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Sample records for kurtz powder technique

  1. The development of an alternative thermoplastic powder prepregging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogden, A. L.; Hyer, M. W.; Muellerleile, J. T.; Wilkes, G. L.; Loos, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is a novel powder prepregging technique that is based on the deposition of the powder onto fibers that have been moistened using an ultrasonic humidifier. The moisture acts as an initial binding agent for the powder until the powder can be melted onto the fiber in a subsequent heating step. LaRC-TPI powder, produced by Mitsui Toastsu, and Hercules AS-4 fiber served as the process development material system. The influence of powder particle size on this process, and the quality of the resulting composite are discussed.

  2. Densification of powder metallurgy billets by a roll consolidation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellman, W. H.; Weinberger, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Container design is used to convert partially densified powder metallurgy compacts into fully densified slabs in one processing step. Technique improves product yield, lowers costs and yields great flexibility in process scale-up. Technique is applicable to all types of fabricable metallic materials that are produced from powder metallurgy process.

  3. Physical and chemical characterization techniques for metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Watson, S. S.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. An extensive array of characterization techniques were applied to these two powders. The physical techniques included laser-diffraction particle-size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry included X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analytical X-ray analysis. The background of these techniques will be summarized and some typical findings comparing different samples of virgin additive manufacturing powders, taken from the same lot, will be given. The techniques were used to confirm that different samples of powder from the same lot were essentially identical, within the uncertainty of the measurements.

  4. Physical and chemical characterization techniques for metallic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Watson, S. S.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. An extensive array of characterization techniques were applied to these two powders. The physical techniques included laser-diffraction particle-size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry included X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analytical X-ray analysis. The background of these techniques will be summarized and some typical findings comparing different samples of virgin additive manufacturing powders, taken from the same lot, will be given. The techniques were used to confirm that different samples of powder from the same lot were essentially identical, within the uncertainty of the measurements.

  5. Application of physical and chemical characterization techniques to metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Watson, S. S.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry, including X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, were also employed. Results of these analyses will be used to shed light on the question: how does virgin powder change after being exposed to and recycled from one or more additive manufacturing build cycles? In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  6. Application of physical and chemical characterization techniques to metallic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Watson, S. S.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry, including X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, were also employed. Results of these analyses will be used to shed light on the question: how does virgin powder change after being exposed to and recycled from one or more additive manufacturing build cycles? In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  7. ?-arrestin Kurtz inhibits MAPK and Toll signalling in Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Tipping, Marla; Kim, Yoosik; Kyriakakis, Phillip; Tong, Mei; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Veraksa, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    ?-Arrestins have been implicated in the regulation of multiple signalling pathways. However, their role in organism development is not well understood. In this study, we report a new in vivo function of the Drosophila ?-arrestin Kurtz (Krz) in the regulation of two distinct developmental signalling modules: MAPK ERK and NF-?B, which transmit signals from the activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and the Toll receptor, respectively. Analysis of the expression of effectors and target genes of Toll and the RTK Torso in krz maternal mutants reveals that Krz limits the activity of both pathways in the early embryo. Protein interaction studies suggest a previously uncharacterized mechanism for ERK inhibition: Krz can directly bind and sequester an inactive form of ERK, thus preventing its activation by the upstream kinase, MEK. A simultaneous dysregulation of different signalling systems in krz mutants results in an abnormal patterning of the embryo and severe developmental defects. Our findings uncover a new in vivo function of ?-arrestins and present a new mechanism of ERK inhibition by the Drosophila ?-arrestin Krz. PMID:20802461

  8. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Antony, Leo V. M. (Inventor); O'Dell, Scott (Inventor); Power, Chris (Inventor); Tabor, Terry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  9. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    DOEpatents

    McKechnie, Timothy N.; Antony, Leo V. M.; O'Dell, Scott; Power, Chris; Tabor, Terry

    2009-11-10

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  10. The development of an alternative thermoplastic powder prepregging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogden, A. L.; Hyer, M. W.; Wilkes, G. L.; Loos, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    An alternative powder prepregging technique is discussed that is based on the deposition of powder onto carbon fibers that have been moistened using an ultrasonic humidifier. The dry fiber tow is initially spread to allow a greater amount of the fiber surface to be exposed to the powder, thus ensuring a significant amount of intimate contact between the fiber and the matrix. Moisture in the form of ultrafine water droplets is then deposited onto the spread fiber tow. The moisture promotes adhesion to the fiber until the powder can be tacked to the fibers by melting. Powdered resin is then sieved onto the fibers and then tacked onto the fibers by quick heating in a convective oven. This study focuses on the production of prepregs and laminates made with LaRC-TPI (thermoplastic polyimide) using this process. Although the process appears to be successful, early evaluation was hampered by poor interfacial adhesion. The adhesion problem, however, seems to be the result of a material system incompatibility, rather than being influenced by the process.

  11. Analysis of nonlinear optical materials properties by simple powder technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, O. A.; Naumov, A. K.; Lovchev, A. V.; Garipov, M. R.

    2015-03-01

    The article describes a simple technique for comparative analysis of the second harmonic generation properties of new samples and etalon materials by their powders. The effectiveness of the method was tested and and measuring of nonlinear coefficient and damage threshold of the well known materials: KDP, LiIO3, m-nitroaniline was demonstrated. The parameters of the new promising nonlinear material DNPAP were measured.

  12. A Comparison of Cocrystal Structure Solutions from Powder and Single Crystal Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    S Lapidus; P Stephens; K Arora; T Shattock; M Zaworotko

    2011-12-31

    We demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of high resolution powder diffraction for determination of cocrystal structures through a double-blind study. Structures of 10 cocrystals of varying complexity were determined independently using single crystal and powder techniques. The two methodologies give identical molecular packing and hydrogen bond topology, and an rms difference in covalent bond lengths of 0.035 {angstrom}. Powder techniques are clearly sufficient to establish a complete characterization of cocrystal geometry.

  13. NIRS and MIRS technique for the determination of protein and fat content in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Feng, Shuijuan; He, Chao; He, Yong

    2008-03-01

    It is very important to detect the protein and fat content in milk powder fast and non-destructively. Near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared(MIR) spectroscopy techniques have been compared and evaluated for the determination of the protein and fat content in milk powder with the use of Least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM). LS-SVM models have been developed by using both NIR and MIR spectra. Both methods have shown good correlations between infrared transmission values and two nutrition contents. MIRS provided better prediction performance over NIRS. It is concluded that infrared spectroscopy technique can quantify of the protein and fat content in milk powder fast and nondestructively. The process is simple and easy to operate than chemistry methods. The results can be beneficial for designing a simple and non-destructive instrument with MIRS or NIRS spectral sensor for the determination of the protein fat content in milk powder.

  14. Measurement techniques in dry-powdered processing of spent nuclear fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, D. L.; Hong, J.-S.; Kim, H.-D.; Persiani, P. J.; Wolf, S. F.

    1999-07-21

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) detection, {alpha}-spectrometry ({alpha}-S), and {gamma}-spectrometry ({gamma}-S) were used for the determination of nuclide content in five samples excised from a high-burnup fuel rod taken from a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The samples were prepared for analysis by dissolution of dry-powdered samples. The measurement techniques required no separation of the plutonium, uranium, and fission products. The sample preparation and analysis techniques showed promise for in-line analysis of highly-irradiated spent fuels in a dry-powdered process. The analytical results allowed the determination of fuel burnup based on {sup 148}Nd, Pu, and U content. A goal of this effort is to develop the HPLC-ICPMS method for direct fissile material accountancy in the dry-powdered processing of spent nuclear fuel.

  15. Characterization techniques to validate models of density variations in pressed powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, T.; Mahoney, M.; Readey, M.; Ewsuk, K.; Gieske, J.; Stoker, G.; Min, S.

    1995-07-01

    Techniques for characterizing density gradients generated during typical powder compaction processes are reviewed and several are evaluated. The techniques reviewed are ultrasonic velocity measurements, laser ultrasonic velocity measurements, x-ray radiography, autoradiography, computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and simple image analysis of polished cross-sections. Experimental results are reported for all of these techniques except autoradiography, CT and MRI. The test specimens examined were right circular cylinders of a high length/diameter ratio (to ensure significant density variation) pressed from commercial spray-dried alumina powders. Although the density gradients could be detected with all four techniques, ultrasonic velocity measurements gave the best contour map of gradients and is therefore most suitable for model validation. On the other hand, it was concluded that x-ray radiography is preferable in situations where cost and/or number of samples are more important that high resolution.

  16. Detection and original dose assessment of egg powders subjected to gamma irradiation by using ESR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Talat

    2015-09-01

    ESR (electron spin resonance) techniques were applied for detection and original dose estimation to radiation-processed egg powders. The un-irradiated (control) egg powders showed a single resonance line centered at g=2.0086±0.0005, 2.0081±0.0005, 2.0082±0.0005 (native signal) for yolk, white and whole egg, respectively. Irradiation induced at least one additional intense singlet overlapping to the control signal and caused a significant increase in signal intensity without any changes in spectral patterns. Responses of egg powders to different gamma radiation doses in the range 0-10 kGy were examined. The stability of the radiation-induced ESR signal of irradiated egg powders were investigated over a storage period of about 5 months. Additive reirradiation of the egg powders produces a reproducible dose response function, which can be used to assess the initial dose by back-extrapolation. The additive dose method gives an estimation of the original dose within ±12% at the end of the 720 h storage period.

  17. Material accountancy measurement techniques in dry-powdered processing of nuclear spent fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, S. F.

    1999-03-24

    The paper addresses the development of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS), thermal ionization-mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha-spectrometry, and gamma spectrometry techniques for in-line analysis of highly irradiated (18 to 64 GWD/T) PWR spent fuels in a dry-powdered processing cycle. The dry-powdered technique for direct elemental and isotopic accountancy assay measurements was implemented without the need for separation of the plutonium, uranium and fission product elements in the bulk powdered process. The analyses allow the determination of fuel burn-up based on the isotopic composition of neodymium and/or cesium. An objective of the program is to develop the ICPMS method for direct fissile nuclear materials accountancy in the dry-powdered processing of spent fuel. The ICPMS measurement system may be applied to the KAERI DUPIC (direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors) experiment, and in a near-real-time mode for international safeguards verification and non-proliferation policy concerns.

  18. A sol-powder coating technique for fabrication of yttria stabilised zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Wattanasiriwech, Darunee . E-mail: darunee@mfu.ac.th; Wattanasiriwech, Suthee; Stevens, Ron

    2006-08-10

    Yttria stabilised zirconia has been prepared using a simple sol-powder coating technique. The polymeric yttria sol, which was prepared using 1,3 propanediol as a network modifier, was homogeneously mixed with nanocrystalline zirconia powder and it showed a dual function: as a binder which promoted densification and a phase modifier which stabilised zirconia in the tetragonal and cubic phases. Thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction revealed that the polymeric yttria sol which decomposed at low temperature into yttrium oxide could change the m {sup {yields}} t phase transformation behaviour of the zirconia, possibly due to the small particle size and very high surface area of both yttria and zirconia particles allowing rapid alloying. The sintered samples exhibited three crystalline phases: monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic, in which cubic and tetragonal are the major phases. The weight fractions of the individual phases present in the selected specimens were determined using quantitative Rietveld analysis.

  19. Optimization of headspace solid-phase microextraction technique for extraction of volatile smokeless powder compounds in forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kah Haw; Yew, Chong Hooi; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2014-07-01

    Smokeless powders are low explosives and are potentially found in cases involving firearms and improvised explosive devices. Apart from inorganic compound analysis, forensic determination of organic components of these materials appears as a promising alternative, especially the chromatographic techniques. This work describes the optimization of a solid-phase microextraction technique using an 85 ?m polyacrylate fiber followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection for smokeless powder. A multivariate experimental design was performed to optimize extraction-influencing parameters. A 2(4) factorial first-order design revealed that sample temperature and extraction time were the major influencing parameters. Doehlert matrix design has subsequently selected 66C and 21 min as the compromised conditions for the two predetermined parameters. This extraction technique has successfully detected the headspace compounds of smokeless powders from different ammunition types and allowed for their differentiation. The novel technique allows more rapid sample preparation for chromatographic detection of smokeless powders. PMID:24611488

  20. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. Asmore » a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.« less

  1. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. As a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.

  2. Strength and electrical conductivity of deformation-processed Cu-15 Vol Pct Fe alloys produced by powder metallurgy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerman, G. A.; Anderson, I. E.; Verhoeven, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Powder metallurgical techniques have been employed to prepare the precursor billets in the preparation of Cu-15 vol pct Fe alloys by deformation processing. It has been demonstrated that by (1) using high-purity gas-atomized Cu powders blended with commercial high-purity Fe powders and (2) controlling the time/temperature processing conditions within specific limits, it is possible to produce Cu-Fe deformation-processed alloys with strength/conductivity properties matching those of Cu-Nb, Cu-Ta, and Cu-Cr alloys. These properties are significantly superior to the best commercial alloys.

  3. Development of cobalt ferrite powder preparation employing the sol-gel technique and its structural characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjia, M.; Oubaha, M.; Prescott, T.; Olabi, A. G.

    2010-06-01

    This work focuses on the development of a method to make nano cobalt ferrite powder using a solgel process. A particular emphasis is devoted to the understanding of the role of the chemical parameters involved in the solgel technique, and of the heat treatment on the structures and morphologies of the materials obtained. Several samples of cobalt ferrite powder were obtained by varying the initial parameters of the process in addition to the heat treatment temperature. Xray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to identify the structure and morphology of samples demonstrating the influence of the initial parameters. DTA/TGA was carried out on one sample to identify important reaction temperatures during the heat treatment. The average particle size, as estimated for one sample by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the strongest Xray diffraction (XRD) peak, was found to be about 45 nm. It has been found that the chelating agent and the crosslinker have a critical influence on the resultant structure, the particle size and the particle size distribution.

  4. Characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by powder metallurgy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Kumar, M.; Chandrasekar, P.; Chandramohan, P.; Mohanraj, M.

    2012-11-15

    In this work, a detailed characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by three powder metallurgy techniques, namely, hot isostatic pressing, spark plasma sintering and vacuum sintering, was conducted. Two composites with different volume percents of titanium boride reinforcement were used for the investigation. One was titanium with 20% titanium boride, and the other was titanium with 40% titanium boride (by volume). Characterisation was performed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro analysis - energy dispersive spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The characterisation results confirm the completion of the titanium boride reaction. The results reveal the presence of titanium boride reinforcement in different morphologies such as needle-shaped whiskers, short agglomerated whiskers and fine plates. The paper also discusses how mechanical properties such as microhardness, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio are influenced by the processing techniques as well as the volume fraction of the titanium boride reinforcement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-TiB composites were processed by HIP, SPS and vacuum sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The completion of Ti-TiB{sub 2} reaction was confirmed by XRD, SEM and EPMA studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardness and elastic properties of Ti-TiB composites were discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing techniques were compared with respect to their microstructure.

  5. Application of powder metallurgy techniques to produce improved bearing elements for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moracz, D. J.; Shipley, R. J.; Moxson, V. S.; Killman, R. J.; Munson, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to apply powder metallurgy techniques for the production of improved bearing elements, specifically balls and races, for advanced cryogenic turbopump bearings. The materials and fabrication techniques evaluated were judged on the basis of their ability to improve fatigue life, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant bearings over the currently used 440C. An extensive list of candidate bearing alloys in five different categories was considered: tool/die steels, through hardened stainless steels, cobalt-base alloys, and gear steels. Testing of alloys for final consideration included hardness, rolling contact fatigue, cross cylinder wear, elevated temperature wear, room and cryogenic fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking, and five-ball (rolling-sliding element) testing. Results of the program indicated two alloys that showed promise for improved bearing elements. These alloys were MRC-2001 and X-405. 57mm bearings were fabricated from the MRC-2001 alloy for further actual hardware rig testing by NASA-MSFC.

  6. A radiographic technique for measuring the powder packing density in the cavities of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    King, S D

    1977-07-01

    An X-ray technique has been developed to enable reproducible and quantitative data to be obtained from radiographs taken by a diagnostic X-ray machine. Careful attention has been paid to the alignment of the specimen and the diagnostic tube and to operating conditions. The choice of X-ray spectrum is described together with the experimental geometry used to minimize the scattered radiation incident on the film. The resultant scattered radiation intensity achieved is about 4% of the unattenuated direct radiation. Careful calibration procedures using objects the same size as the unknown specimen are necessary to avoid the need for complicated corrections for the resulting variation in scatter across the film. The LiF powder packing density is determined as 1-32 g cm-2 with a standard error of 0-52%. Values of projected bone thickness as a function of position in the bone are given. The average percentage of bone in the trabecular specimen is determined as 12-7 +/- 0-5, which is in close agreement with measurements of the same parameter determined from an optical scanning technique. The relationship between average packing density or rho y and the percentage of bone at different positions in the specimen packing density increase in percentage of bone, as would be expected. PMID:887650

  7. A review of the hybrid techniques for the fabrication of hard magnetic microactuators based on bonded magnetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallapa, M.; Yeow, J. T. W.

    2015-02-01

    Polymer composites based on permanent magnetic bonded powders exhibit immense potential for applications in microactuators and sensors with magnetic performances comparable to their fully dense counterparts. While fabrication and integration of magnetic devices based on bonded magnetic powders is challenging via conventional deposition and electrochemical growth techniques, hybrid fabrication offers a promising alternative. This paper presents the evolution of permanent magnetic materials into bonded magnetic powders, the magnetic performance figures of merit of permanent magnetic materials significant for the design and manufacture of polymer based sensors and actuators. A review of the hybrid fabrication techniques such as replica molding, squeegee coating, spin casting etc are reported. Critical factors affecting the fabrication of polymer magnetic composites such as filler particle size and effect of magnetic field during fabrication are discussed. Prior art based on polymer magnetic composites for the fabrication of hard magnetic films and hard magnetic actuators are presented.

  8. Concurrent use of metered dose inhalers without spacer and dry powder inhalers by asthmatic children adversely affect proper inhalation technique

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Saad; Hassan, Walid M; Alhashimi, Hashim

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease of children. A good control of symptoms will improve quality of patient life. Inhalation technique is an important aspect in the management of asthma. The better the inhalation technique the better the lung deposition of asthma therapy especially inhaled corticosteroids. This will lead to better control of symptoms and improve adherence to treatment. In the following study the inhalation technique of asthma devices were compared using inhalation technique score system. The asthma devices studied were metered dose inhalers (pressurized MDI) without spacers and dry powder inhalers (DPI). The hypothesis studied was that the inhalation technique score of dry powder inhalers will be adversely affected with concurrent use of metered dose inhalers without spacers. PMID:21760757

  9. Recovery of SiC powder from sintered DPF using hydrothermal treatment combined with ball-milling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengang; Sasai, Ryo; Itoh, Hideaki

    2011-04-01

    In the present work, hydrothermal treatment combined with ball-milling technique (HTBT) was attempted to recover SiC powder from bulk sintered DPF. Various parameters including the material and size of the milling-ball, the type of the solvent medium, the rotation speed, the ratio of solvent/DPF, the treatment temperature and time were optimized. The pulverization rate, impurity content and the particle size of the recovered SiC powder were investigated to assess the effect of HTBT. Dilute HF solution was selected as the main solvent and SiC milling-ball was the most suitable for pulverization of the sintered DPF. The rotation speed played a significant role for the pulverization rate and more than 90% of bulk sintered DPF was recovered as SiC powder using SiC balls (5 mm in diameter) in the mixed aqueous solutions of HF (0.05 mol/dm3) and H2O2 (0.25 mol/dm3) with rotation speed >= 275 rpm and solvent/DPF = 1.5 at 200C after 20 h HTBT . Generally the average grain size of the recovered SiC powder was less than 1.5 ?m and decreased with the extended treatment time and the increased rotation speed. The result of purity analysis showed that the recovered SiC powder totally met the demand of the raw SiC powder for DPF production under the optimized conditions.

  10. Novel powder metallurgy technique for development of Fe-P-based soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jiten; Chandra, K.; Misra, P. S.; Sarma, B.

    Novel powder metallurgy technique (hot forging technique) is used for the development of high-density Fe-P-based soft magnetic alloys such as Fe-P binary, Fe-P-Cr ternary and Fe-P-Cr-Si quaternary alloys. In this process, mild steel encapsulated powders were hot forged into slabs, hot rolled and annealed to relieve the residual stresses. These alloys were subjected to in-house characterization, e.g. density and theoretically calculated porosity content at various stages. Microstructural study has been carried out to compare observed porosity with the theoretically calculated porosity. X-ray diffraction studies of these alloys revealed presence of only ferrite as product phase. Various soft magnetic properties such as resistivity, coercivity, maximum flux density (at 350 G magnetic field), retentivity and total magnetic losses were also evaluated and reported. These alloys were made by hot forging using two different kinds of dies, e.g. flat die and channel die. It was observed that the flat-die forged alloys had more porosity than the channel-die forged alloys. Addition of alloying elements such as P, Cr and Si increased the resistivity of Fe. The higher the alloying addition, the higher is the alloy's resistivity. Fe-0.7P-0.7Cr-1Si alloy showed a resistivity as high as 44.1 ?? cm. Coercivity values of the alloys ranged from 1.0 to 2.2 Oe. Addition of Si and P helped in reducing the coercivity values of the alloys. The higher the Si, P content, the lower were the coercivity values observed. Combined addition of P and Si helped in reducing the coercivity values significantly, for example Fe-0.7P-0.7Cr-1Si alloy showed coercivity value approximately 1.0 Oe. It was observed in this investigation that maximum flux densities of the alloys were linearly related with their porosity levels. Total magnetic losses of these alloys varied from 6.0 to 7.8 W/kg. The total magnetic loss of Fe-0.7P-0.7Cr-1Si alloy was the lowest (6.0 W/kg) owing to its highest resistivity combined with its lowest coercivity amongst the alloys developed in the present investigation. Alloys developed in this investigation were capable of hot/cold working to very thin gage of sheet (0.5 mm thickness). These alloys could find their possible application in manufacturing of transformer core.

  11. Spectrochemical determination of thorium in monazite by the powder-d.c. arc technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutra, C.V.; Murata, K.J.

    1954-01-01

    Thorium in monazite is determined by a d.c. carbon-arc technique using zirconium as the internal standard. The analytical curve for Th II 2870.413 A??/Zr II 2844-579 A?? is established by means of synthetic standards containing graduated amounts of thoria and 0.500 per cent zirconia in pegmatite base (60 parts quartz, 40 parts microchne, and 1 part ferric oxide). Monazite samples are diluted 14-fold with pegmatite base that contains 0.538 per cent ZrO2, so that the zirconia content of the resulting mixture is also 0.500 per cent. In addition, both the standards and the diluted monazites are mixed with one-half their weight of powdered graphite. Approximately 25 mg of the prepared samples are arced to completion at 15.5 to 17.5 amperes. With the 14-fold dilution employed, the accurate range of the method is 3 to 20 per cent thoria in the original monazite. The coefficient of variation for a single determination is 4 per cent at the 7 per cent thoria level. Tests with synthetic unknowns and chemically analyzed monazites show a maximum error of ??10 per cent of the thoria content. If niobium is substituted for zirconium as the internal standard, there is a loss of precision. Platinum as the internal standard gives results of good precision but introduces a marked sensitivity to matrix effects. ?? 1954.

  12. Nanospray Drying as a Novel Technique for the Manufacturing of Inhalable NSAID Powders

    PubMed Central

    Rita Patrizia, Aquino; Mariateresa, Stigliani; Pasquale, Del Gaudio; Teresa, Mencherini; Francesca, Sansone; Paola, Russo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential of the nanospray drier as a novel apparatus for the manufacturing of a dry powder for inhalation containing ketoprofen lysinate, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug able to control the inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients. We produced several ketoprofen lysinate and leucine powder batches by means of nanospray dryer, studying the influence of process parameters on yield, particle properties (size distribution and morphology), and, mainly, aerodynamic properties of powders. Micronized particles were prepared from different hydroalcoholic solutions (alcohol content from 0 to 30% v/v) using ketoprofen in its lysine salt form and leucine as dispersibility enhancer in different ratios (from 5 to 15% w/w) with a total solid concentration ranging from 1 to 7% w/v. Results indicated that the spray head equipped with a 7?m nozzle produced powders too big to be inhaled. The reduction of nozzle size from 7 to 4?m led to smaller particles suitable for inhalation but, at the same time, caused a dramatic increase in process time. The selection of process variables, together with the nozzle pretreatment with a surfactant solution, allowed us to obtain a free flowing powder with satisfying aerosol performance, confirming the usefulness of the nanospray drier in the production of powder for inhalation. PMID:25580462

  13. Electrical CT image reconstruction technique for powder flow in petroleum refinery process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Masahiro; Doh, Deog-Hee; Ochi, Mitsuaki

    2008-03-01

    A new reconstruction method called sampled pattern matching (SPM) was applied to the image reconstruction of an electrical capacitance computed tomography in powder flow in a vertical pipe for petroleum refinery process. This new method is able to achieve stable convergence without the use of an empirical value. Experiments were carried out using fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts as powder with two air volume flow rates and four powder volume flow rates to measure the capacitance of a pipe cross section. The SPM method is compared with conventional methods in terms of volume fraction, residual capacitance, and correlation capacitance. Overall, the SPM method proved superior to conventional methods without any empirical value because SPM achieves accurate reconstruction by using an objective function that is calculated as the inner product calculation between the experimental capacitance and the reconstructed image capacitance.

  14. Printability of calcium phosphate: calcium sulfate powders for the application of tissue engineered bone scaffolds using the 3D printing technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zuoxin; Buchanan, Fraser; Mitchell, Christina; Dunne, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    In this study, calcium phosphate (CaP) powders were blended with a three-dimensional printing (3DP) calcium sulfate (CaSO4)-based powder and the resulting composite powders were printed with a water-based binder using the 3DP technology. Application of a water-based binder ensured the manufacture of CaP:CaSO4 constructs on a reliable and repeatable basis, without long term damage of the printhead. Printability of CaP:CaSO4 powders was quantitatively assessed by investigating the key 3DP process parameters, i.e. in-process powder bed packing, drop penetration behavior and the quality of printed solid constructs. Effects of particle size, CaP:CaSO4 ratio and CaP powder type on the 3DP process were considered. The drop penetration technique was used to reliably identify powder formulations that could be potentially used for the application of tissue engineered bone scaffolds using the 3DP technique. Significant improvements (p<0.05) in the 3DP process parameters were found for CaP (30-110 ?m):CaSO4 powders compared to CaP (<20 ?m):CaSO4 powders. Higher compressive strength was obtained for the powders with the higher CaP:CaSO4 ratio. Hydroxyapatite (HA):CaSO4 powders showed better results than beta-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP):CaSO4 powders. Solid and porous constructs were manufactured using the 3DP technique from the optimized CaP:CaSO4 powder formulations. High-quality printed constructs were manufactured, which exhibited appropriate green compressive strength and a high level of printing accuracy. PMID:24656346

  15. Fabrication of dual-pore scaffolds using SLUP (salt leaching using powder) and WNM (wire-network molding) techniques.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Sang; Hong, Myoung Wha; Kim, So-Youn; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Young Yul; Cho, Young-Sam

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a novel technique was proposed to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds combining both SLUP (salt leaching using powder) and WNM (wire-network molding) techniques. This technique has several advantages: solvent-free, no limit on the use of thermoplastic polymers as a raw material, and easiness of fabricating scaffolds with dual-scale pores that are interconnected randomized small pores. To fabricate dual-pore scaffolds, PCL and NaCl powders were mixed at a certain ratio. Subsequently, needles were inserted into a designed mold, and the mixture was filled into the mold thereafter. Subsequently, after the mold was pressurized, the mold was heated to melt the PCL powders. The PCL/NaCl structure and needles were separated from the mold. The structure was sonicated to leach-out the NaCl particles and was dried. Consequently, the remaining PCL structure became the dual-pore scaffold. To compare the characteristics of dual-pore scaffolds, control scaffolds, which are 3D plotter and SLUP scaffolds were fabricated. PMID:25491863

  16. Production of ultra clean gas-atomized powder by the plasma heated tundish technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tingskog, T.A.; Andersson, V.

    1996-12-31

    The paper describes the improvements in cleanliness for different types of gas atomized powders produced by holding the melt in a Plasma Heated Tundish (PHT) before atomization. The cleanliness is measured on Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) or extruded samples. Significant improvements in slag levels and material properties have been achieved. On extruded powder metallurgy stainless steel and nickel alloy tubes, the rejection rate in ultra-sonic testing was reduced drastically. Tool steels and high speed steels have greatly improved ductility and bend strength.

