Maecker, Heather; Irving, Bryan A; Kim, Jeong M; Belvin, Marcia; Mellman, Ira

    2016-03-15

    Targeted inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) can induce regression of tumors bearing activating mutations in the Ras pathway but rarely leads to tumor eradication. Although combining MEK inhibition with T-cell-directed immunotherapy might lead to more durable efficacy, T cell responses are themselves at least partially dependent on MEK activity. We show here that MEK inhibition did profoundly block naive CD8(+) T cell priming in tumor-bearing mice, but actually increased the number of effector-phenotype antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells within the tumor. MEK inhibition protected tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells from death driven by chronic TCR stimulation while sparing cytotoxic activity. Combining MEK inhibition with anti-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) resulted in synergistic and durable tumor regression even where either agent alone was only modestly effective. Thus, despite the central importance of the MAP kinase pathway in some aspects of T cell function, MEK-targeted agents can be compatible with T-cell-dependent immunotherapy. PMID:26944201

  13. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  14. Embryonic GABAB Receptor Blockade Alters Cell Migration, Adult Hypothalamic Structure, and Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors Sex Specifically in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T.; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J.; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABAB receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABAB receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11–E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABAB receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABAB receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABAB receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABAB receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  15. Kaempferol Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth and Migration through the Blockade of EGFR-Related Pathway In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwhoi; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most appalling cancers with a pessimistic prognosis. Despite many therapies, there has been no improvement of survival rates. In this study, we assessed the anti-cancer effects of kaempferol, a well known flavonoid having functional bio-activity against various malignant tumors. Kaempferol had anti-cancer effects on Miapaca-2, Panc-1, and SNU-213 human pancreatic cancer cells. In a dose-dependent manner, kaempferol decreased viability of these pancreatic cancer cells by increasing apoptosis. In particular, kaempferol effectively inhibited the migratory activity of human pancreatic cancer cells at relatively low dosages without any toxicity. The anti-cancer effect of kaempferol was mediated by inhibition of EGFR related Src, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways. These results collectively indicate that kaempferol, a phytochemical ingredient reported to have anti-viability and anti-oxidant properties, can act as a safety anti-migration reagent in human pancreatic cancer cells, which provide the rationale for further investigation of kaempferol as a strong candidate for the potential clinical trial of malignant pancreatic cancers. PMID:27175782

  16. Genetic ablation or pharmacological blockade of dipeptidyl peptidase IV does not impact T cell-dependent immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Kalpit A; Porter, Gene; Peng, Roche; Cui, Yan; Pryor, Kellyann; Eiermann, George; Zaller, Dennis M

    2009-01-01

    Background Current literature suggests that dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV; CD26) plays an essential role in T-dependent immune responses, a role that could have important clinical consequences. To rigorously define the role of DPP-IV in the immune system, we evaluated genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme on T-dependent immune responses in vivo. Results The DPP-IV null animals mounted robust primary and secondary antibody responses to the T dependent antigens, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl-ovalbumin (NP-Ova) and 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl-chicken gamma globulin (NP-CGG), which were comparable to wild type mice. Serum levels of antigen specific IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3 were similar between the two groups of animals. DPP-IV null animals mounted an efficient germinal center reaction by day 10 after antigen stimulation that was comparable to wild type mice. Moreover, the antibodies produced by DPP-IV null animals after repeated antigenic challenge were affinity matured. Similar observations were made using wild type animals treated with a highly selective DPP-IV inhibitor during the entire course of the experiments. T cell recall responses to ovalbumin and MOG peptide, evaluated by measuring proliferation and IL-2 release from cells isolated from draining lymph nodes, were equivalent in DPP-IV null and wild type animals. Furthermore, mice treated with DPP-IV inhibitor had intact T-cell recall responses to MOG peptide. In addition, female DPP-IV null and wild type mice treated with DPP-IV inhibitor exhibited normal and robust in vivo cytotoxic T cell responses after challenge with cells expressing the male H-Y minor histocompatibility antigen. Conclusion These data indicate Selective inhibition of DPP-IV does not impair T dependent immune responses to antigenic challenge. PMID:19358731

  17. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned locomotion

  18. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned

  19. Blockade of voltage-gated K⁺ currents in rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells by MK801.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Min; Park, Sang Woong; Lin, Hai Yue; Shin, Kyung Chul; Sung, Dong Jun; Kim, Jae Gon; Cho, Hana; Kim, Bokyung; Bae, Young Min

    2015-01-01

    MK801 (dizocilpine), a phencyclidine (PCP) derivative, is a potent noncompetitive antagonist of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr). Another PCP derivative, ketamine, was reported to block voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels, which was independent of NMDAr function. Kv currents are major regulators of the membrane potential (Em) and excitability of muscles and neurons. Here, we investigated the effect of MK801 on the Kv channels and Em in rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells (RMASMCs). We used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to analyze the effect of MK801 enantiomers on Kv channels and Em. (+)MK801 inhibited Kv channels in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 89.1 ± 13.1 μM, Hill coefficient of 1.05 ± 0.08). The inhibition was voltage- and state- independent. (+)MK801 didn't influence steady-state activation and inactivation of Kv channels. (+)MK801 treatment depolarized Em in a concentration-dependent manner and concomitantly decreased membrane conductance. (-)MK801 also similarly inhibited the Kv channels (IC50 of 134.0 ± 17.5 μM, Hill coefficient of 0.87 ± 0.09). These results indicate that MK801 directly inhibits the Kv channel in a state-independent manner in RMASMCs. This MK801-mediated inhibition of Kv channels should be considered when assessing the various pharmacological effects produced by MK801, such as schizophrenia, neuroprotection, and hypertension. PMID:25704024

  20. Blockade of ATP binding site of P2 purinoceptors in rat parotid acinar cells by isothiocyanate compounds.

    PubMed

    Soltoff, S P; McMillian, M K; Talamo, B R; Cantley, L C

    1993-05-01

    Extracellular ATP activates a P2Z-type purinergic receptor (purinoceptor) in rat parotid acinar cells that increases the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration via the entry of extracellular Ca2+ through an ATP-sensitive cation channel (Soltoff et al., Am J Physiol 262: C934-C940, 1992). To learn more about the ATP binding site of the purinoceptor, we examined the effects of several stilbene isothiocyanate analogs of DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), which block the binding of [32P]ATP to intact parotid cells (McMillian et al., Biochem J 255:291-300, 1988) and blocked the activation of the P2Z purinoceptor. The ATP-stimulated 45Ca2+ uptake was blocked by DIDS, H2DIDS (dihydro-DIDS; 4,4'-diisothiocyanatodihydrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), and SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), but not by DNDS (4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), a stilbene disulfonate compound lacking isothiocyanate (SCN-) groups, or by KSCN. The potency of the stilbene disulfonates was related to the number of isothiocyanate groups on each compound. Under the experimental conditions, the IC50 value of DIDS (approximately 35 microM), which has two SCN-groups, was much lower than that of SITS (approximately 125 microM), which has only one SCN-group. The inhibitory effects of DIDS appeared to be much more potent than those of SITS due to the kinetics of their binding to the purinoceptors. Eosin-5-isothiocyanate (EITC) and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC), non-stilbene isothiocyanate compounds with single SCN-groups, also blocked the response to ATP and were less potent than DIDS. Trinitrophenyl-ATP (TNP-ATP), an ATP derivative that is not an effective agonist of the parotid P2Z receptor, blocked the covalent binding of DIDS to the plasma membrane, suggesting that ATP and DIDS bind to the same site. Reactive Blue 2 (Cibacron Blue 3GA), an anthraquinone-sulfonic acid derivative that is a noncovalent purinergic antagonist, also blocked

  1. Duration of opioid receptor blockade determines biotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2015-10-01

    Historically, studies on endogenous and exogenous opioids and their receptors focused on the mediation of pain, with excess opiate consumption leading to addiction. Opioid antagonists such as naloxone and naltrexone blocked these interactions, and still are widely used to reverse drug and alcohol overdose. Although specific opioid antagonists have been designed for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, the general antagonists remain the most effective. With the discovery of the opioid growth factor (OGF)-OGF receptor (OGFr) axis as a novel biological pathway involved in homeostasis of replicating cells and tissues, the role of opioid receptor antagonists was expanded. An intermittent OGFr blockade by low dosages of naltrexone resulted in depressed cell replication, whereas high (or sustained) dosages of naltrexone that conferred a continuous OGFr blockade resulted in enhanced growth. More than 3 decades of research have confirmed that the duration of opioid receptor blockade, not specifically the dosage, by general opioid antagonists determines the biotherapeutic outcome. Dysregulation of the OGF-OGFr pathway is apparent in a number of human disorders including diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and cancer, and thus opioid antagonist disruption of interaction prevails as a therapeutic intervention. We review evidence that the duration of opioid receptor blockade is correlated with the magnitude and direction of response, and discuss the potential therapeutic effectiveness of continuous receptor blockade for treatment of diabetic complications such as corneal defects and skin wounds, and of intermittent receptor blockade by low dosages of naltrexone for treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:26119823

  2. hERG Blockade by Iboga Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Alper, Kenneth; Bai, Rong; Liu, Nian; Fowler, Steven J; Huang, Xi-Ping; Priori, Silvia G; Ruan, Yanfei

    2016-01-01

    The iboga alkaloids are a class of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds, some of which modify drug self-administration and withdrawal in humans and preclinical models. Ibogaine, the prototypic iboga alkaloid that is utilized clinically to treat addictions, has been associated with QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and fatalities. hERG blockade as IKr was measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in HEK 293 cells. This yielded the following IC50 values: ibogaine manufactured by semisynthesis via voacangine (4.09 ± 0.69 µM) or by extraction from T. iboga (3.53 ± 0.16 µM); ibogaine's principal metabolite noribogaine (2.86 ± 0.68 µM); and voacangine (2.25 ± 0.34 µM). In contrast, the IC50 of 18-methoxycoronaridine, a product of rational synthesis and current focus of drug development was >50 µM. hERG blockade was voltage dependent for all of the compounds, consistent with low-affinity blockade. hERG channel binding affinities (K i) for the entire set of compounds, including 18-MC, ranged from 0.71 to 3.89 µM, suggesting that 18-MC binds to the hERG channel with affinity similar to the other compounds, but the interaction produces substantially less hERG blockade. In view of the extended half-life of noribogaine, these results may relate to observations of persistent QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmia at delayed intervals of days following ibogaine ingestion. The apparent structure-activity relationships regarding positions of substitutions on the ibogamine skeleton suggest that the iboga alkaloids might provide an informative paradigm for investigation of the structural biology of the hERG channel. PMID:25636206

  3. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis augments lysis of AML cells by the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct AMG 330: reversing a T-cell-induced immune escape mechanism.

    PubMed

    Krupka, C; Kufer, P; Kischel, R; Zugmaier, G; Lichtenegger, F S; Köhnke, T; Vick, B; Jeremias, I; Metzeler, K H; Altmann, T; Schneider, S; Fiegl, M; Spiekermann, K; Bauerle, P A; Hiddemann, W; Riethmüller, G; Subklewe, M

    2016-02-01

    Bispecific T-cell engagers (BiTEs) are very effective in recruiting and activating T cells. We tested the cytotoxicity of the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct AMG 330 on primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells ex vivo and characterized parameters contributing to antileukemic cytolytic activity. The E:T ratio and the CD33 expression level significantly influenced lysis kinetics in long-term cultures of primary AML cells (n=38). AMG 330 induced T-cell-mediated proinflammatory conditions, favoring the upregulation of immune checkpoints on target and effector cells. Although not constitutively expressed at the time of primary diagnosis (n=123), PD-L1 was strongly upregulated on primary AML cells upon AMG 330 addition to ex vivo cultures (n=27, P<0.0001). This phenomenon was cytokine-driven as the sole addition of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α also induced expression. Through blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction, AMG 330-mediated lysis (n=9, P=0.03), T-cell proliferation (n=9, P=0.01) and IFN-γ secretion (n=8, P=0.008) were significantly enhanced. The combinatorial approach was most beneficial in settings of protracted AML cell lysis. Taken together, we have characterized a critical resistance mechanism employed by primary AML cells under AMG 330-mediated proinflammatory conditions. Our results support the evaluation of checkpoint molecules in upcoming clinical trials with AMG 330 to enhance BiTE antibody construct-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:26239198

  4. Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Postow, Michael A.; Callahan, Margaret K.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2015-01-01

    Immunologic checkpoint blockade with antibodies that target cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and the programmed cell death protein 1 pathway (PD-1/PD-L1) have demonstrated promise in a variety of malignancies. Ipilimumab (CTLA-4) and pembrolizumab (PD-1) are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of advanced melanoma, and additional regulatory approvals are expected across the oncologic spectrum for a variety of other agents that target these pathways. Treatment with both CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 blockade is associated with a unique pattern of adverse events called immune-related adverse events, and occasionally, unusual kinetics of tumor response are seen. Combination approaches involving CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 blockade are being investigated to determine whether they enhance the efficacy of either approach alone. Principles learned during the development of CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 approaches will likely be used as new immunologic checkpoint blocking antibodies begin clinical investigation. PMID:25605845

  5. Immune checkpoint blockade in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Aswin; Socinski, Mark A; Villaruz, Liza C

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized the therapeutic landscape of advanced lung cancer. The adaptive immune system has developed a sophisticated method of tumor growth control, but T-cell activation is regulated by various checkpoints. Blockade of the immune checkpoints with therapies targeting the PD-1 pathway, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, has been validated as a therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer. Newer therapies and novel combinations are also being evaluated, and the use of biomarkers in conjunction with these drugs is an area of active investigation. This review summarizes the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of the above approaches in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27585231

  6. Blockade by NNC 55-0396, mibefradil, and nickel of calcium and exocytotic signals in chromaffin cells: implications for the regulation of hypoxia-induced secretion at early life.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Morales, José C; Fernando Padín, J; Vestring, Stefan; Musial, Diego C; de Diego, Antonio-Miguel G; García, Antonio G

    2015-03-15

    Adrenal chromaffin cells (CCs) express high-voltage activated calcium channels (high-VACCs) of the L, N and PQ subtypes; in addition, T-type low-VACCs are also expressed during embryo and neonatal life. Effects of the more frequently used T channel blockers NNC 55-0396 (NNC), mibefradil, and Ni2+ on the whole-cell Ba2+ current (IBa), the K+-elicited [Ca2+]c transients and catecholamine secretion have been studied in adult bovine CCs (BCCs) and rat embryo CCs (RECCs). NNC, mibefradil, and Ni2+ blocked BCC IBa with IC50 of 1.8, 4.9 and 70 μM, while IC50 to block IBa in RECCs were 2.1, 4.4 and 41 μM. Pronounced blockade of K+-elicited [Ca2+]c transients and secretion was also elicited by the three agents. However, the hypoxia-induced secretion (HIS) of catecholamine in RECCs was blocked substantially (75%) with thresholds concentrations of NCC (IC20 to block IBa); this was not the case for mibefradil and Ni2+ that required higher concentrations to block the HIS response. Thus, out of the three compounds, NNC seemed to be an adequate pharmacological tool to discern the contribution of T channels to the HIS response, without a contamination with high-VACC blockade. PMID:25622555

  7. Heterologous Vaccination and Checkpoint Blockade Synergize To Induce Antileukemia Immunity.

    PubMed

    Manlove, Luke S; Schenkel, Jason M; Manlove, Kezia R; Pauken, Kristen E; Williams, Richard T; Vezys, Vaiva; Farrar, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Checkpoint blockade-based immunotherapies are effective in cancers with high numbers of nonsynonymous mutations. In contrast, current paradigms suggest that such approaches will be ineffective in cancers with few nonsynonymous mutations. To examine this issue, we made use of a murine model of BCR-ABL(+) B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Using a principal component analysis, we found that robust MHC class II expression, coupled with appropriate costimulation, correlated with lower leukemic burden. We next assessed whether checkpoint blockade or therapeutic vaccination could improve survival in mice with pre-established leukemia. Consistent with the low mutation load in our leukemia model, we found that checkpoint blockade alone had only modest effects on survival. In contrast, robust heterologous vaccination with a peptide derived from the BCR-ABL fusion (BAp), a key driver mutation, generated a small population of mice that survived long-term. Checkpoint blockade strongly synergized with heterologous vaccination to enhance overall survival in mice with leukemia. Enhanced survival did not correlate with numbers of BAp:I-A(b)-specific T cells, but rather with increased expression of IL-10, IL-17, and granzyme B and decreased expression of programmed death 1 on these cells. Our findings demonstrate that vaccination to key driver mutations cooperates with checkpoint blockade and allows for immune control of cancers with low nonsynonymous mutation loads. PMID:27183622

  8. Combining Regulatory T Cell Depletion and Inhibitory Receptor Blockade Improves Reactivation of Exhausted Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells and Efficiently Reduces Chronic Retroviral Loads

    PubMed Central

    Dietze, Kirsten K.; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy; Liu, Jia; Kretzmer, Freya; Schimmer, Simone; Dittmer, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Chronic infections with human viruses, such as HIV and HCV, or mouse viruses, such as LCMV or Friend Virus (FV), result in functional exhaustion of CD8+ T cells. Two main mechanisms have been described that mediate this exhaustion: expression of inhibitory receptors on CD8+ T cells and expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress CD8+ T cell activity. Several studies show that blockage of one of these pathways results in reactivation of CD8+ T cells and partial reduction in chronic viral loads. Using blocking antibodies against PD-1 ligand and Tim-3 and transgenic mice in which Tregs can be selectively ablated, we compared these two treatment strategies and combined them for the first time in a model of chronic retrovirus infection. Blocking inhibitory receptors was more efficient than transient depletion of Tregs in reactivating exhausted CD8+ T cells and reducing viral set points. However, a combination therapy was superior to any single treatment and further augmented CD8+ T cell responses and resulted in a sustained reduction in chronic viral loads. These results demonstrate that Tregs and inhibitory receptors are non-overlapping factors in the maintenance of chronic viral infections and that immunotherapies targeting both pathways may be a promising strategy to treat chronic infectious diseases. PMID:24339778

  9. Increase of cells expressing PD-L1 in bovine leukemia virus infection and enhancement of anti-viral immune responses in vitro via PD-L1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The inhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) are involved in immune evasion mechanisms for several pathogens causing chronic infections. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway restores anti-virus immune responses, with concomitant reduction in viral load. In a previous report, we showed that, in bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection, the expression of bovine PD-1 is closely associated with disease progression. However, the functions of bovine PD-L1 are still unknown. To investigate the role of PD-L1 in BLV infection, we identified the bovine PD-L1 gene, and examined PD-L1 expression in BLV-infected cattle in comparison with uninfected cattle. The deduced amino acid sequence of bovine PD-L1 shows high homology to the human and mouse PD-L1. The proportion of PD-L1 positive cells, especially among B cells, was upregulated in cattle with the late stage of the disease compared to cattle at the aleukemic infection stage or uninfected cattle. The proportion of PD-L1 positive cells correlated positively with prediction markers for the progression of the disease such as leukocyte number, virus load and virus titer whilst on the contrary, it inversely correlated with the degree of interferon-gamma expression. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in vitro by PD-L1-specific antibody upregulated the production of interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma, and correspondingly, downregulated the BLV provirus load and the proportion of BLV-gp51 expressing cells. These data suggest that PD-L1 induces immunoinhibition in disease progressed cattle during chronic BLV infection. Therefore, PD-L1 would be a potential target for developing immunotherapies against BLV infection. PMID:21943148

  10. Cadmium-induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons mediated by muscarinic M1 receptor blockade, increase in GSK-3β enzyme, β-amyloid and tau protein levels.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Gabriela; Anadón, María José; Moyano, Paula; Díaz, María Jesús; García, José Manuel; Frejo, María Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium is a neurotoxic compound which induces cognitive alterations similar to those produced by Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism through which cadmium induces this effect remains unknown. In this regard, we described in a previous work that cadmium blocks cholinergic transmission and induces a more pronounced cell death on cholinergic neurons from basal forebrain which is partially mediated by AChE overexpression. Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as happens in AD, results in memory deficits attributable to the loss of cholinergic modulation of hippocampal synaptic circuits. Moreover, cadmium has been described to activate GSK-3β, induce Aβ protein production and tau filament formation, which have been related to a selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and development of AD. The present study is aimed at researching the mechanisms of cell death induced by cadmium on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. For this purpose, we evaluated, in SN56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line from basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability through muscarinic M1 receptor, AChE splice variants, GSK-3β enzyme, Aβ and tau proteins. This study proves that cadmium induces cell death on cholinergic neurons through blockade of M1 receptor, overexpression of AChE-S and GSK-3β, down-regulation of AChE-R and increase in Aβ and total and phosphorylated tau protein levels. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on cholinergic neurons and suggest that cadmium could mediate these mechanisms by M1R blockade through AChE splices altered expression. PMID:26026611

  11. Keratinocyte growth factor and androgen blockade work in concert to protect against conditioning regimen-induced thymic epithelial damage and enhance T-cell reconstitution after murine bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan M.; Highfill, Steven L.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A.; Boyd, Richard L.; Holländer, Georg A.

    2008-01-01

    Myeloablative conditioning results in thymic epithelial cell (TEC) injury, slow T-cell reconstitution, and a high risk of opportunistic infections. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) stimulates TEC proliferation and, when given preconditioning, reduces TEC injury. Thymocytes and TECs express androgen receptors, and exposure to androgen inhibits thymopoiesis. In this study, we have investigated whether TEC stimulation via preconditioning treatment with KGF and leuprolide acetate (Lupron), 2 clinically approved agents, given only before conditioning would circumvent the profound TEC and associated T-cell deficiency seen in allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients. Only combined treatment with KGF plus leuprolide acetate normalized TEC subset numbers and thymic architecture. Thymopoiesis and thymic output were supranormal, leading to the accelerated peripheral reconstitution of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells with a broad Vβ repertoire and decreased homeostatic T-cell proliferation. Combined therapy facilitated T:B cooperativity and enabled a B-cell humoral response to a CD4 T cell–dependent neoantigen challenge soon after BMT. In vivo antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses and clearance of a live pathogen was superior with combined versus individual agent therapy. Thus, KGF combined with androgen blockade represents a novel approach to restore thymic function and facilitates the rapid recovery of peripheral T-cell function after allogeneic BMT. PMID:18334670

  12. Sulforaphane induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase via the blockade of cyclin B1/CDC2 in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant tumors are the single most common cause of death and the mortality rate of ovarian cancer is the highest among gynecological disorders. The excision of benign tumors is generally followed by complete recovery; however, the activity of cancer cells often results in rapid proliferation even after the tumor has been excised completely. Thus, clinical treatment must be supplemented by auxiliary chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an extract from the mustard family recognized for its anti-oxidation abilities, phase 2 enzyme induction, and anti-tumor activity. Methods This study investigated the cell cycle arrest in G2/M by SFN and the expression of cyclin B1, Cdc2, and the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex in PA-1 cells using western blotting and co-IP western blotting. Results This study investigated the anticancer effects of dietary isothiocyanate SFN on ovarian cancer, using cancer cells line PA-1. SFN-treated cells accumulated in metaphase by CDC2 down-regulation and dissociation of the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex. Conclusion Our findings suggest that, in addition to the known effects on cancer prevention, SFN may also provide antitumor activity in established ovarian cancer. PMID:23799914

  13. PD-L1 blockade improves immune dysfunction of spleen dendritic cells and T-cells in zymosan-induced multiple organs dysfunction syndromes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Lv, Yi; Zhao, Min; Jin, Yiduo; Lu, Jiangyang

    2015-01-01

    This research is to investigate the role of tolerant spleen dendritic cells (DC) in multiple organs dysfunction syndromes (MODS) at late stage. Tolerant DC and MODS were induced by intraperotineal injection of zymosan. The immunity of DC was determined by examining interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, IL-2, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), CD86, programmed death (PD-1), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B) or T-cell proliferation in serum, spleen homogenate, DC culture or DC/T-cell co-culture. The PD-L1/PD-1 pathway was blocked using PD-L1 antibody. The IL-12p70 in serum, spleen homogenate and DC culture supernatant were decreased at 5 d and 12 d after zymosan injection while the IL-12p40 and IL-10 were increased. The expression of MHC, cluster of differentiation 86 (CD86), PD-1 and PD-L1 in spleen DCs were increased at early stage after zymosan injection. At 5 d and 12 d, the expression of MHC and CD86 was reduced while the expression of PD-1, PD-L1 and PIR-B was increased, accompanied with decreased proliferation of T-cell and decrease of IL-2 in spleen and serum. Application of PD-L1 antibody improved the above changes. At late stage of MODS mice induced by zymosan, the expression of co-stimulators and inhibitors in spleen DCs was imbalanced to form tolerant DCs which reduced the activation of T-cells. PD-L1 antibody improved the immune tolerance of DCs through intervening PD-1/PD-L1 pathway, and attenuated the inhibition of T-cell activities by tolerant DCs and the immune inhibition. PMID:25973021

  14. PD-L1 blockade improves immune dysfunction of spleen dendritic cells and T-cells in zymosan-induced multiple organs dysfunction syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Lv, Yi; Zhao, Min; Jin, Yiduo; Lu, Jiangyang

    2015-01-01

    This research is to investigate the role of tolerant spleen dendritic cells (DC) in multiple organs dysfunction syndromes (MODS) at late stage. Tolerant DC and MODS were induced by intraperotineal injection of zymosan. The immunity of DC was determined by examining interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, IL-2, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), CD86, programmed death (PD-1), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B) or T-cell proliferation in serum, spleen homogenate, DC culture or DC/T-cell co-culture. The PD-L1/PD-1 pathway was blocked using PD-L1 antibody. The IL-12p70 in serum, spleen homogenate and DC culture supernatant were decreased at 5 d and 12 d after zymosan injection while the IL-12p40 and IL-10 were increased. The expression of MHC, cluster of differentiation 86 (CD86), PD-1 and PD-L1 in spleen DCs were increased at early stage after zymosan injection. At 5 d and 12 d, the expression of MHC and CD86 was reduced while the expression of PD-1, PD-L1 and PIR-B was increased, accompanied with decreased proliferation of T-cell and decrease of IL-2 in spleen and serum. Application of PD-L1 antibody improved the above changes. At late stage of MODS mice induced by zymosan, the expression of co-stimulators and inhibitors in spleen DCs was imbalanced to form tolerant DCs which reduced the activation of T-cells. PD-L1 antibody improved the immune tolerance of DCs through intervening PD-1/PD-L1 pathway, and attenuated the inhibition of T-cell activities by tolerant DCs and the immune inhibition. PMID:25973021