  17. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED methods will become crucially important in the near future. PMID:25866663

  18. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni-Se-O-Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal-organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED methods will become crucially important in the near future. PMID:25866663

  19. Polarizing microscopy of partially dissolved gallstone powder: a simple technique for studying gallstone composition.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, G; Agarwal, D K; Negi, T S

    1995-01-01

    A quick and reliable method for estimating the proportion of constituents of a stone may be useful in determining the prevalence of chemical type of gallstones in different geographic areas or ethnic groups. Chemical and infrared spectroscopy estimation facilities are not commonly available in many parts of the world and visual inspection may not be reliable for scientific purposes. To investigate whether identification of microcrystalline solids in partially dissolved stone powder could accurately predict the chemical nature of the gallstone we undertook a blind study on 40 samples of gallstones and compared our results with those of visual inspection and quantitative infrared spectroscopy. There were 29 cholesterol stones (mean cholesterol 83.4 +/- 7.5%), six intermediate cholesterol stones (mean cholesterol 48.0 +/- 21.2%) and five pigment stones (mean cholesterol 14.3 +/- 4.3%) as determined by quantitative infrared spectroscopy. Microscopic examination of partially dissolved gallstone powder in ethanol correctly identified all 29 cholesterol gallstones (sensitivity 100%, specificity 92%), four of six intermediate cholesterol stones (sensitivity 67%, specificity 100%) and all five pigment stones (sensitivity 100%, specificity 97%). It also detected microspheroliths of calcium carbonate in 14 of 16 calcium carbonate containing gallstones (sensitivity 88%, specificity 100%). The chemical grouping of stones on the basis of microscopic examination was correct in 37 (93%) of 40 samples and was especially useful in identifying 'intermediate' cholesterol stones which cannot be recognized by visual inspection. Thus microscopic examination of powdered gallstones appears to be a simple and reliable method of determining gallstone composition. PMID:7548797

  20. Chemiluminescence measurements on irradiated garlic powder by the single photon counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narvaiz, P.

    1995-02-01

    The feasibility of identifying irradiated garlic powder measuring chemiluminescence by liquid scintillation spectrometry was studied. Samples packed in 100 μm thick polyethylene bags were irradiated in a 60Co semi-industrial facility, with doses of 10 and 30 kGy. Control and irradiated samples were stored at 20 ± 4°C and 70 ± 10% RH in darkness for 2 years. Assays were performed to establish the best sample concentration and pH of the buffer solution in which garlic powder was to be suspended for its measurement. The water content of garlic samples was also analyzed throughout storage time, as it related to the stability of the species causing luminescence. Chemiluminescence values diminished in every sample over storage time following an exponential pattern. Irradiated samples showed values significantly higher than those of the control samples, according to the radiation dose, throughout the storage period. This does not necessarily imply that the identification of the irradiated samples would be certain, since values of control samples coming from different origins have been found to fluctuate within a rather wide range. Nonetheless, in principle, the method looks promising for the measurement of chemiluminescence in irradiated samples

  1. Unraveling the nature of electric field- and stress- induced structural transformations in soft PZT by a new powder poling technique.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, Ajay Kumar; V, Lalitha K; James, Ajit R; Fitch, Andy; Ranjan, Rajeev

    2015-02-25

    A 'powder-poling' technique was developed to study electric field induced structural transformations in ferroelectrics exhibiting a morphotropic phase boundary (MPB). The technique was employed on soft PZT exhibiting a large longitudinal piezoelectric response (d(33) ∼ 650 pC N(-1)). It was found that electric poling brings about a considerable degree of irreversible tetragonal to monoclinic transformation. The same transformation was achieved after subjecting the specimen to mechanical stress, which suggests an equivalence of stress and electric field with regard to the structural mechanism in MPB compositions. The electric field induced structural transformation was also found to be accompanied by a decrease in the spatial coherence of polarization. PMID:25629264

  2. Application of powder metallurgy technique to produce improved bearing elements for cryogenic aerospace engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxson, V. S.; Moracz, D. J.; Bhat, B. N.; Dolan, F. J.; Thom, R.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, vacuum melted 440C stainless steel is used for high performance bearings for aerospace cryogenic systems where corrosion due to condensation is a major concern. For the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), however, 440C performance in the high-pressure turbopumps has been marginal. A basic assumption of this study was that powder metallurgy, rather than cast/wrought, processing would provide the finest, most homogeneous bearing alloy structure. Preliminary testing of P/M alloys (hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness) was used to 'de-select' alloys which did perform as well as baseline 440C. Five out of eleven candidate materials (14-4/6V, X-405, MRC-2001, T-440V, and D-5) based on preliminary screening were selected for the actual rolling-sliding five-ball testing. The results of this test were compared with high-performance vacuum-melted M50 bearing steel. The results of the testing indicated outstanding performance of two P/M alloys, X-405 and MRC-2001, which eventually will be further evaluated by full-scale bearing testing.

  3. Preparation of Cu and Fly Ash Composite by Powder Metallurgy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, P. Y.; Lim, P. S.; Ng, M. C.; Zahi, S.; You, A. H.

    2011-03-30

    Cu and Fly Ash (FA) mixtures with different weight percentages were prepared. Pellets of the mixture powder were produced with the dimension of 17.7 mm in diameter and 10-15 mm in height. These different composites were compacted at a constant pressure of 280 MPa. One of the selected weight percentages was then compacted to form into pellet and sintered at different temperatures which were at 900, 950 and 1000 deg. C respectively for 2 hours. Density of green pellet was measured before sintered in furnace. After sintering, all the pellets with different temperatures were re-weighed and sintered density were calculated. The densification of the green and sintered pellets was required to be measured as one of the parameter in selection of the best material properties. Porosity of the pellet shall not be ignored in order to analyze the close-packed particles stacking in the pellet. SEM micrograph had been captured to observe the presence of pores and agglomeration of particles in the sample produced.

  4. Characteristics of hydroxyapatite film formed on human enamel with the powder jet deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Ryo; Sasaki, Keiichi; Zahmaty, Mohammed Saeed Sepasy; Noji, Miyoko; Anada, Takahisa; Suzuki, Osamu; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to create hydroxyapatite (HAp) film by powder jet deposition with manipulating the blasting nozzle above human enamel and to examine the microstructural and mechanical properties of the HAp film and the bonding strength at the interface between the HAp film and the enamel substrate. HAp particles calcinated at 1200°C with an average size of 4.7 μm were used. The HAp particles were mixed with carrier gas (N₂) to form an aerosol flow and was accelerated and blasted from the nozzle onto the enamel substrate at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. To evaluate the microstructure, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the surface and cross section of the HAp films and a three-dimensional profile of the HAp films were observed. To evaluate the mechanical properties, the micro-Vickers hardness and the bonding strength of the HAp films to the enamel substrate were measured. The deposition area of the HAp film was over 3 × 4 mm. The average and maximum thickness were about 30 and 40 μm, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the hardness of the HAp film and the enamel (p > 0.05). The bonding strength of the HAp film was the same as the bonding strength between composite resin and enamel. Compared with previous reports, wider and thicker HAp film was created on the enamel substrate successfully. The HAp film, which has same hardness with enamel and same bonding strength to the enamel with composite resin, would be a candidate as dental restorative materials. PMID:21681950

  5. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sabelström, N. Hayashi, M.; Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.

    2014-10-28

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100 °C could be observed.

  6. Gene silencing in a mouse lung metastasis model by an inhalable dry small interfering RNA powder prepared using the supercritical carbon dioxide technique.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tomoyuki; Kito, Daisuke; Oiwa, Ai; Fukushima, Michiko; Hira, Daiki; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel dry small interfering RNA (siRNA) powder for inhalation, containing chitosan and mannitol, was prepared using the supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) technique. Although the siRNA/chitosan powder was difficult to disperse because of a long needle-like structure, it could be reduced to fragments of 10-20?m by manual grinding, which allowed for administration into mice. Electrophoresis revealed that the supercritical CO2 technique and manual grinding didn't greatly affect the integrity of the siRNA. Furthermore, the siRNA was more stable in the lungs than in blood, suggesting the utility of pulmonary delivery. Biodistribution experiments using Cy5.5-labeled siRNA demonstrated that pulmonary administration of the powder achieved a prolonged exposure of the siRNA/chitosan complex on the lung epithelial surface at a higher concentration. For the evaluation of the in-vivo gene silencing effect of the siRNA/chitosan powder, mice bearing colon26/Luc cells were used. The powder significantly inhibited the increase in luminescence intensity in the lungs, but the siRNA/chitosan solution and a non-specific dry siRNA/chitosan powder didn't, indicating the effective and specific gene silencing against the tumor cells metastasized in the lungs of mice by the siRNA/chitosan powder. These results strongly indicate that inhalable dry siRNA powders have the possibility of effective pulmonary gene silencing and that the supercritical CO2 technique can be applied to the production. PMID:23811567

  7. Investigation of thin layers deposited by two PVD techniques on high speed steel produced by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubczyov, D.; Hvizdo, P.; Seleck, M.

    2012-04-01

    This study was intended to investigate the properties and cutting performance with thin layers applied by two PVD techniques. PVD techniques ARC and LARC were used for the deposition of thin coatings onto cutting tools prepared by powder metallurgy. Advanced types of layers - monolayer AlTiCrN and nanocomposite type of nc-AlTiN/Si3N4 layer - were analyzed by standard techniques for surface status and quality assessment - roughness, hardness, layer thickness, chemical composition by GDOES, tribological properties at room and elevated temperature. Durability testing of the cutting tools was carried out according to the standard ISO 3685-1999. The nanocomposite nc-AlTiN/Si3N4 layer achieved lower roughness when compared to monolayer AlTiCrN which leads to the achievement of higher hardness and better layer quality. The HV0.5 hardness values were ?26 GPa. The results showed a 2-3-times longer durability of the cutting tools in comparison with equivalent uncoated PM and traditional materials. The deposited coatings contributed to the improvement of their durability.

  8. Synthesis, growth and characterization of non linear optical Bisthiourea ammonium chloride single crystals by slow evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilango, E.; Rajasekaran, R.; Shankar, K.; Krishnan, S.; Chithambaram, V.

    2014-11-01

    A new semi-organic nonlinear optical crystal of Bisthiourea Ammonium Chloride (BTAC) has been grown by slow evaporation technique. The crystal system and lattice parameters were determined from X-ray diffraction. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) studies confirm the various functional groups present in the grown crystal. The transmittance and absorbance of electromagnetic radiation is studied through UV-Visible spectrum. The thermal behavior of the grown crystals has been investigated by TG/DTA analysis. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss has been studied as a function of frequency for various temperatures and the result were discussed in detail. The SEM analysis was also done and it revealed the surface morphology of BTAC crystal. The second harmonic generation has been confirmed by the Kurtz powder test and it is found to be 1.4 times more than that of KDP crystal.

  9. Solid-state structural properties of 2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene derivatives, determined directly from powder X-ray diffraction data in conjunction with other techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhigang; Xu, Mingcan; Cheung, Eugene Y.; Platts, James A.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Constable, Edwin C.; Housecroft, Catherine E.

    2006-10-01

    Structural properties of 2,4,6-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, 2,4,6-trimethoxybenzyl alcohol and 2,4,6-trimethoxyacetophenone have been determined directly from powder X-ray diffraction data, using the direct-space Genetic Algorithm (GA) technique for structure solution followed by Rietveld refinement. Structural similarities and contrasts within this family of materials are elucidated. The work illustrates the value of utilizing information from other sources, including spectroscopic data and computational techniques, as a means of augmenting the structural knowledge established from the powder X-ray diffraction data.

  10. Development and in vitro evaluation of ketoprofen extended release pellets using powder layering technique in a rotary centrifugal granulator.

    PubMed

    Pai, Raveendra; Pai, Aruna; Srivastava, Birendra; Kohli, Kanchan

    2011-02-01

    Powder layering technique was evaluated using laboratory scale centrifugal granulator instrument to prepare extended release pellet dosage form of ketoprofen. Ethyl cellulose and shellac polymers were used for drug layering and extended release coating in the same apparatus. Inert sugar spheres were intermittently treated with drug powder and binding solution. Combination of ethyl cellulose (45cps) and shellac was evaluated as binders at different levels (1:3 ratio, at 6%, 12%, 16% and 21%w/w polymer) for drug loading and for extended release coating (1:3 ratio at 2%, 4% and 7% w/w polymer). Pellets were evaluated for drug release study using paddle apparatus in pH 6.8 Phosphate buffer, 900ml at 100 rpm. Ethyl cellulose and shellac when used as binder during drug layering did not extend the ketoprofen release beyond 4h. However, coating of drug loaded pellets using ethyl cellulose and shellac resulted in extended release profile of ketoprofen for about 10h. Ethyl cellulose coating alone at a level of 3% w/w resulted in extended release profile. Coated pellets were evaluated for sphericity, Hardness-Friability Index and scanning electron microscopy. Scanning electron micrographs of the pellets showed a uniform coating of polymer on the core pellets substantiating the use of centrifugal granulator for extended release coating. Release pattern from the optimized batch was best explained by Higuchi's model. The drug release pattern from the pellets was found to be Non-Fickian anomalous type, involving both diffusion and erosion mechanism. Accelerated stability study of the coated pellets filled in hard gelatin capsule was conducted for 3-month period and observed for the effect on drug release profile. PMID:21118082

  11. Application of ultrasound irradiation on sol-gel technique for corrosion protection of Al65Cu20Fe15 alloy powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Baoyan; Wang, Guodong; Li, Di; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2013-11-01

    Al65Cu20Fe15 alloy powder was firstly encapsulated by the conventional sol-gel technique utilizing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as the precursor in order to improve its corrosion resistance. The optimization was based on nine well-planned orthogonal experiments (L9 (34)). Four main factors in the encapsulation process (i.e. reaction temperature, ethylenediamine concentration, TEOS concentration and feeding method) were investigated. According to the visual analyses of the result, the optimum condition was obtained. Based on the optimal condition in the conventional sol-gel technique, the encapsulation process was then conducted under ultrasonic irradiation. The effects of ultrasound amplitude and irradiation time on the encapsulation process were also studied. FTIR, XRD, SEM, DLS and EDS were also used to characterize the resulting sample. Finally, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of encapsulated powder attained 99.3% in the acidic condition of pH 1, and the average grain size (d50) of the encapsulated powder was just 4.8% larger than that of the raw powder, implying that there was a thin silica film on the surface of powder.

  12. Enhancement of aged and denatured fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming technique following dusting with amino acid-containing powders.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Carly; Almond, Matthew J; Baum, John V; Bond, John W

    2013-03-01

    We have carried out experiments to investigate the aging of latent fingerprints deposited on black PVC over a period of 4-15 weeks. A thumbprint was used in each case and before deposition of the print the donor rubbed their thumb around their nose to add sebaceous deposits. We have studied the effect of heat, light, and moisture and we find that moisture is the most significant factor in the degradation of the latent print. We have attempted to enhance these latent prints by dusting with valine powder or powders composed of valine mixed with gold or red fluorescent commercial fingerprint powders. To make a direct comparison between "treated" and "untreated" prints, the prints were cut in half with one-half being "treated" and one-half not. Our studies show the best results being obtained when powders of valine and red fluorescent powders are applied prior to cyanoacrylate fuming. PMID:23316682

  13. Synthesis, optical and thermal studies on novel semi organic nonlinear optical Urea Zinc Acetate crystals by solution growth technique for the applications of optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithambaram, V.; Krishnan, S.

    2014-02-01

    Urea Zinc Acetate (UZA), a novel semi organic nonlinear optical crystal having dimensions 302810 mm3 has been synthesized using slow evaporation technique. The lattice parameters for the grown crystals were determined using single crystal XRD. The presence of functional groups for the grown crystals was confirmed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The optical absorption studies show that the material has wide optical transparency in the entire visible region. The thermal stability of the crystal was determined from thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis curve. The second harmonic generation was confirmed by Kurtz powder method and it is found to be 3 times than that of KDP crystal.

  14. Improved L-C resonant decay technique for Q measurement of quasilinear power inductors: New results for MPP and ferrite powdered cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Gerber, Scott S.

    1995-01-01

    The L-C resonant decay technique for measuring circuit Q or losses is improved by eliminating the switch from the inductor-capacitor loop. A MOSFET switch is used instead to momentarily connect the resonant circuit to an existing voltage source, which itself is gated off during the decay transient. Very reproducible, low duty cycle data could be taken this way over a dynamic voltage range of at least 10:1. Circuit Q is computed from a polynomial fit to the sequence of the decaying voltage maxima. This method was applied to measure the losses at 60 kHz in inductors having loose powder cores of moly permalloy and an Mn-Zn power ferrite. After the copper and capacitor losses are separated out, the resulting specific core loss is shown to be roughly as expected for the MPP powder, but anomalously high for the ferrite powder. Possible causes are mentioned.

  15. Improved L-C resonant decay technique for Q measurement of quasilinear power inductors: New results for MPP and ferrite powdered cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Gerber, Scott S.

    1995-08-01

    The L-C resonant decay technique for measuring circuit Q or losses is improved by eliminating the switch from the inductor-capacitor loop. A MOSFET switch is used instead to momentarily connect the resonant circuit to an existing voltage source, which itself is gated off during the decay transient. Very reproducible, low duty cycle data could be taken this way over a dynamic voltage range of at least 10:1. Circuit Q is computed from a polynomial fit to the sequence of the decaying voltage maxima. This method was applied to measure the losses at 60 kHz in inductors having loose powder cores of moly permalloy and an Mn-Zn power ferrite. After the copper and capacitor losses are separated out, the resulting specific core loss is shown to be roughly as expected for the MPP powder, but anomalously high for the ferrite powder. Possible causes are mentioned.

  16. Investigation of the Surface Stress in SiC and Diamond Nanocrystals by In-situ High Pressure Powder Diffraction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Zhao, Y.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines key properties of the materials. For such materials the serious experimental problem lies in obtaining sufficiently accurate measurements of the structural parameters of the crystals, since very small crystals constitute rather a two-phase than a uniform crystallographic phase system. As a result, elastic properties of nanograins may be expected to reflect a dual nature of their structure, with a corresponding set of different elastic property parameters. We studied those properties by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique. For nanocrystalline, even one-phase materials such measurements are particularly difficult to make since determination of the lattice parameters of very small crystals presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard elaboration of powder diffractograms. In this investigation we used our methodology of the structural analysis, the 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) concept. The methodology allowed us to avoid the traps (if applied to nanocrystals) of standard powder diffraction evaluation techniques. The experiments were performed for nanocrystalline Sic and GaN powders using synchrotron sources. We applied both hydrostatic and isostatic pressures in the range of up to 40 GPa. Elastic properties of the samples were examined based on the measurements of a change of the lattice parameters with pressure. The results show a dual nature of the mechanical properties (compressibilities) of the materials, indicating a complex, core-shell structure of the grains.

  17. Powder Crystallography on Macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Margiolaki,I.; Wright, J.

    2008-01-01

    Following the seminal work of Von Dreele, powder X-ray diffraction studies on proteins are being established as a valuable complementary technique to single-crystal measurements. A wide range of small proteins have been found to give synchrotron powder diffraction profiles where the peak widths are essentially limited only by the instrumental resolution. The rich information contained in these profiles, combined with developments in data analysis, has stimulated research and development to apply the powder technique to microcrystalline protein samples. In the present work, progress in using powder diffraction for macromolecular crystallography is reported.

  18. A combined powder melt and infiltration growth technique for fabricating nano-composited Y-Ba-Cu-O single-grain superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo-Zheng; Li, Jia-Wei; Yang, Wan-Min

    2015-10-01

    The top-seeded melt growth (MG) and infiltration growth (IG) techniques are the two most popular methods of fabricating single-grain Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) bulk superconductors, which are also considered as two distinctly different processes. In this study, we report a combined powder melt and infiltration growth (PM-IG) technique for fabricating nano-composited YBCO single-grain superconductors using raw metallic oxides. In this new technique, a solid source pellet (SSP) of composition nano-Y2O3 + BaO + CuO + 1 wt.%CeO2 and a liquid source pellet (LSP) of composition nano-Y2O3 + 10BaO + 16CuO are employed, thus during heat treatment process the powder melt in SSP (corresponding to the final YBCO bulk) and liquid infiltration from LSP to SSP coexist. Because the process of precursor powder synthesis is avoided, the fabrication flow is much simplified and the experimental efficiency is increased significantly. Microstructural observation indicates that a large number of Y2BaCuO5 nano-inclusions (around 100 nm) are trapped in the YBa2Cu3O7-? superconducting matrix. Measurements of levitation force and trapped field prove the superior performance of the nano-composited YBCO sample. The calculated zero-field J c at 77 K reaches 6.98 104 A cm-2, nearly 23% higher than the sample fabricated by the conventional IG technique. Thus, this study supplies a practical method for fabricating nano-composited YBCO bulk superconductors with high performance.

  19. The development and evaluation of an alternative powder prepregging technique for use with LaRC-TPI/graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogden, Andrea L.; Hyer, Michael W.; Wilkes, Garth L.; Loos, Alfred C.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An alternative powder prepregging method for use with LaRC-TPI (a thermoplastic polyimide)/graphite composites is investigated. The alternative method incorporates the idea of moistening the fiber prior to powder coating. Details of the processing parameters are given and discussed. The material was subsequently laminated into small coupons which were evaluated for processing defects using electron microscopy. After the initial evaluation of the material, no major processing defects were encountered but there appeared to be an interfacial adhesion problem. As a result, prepregging efforts were extended to include an additional fiber system, XAS, and a semicrystalline form of the matrix. The semicrystalline form of the matrix was the result of a complex heat treating cycle. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the fiber/matrix adhesion was evaluated in these systems relative to the amorphous/XAS coupons. Based on these results, amorphous and semicrystalline/AS-4 and XAS materials were prepregged and laminated for transverse tensile testing. The results of these tests are presented, and in an effort to obtain more information on the effect of the matrix, remaining semicrystalline transverse tensile coupons were transformed back to the amorphous state and tested. The mechanical properties of the transformed coupons returned to the values observed for the original amorphous coupons, and the interfacial adhesion, as observed by SEM, was better than in any previous sample.

  20. Investigation on the growth and characterization of nonlinear optical single crystal 4,4'-dimethoxybenzoin by vertical Bridgman technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivazhagan, T.; Rajesh, Narayana Perumal

    2014-12-01

    An organic nonlinear optical (NLO) material 4,4'-dimethoxybenzoin single crystal has been grown by vertical Bridgman technique using single wall ampoule. The grown crystal was confirmed by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The functional groups of the grown crystal were identified by Fourier transform infra red analysis. The thermal behavior of the grown crystal were studied by thermo gravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis. The UV-vis-NIR spectrum has been recorded in the range 190-1100 nm and it shows that the cutoff wavelength of grown crystal is around 343 nm. The yellow emission of the grown crystal was identified by photoluminescence (PL) spectral measurements. The NLO property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz and Perry powder technique and the SHG efficiency of the grown crystal was found to be 2 times greater than KDP. The dielectric measurements were carried out and the results indicate that an increase in dielectric parameters with increase of temperature at all frequencies.

  1. Proteins and Powders: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margiolaki, Irene

    Following the seminal work of Von Dreele, powder X-ray diffraction studies on proteins are being established as a valuable complementary technique to single crystal measurements. A wide range of small proteins have been found to give synchrotron powder diffraction profiles where the peak widths are essentially limited only by the instrumental resolution. The rich information contained in these profiles, combined with developments in data analysis, has stimulated research and development to apply the powder technique to microcrystalline protein samples. In this chapter, progress in using powder diffraction for macromolecular crystallography is reported.

  2. Investigations of BaxSr1-xTiO3 ceramics and powders prepared by direct current arc discharge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuangbin; Yao, Ying; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.; Jia, Yongzhong; Wang, Xiaohan; Xie, Shaolei; Jing, Yan

    2014-09-01

    BaxSr1-xTiO3 ceramics with x ranging from 0 to 1 were prepared by direct current arc discharge technique and studied by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The cubic-tetragonal ferroelectric phase transition in BaxSr1-xTiO3 ceramics was found to occur at x ? 0.75. XRD investigation of as-grown BaTiO3 ceramics revealed co-existence of tetragonal and hexagonal modifications with a small amount of impurity phase BaTi4O9. No evidences of hexagonal phase were observed in Raman spectra of as-grown BaTiO3 ceramics, while Raman peaks related to hexagonal phase were clearly observed in the spectrum of fine-grain powders prepared from the same ceramics. A core-shell model for BaTiO3 ceramics prepared by direct current arc discharge technique is proposed. Absence of the hexagonal phase in any BaxSr1-xTiO3 solid solution with x < 1 is discussed in the frame of specific atomic arrangement.

  3. Investigations of Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3} ceramics and powders prepared by direct current arc discharge technique

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuangbin; Wang, Xiaohan; Yao, Ying Jia, Yongzhong; Xie, Shaolei; Jing, Yan; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.

    2014-09-01

    Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3} ceramics with x ranging from 0 to 1 were prepared by direct current arc discharge technique and studied by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The cubic-tetragonal ferroelectric phase transition in Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3} ceramics was found to occur at x ≈ 0.75. XRD investigation of as-grown BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics revealed co-existence of tetragonal and hexagonal modifications with a small amount of impurity phase BaTi{sub 4}O{sub 9}. No evidences of hexagonal phase were observed in Raman spectra of as-grown BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics, while Raman peaks related to hexagonal phase were clearly observed in the spectrum of fine-grain powders prepared from the same ceramics. A core-shell model for BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics prepared by direct current arc discharge technique is proposed. Absence of the hexagonal phase in any Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3} solid solution with x < 1 is discussed in the frame of specific atomic arrangement.

  4. Rapid analysis of adulterations in Chinese lotus root powder (LRP) by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy coupled with chemometric class modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Shi, Peng-Tao; Ye, Zi-Hong; Yan, Si-Min; Yu, Xiao-Ping

    2013-12-01

    This paper develops a rapid analysis method for adulteration identification of a popular traditional Chinese food, lotus root powder (LRP), by near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics. 85 pure LRP samples were collected from 7 main lotus producing areas of China to include most if not all of the significant variations likely to be encountered in unknown authentic materials. To evaluate the model specificity, 80 adulterated LRP samples prepared by blending pure LRP with different levels of four cheaper and commonly used starches were measured and predicted. For multivariate quality models, two class modeling methods, the traditional soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) and a recently proposed partial least squares class model (PLSCM) were used. Different data preprocessing techniques, including smoothing, taking derivative and standard normal variate (SNV) transformation were used to improve the classification performance. The results indicate that smoothing, taking second-order derivatives and SNV can improve the class models by enhancing signal-to-noise ratio, reducing baseline and background shifts. The most accurate and stable models were obtained with SNV spectra for both SIMCA (sensitivity 0.909 and specificity 0.938) and PLSCM (sensitivity 0.909 and specificity 0.925). Moreover, both SIMCA and PLSCM could detect LRP samples mixed with 5% (w/w) or more other cheaper starches, including cassava, sweet potato, potato and maize starches. Although it is difficult to perform an exhaustive collection of all pure LRP samples and possible adulterations, NIR spectrometry combined with class modeling techniques provides a reliable and effective method to detect most of the current LRP adulterations in Chinese market. PMID:23870978

  5. Polymer powder prepregging: Scoping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throne, James L.

    1988-01-01

    Early on, it was found that NEAT LARC-TPI thermoplastic polyimide powder behaved elastoplastically at pressures to 20 ksi and temperatures to 260 degrees celcius (below MP). At high resin assay, resin powder could be continuously cold-flowed around individual carbon fibers in a metal rolling mill. At low resin assay (2:1, C:TPI), fiber breakage was prohibitive. Thus, although processing of TPI below MP would be quite unique, it appears that the polymer must be melted and flowed to produce low resin assay prepreg. Fiber tow was spread to 75 mm using a venturi slot tunnel. This allowed intimate powder/fiber interaction. Two techniques were examined for getting room temperature powder onto the room temperature fiber surface. Electrostatic powder coating allows the charged powder to cling tenaciously to the fiber, even while heated with a hot air gun to above its melt temperature. A variant of the wet slurry coating process was also explored. The carbon fibers are first wetted with water. Then dry powder is sprinkled onto the wet tow and doctor-rolled between the fibers. The wet structure is then taken onto a heated roll, with hot air guns drying and sinter-melting the powder onto the fiber surfaces. In both cases SEM shows individual fibers coated with powder particles that have melted in place and flowed along the fiber surface via surface tension.

  6. Powder forging

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, H.A.; Ferguson, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental and applications aspects of powder-forging (PF) technology are examined in an introduction and reference guide for practicing engineers. The treatment is based on a combined metallurgical-mechanical approach, and the potential benefits of FEM process simulations and expert-system design-optimization methods are illustrated. Chapters are devoted to materials considerations for PF, PF mechanics, PF analysis, PF process design, and PF practice. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, and micrographs are provided. 160 refs.

  7. Structural, Infrared and Magnetic Properties of Nanosized Ni(x)Zn1-xFe2O4 Powders Synthesized by Sol-Gel Technique.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang-Rong; Zhu, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Cheng; Shen, Hong-Lie

    2015-04-01

    Ni-Zn ferrites Ni(x)Zn1-xFe2O4 (x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8) powders were synthesized by sol-gel technique. Structural, infrared and magnetic properties of samples were investigated. Spinel structural characteristics are shown by XRD spectra and the morphologies observed by atomic force microscopy demonstrate the samples are in nano-range. For all the samples, FTIR spectra exhibit obvious v1 infrared absorbing bands, in the range 500-600 cm-1, corresponding to intrinsic stretching vibrations of the metal ions at the tetrahedral site (Td), Mtetra <--> O. Furthermore, the central position of v1 band is tending to shift to larger wave numbers with the increasing Ni contents in the samples. For the samples Ni(x)Zn1-xFe2O4 (x = 0.2, 0.4), the v2 infrared absorbing bands, in the range 450-385 cm(-1), corresponding to stretching vibrations of the metal ions at the octahedral-metal stretching (Oh), Mocta <--> O, were also observed. However, for samples Ni(x)Zn1-xFe2O4 with higher Ni content (x = 0.5, 0.6, 0.8), the v2 infrared absorbing bands were obscure. The magnetic hysteretic loops at room temperature obtained from vibration samples magnetometer reveal the soft magnetism of the samples. The sample with lowest Ni content, Ni0.2Zn0.8Fe2O4, presents much higher saturation field than the other samples. The coercive field rises with increased Ni content, which is ascribed to the increased magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant with Ni content. PMID:26353559

  8. In vitro and in vivo evaluations of ketoprofen extended release pellets prepared using powder layering technique in a rotary centrifugal granulator.

    PubMed

    Pai, Raveendra; Kohli, Kanchan; Jain, Gaurav; Srivastava, Birendra

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, an extended release pellet dosage form of ketoprofen was prepared using powder layering technique. A combination of ethyl cellulose (45 cps) and shellac polymers was used as a binder (12% w/w polymer) during drug layering and an extended release coating (1:3 ratio at 2%, 4% and 7% w/w polymer) within the same apparatus. The coated pellets were characterized for sphericity, Hardness-Friability Index, and drug content, and also underwent scanning electron microscopy. In vitro dissolution was performed in 900 mL of phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) using paddle apparatus at 100 rpm. Ethyl cellulose and shellac when used as binders during drug loading did not extend ketoprofen release beyond 3 h. However, coating of the drug loaded pellets using ethyl cellulose and shellac resulted in an extended release profile of about 10 h. Using Higuchi's model and the Korsmeyer equation, the drug release mechanism from the pellets was found to be an anomalous type involving diffusion and erosion. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the pellet morphology and drug release mechanism during dissolution testing. In vivo evaluations of the extended release pellets in rats indicated a significant increase in the time to reach maximum concentration (t(max)) and extent of absorption (AUC(0-?)) compared to the ketoprofen immediate release tablet blend dispersed and dosed. In conclusion, extended release pellets of ketoprofen could perform therapeutically better than conventional dosage forms, leading to improved efficacy for a prolonged period. PMID:21811920

  9. Improved Production Of Wrought Articles From Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James R.; Singleton, Ogle R.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique for consolidation of powders into dense articles developed. Peripheral bands used in consolidation, forging, and rolling operations. Facilitates consolidation of dispersion-hardened aluminous powders and composite mixtures for processing to such useful wrought articles as plates and sheets. Potential use in production of plates and sheets and perhaps other objects from "hard" powders, particularly from powders, objects made from which have propensity to crack when mechanically worked to other forms.

  10. Powder metallurgy of superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gessinger, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Powder metallurgy superalloys were developed in the mid-1960's when stronger aircraft turbine disk materials were needed. Their characteristics of greatly reduced segregation, better hot-workability, improved mechanical properties, and cost-effective manufacturing processes made P/M superalloys highly desirable in high-temperature applications. This book deals with prealloyed superalloys including rapidly solidified (RSR) alloys and oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys, as well as processing techniques such as sintering, hot isostatic pressing, extrusion, and isothermal forging. The large range of microstructures possible are correlated with mechanical properties at intermediate and elevated temperatures. Methods of powder production and consolidation are detailed, as are thermomechanical processing principles by which different microstructures can be created. Non-destructive testing techniques, and problems and advances relating to mechanical properties and processing are also covered.

  11. Drying of sweet whey using drum dryer technique and utilization of the produced powder in French-type bread and butter cookies.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, L; Alsaed, A K; Al-Domi, H

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to dry sweet liquid whey using drum dryer and to utilize the whey powder in French-type bread and cookies as a sugar substitute. The sweet whey powder was characterized chemically for ash, moisture, water activity, protein, salt, acidity and lactose contents. Optimization parameters including drying temperature, drum speed and starch addition for whey drying by drum dryer were tested to produce the best powder characteristics. The optimum temperature was 140C at a drum speed of 20 rpm with a corn starch level of 2% (weight per weight). Sweet whey powder produced was used as a sugar replacer in French-type bread and butter cookies at substitution levels of 25, 50 and 75% of total sugars. The developed products were analyzed chemically and sensorially. The two developed products were relatively high in protein, ash, lactose and salts compared to the control samples. Regarding the sensory evaluation, the results showed that the sugar substitution of 25 and 50% in bread and cookies were significantly (p<0.05) better than the control. It can be concluded that sweet whey powder can significantly improve the quality of the studied bakery items. PMID:26035954

  12. Energetic powder

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Danen, Wayne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-12-23

    Fluoroalkylsilane-coated metal particles. The particles have a central metal core, a buffer layer surrounding the core, and a fluoroalkylsilane layer attached to the buffer layer. The particles may be prepared by combining a chemically reactive fluoroalkylsilane compound with an oxide coated metal particle having a hydroxylated surface. The resulting fluoroalkylsilane layer that coats the particles provides them with excellent resistance to aging. The particles can be blended with oxidant particles to form energetic powder that releases chemical energy when the buffer layer is physically disrupted so that the reductant metal core can react with the oxidant.

  13. Ceramic Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In developing its product line of specialty ceramic powders and related products for government and industrial customers, including companies in the oil, automotive, electronics and nuclear industries, Advanced Refractory Technologies sought technical assistance from NERAC, Inc. in specific areas of ceramic materials and silicon technology, and for assistance in identifying possible applications of these materials in government programs and in the automotive and electronics industry. NERAC conducted a computerized search of several data bases and provided extensive information in the subject areas requested. NERAC's assistance resulted in transfer of technologies that helped ART staff develop a unique method for manufacture of ceramic materials to precise customer specifications.

  14. Light extinction in metallic powder beds: Correlation with powder structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rombouts, M.; Froyen, L.; Gusarov, A.V.; Bentefour, E.H.; Glorieux, C.

    2005-07-01

    A theoretical correlation between the effective extinction coefficient, the specific surface area, and the chord length distribution of powder beds is verified experimentally. The investigated powder beds consist of metallic particles of several tens of microns. The effective extinction coefficients are measured by a light-transmission technique at a wavelength of 540 nm. The powder structure is characterized by a quantitative image analysis of powder bed cross sections resulting in two-point correlation functions and chord length distributions. The specific surface area of the powders is estimated by laser-diffraction particle-size analysis and by the two-point correlation function. The theoretically predicted tendency of increasing extinction coefficient with specific surface area per unit void volume is confirmed by the experiments. However, a significant quantitative discrepancy is found for several powders. No clear correlation of the extinction coefficient with the powder material and particle size, and morphology is revealed, which is in line with the assumption of geometrical optics.

  15. A co-precipitation technique to prepare BiNbO{sub 4}, MgTiO{sub 3} and Mg{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gaikwad, A.B.; Navale, S.C.; Samuel, V.; Murugan, A.V.; Ravi, V. . E-mail: ravi@ems.ncl.res.in

    2006-02-02

    A simple co-precipitation technique has been used successfully for the preparation of pure, ultrafine, single phase BiNbO{sub 4} (BN), MgTiO{sub 3} and Mg{sub 4}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}. An aqueous sodium hydroxide or ammonium hydroxide and ammonium carbonate solution was used to precipitate these cations as hydroxides and carbonates simultaneously under basic conditions. These precursors on heating at 750 deg. C, produce the respective powders. For comparison, these compounds were also prepared by the traditional solid state method. The phase purity and lattice parameters were studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Particle size and morphology was studied by transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM)

  16. Powder treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, J.D.

    1988-02-09

    Disclosed are: (1) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder. 2 figs.

  17. Powder treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, John D. (Greensburg, PA)

    1988-01-01

    (1) A process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder.

  18. Development of dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Mahavir B; Padhi, Bijay K; Jinturkar, Kaustubh A; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2007-01-01

    Development of dry powder inhalers involves powder recrystallization, formulation, dispersion, delivery, and deposition of the therapeutic agent in different regions of the airways in prophylaxis/ treatment/ diagnosis of pulmonary and systemic disorders. Conventional powder production by crystallization and milling has many limitations resulting into development of alternative techniques to overcome the problems. In the last decade many patents have been filed claiming improvement in aerosol performance of dry powder inhalers through the use of (i) incorporation of fines of carrier particles to occupy active sites on the surface and use of hydrophobic carriers to facilitate deaggregation through reduced surface energy and particle interaction (ii) reducing aerodynamic diameters through particle engineering and incorporating drug into porous or low particle density, and/or (iii) preparing less cohesive and adhesive particles through corrugated surfaces, low bulk density, reduced surface energy and particle interaction and hydrophobic additives. Moisture within dry powder inhaler (DPI) products has also been shown to influence aerosol performance via capillary force and electrostatic interaction. Better understanding of particle forces and surface energy has been achieved by the use of sophisticated analytical techniques. Understanding the intricacies of particle shape and surface properties influencing specific lung deposition has been further facilitated by the availability of newer and advanced softwares. A critical review of recent patents claiming different approaches to improve lung deposition of dry powder inhalers will help in deciding the focus of the research in the area of technological gaps. PMID:19075871

  19. Simultaneous determination of bromine and iodine in milk powder for adult and infant nutrition by plasma based techniques after digestion using microwave-induced combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoloto, Rochele S.; Doneda, Morgana; Flores, Eder L. M.; Mesko, Marcia F.; Flores, Erico M. M.; Mello, Paola A.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, bromine and iodine determination in milk powder for adult and infant nutrition was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after digestion by microwave-induced combustion (MIC). Contrarily to previous works using MIC, a higher sample mass was digested (700 mg). Water and ammonium hydroxide (10 to 100 mmol L- 1) were investigated as absorbing solutions and accurate results were achieved using a 25 mmol L- 1 NH4OH solution. Moreover, the high stability of analytes after digestion (up to 30 days) using this solution was observed. The accuracy of the proposed MIC method was evaluated using certified and reference materials of milk powder (NIST 1549 and NIST 8435). No statistical difference was observed between results obtained by MIC-ICP-MS and reference values. Results for samples were also compared with those obtained by ICP-OES and no statistical difference was observed. Microwave-assisted alkaline extraction (MW-AE) was also evaluated for milk powder using NH4OH and tetramethylammonium hydroxide solutions. Solutions obtained after digestion by MIC (whole milk powder) presented low carbon content in digests (< 25 mg L- 1) while solutions obtained after alkaline extraction presented up to 10,000 mg L- 1 of C. MIC method was preferable in view of the possibility of obtaining solutions with low carbon content even using a relatively high sample mass (up to 700 mg) avoiding additional dilution prior to ICP-MS analysis, thus allowing better detection limits. Limits of detection obtained by MIC-ICP-MS were 0.007 and 0.003 μg g- 1 for Br and I, respectively, while for MW-AE were 0.1 and 0.05 μg g- 1 respectively for Br and I. Among the main advantages of the proposed method are the use of diluted alkaline solutions that is in agreement with green analytical chemistry recommendations, the high stability of analytes in solution and the suitability of digests for analysis by ICP-MS and also ICP-OES, minimizing memory effects and being advantageous for routine analysis.

  20. Preparation of titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1985-01-01

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  1. Preparation of metal diboride powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group of consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  2. Rapid breakdown anodization technique for the synthesis of high aspect ratio and high surface area anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotube powders

    SciTech Connect

    Antony, Rajini P.; Mathews, Tom; Dasgupta, Arup; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-03-15

    Clusters of high aspect ratio, high surface area anatase-TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with a typical nanotube outer diameter of about 18 nm, wall thickness of approximately 5 nm and length of 5-10 {mu}m were synthesized, in powder form, by breakdown anodization of Ti foils in 0.1 M perchloric acid, at 10 V (299 K) and 20 V ({approx}275 and 299 K). The surface area, morphology, structure and band gap were determined from Brunauer Emmet Teller method, field emmission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopic studies. The tubular morphology and anatase phase were found to be stable up to 773 K and above 773 K anatase phase gradually transformed to rutile phase with disintegration of tubular morphology. At 973 K, complete transformation to rutile phase and disintegration of tubular morphology were observed. The band gap of the as prepared and the annealed samples varied from 3.07 to 2.95 eV with increase in annealing temperature as inferred from photoluminescence and diffuse reflectance studies. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} High aspect ratio anatase-titania nanotube powders were synthesized electrochemically. {yields} The surface area of the nanotubes were much higher than those reported. {yields} The annealing temperature limit for maintaining tubular morphology was established. {yields} The photoluminiscence spectroscopy reflected the presence of defects, annealing of defects and phase transformation. {yields} The nanotubes were of {approx}5 nm wall thickness as revealed by TEM studies.

  3. Making Pure Fine-Grained Inorganic Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    Sustained arc plasma chemical reactor fabricates very-fine-grained inorganic solids having low thermal conductivity. Powder fabrication method, based on plasma tube technique produces pure solids without contamination commonly produced by grinding.

  4. Production of metal powder

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, R.B.

    1982-01-20

    Fine mesh metal powder, such as titanium powder, is prepared by reaction of a halide of the metal, in vapor form, with a fine spray of molten sodium at a temperature below the melting point of the metal.

  5. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Schmale, David T. (Albuquerque, NM); Oliver, Michael S. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  6. Composite powder particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Donald S. (Inventor); MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A liquid coating composition including a coating vehicle and composite powder particles disposed within the coating vehicle. Each composite powder particle may include a magnesium component, a zinc component, and an indium component.

  7. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flumerfelt, Joel Fredrick

    In recent years, the aluminum powder industry has expanded into non-aerospace applications. However, the alumina and aluminum hydroxide in the surface oxide film on aluminum powder require high cost powder processing routes. A driving force for this research is to broaden the knowledge base about aluminum powder metallurgy to provide ideas for fabricating low cost aluminum powder components. The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization commercial inert gas atomization and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). The commercial atomization methods are bench marks of current aluminum powder technology. The GARS process is a laboratory scale inert gas atomization facility. A benefit of using pure aluminum powders is an unambiguous interpretation of the results without considering the effects of alloy elements. A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  8. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  9. Nanoliposomal Dry Powder Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Gaurang; Chougule, Mahavir; Singh, Mandip; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2013-01-01

    Liposomal dry powder formulations (DPFs) have proven their superiority over conventional DPFs due to favorably improved pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of entrapped drugs, and thus, reduced local and systemic toxicities. Nanoliposomal DPFs (NLDPFs) provide stable, high aerosolization efficiency to deep lung, prolonged drug release, slow systemic dilution, and avoid macrophage uptake of encapsulated drug by carrier-based delivery of nano-range liposomes. This chapter describes methods of preparation of nanoliposomes (NLs) and NLDPFs, using various techniques, and their characterization with respect to size distribution, flow behavior, in vitro drug release profile, lung deposition, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity, and in vivo pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Some examples have been detailed for better understanding of the methods of preparation and evaluation of NLDPFs by investigators. PMID:19903555

  10. Explosive containment with spherically tamped powders

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.

    1986-11-15

    An effective technique for maximizing the explosive charge that a given container can safely handle is to fill the space between the charge and the container walls with a porous medium or a powder. Using the wrong powder, however, can be worse than using no powder at all. Moreover, a powder-filled container that performs very well with a small charge may also be worse than a powderless system when the charge is increased. An analysis of this problem is developed with the aim of identifying appropriate buffer material properties and the conditions under which breakdown occurs. The results are compared with various experiments performed with graphite powder, coke chunks, granular salt, snow, and vermiculite.

  11. Multiple feed powder splitter

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

  12. Multiple feed powder splitter

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

  13. Powder metallurgy in 1995

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.G.

    1995-08-01

    The powder metallurgy industry has enjoyed extraordinary growth during the last three years, based on progress in materials, processes, and equipment. Total metal powder shipments increased 18% in 1994 to 426,050 tons. For the first time, North American iron powder shipments went beyond 338,000 tons in 1994, a 17.4% increase over 1993. The copper and copper-base powder markets in 1994 reached 23,000 tons, growing slightly less than 3% over 1993. The parts segment of this market reached 19,670 tons, almost flat with 1993 because of the sharply rising price of copper on world commodity markets. This article will discuss advances in steel powders and processing, the range of iron powder applications, advanced particulate materials, equipment improvements, and standards development.

  14. Cow dung powder poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sherfudeen, Khaja Mohideen; Kaliannan, Senthil Kumar; Dammalapati, Pavan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Cow dung, which has germicidal property, was used in ancient days to clean living premises in South India. Nowadays, people are using commercially available synthetic cow dung powder. It is locally known as "saani powder" in Tamil Nadu. It is freely available in homes and is sometimes accidentally consumed by children. It is available in two colors - yellow and green. Cow dung powder poisoning is common in districts of Tamil Nadu such as Coimbatore, Tirupur, and Erode. We report two cases of yellow cow dung powder poisoning from our hospital. PMID:26730123

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Powder-Metallurgy Process And Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid-solidification processing yields alloys with improved properties. Study undertaken to extend favorable property combinations of I/M 2XXX alloys through recently developed technique of rapid-solidification processing using powder metallurgy(P/M). Rapid-solidification processing involves impingement of molten metal stream onto rapidly-spinning chill block or through gas medium using gas atomization technique.

  17. Structural characterization of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 as a function of temperature using neutron powder diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, A. N.; Wong-Ng, W.; Huang, Q.; Tang, W.; Thompson, A.; Sharp, J.

    2014-08-01

    The structure of Bi2Te3 (Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material (SRM 3451)) and the related phase Sb2Te3 have been characterized as a function of temperature using the neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The neutron structural studies were carried out from 20 K to 300 K for Bi2Te3 and from 10 K to 298 K for Sb2Te3. The EXAFS technique for studying the local structure of the two compounds was conducted from 19 K to 298 K. Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 are isostructural, with a space group of R 3 m. The structure consists of repeated quintuple layers of atoms, Te2-M-Te1-M-Te2 (where M = Bi or Sb) stacking along the c-axis of the unit cell. EXAFS was used to examine the bond distances and static and thermal disorders for the first three shells of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 as a function of temperature. The temperature dependencies of thermal disorders were analyzed using the Debye and Einstein models for lattice vibrations. The Debye and Einstein temperatures for the first two shells of Bi2Te3 are similar to those of Sb2Te3 within the uncertainty in the data. However, the Debye and Einstein temperatures for the third shell of Bi-Bi are significantly lower than those of the third shell of Sb-Sb. The Einstein temperature for the third shell is consistent with a soft phonon mode in both Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3. The lower Einstein temperature of Bi-Bi relative to Sb-Sb is consistent with the lower value of thermal conductivity of Bi2Te3 relative to Sb2Te3.

  18. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 ?m, <75 ?m, and < 45 ?m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 ?m and < 45 ?m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  19. Sintering titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press-and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics, with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  20. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 ?m, <75 ?m, and < 45 ?m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 ?m and < 45 ?m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  1. Ceramic powder synthesis in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, C.L.J.; Russick, E.M.; Cesarano, J; Tadros, M.E.; Voigt, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    Gas-phase processing plays an important role in the commercial production of a number of ceramic powders. These include titanium dioxide, carbon black, zinc oxide, and silicon dioxide. The total annual output of these materials is on the order of 2 million tons. The physical processes involved in gas-phase synthesis are typical of those involved in solution -phase synthesis: chemical reaction kinetics, mass transfer, nucleation, coagulation, and condensation. This report focuses on the work done under a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that explored the use of various high pressure techniques for ceramic powder synthesis. Under this project, two approaches were taken. First, a continuous flow, high pressure water reactor was built and studied for powder synthesis. And second, a supercritical carbon dioxide static reactor, which was used in conjunction with surfactants, was built and used to generate oxide powders.

  2. Cow dung powder poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sherfudeen, Khaja Mohideen; Kaliannan, Senthil Kumar; Dammalapati, Pavan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cow dung, which has germicidal property, was used in ancient days to clean living premises in South India. Nowadays, people are using commercially available synthetic cow dung powder. It is locally known as “saani powder” in Tamil Nadu. It is freely available in homes and is sometimes accidentally consumed by children. It is available in two colors - yellow and green. Cow dung powder poisoning is common in districts of Tamil Nadu such as Coimbatore, Tirupur, and Erode. We report two cases of yellow cow dung powder poisoning from our hospital. PMID:26730123

  3. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (-20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties.

  4. Combustibility of titanium powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Ye. I.; Poyarkov, V. G.; Finayev, Yu. A.

    1989-01-01

    The combustion of compact samples was studied; the mechanism of autoignition is defined. Several studies are made of the combustibility of titanium using 50 samples. The data provide a clear idea of the combustibility of titanium powders.

  5. POWDER COAT APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses an investigation of critical factors that affect the use of powder coatings on the environment, cost, quality, and production. The investigation involved a small business representative working with the National Defense Center for Environmental Excellence (ND...

  6. Comparative study of pure and alkaline earth metallic doped cadmium mercury thiocyanate single crystalsGel technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalainathan, S.; Kumari, P. Nisha Santha

    2009-07-01

    Growth aspects of Ba and Ca doped cadmium mercury thiocyanate (CMTC) single crystals from silica gel by the process of diffusion are discussed. The incorporation of dopants in the crystal has been confirmed by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal the structures of the doped crystals to be tetragonal implying that the incorporation of the dopants has not changed the structure of the parent crystal. The diffraction planes were identified and indexed by powder diffraction analysis. High-resolution X-ray diffraction analyses were carried out to investigate the crystalline perfection of the grown crystals. The grown crystals were characterized by Fourier transform infrared and transmission spectral analyses. Vickers microhardness studies on the grown crystals reveal that they belong to soft material category. Employing powder Kurtz method, their second harmonic generation efficiencies were measured in comparison with urea.

  7. Powder Diffraction: By Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, William I. F.

    This introductory chapter reviews the first 100 years of powder diffraction, decade by decade, from the earliest X-ray powder diffraction measurements of the crystal structure of graphite through to the diversity and complexity of twenty-first century powder diffraction. Carbon features as an illustrative example throughout the discussion of these ten decades from graphite and the disorder of carbon black through to lonsdaleite, the elusive hexagonal polymorph of diamond, and C60, the most symmetrical of molecules. Electronics and computing have played a leading role in the development of powder diffraction, particularly over the past 60 years, and the Moore's Law decade-by-decade rise in computing power is clear in the increasing complexity of powder diffraction experiments and material systems that can be studied. The chapter concludes with a final discussion of decades - the four decades of length-scale from the ngstrom to the micron that not only represent the domain of powder diffraction but are also the distances that will dominate twenty-first century science and technology.

  8. PREPARATION OF METAL POWDER COMPACTS PRIOR TO PRESSING

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, H.

    1958-08-26

    A method of fabricating uranium by a powder metallurgical technique is described. It consists in introducing powdered uranium hydride into a receptacle shaped to coincide with the coatour of the die cavity and heating the hydride so that it decomposes to uranium metal. The metal particles cohere in the shapw of the receptacle and thereafter the prefurmed metal powder is pressed and sintered to obtain a dense compact.

  9. Powder metallurgy repair of turbine components

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, K.A.; Lowden, P.; Liburdi, J. )

    1994-01-01

    An advanced powder metallurgy repair process called Liburdi Powder Metallurgy (LPM) has been developed for the repair, overlay or joining of nickel and cobalt-based high-temperature alloys. This process involves mechanical cleaning, followed by the application and consolidation of a filler metal powder, which has substantially the same composition as the base metal, and producer joints with mechanical properties similar to those of the parent material. While previously activated braze or wide-gap'' repair processes have been limited to clearances of approximately 1 mm, the LPM technique has the ability to bridge larger gaps of over 5 mm. In addition, the LPM joints contain significantly lower concentrations of melting point depressants such as silicon and boron than conventional wide-gap repair techniques and exhibit superior microstructural features. The characteristics and typical applications of the LPM process for blade and vane repairs are highlighted and the results of laboratory and engine tests are discussed.

  10. Recent analytical developments for powder characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackx, E.; Pages, S.; Dugne, O.; Podor, R.

    2015-07-01

    Powders and divided solid materials are widely represented as finished or intermediary products in industries as widely varied as foodstuffs, cosmetics, construction, pharmaceuticals, electronic transmission, and energy. Their optimal use requires a mastery of the transformation process based on knowledge of the different phenomena concerned (sintering, chemical reactivity, purity, etc.). Their modelling and understanding need a prior acquisition of sets of data and characteristics which are more or less challenging to obtain. The goal of this study is to present the use of different physico-chemical characterization techniques adapted to uranium-containing powders analyzed either in a raw state or after a specific preparation (ionic polishing). The new developments touched on concern dimensional characterization techniques for grains and pores by image analysis, chemical surface characterization and powder chemical reactivity characterization. The examples discussed are from fabrication process materials used in the nuclear fuel cycle.

  11. Curcumin content of turmeric and curry powders.

    PubMed

    Tayyem, Reema F; Heath, Dennis D; Al-Delaimy, Wael K; Rock, Cheryl L

    2006-01-01

    Curcumin, derived from the rhizome curcuma longa, is one of the primary ingredients in turmeric and curry powders that are used as spices in Middle Eastern and Asian countries, especially on the Indian subcontinent. More recently, laboratory studies have demonstrated that dietary curcumin exhibits various biological activities and significantly inhibits colon tumorigenesis and tumor size in animals. Curcumin displays both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, giving it the potential to be considered in the development of cancer preventive strategies and applications in clinical research. Experimental studies have shown the biological activities of the compound, but much more information on pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, and food content are needed. Whether the amount of curcumin in turmeric and curry powders is sufficient to suggest effects on biological activities and cancer risk is unknown. To determine and compare the quantitative amounts of curcumin that are present in several brands of turmeric and curry powders, a high performance liquid chromatography technique was used to analyze 28 spice products described as turmeric or curry powders and two negative controls. Pure turmeric powder had the highest curcumin concentration, averaging 3.14% by weight. The curry powder samples, with one exception, had relatively small amounts of curcumin present, and the variability in content was great. The curcumin content of these seasoning products that are consumed as a component of the diet should be considered in evaluating baseline tissue concentration and response to curcumin supplementation, which is under study in chemoprevention trials. PMID:17044766

  12. Structural characterization of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature using neutron powder diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, A. N.; Wong-Ng, W.; Huang, Q.; Tang, W.; Thompson, A.; Sharp, J.

    2014-08-28

    The structure of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material (SRM 3451)) and the related phase Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} have been characterized as a function of temperature using the neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The neutron structural studies were carried out from 20?K to 300?K for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and from 10?K to 298?K for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The EXAFS technique for studying the local structure of the two compounds was conducted from 19?K to 298?K. Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are isostructural, with a space group of R3{sup }m. The structure consists of repeated quintuple layers of atoms, Te2-M-Te1-M-Te2 (where M?=?Bi or Sb) stacking along the c-axis of the unit cell. EXAFS was used to examine the bond distances and static and thermal disorders for the first three shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature. The temperature dependencies of thermal disorders were analyzed using the Debye and Einstein models for lattice vibrations. The Debye and Einstein temperatures for the first two shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are similar to those of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} within the uncertainty in the data. However, the Debye and Einstein temperatures for the third shell of Bi-Bi are significantly lower than those of the third shell of Sb-Sb. The Einstein temperature for the third shell is consistent with a soft phonon mode in both Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The lower Einstein temperature of Bi-Bi relative to Sb-Sb is consistent with the lower value of thermal conductivity of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} relative to Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}.

  13. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  14. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  1. Shock-Wave Consolidation of Nanostructured Bismuth Telluride Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jan; Alvarado, Manuel; Nemir, David; Nowell, Mathew; Murr, Lawrence; Prasad, Narasimha

    2012-06-01

    Nanostructured thermoelectric powders can be produced using a variety of techniques. However, it is very challenging to build a bulk material from these nanopowders without losing the nanostructure. In the present work, nanostructured powders of the bismuth telluride alloy system are obtained in kilogram quantities via a gas atomization process. These powders are characterized using a variety of methods including scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Then the powders are consolidated into a dense bulk material using a shock-wave consolidation technique whereby a nanopowder-containing tube is surrounded by explosives and then detonated. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth of other techniques. We describe the test setup and consolidation results.

  2. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  3. Strength enhancement process for prealloyed powder superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique involving superplastic processing and high pressure autoclaving was applied to a nickel base prealloyed powder alloy. Tensile strengths as high as 2865 MN/sq m at 480 C were obtained with as-superplastically deformed material. Appropriate treatments yielding materials with high temperature tensile and stress rupture strengths were also devised.

  4. Powder towpreg process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1991-01-01

    The process for dry powder impregnation of carbon fiber tows being developed at LaRC overcomes many of the difficulties associated with melt, solution, and slurry prepregging. In the process, fluidized powder is deposited on spread tow bundles and fused to the fibers by radiant heating. Impregnated tows have been produced for preform, weaving, and composite materials applications. Design and operating data correlations were developed for scale up of the process to commercial operation. Bench scale single tow experiments at tow speeds up to 50 cm/sec have demonstrated that the process can be controlled to produce weavable towpreg. Samples were woven and molded into preform material of good quality.