  15. Primary cross-resistance to BRAFV600E-, MEK1/2- and PI3K/mTOR-specific inhibitors in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells counteracted by dual pathway blockade

    PubMed Central

    Penna, Ilaria; Molla, Alessandra; Grazia, Giulia; Cleris, Loredana; Nicolini, Gabriella; Perrone, Federica; Picciani, Benedetta; Del Vecchio, Michele; de Braud, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic cross-resistance to inhibition of different signaling pathways may hamper development of combinatorial treatments in melanoma, but the relative frequency of this phenotype and the strategies to overcome this hurdle remain poorly understood. Among 49 BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines from patients not previously treated with target therapy, 21 (42.9%) showed strong primary resistance (IC50 > 1 μM) to a BRAFV600E inhibitor. Most of the BRAF-inhibitor-resistant cell lines showed also strong or intermediate cross-resistance to MEK1/2- and to PI3K/mTOR-specific inhibitors. Primary cross-resistance was confirmed in an independent set of 23 BRAF-mutant short-term melanoma cell cultures. MEK1/2 and PI3K/mTOR co-targeting was the most effective approach, compared to BRAF and PI3K/mTOR dual blockade, to counteract primary resistance to BRAF inhibition and the cross-resistant phenotype. This was shown by extensive drug interaction analysis, tumor growth inhibition assays in-vivo, p-ERK and p-AKT inhibition, promotion of melanoma apoptosis, apoptosis-related protein modulation, activation of effector caspases and selective modulation of genes involved in melanoma drug resistance and belonging to the ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT canonical pathways. Compared to co-targeting of mutant BRAF and PI3K/mTOR, the association of a MEK1/2 and a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor was more effective in the activation of Bax and of caspase-3 and in the induction of caspase-dependent melanoma apoptosis. Furthermore Bax silencing reduced the latter effects. These results suggest that intrinsic resistance to BRAF inhibition is frequently associated with primary cross-resistance to MEK and PI3K/mTOR blockade in BRAF-mutant melanoma and provide pre-clinical evidence for a combinatorial approach to counteract this phenotype. PMID:26678033

  16. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Hamann, Alf; Bach, Emil; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos; Kristiansen, Karsten; Serikawa, Kyle; Fox, Brian; Kruse, Kim; Haase, Claus; Skov, Søren; Nansen, Anneline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rodent models of arthritis have been extensively used in the elucidation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and are instrumental in the development of therapeutic strategies. Here we utilise delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA), a model in C57BL/6 mice affecting one paw with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregs and the role of IL-17 in connection with Treg depletion. Given the relevance of Tregs in RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies, this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregs in inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregs was achieved using a Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of the Foxp3 gene. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used for IL-17 blockade. Numbers and activation of Tregs increased in the paw and its draining lymph node in DTHA, and depletion of Tregs resulted in exacerbation of disease as shown by increased paw swelling, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Treg depletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregs are important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse on a C57BL/6 background for Treg depletion in an arthritis model, and we here demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to study the role of Tregs and IL-17 in arthritis

  17. Dietary peptides from the non-digestible fraction of Phaseolus vulgaris L. decrease angiotensin II-dependent proliferation in HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells through the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; Liang, Katie; González de Mejía, Elvira; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to determine the ability of peptides present in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans to decrease angiotensin II (AngII) through the blockade of RAS and its effect on the proliferation of HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells. Pure synthesized peptides GLTSK and GEGSGA and the peptide fractions (PF) of cultivars Azufrado Higuera and Bayo Madero were used. The cells were pretreated with pure peptides, PF or AGT at their IC50 or IC25 values, in comparison with the simultaneous treatment of peptides and AGT. For western blot and microscopy analysis, 100 μM and 0.5 mg mL(-1) were used for pure peptides and PF treatments, respectively. According to the ELISA tests, GLTSK and GEGSGA decreased (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AGT to angiotensin I (AngI) by 38 and 28%, respectively. All the peptides tested reduced (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AngI to AngII from 38 to 50%. When the cells were pretreated with both pure peptides and PF before exposure to AGT, the effectiveness inhibiting cell proliferation was higher than the simultaneous treatment suggesting their preventive effects. GLTSK and GEGSGA interacted with the catalytic site of renin, the angiotensin-I converting enzyme, and the AngII receptor, mainly through hydrogen bonds, polar, hydrophobic and cation-π interactions according to molecular docking. Through confocal microscopy, it was determined that GLTSK and GEGSGA caused the decrease (p < 0.05) of AngII-dependent STAT3 nuclear activation in HCT116 cells by 66 and 23%, respectively. The results suggest that peptides present in the common bean NDF could potentially ameliorate the effects of RAS overexpression in colorectal cancer. PMID:27156533

  18. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade relies on the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Vétizou, Marie; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Lepage, Patricia; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Flament, Caroline; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Routy, Bertrand; Roberti, Maria P; Duong, Connie P M; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Roux, Antoine; Becharef, Sonia; Formenti, Silvia; Golden, Encouse; Cording, Sascha; Eberl, Gerard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Ginhoux, Florent; Mani, Sridhar; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P; Bérard, Marion; Nigou, Jérôme; Opolon, Paule; Eggermont, Alexander; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Chachaty, Elisabeth; Chaput, Nathalie; Robert, Caroline; Mateus, Christina; Kroemer, Guido; Raoult, Didier; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Carbonnel, Franck; Chamaillard, Mathias; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2015-11-27

    Antibodies targeting CTLA-4 have been successfully used as cancer immunotherapy. We find that the antitumor effects of CTLA-4 blockade depend on distinct Bacteroides species. In mice and patients, T cell responses specific for B. thetaiotaomicron or B. fragilis were associated with the efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade. Tumors in antibiotic-treated or germ-free mice did not respond to CTLA blockade. This defect was overcome by gavage with B. fragilis, by immunization with B. fragilis polysaccharides, or by adoptive transfer of B. fragilis-specific T cells. Fecal microbial transplantation from humans to mice confirmed that treatment of melanoma patients with antibodies against CTLA-4 favored the outgrowth of B. fragilis with anticancer properties. This study reveals a key role for Bacteroidales in the immunostimulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade. PMID:26541610

  19. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade relies on the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Vétizou, Marie; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Daillère, Romain; Lepage, Patricia; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Flament, Caroline; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Routy, Bertrand; Roberti, Maria P.; Duong, Connie P. M.; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Roux, Antoine; Becharef, Sonia; Formenti, Silvia; Golden, Encouse; Cording, Sascha; Eberl, Gerard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Ginhoux, Florent; Mani, Sridhar; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P.; Bérard, Marion; Nigou, Jérôme; Opolon, Paule; Eggermont, Alexander; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Chachaty, Elisabeth; Chaput, Nathalie; Robert, Caroline; Mateus, Christina; Kroemer, Guido; Raoult, Didier; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Carbonnel, Franck; Chamaillard, Mathias; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting CTLA-4 have been successfully used as cancer immunotherapy. We find that the antitumor effects of CTLA-4 blockade depend on distinct Bacteroides species. In mice and patients, T cell responses specific for B. thetaiotaomicron or B. fragilis were associated with the efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade. Tumors in antibiotic-treated or germ-free mice did not respond to CTLA blockade. This defect was overcome by gavage with B. fragilis, by immunization with B. fragilis polysaccharides, or by adoptive transfer of B. fragilis–specific T cells. Fecal microbial transplantation from humans to mice confirmed that treatment of melanoma patients with antibodies against CTLA-4 favored the outgrowth of B. fragilis with anticancer properties. This study reveals a key role for Bacteroidales in the immunostimulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade. PMID:26541610

  20. Immunotherapeutic implications of IL-6 blockade for cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshio; Narazaki, Masashi; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 contributes to host defense against infections and tissue injuries. However, exaggerated, excessive synthesis of IL-6 while fighting environmental stress leads to an acute severe systemic inflammatory response known as 'cytokine storm', since high levels of IL-6 can activate the coagulation pathway and vascular endothelial cells but inhibit myocardial function. Remarkable beneficial effects of IL-6 blockade therapy using a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab were recently observed in patients with cytokine release syndrome complicated by T-cell engaged therapy. In this review we propose the possibility that IL-6 blockade may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for other types of cytokine storm, such as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome including sepsis, macrophage activation syndrome and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. PMID:27381687

  1. Selective blockade of phosphodiesterase types 2, 5 and 9 results in cyclic 3′5′ guanosine monophosphate accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Diederen, R M H; Heij, E C La; Ittersum, M Markerink‐van; Kijlstra, A; Hendrikse, F; de Vente, J

    2007-01-01

    Aim To investigate which phosphodiesterase (PDE) is involved in regulating cyclic 3′5′ guanosine monophosphate breakdown in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Methods cGMP content in the cultured RPE cells (D407 cell line) was evaluated by immunocytochemistry in the presence of non‐selective or isoform‐selective PDE inhibitors in combination with the particulate guanylyl cyclase stimulator atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or the soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator sodium nitroprusside (SNP). mRNA expression of PDE2, PDE5 and PDE9 was studied in cultured human RPE cells and rat RPE cell layers using non‐radioactive in situ hybridisation. Results In the absence of PDE inhibitors, cGMP levels in cultured RPE cells are very low. cGMP accumulation was readily detected in cultured human RPE cells after incubation with Bay60–7550 as a selective PDE2 inhibitor, sildenafil as a selective PDE5 inhibitor or Sch51866 as a selective PDE9 inhibitor. In the presence of PDE inhibition, cGMP content increased markedly after stimulation of the particulate guanylyl cyclase. mRNA of PDE2,PDE5 and PDE9 was detected in all cultured human RPE cells and also in rat RPE cell layers. Conclusions PDE2, PDE5 and PDE9 have a role in cGMP metabolism in RPE cells. PMID:16943225

  2. Combination OX40 agonism/CTLA-4 blockade with HER2 vaccination reverses T-cell anergy and promotes survival in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Linch, Stefanie N.; Kasiewicz, Melissa J.; McNamara, Michael J.; Hilgart-Martiszus, Ian F.; Farhad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is gathering momentum as a primary therapy for cancer patients. However, monotherapies have limited efficacy in improving outcomes and benefit only a subset of patients. Combination therapies targeting multiple pathways can augment an immune response to improve survival further. Here, we demonstrate that dual aOX40 (anti-CD134)/aCTLA-4 (anti–cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated protein 4) immunotherapy generated a potent antigen-specific CD8 T-cell response, enhancing expansion, effector function, and memory T-cell persistence. Importantly, OX40 and CTLA-4 expression on CD8 T cells was critical for promoting their maximal expansion following combination therapy. Animals treated with combination therapy and vaccination using anti–DEC-205 (dendritic and epithelial cells, 205 kDa)–HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) had significantly improved survival in a mammary carcinoma model. Vaccination with combination therapy uniquely restricted Th2-cytokine production by CD4 cells, relative to combination therapy alone, and enhanced IFNγ production by CD8 and CD4 cells. We observed an increase in MIP-1α (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α)/CCL3 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3], MIP-1β/CCL4, RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and excreted)/CCL5, and GM-CSF production by CD8 and CD4 T cells following treatment. Furthermore, this therapy was associated with extensive tumor destruction and T-cell infiltration into the tumor. Notably, in a spontaneous model of prostate adenocarcinoma, vaccination with combination therapy reversed anergy and enhanced the expansion and function of CD8 T cells recognizing a tumor-associated antigen. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the addition of a vaccine with combined aOX40/aCTLA-4 immunotherapy augmented antitumor CD8 T-cell function while limiting Th2 polarization in CD4 cells and improved overall survival. PMID:26729864

  3. Checkpoint blockade in combination with cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-12-16

    Checkpoint blockade, prevention of inhibitory signaling that limits activation or function of tumor antigen-specific T cells responses, is revolutionizing the treatment of many poor prognosis malignancies. Indeed monoclonal antibodies that modulate signaling through the inhibitory molecules CTLA-4 and PD-1 are now clinically available; however, many tumors, demonstrate minimal response suggesting the need for combinations with other therapeutic strategies. Because an inadequate frequency of activated tumor antigen-specific T cells in the tumor environment, the so-called non-inflamed phenotype, is observed in some malignancies, other rationale partners are modalities that lead to enhanced T cell activation (vaccines, cytokines, toll-like receptor agonists, and other anticancer therapies such as chemo-, radio- or targeted therapies that lead to release of antigen from tumors). This review will focus on preclinical and clinical data supporting the use of cancer vaccines with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies. Preliminary preclinical data demonstrate enhanced antitumor activity although the results in human studies are less clear. Broader combinations of multiple immune modulators are now under study. PMID:26482147

  4. Coulomb blockade with neutral modes.

    PubMed

    Kamenev, Alex; Gefen, Yuval

    2015-04-17

    We study transport through a quantum dot in the fractional quantum Hall regime with filling factors ν=2/3 and ν=5/2, weakly coupled to the leads. We account for both injection of electrons to or from the leads, and quasiparticle rearrangement processes between the edge and the bulk of the quantum dot. The presence of neutral modes introduces topological constraints that modify qualitatively the features of the Coulomb blockade (CB). The periodicity of CB peak spacings doubles and the ratio of spacing between adjacent peaks approaches (in the low temperature and large dot limit) a universal value: 2∶1 for ν=2/3 and 3∶1 for ν=5/2. The corresponding CB diamonds alternate their width in the direction of the bias voltage and allow for the determination of the neutral mode velocity, and of the topological numbers associated with it. PMID:25933323

  5. Neurohumoral blockade in CHF management.

    PubMed

    Willenbrock, R; Philipp, S; Mitrovic, V; Dietz, R

    2000-09-01

    Is heart failure an endocrine disease? Historically, congestive heart failure (CHF) has often been regarded as a mechanical and haemodynamic condition. However, there is now strong evidence that the activation of neuroendocrine systems, like the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system, as well as the activation of natriuretic peptides, endothelin and vasopressin, play key roles in the progression of CHF. In this context, agents targeting neurohormones offer a highly rational approach to CHF management, with ACE inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists and beta-adrenergic blockade improving the prognosis for many patients. Although relevant improvements in clinical status and survival can be achieved with these drug classes, mortality rates for patients with CHF are still very high. Moreover, most patients do not receive these proven life-prolonging drugs, partially due to fear of adverse events, such as hypotension (with ACE inhibitors), gynaecomastia (with spironolactone) and fatigue (with beta-blockers). New agents that combine efficacy with better tolerability are therefore needed. The angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1))-receptor blockers have the potential to fulfil both these requirements, by blocking the deleterious cardiovascular and haemodynamic effects of angiotensin II while offering placebo-like tolerability. As shown with candesartan, AT(1)-receptor blockers also modulate the levels of other neurohormones, including aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Combined with its tight, long-lasting binding to AT(1)-receptors, this characteristic gives candesartan the potential for complete blockade of the RAAS-neurohormonal axis, along with the great potential to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:11967792

  6. [Genetic Mutation Accumulation and Clinical Outcome of Immune Checkpoint Blockade Therapy].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapy has recently attracted great attention in the area of oncology. In Japan, since 2014, an anti-PD-1antibody nivolumab and anti-CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab have been available for the treatment of patients with malignant melanoma, and nivolumab has been available for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Clinical trials using these drugs and other immune checkpoint inhibitors are currently in progress worldwide. The immune checkpoint blockade therapy is a promising new cancer therapy; however, not all patients with cancer can benefit from this therapy. Recent evidence shows that markers reflecting the extent of genetic mutation accumulation, including mutation burden, non-synonymous mutation that produces neoantigen, and microsatellite instability, possibly serve as promising marker to predict who can benefit from the immune checkpoint blockade therapy. Here, I introduce the recent evidence and discuss the correlation between genetic mutation accumulation and clinical outcome of immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27306805

  7. Blockade of Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins in Combination with Conventional Chemotherapy Leads to Synergistic Antitumor Activity in Medulloblastoma and Cancer Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Li, Ying-Ying; Tu, Chiao-Hui; Salazar, Nicole; Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Huang, Shiang-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common pediatric primary malignant brain tumor. Approximately one-third of MB patients succumb to treatment failure and some survivors suffer detrimental side effects. Hence, the purpose of this study is to explore new therapeutic regimens to overcome chemotherapeutic agent resistance or reduce chemotherapy-induced toxicity. Methods We detected the expression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in MB and CD133+ MB cell lines and MB tissues using immunoblotting and immunohistochemical staining. The antitumor effects of inhibitors against IAPs on MB or CD133+ MB cells were evaluated by MTT assay, Annexin V/PI analysis, and caspase-3/7 activity. Autophagy was assessed by the conversion of light chain (LC) 3-I to LC3-II and Cyto-ID autophagy detection kit. Results MB cells showed higher expression of IAPs compared to normal astrocytes and normal brain tissues. Conventional chemotherapeutic agents combined with small-molecule IAP inhibitors (LCL161 or LBW242) showed a synergistic effect in MB cells. Combined treatments triggered apoptosis in MB cells through activation of caspase-3/7 and autophagic flux simultaneously. In addition, we found that CD133+ MB cells with features of cancer stem cells displayed higher levels of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1/2 (cIAP1/2), and were hypersensitive to treatment with IAP inhibitors. Conclusions These results shed light on the biological effects of combination therapy on MB cells and illustrate that IAP inhibitors are more effective for CD133+ stem-like MB cells. PMID:27537345

  8. Blockade of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Production in CD4^+ T Cells by an Intracellular CD4 Expressed Under Control of the Viral Long Terminal Repeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K.

    1993-04-01

    A retroviral vector was constructed in which a gene encoding a mutated soluble CD4 protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (sCD4-KDEL) is expressed under control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory elements. HIV-1 infection of a human T-cell line transduced with this vector led to induction of sCD4-KDEL synthesis and a block in transport of the HIV envelope protein to the cell surface. There was a complete block to maturation of infectious HIV-1 in the transduced cells, no viral spread, and little or no syncytium formation. Infected cells gradually disappeared from the culture over a period of 2 months. This intracellular trap for HIV has potential application in gene therapy for AIDS.

  9. Blockade of Tim-3 Pathway Ameliorates Interferon-γ Production from Hepatic CD8+ T Cells in a Mouse Model of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ying; Hou, Nan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Di; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jinjin; Luan, Fang; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Faliang; Sun, Wensheng; Zhang, Lining; Gao, Chengjiang; Gao, Lifen; Liang, Xiaohong; Ma, Chunhong

    2009-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been reported to participate in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. However, whether Tim-3 is involved in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains unknown. Here, we studied the expression and function of Tim-3 in a hydrodynamics-based mouse model of HBV infection. A significant increase of Tim-3 expression on hepatic T lymphocytes, especially on CD8+ T cells, was demonstrated in HBV model mice from day 7 to day 18. After Tim-3 knockdown by specific shRNAs, significantly increased IFN-γ production from hepatic CD8+ T cells in HBV model mice was observed. Very interestingly, we found Tim-3 expression on CD8+ T cells was higher in HBV model mice with higher serum anti-HBs production. Moreover, Tim-3 knockdown influenced anti-HBs production in vivo. Collectively, our data suggested that Tim-3 might act as a potent regulator of antiviral T-cell responses in HBV infection. PMID:19254478

  10. 4-Acetylantroquinonol B suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of hepatoma cells via blockade of translation-dependent signaling pathway and VEGF production.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Hsin; Huang, Tur-Fu; Lin, Kung-Tin; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Wei-Luen; Wang, Shih-Wei; Ko, Feng-Nien; Peng, Hui-Chin; Chung, Ching-Hu

    2015-01-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has become one of most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Previous study has shown that 4-acetylantroquinonol B (4AAQB) isolated from Antrodia cinnamomea (or niu-chang-chih) was observed to inhibit HepG2 cell proliferation via affecting cell cycle. However, the in vivo effects and antimetastatic activity of 4AAQB have not yet been addressed. This study found that 4AAQB inhibited HepG2 and HuH-7 hepatoma cell growth in both in vitro and in vivo models and exhibited pronounced inhibitory effects on HuH-7 tumor growth in xenograft and orthotopic models. 4AAQB efficiently inhibited the phosphorylation of mTOR and its upstream kinases and the downstream effectors and decreased the production of VEGF and activity of Rho GTPases in HuH-7 cells. Furthermore, 4AAQB inhibited in vitro HuH-7 cell migration and in vivo pulmonary metastasis. The results suggested that 4AAQB is a potential candidate for HCC therapy. PMID:25494404

  11. Selective targeting of JAK/STAT signaling is potentiated by Bcl-xL blockade in IL-2–dependent adult T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meili; Mathews Griner, Lesley A.; Ju, Wei; Duveau, Damien Y.; Guha, Rajarshi; Petrus, Michael N.; Wen, Bernard; Maeda, Michiyuki; Shinn, Paul; Ferrer, Marc; Conlon, Kevin D.; Bamford, Richard N.; O’Shea, John J.; Thomas, Craig J.; Waldmann, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) develops in individuals infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1). Presently there is no curative therapy for ATL. HTLV-1–encoded protein Tax (transactivator from the X-gene region) up-regulates Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large) expression and activates interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-9, and IL-15 autocrine/paracrine systems, resulting in amplified JAK/STAT signaling. Inhibition of JAK signaling reduces cytokine-dependent ex vivo proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from ATL patients in smoldering/chronic stages. Currently, two JAK inhibitors are approved for human use. In this study, we examined activity of multiple JAK inhibitors in ATL cell lines. The selective JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib was examined in a high-throughput matrix screen combined with >450 potential therapeutic agents, and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor navitoclax was identified as a strong candidate for multicomponent therapy. The combination was noted to strongly activate BAX (Bcl-2-associated X protein), effect mitochondrial depolarization, and increase caspase 3/7 activities that lead to cleavage of PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) and Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia 1). Ruxolitinib and navitoclax independently demonstrated modest antitumor efficacy, whereas the combination dramatically lowered tumor burden and prolonged survival in an ATL murine model. This combination strongly blocked ex vivo proliferation of five ATL patients’ PBMCs. These studies provide support for a therapeutic trial in patients with smoldering/chronic ATL using a drug combination that inhibits JAK signaling and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. PMID:26396258

  12. [Recent Development of Therapies for Melanoma Using Immune Checkpoint Blockades].

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Ryuhei

    2016-06-01

    Melanoma is a highly immune tumor, and tumor-specific T lymphocytes are occasionally induced. Recent progress in tumor immunology has made it possible to clinically develop new medicines targeting immune checkpoint molecules, such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4(CTLA-4), programmed cell death 1(PD-1), and programmed cell death 1 ligand 1(PD-L1). CTLA-4 is expressed on naïve T cells and regulatory T cells. Ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 antibody, shows a distinct durable clinical benefit by inhibiting the immunosuppressive function of CTLA-4. PD-1, which is expressed on activated T cells, inhibits T cell responses against tumor cells. The antibodies against PD-1, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, produce anti-tumor responses in melanoma and other cancers due to T cell reactivation. Furthermore, clinical trials of combination therapies using immune checkpoint blockades with molecularly targeted therapies and other chemotherapeutic agents are being conducted. However, immune checkpoint blockades frequently cause immune-related adverse events. Targeted therapies to immune checkpoint molecules are expected to be promising strategies for treatment of melanoma and other cancers. PMID:27306802

  13. Molecular characterization of woodchuck interleukin-10 receptor and enhanced function of specific T cells from chronically infected woodchucks following its blockade.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Ejuan; Meng, Zhongji; Wang, Baoju; Roggendorf, Michael; Yang, Dongliang; Lu, Mengji; Xu, Yang

    2012-12-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic cytokine acting on a variety of immune cells through the cell surface receptor (IL-10R). It has been suggested to resuscitate antiviral immunity by interfering with IL-10/IL-10R pathway. The woodchuck model infected by woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represents an informative animal model to study hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this study, the woodchuck IL-10R (wIL-10R) was molecularly cloned and characterized, showing high similarity of its nucleotide and amino acid sequences to that of other mammalian species. The expression level of wIL-10R mRNA in woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells was significantly increased in acute WHV infection but down-regulated during chronic WHV infection. Specific rabbit antibodies against wIL-10R were prepared and showed the ability to enhance the proliferation and degranulation of specific T-cells from chronically WHV-infected woodchucks in vitro. The present work on wIL-10R provided a good basis for future preclinical studies on therapeutic approaches for chronic HBV infection. PMID:22784930

  14. Blockade of Androgen Markers Using a Novel Betasitosterol, Thioctic Acid and Carnitine-containing Compound in Prostate and Hair Follicle Cell-based Assays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Wang, Jiaolong; Mouser, Glen; Li, Yan Chun; Marcovici, Geno

    2016-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) affects approximately 70% of men and 40% of women in an age-dependent manner and is partially mediated by androgen hormones. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) similarly affects 50% of the male population, rising by 10% each decade. Finasteride inhibits 5-alpha reductase (5AR) and is used to treat both disorders, despite offering limited clinical benefits accompanied by significant adverse side effects. Building on our previous work demonstrating the efficacy of naturally derived 5AR inhibitors (such as stigmasterol and beta sitosterol), we hypothesize that targeting 5AR as well as inflammatory pathways may yield improved efficacy in AGA and BPH. Here we address these dual pathomechanisms by examining the potency of a novel composition using in vitro assays of representative cell lines for AGA (hair follicle dermal papilla cells) and BPH (LNCaP prostate cells), respectively. Exposure of cells to the novel test composition down-regulated mRNA expression profiles characteristic of both disease processes, which outperformed finasteride. Changes in mRNA expression were corroborated at the protein level as assessed by western blotting. These studies provide proof of concept that novel, naturally derived compositions simultaneously targeting 5AR and inflammatory mediators may represent a rational approach to treating AGA and BPH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26990224

  15. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Saban; Cece, Hasan; Nacar, Halil; Karahan, Mahmut Alp

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture. PMID:21712873

  16. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Saban; Cece, Hasan; Nacar, Halil; Karahan, Mahmut Alp

    2011-03-01

    Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture. PMID:21712873

  17. [The practice guideline 'Neuraxis blockade and anticoagulation'].