  5. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  6. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-03-01

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  7. Enhanced centrifuge-based approach to powder characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Myles Calvin

    Many types of manufacturing processes involve powders and are affected by powder behavior. It is highly desirable to implement tools that allow the behavior of bulk powder to be predicted based on the behavior of only small quantities of powder. Such descriptions can enable engineers to significantly improve the performance of powder processing and formulation steps. In this work, an enhancement of the centrifuge technique is proposed as a means of powder characterization. This enhanced method uses specially designed substrates with hemispherical indentations within the centrifuge. The method was tested using simulations of the momentum balance at the substrate surface. Initial simulations were performed with an ideal powder containing smooth, spherical particles distributed on substrates designed with indentations. The van der Waals adhesion between the powder, whose size distribution was based on an experimentally-determined distribution from a commercial silica powder, and the indentations was calculated and compared to the removal force created in the centrifuge. This provided a way to relate the powder size distribution to the rotational speed required for particle removal for various indentation sizes. Due to the distinct form of the data from these simulations, the cumulative size distribution of the powder and the Hamaker constant for the system were be extracted. After establishing adhesion force characterization for an ideal powder, the same proof-of-concept procedure was followed for a more realistic system with a simulated rough powder modeled as spheres with sinusoidal protrusions and intrusions around the surface. From these simulations, it was discovered that an equivalent powder of smooth spherical particles could be used to describe the adhesion behavior of the rough spherical powder by establishing a size-dependent 'effective' Hamaker constant distribution. This development made it possible to describe the surface roughness effects of the entire powder through one adjustable parameter that was linked to the size distribution. It is important to note that when the engineered substrates (hemispherical indentations) were applied, it was possible to extract both powder size distribution and effective Hamaker constant information from the simulated centrifuge adhesion experiments. Experimental validation of the simulated technique was performed with a silica powder dispersed onto a stainless steel substrate with no engineered surface features. Though the proof-of-concept work was accomplished for indented substrates, non-ideal, relatively flat (non-indented) substrates were used experimentally to demonstrate that the technique can be extended to this case. The experimental data was then used within the newly developed simulation procedure to show its application to real systems. In the absence of engineered features on the substrates, it was necessary to specify the size distribution of the powder as an input to the simulator. With this information, it was possible to extract an effective Hamaker constant distribution and when the effective Hamaker constant distribution was applied in conjunction with the size distribution, the observed adhesion force distribution was described precisely. An equation was developed that related the normalized effective Hamaker constants (normalized by the particle diameter) to the particle diameter was formulated from the effective Hamaker constant distribution. It was shown, by application of the equation, that the adhesion behavior of an ideal (smooth, spherical) powder with an experimentally-validated, effective Hamaker constant distribution could be used to effectively represent that of a realistic powder. Thus, the roughness effects and size variations of a real powder are captured in this one distributed parameter (effective Hamaker constant distribution) which provides a substantial improvement to the existing technique. This can lead to better optimization of powder processing by enhancing powder behavior models.

  8. Ion beam analysis of powdered samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellschop, J. P. F.; Prins, J. F.; von Wimmersperg, U.; Tredoux, M.; Rebak, M.

    1983-12-01

    Frequently samples are presented in powdered form, or have for reasons of inhomogeneity to be powdered and thoroughly mixed in order to get a representative sample. In other situations while solid samples may be available, in the case of precious minerals such as diamond, they may be very small so that accurate results can inherently not be obtained. Since these problems frequently present themselves with our interests in nuclear geology, solutions to the problem which does not arise in most other analytical techniques have been sought and now established. Two basic approaches will be described together with the instrumentation developed.

  9. Macromolecular powder diffraction : structure solution via molecular.

    SciTech Connect

    Doebbler, J.; Von Dreele, R.; X-Ray Science Division

    2009-01-01

    Macromolecular powder diffraction is a burgeoning technique for protein structure solution - ideally suited for cases where no suitable single crystals are available. Over the past seven years, pioneering work by Von Dreele et al. [1,2] and Margiolaki et al. [3,4] has demonstrated the viability of this approach for several protein structures. Among these initial powder studies, molecular replacement solutions of insulin and turkey lysozyme into alternate space groups were accomplished. Pressing the technique further, Margiolaki et al. [5] executed the first molecular replacement of an unknown protein structure: the SH3 domain of ponsin, using data from a multianalyzer diffractometer. To demonstrate that cross-species molecular replacement using image plate data is also possible, we present the solution of hen egg white lysozyme using the 60% identical human lysozyme (PDB code: 1LZ1) as the search model. Due to the high incidence of overlaps in powder patterns, especially in more complex structures, we have used extracted intensities from five data sets taken at different salt concentrations in a multi-pattern Pawley refinement. The use of image plates severely increases the overlap problem due to lower detector resolution, but radiation damage effects are minimized with shorter exposure times and the fact that the entire pattern is obtained in a single exposure. This image plate solution establishes the robustness of powder molecular replacement resulting from different data collection techniques.

  10. Demystifying Mystery Powders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotar, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Describes science activities which use simple chemical tests to distinguish between materials and to determine some of their properties. Explains the water, iodine, heat, acid, baking soda, acid/base indicator, glucose, and sugar tests. Includes activities to enhance chemical testing and a list of suggested powders for use. (RT)

  11. Dry powder coating of pharmaceuticals: a review.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Dorothea; Cerea, Matteo; DiNunzio, James; McGinity, James

    2013-12-01

    Over the last half century, film coating technology has evolved significantly in terms of compositions and manufacturing processes, allowing for greater functionality, flexibility and efficiency. Driven by a combination of cost considerations and functionality, a range of dry powder coating technologies have been developed in both academic and industrial settings. These technologies can be generally classified into three major types based on the layer formation process: liquid assisted, thermal adhesion and electrostatic. In addition to specific manufacturing processes that must be implemented to achieve the desired product attributes, many of these techniques also require the use of novel excipients and specific formulations to provide acceptable manufacturability. This review summarizes the current dry powder coating technologies and highlights their industrial applicability with publicly disclosed case studies. Commentary on the future directions of dry powder coating is also provided. PMID:23428881

  12. Polymer powders for selective laser sintering (SLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Manfred; Amado, Antonio; Wegener, Konrad

    2015-05-01

    Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is close to be accepted as a production technique (Additive Manufacturing). However, one problem limiting employment of SLS for additive manufacturing in a wide-ranging industrial scope is the narrow variety of applicable polymers. The commonly applied SLS powder to date is polyamide 12 (PA 12). PA 12 or ccompounds of PA 12 (dry blends) are approximately 90 % of complete industrial consumption. The remaining small quantity is distributed on polyamide 11 (PA11) and some other `exotic' polymers (TPU, PEBA, P(E)EK). Industry is awaiting commodity polymers like polypropylene (PP) or polyethylene (PE) crucial to open new market segments. But several approaches launching those polymers failed. But what are the reasons for the difficulties in developing new SLS powders? The contribution is to answer this and highlights the combination of intrinsic and extrinsic polymer properties necessary to generate a polymer powder promising for SLS application. Particle shape, powder distribution, thermal, rheological and optical requirements must be considered and only a particularly controlled property combination leads to successful SLS implementation. Thermal behavior, particle shape and -distribution is discussed in detail, although the other properties can't be disregarded for providing new commercially successful SLS powder finally.

  13. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    SciTech Connect

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  14. Method for synthesizing powder materials

    DOEpatents

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.

    1988-01-21

    A method for synthesizing ultrafine powder materials, for example, ceramic and metal powders, comprises admitting gaseous reactants from which the powder material is to be formed into a vacuum reaction chamber maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric and at a temperature less than about 400/degree/K (127/degree/C). The gaseous reactants are directed through a glow discharge provided in the vacuum reaction chamber to form the ultrafine powder material. 1 fig.

  15. Method to blend separator powders

    DOEpatents

    Guidotti, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM); Andazola, Arthur H. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Frederick W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-12-04

    A method for making a blended powder mixture, whereby two or more powders are mixed in a container with a liquid selected from nitrogen or short-chain alcohols, where at least one of the powders has an angle of repose greater than approximately 50 degrees. The method is useful in preparing blended powders of Li halides and MgO for use in the preparation of thermal battery separators.

  16. Modern developments in powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Aqua, E.N.; Whitman, C.I.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on metal powders. Topics considered at the conference included sintering fundamentals, liquid phase and activated sintering, stainless steels, copper-base powder metallurgy, aluminium alloys, refractory metals, carbides, cutting tools, friction, wear, and powder production.

  17. Proteins and Powders: Technical Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jonathan P.

    Protein powder samples offer many technical challenges for powder diffraction experiments and data analysis. Samples are sensitive to radiation damage and the large unit cells lead to severe peak overlaps, creating interesting challenges. Powder diffraction remains as the unique tool to characterize certain polymorphic forms of crystalline proteins.

  18. Study of Velocity and Materials on Tribocharging of Polymer Powders for Powder Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biris, Alex S.; Trigwell, Steve; Sims, Robert A.; Mazumder, Malay K.

    2005-01-01

    Electrostatic powder deposition is widely used in a plethora of industrial-applications ranging from the pharmaceutical and food.industries, to farm equipment and automotive applications. The disadvantages of this technique are possible back corona (pin-like formations) onset and the Faraday penetration limitation (when the powder does not penetrate in some recessed areas). A possible solution to overcome these problems is to use tribochargers to electrostatically charge the powder. Tribocharging, or contact charging while two materials are in contact, is related to the work function difference between the contacting materials and generates bipolarly charged particles. The generation of an ion-free powder cloud by tribocharging with high bipolar charge and an overall charge density of almost zero, provides a better coverage of the recessed areas. In this study, acrylic and epoxy powders were fluidized and charged by passing through stainless steel, copper, aluminum, and polycarbonate static mixers, respectively. The particle velocity was varied to determine its effect on the net charge-to-mass ratio (QIM) acquired by the powders. In general, the Q/M increases rapidly when the velocity was increased from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, remaining almost constant for higher velocities. Charge separation experiments showed bipolar charging for all chargers.

  19. Processing polymeric powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throne, James L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of uniformly and continuously depositing and sinter-fusing nominal 0.1 to 40 microns dimensioned electrostatically charged polymer powder particles onto essentially uniformly spread 5 to 20 micron grounded continuous fiber tow to produce a respoolable thermoplastic composite two-preg was formulated at NASA Langley. The process was reduced to practice under a NASA grant at the University of Akron this spring. The production of tow-preg is called phase 1. The production of ultrafine polymer powders from 5 to 10 percent (wt) polymer solids in solvent is considered. This is phase 0 and is discussed. The production of unitape from multi tow-pregs was also considered. This is phase 2 and is also discussed. And another approach to phase 1, also proposed last summer, was scoped. This is phase 1A and is also discussed.

  20. Screening mail for powders using terahertz technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Mike

    2011-11-01

    Following the 2001 Anthrax letter attacks in the USA, there has been a continuing interest in techniques that can detect or identify so-called 'white powder' concealed in envelopes. Electromagnetic waves (wavelengths 100-500 ?m) in the terahertz frequency range penetrate paper and have short enough wavelengths to provide good resolution images; some materials also have spectroscopic signatures in the terahertz region. We report on an experimental study into the use of terahertz imaging and spectroscopy for mail screening. Spectroscopic signatures of target powders were measured and, using a specially designed test rig, a number of imaging methods based on reflection, transmission and scattering were investigated. It was found that, contrary to some previous reports, bacterial spores do not appear to have any strong spectroscopic signatures which would enable them to be identified. Imaging techniques based on reflection imaging and scattering are ineffective in this application, due to the similarities in optical properties between powders of interest and paper. However, transmission imaging using time-of-flight of terahertz pulses was found to be a very simple and sensitive method of detecting small quantities (25 mg) of powder, even in quite thick envelopes. An initial feasibility study indicates that this method could be used as the basis of a practical mail screening system.

  1. Vacuum powder injector and method of impregnating fiber with powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Working, Dennis C. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus uniformly impregnate stranded material with dry powder such as low solubility, high melt flow polymer powder to produce, for example, composite prepregs. The stranded material is expanded in an impregnation chamber by an influx of air so that the powder, which may enter through the same inlet as the air, penetrates to the center of the stranded material. The stranded material then is contracted for holding the powder therein. The stranded material and powder may be pulled through the impregnation chamber in the same direction by vacuum. Larger particles of powder which do not fully penetrate the stranded material may be combed into the stranded material and powder which does not impregnate the stranded material may be collected and reused.

  2. Effects of physical properties for starch acetate powders on tableting.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Ossi; Pohja, Seppo; Peltonen, Soili; Suihko, Eero; Vidgren, Mika; Paronen, Petteri; Ketolainen, Jarkko

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate particle and powder properties of various starch acetate powders, to study the effect of these properties on direct compression characteristics, and to evaluate the modification opportunity of physical properties for starch acetate powders by using various drying methods. At the end of the production phase of starch acetate, the slurry of starch acetate was dried using various techniques. Particle, powder, and tableting properties of end products were investigated. Particle size, circularity, surface texture, water content and specific surface area varied according to the particular drying method of choice. However, all powders were freely flowing. Bulk and tapped densities of powders varied in the range of 0.29 to 0.44 g/cm3 and 0.39 to 0.56 g/cm3, respectively. Compaction characteristics revealed that all powders were easily deformed under compression, having yield pressure values of less than 66 MPa according to Heckel analysis. All powders possessed a significant interparticulate bond-forming capacity during compaction. The tensile strength values of tablets varied between 10 and 18 MPa. In conclusion, physical properties of starch acetate could be affected by various drying techniques. A large specific surface area and water content above 4% were favorable properties by direct compression, especially for small, irregular, and rough particles. PMID:12916928

  3. Microstructural development of rapid solidification in Al-Si powder

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, F.

    1995-11-01

    The microstructure and the gradient of microstructure that forms in rapidly solidificated powder were investigated for different sized particles. High pressure gas atomization solidification process has been used to produce a series of Al-Si alloys powders between 0.2 {mu}m to 150 {mu}m diameter at the eutectic composition (12.6 wt pct Si). This processing technique provides powders of different sizes which solidify under different conditions (i.e. interface velocity and interface undercooling), and thus give different microstructures inside the powders. The large size powder shows dendritic and eutectic microstructures. As the powder size becomes smaller, the predominant morphology changes from eutectic to dendritic to cellular. Microstructures were quantitatively characterized by using optical microscope and SEM techniques. The variation in eutectic spacing within the powders were measured and compared with the theoretical model to obtain interface undercooling, and growth rate during the solidification of a given droplet. Also, nucleation temperature, which controls microstructures in rapidly solidified fine powders, was estimated. A microstructural map which correlates the microstructure with particle size and processing parameters is developed.

  4. Reducing metal alloy powder costs for use in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing: Improving the economics for production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Fransisco

    Titanium and its associated alloys have been used in industry for over 50 years and have become more popular in the recent decades. Titanium has been most successful in areas where the high strength to weight ratio provides an advantage over aluminum and steels. Other advantages of titanium include biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Electron Beam Melting (EBM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that has been successfully applied in the manufacturing of titanium components for the aerospace and medical industry with equivalent or better mechanical properties as parts fabricated via more traditional casting and machining methods. As the demand for titanium powder continues to increase, the price also increases. Titanium spheroidized powder from different vendors has a price range from 260/kg-450/kg, other spheroidized alloys such as Niobium can cost as high as $1,200/kg. Alternative titanium powders produced from methods such as the Titanium Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) process and the Armstrong Commercially Pure Titanium (CPTi) process can be fabricated at a fraction of the cost of powders fabricated via gas atomization. The alternative powders can be spheroidized and blended. Current sectors in additive manufacturing such as the medical industry are concerned that there will not be enough spherical powder for production and are seeking other powder options. It is believed the EBM technology can use a blend of spherical and angular powder to build fully dense parts with equal mechanical properties to those produced using traditional powders. Some of the challenges with angular and irregular powders are overcoming the poor flow characteristics and the attainment of the same or better packing densities as spherical powders. The goal of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing alternative and lower cost powders in the EBM process. As a result, reducing the cost of the raw material to reduce the overall cost of the product produced with AM. Alternative powders can be made by blending or re-spheroidizing HDH and CPTi powders. Machine modifications were performed to allow the testing and manufacturing with these low cost alternative powders. A comparison was made between alternative powders and gas atomized powders. Powders were compared in terms of morphology and at the microstructural level. Flowability of different powder blends was also measured. Finally, a comparison of parts fabricated from the multiple powder blends and gas atomized powder was made. It has been demonstrated that powder blending can produce fully dense parts in the Arcam system by utilizing the double melt technique or HIPing the built pars. The double melt technique increased the density of the sample part and modified the microstructure into finer martensitic grains. The HIP process can make a part fully dense regardless of what percentage of HDH powder blending is used. The HIP process yielded the same microstructure, regardless of the grain structure it started with. This research allows for the reduction of costs using titanium powders in the EBM system, but can also be implemented with more costly elements and alloys using other metal AM technologies. This includes niobium, tantalum, and nickel-based superalloys for use in various industries.

  5. Dry powder inhaler formulation.

    PubMed

    Telko, Martin J; Hickey, Anthony J

    2005-09-01

    A drug product combines pharmacologic activity with pharmaceutical properties. Desirable performance characteristics are physical and chemical stability, ease of processing, accurate and reproducible delivery to the target organ, and availability at the site of action. For the dry powder inhaler (DPI), these goals can be met with a suitable powder formulation, an efficient metering system, and a carefully selected device. This review focuses on the DPI formulation and development process. Most DPI formulations consist of micronized drug blended with larger carrier particles, which enhance flow, reduce aggregation, and aid in dispersion. A combination of intrinsic physicochemical properties, particle size, shape, surface area, and morphology affects the forces of interaction and aerodynamic properties, which in turn determine fluidization, dispersion, delivery to the lungs, and deposition in the peripheral airways. When a DPI is actuated, the formulation is fluidized and enters the patient's airways. Under the influence of inspiratory airflow, the drug particles separate from the carrier particles and are carried deep into the lungs, while the larger carrier particles impact on the oropharyngeal surfaces and are cleared. If the cohesive forces acting on the powder are too strong, the shear of the airflow may not be sufficient to separate the drug from the carrier particles, which results in low deposition efficiency. Advances in understanding of aerosol and solid state physics and interfacial chemistry are moving formulation development from an empirical activity to a fundamental scientific foundation. PMID:16122404

  6. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  7. Characterization of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, JA; Garboczi, EJ; Stutzman, PE; Ferraris, CF; Watson, SS; Peltz, MA

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques1 can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical parts, such as those found in aerospace components. The production of AM parts with consistent and predictable properties requires input materials (e.g., metal powders) with known and repeatable characteristics, which in turn requires standardized measurement methods for powder properties. First, based on our previous work, we assess the applicability of current standardized methods for powder characterization for metal AM powders. Then we present the results of systematic studies carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to structure and chemistry, including X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed. The results of these analyses show how virgin powder changes after being exposed to and recycled from one or more Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing build cycles. In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process. PMID:26601040

  8. Characterization of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, J A; Garboczi, E J; Stutzman, P E; Ferraris, C F; Watson, S S; Peltz, M A

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical parts, such as those found in aerospace components. The production of AM parts with consistent and predictable properties requires input materials (e.g., metal powders) with known and repeatable characteristics, which in turn requires standardized measurement methods for powder properties. First, based on our previous work, we assess the applicability of current standardized methods for powder characterization for metal AM powders. Then we present the results of systematic studies carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to structure and chemistry, including X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed. The results of these analyses show how virgin powder changes after being exposed to and recycled from one or more Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing build cycles. In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process. PMID:26601040

  9. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  10. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  11. Crack prevention in shock compaction of powders

    SciTech Connect

    Carton, E. P.; Stuivinga, M.; Verbeek, H. J.

    1998-07-10

    The occurrence of macro-cracks in compacts fabricated by shock compaction of powders is a severe problem preventing this consolidation technique from commercial applications. In this paper the sources of important failure types that typically occur in the cylindrical configuration i.e. radial, transverse, and spiral cracks and the Mach stem are described. Subsequently, solutions for their prevention are given supported by experimental results and/or computer simulations. Some conflicting requirements for obtaining bonded crack-free compacts are discussed.

  12. Strength enhancement process for prealloyed powder superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique involving superplastic processing and high-pressure autoclaving was applied to a nickel-base prealloyed powder alloy. Tensile strengths as high as 2865 MN/sq m (415 ksi) at 480 C (900 F) were obtained with as-superplastically deformed material. Appropriate treatments yielding materials with high-temperature tensile and stress-rupture strengths (980 C (1800 F)) were also devised.

  13. LARC powder prepreg system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1990-01-01

    Thermoplastic prepregs of LARC-TPI have been produced in a fluidized bed unit on spread continuous fiber tows. The powders are melted on the fibers by radiant heating to adhere the polymer to the fiber. This process produces tow prepreg uniformly without imposing severe stress on the fibers or requiring long high temperature residence times for the polymer. Unit design theory and operating correlations have been developed to provide the basis for scale up to commercial operation. Special features of the operation are the pneumatic tow spreader, fluidized bed and resin feed systems.

  14. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  15. Wettability studies of morphine sulfate powders.

    PubMed

    Prestidge, C A; Tsatouhas, G

    2000-04-01

    A capillary penetration technique was used to determine the wettability of morphine sulfate powders by a range of wetting and partially wetting liquids. Wetting rates were found to be dependent on both the properties of the wetting liquid and the morphine sulfate batch. A number of liquids were established as perfectly wetting, and the critical surface tension for morphine sulfate wetting was estimated to be approximately 40 mN m(-1). Effective capillary radii for packed beds of morphine sulfate powders were determined in the range 0.3-0.6 microm; these are compared with particle size, shape and surface area data. From the Washburn approach, the advancing water-particle contact angles for the different morphine sulfate samples were determined to be in the range 57-79 degrees, with errors less than +/-3 degrees. Sessile drop measurements on the same samples were unable to determine reproducible equilibrium contact angles and could not differentiate between the batches. The role of surface chemistry, crystal morphology and crystal structure in controlling morphine sulfate powder wettability was explored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. Contact angles were shown to correlate with both the aspect ratio of the morphine sulfate crystals and the nitrogen-to-oxygen surface atomic concentration ratio, determined by SEM and XPS, respectively. The relative exposure of different crystal faces is considered to play an important role in controlling the wettability of morphine sulfate powders. PMID:10767569

  16. An insight into powder entrainment and drug delivery mechanisms from a modified Rotahaler.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sally; Margo, Kenneth; Parks, Jonathan; Howell, Ruth; Hebbink, Gerald A; Orlando, Laurence; Larson, Ian; Leslie, Philip; Ho, Louise; Morton, David A V

    2014-12-30

    This study aims to improve understanding of the powder fluidisation and aerosolisation processes unique to a split capsule dry powder inhaler. It uses a combination of dynamic real-time methods and a suite of powder material physicochemical characterisation methods. The study focused on examining the effect of different characteristics of lactose carrier employed, and considered specifically the powder fluidisation, entrainment and de-agglomeration mechanisms. A GSK Rotahaler() was selected as the inhaler device. Powder fluidisation and entrainment were investigated using the ensemble technique of laser diffraction and high-speed imaging. This ensemble technique afforded both the powder entrainment profile and simultaneous visual confirmation of the capsule movement and powder fluidisation within the Rotahaler. The results showed that powder fluidisation from a dynamic split capsule was substantially different to that from a static powder bed. Furthermore, the presence of the split capsule dominated powder emission mechanisms from the Rotahaler, regulated by its impaction on the grid/Rotahaler wall and the rotational movement in the entrained air. Of all the material characterisation metrics, the most significant linear correlation was revealed between powder permeability and the aerosolisation efficiency as measured by fine particle fraction (R(2)=0.98). This indicates that drug delivery from the Rotahaler was mainly governed by the influence of the cohesive fine particle size component. Powder permeability as a practical test may afford an effective and practical predictive link between the raw excipients and drug delivery performance from the capsule device. PMID:25196720

  17. Heats of immersion of titania powders in primer solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siriwardane, R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The oxide layer present on titanium alloys can play an important role in determining the strength and durability of adhesive bonds. Here, three titania powders in different crystalline phases, rutile-R1, anatase-A1, and anatase-A2, are characterized by several techniques. These include microelectrophoresis, X-ray diffractometry, surface area pore volume analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and measurements of the heats of immersion. Of the three powders, R1 has the highest heat of immersion in water, while the interaction between water and A1 powder is low. Experimental data also suggest a specific preferential interaction of polyphenylquinoxaline with anatase.

  18. Plasma technology for the production of metallic and ceramic powder

    SciTech Connect

    Vursel, P.B.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma technology gives an opportunity to obtain powders of different materials in a widest range of sizes with desirable properties. Some techniques of production and some properties of ultrafine, refractory, semiconducting, magnetic powders are described. An influence of plasma parameters (temperature, flow rate, composition, rate of heating) and quenching conditions (quenching agent temperature and composition, cooling rate) on chemical and phase compositions, microstructure, particle`s size and shape is established by experiments. The last parameters determine exploitation properties of powders and items made of them.

  19. Linking compaction dynamics to the flow properties of powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumay, G.; Vandewalle, N.; Bodson, C.; Delattre, L.; Gerasimov, O.

    2006-08-01

    The authors have investigated the flow properties of powders by using two classical techniques based on the shear stress measurements and the count of intermittent avalanches, respectively. Results are compared with measurements of the compaction dynamics. Strong correlations are evidenced between compaction relaxation parameters and free flow characteristics. Those correlations are given by semiempirical laws based on physical arguments. This work opens perspectives in powder technology and the knowledge on granular matter.

  20. Processing of PZT ceramics: aqueous mixing procedures for powder consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, B.C.; Lamppa, D.L.; Moore, R.H.

    1986-02-01

    Inhomogeneities in chemical compositions and microstructures can result in lot-to-lot variations in the charge release characteristics of ferroelectric lead-zirconate-titanate ceramics. One source of inhomogeneity is agglomeration and selective sedimentation which occurs during aqueous mixing of the constituent oxides. Procedures using electrostatic and steric stabilization of oxide powders were developed for fabricating homogeneous powder compacts. Use of lead carbonate instead of lead oxide minimizes problems encountered using various slurry stabilization techniques.

  1. Dry powder aerosol delivery systems: current and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hak-Kim

    2006-01-01

    Development of dry powder aerosol delivery system involves powder production, formulation, dispersion, delivery, and deposition of the powder aerosol in the airways. Insufficiency of conventional powder production by crystallization and milling has led to development of alternative techniques. Over the last decade, performance of powder formulations has been improved significantly through the use of engineered drug particles and excipient systems which are (i) of low aerodynamic diameters (being porous or of low particle density), and/or (ii) less cohesive and adhesive (via corrugated surfaces, low bulk density, reduced surface energy and particle interaction, hydrophobic additives, and fine carrier particles). Early insights into particle forces and surface energy that help explain the improvement have been provided by analytical techniques such as the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and inverse gas chromatography (IGC). Relative humidity is critical to the performance of dry powder inhaler (DPI) products via capillary force and electrostatic interaction. Electrostatic charge of different particle size fractions of an aerosol can now be measured using a modified electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI). Compared with powders, much less work has been done on the inhaler devices at the fundamental level. Most recently, computational fluid dynamics has been applied to understand how the inhaler design (such as mouthpiece, grid structure, air inlet) affects powder dispersion. The USP throat is known to under-represent the oropharyngeal deposition of DPI aerosols. Studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) model casts have been undertaken to explain the inter- and intra- subject variation in oropharyngeal deposition. Most of the lung deposition studies performed on commercial products did not allow a thorough understanding of the determinants affecting in vivo lung deposition. A more systematic approach would be necessary to build a useful database on the dependence of lung deposition on the breathing parameters, inhaler design, and powder formulation properties. PMID:16551211

  2. Sol-spray preparation, particulate characteristics, and sintering of alumina powders

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, H.K.; Mani, T.V.; Damodaran, A.D.; Warrier, K.G.K.; Balachandran, U.

    1993-07-01

    Fine alumina powders of spherical morphology and narrow particle-size distribution have been synthesized by a technique that uses precipitation/peptization/spray drying of boehmite sol prepared from aluminum nitrate. The spray-dried powder was further washed with solvents of varying polarities, such as acetone, isopropanol, and tert-butanol. This post-spray-drying treatment changed the powder`s particle-size distribution, morphology, density, and compaction characteristics. Microstructure, dielectric properties, and effect of post-treatment on the boehmite-sol-derived alumina powders in reducing agglomeration are discussed.

  3. Rapid synthesis of gallium nitride powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaqiang; Hunting, Janet; Uheda, Kyota; Lepak, Lori; Konkapaka, Phanikumar; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Spencer, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The synthesis of high purity, single-phase gallium nitride (GaN) powder has been achieved through the reaction between molten Ga and ammonia (NH 3) using Bi as a catalyst. In this simple apparatus, 25 g Ga can be fully, stoichiometrically converted into GaN within 5 h. The optimum temperature, NH 3 flow rate and reaction time in this hot wall tube furnace were 1000 C, 500 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) and 5 h, respectively. The synthesized powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), Raman spectroscopy, and cathodoluminescence (CL). All of these techniques indicated high purity, hexagonal polycrystalline GaN with 1-20 ?m across plate like grains.

  4. Mound powder loader, Mod 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gress, A.V. Jr.

    1985-08-21

    At the investigation of Sandia Albuquerque, a semiautomatic powder loader was designed and fabricated for pyrotechnics devices. The basic functions of the system were to load a precise, measured amount of powder into a charge holder and to compact the mixture to a specified density. This report documents the history, rationale, design, and performance of the Mod 1 loader.

  5. Infrared-optical transmission and reflection measurements on loose powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, J.; Korder, S.; Arduini-Schuster, M. C.; Caps, R.; Fricke, J.

    1993-09-01

    A method is described to determine quantitatively the infrared-optical properties of loose powder beds via directional-hemispherical transmission and reflection measurements. Instead of the integration of the powders into a potassium bromide (KBr) or a paraffin oil matrix, which would drastically alter the scattering behavior, the powders are placed onto supporting layers of polyethylene (PE) and KBr. A commercial spectrometer is supplemented by an external optics, which enables measurements on horizontally arranged samples. For data evaluation we use a solution of the equation of radiative transfer in the 3-flux approximation under boundary conditions adapted to the PE or KBr/powder system. A comparison with Kubelka-Munk's theory and Schuster's 2-flux approximation is performed, which shows that 3-flux approximation yields results closest to the exact solution. Equations are developed, which correct transmission and reflection of the samples for the influence of the supporting layer and calculate the specific extinction and the albedo of the powder and thus enables us to separate scattering and absorption part of the extinction spectrum. Measurements on TiO2 powder are presented, which show the influence of preparation techniques and data evaluation with different methods to obtain the albedo. The specific extinction of various TiO2 powders is presented.

  6. 3D CO2 laser synthesis from thermoreactive resin powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, Vadim P.; Yakovlev, A. G.

    1998-12-01

    Short review of 3-D Laser Synthesis (3D LS) or Rapid Prototyping (RP) is given, including three mali directions such as stereolithography (STL), laminated object manufacturing (LOM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). Comparative advantages and disadvantages of every one of them are discussed. The new direction of 3-D LS is suggested, combining advantages of STL and SLS. This direction based on the creation of 3D models from the resin's powder. The physical processes of the new technique similar with STL- process. In spite of the phase state of the initial material (powder) the mechanism of solidification has many skills of STL with viscous digomer. There are many new possibilities in the process with powder polymerization. One can use not mechanical devices (which are very complex) for powder deposition but electrostatic and so on. Some physical phenomena of powder solidification under the CO2-laser action are studied, as speed of the process, which is much higher than under the conventional heating and so on. The experimental results of the process investigation are discussed. In particular the chemical analysis of the solidificated model is made which confirm that initial powder under laser treatment gave perfect resin. Main advantages of the new methods are the cheapness of the initial material and good mechanical quality of models, which expands the field of application of models made with described powder.

  7. Development of Spray-Freeze-Dried Powders for Inhalation with High Inhalation Performance and Antihygroscopic Property.

    PubMed

    Otake, Hiroko; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2016-03-01

    Spray-freeze-drying (SFD) is a unique powderization technique to produce highly porous dry powders with a low density. The characteristic morphology can markedly contribute to the superior inhalation performances of SFD powders. Due to the increased specific surface area of the powders, however, moisture adsorption may readily occur, subsequently leading to losses of their inhalation potentials. In this study, hydrophobic amino acids were newly applied as pharmaceutical excipients to obtain SFD powders with both a favorable inhalation performance and antihygroscopic property. SFD powders composed of several hydrophobic amino acids were prepared. The morphology, particle size distribution, and crystallinity of the prepared powders were evaluated by scanning electron micrography, laser diffraction, and X-ray powder diffraction, respectively. The inhalation characteristics of the SFD powders were examined using a twin-stage liquid impinger equipped with an inspiratory pattern simulator and devices. To investigate their antihygroscopicity, moreover, the SFD powders were stored under a humidified condition to assess the morphology, crystallinity, and inhalation performance as described above. It was demonstrated that a SFD powder composed of L-leucine, L-isoleucine, or L-phenylalanine showed a superior inhalation performance, which was sufficiently maintained after storage under the humidified condition, strongly indicating their antihygroscopicity. These results indicated that the hygroscopicity of SFD powders can be effectively improved by the application of hydrophobic amino acids as excipients. PMID:26725381

  8. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis are familiar to laboratory diffractionists. This is reflected in the fact that there are already dedicated instruments for powder diffraction at a number of synchrotrons sources, including the NSLS, the Synchrotrons Radiation Source, Daresbury, the Photon Factory, Tsukuba and HASYLAB. In addition, most general purpose beamlines can be adapted for powder diffraction experiments fairly easily. Dedicated beamlines are also planned or under consideration at the next generation of synchrotrons sources, the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, and the SPring-8 machine at Harima. These will be high brilliance sources with a much harder radiation spectrum that will offer many new possibilities for powder diffraction experiments, especially at energies above 10 keV.

  9. Structural materials by powder HIP for fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellis, C.; Le Marois, G.; van Osch, E. V.

    1998-10-01

    Tokamak blankets have complex shapes and geometries with double curvature and embedded cooling channels. Usual manufacturing techniques such as forging, bending and welding generate very complex fabrication routes. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is a versatile and flexible fabrication technique that has a broad range of commercial applications. Powder HIP appears to be one of the most suitable techniques for the manufacturing of such complex shape components as fusion reactor modules. During the HIP cycle, consolidation of the powder is made and porosity in the material disappears. This involves a variation of 30% in volume of the component. These deformations are not isotropic due to temperature gradients in the part and the stiffness of the canister. This paper discusses the following points: (i) Availability of manufacturing process by powder HIP of 316LN stainless steel (ITER modules) and F82H martensitic steel (ITER Test Module and DEMO blanket) with properties equivalent to the forged one.(ii) Availability of powerful modelling techniques to simulate the densification of powder during the HIP cycle, and to control the deformation of components during consolidation by improving the canister design.(iii) Material data base needed for simulation of the HIP process, and the optimisation of canister geometry.(iv) Irradiation behaviour on powder HIP materials from preliminary results.

  10. AVLIS modified direct denitration: UO{sub 3} powder evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Slagle, O.D.; Davis, N.C.; Parchen, L.J.

    1994-02-01

    The evaluation study demonstrated that AVLIS-enriched uranium converted to UO{sub 3} can be used to prepare UO{sub 3} pellets having densities in the range required for commercial power reactor fuel. Specifically, the program has demonstrated that MDD (Modified Direct Denitration)-derived UO{sub 2} powders can be reduced to sinterable UO{sub 2} powder using reduction techniques that allow control of the final powder characteristics; the resulting UO{sub 2} powders can be processed/sintered using standard powder preparation and pellet fabrication techniques to yield pellets with densities greater than 96% TD; pellet microstructures appear similar to those of power reactor fuel, and because of the high final pellet densities, it is expected that they would remain stable during in-reactor operation; the results of the present study confirm the results of a similar study carried out in 1982 (Davis and Griffin 1992). The laboratory processes were selected on the basis that they could be scaled up to standard commercial fuel processing. However, larger scale testing may be required to establish techniques compatible with commercial fuel fabrication techniques.

  11. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... specified name of the food is Vanilla powder _-fold or _-fold vanilla powder, except that if sugar is...-fold, the term _-fold is omitted from the name. (2) The label of vanilla powder shall bear the...

  12. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO); Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  13. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, R.

    1998-08-04

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products. 7 figs.

  14. Synthesis of Cu-CNT nanocomposite powder by ball milling.

    PubMed

    Kim, B J; Oh, S Y; Yun, H S; Ki, J H; Kim, C J; Baik, S; Lim, B S

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, to improve the poor wettability between the Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and metal matrix, the mechanical alloying (MA) technique by the ball milling method was employed. Also, the CNTs were pre-coated to improve the agglomeration of the CNTs with copper powder. The main aim of this work is the fabrication of Cu-CNT nanocomposite powder using the MA by ball milling. The as-received dendritic copper powders change their shape sequentially to flaky, disk-typed particles and finally, to globular type particles. Also, the tendency of globular formation was prominent in the milled Cu-Cu coated MWNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes) powder and the grain size of the sintered Cu coated MWNTs specimen decreased more than that of the pure copper specimen. Finally, the homogeneous Cu-CNT nanocomposite intermetallic particles having fine grains was produced by the MA method of ball milling. PMID:19908795

  15. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Weaver, Fred J.

    1995-01-01

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2/ g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

  16. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Weaver, Fred J.

    1996-01-01

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2/ g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

  17. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Weaver, Fred J.

    1994-01-01

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2 /g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

  18. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOEpatents

    Harris, M.T.; Basaran, O.A.; Kollie, T.G.; Weaver, F.J.

    1996-01-02

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm{sup 3} and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m{sup 2}/g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraalkyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders. 2 figs.

  19. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  20. Shock compaction of molybdenum powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Kostka, D.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Schwarz, R. B.; Kasiraj, P.

    1983-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments which were carried out in the 9 to 12 GPa range on 1.4 distension Mo and appear adequate to compact to full density ( 45 (SIGMA)m) powders were examined. The stress levels, however, are below those calculated to be from 100 to approx. 22 GPa which a frictional heating model predicts are required to consolidate approx. 10 to 50 (SIGMA)m particles. The model predicts that powders that have a distension of m=1.6 shock pressures of 14 to 72 GPa are required to consolidate Mo powders in the 50 to 10 (SIGMA)m range.

  1. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  2. Thermal analysis of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and development of a powder aging model

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Sandstrom, Mary M; Giambra, Anna M; Archuleta, Jose G; Monroe, Deirde C

    2009-01-01

    We have applied a range of different physical and thermal analysis techniques to characterize the thermal evolution of the specific surface area of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) powders. Using atomic force microscopy we have determined that the mass transfer mechanism leading to powder coarsening is probably sublimation and redeposition of PETN. Using thermogravimetric analysis we have measured vapor pressures of PETN powders whose aging will be simulated in future work. For one specific powder we have constructed an empirical model of the coarsening that is fit to specific surface area measurements at 60 C to 70 C to provide predictive capability of that powder's aging. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectroscopy measurements highlight some of the thermal behavior of the powders and suggest that homologue-based eutectics and impurities are localized in the powder particles.

  3. Measurements of Powder-Polymer Mixture Properties and Their Use in Powder Injection Molding Simulations for Aluminum Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kate, Kunal H.; Onbattuvelli, Valmikanathan P.; Enneti, Ravi K.; Lee, Shi W.; Park, Seong-Jin; Atre, Sundar V.

    2012-09-01

    Aluminum nitride has been favored for applications in manufacturing substrates for heat sinks due to its elevated temperature operability, high thermal conductivity, and low thermal expansion coefficient. Powder injection molding is a high-volume manufacturing technique that can translate these useful material properties into complex shapes. In order to design and fabricate components from aluminum nitride, it is important to know the injection-molding behavior at different powder-binder compositions. However, the lack of a materials database for design and simulation at different powder-polymer compositions is a significant barrier. In this paper, a database of rheological and thermal properties for aluminum nitride-polymer mixtures at various volume fractions of powder was compiled from experimental measurements. This database was used to carry out mold-filling simulations to understand the effects of powder content on the process parameters and defect evolution during the injection-molding process. The experimental techniques and simulation tools can be used to design new materials, select component geometry attributes, and optimize process parameters while eliminating expensive and time-consuming trial-and-error practices prevalent in the area of powder injection molding.

  4. Powder processing of hybrid titanium neural electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose Luis, Jr.

    A preliminary investigation into the powder production of a novel hybrid titanium neural electrode for EEG is presented. The rheological behavior of titanium powder suspensions using sodium alginate as a dispersant are examined for optimal slip casting conditions. Electrodes were slip cast and sintered at 950C for 1 hr, 1000C for 1, 3, and 6 hrs, and 1050C for 1 hr. Residual porosities from sintering are characterized using Archimedes' technique and image analysis. The pore network is gel impregnated by submerging the electrodes in electrically conductive gel and placing them in a chamber under vacuum. Gel evaporation of the impregnated electrodes is examined. Electrodes are characterized in the dry and gelled states using impedance spectrometry and compared to a standard silver- silver chloride electrode. Power spectral densities for the sensors in the dry and gelled state are also compared. Residual porosities for the sintered specimens were between 50.59% and 44.81%. Gel evaporation tests show most of the impregnated gel evaporating within 20 min of exposure to atmospheric conditions with prolonged evaporation times for electrodes with higher impregnated gel mass. Impedance measurements of the produced electrodes indicate the low impedance of the hybrid electrodes are due to the increased contact area of the porous electrode. Power spectral densities of the titanium electrode behave similar to a standard silver-silver chloride electrode. Tests suggest the powder processed hybrid titanium electrode's performance is better than current dry contact electrodes and comparable to standard gelled silver-silver chloride electrodes.

  5. Effects of Powder Attributes and Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) Process Conditions on the Densification and Mechanical Properties of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrinki, Harish; Dexter, Michael; Barmore, Brenton; Enneti, Ravi; Pasebani, Somayeh; Badwe, Sunil; Stitzel, Jason; Malhotra, Rajiv; Atre, Sundar V.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of powders attributes (shape and size distribution) and critical processing conditions (energy density) on the densification and mechanical properties of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) 17-4 PH stainless steel were studied using four types of powders. The % theoretical density, ultimate tensile strength and hardness of both water- and gas-atomized powders increased with increased energy density. Gas-atomized powders showed superior densification and mechanical properties when processed at low energy densities. However, the % theoretical density and mechanical properties of water-atomized powders were comparable to gas-atomized powders when sintered at a high energy density of 104 J/mm3. An important result of this study was that, even at high % theoretical density (97% ± 1%), the properties of as-printed parts could vary over a relatively large range (UTS: 500-1100 MPa; hardness: 25-39 HRC; elongation: 10-25%) depending on powder characteristics and process conditions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of using relatively inexpensive water-atomized powders as starting raw material instead of the typically used gas-atomized powders to fabricate parts using L-PBF techniques by sintering at high energy densities.

  6. Effects of Powder Attributes and Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) Process Conditions on the Densification and Mechanical Properties of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrinki, Harish; Dexter, Michael; Barmore, Brenton; Enneti, Ravi; Pasebani, Somayeh; Badwe, Sunil; Stitzel, Jason; Malhotra, Rajiv; Atre, Sundar V.

    2016-03-01

    The effects of powders attributes (shape and size distribution) and critical processing conditions (energy density) on the densification and mechanical properties of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) 17-4 PH stainless steel were studied using four types of powders. The % theoretical density, ultimate tensile strength and hardness of both water- and gas-atomized powders increased with increased energy density. Gas-atomized powders showed superior densification and mechanical properties when processed at low energy densities. However, the % theoretical density and mechanical properties of water-atomized powders were comparable to gas-atomized powders when sintered at a high energy density of 104 J/mm3. An important result of this study was that, even at high % theoretical density (97% ± 1%), the properties of as-printed parts could vary over a relatively large range (UTS: 500-1100 MPa; hardness: 25-39 HRC; elongation: 10-25%) depending on powder characteristics and process conditions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of using relatively inexpensive water-atomized powders as starting raw material instead of the typically used gas-atomized powders to fabricate parts using L-PBF techniques by sintering at high energy densities.

  7. Ceramic powder for sintering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akiya, H.; Saito, A.

    1984-01-01

    Surface activity of ceramic powders such as MgO and Al2O3, for use in sintering with sp. emphasis on their particle size, shape, particle size distribution, packing, and coexisting additives and impurities are reviewed.

  8. Rotary powder feed through apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A device for increasing the uniformity of solids within a solids fabrication system, such as a direct light fabrication (DLF) system in which gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention provides a feed through interface wherein gas entrained powders input from stationary input lines are coupled to a rotating head of the fabrication system. The invention eliminates the need to provide additional slack in the feed lines to accommodate head rotation, and therefore reduces feed line bending movements which induce non-uniform feeding of gas entrained powder to a rotating head.

  9. Laser production of articles from powders

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, G.K.; Milewski, J.O.; Cremers, D.A.; Nemec, R.B.; Barbe, M.R.

    1998-11-17

    Method and apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. Preferably the tool path and other parameters of the deposition process are established using computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of a deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which a deposition head which delivers the laser beam and powder to the deposition zone moves along the tool path. 20 figs.

  10. Laser production of articles from powders

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Nemec, Ronald B. (White Rock, NM); Barbe, Michael R. (White Rock, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. Preferably the tool path and other parameters of the deposition process are established using computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of a deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which a deposition head which delivers the laser beam and powder to the deposition zone moves along the tool path.

  11. Luminescence of powdered uranium glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, A. G.; Mcgarrity, J. M.; Silverman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement of cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence efficiencies in powdered borosilicate glasses having different particle size and different uranium content. Excitation with 100 to 350 keV electrons and with 253.7 nm light was found to produce identical absolute radiant exitance spectra in powdered samples. The most efficient glass was one containing 29.4 wt% B2O3, 58.8 wt% SiO2, 9.8 wt% Na2O and 2.0 wt% UO2.

  12. Neutron detectors comprising boron powder

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

    2013-05-21

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  13. Method for Production of Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M. (Inventor); Sircar, Subhasish (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for producing oxides of metals and of metal alloys. The metal or alloy is placed in an oxygen atmosphere in a combustion chamber and ignited. Products of the combustion include one or more oxides of the metal or alloy in powdered form. In one embodiment of the invention a feeder is provided whereby material to be oxidized by combustion can be achieved into a combustion chamber continuously. A product remover receives the powder product of the combustion.

  14. Powder collection apparatus/method

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Terpstra, R.L.; Moore, J.A.

    1994-01-11

    Device for separating and collecting ultrafine atomized powder from the gas stream of a gas atomizing apparatus comprises a housing having an interior wall oriented at an angle relative to horizontal so as to form a downwardly converging, conical expansion chamber, an inlet conduit communicated to the expansion chamber proximate an upper region thereof for receiving the gas stream, and an outlet proximate a lower region of the expansion chamber. The inlet conduit is oriented at a compound inclined angle (with respect to horizontal) selected to promote separation and collection of powder from the gas stream in the expansion chamber. The compound angle comprises a first entrance angle that is greater than the angle of repose of the powder on the housing interior wall such that any powder accumulation in the inlet conduit tends to flow down the wall toward the outlet. The second angle is selected generally equal to the angle of the housing interior wall measured from the same horizontal plane so as to direct the gas stream into the expansion chamber generally tangent to the housing interior wall to establish a downward swirling gas stream flow in the expansion chamber. A powder collection container is communicated to the outlet of the expansion chamber to collect the powder for further processing. 4 figures.

  15. Powder collection apparatus/method

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA); Moore, Jeffery A. (Ames, IA)

    1994-01-11

    Device for separating and collecting ultrafine atomized powder from the gas stream of a gas atomizing apparatus comprises a housing having an interior wall oriented at an angle relative to horizontal so as to form a downwardly converging, conical expansion chamber, an inlet conduit communicated to the expansion chamber proximate an upper region thereof for receiving the gas stream, and an outlet proximate a lower region of the expansion chamber. The inlet conduit is oriented at a compound inclined angle (with respect to horizontal) selected to promote separation and collection of powder from the gas stream in the expansion chamber. The compound angle comprises a first entrance angle that is greater than the angle of repose of the powder on the housing interior wall such that any powder accumulation in the inlet conduit tends to flow down the wall toward the outlet. The second angle is selected generally equal to the angle of the housing interior wall measured from the same horizontal plane so as to direct the gas stream into the expansion chamber generally tangent to the housing interior wall to establish a downward swirling gas stream flow in the expansion chamber. A powder collection container is communicated to the outlet of the expansion chamber to collect the powder for further processing.

  16. A fluidized bed process for electron sterilization of powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Sam V.; Wood, James C.; Desrosiers, Marc F.; Nagy, Vitaly Yu.

    1998-06-01

    A small capacity (100 g.s -1) pilot system is described for presentation of powders and fine aggregates at high velocity, to an electron beam. Electron beam dose rate is continuously monitored in real time, while the thickness of the fluidized bed used to pneumatically transport the product can be monitored and controlled using beta-gauge techniques. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques, alanine power mixed with the product is used for precise determination of dose delivered to the powder stream. Thin film dosimeters transported in the bed are also used for dose determination. Results with a variety of products are presented using both dose rate and velocity as the independent variables. Lethality data for the bioburdens present in several powdered foodstuffs are discussed.

  17. Powder lubrication of faults by powder rolls in gouge zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Madden, A. S.; Reches, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Powder-lubrication by fault gouge can be an effective mechanism of dynamic weakening of faults (Reches & Lockner, 2010); however, the physical mechanisms of this lubrication are poorly understood. While the flow of coarse-grained (> 100 ?m) materials, e.g. glass beads or quartz sand, was extensively studied, the flow of fine-grained (< 1 ?m) powders, e.g., fault-gouge and nano-powders, have remained enigmatic. We report here experimental results of a new efficient mechanism for powder lubrication. We conducted friction tests on high-velocity rotary shear apparatus (Reches & Lockner, 2010). Two types of experimental faults were tested: (1) faults made of solid, igneous rocks (granite, tonalite and diorite); and (2) fault-zones made of 2-3 mm thick layer of granular materials (oolites, calcite or gypsum) sheared in a confined cell. We performed 21 runs with total slip of 0.14-13 m, normal stress of 1.2-14.5 MPa, slip velocity of 0.012-0.97 m/s. The ultra-microscopic (SEM and AFM) analysis of the experimental slip surfaces revealed two outstanding features in 17 out of the 21 experiments: (1) localized fault-slip along Principal Slip Zones (PSZs) that are composed of a dense, shiny, cohesive crust, 0.5-1 micron thick, that overlaid a porous substrate, and (2) elongated rolls composed of gouge-powder into three-dimensional structures of closely-packed powder grains, (20-50 nm in size). The rolls are cylindrical, 0.75-1.4 micron wide, and 1.7-30 micron long, with smooth outer surface, and laminated, concentric layers of compacted grains. The rolls were exclusively found on the PSZs. Many rolls were destroyed fracturing and smearing on the PSZ, suggesting that the rolls underwent a life cycle of formation and destruction. Significant macroscopic friction reduction was measured in experiments with observed rolls, and no (or minor) friction reduction in the four experiments without rolls. The final, reduced friction coefficients have a general reciprocal relation to the rolls surface coverage, suggesting that increased development of rolls (= increasing surface coverage) enhanced fault weakening. We applied the Eldredge and Tabor (1955) model for rolling friction to the AFM observed morphology of the rolls and PSZs, and found good agreement between measured and modeled friction coefficients. We conclude that the measured friction reduction reflects a transition from sliding-dominated slip to rolling-dominated slip due to the presence and density of powder rolls. We further argue that powder rolling is an effective mechanism of powder lubrication, and that spontaneous growth of such rolls along crustal faults is likely to control earthquake weakening.

  18. Permanent magnet microstructures using dry-pressed magnetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oniku, Ololade D.; Bowers, Benjamin J.; Shetye, Sheetal B.; Wang, Naigang; Arnold, David P.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents microfabrication methods and performance analysis of bonded powder permanent magnets targeting dimensions ranging from 10 m to greater than 1 mm. For the structural definition and pattern transfer, a doctor blade technique is used to dry press magnetic powders into pre-etched cavities in a silicon substrate. The powders are secured in the cavities by one of the three methods: capping with a polyimide layer, thermal reflow of intermixed wax-binder particles, or conformal coating with a vapor-deposited parylene-C film. A systematic study of micromagnets fabricated using these methods is conducted using three different types of magnetic powders: 50 m Nd-Fe-B, 5 m Nd-Fe-B and 1 m barium ferrite powder. The isotropic magnets are shown to exhibit intrinsic coercivities (Hci) as high as 720 kA m-1, remanences (Br) up to 0.5 T and maximum energy products (BHmax) up to 30 kJ m-3, depending on the magnetic powder used. Process compatibility experiments demonstrate the potential for the magnets to withstand typical microfabrication chemical exposure and thermal cycles, thereby facilitating their integration into more complex process flows. The remanences are also characterized at elevated temperatures to determine thermal sensitivities and maximum operating temperature ranges.

  19. Formulation of a dry powder influenza vaccine for nasal delivery.

    PubMed

    Garmise, Robert J; Mar, Kevin; Crowder, Timothy M; Hwang, C Robin; Ferriter, Matthew; Huang, Juan; Mikszta, John A; Sullivan, Vincent J; Hickey, Anthony J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to prepare a dry powder vaccine formulation containing whole inactivated influenza virus (WIIV) and a mucoadhesive compound suitable for nasal delivery. Powders containing WIIV and either lactose or trehalose were produced by lyophilization. A micro-ball mill was used to reduce the lyophilized cake to sizes suitable for nasal delivery. Chitosan flakes were reduced in size using a cryo-milling technique. Milled powders were sieved between 45 and 125 microm aggregate sizes and characterized for particle size and distribution, morphology, and flow properties. Powders were blended in the micro-ball mill without the ball. Lyophilization followed by milling produced irregularly shaped, polydisperse particles with a median primary particle diameter of approximately 21 microm and a yield of approximately 37% of particles in the 45 to 125 microm particle size range. Flow properties of lactose and trehalose powders after lyophilization followed by milling and sieving were similar. Cryo-milling produced a small yield of particles in the desired size range (<10%). Lyophilization followed by milling and sieving produced particles suitable for nasal delivery with different physicochemical properties as a function of processing conditions and components of the formulation. Further optimization of particle size and morphology is required for these powders to be suitable for clinical evaluation. PMID:16584149

  20. 30 CFR 56.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black powder. 56.6901 Section 56.6901 Mineral....6901 Black powder. (a) Black powder shall be used for blasting only when a desired result cannot be...) Containers of black powder shall be— (1) Nonsparking; (2) Kept in a totally enclosed cargo space while...

  1. 30 CFR 57.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black powder. 57.6901 Section 57.6901 Mineral...-Surface and Underground § 57.6901 Black powder. (a) Black powder shall be used for blasting only when a... dimension stone. (b) Containers of black powder shall be— (1) Nonsparking; (2) Kept in a totally...

  2. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper....

  3. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper....

  4. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper....

  5. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper....

  6. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper....

  7. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.L.; Chenghung Hung.

    1993-12-07

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions. 14 figures.

  8. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Joseph L. (Baltimore, MD); Hung, Cheng-Hung (Baltimore, MD)

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions.

  9. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C.

    2012-07-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  10. Advances in powder metallurgy; Proceedings of the 1989 Powder Metallurgy Conference and Exhibition, San Diego, CA, June 11-14, 1989. Volumes 1, 2, 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gasbarre, T.G.; Jandeska, W.F. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in powder-metallurgy (PM) techniques and the applications of PM materials are discussed in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to blending technologies, compressibility, compaction processes, enhanced sintering, high-temperature sintering, postsinter heat treatment, powder forging, alloy development, mechanical properties, PM testing and characterization, statistical process control, powder production techniques, and spray forming. Consideration is given to Al and Cu alloys, stainless and tool steels, heavy metals, high-performance materials, superconductors and magnetic materials, metal injection molding, and PM aerospace materials. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, micrographs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  11. Plasma-chemical method for producing metal oxide powders and their application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, I.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Promakhov, V.; Bondarchuk, I.; Zhukov, A.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2015-11-01

    Structure and properties of ZrO2 and Al2O3 powders produced using plasma chemical technique were studied in the framework of this research. Obtained Al2O3 powder was used for reinforcement of Al alloy. Improvement of mechanical properties of Al alloy associated with introduction of alumina particles into the melt was demonstrated.

  12. Plasma-Chemical Synthesis of Nanosized Powders-Nitrides, Carbides, Oxides, Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katerina, Zaharieva; Gheorghi, Vissokov; Janis, Grabis; Slavcho, Rakovsky

    2012-11-01

    In this article the plasma-chemical synthesis of nanosized powders (nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes) is reviewed. Nanosized powders - nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes have been successfully produced using different techniques, technological apparatuses and conditions for their plasma-chemical synthesis.

  13. Assessing flowability of small quantities of cohesive powder using distinct element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, Massih; Hare, Colin; Hassanpour, Ali; Ghadiri, Mojtaba

    2013-06-01

    The characterisation of cohesive powder flowability is often required for reliable design and consistent operation of powder processes. This is commonly achieved by mechanical testing techniques on bulk powder, such as shear test, but these techniques require a relatively large amount of powder and are carried out at large pre-consolidation loads. Many industrial cases require small amounts of powders to be handled and processed, such as filling and dosing of capsules. In other cases, the availability of testing powders could be a limiting issue. It has been shown that under certain circumstances, indentation on a cohesive powder bed by a blunt indenter can give a measure of the resistance to powder flow (Hassanpour and Ghadiri 2007). In the present work, the ball indentation process is analysed by numerical simulations using DEM in order to investigate the operation window of the process in terms of indenter size and penetration depth. The flow resistance of the assembly, commonly termed hardness, is evaluated for a range of sample quantities and operation variables. A sensitivity analysis of bed height reveals that a minimum bed height of 20 particle diameters is required in order to achieve reliable measurements of hardness. It is also found that indenter sizes with diameters smaller than 16 particle diameters exhibit fluctuations in powder flow stress measurements. As the indenter size decreases, it moves closer to the size of bed particles. Therefore, rearrangements at the single particle level influence the force on the indenter, resulting in fluctuations, and possible compaction.