    PubMed

    De Lange, J J; Van Kleef, J W; Van Everdingen, J J E

    2004-07-31

    In a patient with a coagulation disorder, the administration of a local anaesthetic by means of a needle or via the insertion of a catheter into the epidural space or spinal cavity may lead to bleeding and haematoma formation, with a danger of pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. Employing the method of the Dutch Institute for Healthcare (CBO) for the development of practice guidelines, a working group of anaesthesiologists, a haematologist and a hospital chemist have drawn up recommendations for neuraxis blockade in combination with anticoagulant therapy. In patients with a clinically acquired tendency toward increased bleeding, the management is highly dependent on the cause of the bleeding tendency. If the patient uses acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel, the medication must be withdrawn at least 10 days before neuraxis blockade is started. Therapy with glycoprotein-IIb/IIIa-receptor antagonists is an absolute contra-indication for neuraxis blockade. In patients who are using coumarin derivatives, neuraxis blockade results in an increased risk of a neuraxial haematoma. The coumarin derivative should then be withdrawn and replaced by a different form of anticoagulation. The use of low-molecular-weight heparin at the usual prophylactic dosage is not a contra-indication for neuraxis blockade and the risk of a neuraxial haematoma following neuraxis blockade is also not increased significantly by the subcutaneous administration of unfractionated heparin. PMID:15366721

  18. Augmentation of primary influenza A virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses in aged mice through blockade of an immunoinhibitory pathway.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Lauren; Latimer, Brian; Parzych, Elizabeth; Haut, Larissa H; Töpfer, Katrin; Abdulla, Sarah; Yu, Hong; Manson, Brian; Giles-Davis, Wynetta; Zhou, Dongming; Lasaro, Marcio O; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2010-05-15

    Immune responses diminish with age resulting in an increased susceptibility of the elderly to infectious agents and an inability to mount protective immune responses to vaccines. Immunosenescence affects multiple aspects of the immune system, including CD8(+) T cells, which control viral infections and are assumed to prevent the development of cancers. In this study, we tested if CD8(+) T cell responses in aged mice could be enhanced through a vaccine that concomitantly expresses Ag and a molecule that blocks an immunoinhibitory pathway. Specifically, we tested a vaccine based on a replication-defective chimpanzee-derived adenovirus vector expressing the nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza A virus as a fusion protein with the HSV type 1 glycoprotein D, which through binding to the herpes virus entry mediator, blocks the immunoinhibitory herpes virus entry mediator B and T lymphocyte attenuator/CD160 pathways. Our results show that the vaccine expressing a fusion protein of NP and glycoprotein D induces significantly higher NP-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in young and aged mice compared with the vaccine expressing NP only. PMID:20410485

  19. Phase 1 trial of IL-15 trans presentation blockade using humanized Mik-Beta-1 mAb in patients with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Kevin C.; Stewart, Donn M.; Worthy, TatYana A.; Janik, John E.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Albert, Paul S.; Figg, William D.; Spencer, Shawn D.; Raffeld, Mark; Decker, Jean R.; Goldman, Carolyn K.; Bryant, Bonita R.; Petrus, Michael N.; Creekmore, Stephen P.; Morris, John C.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, Hu-Mikβ1, a humanized mAb directed at the shared IL-2/IL-15Rβ subunit (CD122) was evaluated in patients with T-cell large granular lymphocytic (T-LGL) leukemia. Hu-Mikβ1 blocked the trans presentation of IL-15 to T cells expressing IL-2/IL-15Rβ and the common γ-chain (CD132), but did not block IL-15 action in cells that expressed the heterotrimeric IL-15 receptor in cis. There was no significant toxicity associated with Hu-Mikβ1 administration in patients with T-LGL leukemia, but no major clinical responses were observed. One patient who had previously received murine Mikβ1 developed a measurable Ab response to the infused Ab. Nevertheless, the safety profile of this first in-human study of the humanized mAb to IL-2/IL-15Rβ (CD122) supports its evaluation in disorders such as refractory celiac disease, in which IL-15 and its receptor have been proposed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis and maintenance of disease activity. The protocol is registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov as number NCT 00076180. PMID:23212516

  20. Dual blockade of the A1 and A2A adenosine receptor prevents amyloid beta toxicity in neuroblastoma cells exposed to aluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Salvatore; Andriolo, Violetta; Castorina, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    In a previous work we have shown that exposure to aluminum (Al) chloride (AlCl3) enhanced the neurotoxicity of the amyloid beta(25-35) fragment (Abeta(25-35)) in neuroblastoma cells and affected the expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related genes. Caffein, a compound endowed with beneficial effects against AD, exerts neuroprotection primarily through its antagonist activity on A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR), although it also inhibits A1Rs with similar potency. Still, studies on the specific involvement of these receptors in neuroprotection in a model of combined neurotoxicity (Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3) are missing. To address this issue, cultured SH-SY5Y cells exposed to Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 were assessed for cell viability, morphology, intracellular ROS activity and expression of apoptosis-, stress- and AD-related proteins. To define the role of A1R and A2ARs, pretreatment with caffein, specific receptor antagonists (DPCPX or SCH58261) or siRNA-mediated gene knockdown were delivered. Results indicate that AlCl3 treatment exacerbated Abeta(25-35) toxicity, increased ROS production, lipid peroxidation, β-secretase-1 (BACE1) and amyloid precursor protein (APP). Interestingly, SCH58261 successfully prevented toxicity associated to Abeta(25-35) only, whereas pretreatment with both DPCPX and SCH58261 was required to fully avert Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3-induced damage, suggesting that A1Rs might also be critically involved in protection during combined toxicity. The effects of caffein were mimicked by both N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, and desferrioxamine, likely acting through distinct mechanisms. Altogether, our data establish a novel protective function associated with A1R inhibition in the setting of combined Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 neurotoxicity, and expand our current knowledge on the potential beneficial role of caffein to prevent AD progression in subjects environmentally exposed to aluminum. PMID:25058312

  1. Role of glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid receptor in priming of macrophages caused by glucocorticoid receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Yu-Jian; Diao, Fei; Fan, Jie; Lu, Jian; Xu, Ren-Bao

    2007-04-01

    We previously reported that glucocorticoid receptor (GR) blockade (injected with GR antagonist RU486) primed the host responses to lipopolysaccharide. Since decrease of GR and elevated glucocorticoids (GCs) have been always reported as parallel responses, we hypothesize that both GCs and GR play important roles in GR blockade induced priming. We first confirm that the production of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O2-), and PKCalpha expression are all increased in peritoneal macrophages from GR blockade rats, indicating that macrophages are primed by GR blockade. Furthermore, using unilateral adrenalectomy rats, we find that the elevated GCs caused by a feedback mechanism following GR blockade may be involved in the process of priming. In vitro experiments in RAW264.7 cells show the inhibitory effect of GCs on NO production, which can be thoroughly blocked by RU486, indicating the increase of NO production in GR blockade rats is due to the elimination of GCs's anti-inflammatory function. In contrast, 10(-7) M corticosterone induces significant increases in O2- release, PKCalpha expression and phosphorylation, which cannot be reversed by RU486, demonstrating a previously unrecognized pro-inflammatory role of GCs in enhancing PM activation through a GR-independent pathway. The effect of GCs on PKCalpha expression even exists in GR deficient COS-7 cells as well as in GR knock-down RAW264.7 cells. In conclusion, both GR impairment and elevation of GCs are involved in the priming of macrophages caused by GR blockade. The findings of the divergent roles of GCs in modulation of inflammation may change therapeutic strategy for inflammatory diseases with GCs. PMID:17873323

  2. Extracellular α-crystallin protects astrocytes from cell death through activation of MAPK, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and blockade of ROS release from mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhihui; Li, Rongyu; Stricker, Rolf; Reiser, Georg

    2015-09-16

    α-Crystallin with two isoforms, αA-crystallin (HSPB4) and αB-crystallin (HSPB5), is found in eye lens, spleen, lung, kidney, cornea, skin, but also in brain. Several studies revealed roles of αA/αB-crystallin in regulating cell viability and protection in the central nervous system. We previously demonstrated that α-crystallin serves as an intracellular protectant in astrocytes. Compared to well-studied intracellular functions of α-crystallin, there is limited proof for the role of α-crystallin as extracellular protectant. In order to clarify protective effects of extracellular αA/αB-crystallin, we exposed astrocytes to the toxic agents, staurosporine or C2-ceramide, or serum-starvation in the presence of αA/αB-crystallin. Extracellular αA/αB-crystallin protected astrocytes from staurosporine- and C2-ceramide-induced cell death. In addition, extracellular αB-crystallin/HSPB5 effectively promoted astrocytes viability through phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) signaling pathways under serum-deprivation. Furthermore, αB-crystallin/HSPB5 decreases the staurosporine-mediated cleavage of caspase 3 through PI3K/Akt signaling preventing apoptosis of astrocytes. Thus, the current study indicates that extracellular αA/αB-crystallin protects astrocytes exposed to various harmful stimuli. Furthermore, application of αB-crystallin/HSPB5 to isolated rat brain mitochondria inhibits ROS generation induced by complex III inhibition with Antimycin A. PMID:25998538

  3. Reduced availability of voltage-gated sodium channels by depolarization or blockade by tetrodotoxin boosts burst firing and catecholamine release in mouse chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandael, David H F; Ottaviani, Matteo M; Legros, Christian; Lefort, Claudie; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Allio, Arianna; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Action potential (AP) firing in mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) is mainly sustained by Cav1.3 L-type channels that drive BK and SK currents and regulate the pacemaking cycle. As secretory units, CCs optimally recruit Ca2+ channels when stimulated, a process potentially dependent on the modulation of the AP waveform. Our previous work has shown that a critical determinant of AP shape is voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) channel availability. Here, we studied the contribution of Nav channels to firing patterns and AP shapes at rest (−50 mV) and upon stimulation (−40 mV). Using quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting, we show that MCCs mainly express tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, fast-inactivating Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels that carry little or no Na+ current during slow ramp depolarizations. Time constants and the percentage of recovery from fast inactivation and slow entry into closed-state inactivation are similar to that of brain Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels. The fraction of available Nav channels is reduced by half after 10 mV depolarization from −50 to −40 mV. This leads to low amplitude spikes and a reduction in repolarizing K+ currents inverting the net current from outward to inward during the after-hyperpolarization. When Nav channel availability is reduced by up to 20% of total, either by TTX block or steady depolarization, a switch from tonic to burst firing is observed. The spontaneous occurrence of high frequency bursts is rare under control conditions (14% of cells) but leads to major Ca2+-entry and increased catecholamine release. Thus, Nav1.3/Nav1.7 channel availability sets the AP shape, burst-firing initiation and regulates catecholamine secretion in MCCs. Nav channel inactivation becomes important during periods of high activity, mimicking stress responses. PMID:25620605

  4. Adrenomedullin blockade induces regression of tumor neovessels through interference with vascular endothelial-cadherin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sauze, Samantha; Berenguer-Daizé, Caroline; Sigaud, Romain; Delfino, Christine; Cayol, Mylène; Metellus, Philippe; Chinot, Olivier; Mabrouk, Kamel; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which adrenomedullin (AM) blockade suppresses tumor neovessels are not well defined. Herein, we show that AM blockade using anti-AM and anti-AM receptors antibodies targets vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and induces regression of unstable nascent tumor neovessels. The underlying mechanism involved, and shown in vitro and in vivo in mice, is the disruption of the molecular engagement of the endothelial cell-specific junctional molecules vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin)/β-catenin complex. AM blockade increases endothelial cell permeability by inhibiting cell-cell contacts predominantly through disruption of VE-cadherin/β-catenin/Akt signalling pathway, thereby leading to vascular collapse and regression of tumor neovessels. At a molecular level, we show that AM blockade induces tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at a critical tyrosine, Tyr731, which is sufficient to prevent the binding of β-catenin to the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin leading to the inhibition of cell barrier function. Furthermore, we demonstrate activation of Src kinase by phosphorylation on Tyr416, supporting a role of Src to phosphorylate Tyr731-VE-cadherin. In this model, Src inhibition impairs αAM and αAMR-induced Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation state is dependent on Src activation. We found that AM blockade induces β-catenin phosphorylation on Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 sites in both ECs and VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data suggest that AM blockade selectively induces regression of unstable tumor neovessels, through disruption of VE-cadherin signalling. Targeting AM system may present a novel therapeutic target to selectively disrupt assembly and induce regression of nascent tumor neovessels, without affecting normal stabilized vasculature. PMID:25924235

  5. Adrenomedullin blockade induces regression of tumor neovessels through interference with vascular endothelial-cadherin signalling.

    PubMed

    Khalfaoui-Bendriss, Ghizlane; Dussault, Nadège; Fernandez-Sauze, Samantha; Berenguer-Daizé, Caroline; Sigaud, Romain; Delfino, Christine; Cayol, Mylène; Metellus, Philippe; Chinot, Olivier; Mabrouk, Kamel; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2015-04-10

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which adrenomedullin (AM) blockade suppresses tumor neovessels are not well defined. Herein, we show that AM blockade using anti-AM and anti-AM receptors antibodies targets vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and induces regression of unstable nascent tumor neovessels. The underlying mechanism involved, and shown in vitro and in vivo in mice, is the disruption of the molecular engagement of the endothelial cell-specific junctional molecules vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin)/β-catenin complex. AM blockade increases endothelial cell permeability by inhibiting cell-cell contacts predominantly through disruption of VE-cadherin/β-catenin/Akt signalling pathway, thereby leading to vascular collapse and regression of tumor neovessels. At a molecular level, we show that AM blockade induces tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at a critical tyrosine, Tyr731, which is sufficient to prevent the binding of β-catenin to the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin leading to the inhibition of cell barrier function. Furthermore, we demonstrate activation of Src kinase by phosphorylation on Tyr416, supporting a role of Src to phosphorylate Tyr731-VE-cadherin. In this model, Src inhibition impairs αAM and αAMR-induced Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation state is dependent on Src activation. We found that AM blockade induces β-catenin phosphorylation on Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 sites in both ECs and VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data suggest that AM blockade selectively induces regression of unstable tumor neovessels, through disruption of VE-cadherin signalling. Targeting AM system may present a novel therapeutic target to selectively disrupt assembly and induce regression of nascent tumor neovessels, without affecting normal stabilized vasculature. PMID:25924235

  6. [Osmoregulatory reactions of frog erythrocytes under conditions of activation and blockade of Ca2+-channels].

    PubMed

    Skorkina, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of cell osmoregulatory reactions under conditions of activation and blockade of Ca2+-channels was studied on a model of frog polyfunctional nuclear erythrocyte. Both activation and blockade of Ca2+-channels has been established to promote swelling of nuclei and an increase of the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios under conditions of hypotonic exposure. The osmoregulatory cell reactions after activation of Ca2+-channels are expressed as a decrease of the cell volume. The blockator of Ca2+-channels verapamil produces an alternated increase and decrease of the erythrocyte volume with time intervals of 30 and 60 s. The clearly expressed functional activity of the nuclear membrane in response to the hypotonic action under conditions of activation and blockade of Ca2+-channels indicates participation of Ca2+ ions in mechanisms of the nuclear-cytoplasmic transfer. PMID:22645976

  7. Inducible T-cell co-stimulator ligand (ICOSL) blockade leads to selective inhibition of anti-KLH IgG responses in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, B A; Tsuji, W; Kivitz, A; Peng, J; Arnold, G E; Boedigheimer, M J; Chiu, K; Green, C L; Kaliyaperumal, A; Wang, C; Ferbas, J; Chung, J B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of single-dose and multiple-dose administration of AMG 557, a human anti-inducible T cell co-stimulator ligand (ICOSL) monoclonal antibody, in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Patients with mild, stable SLE (n=112) were enrolled in two clinical trials to evaluate the effects of single (1.8–210 mg subcutaneous or 18 mg intravenous) and multiple (6 –210 mg subcutaneous every other week (Q2W)×7) doses of AMG 557. Subjects received two 1 mg intradermal injections 28 days apart of keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), a neoantigen, to assess PD effects of AMG 557. Safety, PK, target occupancy, anti-KLH antibody responses, lymphocyte subset analyses and SLE-associated biomarkers and clinical outcomes were assessed. Results AMG 557 demonstrated an acceptable safety profile. The PK properties were consistent with an antibody directed against a cell surface target, with non-linear PK observed at lower concentrations and linear PK at higher concentrations. Target occupancy by AMG 557 was dose dependent and reversible, and maximal occupancy was achieved in the setting of this trial. Anti-AMG 557 antibodies were observed, but none were neutralising and without impact on drug levels. A significant reduction in the anti-KLH IgG response was observed with AMG 557 administration without discernible changes in the anti-KLH IgM response or on the overall IgG levels. No discernible changes were seen in lymphocyte subsets or in SLE-related biomarkers and clinical measures. Conclusions The selective reduction in anti-KLH IgG demonstrates a PD effect of AMG 557 in subjects with SLE consistent with the biology of the ICOS pathway and supports further studies of AMG 557 as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune diseases. Trial registration numbers NCT02391259 and NCT00774943. PMID:27099766

  8. PD-1 Checkpoint Blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Alison; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Immune checkpoints are regulatory pathways induced in activated T lymphocytes that regulate antigen responsiveness. These immune checkpoints are hijacked by tumors to promote dysfunction of anti-tumor effector cells and consequently of tumor escape from the host immune system. Areas covered PD1/PDL-1, a checkpoint pathway, has been extensively investigated in leukemia mouse models. Expression of PD-1 on the surface of activated immune cells and of its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, on leukemic blasts has been documented. Clinical trials with PD-1 inhibitors in patients with hematological malignancies are ongoing with promising clinical responses. Expert Opinion Therapy of hematological cancers with antibodies blocking inhibitory receptors is expected to be highly clinically effective. Checkpoint inhibitory receptors and their ligands are co-expressed on hematopoietic cells found in the leukemic milieu. Several distinct immunological mechanisms are likely to be engaged by antibody-based checkpoint blockade. Co-expression of multiple inhibitory receptors on hematopoietic cells offers an opportunity for combining blocking antibodies to achieve more effective therapy. Up-regulation of receptor/ligand expression in the leukemic milieu may provide a blood marker predictive of response. Finally, chemotherapy-induced up-regulation of PD-1 on T cells after conventional leukemia therapy creates a solid rationale for application of checkpoint blockade as a follow-up therapy. PMID:26036819

  9. Targeted blockade of JAK/STAT3 signaling inhibits proliferation, migration and collagen production as well as inducing the apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuan-Jing; Sun, Wu-Yi; Zhang, Sen; Li, Xin-Ran; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases belonging to the Janus kinase (JAK) family are associated with many cytokine receptors, which, on ligand binding, regulate important cellular functions such as proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. The protective effects of JAK inhibitors on fibrotic diseases such as myelofibrosis and bone marrow fibrosis have been demonstrated in previous studies. The JAK inhibitor SHR0302 is a synthetic molecule that potently inhibits all members of the JAK family, particularly JAK1. However, its effect on hepatic fibrosis has not been investigated to date, to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, the effects of SHR0302 on the activation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) as well as HSC collagen production were investigated. Our data demonstrated that treatment with SHR0302 (10-9-10-5 mol/l) exerted an inhibitory effect on the activation, proliferation and migration of HSCs. In addition, the expression of collagen I and collagen III were significantly decreased following treatment with SHR0302. Furthermore, SHR0302 induced the apoptosis of HSCs, which was demonstrated by Annexin V/PI staining. SHR0302 significantly increased the activation of caspase-3 and Bax in HSCs whereas it decreased the expression of Bcl-2. SHR0302 also inhibited the activation of Akt signaling pathway. The pharmacological inhibition of the JAK1/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 pathway led to the disruption of functions essential for HSC growth. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that SHR0302 may have the potential to alleviate hepatic fibrosis by targeting HSC functions. PMID:27460897

  10. Intra-articular nuclear factor-κB blockade ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by eliciting regulatory T cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Min, S-Y; Yan, M; Du, Y; Wu, T; Khobahy, E; Kwon, S-R; Taneja, V; Bashmakov, A; Nukala, S; Ye, Y; Orme, J; Sajitharan, D; Kim, H-Y; Mohan, C

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is a transcription factor implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we have examined the effect of intra-articular administration of the IKK inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain peptide (NBD), on the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). NBD peptides were injected intra-articularly into the knee joints of DBA/1J mice after the onset of disease. Collagen-injected mice given a scrambled peptide served as controls. Arthritis severity was determined by visual examination of paws. Intra-articular NBD injection reduced the arthritis score and ameliorated morphological signs of bone destruction compared to the controls. Serum levels of type-II collagen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibodies were lower in NBD-treated mice versus the control mice, whereas the levels of type-II collagen-specific IgG1 antibodies were increased by NBD treatment. NBD treatment diminished the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ in serum, but increased the regulatory cytokine IL-10. NBD-treated CIA mice exhibited significantly higher percentages and numbers of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+)) CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells than controls. Immunofluorescence analysis of NBD-treated mice revealed that FoxP3 and Ym1, a marker of alternatively activated macrophages, were juxtaposed to each other within draining inguinal lymph nodes. Intra-articular administration of NBD peptide is effective as an experimental therapy in a murine model of RA. Nevertheless, the intra-articular treatment modality is still associated with systemic effects on the immune system. PMID:23574318

  11. CD40 Blockade Combines with CTLA4Ig and Sirolimus To Produce Mixed Chimerism in an MHC-defined Rhesus Macaque Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Page, Andrew; Srinivasan, Swetha; Singh, Karnail; Russell, Maria; Hamby, Kelly; Deane, Taylor; Sen, Sharon; Stempora, Linda; Leopardi, Frank; Price, Andrew A.; Strobert, Elizabeth; Reimann, Keith A.; Kirk, Allan D.; Larsen, Christian P.; Kean, Leslie S.

    2011-01-01

    In murine models, T-cell costimulation blockade of the CD28:B7 and CD154:CD40 pathways synergistically promotes immune tolerance after transplantation. While CD28 blockade has been successfully translated to the clinic, translation of blockade of the CD154:CD40 pathway has been less successful, in large part due to thromboembolic complications associated with anti-CD154 antibodies. Translation of CD40 blockade has also been slow, in part due to the fact that synergy between CD40 blockade and CD28 blockade had not yet been demonstrated in either primate models or humans. Here we show that a novel, non-depleting CD40 monoclonal antibody, 3A8, can combine with combined CTLA4Ig and sirolimus in a well-established primate bone marrow chimerism-induction model. Prolonged engraftment required the presence of all three agents during maintenance therapy, and resulted in graft acceptance for the duration of immunosuppressive treatment, with rejection resulting upon immunosuppression withdrawal. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that upregulation of CD95 expression on both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells correlated with rejection, suggesting that CD95 may be a robust biomarker of graft loss. These results are the first to demonstrate prolonged chimerism in primates treated with CD28/mTOR blockade and non-depletional CD40 blockade, and support further investigation of combined costimulation blockade targeting the CD28 and CD40 pathways. PMID:21929643

  12. Sugammadex: A Review of Neuromuscular Blockade Reversal.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-07-01

    Sugammadex (Bridion(®)) is a modified γ-cyclodextrin that reverses the effect of the steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents rocuronium and vecuronium. Intravenous sugammadex resulted in rapid, predictable recovery from moderate and deep neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing surgery who received rocuronium or vecuronium. Recovery from moderate neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 2 mg/kg than with neostigmine, and recovery from deep neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 4 mg/kg than with neostigmine or spontaneous recovery. In addition, recovery from neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster when sugammadex 16 mg/kg was administered 3 min after rocuronium than when patients spontaneously recovered from succinylcholine. Sugammadex also demonstrated efficacy in various special patient populations, including patients with pulmonary disease, cardiac disease, hepatic dysfunction or myasthenia gravis and morbidly obese patients. Intravenous sugammadex was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, sugammadex is an important option for the rapid reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. PMID:27324403

  13. Kuppfer Cells Trigger Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Development in Diet-induced Mouse Model through Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production*

    PubMed Central

    Tosello-Trampont, Annie-Carole; Landes, Susan G.; Nguyen, Virginia; Novobrantseva, Tatiana I.; Hahn, Young S.

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), characterized by lipid deposits within hepatocytes (steatosis), is associated with hepatic injury and inflammation and leads to the development of fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocarcinoma. However, the pathogenic mechanism of NASH is not well understood. To determine the role of distinct innate myeloid subsets in the development of NASH, we examined the contribution of liver resident macrophages (i.e. Kupffer cells) and blood-derived monocytes in triggering liver inflammation and hepatic damage. Employing a murine model of NASH, we discovered a previously unappreciated role for TNFα and Kupffer cells in the initiation and progression of NASH. Sequential depletion of Kupffer cells reduced the incidence of liver injury, steatosis, and proinflammatory monocyte infiltration. Furthermore, our data show a differential contribution of Kupffer cells and blood monocytes during the development of NASH; Kupffer cells increased their production of TNFα, followed by infiltration of CD11bintLy6Chi monocytes, 2 and 10 days, respectively, after starting the methionine/choline-deficient (MCD) diet. Importantly, targeted knockdown of TNFα expression in myeloid cells decreased the incidence of NASH development by decreasing steatosis, liver damage, monocyte infiltration, and the production of inflammatory chemokines. Our findings suggest that the increase of TNFα-producing Kupffer cells in the liver is crucial for the early phase of NASH development by promoting blood monocyte infiltration through the production of IP-10 and MCP-1. PMID:23066023

  14. The zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle as a model system for the molecular mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to stimulation of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Roxo-Rosa, Mónica; Jacinto, Raquel; Sampaio, Pedro; Lopes, Susana Santos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst inflation and continuous enlargement are associated with marked transepithelial ion and fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Indeed, the inhibition or degradation of CFTR prevents the fluid accumulation within cysts. The in vivo mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to CFTR stimulation are an outstanding challenge in ADPKD research and may bring important biomarkers for the disease. However, hampering their study, the available ADPKD in vitro cellular models lack the three-dimensional architecture of renal cysts and the ADPKD mouse models offer limited access for live-imaging experiments in embryonic kidneys. Here, we tested the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV) as an alternative model-organ. KV is a fluid-filled vesicular organ, lined by epithelial cells that express both CFTR and Polycystin-2 endogenously, being each of them easily knocked-down. Our data on the intracellular distribution of Polycystin-2 support its involvement in the KV fluid-flow induced Ca2+-signalling. Mirroring kidney cysts, the KV lumen inflation is dependent on CFTR activity and, as we clearly show, the knockdown of Polycystin-2 results in larger KV lumens through overstimulation of CFTR. In conclusion, we propose the zebrafish KV as a model organ to study the renal cyst inflation. Favouring its use, KV volume can be easily determined by in vivo imaging offering a live readout for screening compounds and genes that may prevent cyst enlargement through CFTR inhibition. PMID:26432887

  15. The zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle as a model system for the molecular mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to stimulation of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Roxo-Rosa, Mónica; Jacinto, Raquel; Sampaio, Pedro; Lopes, Susana Santos

    2015-01-01

    In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst inflation and continuous enlargement are associated with marked transepithelial ion and fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Indeed, the inhibition or degradation of CFTR prevents the fluid accumulation within cysts. The in vivo mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to CFTR stimulation are an outstanding challenge in ADPKD research and may bring important biomarkers for the disease. However, hampering their study, the available ADPKD in vitro cellular models lack the three-dimensional architecture of renal cysts and the ADPKD mouse models offer limited access for live-imaging experiments in embryonic kidneys. Here, we tested the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV) as an alternative model-organ. KV is a fluid-filled vesicular organ, lined by epithelial cells that express both CFTR and Polycystin-2 endogenously, being each of them easily knocked-down. Our data on the intracellular distribution of Polycystin-2 support its involvement in the KV fluid-flow induced Ca(2+)-signalling. Mirroring kidney cysts, the KV lumen inflation is dependent on CFTR activity and, as we clearly show, the knockdown of Polycystin-2 results in larger KV lumens through overstimulation of CFTR. In conclusion, we propose the zebrafish KV as a model organ to study the renal cyst inflation. Favouring its use, KV volume can be easily determined by in vivo imaging offering a live readout for screening compounds and genes that may prevent cyst enlargement through CFTR inhibition. PMID:26432887

  16. In Vivo Notch Signaling Blockade Induces Abnormal Spermatogenesis in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Murta, Daniel; Batista, Marta; Trindade, Alexandre; Silva, Elisabete; Henrique, Domingos; Duarte, António; Lopes-da-Costa, Luís

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study we identified active Notch signaling in key cellular events occurring at adult spermatogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the function of Notch signaling in spermatogenesis through the effects of in vivo Notch blockade. Adult CD1 male mice were either submitted to a long term DAPT (?-secretase inhibitor) or vehicle treatment. Treatment duration was designed to attain one half the time (25 days) or the time (43 days) required to accomplish a complete cycle of spermatogenesis. Blockade of Notch signaling was depicted from decreased transcription of Notch effector genes. Notch signaling blockade disrupted the expression patterns of Notch components in the testis, induced male germ cell fate aberrations, and significantly increased germ cell apoptosis, mainly in the last stages of the spermatogenic cycle, and epididymis spermatozoa morphological defects. These effects were more pronounced following the 43 day than the 25 day DAPT treatment schedule. These results indicate a relevant regulatory role of Notch signaling in mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:25412258

  17. Spin blockade qubit in a superconducting junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padurariu, C.; Nazarov, Yu. V.