  14. NON-MELT PROCESSING OF "LOW-COST", ARMSTRONG TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOY POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, William H; Blue, Craig A; Clive, Scorey; Ernst, Bill; McKernan, John; Kiggans, Jim; Rivard, John D; Yu, Dr. Charlie

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade, a considerable effort has been made to develop new methods for producing low cost titanium and titanium powders. The Armstrong process is a new method of producing titanium powder via reducing TiCl4 vapor in molten sodium. The process is scalable, and can be used to produce pre-alloyed powders. Non-melt processing and powder metallurgy approaches are economically viable with the commercially pure powders. In this investigation, several non-melt processing technologies, including vacuum hot pressing, extrusion, roll compaction, and forging techniques, will be evaluated using the Armstrong titanium powders. The metallurgical, chemical, and mechanical properties of the processed titanium samples will be discussed.

  15. Developments in Die Pressing Strategies for Low-Cost Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Weil, K. Scott; Lavender, Curt A.

    2009-05-01

    Recent developments in the production of low-cost titanium powders have rejuvenated interest in manufacturing titanium powder metallurgy components by direct press and sinter techniques. However excessive friction typically observed during titanium powder pressing operations leads to numerous problems ranging from non-homogeneous green densities of the compacted powder to excessive part ejection forces and reduced die life due to wear and galling. An instrumented double-acting die press was developed to both investigate the mechanics of titanium powder pressing (particularly for the new low-cost powder morphologies) and to screen potential lubricants that could reduce frictional effects. As will be discussed, the instrument was used to determine friction coefficients and to evaluate a number of candidate lubricants. These results were then used to optimize the lubricant system to reduce die-wall stresses and improve part density uniformity.

  16. Characterization of superconducting properties of BSCCO powder prepared by attrition milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Nabialek, A.; Niewczas, M.

    2005-03-01

    The nonconventional technique of attrition milling has been used to produce superconducting BSCCO powder from the starting powders of oxides and carbonates of Bi, Sr, Ca and Cu. This process shows a drastic reduction in processing time by 80% from the conventional solid-state reaction. The completion of the reaction was determined by x-ray diffraction of the milled powder. The superconducting property characterization was done for the critical transition temperature and the critical current density of the processed powder by magnetic methods. The attrition milled powder shows a Tc of about 87 K after two high temperature treatments for 60 h and Jc of the order of 106 A cm-2 at 4 K. The superconducting properties of the processed powder are discussed in the framework of the Bean model.

  17. Ceramic Tool For Preconsolidation Of Powder-Coated Towpreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1994-01-01

    Tool converts partly formed towpreg into preconsolidated towpreg ribbon. In technique, towpreg coated with thermoplastic powder converted into preconsolidated ribbon without use of plasticizers or solvents. Relying on melt flow and proper application of tension, friction, and cooling, technique ensures both consistent distribution of polymer within, and consistent cross section of ribbon. Ceramic preconsolidation tool includes heated and cooled halves thermally insulated from each other.

  18. Oxide-dispersion strengthening of porous powder metalurgy parts

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthening of porous metal articles includes the incorporation of dispersoids of metallic oxides in elemental metal powder particles. Porous metal articles, such as filters, are fabricated using conventional techniques (extrusion, casting, isostatic pressing, etc.) of forming followed by sintering and heat treatments that induce recrystallization and grain growth within powder grains and across the sintered grain contact points. The result is so-called "oxide dispersion strengthening" which imparts, especially, large increases in creep (deformation under constant load) strength to the metal articles.

  19. Compact, Non-Pneumatic Rock-Powder Samplers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Jones, Christopher; Aldrich, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Tool bits that automatically collect powdered rock, permafrost, or other hard material generated in repeated hammering action have been invented. The present invention pertains to the special case in which it is desired to collect samples in powder form for analysis by x-ray diffraction and possibly other techniques. The present invention eliminates the need for both the mechanical collection equipment and the crushing chamber and the pneumatic collection equipment of prior approaches, so that it becomes possible to make the overall sample-acquisition apparatus more compact.

  20. Flexible thermoset towpregs by electrostatic powder fusion coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Pei-Hua; Varughese, Babu; Muzzy, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Thermoset prepregs of expoxy and polyimide have been produced by electrostatic deposition of charged fluidized polymer powders on spread continuous fiber tows. The powders are melted onto the fibers by radiant heating to adhere the polymer to the fiber. This process produces towpreg uniformly and rapidly without imposing severe stresses on the fibers. The towpregs produced by this novel process were consolidated to make unidirectional laminates for mechanical testing. Low void content samples have been made and demonstrated by C-scan and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of unidirectional laminates are equivalent to composites fabricated by conventional techniques.

  1. Ceramics in gas turbine: Powder and process characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the intrinsic properties of various forms of Si3N4 and SiC are listed and limitations of such materials' availability are pointed out. The essential features/parameters to characterize a batch of powder are discussed including the standard techniques for such characterization. In process characterization, parameters in sintering, reaction sintering, and hot pressing processes are discussed including the factors responsible for strength limitations in ceramic bodies. Significant improvements in material properties can be achieved by reducing or eliminating the strength limiting factors with consistent powder and process characterization along with process control.

  2. Investigations of Light Transfer in Powder Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuri, Chivel

    At selective laser sintering / melting of powder bodies by laser irradiation it is very important to determine the actual energy deposited in a layer of powder and its distribution over the thickness of the powder bed. By varying the thickness of the powder bed the distribution of absorbed energy over the thickness of the powder bed has been determined. The modeling of sintering of the powder bed from two layers of spherical metal particles in pulse mode of operation validate the efficiency of the method of sintering, the essence of which is the directional focusing of laser radiation to the space between the particles of upper layer under appropriate focus spot dimension.

  3. POWDER COATINGS: A TECHNOLOGY REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1995, surface coatings accounted for nearly 2.55 million Mg of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions nationally, which is more than 12% of VOC emissions from all sources. In recent years, powder coatings have been steadily gaining popularity as an alternative to solvent-bo...

  4. Direct laser powder deposition - 'State of the Art'

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, J.W.

    1999-11-01

    Recent developments on Laser Cladding and Rapid Prototyping have led to Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technologies that produce net shape metal components by laser fusion of metal powder alloys. These processes are known by various names such as Directed Light Fabrication (DLF{trademark}), Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS{trademark}), and Direct Metal Deposition (DMD{trademark}) to name a few. These types of processes can be referred to as direct laser powder deposition (DLPD). DLPD involves fusing metal alloy powders in the focal point of a laser (or lasers) that is (are) being controlled by Computer Aided Design-Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. DLPD technology has the capability to produce fully dense components with little need for subsequent processing. Research and development of DLPD is being conducted throughout the world. The list of facilities conducting work in this area continues to grow (over 25 identified in North America alone). Selective Laser Sintering (SLS{trademark}) is another type of SFF technology based on laser fusion of powder. The SLS technology was developed as a rapid prototyping technique, whereas DLPD is an extension of the laser cladding technology. Most of the effort in SLS has been directed towards plastics and ceramics. In SLS, the powder is pre-placed by rolling out a layer for each laser pass. The computer control selects where in the layer the powder will be sintered by the laser. Sequential layers are sintered similarly forming a shape. In DLPD, powder is fed directly into a molten metal pool formed at the focal point of the laser where it is melted. As the laser moves on the material it rapidly resolidifies to form a shape. This talk elaborates on the state of these developments.

  5. A simple procedure to prepare spherical {alpha}-alumina powders

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hongyu; Ning Guiling Gan Zhihong; Lin Yuan

    2009-04-02

    Spherical {alpha}-alumina powders were prepared by the controlled hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide in a hydrolysis system consisting of octanol and acetonitrile. Diverse solvents to dissolve reactant formed diverse hydrolysis systems and affected particle shape of {alpha}-alumina powders. The precursors crystallized to {gamma}-alumina at 1000 deg. C and converted to {alpha}-alumina at 1150 deg. C without intermediate phases. The particle morphology of precursor was retained after it crystallized to {alpha}-alumina. The heating rate influenced the particle shape and the state of agglomeration during calcination process. The thermal properties of the precursors were characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis. X-ray diffraction technique was used to confirm the conversion of crystalline phase of alumina powders from amorphous to {alpha}-phase. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphologies and size of the precursors and products.

  6. Surface carbon films on Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline powders

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, T.E.; Flumerfelt, J.; Kramer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    In order to study the unique properties of quasicrystals, it is necessary to form dense, homogeneous monoliths of these alloys. Unfortunately, Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline alloy ingots prepared by conventional casting techniques result in large scale chemical inhomogeneities which contain numerous cracks due to differential thermal contraction between the various phases during cooling. Thus a powder metallurgical approach using gas atomized (GA) powders is being pursued in order to form large samples of phase pure Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. A samples of specific compositions and sizes are hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) to form dense monoliths. The effects of surface contamination of GA powders, which may inhibit particle-to-particle sintering and may also increase second phase contamination in the HIPed piece, is being studied by scanning Auger microprobe (SAM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  7. Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder

    DOEpatents

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  8. The effect of refinement of carbon-substituted MgB2 filling powder using various starting powders on the microstructure and critical current density of ex situ processed superconducting tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, H.; Ozawa, K.; Kitaguchi, H.

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the effect of refinement of homemade carbon-substituted MgB2 (MBC) filling powders prepared by using various commercially available Mg and B powders on the microstructure and critical current density (Jc) of Fe-sheathed MgB2 tapes fabricated through an ex situ process in a powder-in-tube (PIT) technique. The homemade MBC powders contained a substantial amount of MgO as a main impurity phase when using fine Mg powder, whereas the use of coarse Mg powder significantly reduced the formation of MgO. This was independent of the starting B powder. The MgO was present as isolated particles and platelets inside MgB2 crystallites. Weak acid could dissolve the MgO partially, whereas strong acid could dissolve it almost completely. When using the as-sintered MBC powders, the Jc properties of tapes were very poor. However, they were remarkably enhanced by the refinement of these powders with the acid solutions. The quality of the refined MBC powder prepared with low-cost B powder was comparable to that prepared with high-cost B. The Jc values of tapes using these powders reached about 6 kA cm-2 at 4.2 K and 10 T.

  9. [Identification of antler powder components based on DNA barcoding technology].

    PubMed

    Jia, Jing; Shi, Lin-chun; Xu, Zhi-chao; Xin, Tian-yi; Song, Jing-yuan; Chen Shi, Lin

    2015-10-01

    In order to authenticate the components of antler powder in the market, DNA barcoding technology coupled with cloning method were used. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences were obtained according to the DNA barcoding standard operation procedure (SOP). For antler powder with possible mixed components, the cloning method was used to get each COI sequence. 65 COI sequences were successfully obtained from commercial antler powders via sequencing PCR products. The results indicates that only 38% of these samples were derived from Cervus nippon Temminck or Cervus elaphus Linnaeus which is recorded in the 2010 edition of "Chinese Pharmacopoeia", while 62% of them were derived from other species. Rangifer tarandus Linnaeus was the most frequent species among the adulterants. Further analysis showed that some samples collected from different regions, companies and prices, contained adulterants. Analysis of 36 COI sequences obtained by the cloning method showed that C. elaphus and C. nippon were main components. In addition, some samples were marked clearly as antler powder on the label, however, C. elaphus or R. tarandus were their main components. In summary, DNA barcoding can accurately and efficiently distinguish the exact content in the commercial antler powder, which provides a new technique to ensure clinical safety and improve quality control of Chinese traditional medicine PMID:26837186

  10. Fine tuning the roughness of powder blasted surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, Henk; Schlautmann, Stefan; Goedbloed, Martijn H.; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

    2002-09-01

    Powder blasting (abrasive jet machining) has recently been introduced as a bulk-micromachining technique for brittle materials. The surface roughness that is created with this technique is much higher (with a value of Ra between 1-2.5 ?m) compared to general micromachining techniques. In this paper we study the roughness of powder blasted glass surfaces, and show how it depends on the process parameters. The roughness can also be changed after blasting by HF etching or by using a high-temperature anneal step. Roughness measurements and scanning electron microscopy images show the quantitative and qualitative changes in roughness. These post-processes will allow us to investigate the influence of surface roughness on the microsystem performance in future research.

  11. Theory for optimization of thermoelectric powder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anatychuk, L.I.; Kosyachenko, S.V.; Melnychuk, S.V.; Chernov, V.M.

    1994-08-10

    The methods for optimization of thermoelectric powder materials are discussed. Possibilities to optimize powder thermoelectric materials by computer-aided modelling are demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Process for manufacturing uranium dioxide powder

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Sh.I.; Sekine, M.; Takano, E.

    1985-03-19

    A process is described for manufacturing uranium dioxide powder which comprises forming fine uranium dioxide powder having a high sinterability and coarse uranium dioxide powder having a low sinterability continuously in one process by changing periodically the precipitation condition of the ammonium diuranate under the same condition of calcining and reducing of the ammonium diuranate. The thus obtained mixture of these uranium dioxide powders is suitable for uranium dioxide pellets which are a fuel of nuclear power reactor.

  13. Chemical and Physical Properties of Tantalum Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purushotham, Y.; Balaji, T.; Kumar, Arbind; Govindaiah, R.; Sharma, M. K.; Sethi, V. C.; Prakash, T. L.

    The present work is intended to produce capacitor grade Tantalum powder by sodium reduction of potassium tantalum fluoride prepared from an indigenous ore source. The powder has been characterized for its chemical and physical properties, and compared with the commercially available powders. It is found that indigenous powder has higher impurity levels which could, however, be reduced to acceptance limits. The average particle size is within the prescribed limits.

  14. Method for synthesizing ultrafine powder materials

    DOEpatents

    Buss, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ho, Pauline (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A method for synthesizing ultrafine powder materials, for example, ceramic and metal powders, comprises admitting gaseous reactants from which the powder material is to be formed into a vacuum reaction chamber maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric and at a temperature less than about 400.degree. K. (127.degree.C.). The gaseous reactants are directed through a glow discharge provided in the vacuum reaction chamber to form the ultrafine powder material.

  15. Container Prevents Oxidation Of Metal Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, William H.; Power, Christopher A.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Burns, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Sealed high-vacuum container holds metal powder required free of contamination by oxygen from point of manufacture to point of use at vacuum-plasma-spraying machine. Container protects powder from air during filling, storage, and loading of spraying machine. Eliminates unnecessary handling and transfer of powder from one container to another. Stainless-steel container sits on powder feeder of vacuum-plasma-spraying machine.

  16. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bronze powder. 73.1646 Section 73.1646 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs 73.1646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bronze powder is a very fine metallic...

  17. 7 CFR 160.93 - Powdered rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powdered rosin. 160.93 Section 160.93 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Labeling, Advertising and Packing 160.93 Powdered rosin. The classification and grade of any rosin sold in commerce in a powdered or finely broken condition shall be stated in...

  18. 7 CFR 160.93 - Powdered rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powdered rosin. 160.93 Section 160.93 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Labeling, Advertising and Packing 160.93 Powdered rosin. The classification and grade of any rosin sold in commerce in a powdered or finely broken condition shall be stated in...

  19. 7 CFR 160.93 - Powdered rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powdered rosin. 160.93 Section 160.93 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Labeling, Advertising and Packing 160.93 Powdered rosin. The classification and grade of any rosin sold in commerce in a powdered or finely broken condition shall be stated in...

  20. 7 CFR 160.93 - Powdered rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powdered rosin. 160.93 Section 160.93 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Labeling, Advertising and Packing 160.93 Powdered rosin. The classification and grade of any rosin sold in commerce in a powdered or finely broken condition shall be stated in...

  1. 7 CFR 160.93 - Powdered rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powdered rosin. 160.93 Section 160.93 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Labeling, Advertising and Packing 160.93 Powdered rosin. The classification and grade of any rosin sold in commerce in a powdered or finely broken condition shall be stated in...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Black powder. 56.6901 Section 56.6901 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives General Requirements § 56.6901 Black powder. (a) Black powder...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Black powder. 56.6901 Section 56.6901 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives General Requirements § 56.6901 Black powder. (a) Black powder...

  4. 30 CFR 56.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Black powder. 56.6901 Section 56.6901 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives General Requirements § 56.6901 Black powder. (a) Black powder...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Black powder. 56.6901 Section 56.6901 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives General Requirements § 56.6901 Black powder. (a) Black powder...

  6. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bronze powder. 73.1646 Section 73.1646 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bronze powder is a very fine metallic...

  7. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bronze powder. 73.1646 Section 73.1646 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bronze powder is a very fine metallic...

  8. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bronze powder. 73.1646 Section 73.1646 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bronze powder is a very fine metallic...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bronze powder. 73.1646 Section 73.1646 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive bronze powder is a very fine metallic...

  11. Structural color painting by rubbing particle powder.

    PubMed

    Park, ChooJin; Koh, Kunsuk; Jeong, Unyong

    2015-01-01

    Structural colors originate from purely physical structures. Scientists have been inspired to mimic the structures found in nature, the realization of these structures still presents a great challenge. We have recently introduced unidirectional rubbing of a dry particle powder on a rubbery surface as a quick, highly reproducible means to fabricate a single crystal monolayer assembly of particles over an unlimited area. This study extends the particle-rubbing process to a novel fine-art painting, structural color painting (SCP). SCP is based on structural coloring with varying iridescence according to the crystal orientation, as controlled by the rubbing direction. This painting technique can be applied on curved surfaces, which enriches the objects to be painted and helps the painter mimic the structures found in nature. It also allows for quick fabrication of complicated particle-assembly patterns, which enables replication of paintings. PMID:25661669

  12. Structural Color Painting by Rubbing Particle Powder

    PubMed Central

    Park, ChooJin; Koh, Kunsuk; Jeong, Unyong

    2015-01-01

    Structural colors originate from purely physical structures. Scientists have been inspired to mimic the structures found in nature, the realization of these structures still presents a great challenge. We have recently introduced unidirectional rubbing of a dry particle powder on a rubbery surface as a quick, highly reproducible means to fabricate a single crystal monolayer assembly of particles over an unlimited area. This study extends the particle-rubbing process to a novel fine-art painting, structural color painting (SCP). SCP is based on structural coloring with varying iridescence according to the crystal orientation, as controlled by the rubbing direction. This painting technique can be applied on curved surfaces, which enriches the objects to be painted and helps the painter mimic the structures found in nature. It also allows for quick fabrication of complicated particle-assembly patterns, which enables replication of paintings. PMID:25661669

  13. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-28

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  14. Wetter for fine dry powder

    DOEpatents

    Hall, James E.; Williams, Everett H.

    1977-01-01

    A system for wetting fine dry powders such as bentonite clay with water or other liquids is described. The system includes a wetting tank for receiving water and a continuous flow of fine powder feed. The wetting tank has a generally square horizontal cross section with a bottom end closure in the shape of an inverted pyramid. Positioned centrally within the wetting tank is a flow control cylinder which is supported from the walls of the wetting tank by means of radially extending inclined baffles. A variable speed motor drives a first larger propeller positioned immediately below the flow control cylinder in a direction which forces liquid filling the tank to flow downward through the flow control cylinder and a second smaller propeller positioned below the larger propeller having a reverse pitch to oppose the flow of liquid being driven downward by the larger propeller.

  15. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine...

  16. Compositionally continuously graded cathode layers of (Ba0.5Sr0.5)(Fe0.91Al0.09)O3-?-Gd0.1Ce0.9O2 by wet powder spraying technique for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Taizhi; Wang, Zhenhua; Ren, Baiyu; Qiao, Jinshuo; Sun, Wang; Sun, Kening

    2014-02-01

    Compositionally continuously graded cathode layers (CGCLs) of (Ba0.5Sr0.5)(Fe0.91Al0.09)O3-?-Gd0.1Ce0.9O2 (BSFA-GDC) have been constructed by a handy and effective technique called wet powder spraying (WPS). CGCLs exhibit similar thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) value between adjacent thin layers. The continuously graded structure and the well-distributed components of BSFA-GDC cathode are confirmed by morphological characterization with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and by compositional analysis with energy dispersion X-ray spectrometer (EDS), respectively. The polarization resistance (Rp) of CGCLs with three different thicknesses is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The EIS results show that CGCLs with a moderate thickness of 20 ?m achieve the lowest Rp of 0.301 ? cm2 at 800 C. In addition, anode-supported single cells with the configuration of NiO-YSZ/YSZ/GDC/BSFA-GDC have been fabricated and tested. The cell with the CGCLs thickness of 20 ?m reaches the highest output power density of 848 mW cm-2 at 800 C.

  17. [Impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on powder property of fermented cordyceps powder].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hua; Yue, Guo-Chao; Guan, Yong-Mei; Yang, Ming; Zhu, Wei-Feng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate such physical indexes as hygroscopicity, angle of repose, bulk density, fillibility of compression of mixed powder of directly compressed auxiliary materials and fermented cordyceps powder by using micromeritic study methods. The results showed that spray-dried lactose Flowlac100 and microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH102 had better effect in liquidity and compressibility on fermented cordyceps powder than pregelatinized starch. The study on the impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on the powder property of fermented cordyceps powder had guiding significant to the research of fermented cordyceps powder tablets, and could provide basis for the development of fermented cordyceps powder tablets. PMID:24754170

  18. Anti-Corrosive Powder Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Donald; MacDowell, Louis, III

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) seeks partners for a new approach in protecting embedded steel surfaces from corrosion. Corrosion of reinforced steel in concrete structures is a significant problem for NASA structures at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) because of the close proximity of the structures to salt spray from the nearby Atlantic Ocean. In an effort to minimize the damage to such structures, coatings were developed that could be applied as liquids to the external surfaces of a substrate in which the metal structures were embedded. The Metallic Pigment Powder Particle technology was developed by NASA at KSC. This technology combines the metallic materials into a uniform particle. The resultant powder can be sprayed simultaneously with a liquid binder onto the surface of concrete structures with a uniform distribution of the metallic pigment for optimum cathodic protection of the underlying steel in the concrete. Metallic Pigment Powder Particle technology improves upon the performance of an earlier NASA technology Liquid Galvanic Coating (U.S. Patent No. 6,627,065).

  19. Compaction and Sintering of Mo Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, Stephen D; Kiggans, Jim; Bryan, Chris

    2013-01-01

    To support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, Mo metal powders were evaluated for compaction and sintering characteristics as they relate to Mo-100 accelerator target disk fabrication. Powders having a natural isotope distribution and enriched Mo-100 powder were examined. Various powder characteristics are shown to have an effect on both the compaction and sintering behavior. Natural Mo powders could be cold pressed directly to >90% density. All of the powders, including the Mo-100 samples, could be sintered after cold pressing to >90% density. As an example, a compacted Mo-100 disk reached 89.7% density (9.52 g/cm3) after sintering at 1000 C for 1 hr. in flowing Ar/4%H2. Higher sintering temperatures were required for other powder samples. The relationships between processing conditions and the resulting densities of consolidated Mo disks will be presented.

  20. Compactible powders of omega-3 and ?-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Vestland, Tina Lien; Jacobsen, yvind; Sande, Sverre Arne; Myrset, Astrid Hilde; Klaveness, Jo

    2015-10-15

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used in both nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals in the form of triglycerides and ethyl esters. Administration forms available for omega-3 include bulk oil, soft gel capsules, emulsions and some powder compositions. Cyclodextrins are substances well known for their ability to encapsulate lipophilic molecules. In the present work, powders loaded with omega-3 oil, ranging from 10 to 40% (w/w), have been prepared by vacuum drying, freeze drying or spray granulation of aqueous mixtures of omega-3 oil and ?-cyclodextrin. The powders were found to be partially crystalline by powder X-ray diffraction and to contain crystalline phases not present in pure ?-cyclodextrin, indicating true complexation. The compactibility of the powders has been explored, revealing that a dry and compactible powder can be prepared from various omega-3 oils and ?-cyclodextrin. Spray granulation was found to be the superior drying method for the preparation of compactible powders. PMID:25952853

  1. Laser damage threshold and nonlinear optical studies on guanidinium L - monohydrogen tartrate (GuHT) single crystal for NLO device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, P.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2015-06-01

    An organic NLO material guanidinium l - monohydrogen tartrate (GuHT) was grown by the slow evaporation technique using water as a solvent. The GuHT crystal belongs to orthorhombic system with noncentrosymmetric space group P212121. The morphology of the GuHT crystal was studied. The laser induced surface damage threshold behaviour of the GuHT crystal was analyzed in different planes. The second harmonic generation (SHG) effective nonlinearity was confirmed by Kurtz and Perry powder technique.

  2. Rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis spores directly from powders with an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Tims, T Bryan; Lim, Daniel V

    2004-10-01

    There currently are no rapid, sensitive tests to directly and reliably detect Bacillus anthracis spores in common powders. Traditional culture is time consuming and molecular techniques cannot directly process powders. This study describes a biosensor assay that detects B. anthracis at concentrations of 3.2 x 10(5) spores/mg or higher in spiked powders in less than 1 h with minimal sample preparation. PMID:15325759

  3. Powder aspirator for shock tube studies of heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M. T.; Kirsch, M. J.; Lester, T. W.

    1988-02-01

    The application of single-pulse shock tube techniques in the study of heterogeneous reactions is described. In particular, nitric oxide removal on carbonaceous materials at temperatures simulating pulverized coal firing is reported. Carbon black particulates were suspended and heated behind reflected shock waves in order to simulate flame-borne particulates. To meet the specific requirement of preshock conditions, a novel and simple powder aspirator was designed and fabricated for dispersing carbon black. Particle concentrations measured by a gravimetric method and by in-line light transmission were compared. Changes of nitric oxide concentration, reaction products and volatile species emitted from the particulates were analyzed with gas chromatographic techniques. Representative results of nitric oxide reduction by carbon black particulates at concentrations up to 50 g/m3 are provided, and indicate that single-pulse shock tubes coupled with a simple powder aspirator may be used to infer global rates for gas/solid reactions of potential importance in combustion.

  4. The thermal spray processing of HA powders and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Cheang, P.; Wang, Y.

    1997-02-01

    In recent years, coated implants have been actively researched and put to use in many biomedical engineering applications. The coating used on the implants is hydroxyapatite (HA), a calcium-phosphate compound with attractive bioactive and biocompatible properties that can enhance the fixation process of biomedical implants. Thermal spraying provides a potent means for depositing the HA coatings on implants. Among the populat thermal-spray techniques are combustion-flame spray, plasma spray, and high-velocity oxy-fuel spray. This article investigates the versatility of thermal-spray techniques to perform spheroidization of HA powders, the preparation of HA-based biocomposite powders and coatings, and the deposition of HA coatings.

  5. Preliminary attempt at sintering an ultrafine alumina powder using microwaves. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Alhambra, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    A commercially available microwave oven was used to sinter ultrafine alumina powders (0.02 - 0.05 micrometers particle size) with and without CaO sintering aid. The oven was modified by inserting a thermocouple probe through the bottom housing, and thoroughly insulating the interior with insulating material. The oven was placed in a glove box and filled with argon to prevent degradation of the thermocouple, and oxidation of the powdered graphite susceptor. Heating rates of 50-75 Deg C/sec with a maximum temperature of 1575 Deg C were obtained. Limited success in sintering of the the powder compacts was achieved in this preliminary effort. The microstructures of the sintered products were examined by scanning electron microscopy. It was concluded that further work is necessary to develop this technique into one which can be used for the routine sintering of fine powdered ceramic material. A review of the literature on microwave sintering of ceramic powders is also reported.

  6. Preparation of ceramic grade UO 2 powder by atomization from uranyl nitrate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainetti, P.; Riella, H. Gracher

    1991-02-01

    The thermal denitration of a nitrate solution by direct conversion to a ceramic grade uranium dioxide powder, in a furnace that combines atomization nozzle and gas stirred bed, is an attractive method because no liquid waste products are formed and it has relative simplicity. The UO 2 powder characteristics, such as size, shape, specific surface area and sinterability as a function of procedural variables were determined. This technique has been developed in the pelleting pilot plant of the IPEN/CNEN-SP and it appears to be practical and economically feasible for wet recovery of rejected UO 2 powders and pellets from production process, with the recovered powder being directly mixed to the powder from the AUC reduction process.

  7. Plasma preparation and low-temperature sintering of spherical TiC-Fe composite powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-jun; Hao, Jun-jie; Guo, Zhi-meng; Wang, Song

    2015-12-01

    A spherical Fe matrix composite powder containing a high volume fraction (82vol%) of fine TiC reinforcement was produced using a novel process combining in situ synthesis and plasma techniques. The composite powder exhibited good sphericity and a dense structure, and the fine sub-micron TiC particles were homogeneously distributed in the ?-Fe matrix. A TiC-Fe cermet was prepared from the as-prepared spherical composite powder using powder metallurgy at a low sintering temperature; the product exhibited a hardness of HRA 88.5 and a flexural strength of 1360 MPa. The grain size of the fine-grained TiC and special surface structure of the spherical powder played the key roles in the fabrication process.

  8. Characterization of polymer materials and powders for selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wudy, K.; Drummer, D.; Drexler, M.