    2012-12-01

    We interpret a recent pioneering experiment (Zgirski M. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 257003) on quasiparticle manipulation in a superconducting break junction in terms of spin blockade drawing analogy with spin qubits. We propose a novel qubit design that exploits the spin state of two trapped quasiparticles. We detail the coherent control of all four spin states by resonant quantum manipulation and compute the corresponding Rabi frequencies. The read-out technique is based on the spin blockade that inhibits quasiparticle recombination in triplet states. We provide extensive microscopic estimations of the parameters of our model.

  18. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels.

  19. Intratumoral IL-12 combined with CTLA-4 blockade elicits T cell–mediated glioma rejection

    PubMed Central

    vom Berg, Johannes; Vrohlings, Melissa; Haller, Sergio; Haimovici, Aladin; Kulig, Paulina; Sledzinska, Anna; Weller, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBs) are the most aggressive form of primary brain cancer and virtually incurable. Accumulation of regulatory T (T reg) cells in GBs is thought to contribute to the dampening of antitumor immunity. Using a syngeneic mouse model for GB, we tested whether local delivery of cytokines could render the immunosuppressive GB microenvironment conducive to an antitumor immune response. IL-12 but not IL-23 reversed GB-induced immunosuppression and led to tumor clearance. In contrast to models of skin or lung cancer, IL-12–mediated glioma rejection was T cell dependent and elicited potent immunological memory. To translate these findings into a clinically relevant setting, we allowed for GB progression before initiating therapy. Combined intratumoral IL-12 application with systemic blockade of the co-inhibitory receptor CTLA-4 on T cells led to tumor eradication even at advanced disease stages where monotherapy with either IL-12 or CTLA-4 blockade failed. The combination of IL-12 and CTLA-4 blockade acts predominantly on CD4+ cells, causing a drastic decrease in FoxP3+ T reg cells and an increase in effector T (T eff) cells. Our data provide compelling preclinical findings warranting swift translation into clinical trials in GB and represent a promising approach to increase response rates of CTLA-4 blockade in solid tumors. PMID:24277150

  20. Combined LFA-1 and costimulatory blockade prevents transplant rejection mediated by heterologous immune memory alloresponses

    PubMed Central

    Kitchens, William H.; Haridas, Divya; Wagener, Maylene E.; Song, Mingqing; Ford, Mandy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that alloreactive memory T cells are generated by the process of heterologous immunity, whereby memory T cells arising in response to pathogen infection cross-react with donor antigens. Due to their diminished requirements for costimulation during recall, these pathogen-elicited allo-crossreactive memory T cells are of particular clinical importance, especially given the emergence of costimulatory blockade as a transplant immunosuppression strategy. Methods We utilized an established model of heterologous immunity involving sequential infection of a naïve C57BL/6 recipient with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and vaccinia virus, followed by combined skin and bone marrow transplant from a BALB/c donor. Results We demonstrate that coupling the integrin antagonist anti-LFA-1 with costimulatory blockade could surmount the barrier posed by heterologous immunity in a fully allogeneic murine transplant system. The combined costimulatory and integrin blockade regimen suppressed proliferation of alloreactive memory T cells and attenuated their cytokine effector responses. This combined blockade regimen also promoted the retention of FoxP3+ Tregs in draining lymph nodes. Finally, we show that in an in vitro mixed lymphocyte reaction system using human T cells, the combination of belatacept and anti-LFA-1 was able to suppress cytokine production by alloreactive memory T cells that was resistant to belatacept alone. Conclusions As an antagonist against human LFA-1 exists and has been used clinically to treat psoriasis, these findings have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:22475765

  1. Neuromuscular blockade in the elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Luis A; Athanassoglou, Vassilis; Pandit, Jaideep J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular blockade is a desirable or even essential component of general anesthesia for major surgical operations. As the population continues to age, and more operations are conducted in the elderly, due consideration must be given to neuromuscular blockade in these patients to avoid possible complications. This review considers the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of neuromuscular blockade that may be altered in the elderly. Compartment distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs may vary due to age-related changes in physiology, altering the duration of action with a need for reduced dosage (eg, aminosteroids). Other drugs (atracurium, cisatracurium) have more reliable duration of action and should perhaps be considered for use in the elderly. The range of interpatient variability that neuromuscular blocking drugs may exhibit is then considered and drugs with a narrower range, such as cisatracurium, may produce more predictable, and inherently safer, outcomes. Ultimately, appropriate neuromuscular monitoring should be used to guide the administration of muscle relaxants so that the risk of residual neuromuscular blockade postoperatively can be minimized. The reliability of various monitoring is considered. This paper concludes with a review of the various reversal agents, namely, anticholinesterase drugs and sugammadex, and the alterations in dosing of these that should be considered for the elderly patient. PMID:27382330

  2. Effects of VLA-1 Blockade on Experimental Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Totsuka, Ryuichi; Kondo, Takaaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Hirai, Midori; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    VLA-1 (very late antigen-1) is implicated in recruitment, retention and activation of leukocytes and its blockade has been referred as a potential target of new drug discovery to address unmet medical needs in inflammatory disease area. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an anti-murine CD49a (integrin α subunit of VLA-1) monoclonal antibody (Ha31/8) on various experimental models of inflammatory diseases in mice. Pretreatment with Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 250 µg significantly (P<0.01) reduced arthritic symptoms and joint tissue damage in mice with type II collagen-induced arthritis. In addition, Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg significantly (P<0.01) inhibited airway inflammatory cell infiltration induced by repeated exposure to cigarette smoke. In contrast, Ha31/8 failed to inhibit oxazolone-induced chronic dermatitis and OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg. These results show that VLA-1 is involved, at least partly, in the pathogenesis of type II collagen-induced arthritis and cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammatory cell infiltration in mice, indicating the therapeutic potential of VLA-1 blockade against rheumatoid arthritis and chronic occlusive pulmonary disease. PMID:27578034

  3. OX40L blockade protects against inflammation-driven fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna Maria; Ruzehaji, Nadira; Amiar, Olivia; Ruiz, Barbara; Brahiti, Hassina; Ponsoye, Matthieu; Fréchet, Maxime; Burgevin, Anne; Pezet, Sonia; Sadoine, Jérémy; Guilbert, Thomas; Nicco, Carole; Akiba, Hisaya; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Subramaniam, Arun; Resnick, Robert; Molberg, Øyvind; Kahan, André; Chiocchia, Gilles; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-07-01

    Treatment for fibrosis represents a critical unmet need, because fibrosis is the leading cause of death in industrialized countries, and there is no effective therapy to counteract the fibrotic process. The development of fibrosis relates to the interplay between vessel injury, immune cell activation, and fibroblast stimulation, which can occur in various tissues. Immunotherapies have provided a breakthrough in the treatment of immune diseases. The glycoprotein OX40-OX40 ligand (OX40L) axis offers the advantage of a targeted approach to costimulatory signals with limited impact on the whole immune response. Using systemic sclerosis (SSc) as a prototypic disease, we report compelling evidence that blockade of OX40L is a promising strategy for the treatment of inflammation-driven fibrosis. OX40L is overexpressed in the fibrotic skin and serum of patients with SSc, particularly in patients with diffuse cutaneous forms. Soluble OX40L was identified as a promising serum biomarker to predict the worsening of lung and skin fibrosis, highlighting the role of this pathway in fibrosis. In vivo, OX40L blockade prevents inflammation-driven skin, lung, and vessel fibrosis and induces the regression of established dermal fibrosis in different complementary mouse models. OX40L exerts potent profibrotic effects by promoting the infiltration of inflammatory cells into lesional tissues and therefore the release of proinflammatory mediators, thereafter leading to fibroblast activation. PMID:27298374

  4. Simultaneous blockade of programmed death 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) induces synergistic anti-tumour effect in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, S; Sho, M; Yamato, I; Yoshiji, H; Wakatsuki, K; Nishiwada, S; Yagita, H; Nakajima, Y

    2013-01-01

    Recent basic and clinical studies have shown that the programmed death ligand (PD-L)/PD-1 pathway has a significant role in tumour immunity, and its blockade has a therapeutic potential against several human cancers. We hypothesized that anti-angiogeneic treatment might augment the efficacy of PD-1 blockade. To this end, we evaluated combining the blockade of PD-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) in a murine cancer model using Colon-26 adenocarcinoma. Interestingly, simultaneous treatment with anti-PD-1 and anti-VEGFR2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) inhibited tumour growth synergistically in vivo without overt toxicity. Blocking VEGFR2 inhibited tumour neovascularization significantly, as demonstrated by the reduced number of microvessels, while PD-1 blockade had no impact on tumour angiogenesis. PD-1 blockade might promote T cell infiltration into tumours and significantly enhanced local immune activation, as shown by the up-regulation of several proinflammatory cytokine expressions. Importantly, VEGFR2 blockade did not interfere with T cell infiltration and immunological activation induced by PD-1 blockade. In conclusion, simultaneous blockade of PD-1 and VEGFR2 induced a synergistic in-vivo anti-tumour effect, possibly through different mechanisms that might not be mutually exclusive. This unique therapeutic strategy may hold significant promise for future clinical application. PMID:23600839

  5. Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Laura A; Burnell, Erica S; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4'-dinitro-stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility. PMID:27501143

  6. Costimulation Blockade in Autoimmunity and Transplantation: The CD28 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Adams, Andrew B; Ford, Mandy L; Larsen, Christian P

    2016-09-15

    T cell activation is a complex process that requires multiple cell signaling pathways, including a primary recognition signal and additional costimulatory signals. TCR signaling in the absence of costimulatory signals can lead to an abortive attempt at activation and subsequent anergy. One of the best-characterized costimulatory pathways includes the Ig superfamily members CD28 and CTLA-4 and their ligands CD80 and CD86. The development of the fusion protein CTLA-4-Ig as an experimental and subsequent therapeutic tool is one of the major success stories in modern immunology. Abatacept and belatacept are clinically approved agents for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and renal transplantation, respectively. Future interventions may include selective CD28 blockade to block the costimulatory potential of CD28 while exploiting the coinhibitory effects of CTLA-4. PMID:27591335

  7. Efficient Multiparticle Entanglement via Asymmetric Rydberg Blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Saffman, M.; Moelmer, K.

    2009-06-19

    We present an efficient method for producing N particle entangled states using Rydberg blockade interactions. Optical excitation of Rydberg states that interact weakly, yet have a strong coupling to a second control state is used to achieve state dependent qubit rotations in small ensembles. On the basis of quantitative calculations, we predict that an entangled quantum superposition state of eight atoms can be produced with a fidelity of 84% in cold Rb atoms.

  8. Reversal by pronethalol of dibenamine blockade

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, S.

    1969-01-01

    1. The guinea-pig seminal vesicle has been shown to be a very suitable test object for the study of mechanisms involving α-adrenoceptive receptors, because no β-receptors were found in this preparation. 2. Adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine were directly acting agonists, their ED50 values being 7·1 × 10-6M, 1·5 × 10-5M and 2·7 × 10-5M, respectively. 3. Pretreatment with reserpine had no influence on the contractions caused by adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine but abolished or greatly reduced the contractions caused by dopamine. Cocaine enhanced the effects of adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine and reduced those of dopamine. 4. Pronethalol (6·8 × 10-5M) reversed the α-receptor blockade by dibenamine, ergotamine and phentolamine of responses to adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine; it did not affect the blockade by dibenamine of responses to histamine. 5. Reversal of the blockade by dibenamine was observed only when its concentration was such that it caused a parallel shift of the dose-effect curves of the agonists to the right; higher concentrations, which caused an unsurmountable depression of the maximal contraction, were not antagonized by pronethalol. 6. It is assumed that the reversal is dependent on a direct action on α-receptors, “spare receptors” being probably involved. PMID:4389284

  9. Nonintubated Thoracoscopic Lobectomy for Lung Cancer Using Epidural Anesthesia and Intercostal Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Hui; Chan, Kuang-Cheng; Liu, Ying-Ju; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Ke-Cheng; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intubated general anesthesia with single-lung ventilation has been considered mandatory for thoracoscopic lobectomy for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Few reports of thoracoscopic lobectomy without tracheal intubation are published, using either thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) or intercostal blockade. The comparisons of perioperative outcomes of nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using epidural anesthesia and intercostal blockade are not reported previously. From September 2009 to August 2014, a total of 238 patients with lung cancer who underwent nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy were recruited from our prospectively maintained database of all patients undergoing nonintubated thoracoscopic surgery using TEA or intercostal blockade. A multiple regression analysis, adjusting for preoperative variables, was performed to compare the perioperative outcomes of the 2 anesthesia methods. Overall, 130 patients underwent nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using epidural anesthesia whereas 108 had intercostal blockade. The 2 groups were similar in demographic data, except for sex, preoperative lung function, physical status classification, and history of smoking. After adjustment for the preoperative variables, nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using intercostal blockade was associated with shorter durations of anesthetic induction and surgery (P < 0.001). Furthermore, hemodynamics were more stable with less use of vasoactive drugs (odds ratio: 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27 to 1.04; P = 0.064) and less blood loss (mean difference: −55.2 mL; 95% CI, −93 to −17.3; P = 0.004). Postoperatively, the 2 groups had comparable incidences of complications. Patients in the intercostal blockade group had a shorter average duration of chest tube drainage (P = 0.064) but a similar average length of hospital stay (P = 0.569). Conversion to tracheal intubation was required in 13 patients (5.5%), and no in-hospital mortality occurred

  10. CTLA-4 Blockade Synergizes Therapeutically with PARP Inhibition in BRCA1-Deficient Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Tomoe; Flies, Dallas B; Marjon, Nicole A; Mantia-Smaldone, Gina; Ronner, Lukas; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Adams, Sarah F

    2015-11-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade has shown significant therapeutic efficacy in melanoma and other solid tumors, but results in ovarian cancer have been limited. With evidence that tumor immunogenicity modulates the response to checkpoint blockade, and data indicating that BRCA-deficient ovarian cancers express higher levels of immune response genes, we hypothesized that BRCA(-) ovarian tumors would be vulnerable to checkpoint blockade. To test this hypothesis, we used an immunocompetent BRCA1-deficient murine ovarian cancer model to compare treatment with CTLA-4 or PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies alone or combined with targeted cytotoxic therapy using a PARP inhibitor. Correlative studies were performed in vitro using human BRCA1(-) cells. We found that CTLA-4 antibody, but not PD-1/PD-L1 blockade, synergized therapeutically with the PARP inhibitor, resulting in immune-mediated tumor clearance and long-term survival in a majority of animals (P < 0.0001). The survival benefit of this combination was T-cell mediated and dependent on increases in local IFNγ production in the peritoneal tumor environment. Evidence of protective immune memory was observed more than 60 days after completion of therapy. Similar increases in the cytotoxic effect of PARP inhibition in the presence of elevated levels of IFNγ in human BRCA1(-) cancer cells support the translational potential of this treatment protocol. These results demonstrate that CTLA-4 blockade combined with PARP inhibition induces protective antitumor immunity and significant survival benefit in the BRCA1(-) tumor model, and support clinical testing of this regimen to improve outcomes for women with hereditary ovarian cancer. PMID:26138335

  11. Blockade of KCa3.1 potassium channels protects against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Lung; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu; Pao, Li-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Tubular cell apoptosis significantly contributes to cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) pathogenesis. Although KCa3.1, a calcium-activated potassium channel, participates in apoptosis, its involvement in cisplatin-induced AKI is unknown. Here, we found that cisplatin treatment triggered an early induction of KCa3.1 expression associated with HK-2 cell apoptosis, the development of renal tubular damage, and apoptosis in mice. Treatment with the highly selective KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34 suppressed cisplatin-induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. We further assessed whether KCa3.1 mediated cisplatin-induced AKI in genetic knockout and pharmacological blockade mouse models. KCa3.1 deficiency reduced renal function loss, renal tubular damage, and the induction of the apoptotic marker caspase-3 in the kidneys of cisplatin-treated KCa3.1 (-/-) mice. Pharmacological blockade of KCa3.1 by TRAM-34 similarly attenuated cisplatin-induced AKI in mice. Furthermore, we dissected the mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced apoptosis reduction via KCa3.1 blockade. We found that KCa3.1 blockade attenuated cytochrome c release and the increase in the intrinsic apoptotic mediators Bax, Bak, and caspase-9 after cisplatin treatment. KCa3.1 blocking inhibited the cisplatin-induced activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediator caspase-12, which is independent of calcium-dependent protease m-calpain activation. Taken together, KCa3.1 blockade protects against cisplatin-induced AKI through the attenuation of apoptosis by interference with intrinsic apoptotic and ER stress-related mediators, providing a potential target for the prevention of cisplatin-induced AKI. PMID:26438401

  12. Push and release: TLR9 activation plus STAT3 blockade for systemic antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Kortylewski, Marcin; Kuo, Ya-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Proper immunostimulation ("push") and immune checkpoint blockade ("release") are both critical for the efficacy of anticancer immunotherapy. We have recently shown that activating Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) while specifically blocking signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in leukemic cells enhances their immunogenicity, allowing for CD8(+) T cell-mediated tumor eradication. These findings underscore the therapeutic potential of such a "Push & Release" strategy against hematological malignancies. PMID:24800162

  13. Interleukin-1 Antagonists and Other Cytokine Blockade Strategies for Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines stimulate adaptive immunity and attenuate T cell regulation and tolerance induction. They also profoundly impair β-cell function, proliferation, and viability, activities of similar importance in the context of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of β-cell toxicity has been gathered within the last 2-3 decades. However, the efficacy of individual proinflammatory cytokine blockade in animal models of T1D has been inconsistent and generally modest, except in the context of islet transplantation. This suggests that the timing of the cytokine blockade relative to anti-β-cell immune activation is critical, and that combination therapy may be required. In randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trials of limited power, TNF-α (but not IL-1) blockade has yielded moderate but significant improvements in glycemia, insulin requirement, and β-cell function. The safety experience with anti-cytokine biologics is still very limited in T1D. However, combinations with other biologics, at doses of adaptive and innate immune inhibitors/modulators that are suboptimal or ineffective in themselves, may generate synergies of true therapeutic benefit and safety in T1D. Critical and balanced appraisal of the preclinical and clinical evidence of efficacy and safety of anti-immune, anti-inflammatory, and anti-dysmetabolic therapeutics should thus guide future studies to move closer to novel treatments, targeting the underlying causes of β-cell failure and destruction in T1D. PMID:23804271

  14. A2aR antagonists: Next generation checkpoint blockade for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Robert D.; Lo, Ying-Chun; Powell, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    The last several years have witnessed exciting progress in the development of immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. This has been due in great part to the development of so-called checkpoint blockade. That is, antibodies that block inhibitory receptors such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 and thus unleash antigen-specific immune responses against tumors. It is clear that tumors evade the immune response by usurping pathways that play a role in negatively regulating normal immune responses. In this regard, adenosine in the immune microenvironment leading to the activation of the A2a receptor has been shown to represent one such negative feedback loop. Indeed, the tumor microenvironment has relatively high concentrations of adenosine. To this end, blocking A2a receptor activation has the potential to markedly enhance anti-tumor immunity in mouse models. This review will present data demonstrating the ability of A2a receptor blockade to enhance tumor vaccines, checkpoint blockade and adoptive T cell therapy. Also, as several recent studies have demonstrated that under certain conditions A2a receptor blockade can enhance tumor progression, we will also explore the complexities of adenosine signaling in the immune response. Despite important nuances to the A2a receptor pathway that require further elucidation, studies to date strongly support the development of A2a receptor antagonists (some of which have already been tested in phase III clinical trials for Parkinson Disease) as novel modalities in the immunotherapy armamentarium. PMID:25941561

  15. Studies Introducing Costimulation Blockade for Vascularized Composite Allografts in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Freitas, A M; Samy, K P; Farris, A B; Leopardi, F V; Song, M; Stempora, L; Strobert, E A; Jenkins, J A; Kirk, A D; Cendales, L C

    2015-08-01

    Vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) are technically feasible. Similar to other organ transplants, VCAs are hampered by the toxicity and incomplete efficacy associated with conventional immunosuppression. Complications attributable to calcineurin inhibitors remain prevalent in the clinical cases reported to date, and these loom particularly large given the nonlifesaving nature of VCAs. Additionally, acute rejection remains almost ubiquitous, albeit controllable with current agents. Costimulation blockade offers the potential to provide prophylaxis from rejection without the adverse consequences of calcineurin-based regimens. In this study, we used a nonhuman-primate model of VCA in conjunction with immunosuppressive regimens containing combinations of B7-specific costimulation blockade with and without adhesion blockade with LFA3-Ig to determine what adjunctive role these agents could play in VCA transplantation when combined with more conventional agents. Compared to tacrolimus, the addition of belatacept improved rejection free allograft survival. The combination with LFA3-Ig reduced CD2(hi) memory T cells, however did not provide additional protection against allograft rejection and hindered protective immunity. Histology paralleled clinical histopathology and Banff grading. These data provide the basis for the study of costimulation blockade in VCA in a relevant preclinical model. PMID:26139552

  16. Human Cancer Immunotherapy with PD-1/PD-L1 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Peilin; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2015-01-01

    The ligation of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) to its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 counteracts T-cell activation, which is critical in immune tolerance. The persistent high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 are also observed on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and various tumor cells, maintaining the highly suppressive microenvironment in tumor sites and promoting tumor malignancies. The blockade of PD-1 axis with PD-L2 fusion protein or monoclonal antibodies against either PD-1 or PD-L1 has been clinically evaluated in various tumor types. This short review summarizes the progress of PD-1 axis blockade in clinical trials to evaluate its effectiveness in the antitumor immunotherapy. PMID:26448693

  17. Photonic Nonlinearities via Quantum Zeno Blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-Zhu; Huang, Yu-Ping; Kumar, Prem

    2013-05-01

    Realizing optical-nonlinear effects at a single-photon level is a highly desirable but also extremely challenging task, because of both fundamental and practical difficulties. We present an avenue to surmounting these difficulties by exploiting quantum Zeno blockade in nonlinear optical systems. Considering specifically a lithium-niobate microresonator, we find that a deterministic phase gate can be realized between single photons with near-unity fidelity. Supported by established techniques for fabricating and operating such devices, our approach can provide an enabling tool for all-optical applications in both classical and quantum domains.

  18. Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Laura A.; Burnell, Erica S.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4’-dinitro-stilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4’-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility. PMID:27501143

  19. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 overcomes resistance of cancers to immunotherapy with CTLA4 checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, T; Pitt, J M; Vétizou, M; Marabelle, A; Flores, C; Rekdal, Ø; Kroemer, G; Zitvogel, L

    2016-06-01

    Intratumoral immunotherapies aim at reducing local immunosuppression, as well as reinstating and enhancing systemic anticancer T-cell functions, without inducing side effects. LTX-315 is a first-in-class oncolytic peptide-based local immunotherapy that meets these criteria by inducing a type of malignant cell death that elicits anticancer immune responses. Here, we show that LTX-315 rapidly reprograms the tumor microenvironment by decreasing the local abundance of immunosuppressive Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells and by increasing the frequency of polyfunctional T helper type 1/type 1 cytotoxic T cells with a concomitant increase in cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) and drop in PD-1 expression levels. Logically, in tumors that were resistant to intratumoral or systemic CTLA4 blockade, subsequent local inoculation of LTX-315 cured the animals or caused tumor regressions with abscopal effects. This synergistic interaction between CTLA4 blockade and LTX-315 was reduced upon blockade of the β-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (CD122). This preclinical study provides a strong rationale for administering the oncolytic peptide LTX-315 to patients who are receiving treatment with the CTLA4 blocking antibody ipilimumab. PMID:27082453

  20. Transformation of the tumour microenvironment by a CD40 agonist antibody correlates with improved responses to PD-L1 blockade in a mouse orthotopic pancreatic tumour model

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Stefanie; Sulikowski, Michal G.; Martin, Philip; Brown, Lee; Lewis, Arthur; Davies, Gareth; Morrow, Michelle; Wilkinson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of recently developed chemotherapy regimens, survival times for pancreatic cancer patients remain poor. These patients also respond poorly to immune checkpoint blockade therapies (anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-L1, anti-PD-1), which suggests the presence of additional immunosuppressive mechanisms in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment (TME). CD40 agonist antibodies (αCD40) promote antigen presenting cell (APC) maturation and enhance macrophage tumouricidal activity, and may therefore alter the pancreatic TME to increase sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade. Here, we test whether αCD40 transforms the TME in a mouse syngeneic orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer, to increase sensitivity to PD-L1 blockade. We found that whilst mice bearing orthotopic Pan02 tumours responded poorly to PD-L1 blockade, αCD40 improved overall survival. αCD40 transformed the TME, upregulating Th1 chemokines, increasing cytotoxic T cell infiltration and promoting formation of an immune cell-rich capsule separating the tumour from the normal pancreas. Furthermore, αCD40 drove systemic APC maturation, memory T cell expansion, and upregulated tumour and systemic PD-L1 expression. Combining αCD40 with PD-L1 blockade enhanced anti-tumour immunity and improved overall survival versus either monotherapy. These data provide further support for the potential of combining αCD40 with immune checkpoint blockade to promote anti-tumour immunity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26918344

  1. IMPACT OF PHARMACOLOGICAL AUTONOMIC BLOCKADE ON COMPLEX FRACTIONATED ATRIAL ELECTROGRAMS

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Sébastien; Wright, Matthew; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Nault, Isabelle; Lellouche, Nicolas; Sacher, Frédéric; Kim, Steven J.; Morgan, Dennis; Afonso, Valtino; Shinzuke, Miyazaki; Hocini, Mélèze; Clémenty, Jacques; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Ritter, Phillipe; Jaïs, Pierre; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The influence of the autonomic nervous system on the pathogenesis of complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAE) during atrial fibrillation (AF) is incompletely understood. This study evaluated the impact of pharmacological autonomic blockade on CFAE characteristics. Methods Autonomic blockade was achieved with propanolol and atropine in 29 patients during AF. Three-dimensional maps of the fractionation degree were made before and after autonomic blockade using the Ensite Navx® system. In 2 patients, AF terminated following autonomic blockade. In the remaining 27 patients, 20113 electrogram samples of 5 seconds duration were collected randomly throughout the left atrium (10054 at baseline and 10059 after autonomic blockade). The impact of autonomic blockade on fractionation was assessed by blinded investigators and related to the type of AF and AF cycle length. Results Globally, CFAE as a proportion of all atrial electrogram samples were reduced after autonomic blockade: 61.6±20.3% vs. 57.9±23.7%, p=0.027. This was true/significant for paroxysmal AF (47±23% vs. 40±22%, p=0.003), but not for persistent AF (65±22% vs. 62±25% respectively, p=0.166). Left atrial AF cycle length prolonged with autonomic blockade from 170±33 ms to. 180±40 ms (p=0.001). Fractionation decreases only in the 14/27 patients with a significant (>6ms) prolongation of the AF cycle length (64±20% vs. 59±24%, p=0.027), while fractionation did not reduce when autonomic blockade did not affect the AF cycle length (58±21% vs. 56±25%, p=0.419). Conclusions Pharmacological autonomic blockade reduces CFAE in paroxysmal AF, but not persistent AF. This effect appears to be mediated by prolongation of the AF cycle length. PMID:20132382

  2. Blockade of store-operated calcium entry alleviates ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Ruibing; Yan, Lihui; Luo, Zheng; Guo, Xiaolan; Yan, Ming

    2015-08-15

    Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx has been suggested to play a role in ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and necrosis. Previous studies indicated that store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) was involved in liver injury induced by ethanol in HepG2 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by SOCE remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of SOCE inhibition on liver injury induced by ethanol in BRL cells and Sprague–Dawley rats. Our data demonstrated that ethanol (0–400 mM) dose-dependently increased hepatocyte injury and 100 mM ethanol significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of SOC for at least 72 h in BRL cells. Blockade of SOCE by pharmacological inhibitors and sh-RNA knockdown of STIM1 and Orai1 attenuated intracellular Ca{sup 2+} overload, restored the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited ethanol-induced apoptosis. STIM1 and Orai1 expression was greater in ethanol-treated than control rats, and the SOCE inhibitor corosolic acid ameliorated the histopathological findings and alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase activity as well as decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited alcohol-induced cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that SOCE blockade could alleviate alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis. SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases. - Highlights: • Blockade of SOCE alleviated overload of Ca{sup 2+} and hepatotoxicity after ethanol application. • Blockade of SOCE inhibited mitochondrial apoptosis after ethanol application. • SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases.

  3. The Next Immune-Checkpoint Inhibitors: PD-1/PD-L1 Blockade in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Kathleen M.; Freeman, Gordon J.; McDermott, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Blocking the interaction between the programmed cell death (PD)-1 protein and one of its ligands, PD-L1, has been reported to have impressive antitumor responses. Therapeutics targeting this pathway are currently in clinical trials. Pembrolizumab and nivolumab are the first of this anti-PD-1 pathway family of checkpoint inhibitors to gain accelerated approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of ipilimumab-refractory melanoma. Nivolumab has been associated with improved overall survival compared with dacarbazine in patients with previously untreated wild-type serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf proto-oncogene BRAF melanoma. Although the most mature data are in the treatment of melanoma, the FDA has granted approval of nivolumab for squamous cell lung cancer and the breakthrough therapy designation to immune-checkpoint inhibitors for use in other cancers: nivolumab, an anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, for Hodgkin lymphoma, and MPDL-3280A, an anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody, for bladder cancer and non–small cell lung cancer. Here we review the literature on PD-1 and PD-L1 blockade and focus on the reported clinical studies that have included patients with melanoma. Methods PubMed was searched to identify relevant clinical studies of PD-1/PD-L1–targeted therapies in melanoma. A review of data from the current trials on clinicaltrial.gov was incorporated, as well as data presented in abstracts at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, given the limited number of published clinical trials on this topic. Findings The anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 agents have been reported to have impressive antitumor effects in several malignancies, including melanoma. The greatest clinical activity in unselected patients has been seen in melanoma. Tumor expression of PD-L1 is a suggestive, but inadequate, biomarker predictive of response to immune-checkpoint blockade. However, tumors expressing little or no PD-L1 are

  4. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade: obligatory contribution of IL-2 receptors and negative prognostic impact of soluble CD25

    PubMed Central

    Hannani, Dalil; Vétizou, Marie; Enot, David; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Chaput, Nathalie; Klatzmann, David; Desbois, Melanie; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Vimond, Nadège; Chouaib, Salem; Mateus, Christine; Allison, James P; Ribas, Antoni; Wolchok, Jedd D; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Philip; Postow, Michael; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Schadendorff, Dirk; Jaeger, Dirk; Korman, Alan J; Bahjat, Keith; Maio, Michele; Calabro, Luana; Teng, Michele WL; Smyth, Mark J; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4)-blocking antibody ipilimumab induces immune-mediated long-term control of metastatic melanoma in a fraction of patients. Although ipilimumab undoubtedly exerts its therapeutic effects via immunostimulation, thus far clinically useful, immunologically relevant biomarkers that predict treatment efficiency have been elusive. Here, we show that neutralization of IL-2 or blocking the α and β subunits of the IL-2 receptor (CD25 and CD122, respectively) abolished the antitumor effects and the accompanying improvement of the ratio of intratumoral T effector versus regulatory cells (Tregs), which were otherwise induced by CTLA-4 blockade in preclinical mouse models. CTLA-4 blockade led to the reduction of a suppressive CD4+ T cell subset expressing Lag3, ICOS, IL-10 and Egr2 with a concomitant rise in IL-2-producing effector cells that lost FoxP3 expression and accumulated in regressing tumors. While recombinant IL-2 improved the therapeutic efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade, the decoy IL-2 receptor α (IL-2Rα, sCD25) inhibited the anticancer effects of CTLA-4 blockade. In 262 metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab, baseline serum concentrations of sCD25 represented an independent indicator of overall survival, with high levels predicting resistance to therapy. Altogether, these results unravel a role for IL-2 and IL-2 receptors in the anticancer activity of CTLA-4 blockade. Importantly, our study provides the first immunologically relevant biomarker, namely elevated serum sCD25, that predicts resistance to CTLA-4 blockade in patients with melanoma. PMID:25582080

  5. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade: obligatory contribution of IL-2 receptors and negative prognostic impact of soluble CD25.

    PubMed

    Hannani, Dalil; Vétizou, Marie; Enot, David; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Chaput, Nathalie; Klatzmann, David; Desbois, Melanie; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Vimond, Nadège; Chouaib, Salem; Mateus, Christine; Allison, James P; Ribas, Antoni; Wolchok, Jedd D; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Philip; Postow, Michael; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Schadendorff, Dirk; Jaeger, Dirk; Zörnig, Inka; Hassel, Jessica; Korman, Alan J; Bahjat, Keith; Maio, Michele; Calabro, Luana; Teng, Michele Wl; Smyth, Mark J; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2015-02-01

    The cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4)-blocking antibody ipilimumab induces immune-mediated long-term control of metastatic melanoma in a fraction of patients. Although ipilimumab undoubtedly exerts its therapeutic effects via immunostimulation, thus far clinically useful, immunologically relevant biomarkers that predict treatment efficiency have been elusive. Here, we show that neutralization of IL-2 or blocking the α and β subunits of the IL-2 receptor (CD25 and CD122, respectively) abolished the antitumor effects and the accompanying improvement of the ratio of intratumoral T effector versus regulatory cells (Tregs), which were otherwise induced by CTLA-4 blockade in preclinical mouse models. CTLA-4 blockade led to the reduction of a suppressive CD4(+) T cell subset expressing Lag3, ICOS, IL-10 and Egr2 with a concomitant rise in IL-2-producing effector cells that lost FoxP3 expression and accumulated in regressing tumors. While recombinant IL-2 improved the therapeutic efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade, the decoy IL-2 receptor α (IL-2Rα, sCD25) inhibited the anticancer effects of CTLA-4 blockade. In 262 metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab, baseline serum concentrations of sCD25 represented an independent indicator of overall survival, with high levels predicting resistance to therapy. Altogether, these results unravel a role for IL-2 and IL-2 receptors in the anticancer activity of CTLA-4 blockade. Importantly, our study provides the first immunologically relevant biomarker, namely elevated serum sCD25, that predicts resistance to CTLA-4 blockade in patients with melanoma. PMID:25582080

  6. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and immune checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Elizabeth; Hodi, F Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between cancer and the immune system is complex and provides unique therapeutic opportunities. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is a regulatory molecule that suppresses T cell effector function following initial activation by costimulatory signals. Fully human monoclonal antibodies targeting CTLA-4 have been shown to increase T cell function and antitumor responses in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. Responses observed with such immune checkpoint therapy can follow a different pattern from that seen with cytotoxic chemotherapy or targeted therapy and may continue after therapy is discontinued. In addition, the toxicities that are associated with anti-CTLA-4 therapy may differ from those of conventional therapies and consist of inflammatory events in parts of the body that do not contain cancerous cells. Early recognition of these inflammatory events and intervention is important, and the identification of predictive biomarkers continues to be an unfulfilled need in the field of immunotherapy. Combinatorial approaches with targeted therapies, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or other immune checkpoint agonists/antagonists have the potential to increase the efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade. PMID:26325034

  7. Photon blockade in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

    PubMed

    Ridolfo, A; Leib, M; Savasta, S; Hartmann, M J

    2012-11-01

    We explore photon coincidence counting statistics in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the atom-cavity coupling rate becomes comparable to the cavity resonance frequency. In this regime, usual normal order correlation functions fail to describe the output photon statistics. By expressing the electric-field operator in the cavity-emitter dressed basis, we are able to propose correlation functions that are valid for arbitrary degrees of light-matter interaction. Our results show that the standard photon blockade scenario is significantly modified for ultrastrong coupling. We observe parametric processes even for two-level emitters and temporal oscillations of intensity correlation functions at a frequency given by the ultrastrong photon emitter coupling. These effects can be traced back to the presence of two-photon cascade decays induced by counterrotating interaction terms. PMID:23215383

  8. Coulomb blockade of spin-dependent shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Kadigrobov, Anatoli M.; Shekhter, Robert I.; Jonson, M.

    2013-12-01

    We show that nanomechanical shuttling of single electrons may enable qualitatively new functionality if spin-polarized electrons are injected into a nanoelectromechanical single-electron tunneling (NEM-SET) device. This is due to the combined effects of spin-dependent electron tunneling and Coulomb blockade of tunneling, which are phenomena that occur in certain magnetic NEM-SET devices. Two effects are predicted to occur in such structures. The first is a reentrant shuttle instability, by which we mean the sequential appearance, disappearance and again the appearance of a shuttle instability as the driving voltage is increased (or the mechanical dissipation is diminished). The second effect is an enhanced spin polarization of the nanomechanically assisted current flow.

  9. Pauli spin blockade in double molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płomińska, Anna; Weymann, Ireneusz

    2016-07-01

    The Pauli spin blockade effect in transport through two, coupled in series, single molecular magnets weakly attached to external leads is considered theoretically. By using the real-time diagrammatic technique in the lowest-order perturbation theory with respect to the coupling strength, the behavior of the current and the shot noise is studied in the nonlinear response regime. It is shown that the current suppression occurs due to the occupation of highest-weight spin states of the system. Moreover, transport properties are found to strongly depend on parameters of the double molecular magnet, such as the magnitude of spin, internal exchange interaction and the hopping between the molecules. It is also demonstrated that the current suppression may be accompanied by negative differential conductance and a large super-Poissonian shot noise. The mechanisms leading to those effects are discussed.

  10. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration. PMID:27625489

  11. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration. PMID:27625489

  12. PD-1 blockade enhances the vaccination-induced immune response in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Antonios, Joseph P.; Soto, Horacio; Everson, Richard G.; Orpilla, Joey; Moughon, Diana; Shin, Namjo; Sedighim, Shaina; Yong, William H.; Li, Gang; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Liau, Linda M.; Prins, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    DC vaccination with autologous tumor lysate has demonstrated promising results for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) in preclinical and clinical studies. While the vaccine appears capable of inducing T cell infiltration into tumors, the effectiveness of active vaccination in progressively growing tumors is less profound. In parallel, a number of studies have identified negative costimulatory pathways, such as programmed death 1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1), as relevant mediators of the intratumoral immune responses. Clinical responses to PD-1 pathway inhibition, however, have also been varied. To evaluate the relevance to established glioma, the effects of PD-1 blockade following DC vaccination were tested in intracranial (i.c.) glioma tumor– bearing mice. Treatment with both DC vaccination and PD-1 mAb blockade resulted in long-term survival, while neither agent alone induced a survival benefit in animals with larger, established tumors. This survival benefit was completely dependent on CD8+ T cells. Additionally, DC vaccine plus PD-1 mAb blockade resulted in the upregulation of integrin homing and immunologic memory markers on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In clinical samples, DC vaccination in GBM patients was associated with upregulation of PD-1 expression in vivo, while ex vivo blockade of PD-1 on freshly isolated TILs dramatically enhanced autologous tumor cell cytolysis. These findings strongly suggest that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway plays an important role in the adaptive immune resistance of established GBM in response to antitumor active vaccination and provide us with a rationale for the clinical translation of this combination therapy. PMID:27453950

  13. Resistance Mechanisms to Immune-Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer: Tumor-Intrinsic and -Extrinsic Factors.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Jonathan M; Vétizou, Marie; Daillère, Romain; Roberti, María Paula; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Routy, Bertrand; Lepage, Patricia; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Chamaillard, Mathias; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2016-06-21

    Inhibition of immune regulatory checkpoints, such as CTLA-4 and the PD-1-PD-L1 axis, is at the forefront of immunotherapy for cancers of various histological types. However, such immunotherapies fail to control neoplasia in a significant proportion of patients. Here, we review how a range of cancer-cell-autonomous cues, tumor-microenvironmental factors, and host-related influences might account for the heterogeneous responses and failures often encountered during therapies using immune-checkpoint blockade. Furthermore, we describe the emerging evidence of how the strong interrelationship between the immune system and the host microbiota can determine responses to cancer therapies, and we introduce a concept by which prior or concomitant modulation of the gut microbiome could optimize therapeutic outcomes upon immune-checkpoint blockade. PMID:27332730

  14. CSF1 Receptor Targeting In Prostate Cancer Reverses Macrophage-Mediated Resistance To Androgen Blockade Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Escamilla, Jemima; Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Liu, Connie; Priceman, Saul J.; Moughon, Diana; Jiang, Ziyue; Pouliot, Frederic; Magyar, Clara; Sung, James L.; Xu, Jingying; Deng, Gang; West, Brian L.; Bollag, Gideon; Fradet, Yves; Lacombe, Louis; Jung, Michael E.; Huang, Jiaoti; Wu, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote cancer progression and therapeutic resistance by enhancing angiogenesis, matrix-remodeling and immunosuppression. In this study prostate cancer (PCa) under androgen blockade therapy (ABT) was investigated, demonstrating that TAMs contribute to PCa disease recurrence through paracrine signaling processes. ABT induced the tumor cells to express macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (M-CSF-1 or CSF-1) and other cytokines that recruit and modulate macrophages, causing a significant increase in TAM infiltration. Inhibitors of CSF-1 signaling through its receptor, CSF-1R, were tested in combination with ABT, demonstrating that blockade of TAM influx in this setting disrupts tumor promotion and sustains a more durable therapeutic response compared to ABT alone. PMID:25736687

  15. Blockade of interferon Beta, but not interferon alpha, signaling controls persistent viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Cherie T; Sullivan, Brian M; Teijaro, John R; Lee, Andrew M; Welch, Megan; Rice, Stephanie; Sheehan, Kathleen C F; Schreiber, Robert D; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2015-05-13

    Although type I interferon (IFN-I) is thought to be beneficial against microbial infections, persistent viral infections are characterized by high interferon signatures suggesting that IFN-I signaling may promote disease pathogenesis. During persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, IFNα and IFNβ are highly induced early after infection, and blocking IFN-I receptor (IFNAR) signaling promotes virus clearance. We assessed the specific roles of IFNβ versus IFNα in controlling LCMV infection. While blockade of IFNβ alone does not alter early viral dissemination, it is important in determining lymphoid structure, lymphocyte migration, and anti-viral T cell responses that lead to accelerated virus clearance, approximating what occurs during attenuation of IFNAR signaling. Comparatively, blockade of IFNα was not associated with improved viral control, but with early dissemination of virus. Thus, despite their use of the same receptor, IFNβ and IFNα have unique and distinguishable biologic functions, with IFNβ being mainly responsible for promoting viral persistence. PMID:25974304

  16. α–blockade, apoptosis, and prostate shrinkage: how are they related?

    PubMed Central

    Chłosta, Piotr; Kaplan, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The α1–adrenoreceptor antagonists, such as terazosin and doxazosin, induce prostate programmed cell death (apoptosis) within prostate epithelial and stromal cells in vitro. This treatment should cause prostate volume decrease, However, this has never been observed in clinical conditions. The aim of this paper is to review the disconnect between these two processes. Methods PubMed and DOAJ were searched for papers related to prostate, apoptosis, and stem cell death. The following key words were used: prostate, benign prostate hyperplasia, programmed cell death, apoptosis, cell death, α1–adrenoreceptor antagonist, α–blockade, prostate epithelium, prostate stroma, stem cells, progenitors, and in vitro models. Results We have shown how discoveries related to stem cells can influence our understanding of α–blockade treatment for BPH patients. Prostate epithelial and mesenchymal compartments have stem (progenitors) and differentiating cells. These compartments are described in relation to experimental in vitro and in vivo settings. Conclusions Apoptosis is observed within prostate tissue, but this effect has no clinical significance and cannot lead to prostate shrinkage. In part, this is due to stem cells that are responsible for prostate tissue regeneration and are resistant to apoptosis triggered by α1–receptor antagonists. PMID:24579025

  17. Mevalonate Pathway Blockade, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Autophagy: A Possible Link

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Crovella, Sergio; Celsi, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway, crucial for cholesterol synthesis, plays a key role in multiple cellular processes. Deregulation of this pathway is also correlated with diminished protein prenylation, an important post-translational modification necessary to localize certain proteins, such as small GTPases, to membranes. Mevalonate pathway blockade has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction: especially involving lower mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of pro-apoptotic factors in cytosol. Furthermore a severe reduction of protein prenylation has also been associated with defective autophagy, possibly causing inflammasome activation and subsequent cell death. So, it is tempting to hypothesize a mechanism in which defective autophagy fails to remove damaged mitochondria, resulting in increased cell death. This mechanism could play a significant role in Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, an autoinflammatory disease characterized by a defect in Mevalonate Kinase, a key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. Patients carrying mutations in the MVK gene, encoding this enzyme, show increased inflammation and lower protein prenylation levels. This review aims at analysing the correlation between mevalonate pathway defects, mitochondrial dysfunction and defective autophagy, as well as inflammation, using Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency as a model to clarify the current pathogenetic hypothesis as the basis of the disease. PMID:26184189

  18. [The micro-particles of blood plasma, micro-vesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies and Kupffer macrophage in liver: late in phylogenesis system of realization of biological function of endoecology].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2014-07-01

    Probably, at early stages of phylogenesis and on the stage of first contacts of single cells in environment the mode of intercommunication was developed via formation of micro-vesicles. It is quite possible that this so complicated way was used during billions of years to develop the very early cenosises of functionally different cells. Later on, diffusion of humoral mediators within the framework of group of cells but without vesicles resulted in formation of very early regulated cenosises of various cells. In billions years, these paracrin regulated cenosises became structural and functional units of every organ. It is difficult to imagine that mode of early in phylogenesis humoral intercommunication of cells could preserve its significance in present conditions. At the same time, according to methodological approach of biological continuity in becoming of biological functions and biological reactions, micro-vesicles continue to function but with somehow different purposes. It is surmised that microparticles of blood plasma consist a heterogeneous population of micro-vesicles initially formed by cells, exosomes and apoptotic bodies. This population is a foundation of spontaneous, physical chemical formation of complexes in blood plasma on principles of absorption, hydrophobicity and ionic interaction of structural cells'components insoluble in water medium. It is assumed that presently formation of micro-particles in blood is functionally a kind of realization of phylogenetically late variant of biological function of endoecology, in inter-cellular medium, in local pool of intravascular blood plasma. This variant includes: a) microparticles, micro-vesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies as elements of biological reaction of support of "purity" of inter-cellular medium; b) in many respects highly specialized variant of phagocytosis of micro-particles by Kupffer macrophages in liver In the aggregate, this is a phylogenetically late medium of realization of

  19. Rydberg blockade effects at n ˜300 in strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Dunning, F. B.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2015-11-01

    Rydberg blockade at n ˜300 , is examined using strontium n F13 Rydberg atoms excited in an atomic beam in a small volume defined by two tightly focused crossed laser beams. The observation of blockade for such states is challenging due to their extreme sensitivity to stray fields and the many magnetic sublevels associated with F states which results in a high local density of states. Nonetheless, with a careful choice of laser polarization to selectively excite only a limited number of these sublevels, sizable blockade effects are observed on an ˜0.1 mm length scale extending blockade measurements into the near-macroscopic regime and enabling study of the dynamics of strongly coupled many-body high-n Rydberg systems under carefully controlled conditions.

  20. Comparison of bupivacaine and etidocaine in extradural blockade.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C J; Scott, D B

    1984-02-01

    In a randomized, double-blind study, 40 female patients underwent major gynaecological surgery with extradural anaesthesia provided by 0.75% bupivacaine, 0.75% bupivacaine with adrenaline 5 micrograms ml-1, 1.5% etidocaine or 1.5% etidocaine with adrenaline 5 micrograms ml-1, 20 ml in each case. In all patients the resultant blockade was suitable for intra-abdominal pelvic surgery. Mean maximum spread of analgesia was around T3/4 with all four drugs. Onset of sensory and motor block was more rapid following etidocaine than following bupivacaine. The addition of adrenaline increased the speed of onset of sensory block. Patients receiving etidocaine had a denser motor blockade than those receiving bupivacaine, and the addition of adrenaline led to an increase in the density of the motor blockade. There were no differences in the durations of motor blockade. Objective measurements of the duration of sensory blockade showed that there were no differences between the drugs and that the addition of adrenaline increased the duration of blockade. However, pain returned sooner following etidocaine than bupivacaine, and the additive effect of adrenaline was to increase this period of subjective analgesia. PMID:6362694

  1. Orbital excitation blockade and algorithmic cooling in quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2011-12-22

    Interaction blockade occurs when strong interactions in a confined, few-body system prevent a particle from occupying an otherwise accessible quantum state. Blockade phenomena reveal the underlying granular nature of quantum systems and allow for the detection and manipulation of the constituent particles, be they electrons, spins, atoms or photons. Applications include single-electron transistors based on electronic Coulomb blockade and quantum logic gates in Rydberg atoms. Here we report a form of interaction blockade that occurs when transferring ultracold atoms between orbitals in an optical lattice. We call this orbital excitation blockade (OEB). In this system, atoms at the same lattice site undergo coherent collisions described by a contact interaction whose strength depends strongly on the orbital wavefunctions of the atoms. We induce coherent orbital excitations by modulating the lattice depth, and observe staircase-like excitation behaviour as we cross the interaction-split resonances by tuning the modulation frequency. As an application of OEB, we demonstrate algorithmic cooling of quantum gases: a sequence of reversible OEB-based quantum operations isolates the entropy in one part of the system and then an irreversible step removes the entropy from the gas. This technique may make it possible to cool quantum gases to have the ultralow entropies required for quantum simulation of strongly correlated electron systems. In addition, the close analogy between OEB and dipole blockade in Rydberg atoms provides a plan for the implementation of two-quantum-bit gates in a quantum computing architecture with natural scalability. PMID:22193104

  2. Durable antitumor responses to CD47 blockade require adaptive immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Dougan, Michael; Ingram, Jessica R; Ho, Chia Chi M; Kauke, Monique J; Almo, Steven C; Ploegh, Hidde L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2016-05-10

    Therapeutic antitumor antibodies treat cancer by mobilizing both innate and adaptive immunity. CD47 is an antiphagocytic ligand exploited by tumor cells to blunt antibody effector functions by transmitting an inhibitory signal through its receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα). Interference with the CD47-SIRPα interaction synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to eliminate human tumor xenografts by enhancing macrophage-mediated antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), but synergy between CD47 blockade and ADCP has yet to be demonstrated in immunocompetent hosts. Here, we show that CD47 blockade alone or in combination with a tumor-specific antibody fails to generate antitumor immunity against syngeneic B16F10 tumors in mice. Durable tumor immunity required programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade in combination with an antitumor antibody, with incorporation of CD47 antagonism substantially improving response rates. Our results highlight an underappreciated contribution of the adaptive immune system to anti-CD47 adjuvant therapy and suggest that targeting both innate and adaptive immune checkpoints can potentiate the vaccinal effect of antitumor antibody therapy. PMID:27091975

  3. α2-Adrenergic blockade mimics the enhancing effect of chronic stress on breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Lamkin, Donald M; Sung, Ha Yeon; Yang, Gyu Sik; David, John M; Ma, Jeffrey C Y; Cole, Steve W; Sloan, Erica K

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies in preclinical mouse models of breast cancer have shown that chronic restraint stress can enhance disease progression by increasing catecholamine levels and subsequent signaling of β-adrenergic receptors. Catecholamines also signal α-adrenergic receptors, and greater α-adrenergic signaling has been shown to promote breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. However, antagonism of α-adrenergic receptors can result in elevated catecholamine levels, which may increase β-adrenergic signaling, because pre-synaptic α2-adrenergic receptors mediate an autoinhibition of sympathetic transmission. Given these findings, we examined the effect of α-adrenergic blockade on breast cancer progression under non-stress and stress conditions (chronic restraint) in an orthotopic mouse model with MDA-MB-231HM cells. Chronic restraint increased primary tumor growth and metastasis to distant tissues as expected, and non-selective α-adrenergic blockade by phentolamine significantly inhibited those effects. However, under non-stress conditions, phentolamine increased primary tumor size and distant metastasis. Sympatho-neural gene expression for catecholamine biosynthesis enzymes was elevated by phentolamine under non-stress conditions, and the non-selective β-blocker propranolol inhibited the effect of phentolamine on breast cancer progression. Selective α2-adrenergic blockade by efaroxan also increased primary tumor size and distant metastasis under non-stress conditions, but selective α1-adrenergic blockade by prazosin did not. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that α2-adrenergic signaling can act through an autoreceptor mechanism to inhibit sympathetic catecholamine release and, thus, modulate established effects of β-adrenergic signaling on tumor progression-relevant biology. PMID:25462899

  4. Dvr1 transfers left-right asymmetric signals from Kupffer's vesicle to lateral plate mesoderm in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Annita G; Wang, Xinghao; Yost, H Joseph

    2013-10-01

    An early step in establishing left-right (LR) symmetry in zebrafish is the generation of asymmetric fluid flow by Kupffer's vesicle (KV). As a result of fluid flow, a signal is generated and propagated from the KV to the left lateral plate mesoderm, activating a transcriptional response of Nodal expression in the left lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). The mechanisms and molecules that aid in this transfer of information from the KV to the left LPM are still not clear. Here we provide several lines of evidence demonstrating a role for a member of the TGFβ family member, Dvr1, a zebrafish Vg1 ortholog. Dvr1 is expressed bilaterally between the KV and the LPM. Knockdown of Dvr1 by morpholino causes dramatically reduced or absent expression of southpaw (spaw, a Nodal homolog), in LPM, and corresponding loss of downstream Lefty (lft1 and lft) expression, and aberrant brain and heart LR patterning. Dvr1 morphant embryos have normal KV morphology and function, normal expression of southpaw (spaw) and charon (cha) in the peri-KV region and normal expression of a variety of LPM markers in LPM. Additionally, Dvr1 knockdown does not alter the capability of LPM to respond to signals that initiate and propagate spaw expression. Co-injection experiments in Xenopus and zebrafish indicate that Dvr1 and Spaw can enhance each other's ability to activate the Nodal response pathway and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal differential relationships among activators and inhibitors in this pathway. These results indicate that Dvr1 is responsible for enabling the transfer of a left-right signal from KV to the LPM. PMID:23791819

  5. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor signaling blockade combined with radiation.