    2014-05-01

    Concerning individualization, the requirements to products have increased. The trend towards individualized serial products faces manufacturing techniques with demands of increasing flexibility. Additive manufacturing techniques generate components directly out of a CAD data set while requiring no specific tool or form. Due to this additive manufacturing processes comply, in opposite to conventional techniques, with these increased demands on processing technology. With a variety of available additive manufacturing techniques, some of them have a high potential to generate series products with reproducible properties. Selective laser melting (SLM) of powder materials shows the highest potential for this application. If components made by SLM are desired to be applied in technical series products, their achievable properties play a major part. These properties are mainly determined by the processed materials. The range of present commercially available materials for SLM of polymer powders is limited. This paper shows interrelations of various material properties to create a basic understanding of sintering processes and additional qualifying new materials. Main properties of polymer materials, with regard to their consolidation are viscosity and surface energy. On the one hand the difference of the surface energy between powder and melt influences, the wetting behavior, and thus the penetration depth. On the other hand, a high surface tension is fundamental for good coalescence of bordering particles. To fulfill these requirements limits of the surface tension will be determined on the basis of a reference material. For these reason methods for determining surface tension of solids, powders and melts are analyzed, to carry out a possible process-related material characterization. Not only an insight into observed SLM phenomena is provided but also hints concerning suitable material selection.

  9. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Powdered Drug Reconstitution in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant; Johnston, Smith; Marshburn, Tom

    1999-01-01

    Owing to the high cost of transporting mass into space, and the small volume available for equipment in the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the International Space Station, refrigeration space is extremely limited. For this reason, there exists strong motivation for transporting certain drugs in powdered form so that they do not require refrigeration. When needed, the powdered drug will be mixed with saline to obtain a liquid form that may be injected intravenously. While this is a relatively simple task in a 1-G environment, there are some difficulties that may be encountered in 0-G. In non-accelerated spaceflight, gravitational and inertial forces are eliminated allowing other smaller forces, such as capillary forces and surface tension, to dominate the behavior of fluids. For instance, water slowly ejected from a straw will tend to form a sphere, while fluid in a container will tend to wet the inside surface forming a highly rounded meniscus. Initial attempts at mixing powdered drugs with saline in microgravity have shown a tendency toward forming foamy emulsions instead of the desired homogeneous solution. The predominance of adhesive forces between the drug particles and the interface tensions at the gas/liquid and solid/liquid interfaces drastically reduce the rate of deaggregation of the drug powder and also reduce the rate of absorption of saline by the powder mass. In addition, the capillary forces cause the saline to wet the inside of the container, thus trapping air bubbles within the liquid. The rate of dissolution of a powder drug is directly proportional to the amount of surface area of the solid that is exposed to liquid solvent. The surface area of drug that is in contact with the liquid is greatly reduced in microgravity and, as a result, the dissolution rate is reduced as well. The KC-135 research described here was aimed at evaluating the extent to which it is possible to perform drug reconstitution in the weightlessness of parabolic flight using standard pharmacological supplies. The experiment included a parametric assessment of possible factors affecting the reconstitution process. The specific questions that we wished to answer were: (1) Is it possible to reconstitute powdered drugs in weightlessness using standard pharmacological equipment? (2) What are the differences between drug reconstitution in a 1-G and a 0-G environment? (3) What techniques of mixing the drug powder and diluent are more successful? (4) What physical and chemical factors play a role in determining the success of mixing and dissolution? (5) Is it necessary to employ crewmember and equipment restraints during the reconstitution process?

  10. Roller compaction of moist pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-Y; Hung, W-L; Miguélez-Morán, A M; Gururajan, B; Seville, J P K

    2010-05-31

    The compression behaviour of powders during roller compaction is dominated by a number of factors, such as process conditions (roll speed, roll gap, feeding mechanisms and feeding speed) and powder properties (particle size, shape, moisture content). The moisture content affects the powder properties, such as the flowability and cohesion, but it is not clear how the moisture content will influence the powder compression behaviour during roller compaction. In this study, the effect of moisture contents on roller compaction behaviour of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel PH102) was investigated experimentally. MCC samples of different moisture contents were prepared by mixing as-received MCC powder with different amount of water that was sprayed onto the powder bed being agitated in a rotary mixer. The flowability of these samples were evaluated in terms of the poured angle of repose and flow functions. The moist powders were then compacted using the instrumented roller compactor developed at the University of Birmingham. The flow and compression behaviour during roller compaction and the properties of produced ribbons were examined. It has been found that, as the moisture content increases, the flowability of moist MCC powders decreases and the powder becomes more cohesive. As a consequence of non-uniform flow of powder into the compaction zone induced by the friction between powder and side cheek plates, all produced ribbons have a higher density in the middle and lower densities at the edges. For the ribbons made of powders with high moisture contents, different hydration states across the ribbon width were also identified from SEM images. Moreover, it was interesting to find that these ribbons were split into two halves. This is attributed to the reduction in the mechanical strength of moist powder compacts with high moisture contents produced at high compression pressures. PMID:20176096

  11. Mechanical properties and shear failure surfaces of two alumina powders in triaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    ZEUCH,DAVID H.; GRAZIER,J. MARK; ARGUELLO JR.,JOSE G.; EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    2000-04-24

    In the manufacture of ceramic components, near-net-shape parts are commonly formed by uniaxially pressing granulated powders in rigid dies. Density gradients that are introduced into a powder compact during press-forming often increase the cost of manufacturing, and can degrade the performance and reliability of the finished part. Finite element method (FEM) modeling can be used to predict powder compaction response, and can provide insight into the causes of density gradients in green powder compacts; however, accurate numerical simulations require accurate material properties and realistic constitutive laws. To support an effort to implement an advanced cap plasticity model within the finite element framework to realistically simulate powder compaction, the authors have undertaken a project to directly measure as many of the requisite powder properties for modeling as possible. A soil mechanics approach has been refined and used to measure the pressure dependent properties of ceramic powders up to 68.9 MPa (10,000 psi). Due to the large strains associated with compacting low bulk density ceramic powders, a two-stage process was developed to accurately determine the pressure-density relationship of a ceramic powder in hydrostatic compression, and the properties of that same powder compact under deviatoric loading at the same specific pressures. Using this approach, the seven parameters that are required for application of a modified Drucker-Prager cap plasticity model were determined directly. The details of the experimental techniques used to obtain the modeling parameters and the results for two different granulated alumina powders are presented.

  12. Dry powder segregation and flowability: Experimental and numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, David R.

    Dry powder blending is a very important industrial and physical process used in the production of numerous pharmaceutical dosage forms such as tablets, capsules, and dry powder aerosols. Key aspects of this unit operation are process monitoring and control. Process control is particularly difficult due to the complexity of particle-particle interactions, which arise from the adhesion/cohesion characteristics of interfaces and morphological characteristics such as particle size, shape, and dispersity. The effects of such characteristics need to be understood in detail in order to correlate individual particle properties to bulk powder properties. The present dissertation numerically and experimentally quantifies the mixing process to rationalize particle-particle interactions. In particular, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to non-invasively characterize in real-time the blending processes and thus investigate the dynamics of blending under different operating conditions. A novel image analysis technique was developed to quantify the scale of segregation from images obtained non-destructively via near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI). Although NIR-CI data acquisition times are too long for real-time data collection, NIR-CI has an advantage, in that it provides the spatial distribution of the drug. Therefore, NIRS and NIR-CI are complementary techniques for investigating the complex process of blending dry powders and assessing end-product quality. Additionally, the discrete element method was used to investigate the effect of powder cohesion on the packing fraction. Simulations indicated an exponential relationship between the random loose packing fraction and cohesive forces. Specifically, the packing fraction decreased asymptotically with increased ratio of cohesive force to particle weight. Thus, increasing this force ratio above a critical value has negligible impact on the packing fraction. Such result directly impacts the Hausner ratio flowability measurement, which is directly related to the packing fraction. Two commonly used tests were compared to assess their utility: the rotational split-cell shear cell test and the Hausner ratio. The Hausner ratio proved to be better suited for characterizing the flowability of unconsolidated powders than the splitring shear cell. Results demonstrate that the optimal flowability test depends on the powder properties and the environment under which flow will be induced.

  13. Development of liposomal salbutamol sulfate dry powder inhaler formulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Hua; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Wu, Heng; Wong, Yuen-Fan; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen; Liu, Liang

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to develop a formulation of liposomal salbutamol sulfate (SBS) dry powder inhaler (DPI) for the treatment of asthma. Liposomes of high encapsulation efficiency (more than 80%) were prepared by a vesicular phospholipid gel (VPG) technique. SBS VPG liposomes were subjected to lyophilization using different kinds of cryoprotectants in various mass ratios. Coarse lactose (63-106 microm) in different mass ratios was used as a carrier. Magnesium stearate (0.5%) was added as a lubricator. The dry liposomal powders were then crushed by ball milling and sieved through a 400-mesh sieve to control the mean particle size at about 10 microm. The effects of different kinds of cryoprotectants and the amount of lactose carrier on the fine particle fraction (FPF) of SBS were investigated. The results showed that the developed formulation of liposomal dry powder inhaler was obtained using lactose as a cryoprotectant with a mass ratio of lyophilized powder to carrier lactose at 1 : 5; 0.5% magnesium stearate was used as a lubricator. The value of FPF for SBS was 41.51+/-2.22% for this formulation. Sustained release of SBS from the VPG liposomes was found in the in vitro release study. The study results offer the promising possibility of localized pulmonary liposomal SBS delivery in the anhydrous state. PMID:20190418

  14. Dry powders for oral inhalation free of lactose carrier particles.

    PubMed

    Healy, Anne Marie; Amaro, Maria Ins; Paluch, Krzysztof J; Tajber, Lidia

    2014-08-01

    Dry powder inhaler (DPI) products have traditionally comprised a simple formulation of micronised drug mixed with a carrier excipient, typically lactose monohydrate. The presence of the carrier is aimed at overcoming issues of poor flowability and dispersibility, associated with the cohesive nature of small, micronised active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particles. Both the powder blend and the DPI device must be carefully designed so as to ensure detachment of the micronised drug from the carrier excipient on inhalation. Over the last two decades there has been a significant body of research undertaken on the design of carrier-free formulations for DPI products. Many of these formulations are based on sophisticated particle engineering techniques; a common aim in formulation design of carrier-free products being to reduce the intrinsic cohesion of the particles, while maximising dispersion and delivery from the inhaler. In tandem with the development of alternative formulations has been the development of devices designed to ensure the efficient delivery and dispersion of carrier-free powder on inhalation. In this review we examine approaches to both the powder formulation and inhaler design for carrier-free DPI products. PMID:24735676

  15. [Identication of pearl powder and conch powder from different origins by differential scanning calorimetry].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Li, Ming-hua; Yu, Kun-zi; Dong, Ya-juan; Zhang, Nan-ping; Hu, Xiao-ru; Wei, Feng; Ma, Shuang-cheng

    2015-04-01

    The paper is aimed to establish a methods for identication of pearl powder and conch powder from different origins. Hermetic aluminum pan was used to encapsulate samples. The optimal testing conditions were: heating rate 10 degrees C x min(-1), sample weight 3 mg and nitrogen gas flow rate 40 mL x min(-1). The enthalpy values of pearl powder and conch powder was obvious different. Identication of pearl powder and conch powder by DSC is a practical method for its accuracy, convenience and practificality. PMID:26281579

  16. Interparticle force based methodology for prediction of cohesive powder flow properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esayanur, Madhavan Sujatha Sarma

    The transport and handling of powders are key areas in the process industry that have a direct impact on the efficiency and/or the quality of the finished product. A lack of fundamental understanding of powder flow properties as a function of operating variables such as relative humidity, and particle size, leading to problems such as arching, rat-holing and segregation, is one the main causes for unscheduled down times in plant operation and loss of billions of dollars in revenues. Most of the current design strategies and characterization techniques for industrial powders are based on a continuum approach similar to the field of soil mechanics. Due to an increase in complexity of the synthesis process and reduction in size of powders to the nanoscale, the surface properties and inter particle forces play a significant role in determining the flow characteristics. The use of ensemble techniques such as direct shear testing to characterize powders are no longer adequate due to lack of understanding of the changes in the property of powders as a function of the major operating variables such as relative humidity, temperature etc. New instrumentation or techniques need to be developed to reliably characterize powder flow behavior. Simultaneously, scalability of the current models to predict powder flow needs to be revisited. Specifically, this study focuses on the development of an inter particle force based model for predicting the unconfined yield strength of cohesive powders. To understand the role of interparticle forces in determining the strength of cohesive powders, the particle scale interactions were characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), contact angle, surface tension, and coefficient of friction. The bulk scale properties such as unconfined yield strength, packing structure, and size of the shear zone were also investigated. It was determined that an interparticle force based model incorporating the effect of particle size and packing structure leads to a reasonable prediction of the bulk strength of cohesive powders. Additionally, the role of particle size distribution and liquid distribution in the powder was considered. The findings of this research should be helpful to the practitioners in providing reliable input for the design of cohesive powder flow and handling equipment.

  17. Thixoforming of Stellite Powder Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, S. C.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-07

    Thixoforming involves processing metallic alloys in the semi-solid state. The process requires the microstructure to be spheroidal when part-solid and part-liquid i.e. to consist of solid spheroids surrounded by liquid. The aim of this work was to investigate whether powder compacts can be used as feedstock for thixoforming and whether the consolidating pressure in the thixoformer can be used to remove porosity from the compact. The powder compacts were made from stellite 6 and stellite 21 alloys, cobalt-based alloys widely used for e.g. manufacturing prostheses. Isothermal heat treatments of small samples in the consolidated state showed the optimum thixoforming temperature to be in the range 1340 deg. C-1350 deg. C for both materials. The alloys were thixoformed into graphite dies and flowed easily to fill the die. Porosity in the thixoformed components was lower than in the starting material. Hardness values at various positions along the radius of the thixoformed demonstrator component were above the specification for both alloys.

  18. Thixoforming of Stellite Powder Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, S. C.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-01

    Thixoforming involves processing metallic alloys in the semi-solid state. The process requires the microstructure to be spheroidal when part-solid and part-liquid i.e. to consist of solid spheroids surrounded by liquid. The aim of this work was to investigate whether powder compacts can be used as feedstock for thixoforming and whether the consolidating pressure in the thixoformer can be used to remove porosity from the compact. The powder compacts were made from stellite 6 and stellite 21 alloys, cobalt-based alloys widely used for e.g. manufacturing prostheses. Isothermal heat treatments of small samples in the consolidated state showed the optimum thixoforming temperature to be in the range 1340C-1350C for both materials. The alloys were thixoformed into graphite dies and flowed easily to fill the die. Porosity in the thixoformed components was lower than in the starting material. Hardness values at various positions along the radius of the thixoformed demonstrator component were above the specification for both alloys.

  19. Cryolubricity of YBCO powder deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Keeley M.; Krim, Jacqueline

    2010-03-01

    Motivated by recent reports of superconductivity-dependent friction [1] in macroscopic pin-on-disk measurements of steel on YBCO, [2] we have investigated the tribological properties of YBCO powder deposits on metal electrodes of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Measurements are performed as a function of temperature over the range 80 - 300K, by monitoring the frequency and amplitude of the QCM both in the presence and absence of adsorbed nitrogen film layers. A pulsed magnetic field was applied to isolate the effect of superconductivity at and around the transition temperature. The powder deposits produce negative shifts in the QCM fundamental frequency, an indication of the strength of their attachment to the surface. The shifts exhibit structure as the temperature passes through the superconducting transition temperature, but the presumed drop in friction is not so large as to produce a decoupling effect which would lead to positive shifts. [3] Measurements on alternate QCM electrodes in the presence of adsorbed film layers are ongoing and will be reported on. Funding provided by NSF DMR. [4pt] [1] Highland, M. and Krim, J. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 96, 226107.[0pt] [2] Ding, Q. et al. Wear 2008, 265, 1136.[0pt] [3] Dybwad, G.L. J. Appl. Phys. 1985, 58, 2789.

  20. Analysis of the surface energy of pharmaceutical powders by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Grimsey, Ian M; Feeley, Jane C; York, Peter

    2002-02-01

    The behavior of pharmaceutical solids, during either processing or use, can be noticeably affected by the surface energetics of the constituent particles. Several techniques exist to measure the surface energy, for example, sessile drop, and dynamic contact angle measurements. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) is an alternative technique where the powder surface is characterized by the retention behavior of minute quantities of well-characterized vapors that are injected into a column containing the material of interest. Recently published articles using IGC on pharmaceutical powders have ranged from linking surface energetic data with triboelectric charging to studying the effect of surface moisture on surface energetics. Molecular modelling has also recently been used to explore the links between IGC data and the structural and chemical factors that influence surface properties, thereby achieving predictive knowledge regarding powder behavior during processing. In this minireview, the reported applications of IGC in the analysis of pharmaceutical powders are summarized and the major findings highlighted. PMID:11835214

  1. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOEpatents

    Welbon, William W. (Belleair, FL)

    1983-01-01

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  2. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-03-06

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  3. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOEpatents

    Welbon, W.W.

    1983-11-08

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

  4. Analysis of tablet compaction. I. Characterization of mechanical behavior of powder and powder/tooling friction.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, J C; Sinka, I C; Zavaliangos, A

    2004-08-01

    In this first of two articles on the modeling of tablet compaction, the experimental inputs related to the constitutive model of the powder and the powder/tooling friction are determined. The continuum-based analysis of tableting makes use of an elasto-plastic model, which incorporates the elements of yield, plastic flow potential, and hardening, to describe the mechanical behavior of microcrystalline cellulose over the range of densities experienced during tableting. Specifically, a modified Drucker-Prager/cap plasticity model, which includes material parameters such as cohesion, internal friction, and hydrostatic yield pressure that evolve with the internal state variable relative density, was applied. Linear elasticity is assumed with the elastic parameters, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio dependent on the relative density. The calibration techniques were developed based on a series of simple mechanical tests including diametrical compression, simple compression, and die compaction using an instrumented die. The friction behavior is measured using an instrumented die and the experimental data are analyzed using the method of differential slices. The constitutive model and frictional properties are essential experimental inputs to the finite element-based model described in the companion article. PMID:15236452

  5. Metal powder reactions in ball milling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1976-01-01

    On milling chromium powder in three metal chlorides and either chromium or nickel powders in ten organic liquids representative of nine different functional groups, the powders always reacted with the liquids and became contaminated with elements from them. The milled powders had specific surface areas ranging from 0.14 to 37 sq m/g, and the total contamination with elements from the milling liquid ranged from 0.01 to 56 wt%. In most milling runs, compounds resulting from substitution, addition, or elimination reactions formed in or from the milling liquid, and in most runs with organic liquids H2, CH4, and CO2 were generated.

  6. Selective laser sintering of amorphous metal powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Blatter, A.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.

    2005-02-01

    For the first time, selective sintering of amorphous PtCuNiP powder with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser has been studied. Upon pulsed interaction, the grains melt only superficially to build necks between the grains. Depending on the laser parameters, the sintered material can be crystallized or retained amorphous. By contrast with crystalline powder, laser sintering of amorphous powder is achieved at substantially lower pulse energies due to its low melting point. The obtained results are compared with previous results from selective laser sintering of titanium powder.

  7. Purification of silicon powder by the formation of thin porous layer followed byphoto-thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Marouan; Hajji, Messaoud; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon has been prepared using a vapor-etching based technique on a commercial silicon powder. Strong visible emission was observed in all samples. Obtained silicon powder with a thin porous layer at the surface was subjected to a photo-thermal annealing at different temperatures under oxygen atmosphere followed by a chemical treatment. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry results indicate that silicon purity is improved from 99.1% to 99.994% after annealing at 900C. PMID:22873706

  8. Purification of silicon powder by the formation of thin porous layer followed byphoto-thermal annealing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Porous silicon has been prepared using a vapor-etching based technique on a commercial silicon powder. Strong visible emission was observed in all samples. Obtained silicon powder with a thin porous layer at the surface was subjected to a photo-thermal annealing at different temperatures under oxygen atmosphere followed by a chemical treatment. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry results indicate that silicon purity is improved from 99.1% to 99.994% after annealing at 900C. PMID:22873706

  9. Grinding Si3N4 Powder In Si3N4 Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Freedman, Marc R.; Kiser, James D.

    1989-01-01

    Three methods of grinding compared. Report based on study of grinding silicon nitride powder in preparation for sintering into solid ceramic material. Attrition, vibratory, and ball mills lined with reaction-bonded silicon nitride tested. Rates of reduction of particle sizes and changes in chemical compositions of powders measured so grinding efficiences and increases in impurity contents from wear of mills and media evaluated for each technique.

  10. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study of Powder Flow Distribution in High Power Direct Diode Laser Cladding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.; Kovacevic, R.

    2015-12-01

    High power direct diode laser (HPDDL) offers a rectangular laser beam with top-flat intensity distribution making it an ideal tool for wide-clad deposition. In the HPDDL-based cladding process, the powder is commonly fed laterally through a wide nozzle into the molten pool by means of a carrier gas. In order to successfully utilize this cladding technique, the powder feeding behavior needs to be carefully controlled. In this study, based on an investigation of commercial powder feeding nozzles, a 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based gas-powder flow model was developed. The effects of the nozzle exit geometry, powder properties (particle size, density and shape), and powder feeding parameters (powder feeding rate and carrier-gas flow rate) on the characteristics of the powder flow were studied. A high-speed CCD camera was used to capture the powder flow characteristics such as the particle velocity and particle distribution. Deposition experiments are also performed to verify the predicted powder catchment efficiency and to check the clad geometry.

  11. Stereochemistry Determination by Powder X-ray Diffraction Analysis and NMR Spectroscopy Residual Dipolar Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.; Pagola, S; Navarro-Vasquez, A; Phillips, D; Gayathri, C; Krakauer, H; Stephens, P; Nicotra, V; Gil, R

    2009-01-01

    A matter of technique: For a new steroidal lactol, jaborosalactol 24 (1), isolated from Jaborosa parviflora, NMR spectroscopy residual dipolar couplings and powder X-ray diffraction analysis independently gave the same stereochemistry at C23-C26. Conventional NMR spectroscopic techniques, such as NOE and {sup 3}J coupling-constant analysis failed to unambiguously determine this stereochemistry.

  12. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, C.; Walter, P.; Castaing, J.; Penhoud, P.; Veyssire, P.

    The processing technologies available during the time of ancient Egypt are of present concern to the field of Archaeology and Egyptology. Materials characterization is the best tool for establishing the processing history of archaeological objects. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used, in addition to other techniques, for phase identification and study of the microstructure and characteristic defect structures in ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders. These powders generally consist of a mix of Pb-containing mineral phases: galena (PbS), cerussite (PbCO3), and phosgenite (Pb2Cl2CO3), among others. Modern materials are fabricated according to recipes found in ancient texts to mimic the processing of ancient times and to compare with the archaeological specimens. In particular, a comparison between the dislocation structures of PbS crystals deformed in the laboratory and PbS from archaeological specimens from the collections of the Louvre Museum is presented .

  13. Density-permittivity relationships for powdered and granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.O.

    2005-10-01

    Relationships between the permittivities of powdered or granular solid materials and their bulk densities (density of the air-particle mixture) are discussed. Linear relationships between functions of the permittivity and bulk density are identified that are useful in determining permittivity of solids from measurements of the permittivity of pulverized samples. The usefulness of several dielectric mixture equations for calculating solid material permittivity from measured permittivity of pulverized samples is also discussed. Results of testing linear extrapolation techniques and dielectric mixture equations on pulverized coal, limestone, plastics, and granular wheat and flour are presented. Recommendations are provided for reliable estimation of solid material permittivities or changes in permittivities of powdered and granular materials as a result of changes in their bulk densities.

  14. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION FOOD DRESSINGS AND FLAVORINGS Requirements for Specific Standardized Food Dressings and Flavorings... or both, with one or more of the following optional blending ingredients: (1) Sugar. (2) Dextrose. (3... specified name of the food is Vanilla powder _-fold or _-fold vanilla powder, except that if sugar...

  15. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  16. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage 56.6133 Powder... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133...

  17. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage 56.6133 Powder... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133...

  18. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage 56.6133 Powder... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133...

  19. 30 CFR 56.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Storage 56.6133 Powder... CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd., Room 2436, Arlington, Virginia 22209... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Powder chests. 56.6133 Section 56.6133...

  20. 21 CFR 73.2646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1646 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Bronze powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1647 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Copper powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  2. 21 CFR 73.2646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1646 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Bronze powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1647 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Copper powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1647 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Copper powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1646 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Bronze powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1646 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Bronze powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1647 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Copper powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2646 - Bronze powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2646 Bronze powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1646 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Bronze powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1647 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Copper powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with...

  10. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vanilla powder. 169.179 Section 169.179 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD DRESSINGS AND FLAVORINGS Requirements for Specific Standardized Food Dressings and Flavorings 169.179 Vanilla powder. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vanilla powder. 169.179 Section 169.179 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD DRESSINGS AND FLAVORINGS Requirements for Specific Standardized Food Dressings and Flavorings 169.179 Vanilla powder. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vanilla powder. 169.179 Section 169.179 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD DRESSINGS AND FLAVORINGS Requirements for Specific Standardized Food Dressings and Flavorings 169.179 Vanilla powder. (a)...

  13. 77 FR 28252 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Griseofulvin Powder; Levamisole...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Sponsor; Griseofulvin Powder; Levamisole Hydrochloride Powder; Oxytetracycline Powder AGENCY: Food and... applications (ANADAs) for griseofulvin powder, levamisole hydrochloride soluble powder, and oxytetracycline..., ANADA 200-391 for Griseofulvin Powder, ANADAs 200-146 and 200-247 for Oxytetracycline...

  14. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOEpatents

    Stang, L.G.

    1979-08-29

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  15. Tribocharging behaviour of automotive powder coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Aline; Saleh, Khashayar; Guigon, Pierre; Czechowski, Claire

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this work was to build a device allowing the measurement of tribocharging during the fluidization and pneumatic transport of automotive powder coatings. The experimental setup included a fluidization unit, a transport pipe and two 'Faraday cups' allowing continuous monitoring of particle charge. Two batches of industrial automotive powder primers, as well as several other types of powders were tested: alumina, silica... The experimental variables were the length of the conveying pipe and the air flow rate. The results showed that the net amount of acquired tribocharge increases with the length of conveying pipe. The experimental device and procedure allowed to well classify tested powders according to their rate of tribocharging and their maximum charge. More specially, this study pointed out a net difference between electrostatic properties of two powder primers, which behave very differently in the industrial application unit.

  16. Effect of detergent on powder triboelectrification.

    PubMed

    Murtomaa, Matti; Ojanen, Kalle; Laine, Ensio; Poutanen, Jutta

    2002-12-01

    Triboelectrification of pharmaceutical powders during processing and manufacture may cause adhesion/cohesion effects, reduce fill and dose uniformity, affect powder flow and packing behaviour and even obstruct the manufacturing of the product. This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the triboelectrification of microcrystalline cellulose in contact with stainless steel pipes washed with several different detergents. Detergents and their concentrations were chosen to be similar to typical industrial manufacturing stages. The adhesion of powder to the surface had a considerable effect on the triboelectrification process. Therefore, polystyrene spheres were also charged in a similar way and the results were compared with the powder charging results. The results clearly indicate that detergent contamination on the pipe surface has a considerable effect on the generated charge. The detergents and powders used could be arranged in a triboelectric series with only one exception. PMID:12453608

  17. Powder-lubricated piston ring development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshmat, H.

    1991-06-01

    The overall objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new particulate lubrication concept for reducing piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-water slurry-fueled diesels by replacing the present oil-lubricated system with powder lubrication that would utilize coal ash, either alone or in combination with another powder. The feasibility of this particular lubrication concept for reducing ring/liner wear was demonstrated in a series of experiments utilizing redesigned and properly selected components. Wear performance for suitable ring/liner materials lubricated with a powder that incorporates the abrasive ash particles was evaluated in terms of load capacity, friction, and rate of wear for the best combination of ring design, ring and liner materials, and powder constituents. In addition, the use of a powder-lubricated system in the upper portion of the cylinder isolated the particulates from the lower portions of the engine, thus further reducing engine wear.

  18. Powder-lubricated piston ring development

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmat, H.

    1991-06-01

    The overall objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new particulate lubrication concept for reducing piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-water slurry-fueled diesels by replacing the present oil-lubricated system with powder lubrication that would utilize coal ash, either alone or in combination with another powder. The feasibility of this particular lubrication concept for reducing ring/liner wear was demonstrated in a series of experiments utilizing redesigned and properly selected components. Wear performance for suitable ring/liner materials lubricated with a powder that incorporates the abrasive ash particles was evaluated in terms of load capacity, friction, and rate of wear for the best combination of ring design, ring and liner materials, and powder constituents. In addition, the use of a powder-lubricated system in the upper portion of the cylinder isolated the particulates from the lower portions of the engine, thus further reducing engine wear. (VC)

  19. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOEpatents

    Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  20. Substantiating powder metal life methodologies for engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domas, P. A.