    PubMed

    Allen, Gregory W; Saba, Corey; Armstrong, Eric A; Huang, Shyh-Min; Benavente, Sergio; Ludwig, Dale L; Hicklin, Daniel J; Harari, Paul M

    2007-02-01

    Signaling through the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is implicated in cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, metastasis, and resistance to cytotoxic cancer therapies. Targeted disruption of IGF-IR signaling combined with cytotoxic therapy may therefore yield improved anticancer efficacy over conventional treatments alone. In this study, a fully human anti-IGF-IR monoclonal antibody A12 (ImClone Systems, Inc., New York, NY) is examined as an adjunct to radiation therapy. IGF-IR expression is shown for a diverse cohort of cell lines, whereas targeted IGF-IR blockade by A12 inhibits IGF-IR phosphorylation and activation of the downstream effectors Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Anchorage-dependent proliferation and xenograft growth is inhibited by A12 in a dose-dependent manner, particularly for non-small cell lung cancer lines. Clonogenic radiation survival of H226 and H460 cells grown under anchorage-dependent conditions is impaired by A12, demonstrating a radiation dose-enhancing effect for IGF-IR blockade. Postradiation anchorage-independent colony formation is inhibited by A12 in A549 and H460 cells. In the H460 xenograft model, combining A12 and radiation significantly enhances antitumor efficacy compared with either modality alone. These effects may be mediated by promotion of radiation-induced, double-stranded DNA damage and apoptosis as observed in cell culture. In summary, these results validate IGF-IR signal transduction blockade as a promising strategy to improve radiation therapy efficacy in human tumors, forming a basis for future clinical trials. PMID:17283150

  6. CD47 blockade inhibits tumor progression human osteosarcoma in xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shui-Jun; Zhao, Chen; Qiu, Bin-Song; Gu, Hai-Feng; Hong, Jian-Fei; Cao, Li; Chen, Yu; Xia, Bing; Bi, Qin; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone tumors in children and adolescents. Despite intensive chemotherapy, patients with advanced disease still have a poor prognosis, illustrating the need for alternative therapies. In this study, we explored the use of antibodies that block CD47 with a tumor growth suppressive effect on osteosarcoma. We first found that up-regulation of CD47 mRNA levels in the tumorous tissues from eight patients with osteosarcoma when compared with that in adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Further western-blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated that CD47 protein level was highly expressed in osteosarcoma compared to normal osteoblastic cells and adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Osteosarcoma cancer stem cell markers staining shown that the majority of CD44+ cells expressed CD47 albeit with different percentages (ranging from 80% to 99%). Furthermore, high CD47 mRNA expression levels were associated with a decreased probability of progression-free and overall survival. In addition, blockade of CD47 by specific Abs suppresses the invasive ability of osteosarcoma tumor cells and further inhibits spontaneous pulmonary metastasis of KRIB osteosarcoma cells in vivo. Finally, CD47 blockade increases macrophage phagocytosis of osteosarcoma tumor cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CD47 is a critical regulator in the metastasis of osteosarcoma and suggest that targeted inhibition of this antigen by anti-CD47 may be a novel immunotherapeutic approach in the management of this tumor. PMID:26093091

  7. Deguelin-induced blockade of PI3K/protein kinase B/MAP kinase signaling in zebrafish and breast cancer cell lines is mediated by down-regulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Hai, Yang; Chen, Lu; Liu, Rui-Jin; Han, Yu-Xiang; Li, Wen-Hao; Li, Song; Lin, Shuo; Wu, Xin-Rong

    2016-04-01

    Deguelin, a natural component derived from leguminous plants, has been used as pesticide in some regions. Accumulating evidence show that deguelin has promising chemopreventive and therapeutic activities against cancer cells. This study shows that low concentrations of deguelin can lead to significant delay in zebrafish embryonic development through growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, we identified fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) as the putative target of deguelin. The candidate was initially identified by a microarray approach and then validated through in vitro experiments using hormone-responsive (MCF-7) and nonresponsive (MDA-MB-231) human breast cancer cell lines. The results show that deguelin suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in both cancer cell lines, but not in Hs 578Bst cells, by blocking PI3K/AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling. The FGFR4 mRNA and protein level also diminished in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, we found that forced FGFR4 overexpression attenuated deguelin-induced proliferative suppression and apoptotic cell death in both zebrafish and MCF-7 cell lines, p-AKT and p-ERK levels were restored upon FGFR4 overexpression. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that deguelin inhibition of PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling in zebrafish and breast cancer cell lines is partially mediated through down-regulation of FGFR4 activity. PMID:27069628

  8. EVEN VISITING SCIENTISTS COULD MAKE DISCOVERIES IN MONTREAL.

    PubMed

    Lázár, György

    2014-03-30

    This publication summarizes the scientific adventure with Professor Selye, and focuses on the specific effect of rare metal salts on reticuloendothelial functions. Rare earth metal ions markedly affect the functions of cells involved in inflammatory and immunological phenomena. The Kupffer cell blockade induced by GdCl3 is a generally accepted method for investigation of the physiological and pathophysiological roles of Kupffer cells. Potential beneficial effects of macrophage blockade have been demonstrated in different shock states, liver injury and obstructive jaundice. PMID:26118249

  9. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Kristin A.; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M.; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J.; Beard, Philippa M.; Mabbott, Neil A.; Smith, Lee B.; Hume, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development. PMID:24652541

  10. Localized oncolytic virotherapy overcomes systemic tumor resistance to immune checkpoint blockade immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Subudhi, Sumit K.; Park, Joon Seok; Mansour, Mena; Palese, Peter; Merghoub, Taha

    2014-01-01

    Preexisting lymphocytic infiltration of tumors is associated with superior prognostic outcomes in a variety of cancers. Recent studies also suggest that lymphocytic responses may identify patients more likely to benefit from therapies targeting immune checkpoints, suggesting that therapeutic efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade can be enhanced through strategies that induce tumor inflammation. To achieve this effect, here we explored the immunotherapeutic potential of oncolytic Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV). We find that localized intratumoral therapy of B16 melanoma with NDV induces inflammatory responses leading to lymphocytic infiltrates and anti-tumor effect in distant (non-virally injected) tumors without distant virus spread. The inflammatory effect coincided with distant tumor infiltration with tumor-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which was dependent on the identity of the virus-injected tumor. Combination therapy with localized NDV and systemic CTLA-4 blockade led to rejection of pre-established distant tumors and protection from tumor re-challenge in poorly-immunogenic tumor models, irrespective of tumor cell line sensitivity to NDV-mediated lysis. Therapeutic effect was associated with marked distant tumor infiltration with activated CD8+ and CD4+ effector but not regulatory T cells, and was dependent on CD8+ cells, NK cells and type I interferon. Our findings demonstrate that localized therapy with oncolytic NDV induces inflammatory immune infiltrates in distant tumors, making them susceptible to systemic therapy with immunomodulatory antibodies, which provides a strong rationale for investigation of such combination therapies in clinic. PMID:24598590

  11. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L.; Brentville, Victoria A.; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M.; Durrant, Lindy G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10–40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses. PMID:27471648

  12. Blockade of HERG human K+ channels and IKr of guinea-pig cardiomyocytes by the antipsychotic drug clozapine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Choe, Han; Jo, Su-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Clozapine, a commonly used antipsychotic drug, can induce QT prolongation, which may lead to torsades de pointes and sudden death. To investigate the arrhythmogenic side effects of clozapine, we studied the impact of clozapine on human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, and on the delayed rectifier K+ currents of guinea-pig cardiomyocytes. Clozapine dose-dependently decreased the amplitudes of the currents at the end of voltage steps, and the tail currents of HERG. The IC50 for the clozapine blockade of HERG currents in Xenopus oocytes progressively decreased relative to depolarization (39.9 μM at −40 mV, 28.3 μM at 0 mV and 22.9 μM at +40 mV), whereas the IC50 for the clozapine-induced blockade of HERG currents in HEK293 cells at 36°C was 2.5 μM at +20 mV. The clozapine-induced blockade of HERG currents was time dependent: the fractional current was 0.903 of the control at the beginning of the pulse, but declined to 0.412 after 4 s at a test potential of 0 mV. The clozapine-induced blockade of HERG currents was use-dependent, exhibiting more rapid onset and greater steady state blockade at higher frequencies of activation, with a partial relief of blockade observed when the frequency of activation was decreased. In guinea-pig ventricular myocytes held at 36°C, treatment with 1 and 5 μM clozapine blocked the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr) by 24.7 and 79.6%, respectively, but did not significantly block the slowly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (IKs). Our findings collectively suggest that blockade of HERG currents and IKr, but not IKs, may contribute to the arrhythmogenic side effects of clozapine. PMID:16633353

  13. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer treatment: perspectives and issues.

    PubMed

    Hamanishi, Junzo; Mandai, Masaki; Matsumura, Noriomi; Abiko, Kaoru; Baba, Tsukasa; Konishi, Ikuo

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies showed that tumor cells 'edit' host immunity in several ways to evade immune defenses in the tumor microenvironment. This phenomenon is called "cancer immune escape." One of the most important components in this system is an immunosuppressive co-signal (immune checkpoint) mediated by the PD-1 receptor and its ligand, PD-L1. PD-1 is mainly expressed on activated T cells, whereas PD-L1 is expressed on several types of tumor cells. Preclinical studies have shown that inhibition of the interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1 enhances the T-cell response and mediates antitumor activity. Several clinical trials of PD-1/PD-L1 signal-blockade agents have exhibited dramatic antitumor efficacy in patients with certain types of solid or hematological malignancies. In this review, we highlight recent clinical trials using anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies against several types of malignancies, including a trial conducted in our department, and describe the clinical perspectives and issues regarding the PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer treatment. PMID:26899259

  14. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ► We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ► YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ► YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ► YM529/ONO-5920

  15. Primate gastric circulation: effects of catecholamines and adrenergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Zinner, M J; Kerr, J C; Reynolds, D G

    1976-02-01

    The effects of intra-arterial injections and infusions of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and isoproterenol on gastric blood flow were studied in anesthetized baboons. Blood flow was measured electromagnetically before and after adrenergic blockade. The results for injected epinephrine and norepinephrine indicate these agents to be pure vasoconstrictors in the primate gastric circulation, and this response is attenuated by alpha-adrenergic blockade with phenoxybenzamine. Isoproterenol is a pure vasodilator, and its response is attenuated following beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol. Intra-arterial infusions of epinephrine and norepinephrine (.05 mug kg-1 min-1) resulted in sustained vasoconstriction with no evidence of autoregulatory escape and no postinfusion "over-shoot." This study suggests that epinephrine and norepinephrine might provide alternatives to vasopressin as a vasoconstrictor for the control of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:1259012

  16. Distinct clinical patterns and immune infiltrates are observed at time of progression on targeted therapy versus immune checkpoint blockade for melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Zachary A.; Reuben, Alexandre; Spencer, Christine N.; Prieto, Peter A.; Austin-Breneman, Jacob L.; Jiang, Hong; Haymaker, Cara; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Frederick, Dennie T.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Amaria, Rodabe N.; Patel, Sapna P.; Hwu, Patrick; Woodman, Scott E.; Glitza, Isabella C.; Diab, Adi; Vence, Luis M.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Parra, Edwin R.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Coussens, Lisa M.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Chin, Lynda; Davies, Michael A.; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Allison, James P.; Sharma, Padmanee; Wargo, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have made major advances in the treatment of melanoma through the use of targeted therapy and immune checkpoint blockade; however, clinicians are posed with therapeutic dilemmas regarding timing and sequence of therapy. There is a growing appreciation of the impact of antitumor immune responses to these therapies, and we performed studies to test the hypothesis that clinical patterns and immune infiltrates differ at progression on these treatments. We observed rapid clinical progression kinetics in patients on targeted therapy compared to immune checkpoint blockade. To gain insight into possible immune mechanisms behind these differences, we performed deep immune profiling in tumors of patients on therapy. We demonstrated low CD8+ T-cell infiltrate on targeted therapy and high CD8+ T-cell infiltrate on immune checkpoint blockade at clinical progression. These data have important implications, and suggest that antitumor immune responses should be assessed when considering therapeutic options for patients with melanoma. PMID:27141370

  17. Glycolipid presentation to natural killer T cells differs in an organ-dependent fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieg, John; Yang, Guangli; Franck, Richard W.; van Rooijen, Nico; Tsuji, Moriya

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are able to present glycolipids to natural killer (NK) T cells in vivo. However, the essential role of DCs, as well as the role of other cells in glycolipid presentation, is unknown. Here, we show that DCs are the crucial antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for splenic NK T cells, whereas Kupffer cells are the key APCs for hepatic NK T cells. Both cell types stimulate cytokine production by NK T cells within 2 h of glycolipid administration, but only DCs are involved in the systemic, downstream responses to glycolipid administration. More specifically, CD8+ DCs produce IL-12 in response to glycolipid presentation, which stimulates secondary IFN- production by NK cells in different organs. Different APCs participate in glycolipid presentation to NK T cells in vivo but differ in their involvement in the overall glycolipid response. dendritic cell | Kupffer cell

  18. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels. PMID:27019385

  19. Indirect androgen doping by oestrogen blockade in sports

    PubMed Central

    Handelsman, D J

    2008-01-01

    Androgens can increase muscular mass and strength and remain the most frequently abused and widely available drugs used in sports doping. Banning the administration of natural or synthetic androgens has led to a variety of strategies to circumvent the ban of the most effective ergogenic agents for power sports. Among these, a variety of indirect androgen doping strategies aiming to produce a sustained rise in endogenous testosterone have been utilized. These include oestrogen blockade by drugs that act as oestrogen receptor antagonists (antioestrogen) or aromatase inhibitors. The physiological and pharmacological basis for the effects of oestrogen blockade in men, but not women, are reviewed. PMID:18500381

  20. Activation of microglial cells triggers a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) inducing their proliferation in an adenosine A2A receptor-dependent manner: A2A receptor blockade prevents BDNF release and proliferation of microglia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to control microglial responses in neuropathic pain. Since adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) control neuroinflammation, as well as the production and function of BDNF, we tested to see if A2AR controls the microglia-dependent secretion of BDNF and the proliferation of microglial cells, a crucial event in neuroinflammation. Methods Murine N9 microglial cells were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/mL) in the absence or in the presence of the A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM), as well as other modulators of A2AR signaling. The BDNF cellular content and secretion were quantified by Western blotting and ELISA, A2AR density was probed by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry and cell proliferation was assessed by BrdU incorporation. Additionally, the A2AR modulation of LPS-driven cell proliferation was also tested in primary cultures of mouse microglia. Results LPS induced time-dependent changes of the intra- and extracellular levels of BDNF and increased microglial proliferation. The maximal LPS-induced BDNF release was time-coincident with an LPS-induced increase of the A2AR density. Notably, removing endogenous extracellular adenosine or blocking A2AR prevented the LPS-mediated increase of both BDNF secretion and proliferation, as well as exogenous BDNF-induced proliferation. Conclusions We conclude that A2AR activation plays a mandatory role controlling the release of BDNF from activated microglia, as well as the autocrine/paracrine proliferative role of BDNF. PMID:23363775

  1. The effect of vagal nerve blockade using electrical impulses on glucose metabolism in nondiabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sathananthan, Matheni; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Swain, James M; Shah, Meera; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Cobelli, Claudio; Rizza, Robert A; Camilleri, Michael; Vella, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Vagal interruption causes weight loss in humans and decreases endogenous glucose production in animals. However, it is unknown if this is due to a direct effect on glucose metabolism. We sought to determine if vagal blockade using electrical impulses alters glucose metabolism in humans. Patients and methods We utilized a randomized, cross-over study design where participants were studied after 2 weeks of activation or inactivation of vagal nerve blockade (VNB). Seven obese subjects with impaired fasting glucose previously enrolled in a long-term study to examine the effect of VNB on weight took part. We used a standardized triple-tracer mixed meal to enable measurement of the rate of meal appearance, endogenous glucose production, and glucose disappearance. The 550 kcal meal was also labeled with 111In-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) to measure gastrointestinal transit. Insulin action and β-cell responsivity indices were estimated using the minimal model. Results Integrated glucose, insulin, and glucagon concentrations did not differ between study days. This was also reflected in a lack of effect on β-cell responsivity and insulin action. Furthermore, fasting and postprandial endogenous glucose production, integrated meal appearance, and glucose disposal did not differ in the presence or absence of VNB. Similarly, gastric emptying and colonic transit were unchanged by VNB. Conclusion In this pilot study in nondiabetic humans, electrical vagal blockade had no acute effects on glucose metabolism, insulin secretion and action, or gastric emptying. It remains to be determined if more pronounced effects would be observed in diabetic subjects. PMID:25050073

  2. B7-H1/PD-1 blockade therapy in urological malignancies: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lun; Wang, Yonghua; Shao, Shixiu; Yang, Meng; Niu, Haitao; Yu, Qinchao; Wang, Xinshen

    2015-01-01

    The stimulatory and inhibitory coreceptors expressed by T lymphocytes are known to play critical roles in regulating cancer immunity. An array of inhibitory coreceptors involved in the inhibition of T-cell functions and the blockade of immune activation have been discovered in recent years, the most important of which are cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), programmmed death-1 (PD-1), and B7 homolog 1 (B7-H1). Immunotherapies targeting T-cell coinhibitory molecules have proved to be effective in cancer treatment. Several kinds of monoclonal antibodies have been tested in preclinical studies, with better outcomes than conventional therapies in many malignancies. Common urological malignancies including renal cell carcinoma, bladder cancer and prostate cancer are supposed to be immunogenic cancer types and not so sensitive to conventional therapies as other malignancies. This review will focus on B7-H1/PD-1 blockade therapy in urological malignancies, summarizing the results of clinical trials as well as the challenges and prospects of this emerging immunotherapy. PMID:26045125

  3. Adaptive resistance to therapeutic PD-1 blockade is associated with upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A.; Li, Yvonne Y.; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Buczkowski, Kevin A.; Richards, William G.; Gandhi, Leena; Redig, Amanda J.; Rodig, Scott J.; Asahina, Hajime; Jones, Robert E.; Kulkarni, Meghana M.; Kuraguchi, Mari; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Fecci, Peter E.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Janne, Pasi A.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Gangadharan, Sidharta P.; Costa, Daniel B.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Bueno, Raphael; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite compelling antitumour activity of antibodies targeting the programmed death 1 (PD-1): programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint in lung cancer, resistance to these therapies has increasingly been observed. In this study, to elucidate mechanisms of adaptive resistance, we analyse the tumour immune microenvironment in the context of anti-PD-1 therapy in two fully immunocompetent mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. In tumours progressing following response to anti-PD-1 therapy, we observe upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints, notably T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3), in PD-1 antibody bound T cells and demonstrate a survival advantage with addition of a TIM-3 blocking antibody following failure of PD-1 blockade. Two patients who developed adaptive resistance to anti-PD-1 treatment also show a similar TIM-3 upregulation in blocking antibody-bound T cells at treatment failure. These data suggest that upregulation of TIM-3 and other immune checkpoints may be targetable biomarkers associated with adaptive resistance to PD-1 blockade. PMID:26883990

  4. The Union Blockade and Demoralization of the South: Relative Prices in the Confederacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekelund, Robert B., Jr.; Thornton, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Applies the economic concept of relative prices to the blockaded Confederacy during the U.S. Civil War. Describes how the Union blockade encouraged blockade runners to supply luxury items while soldiers lacked food, clothing, and ammunition. Contends that the resultant demoralization was a factor in the demise of the Confederacy. (CFR)

  5. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  6. A new regime of Pauli-spin blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Justin K.; Stewart, M. D.; Zimmerman, Neil M.

    2016-04-01

    Pauli-spin blockade (PSB) is a transport phenomenon in double quantum dots that allows for a type of spin to charge conversion often used to probe fundamental physics such as spin relaxation and singlet-triplet coupling. In this paper, we theoretically explore Pauli-spin blockade as a function of magnetic field B applied parallel to the substrate. In the well-studied low magnetic field regime, where PSB occurs in the forward (1, 1) → (0, 2) tunneling direction, we highlight some aspects of PSB that are not discussed in detail in existing literature, including the change in size of both bias triangles measured in the forward and reverse biasing directions as a function of B. At higher fields, we predict a crossover to "reverse PSB" in which current is blockaded in the reverse direction due to the occupation of a spin singlet as opposed to the traditional triplet blockade that occurs at low fields. The onset of reverse PSB coincides with the development of a tail like feature in the measured bias triangles and occurs when the Zeeman energy of the polarized triplet equals the exchange energy in the (0, 2) charge configuration. In Si quantum dots, these fields are experimentally accessible; thus, this work suggests a way to observe a crossover in magnetic field to qualitatively different behavior.

  7. Accurate Coulomb blockade thermometry up to 60 kelvin.

    PubMed

    Meschke, M; Kemppinen, A; Pekola, J P

    2016-03-28

    We demonstrate experimentally a precise realization of Coulomb blockade thermometry working at temperatures up to 60 K. Advances in nano-fabrication methods using electron beam lithography allow us to fabricate uniform arrays of sufficiently small tunnel junctions to guarantee an overall temperature reading precision of about 1%. PMID:26903107

  8. Sodium intake, RAAS-blockade and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    de Borst, Martin H; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers is the current standard treatment to prevent progressive renal function loss in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet in many patients the renal protective effect of RAAS-blockade is incomplete. Short-term clinical studies have demonstrated that dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS-blockade. More recently, it was shown that this effect is accompanied by a lower risk of end-stage renal disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The modulation of RAAS-blockade efficacy by sodium intake is likely multifactorial, and is mediated by effects of sodium on local tissue RAAS in kidney, vasculature and brain, and by effects on the immune system. Despite the evidence showing the beneficial effects of even a moderate sodium restriction (∼2.5g/d), it remains difficult to realize in clinical practice. In an analysis based on 24-h urinary sodium excretion data from more than 10,000 CKD patients and renal transplant recipients, we found that sodium intake in these patients is on average 3.8g/d, closely resembling the global general population (3.95g/d). Behavioral approaches including the use of online dietary coaching (ehealth) and feedback using data from 24-h urine collections may be useful to successfully lower dietary sodium intake, aiming to improve cardio-renal outcomes in patients with CKD. PMID:27041482

  9. Anti-CD44-mediated blockade of leukocyte migration in skin-associated immune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zöller, Margot; Gupta, Pooja; Marhaba, Rachid; Vitacolonna, Mario; Freyschmidt-Paul, Pia

    2007-07-01

    CD44 plays an important role in leukocyte extravasation, which is fortified in autoimmune diseases and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions. There is additional evidence that distinct CD44 isoforms interfere with the extravasation of selective leukocyte subsets. We wanted to explore this question in alopecia areata (AA), a hair-follicle centric autoimmune disease, and in a chronic eczema. The question became of interest because AA is treated efficiently by topical application of a contact sensitizer, such that a mild DTH reaction is maintained persistently. Aiming to support the therapeutic efficacy of a chronic eczema in AA by anti-CD44 treatment, it became essential to control whether a blockade of migration, preferentially of AA effector cells, could be achieved by CD44 isoform-specific antibodies. Anti-panCD44 and anti-CD44 variant 10 isoform (CD44v10) inhibited in vitro migration of leukocytes from untreated and allergen-treated, control and AA mice. In vivo, both antibodies interfered with T cell and monocyte extravasation into the skin; only anti-panCD44 prevented T cell homing into lymph nodes. Contributing factors are disease-dependent alterations in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression and a blockade of CD44 on endothelial cells and leukocytes. It is important that CD44 can associate with several integrins and ICAM-1. Associations depend on CD44 activation and vary with CD44 isoforms and leukocyte subpopulations. CD44 standard isoform preferentially associates with CD49d in T cells and CD44v10 with CD11b in monocytes. Accordingly, anti-panCD44 and anti-CD49d inhibit T cell, anti-CD11b, and anti-CD44v10 macrophage migration most efficiently. Thus, allergen treatment of AA likely can be supported by targeting AA T cells selectively via a panCD44-CD49d-bispecific antibody. PMID:17442857

  10. Blockade of CD354 (TREM-1) Ameliorates Anti-GBM-Induced Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Wu, Tianfu; Zhou, Xin J; Davis, Laurie S; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    CD354, Triggering Receptor of Myeloid Cells-1 (TREM-1), is a potent amplifier of myeloid immune responses. Our goal was to determine the expression and function of TREM-1 in immune-mediated nephritis. An anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody (anti-GBM)-induced nephritis model was employed, where mice were sensitized with rabbit IgG followed by anti-GBM serum to induce disease. Anti-GBM-treated 129x1/svJ mice developed severe nephritis whereas C57BL/6 (B6) mice were resistant to disease. Anti-GBM disease resulted in elevated renal TREM-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels and increased urine TREM-1 levels in 129x1/svJ. TREM-1 blockade with an inhibitory peptide, LP17, inhibited proteinuria and renal disease as measured by glomerulonephritis class, severity of tubulointerstitial disease, crescent formation, and inflammatory cell infiltrates. In sum, TREM-1 is upregulated in renal inflammation and plays a vital role in driving disease. Thus, TREM-1 blockade emerges as a potential therapeutic avenue for immune-mediated renal diseases such as lupus nephritis. PMID:27083877

  11. Selective blockade of gene expression in a single identified snail neuron.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, D; Ierusalimsky, V; Malyshev, A; Balaban, P; Belyavsky, A

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, the applicability of antisense morpholino oligos for loss-of-function experiments in neurobiology was investigated. The identified withdrawal interneurons of the parietal ganglia expressing helix command neuron-specific 2 (HCS2) gene were pressure injected with HCS2 antisense or control morpholino oligo solution at a final concentration 1-4 microM. No toxic or side effects for the neural functioning were noted immediately or several hours after injection. The changes in the concentration of HCS2-encoded protein in neurons after injection were monitored by two methods, Western blotting and immunostaining of the brain. The amount of the peptide immunoreactive with the HCS2 antibody started to decline in the injected cells at day 2 post-injection, decreased four- to five-fold at day 4, and stayed at this low level thereafter. Similar results obtained by both methods suggest significant selective blockade of production of the HCS2-encoded peptide. In contrast, no substantial decrease of the HCS2-encoded polypeptide was observed after injection with control oligos. Due to the high stability of the morpholino oligos in the cell, they represent a highly efficient tool for a specific long-term blockade of gene expression in molluscan neurons. PMID:12763064

  12. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis and IL-10 Receptor Blockade as Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Henry W.; Lu, Christina M.; Mauze, Smita; Freeman, Sherry; Moreira, Andre L.; Kaplan, Gilla; Coffman, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is thought to promote intracellular infection, including human visceral leishmaniasis, by disabling Th1 cell-type responses and/or deactivating parasitized tissue macrophages. To develop a rationale for IL-10 inhibition as treatment in visceral infection, Th1 cytokine-driven responses were characterized in Leishmania donovani-infected BALB/c mice in which IL-10 was absent or overexpressed or its receptor (IL-10R) was blockaded. IL-10 knockout and normal mice treated prophylactically with anti-IL-10R demonstrated accelerated granuloma assembly and rapid parasite killing without untoward tissue inflammation; IL-12 and gamma interferon mRNA expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase reactivity, and responsiveness to antimony chemotherapy were also enhanced in knockout mice. In IL-10 transgenic mice, parasite replication was unrestrained, and except for antimony responsiveness, measured Th1 cell-dependent events were all initially impaired. Despite subsequent granuloma assembly, high-level infection persisted, and antimony-treated transgenic mice also relapsed. In normal mice with established infection, anti-IL-10R treatment was remarkably active, inducing near-cure by itself and synergism with antimony. IL-10's deactivating effects regulate outcome in experimental visceral leishmaniasis, and IL-10R blockade represents a potential immuno- and/or immunochemotherapeutic approach in this infection. PMID:12379707

  13. Blockade of HERG channels by the class III antiarrhythmic azimilide: mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Busch, A E; Eigenberger, B; Jurkiewicz, N K; Salata, J J; Pica, A; Suessbrich, H; Lang, F

    1998-01-01

    The class III antiarrhythmic azimilide has previously been shown to inhibit IKs and IKr in guinea-pig cardiac myocytes and IKs (minK) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Because HERG channels underly the conductance IKr in human heart, the effects of azimilide on HERG channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes were the focus of the present study.In contrast to other well characterized HERG channel blockers, azimilide blockade was reverse use-dependent, i.e., the relative block and apparent affinity of azimilide decreased with an increase in channel activation frequency. Azimilide blocked HERG channels at 0.1 and 1 Hz with IC50 s of 1.4 μM and 5.2  μM respectively.In an envelope of tail test, HERG channel blockade increased with increasing channel activation, indicating binding of azimilide to open channels.Azimilide blockade of HERG channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes and IKr in mouse AT-1 cells was decreased under conditions of high [K+]e, whereas block of slowly activating IKs channels was not affected by changes in [K+]e.In summary, azimilide is a blocker of cardiac delayed rectifier channels, IKs and HERG. Because of the distinct effects of stimulation frequency and [K+]e on azimilide block of IKr and IKs channels, we conclude that the relative contribution of block of each of these cardiac delayed rectifier channels depends on heart frequency. [K+]e and regulatory status of the respective channels. PMID:9484850

  14. The anti-dyskinetic effect of dopamine receptor blockade is enhanced in parkinsonian rats following dopamine neuron transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eunju; Lisci, Carlo; Tronci, Elisabetta; Fidalgo, Camino; Stancampiano, Roberto; Björklund, Anders; Carta, Manolo

    2014-02-01

    Graft-induced dyskinesia (GID) is a serious complication induced by dopamine (DA) cell transplantation in parkinsonian patients. We have recently shown that DA D2 receptor blockade produces striking blockade of dyskinesia induced by amphetamine in grafted 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, a model of GID. This study was designed to investigate whether blockade of DA D1 receptors could produce similar outcome, and to see whether the effect of these treatments in grafted rats was specific for dyskinesia induced by amphetamine, or could also influence L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). L-DOPA-primed rats received transplants of fetal DA neurons into the DA-denervated striatum. Beginning at 20weeks after transplantation rats were subjected to pharmacological treatments with either L-DOPA (6mg/kg) or amphetamine (1.5mg/kg) alone, or in combination with the D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390, the D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride, and the 5-HT1A agonist/D2 receptor antagonist buspirone. Grafted rats developed severe GID, while LID was reduced. Both eticlopride and SCH23390 produced near-complete suppression of GID already at very low doses (0.015 and 0.1mg/kg, respectively). Buspirone induced similar suppression at a dose as low as 0.3mg/kg, which is far lower than the dose known to affect LID in non-grafted dyskinetic rats. In agreement with our previous results, the effect of buspirone was independent from 5-HT1A receptor activation, as it was not counteracted by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635, but likely due to D2 receptor blockade. Most interestingly, the same doses of eticlopride, SCH23390 and buspirone were found to suppress LID in grafted but not in control dyskinetic rats. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the DA cell grafts strikingly exacerbate the effect of DA D1 and D2 receptor blockade against both GID and LID, and suggest that the anti-GID effect of buspirone seen in patients may also be due to blockade of DA D2 receptors. PMID:24135006

  15. Immunotherapy of hematological cancers: PD-1 blockade for the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The blockade of immunological checkpoints has been successfully employed for the treatment of various solid neoplasms including melanoma, mesothelioma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. A recent study indicates that the vast majority of patients with advanced, heavily pretreated Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) also respond to a monoclonal antibody targeting programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, best known as PD-1). Thus, checkpoint blockers may soon become part of our therapeutic armamentarium against hematological tumors. This would be particularly important as it would spare (at least some) patients the deleterious toxic effects of combinatorial chemotherapies and bone marrow transplantation. We anticipate that the realm of immunotherapy will eventually conquer vast portions of the territory that now belongs to hematological malignancies. PMID:26155425

  16. Local CTLA4 blockade effectively restrains experimental pancreatic adenocarcinoma growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sandin, Linda C; Eriksson, Fredrik; Ellmark, Peter; Loskog, Angelica SI; Tötterman, Thomas H; Mangsbo, Sara M

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-mediated blockade of CTLA4 has been shown to be effective in treating a select group of patients with late-stage melanoma. The precise mechanism underlying the clinical activity of CTLA4 immunotherapy is poorly understood, although recent experimental findings indicate that antibody-mediated depletion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the tumor microenvironment plays a key role in efficacious antitumor responses. In the current study, we used an experimental model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma to compare the antitumor efficacy of peritumoral low-dose anti-CTLA4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) administration to that of a commonly utilized systemic high-dose anti-CTLA4 regimen. We selected pancreatic adenocarcinoma as it presents a particular challenge to clinicians due to its aggressive behavior, metastatic spread and limited treatment options. Furthermore, Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-dense myeloid cells commonly infiltrate pancreatic tumors, such that these tumor types exhibit increased susceptibility to CTLA4 antibody-targeted Treg depletion via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Locally administered anti-CTLA4 mAb effectively reduced tumor growth at a low dose and no additional anti-tumor effects were apparent when increasing the dose or number of injections. No significant difference in overall survival was seen when comparing locally administered low-dose with standard systemic high-dose CTLA4 blockade therapy, and both delivery routes led to increased tumor-infiltrating effector T cells and reduced Treg cells. As opposed to low-dose peritumoral treatment, high-dose systemic therapy stimulated the accumulation of Tregs in secondary lymphoid organs, an effect that could potentially counteract the antitumor immunotherapeutic benefit of CTLA4 blockade. Our study confirms previous findings that local administration of low-dose anti-CTLA4 antibody generates sustained antitumor effects and provides rationale to devise ultrasound-guided intratumoral

  17. Current status and perspectives in translational biomarker research for PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint blockade therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weijie; Gilligan, Barbara M; Yuan, Jianda; Li, Tianhong

    2016-01-01

    Modulating immune inhibitory pathways has been a major recent breakthrough in cancer treatment. Checkpoint blockade antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1) have demonstrated acceptable toxicity, promising clinical responses, durable disease control, and improved survival in some patients with advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and other tumor types. About 20 % of advanced NSCLC patients and 30 % of advanced melanoma patients experience tumor responses from checkpoint blockade monotherapy, with better clinical responses seen with the combination of anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. Given the power of these new therapies, it is important to understand the complex and dynamic nature of host immune responses and the regulation of additional molecules in the tumor microenvironment and normal organs in response to the checkpoint blockade therapies. In this era of precision oncology, there remains a largely unmet need to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy, to optimize the monitoring assays for tumor-specific immune responses, to develop strategies to improve clinical efficacy, and to identify biomarkers so that immune-related adverse events can be avoided. At this time, PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining using 22C3 antibody is the only FDA-approved companion diagnostic for patients with NSCLC-treated pembrolizumab, but more are expected to come to market. We here summarize the current knowledge, clinical efficacy, potential immune biomarkers, and associated assays for immune checkpoint blockade therapies in advanced solid tumors. PMID:27234522

  18. LIGHT May Improve Immune Checkpoint Blockade Response.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    A new study suggests that insufficient T-cell infiltration may explain why a majority of patients do not respond to immunotherapy. Combining PD-L1 inhibitors with antibody-guided LIGHT, a protein that recruits tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, increased antitumor response in mice, and may have the potential to improve patient response rates to immunotherapy. PMID:27080334

  19. Potential effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade in adipose tissue and bone.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dysregulation of adipocytokine functions seen in abdominal obesity may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Angiotensinogen, the precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, is produced primarily in the liver, and also in adipose tissue, where it is up-regulated during the development of obesity and involved in blood pressure regulation and adipose tissue growth. Blockade of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) attenuates weight gain and adiposity by enhanced energy expenditure, and the favorable metabolic effects of telmisartan have been related to its Ang II receptor blockade and action as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. PPARγ plays an important role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ligands for PPARγ can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce triglyceride levels. Similarly, bone metabolism is closely regulated by hormones and cytokines, which have effects on both bone resorption and deposition. It is known that the receptors of Ang II are expressed in culture osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and Ang II is postulated to be able to act upon the cells involved in bone metabolism. In in vitro system, Ang II induced the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts responsible for bone resorption. Importantly, it was demonstrated by the sub-analysis of a recent clinical study that the fracture risk was significantly reduced by the usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To treat the subgroups of hypertensive patients with osteoporosis RAS can be considered a novel target. PMID:23176218

  20. Connexin Hemichannel Blockade Is Neuroprotective after Asphyxia in Preterm Fetal Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Joanne O.; Drury, Paul P.; Green, Colin R.; Nicholson, Louise F.; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2014-01-01

    Asphyxia around the time of preterm birth is associated with neurodevelopmental disability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that blockade of connexin hemichannels would improve recovery of brain activity and reduce cell loss after asphyxia in preterm fetal sheep. Asphyxia was induced by 25 min of complete umbilical cord occlusion in preterm fetal sheep (103–104 d gestational age). Connexin hemichannels were blocked by intracerebroventricular infusion of mimetic peptide starting 90 min after asphyxia at a concentration of 50 µM/h for one hour followed by 50 µM/24 hour for 24 hours (occlusion-peptide group, n = 6) or vehicle infusion for controls (occlusion-vehicle group, n = 7). Peptide infusion was associated with earlier recovery of electroencephalographic power after asphyxia compared to occlusion-vehicle (p<0.05), with reduced neuronal loss in the caudate and putamen (p<0.05), but not in the hippocampus. In the intragyral and periventricular white matter, peptide administration was associated with an increase in total oligodendrocyte numbers (p<0.05) and immature/mature oligodendrocytes compared to occlusion-vehicle (p<0.05), with a significant increase in proliferation (p<0.05). Connexin hemichannel blockade was neuroprotective and reduced oligodendrocyte death and improved recovery of oligodendrocyte maturation in preterm fetuses after asphyxia. PMID:24865217

  1. Galectin-3 blockade inhibits cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in experimental hyperaldosteronism and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Calvier, Laurent; Fernández-Celis, Amaya; Rousseau, Elodie; Jurado-López, Raquel; Rossoni, Luciana V; Jaisser, Frederic; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Cachofeiro, Victoria; López-Andrés, Natalia

    2015-10-01

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is accompanied by molecular inflammation and fibrosis, 2 mechanisms that finally affect cardiac function. At cardiac level, aldosterone promotes inflammation and fibrosis, although the precise mechanisms are still unclear. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding lectin, is associated with inflammation and fibrosis in the cardiovascular system. We herein investigated whether Gal-3 inhibition could block aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis and its potential role in cardiac damage associated with hypertension. Aldosterone-salt-treated rats presented hypertension, cardiac inflammation, and fibrosis that were prevented by the pharmacological inhibition of Gal-3 with modified citrus pectin. Cardiac inflammation and fibrosis presented in spontaneously hypertensive rats were prevented by modified citrus pectin treatment, whereas Gal-3 blockade did not modify blood pressure levels. In the absence of blood pressure modifications, Gal-3 knockout mice were resistant to aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation. In human cardiac fibroblasts, aldosterone increased Gal-3 expression via its mineralocorticoid receptor. Gal-3 and aldosterone enhanced proinflammatory and profibrotic markers, as well as metalloproteinase activities in human cardiac fibroblasts, effects that were not observed in Gal-3-silenced cells treated with aldosterone. In experimental hyperaldosteronism, the increase in Gal-3 expression was associated with cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, alterations that were prevented by Gal-3 blockade independently of blood pressure levels. These data suggest that Gal-3 could be a new molecular mechanism linking cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in situations with high-aldosterone levels, such as hypertension. PMID:26238446

  2. Conductance of a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, B.; Lutchyn, R. M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2016-06-01

    We identify the leading processes of electron transport across finite-length segments of proximitized nanowires and build a quantitative theory of their two-terminal conductance. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction, a nanowire can be tuned across the topological transition point by an applied magnetic field. Due to a finite segment length, electron transport is controlled by the Coulomb blockade. Upon increasing of the field, the shape and magnitude of the Coulomb blockade peaks in the linear conductance are defined, respectively, by Andreev reflection, single-electron tunneling, and resonant tunneling through the Majorana modes emerging after the topological transition. Our theory provides the framework for the analysis of experiments with proximitized nanowires [such as reported in S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162] and identifies the signatures of the topological transition in the two-terminal conductance.

  3. Conductance through a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, Bernard; Lutchyn, Roman; Glazman, Leonid

    Motivated by recent experiments of the Copenhagen group on InAs nanowires with epitaxial Al, we investigate the two-terminal conductance of a strongly proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime. We identify the leading electron transport processes at zero applied magnetic field B as well as at finite fields, suppressing the induced gap Δind (B) . In the conventional superconducting phase, the conductance is controlled by the sequential Cooper pair tunneling if Δind (B) exceeds the charging energy Ec, and by the elastic single-electron processes if Δind (B) blockade peaks, which explains the experimental finding in Ref.. We also develop a quantitative theory for the differential conductance and examine its evolution across the topological transition point.

  4. Effect of beta blockade and beta stimulation on stage fright.

    PubMed

    Brantigan, C O; Brantigan, T A; Joseph, N

    1982-01-01

    Stage fright, physiologically the "fight or flight" reaction, is a disabling condition to the professional musician. Because it is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, we have investigated the effects of beta blockade on musical performance with propranolol in a double blind fashion and the effects of beta stimulation using terbutaline. Stage fright symptoms were evaluated in two trials, which included a total of 29 subjects, by questionnaire and by the State Trai Anxiety Inventory. Quality of musical performance was evaluated by experienced music critics. Beta blockade eliminates the physical impediments to performance caused by stage fright and even eliminates the dry mouth so frequently encountered. The quality of musical performance as judged by experienced music critics is significantly improved. This effect is achieved without tranquilization. Beta stimulating drugs increase stage fright problems, and should be used in performing musicians only after consideration of the detrimental effects which they may have on musical performance. PMID:6120650

  5. BAFF Blockade Prevents Anti-Drug Antibody Formation in a Mouse Model of Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Phillip A.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W.; Morel, Laurence; Byrne, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies formed against the therapeutic protein are a life-threatening complication that arises during enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase deficiency; GAA). To provide an effective alternative to current practices, we investigated the capacity of anti-B-cell activating factor (BAFF) as a novel drug candidate to prevent antibody formation in a Pompe disease mouse model. A BAFF-neutralizing antibody was administered prophylactically and with maintenance doses in association with enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human GAA in Gaa-/- mice. BAFF blockade delayed antibody production and increased GAA activity within tissues with protection from anaphylaxis. Anti-BAFF also resolved antibody formation during an immune response and precluded the maturation of antibody secreting cells from entering the bone marrow compartment. This treatment modality may therefore be a viable alternative for the clinical management of antibody formation for Pompe disease and has potential use against antibody formation in other protein replacement therapies. PMID:25842186

  6. Concomitant BET and MAPK blockade for effective treatment of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Shimin; Shen, Ying; Zhu, Liang; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, and it is imperative to develop new treatments to ameliorate patient survival. Using an anti-cancer drug library containing 180 small molecule inhibitors, we performed a high-content image-based screen and found that BET and MEK inhibitors are among the candidates which were able to effectively inhibit ovarian cancer cell growth. However, BET inhibition alone was largely cytostatic, possibly due to feedback activation of the MAPK pathway. Consequently, the combination of MEK and BET inhibitors suppressed both cell proliferation and survival, and was more efficacious than single agent. Mechanistically, BET and MEK inhibitors exerted synergistic effects on apoptosis regulators including BIM and BAD. Our findings support concomitant BET and MAPK blockade as an effective therapeutic strategy in ovarian cancer. PMID:26575423

  7. Glucocorticoid Receptor Confers Resistance to Anti-Androgens by Bypassing Androgen Receptor Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vivek K.; Schenkein, Emily; Murali, Rajmohan; Subudhi, Sumit K.; Wongvipat, John; Balbas, Minna D.; Shah, Neel; Cai, Ling; Efstathiou, Eleni; Logothetis, Chris; Zheng, Deyou; Sawyers, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The treatment of advanced prostate cancer has been transformed by novel antiandrogen therapies such as enzalutamide. Here we identify induction of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression as a common feature of drug resistant tumors in a credentialed preclinical model, a finding also confirmed in patient samples. GR substituted for the androgen receptor (AR) to activate a similar but distinguishable set of target genes and was necessary for maintenance of the resistant phenotype. The GR agonist dexamethasone was sufficient to confer enzalutamide resistance whereas a GR antagonist restored sensitivity. Acute AR inhibition resulted in GR upregulation in a subset of prostate cancer cells due to relief of AR-mediated feedback repression of GR expression. These findings establish a novel mechanism of escape from AR blockade through expansion of cells primed to drive AR target genes via an alternative nuclear receptor upon drug exposure. PMID:24315100

  8. Touch Perception Altered by Chronic Pain and by Opioid Blockade.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura K; Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Richards, Emily A; Olausson, Håkan; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Touch plays a significant role in human social behavior and social communication, and its rewarding nature has been suggested to involve opioids. Opioid blockade in monkeys leads to increased solicitation and receipt of grooming, suggesting heightened enjoyment of touch. We sought to study the role of endogenous opioids in perception of affective touch in healthy adults and in patients with fibromyalgia, a chronic pain condition shown to involve reduced opioid receptor availability. The pleasantness of touch has been linked to the activation of C-tactile fibers, which respond maximally to slow gentle touch and correlate with ratings of pleasantness. We administered naloxone to patients and healthy controls to directly observe the consequences of µ-opioid blockade on the perceived pleasantness and intensity of touch. We found that at baseline chronic pain patients showed a blunted distinction between slow and fast brushing for both intensity and pleasantness, suggesting reduced C-tactile touch processing. In addition, we found a differential effect of opioid blockade on touch perception in healthy subjects and pain patients. In healthy individuals, opioid blockade showed a trend toward increased ratings of touch pleasantness, while in chronic pain patients it significantly decreased ratings of touch intensity. Further, in healthy individuals, naloxone-induced increase in touch pleasantness was associated with naloxone-induced decreased preference for slow touch, suggesting a possible effect of opioid levels on processing of C-tactile fiber input. These findings suggest a role for endogenous opioids in touch processing, and provide further evidence for altered opioid functioning in chronic pain patients. PMID:27022625

  9. Deterministic entanglement of two neutral atoms via Rydberg blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. L.; Isenhower, L.; Gill, A. T.; Walker, T. G.; Saffman, M.

    2010-09-15

    We demonstrate the deterministic entanglement of two individually addressed neutral atoms using a Rydberg blockade mediated controlled-not gate. Parity oscillation measurements reveal a Bell state fidelity of F=0.58{+-}0.04, which is above the entanglement threshold of F=0.5, without any correction for atom loss, and F=0.71{+-}0.05 after correcting for background collisional losses. The fidelity results are shown to be in good agreement with a detailed error model.

  10. Shape-sensitive Pauli blockade in a bent carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [F. Pei et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 7, 630 (2012), 10.1038/nnano.2012.160], we theoretically study the Pauli blockade transport effect in a double quantum dot embedded in a bent carbon nanotube. We establish a model for the Pauli blockade, taking into account the strong g -factor anisotropy that is linked to the local orientation of the nanotube axis in each quantum dot. We provide a set of conditions under which our model is approximately mapped to the spin-blockade model of Jouravlev and Nazarov [O. N. Jouravlev and Y. V. Nazarov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 176804 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.176804]. The results we obtain for the magnetic anisotropy of the leakage current, together with their qualitative geometrical explanation, provide a possible interpretation of previously unexplained experimental results. Furthermore, we find that in a certain parameter range, the leakage current becomes highly sensitive to the shape of the tube, and this sensitivity increases with increasing g -factor anisotropy. This mutual dependence of the electron transport and the tube shape allows for mechanical control of the leakage current, and for characterization of the tube shape via measuring the leakage current.

  11. Sequential RAAS blockade: is it worth the risk?

    PubMed

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Soon after the emergence of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blocking treatment as the cornerstone of renoprotective treatment in the prevention and treatment of diabetic and nondiabetic CKD, it was investigated if a higher degree of achievable RAAS blockade by combining more than one compound is feasible and advantageous. Regardless of the benefits from using monotherapy for diabetic kidney disease, there is still much improvement to wish for in terms of kidney prognosis in these populations. A great deal of research has gone into evaluating combinations of the RAAS blocking treatments in different populations and with different drugs and doses. Studies have mostly been short-term and use surrogate endpoints such as albuminuria. Side effects have been well known and expected in terms of increasing potassium levels and hypotension, but to an acceptable extent. With recent disappointing results from major hard endpoint trials using dual RAAS blockade the concept is now under scrutiny. In this review we will discuss the pros and cons of dual RAAS blockade, with facts and findings from smaller studies, endpoint trials, and meta-analyses. PMID:24602465

  12. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of tunnel junctions driven by alternating voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabert, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The theory of the dynamical Coulomb blockade is extended to tunneling elements driven by a time-dependent voltage. It is shown that, for standard setups where an external voltage is applied to a tunnel junction via an impedance, time-dependent driving entails an excitation of the modes of the electromagnetic environment by the applied voltage. Previous approaches for ac driven circuits need to be extended to account for the driven bath modes. A unitary transformation involving also the variables of the electromagnetic environment is introduced which allows us to split off the time dependence from the Hamiltonian in the absence of tunneling. This greatly simplifies perturbation-theoretical calculations based on treating the tunneling Hamiltonian as a perturbation. In particular, the average current flowing in the leads of the tunnel junction is studied. Explicit results are given for the case of an applied voltage with a constant dc part and a sinusoidal ac part. The connection with standard dynamical Coulomb blockade theory for constant applied voltage is established. It is shown that an alternating voltage source reveals significant additional effects caused by the electromagnetic environment. The hallmark of the dynamical Coulomb blockade in ac driven devices is a suppression of higher harmonics of the current by the electromagnetic environment. The theory presented basically applies to all tunneling devices driven by alternating voltages.

  13. Beta-adrenergic blockade and atrio--ventricular conduction impairment.

    PubMed

    Giudicelli, J F; Lhoste, F; Boissier, J R

    1975-04-01

    Atrio--ventricular conduction and its modifications induced by six Beta-adrenergic blocking agents have been investigated in the dog. Premature atrial stimuli (St2) were applied at variable intervals following regular stimuli (St1) ensuring atrial pacing; atrial (AERP), nodoventricular (NERP) and global (GERP) effective refractory periods as well as global functional refractory period (GFRP) were determined before and after administration of each of the six drugs. When Beta-blockade was produced with d,1-propranolol which hwas membrane stabilizing effects (MSE) but no intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) or with sotalol, which has neither MSE nor ISA, all parameters were significantly increased. When Beta-blockade was achieved with pindolol or practolol, which have only a poor Beta-adrenolytic potency and no ISA. Alprenolol showed intermediate effects. Thus, it appears that Beta-blockade and not MSE, is responsible for the onset of A-V conduction impairment but that ISA, probably through a metabolic mechanism, affords protection against this impairment. On the other hand, measurement of ventricular effective refractory period (VERP) has shown that at the Purkinje-free junction, it is MSE which is mainly involved in conduction impairment. PMID:238853

  14. [Effect of cimetidine on neuromuscular blockade by succinylcholine and pancuronium].

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Tsuchida, H; Harada, Y; Namiki, A

    1990-02-01

    The effect of cimetidine on neuromuscular blockade by succinylcholine and pancuronium was investigated in 54 adult patients scheduled for elective surgery. The neuromuscular blocking properties were estimated with single twitch height (T1) which was obtained by measuring the acceleration of adduction of the thumb in response to the ulnar nerve stimulation under N2O-fentanyl anesthesia. In cimetidine group, cimetidine 200 mg was administered orally on the night before surgery and 90 mins before anesthesia. Succinylcholine 1 mg.kg-1 (n = 14) or 1.5 mg.kg-1 (n = 20) was injected intravenously, and the onset time (from injection to 0% T1), the duration of maximal block (0% T1), and the recovery time from injection to 50% and 75% of control twitch height were evaluated. ED25 and ED50 of pancuronium were calculated from the dose response curve obtained by incremental administration of the drug (n = 20) whose total cumulative dose was 0.1 mg.kg-1. The recovery index of pancuronium was determined by measuring the 25%-75% recovery time. There was no significant difference between cimetidine pretreated patients and non-pretreated patients regarding these parameters of neuromuscular blockade with both succinylcholine and pancuronium. In conclusion, cimetidine has no influence on neuromuscular blockade of succinylcholine and pancuronium under N2O-fentanyl anesthesia. PMID:2325250

  15. Serum Immunoglobulin A Cross-Strain Blockade of Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Beltramello, Martina; Swanstrom, Jesica; Jones, Taylor A.; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute viral gastroenteritis, justifying vaccine development despite a limited understanding of strain immunity. After genogroup I (GI).1 norovirus infection and immunization, blockade antibody titers to multiple virus-like particles (VLPs) increase, suggesting that GI cross-protection may occur. Methods. Immunoglobulin (Ig)A was purified from sera collected from GI.1-infected participants, and potential neutralization activity was measured using a surrogate neutralization assay based on antibody blockade of ligand binding. Human and mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced to multiple GI VLPs to characterize GI epitopes. Results. Immunoglobulin A purified from day 14 post-GI.1 challenge sera blocked binding of GI.1, GI.3, and GI.4 to carbohydrate ligands. In some subjects, purified IgA preferentially blocked binding of other GI VLPs compared with GI.1, supporting observations that the immune response to GI.1 infection may be influenced by pre-exposure history. For other subjects, IgA equivalently blocked multiple GI VLPs. Only strain-specific mAbs recognized blockade epitopes, whereas strain cross-reactive mAbs recognized nonblockade epitopes. Conclusions. These studies are the first to describe a functional role for serum IgA in norovirus immunity and the first to characterize human monoclonal antibodies to GI strains, expanding our understanding of norovirus immunobiology. PMID:26180833

  16. Intrathecal rimantadine induces motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive blockades in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of rimantadine in spinal anesthesia. Rimantadine in a dose-dependent fashion was constructed after intrathecally injecting the rats with four different doses. The potency and duration of rimantadine were compared with that of the local anesthetic lidocaine at producing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. We demonstrated that intrathecal rimantadine dose-dependently produced spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potencies at inducing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades was lidocaine>rimantadine (P<0.01). Rimantadine exhibited more nociceptive block (ED50) than motor block (P<0.05). At equi-anesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the spinal block duration produced by rimantadine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P<0.01). Furthermore, rimantadine (26.52μmol/kg) prolonged the nociceptive nerve block more than the motor block (P<0.001). Our preclinical data showed that rimantadine, with a more sensory-selective action over motor block, was less potent than lidocaine. Rimantadine produced longer duration in spinal anesthesia when compared with lidocaine. PMID:26949181

  17. Autoimmune dermatologic toxicities from immune checkpoint blockade with anti-PD-1 antibody therapy: a report on bullous skin eruptions.

    PubMed

    Jour, George; Glitza, Isabella C; Ellis, Rachel M; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Li, Janet Y; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; Huen, Auris; Aung, Phyu P; Ivan, Doina; Drucker, Carol R; Prieto, Victor G; Rapini, Ronald P; Patel, Anisha; Curry, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoint programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1) improve the hosts' antitumor immune response and have showed tremendous promise in the treatment of advanced solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Reports of serious autoimmune dermatologic toxicities from immune checkpoint blockade therapy, however, are emerging. We report our experience with five patients who presented with pruritic vesicles and blisters on the skin while treated with anti-PD-1 antibody immunotherapy with either nivolumab or pembrolizumab. Four of the patients' skin biopsies revealed subepidermal bullae with immunohistochemical study for type IV collagen labeling the floor of the blister cavity and direct immunofluorescence studies (in three of the four patients tested) decorated linear IgG and C3 immune deposits on the blister roof, diagnostic of bullous pemphigoid. One patient developed bullous erythema multiforme. All patients had partial or complete resolution of skin lesions following treatment with systemic corticosteroid and cessation of checkpoint blockade. Recognition and treatment of rare immune-related bullous dermatologic toxicities will become increasingly important as more patients are treated with effective and newer immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27086658

  18. Blockade of Gap Junction Hemichannel Suppresses Disease Progression in Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Doi, Yukiko; Jin, Shijie; Noda, Mariko; Liang, Jianfeng; Li, Hua; Zhou, Yan; Mori, Rarami; Yasuoka, Satoko; Li, Endong; Parajuli, Bijay; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Sato, Jun; Yamanaka, Koji; Sobue, Gen; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamate released by activated microglia induces excitotoxic neuronal death, which likely contributes to non-cell autonomous neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Although both blockade of glutamate receptors and inhibition of microglial activation are the therapeutic candidates for these neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate receptor blockers also perturbed physiological and essential glutamate signals, and inhibitors of microglial activation suppressed both neurotoxic/neuroprotective roles of microglia and hardly affected disease progression. We previously demonstrated that activated microglia release a large amount of glutamate specifically through gap junction hemichannel. Hence, blockade of gap junction hemichannel may be potentially beneficial in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Methods and Findings In this study, we generated a novel blood-brain barrier permeable gap junction hemichannel blocker based on glycyrrhetinic acid. We found that pharmacologic blockade of gap junction hemichannel inhibited excessive glutamate release from activated microglia in vitro and in vivo without producing notable toxicity. Blocking gap junction hemichannel significantly suppressed neuronal loss of the spinal cord and extended survival in transgenic mice carrying human superoxide dismutase 1 with G93A or G37R mutation as an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model. Moreover, blockade of gap junction hemichannel also significantly improved memory impairments without altering amyloid β deposition in double transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein with K595N and M596L mutations and presenilin 1 with A264E mutation as an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Conclusions Our results suggest that gap junction hemichannel blockers may represent a new therapeutic strategy to target neurotoxic microglia specifically and prevent microglia-mediated neuronal death in various

  19. Nicotinic receptor blockade decreases fos immunoreactivity within orexin/hypocretin-expressing neurons of nicotine-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Steven J; Gentile, Taylor A; Mo, Lili; Tran, Fionya H; Ma, Sisi; Muschamp, John W

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Nicotine is the principal psychoactive ingredient in tobacco that causes addiction. The structures governing nicotine addiction, including those underlying withdrawal, are still being explored. Nicotine withdrawal is characterized by negative affective and cognitive symptoms that enhance relapse susceptibility, and suppressed dopaminergic transmission from ventral tegmental area (VTA) to target structures underlies behavioral symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. Agonist and partial agonist therapies help 1 in 4 treatment-seeking smokers at one-year post-cessation, and new targets are needed to more effectively aid smokers attempting to quit. Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons send excitatory projections to dopamine (DA)-producing neurons of VTA and modulate mesoaccumbal DA release. The effects of nicotinic receptor blockade, which is commonly used to precipitate withdrawal, on orexin neurons remain poorly investigated and present an attractive target for intervention. The present study sought to investigate the effects of nicotinic receptor blockade on hypothalamic orexin neurons using mecamylamine to precipitate withdrawal in rats. Separate groups of rats were treated with either chronic nicotine or saline for 7-days at which point effects of mecamylamine or saline on somatic signs and anxiety-like behavior were assessed. Finally, tissue from rats was harvested for immunofluorescent analysis of Fos within orexin neurons. Results demonstrate that nicotinic receptor blockade leads to reduced orexin cell activity, as indicated by lowered Fos-immunoreactivity, and suggest that this underlying cellular activity may be associated with symptoms of nicotine withdrawal as effects were most prominently observed in rats given chronic nicotine. We conclude from this study that orexin transmission becomes suppressed in rats upon nicotinic receptor blockade, and that behavioral symptoms associated

  20. Qubit-induced phonon blockade as a signature of quantum behavior in nanomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yuxi; Miranowicz, Adam; Gao, Y. B.; Bajer, Jiri; Sun, C. P.; Nori, Franco

    2010-09-15

    The observation of quantized nanomechanical oscillations by detecting femtometer-scale displacements is a significant challenge for experimentalists. We propose that a phonon blockade can serve as a signature of quantum behavior in nanomechanical resonators. In analogy to the photon blockade and Coulomb blockade for electrons, the main idea for phonon blockade is that the second phonon cannot be excited when there is one phonon in the nonlinear oscillator. To realize phonon blockade, a superconducting quantum two-level system is coupled to the nanomechanical resonator and is used to induce the phonon self-interaction. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the dynamics of the induced nonlinear oscillator is studied via the Cahill-Glauber s-parametrized quasiprobability distributions. We show how the oscillation of the resonator can occur in the quantum regime and demonstrate how the phonon blockade can be observed with the currently accessible experimental parameters.

  1. PD-1/CTLA-4 Blockade Inhibits Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Lymphoma Growth in a Cord Blood Humanized-Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Xu, Xuequn; Jones, Richard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Zumwalde, Nicholas A.; Sharma, Akshat; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes B cell lymphomas in humanized mouse models and contributes to a variety of different types of human lymphomas. T cells directed against viral antigens play a critical role in controlling EBV infection, and EBV-positive lymphomas are particularly common in immunocompromised hosts. We previously showed that EBV induces B cell lymphomas with high frequency in a cord blood-humanized mouse model in which EBV-infected human cord blood is injected intraperitoneally into NOD/LtSz-scid/IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. Since our former studies showed that it is possible for T cells to control the tumors in another NSG mouse model engrafted with both human fetal CD34+ cells and human thymus and liver, here we investigated whether monoclonal antibodies that block the T cell inhibitory receptors, PD-1 and CTLA-4, enhance the ability of cord blood T cells to control the outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas in the cord-blood humanized mouse model. We demonstrate that EBV-infected lymphoma cells in this model express both the PD-L1 and PD-L2 inhibitory ligands for the PD-1 receptor, and that T cells express the PD-1 and CTLA-4 receptors. Furthermore, we show that the combination of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade strikingly reduces the size of lymphomas induced by a lytic EBV strain (M81) in this model, and that this anti-tumor effect requires T cells. PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade markedly increases EBV-specific T cell responses, and is associated with enhanced tumor infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade decreases the number of both latently, and lytically, EBV-infected B cells. These results indicate that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade enhances the ability of cord blood T cells to control outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas, and suggest that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade might be useful for treating certain EBV-induced diseases in humans. PMID:27186886

  2. PD-1/CTLA-4 Blockade Inhibits Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Lymphoma Growth in a Cord Blood Humanized-Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Xu, Xuequn; Jones, Richard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Zumwalde, Nicholas A; Sharma, Akshat; Gumperz, Jenny E; Kenney, Shannon C

    2016-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes B cell lymphomas in humanized mouse models and contributes to a variety of different types of human lymphomas. T cells directed against viral antigens play a critical role in controlling EBV infection, and EBV-positive lymphomas are particularly common in immunocompromised hosts. We previously showed that EBV induces B cell lymphomas with high frequency in a cord blood-humanized mouse model in which EBV-infected human cord blood is injected intraperitoneally into NOD/LtSz-scid/IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. Since our former studies showed that it is possible for T cells to control the tumors in another NSG mouse model engrafted with both human fetal CD34+ cells and human thymus and liver, here we investigated whether monoclonal antibodies that block the T cell inhibitory receptors, PD-1 and CTLA-4, enhance the ability of cord blood T cells to control the outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas in the cord-blood humanized mouse model. We demonstrate that EBV-infected lymphoma cells in this model express both the PD-L1 and PD-L2 inhibitory ligands for the PD-1 receptor, and that T cells express the PD-1 and CTLA-4 receptors. Furthermore, we show that the combination of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade strikingly reduces the size of lymphomas induced by a lytic EBV strain (M81) in this model, and that this anti-tumor effect requires T cells. PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade markedly increases EBV-specific T cell responses, and is associated with enhanced tumor infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade decreases the number of both latently, and lytically, EBV-infected B cells. These results indicate that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade enhances the ability of cord blood T cells to control outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas, and suggest that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade might be useful for treating certain EBV-induced diseases in humans. PMID:27186886

  3. Usefulness of galvanic skin reflex monitor in CT-guided thoracic sympathetic blockade for palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Seiichi; Miura, Hitoshi; Hirabayashi, Go; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Ohta, Takashi; Ishii, Nagao; Ito, Tatsushi

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided thoracic sympathetic blockade with ethanol was performed while monitoring sympathetic nerve activity, with an alternating current (AC) galvanic skin reflex (GSR) monitor, in a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis in whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy was impossible because of pleural adhesion. Sweating was suppressed after the thoracic sympathetic blockade, and the monitor showed a significant increase in skin resistance. The effect of sympathetic blockade could be evaluated directly and in real time using a GSR monitor. PMID:17680195

  4. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Blockade Promotes CCR9+ Lymphocyte Expansion in Nod2 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Charles M.; Jurickova, Ingrid; Molden, Erin; Schreiner, William; Colliver, Joshua; Bonkowski, Erin; Han, Xiaonan; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Denson, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ileal involvement in Crohn’s disease (CD) is associated with NOD2 mutations and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor auto-antibodies (GM-CSF Ab), and GM-CSF blockade promotes ileitis in Nod2/Card15 deficient (C15KO) mice. RALDH2 expressing dendritic cells (DC) and IL-4 promote CCR9 imprinting and small bowel homing of T lymphocytes, in conjunction with CCL25 expression by ileal epithelial cells (IEC). We hypothesized that GM-CSF neutralization promotes ileal disease by modulating expression of CCL25 by IEC and CCR9 by T lymphocytes via Nod2 dependent and independent pathways. Methods CCL25 and CCR9 expression were determined in pediatric CD patients stratified by GM-CSF Ab. Ileitis was induced in C15KO mice via GM-CSF Ab administration followed by NSAID exposure, and expression of CCL25, CCR9, FOXP3, intracellular cytokines, and RALDH2 was determined in IEC and immune cell populations. Results The frequency of CCL25+ IEC and CCR9+ T lymphocytes was increased in CD patients with elevated GM-CSF Ab. In the murine model, GM-CSF blockade alone induced IEC CCL25 expression, and reduced the frequency of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) CD4+FOXP3+ cells, while Card15 deficiency alone enhanced MLN DC RALDH2 expression. Both GM-CSF neutralization and Card15 deficiency were required for down-regulation of MLN DC IL-10 expression; under these conditions NSAID exposure led to an expansion of IL-4+ and IL-17+ CCR9+ lymphocytes in the ileum. Conclusions GM-CSF prevents ileal expansion of CCR9+ lymphocytes via Nod2 dependent and independent pathways. CCR9 blockade may be beneficial in CD patients with elevated GM-CSF Ab. PMID:21381154

  5. PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade reduces pathology and improves memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; Rosenzweig, Neta; Tsitsou-Kampeli, Afroditi; Sharif, Alaa Mohammad; Matcovitch-Natan, Orit; Kertser, Alexander; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2016-02-01

    Systemic immune suppression may curtail the ability to mount the protective, cell-mediated immune responses that are needed for brain repair. By using mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we show that immune checkpoint blockade directed against the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway evokes an interferon (IFN)-γ-dependent systemic immune response, which is followed by the recruitment of monocyte-derived macrophages to the brain. When induced in mice with established pathology, this immunological response leads to clearance of cerebral amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and improved cognitive performance. Repeated treatment sessions were required to maintain a long-lasting beneficial effect on disease pathology. These findings suggest that immune checkpoints may be targeted therapeutically in AD. PMID:26779813

  6. Prospective immunotherapies in childhood sarcomas: PD1/PDL1 blockade in combination with tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Theodore S; Anderson, Jennifer L; Federman, Noah

    2016-03-01

    Progress has slowed substantially in improving survival rates for pediatric sarcomas, particularly in refractory and metastatic disease. Significant progress has been made in the field of tumor vaccines for such malignancies, which target established tumor antigens. While tumor vaccines have demonstrated safety and improved survival rates, they are inadequate in mediating the regression of established tumor masses and metastases. Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) is a cell-surface protein induced in a number of adult malignancies. By acting on the corresponding T-cell receptor PD1, PDL1 is able to suppress cytotoxic T-cell-mediated tumor responses. Recent therapeutics blocking this interaction have shown promise in various adult cancers by restoring a functional T-cell response and by directing this response toward an activated, rather than regulatory, T-cell phenotype. We shall discuss the current state of tumor vaccines targeting pediatric sarcomas, review PD1-PDL1 interactions and current therapies targeting these interactions in adult malignancies, and discuss recent studies in which tumor vaccines, combined with PDL1 blockades, produced superior tumor regression compared with the vaccine alone. These studies provide a compelling case for investigation of PDL1 expression and its inhibition in pediatric sarcomas, while continuing to utilize tumor vaccines in tandem to achieve superior clinical outcomes. PMID:26595537

  7. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Antonio; Scott, Eleanor M; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a "double-edged sword" for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of direct viral oncolysis and indirect, immune-mediated oncosuppression to overall OV efficacy is unclear, it is likely that an initial period of vigorous OV multiplication and lytic activity will most optimally set the stage for subsequent adaptive anti-tumour immunity. In this review, we consider the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as a means of boosting virus replication and lessening the negative impact of innate immunity on the direct oncolytic effect. We also discuss an alternative approach, aimed at potentiating OV-elicited anti-tumour immunity through the blockade of immune checkpoints. We conclude by proposing a two-phase combinatorial strategy in which initial OV replication and spread is maximised through transient HDAC inhibition, with anti-tumour immune responses subsequently enhanced by immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:26751469

  8. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Antonio; Scott, Eleanor M.; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a “double-edged sword” for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of direct viral oncolysis and indirect, immune-mediated oncosuppression to overall OV efficacy is unclear, it is likely that an initial period of vigorous OV multiplication and lytic activity will most optimally set the stage for subsequent adaptive anti-tumour immunity. In this review, we consider the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as a means of boosting virus replication and lessening the negative impact of innate immunity on the direct oncolytic effect. We also discuss an alternative approach, aimed at potentiating OV-elicited anti-tumour immunity through the blockade of immune checkpoints. We conclude by proposing a two-phase combinatorial strategy in which initial OV replication and spread is maximised through transient HDAC inhibition, with anti-tumour immune responses subsequently enhanced by immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:26751469

  9. Glioblastoma Eradication Following Immune Checkpoint Blockade in an Orthotopic, Immunocompetent Model.

    PubMed

    Reardon, David A; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Klein, Sarah R; Ligon, Keith L; Rodig, Scott J; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Jones, Kristen L; Conway, Amy Saur; Liao, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Jun; Wen, Patrick Y; Van Den Abbeele, Annick D; Hodi, F Stephen; Qin, Lei; Kohl, Nancy E; Sharpe, Arlene H; Dranoff, Glenn; Freeman, Gordon J

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of immune checkpoints, including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1), and its ligand PD-L1, has demonstrated exciting and durable remissions across a spectrum of malignancies. Combinatorial regimens blocking complementary immune checkpoints further enhance the therapeutic benefit. The activity of these agents for patients with glioblastoma, a generally lethal primary brain tumor associated with significant systemic and microenvironmental immunosuppression, is not known. We therefore systematically evaluated the antitumor efficacy of murine antibodies targeting a broad panel of immune checkpoint molecules, including CTLA-4, PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 when administered as single-agent therapy and in combinatorial regimens against an orthotopic, immunocompetent murine glioblastoma model. In these experiments, we observed long-term tumor-free survival following single-agent anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1, or anti-CTLA-4 therapy in 50%, 20%, and 15% of treated animals, respectively. Combination therapy of anti-CTLA-4 plus anti-PD-1 cured 75% of the animals, even against advanced, later-stage tumors. In long-term survivors, tumor growth was not seen upon intracranial tumor rechallenge, suggesting that tumor-specific immune memory responses were generated. Inhibitory immune checkpoint blockade quantitatively increased activated CD8(+) and natural killer cells and decreased suppressive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment and draining cervical lymph nodes. Our results support prioritizing the clinical evaluation of PD-1, PD-L1, and CTLA-4 single-agent targeted therapy as well as combination therapy of CTLA-4 plus PD-1 blockade for patients with glioblastoma. PMID:26546453

  10. GP IIb/IIIa Blockade During Peripheral Artery Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Tepe, Gunnar Wiskirchen, Jakub; Pereira, Philippe; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephen; Duda, Stephan H.

    2008-01-15

    The activation of the platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptor is the final and common pathway in platelet aggregation. By blocking this receptor, platelet aggregation can be inhibited independently of the stimulus prompted the targeting of this receptor. Several years ago, three drugs have been approved for coronary artery indications. Since that time, there is increasing evidence that GP IIb/IIIa receptor blockade might have also an important role in peripheral arterial intervention. This article summarizes the action and differences of GP Ilb/IIIa receptor inhibitors and its possible indication in peripheral arteries.

  11. Filtering single atoms from Rydberg-blockaded mesoscopic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, David; Rao, D. D. Bhaktavatsala; Mølmer, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    We propose an efficient method to filter out single atoms from trapped ensembles with unknown numbers of atoms. The method employs stimulated adiabatic passage to reversibly transfer a single atom to the Rydberg state which blocks subsequent Rydberg excitation of all the other atoms within the ensemble. This triggers the excitation of Rydberg-blockaded atoms to short-lived intermediate states and their subsequent decay to untrapped states. Using an auxiliary microwave field to carefully engineer the dissipation, we obtain a nearly deterministic single-atom source. Our method is applicable to small atomic ensembles in individual microtraps and in lattice arrays.

  12. Angiotensin II (AT(1)) receptor blockade reduces vascular tissue factor in angiotensin II-induced cardiac vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Müller, D N; Mervaala, E M; Dechend, R; Fiebeler, A; Park, J K; Schmidt, F; Theuer, J; Breu, V; Mackman, N; Luther, T; Schneider, W; Gulba, D; Ganten, D; Haller, H; Luft, F C

    2000-07-01

    Tissue factor (TF), a main initiator of clotting, is up-regulated in vasculopathy. We tested the hypothesis that chronic in vivo angiotensin (ANG) II receptor AT(1) receptor blockade inhibits TF expression in a model of ANG II-induced cardiac vasculopathy. Furthermore, we explored the mechanisms by examining transcription factor activation and analyzing the TF promoter. Untreated transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) feature hypertension and severe left ventricular hypertrophy with focal areas of necrosis, and die at age 7 weeks. Plasma and cardiac ANG II was three- to fivefold increased compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic treatment with valsartan normalized blood pressure and coronary resistance completely, and ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy (P < 0.001). Valsartan prevented monocyte/macrophage infiltration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, and c-fos expression in dTGR hearts. NF-kappaB subunit p65 and TF expression was increased in the endothelium and media of cardiac vessels and markedly reduced by valsartan treatment. To analyze the mechanism of TF transcription, we then transfected human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the AT(1) receptor with plasmids containing the human TF promoter and the luciferase reporter gene. ANG II induced the full-length TF promoter in both transfected cell lines. TF transcription was abolished by AT(1) receptor blockade. Deletion of both AP-1 and NF-kappaB sites reduced ANG II-induced TF gene transcription completely, whereas the deletion of AP-1 sites reduced transcription. Thus, the present study clearly shows an aberrant TF expression in the endothelium and media in rats with ANG II-induced vasculopathy. The beneficial effects of AT(1) receptor blockade in this model are mediated via the inhibition of NF-kappaB and AP-1 activation, thereby preventing TF expression, cardiac vasculopathy, and

  13. Angiotensin II (AT1) Receptor Blockade Reduces Vascular Tissue Factor in Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Dominik N.; Mervaala, Eero M. A.; Dechend, Ralf; Fiebeler, Anette; Park, Joon-Keun; Schmidt, Folke; Theuer, Jürgen; Breu, Volker; Mackman, Nigel; Luther, Thomas; Schneider, Wolfgang; Gulba, Dietrich; Ganten, Detlev; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2000-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF), a main initiator of clotting, is up-regulated in vasculopathy. We tested the hypothesis that chronic in vivo angiotensin (ANG) II receptor AT1 receptor blockade inhibits TF expression in a model of ANG II-induced cardiac vasculopathy. Furthermore, we explored the mechanisms by examining transcription factor activation and analyzing the TF promoter. Untreated transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) feature hypertension and severe left ventricular hypertrophy with focal areas of necrosis, and die at age 7 weeks. Plasma and cardiac ANG II was three- to fivefold increased compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic treatment with valsartan normalized blood pressure and coronary resistance completely, and ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy (P < 0.001). Valsartan prevented monocyte/macrophage infiltration, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, and c-fos expression in dTGR hearts. NF-κB subunit p65 and TF expression was increased in the endothelium and media of cardiac vessels and markedly reduced by valsartan treatment. To analyze the mechanism of TF transcription, we then transfected human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the AT1 receptor with plasmids containing the human TF promoter and the luciferase reporter gene. ANG II induced the full-length TF promoter in both transfected cell lines. TF transcription was abolished by AT1 receptor blockade. Deletion of both AP-1 and NF-κB sites reduced ANG II-induced TF gene transcription completely, whereas the deletion of AP-1 sites reduced transcription. Thus, the present study clearly shows an aberrant TF expression in the endothelium and media in rats with ANG II-induced vasculopathy. The beneficial effects of AT1 receptor blockade in this model are mediated via the inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 activation, thereby preventing TF expression, cardiac vasculopathy, and microinfarctions. PMID

  14. Blockade of Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway Aggravated Silica-Induced Lung Inflammation through Tregs Regulation on Th Immune Responses