    1993-04-01

    The application of powder metal (PM) superalloys in aircraft turbine engine rotating components is prompted by performance driven high strength and creep resistance requirements. Fine grain, precipitation strengthened nickel-base alloys such as IN100, Rene'95, and Rene'88DT meet these requirements up to operating temperatures in the 1200-1300F (649-704C) range. In addition to burst and deformation limits, design constraints include durability (fatigue) and damage tolerance (crack growth resistance) capability to insure reliability and safety. Fatigue life for these alloys can be influenced by inhomogeneities (inclusions) intrinsic to the microstructure as the result of processing, and by perturbations of the surface integrity during component manufacture and subsequent usage. Understanding of PM fatigue behavior and substantiation of life assessment methodology must appropriately recognize these potential influences. New testing, modeling, and analysis schemes are necessitated in engineering development programs addressing generation and validation of life prediction techniques for these materials. This paper outlines one approach to substantiating PM fatigue life prediction that attempts to recognize homogeneous fatigue initiation by incorporating probabilistic models and development testing methods that address material volume and component feature effects. Complications and limitations being addressed in ongoing work are discussed.

  1. Application of powder rheometer to determine powder flow properties and lubrication efficiency of pharmaceutical particulate systems.

    PubMed

    Navaneethan, Charu V; Missaghi, Shahrzad; Fassihi, Reza

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the behavior of particulate systems under different conditions of shear dynamics before and after granulation and to investigate the efficiency of powder lubrication. Three drug powders, metronidazole, colloidal bismuth citrate, and tetracycline hydrochloride, were chosen as model drugs representing noncohesive and cohesive powder systems. Each powder was individually granulated with microcrystalline cellulose and 5%PVP as a binder. One portion from each granulation was lubricated with different levels of magnesium stearate for 5 minutes. The powder characterization was performed on the plain powders, nonlubricated and lubricated granules using powder rheometer equipped with a helical blade rotating and moving under experimentally fixed set of parameters. The profiles of interaction during the force-distance measurements indicate that powder compresses, expands, and shears many times in a test cycle. Test profiles also clearly reveal existence of significant differences between cohesive and noncohesive powders. In all cases lubrication normalized the overall interactive nature of the powder by reducing peaks and valleys as observed from the profiles and reduced the frictional effect. The developed methods are easy to perform and will allow formulation scientists to better understand powder behavior and help in predicting potential impact of processing factors on particulate systems. PMID:16353997

  2. The Application of Modern Powder Characterisation Methods in Product and Process Development of Solid Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Tim; Brockbank, Katrina; Armstrong, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry still produces the vast majority of their products, from powdered ingredients, in the form of solid doses. Despite their ubiquity, powders are difficult materials to characterise and understand, as evidenced by the frequent problems encountered during manufacture. The reason for this is their complex rheological behaviour coupled with numerous environmental variations, such as humidity. Equally, the range of processes used to manipulate powders subject them to extremes of stress from high compaction loads seen in compactors to the dispersed state seen in fluidised bed dryers. Thus, it is evident that ensuring that the powders characteristics are compatible with the way they are to be processed is a clear prerequisite for today's Quality by Design driven manufacturing. Modern, computer controlled instrumental techniques, including the dynamic, bulk and shear property measurements have enabled direct measurements of a powders response to aeration, consolidation and flow rate - all at low stresses - as well as quantifying shear and bulk properties (such as density, compressibility and permeability). In order to demonstrate how fully characterising a powder can be used in the design, operation and troubleshooting of processes, this paper will present examples of common pharmaceutical unit operations and the different powder characteristics that most influence the performance of each. PMID:26446474

  3. An analysis of un-dissolved powders of instant powdered soup by using ultrasonographic image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaai, Yukinori; Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kasamatsu, Chinatsu

    2008-11-01

    Nowadays, there are many instant powdered soups around us. When we make instant powdered soup, sometimes we cannot dissolve powders perfectly. Food manufacturers want to improve this problem in order to make better products. Therefore, they have to measure the state and volume of un-dissolved powders. Earlier methods for analyzing removed the un-dissolved powders from the container, the state of the un-dissolved power was changed. Our research using ultrasonographic image can measure the state of un-dissolved powders with no change by taking cross sections of the soup. We then make 3D soup model from these cross sections of soup. Therefore we can observe the inside of soup that we do not have ever seen. We construct accurate 3D model. We can visualize the state and volume of un-dissolved powders with analyzing the 3D soup models.

  4. Aluminothermic powder boriding of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunov, Nikolay; Ivanov, Radoslav

    2004-03-01

    Subject of thermodynamical analysis are the probable boron transport reactions, boron precipitation and boride forming in the reaction space with the use of aluminothermic boriding mixtures and activators such as NaF, NH 4F, Na 2O4BF 3 and (NH 4) 24BF 3. Aluminothermic boriding of carbon and alloyed steels have been carried out in a powder boriding mixture containing B 2O 320%, Al7%, Al 2O 372.5%, and (NH 4) 2O4BF 30.5% at a temperature of 1160 K and within a 6 h period. The thickness and the microhardness of the boride layers have been measured and a layer-by-layer chemical spectrum analysis has been made. The proposed structure of an aluminothermic mixture is determined to be suitable for boriding of low-carbon and low-alloyed steels. The boride layers obtained are distinguished for considerable thickness and high microhardness.

  5. T-1018 UCLA Spacordion Tungsten Powder Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Trentalange, Stephen; Tsai, Oleg; Igo, George; Huang, Huan; Pan, Yu Xi; Dunkelberger, Jay; Xu, Wen Qin; Soha, Aria; Heppelmann, Steven; Gagliardi, Carl; /Texas A-M

    2011-11-16

    The present experiments at the BNL-RHIC facility are evolving towards physics goals which require the detection of medium energy electromagnetic particles (photons, electrons, neutral pions, eta mesons, etc.), especially at forward angles. New detectors will place increasing demands on energy resolution, hadron rejection and two-photon resolution and will require large area, high performance electromagnetic calorimeters in a variety of geometries. In the immediate future, either RHIC or JLAB will propose a facility upgrade (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with physics goals such as electron-heavy ion collisions (or p-A collisions) with a wide range of calorimeter requirements. An R and D program based at Brookhaven National Laboratory has awarded the group funding of approximately $110,000 to develop new types of calorimeters for EIC experiments. The UCLA group is developing a method to manufacture very flexible and cost-effective, yet high quality calorimeters based on scintillating fibers and tungsten powder. The design and features of the calorimeter can be briefly stated as follows: an arbitrarily large number of small diameter fibers (< 0.5 mm) are assembled as a matrix and held rigidly in place by a set of precision screens inside an empty container. The container is then back-filled with tungsten powder, compacted on a vibrating table and infused with epoxy under vacuum. The container is then removed. The resulting sub-modules are extremely uniform and achieve roughly the density of pure Lead. The sub-modules are stacked together to achieve a final detector of the desired shape. There is no dead space between sub-modules and the fibers can be in an accordion geometry bent to prevent 'channeling' of the particles due to accidental alignment of their track with the module axis. This technology has the advantage of being modular and inexpensive to the point where the construction work may be divided among groups the size of typical university physics departments. This test run if a proof-of-principle and allows the experiment to improve the design and performance of the final detectors. The experimenters have constructed prototypes of three different designs in order to investigate the characteristics of practical devices such as uniformity, linearity, longitudinal and transverse shower shapes. The first design is an array of 4 x 4 modules intended as a prototype for a practical device to be installed within two years in the STAR experimental hall. The modules are a combination of a spaghetti calorimeter and an accordion (hence 'spacordion'). Each sub-module is 1.44 cm x 1.44 cm x 15 cm and constructed individually. The second design is a prototype of 4 sub-modules constructed in one step, using a different construction technique. The third design is a set of single sub-modules each intended to test variations of the tungsten powder/embedded fiber concept by enhancing the light output/density using liquid scintillator or heavy liquids.

  6. Linking flowability and granulometry of lactose powders.

    PubMed

    Boschini, F; Delaval, V; Traina, K; Vandewalle, N; Lumay, G

    2015-10-15

    The flowing properties of 10 lactose powders commonly used in pharmaceutical industries have been analyzed with three recently improved measurement methods. The first method is based on the heap shape measurement. This straightforward measurement method provides two physical parameters (angle of repose ?r and static cohesive index ?r) allowing to make a first screening of the powder properties. The second method allows to estimate the rheological properties of a powder by analyzing the powder flow in a rotating drum. This more advanced method gives a large set of physical parameters (flowing angle ?f, dynamic cohesive index ?f, angle of first avalanche ?a and powder aeration %ae) leading to deeper interpretations. The third method is an improvement of the classical bulk and tapped density measurements. In addition to the improvement of the measurement precision, the densification dynamics of the powder bulk submitted to taps is analyzed. The link between the macroscopic physical parameters obtained with these methods and the powder granulometry is analyzed. Moreover, the correlations between the different flowability indexes are discussed. Finally, the link between grain shape and flowability is discussed qualitatively. PMID:26283279

  7. Dynamic fragmentation of powders in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, A. M.; Floyd, E.; Longbottom, A. W.; Taylor, P.

    2014-09-01

    Experimental evidence from a wide range of sources shows that the expanding cloud of explosively disseminated material comprises of "particles" or fragments which have different dimensions from those associated with the original material. Photographic evidence shows jets or fingers behind these expanding fragments. Powders and liquids have often been used to surround explosives to act as blast mitigants; this is the main driver for our research. Other examples of areas where these features are observed include fuel air explosives and enhanced blast explosives as well as quasi-static pressure mitigation systems. In this paper, we consider the processes occurring when an explosive interacts with a surrounding layer of powder in spherical geometry. Results from explosive experiments designed to investigate the effects of powder grain size and powder fill-to-burster charge mass ratio (/) are presented and compared with results from numerical modelling to explore what determines the primary fragment size distribution resulting from explosive dissemination of a layer of material and when this process begins. The evidence clearly shows that the process starts during the first wave transit period of the powder material and, despite the surrounding material initially being a loose powder, shows the characteristics of a brittle fracture mechanism. Later time video evidence shows the same number of jets or fingers as are identified by X-rays of the early, primary fragmentation process. The number of fragments is only a very weak function of the initial grain size of the powder.

  8. Skeletal isomerization of hydrocarbons on molybdenum catalysts. II. Catalytic study of unsupported catalysts: film and powder

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, Y.; Garin, F.; Maire, G.; Muller, A.; Engelhard, P.A.; Grosmangin, J.

    1987-03-01

    Mechanisms of skeletal isomerization of hydrocarbons were studied on unsupported molybdenum catalysts, both powder and film, by /sup 13/C labeling techniques and gas-phase chromatography. Catalytic results are very different on film and on powder. On film very fast extensive cracking was obtained, whereas on powder isomerization largely predominated. The most likely interpretation of the catalytic results on molybdenum powder is that isomerization occurs in metallic sites. The cyclic mechanism which has been observed on platinum, palladium, and iridium is not observed on molybdenum. All isomerization proceeds by the bond shift mechanism through ..cap alpha gamma..-diadsorbed species of metallacyclobutane-type structure. This mechanism is close to that of olefin metathesis. Complete isomerization diagrams are proposed for several labeled hydrocarbons.

  9. Combustion synthesis process for the rapid preparation of high-purity SrO powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Correa, Francisco; Bonifacio-Martnez, Juan

    2014-12-01

    A rapid, safe and simple technique for the production of high purity strontium oxide powders via a chemical combustion process is reported. The combustion reactions were performed to optimize the fuel to oxidizer ratios in the reaction mixtures required to obtain pure SrO powders by varying the molar ratio of chemical precursors and the temperature. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and N2-physisorption measurements. The results indicate that crystalline SrO was obtained using a 1:1 strontium nitrate: urea molar ratio at 1000 C after 5 minutes. In addition, high-purity, homogeneous and crystalline SrO powders were easily produced in a short time via a chemical combustion process.

  10. Dry powder vaccines for mucosal administration: critical factors in manufacture and delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheena H; Thompson, Afton L; Hickey, Anthony J; Staats, Herman F

    2012-01-01

    Dry powder vaccine formulations have proved effective for induction of systemic and mucosal immune responses. Here we review the use of dry vaccines for immunization in the respiratory tract. We discuss techniques for powder formulation, manufacture, characterization and delivery in addition to methods used for evaluation of stability and safety. We review the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of dry powder vaccines as compared to liquid vaccines delivered by mucosal or parenteral routes. Included is information on mucosal adjuvants and mucoadhesives that can be used to enhance nasal or pulmonary dry vaccines. Mucosal immunization with dry powder vaccines offers the potential to provide a needle-free and cold chain-independent vaccination strategy for the induction of protective immunity against either systemic or mucosal pathogens. PMID:21822816

  11. Instability of bacteriophages in spray-dried trehalose powders is caused by crystallization of the matrix.

    PubMed

    Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Meeus, Joke; Lavigne, Rob; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2014-09-10

    Spray drying is a valuable technique in pharmaceutical dosage formulation, capable of producing amorphous, spherical powders, suitable for pulmonary deposition and further downstream processing. In this study, we show that spray drying bacteriophages together with trehalose results in an amorphous powder matrix with high glass transition temperature (between 116 and 118C), typical for amorphous trehalose. These powders are stable at low temperatures (4C) and relative humidity (0%). However, high humidity causes crystallization of the amorphous matrix, destroying the embedded phages. Furthermore, storage at higher temperature (25C) causes thermal instability of the embedded phages. The results show that storage conditions are important parameters to take into account in phage therapy development. The resulting particles are hollow spheres, with suitable aerodynamic diameters for deposition into the deep lungs. This opens possibilities to use these phage-containing powder formulations to tackle pulmonary infectious diseases, especially caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens. PMID:24950368

  12. Preparation of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets from HDDR-processed powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Kenta; Akada, Misaho; Soda, Rikio; Ozaki, Kimihiro

    2015-11-01

    The electric-current sintering technique was used to fully densify hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination (HDDR)-processed Nd-Fe-B powder at temperatures below the grain growth temperature in order to produce high-coercive bulk magnets. However, the sintered magnets exhibited anomalous coercivity reduction that depended on sintered density. Reheating examination of the sintered magnets revealed that the reduced coercivity was increased in proportion to the heating temperature, resulting in complete recovery of coercivity. As a result, the combination of electric-current sintering and post-annealing produced sintered magnets with a coercivity of 15 kOe. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed no evidence that associated the anomalous coercivity reduction and recovery with grain boundary morphology. On the other hand, various HDDR powders with different particle sizes were sintered, and finer powders yielded lower coercivity after sintering, implying that the anomalous coercivity reduction was associated with particle surface oxides of the raw powder.

  13. Luminescent properties of Al2O3:Tb3+ powders embedded in polyethylene terephthalate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariscal B., L.; Carmona-Téllez, S.; Alarcón-Flores, G.; Murrieta S., H.; Hernández, J. M.; Camarillo, E.; Falcony, C.

    2015-08-01

    The luminescent properties of Al2O3:Tb3+ powders embedded in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films have been studied. Luminescent Al2O3:Tb3+ polycrystalline powders were synthesized by a simple evaporation method. The powder embedded films were obtained by the spray pyrolysis technique. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence emission spectra from these samples show, in both cases, luminescence peaks associated with transitions within the electronic energy levels of Tb3+ ions. The dominant peak is at 544 nm corresponding to the 5D4 to 7F5 transition. In the case of the powder embedded films, the CIE coordinates depend on the excitation wavelength because there is a blue emission contribution from the PET host. UV-Vis% transmission measurements on these films show that they are transparent (∼80% and 95% T).

  14. Investigation of NIR hyperspectral imaging for discriminating melamine in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaping; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Lim, Jongguk; Lee, Hoyoung; Ying, Yibin

    2013-05-01

    Melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine) contamination of food has become an urgent and broadly recognized issue for which rapid and accurate identification methods are needed by the food industry. In this study, the feasibility and effectiveness of near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging was investigated for detecting melamine in milk powder. Hyperspectral NIR images (144 bands spanning from 990 to 1700 nm) were acquired for Petri dishes containing samples of milk powder mixed with melamine at various concentrations (0.02% to 1%). Spectral bands that showed the most significant differences between pure milk and pure melamine were selected, and two-band difference analysis was applied to the spectrum of each pixel in the sample images to identify melamine particles in milk powders. The resultant images effectively allowed visualization of melamine particle distributions in the samples. The study demonstrated that NIR hyperspectral imaging techniques can qualitatively and quantitatively identify melamine adulteration in milk powders.

  15. Dustiness of Fine and Nanoscale Powders

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Douglas E.; Baron, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Dustiness may be defined as the propensity of a powder to form airborne dust by a prescribed mechanical stimulus; dustiness testing is typically intended to replicate mechanisms of dust generation encountered in workplaces. A novel dustiness testing device, developed for pharmaceutical application, was evaluated in the dustiness investigation of 27 fine and nanoscale powders. The device efficiently dispersed small (mg) quantities of a wide variety of fine and nanoscale powders, into a small sampling chamber. Measurements consisted of gravimetrically determined total and respirable dustiness. The following materials were studied: single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and carbon blacks; fumed oxides of titanium, aluminum, silicon, and cerium; metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, manganese, and silver) silicon carbide, Arizona road dust; nanoclays; and lithium titanate. Both the total and respirable dustiness spanned two orders of magnitude (0.337.9% and 0.131.8% of the predispersed test powders, respectively). For many powders, a significant respirable dustiness was observed. For most powders studied, the respirable dustiness accounted for approximately one-third of the total dustiness. It is believed that this relationship holds for many fine and nanoscale test powders (i.e. those primarily selected for this study), but may not hold for coarse powders. Neither total nor respirable dustiness was found to be correlated with BET surface area, therefore dustiness is not determined by primary particle size. For a subset of test powders, aerodynamic particle size distributions by number were measured (with an electrical low-pressure impactor and an aerodynamic particle sizer). Particle size modes ranged from approximately 300nm to several micrometers, but no modes below 100nm, were observed. It is therefore unlikely that these materials would exhibit a substantial sub-100nm particle contribution in a workplace. PMID:23065675

  16. Preparation and evaluation of herbal shampoo powder.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sachin; Nema, Neelesh; Nayak, S

    2004-07-01

    Two preparations of herbal shampoo powder were formulated using some common traditional drugs used by folk and traditional people of Bundelkhand region (M.P) India, for hair care. The preparations were formulated using bahera, amla, neem tulsi, shikakai henna & brahmi evaluated for organoleptic, powder charecterestics, foam test and physical evaluation. As the selected drugs being used since long time as single drug or in combination, present investigations will further help to establish a standard formulation and evaluation parameters, which will certainly help in the standardization for quality and purity of such type of herbal powder shampoos. PMID:22557149

  17. Preparation and Evaluation of Herbal Shampoo Powder

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Sachin; Nema, Neelesh; Nayak, S.

    2004-01-01

    Two preparations of herbal shampoo powder were formulated using some common traditional drugs used by folk and traditional people of Bundelkhand region (M.P) India, for hair care. The preparations were formulated using bahera, amla, neem tulsi, shikakai henna & brahmi evaluated for organoleptic, powder charecterestics, foam test and physical evaluation. As the selected drugs being used since long time as single drug or in combination, present investigations will further help to establish a standard formulation and evaluation parameters, which will certainly help in the standardization for quality and purity of such type of herbal powder shampoos. PMID:22557149

  18. Powder pressing in a macrosonic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protipopescu, A.; Dragan, O.; Ciovica, D.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to extend the technology of powder product manufacturing to new forms and sizes, to improve their quality as well as pressing efficiency and to reduce waste. In the course of metal and nonmetal powder briquette pressing, macrosounds were associated with the external static pressing force, which led to an increase in the relative height, density and physicomechanical characteristics of the briquettes. This method permits the extension of the range of products that can be manufactured from powders and the improvement of their quality.

  19. Measuring Electrical Resistivity Of Compacted Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Slightly modified micrometer used in conjunction with special cup to measure electrical resistance of specimen of powder as function of packing fraction. Powder pressed between anvils of micrometer, which make electrical contact with specimen. Device used in manufacturing batteries to determine effective electrical conductivities of powders loaded into plastic sheets to make battery substrates. Coupled with good mathematical description of expected conductivity of particulate composite as function of packing density. Also serves as tool for evaluating conductivity of dispersed phase, as well as evaluating electrical resistances of interparticle contacts.

  20. Compatibility of header materials with pyrotechnic powder

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.

    1982-12-01

    The intent of this research program is to qualify several stainless steels, nickel-base alloys and a titanium alloy as candidates for explosive component applications. This report focuses on the compatibility of these materials with pyrotechnic powder. The powder is a combined titanium subhydride-potassium perchlorate mixture, used both wet and dry. Hollow tensile bars were utilized to discern interactions between the metal and powder which underwent accelerated aging. Metallography was employed along with the mechanical property results to characterize the extent of interaction. No degradation in mechanical properties was noted. 6 figures, 6 tables.

  1. Pulmonary drug delivery by powder aerosols.

    PubMed

    Yang, Michael Yifei; Chan, John Gar Yan; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-11-10

    The efficacy of pharmaceutical aerosols relates to its deposition in the clinically relevant regions of the lungs, which can be assessed by in vivo lung deposition studies. Dry powder formulations are popular as devices are portable and aerosolisation does not require a propellant. Over the years, key advancements in dry powder formulation, device design and our understanding on the mechanics of inhaled pharmaceutical aerosol have opened up new opportunities in treatment of diseases through pulmonary drug delivery. This review covers these advancements and future directions for inhaled dry powder aerosols. PMID:24818765

  2. Production of powders of maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Agbalyan, S.G.; Badeyan, B.F.; Samvelyan, R.G.

    1995-03-01

    Maraging steels have attracted an increasing amount of attention in recent years due to their favorable combination of high strength and ductility properties, resistance to heat, cold, and brittle fracture, and dimensional stability during heat treatment. Unfortunately, maraging steels in powder form have not yet been studied to the extent merited. The main problem is that such powders are obtained by mechanical mixing of the components - an operation that does not ensure homogeneity the alloy after sintering. The present study was undertaken with the goal of obtaining powdered maraging steels by synthesizing and reducing complex oxides.

  3. Powder metallurgy design manual, 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This book is the most concise and comprehensive book of its kind on powder metallurgy (P/M) technology for both component design and application. Completely updated from the previous edition, this valuable reference gives an entirely new coverage on metal injection molding (MIM) and powder forging (P/F) with applicable case histories. There is revised information on P/M compared with other technologies, prototyping, and properties and characteristics of alloys, powders and P/M materials. In addition there`s expanded data on sintering including liquid phase processing and hardening.

  4. Baby powder use in infant skin care. Parental knowledge and determinants of powder usage.

    PubMed

    Hayden, G F; Sproul, G T

    1984-03-01

    One hundred parents of infants aged 2 weeks to 6 months were surveyed at the time of routine well-child visits to assess parental knowledge about baby powder and to determine whether hospital policy of providing a free powder sample to newly delivered mothers was unwittingly promoting powder usage. Most parents (69%) reported regular baby powder use as part of routine infant skin care. Powder-users were significantly more likely than nonusers to attribute to baby powder the ability to kill bacteria and yeast and to prevent diaper rash (p less than 0.01). Even among nonusers, fewer than half were aware that aspiration/ingestion of baby powder was a potential health hazard. Almost all parents reported receiving a free sample of baby powder while in the hospital as part of a complimentary gift pack provided by the manufacturers. Most powder-users were currently using a brand they had received as a sample, and eight parents cited the receipt of a sample as the major determinant for selecting a particular brand of powder. The short- and long-term effects of distributing sample packs to newly delivered parents deserve further study. PMID:6697622

  5. Compact Process for the Preparation of Microfine Spherical High-Niobium-Containing TiAl Alloy Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, J. B.; Lu, X.; Liu, C. C.; Wang, L. N.; Qu, X. H.

    2015-03-01

    High-Nb-containing TiAl alloys are a new generation of materials for high-temperature structural applications because of their superior high-temperature mechanical properties. The alloy powders can be widely used for additive manufacturing, thermal spraying, and powder metallurgy. Because of the difficulty of making microfine spherical alloy powders in quantity by conventional techniques, a compact method was proposed, which consisted of two-step ball milling of elemental powders and subsequent radio frequency (RF) argon plasma spheroidization. In comparison with conventional mechanical alloying techniques, the two-step milling process can be used to prepare alloy powders with uniform scale in a short milling time with no addition of process control agent. This makes the process effective and less contaminating. After RF argon plasma spheroidization, the powders produced exhibit good sphericity, and the number-average diameter is about 8.2 ?m with a symmetric unimodal particle size distribution. The powders perform high composition homogeneity and contain predominately supersaturated ? 2-Ti3Al phase. The oxygen and carbon contents of the spheroidized powder are 0.47% and 0.050%, respectively.

  6. Cold-Spray Processing of a High Density Nanocrystalline Aluminum Alloy 2009 Coating Using a Mixture of As-Atomized and As-Cryomilled Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Y.; Wu, X. K.; Cui, H.; Zhang, J. S.

    2011-09-01

    In this work, a mixture of as-atomized and as-cryomilled powders instead of the pure as-cryomilled powder was used as feedstock to achieve high density nanocrystalline coatings by cold spraying. Cryomilled powder with nanocrystalline grains was produced by mechanical milling under liquid nitrogen and the grain size range was from 5 to 30 nm. A mixture of 30 wt.% as-atomized powder and 70 wt.% as-cryomilled powder was sprayed onto the aluminum substrates. High density coatings were attained by use of this kind of mixture, which was described as an effective method to decrease porosity in the cold-sprayed nanocrystalline coating. The functions of the as-atomized powder in the coating were discussed. The mechanical behavior of the powders and the coating were studied using nanoindentation technique.

  7. Penetration Depth Measurement of Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Light for Milk Powder.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Mo, Changyeun; Esquerre, Carlos; Delwiche, Stephen; Zhu, Qibing

    2016-01-01

    The increasingly common application of the near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique to the analysis of food powders has led to the need for optical characterization of samples. This study was aimed at exploring the feasibility of quantifying penetration depth of NIR hyperspectral imaging light for milk powder. Hyperspectral NIR reflectance images were collected for eight different milk powder products that included five brands of non-fat milk powder and three brands of whole milk powder. For each milk powder, five different powder depths ranging from 1 mm-5 mm were prepared on the top of a base layer of melamine, to test spectral-based detection of the melamine through the milk. A relationship was established between the NIR reflectance spectra (937.5-1653.7 nm) and the penetration depth was investigated by means of the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) technique to classify pixels as being milk-only or a mixture of milk and melamine. With increasing milk depth, classification model accuracy was gradually decreased. The results from the 1-mm, 2-mm and 3-mm models showed that the average classification accuracy of the validation set for milk-melamine samples was reduced from 99.86% down to 94.93% as the milk depth increased from 1 mm-3 mm. As the milk depth increased to 4 mm and 5 mm, model performance deteriorated further to accuracies as low as 81.83% and 58.26%, respectively. The results suggest that a 2-mm sample depth is recommended for the screening/evaluation of milk powders using an online NIR hyperspectral imaging system similar to that used in this study. PMID:27023555

  8. Pulsed high energy synthesis of fine metal powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Repetitively pulsed plasma jets generated by a capillary arc discharge at high stagnation pressure (>15,000 psi) and high temperature (>10,000 K) are utilized to produce 0.1-10 .mu.m sized metal powders and decrease cost of production. The plasma jets impact and atomize melt materials to form the fine powders. The melt can originate from a conventional melt stream or from a pulsed arc between two electrodes. Gas streams used in conventional gas atomization are replaced with much higher momentum flux plasma jets. Delivering strong incident shocks aids in primary disintegration of the molten material. A series of short duration, high pressure plasma pulses fragment the molten material. The pulses introduce sharp velocity gradients in the molten material which disintegrates into fine particles. The plasma pulses have peak pressures of approximately one kilobar. The high pressures improve the efficiency of disintegration. High gas flow velocities and pressures are achieved without reduction in gas density. Repetitively pulsed plasma jets will produce powders with lower mean size and narrower size distribution than conventional atomization techniques.

  9. Double-walled carbon nanotubes in composite powders.

    PubMed

    Flahaut, E; Peigney, A; Laurent, Ch

    2003-01-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) may be interesting in many applications since the outer wall would provide an interface with the rest of the system, without modifying the inner wall. CNT-Fe/Fe3C-Al2O3 composite powders containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (65% of which are DWNTs) are prepared by reduction of an oxide solid solution in a H2-CH4 gas mixture. The powders and CNTs are studied by both local and macroscopical techniques. The influence of the reducing atmosphere composition and of the dwell time at 1050 degrees C is studied. There is a 6-fold increase in CNT content upon the increase in the CH4 content from 3 to 30 mol.%, but the formation of undesirable carbon nanofibers can also be promoted. A CH4 content of 12-18 mol.% is adapted for the particular iron content in these powders. Increasing the dwell time at 1050 degrees C results in the formation of CNTs with more walls. PMID:12908244

  10. Processing of laser formed SiC powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, J. S.; Bowen, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Processing research was undertaken to demonstrate that superior SiC characteristics could be achieved through the use of ideal constituent powders and careful post-synthesis processing steps. Initial research developed the means to produce approximately 1000 A uniform diameter, nonagglomerated, spherical, high purity SiC powders. Accomplishing this goal required major revision of the particle formation and growth model from one based on classical nucleation and growth to one based on collision and coalescence of Si particles followed by their carburization. Dispersions based on pure organic solvents as well as steric stabilization were investigated. Test parts were made by the colloidal pressing technique; both liquid filtration and consolidation (rearrangement) stages were modeled. Green densities corresponding to a random close packed structure were achieved. After drying, parts were densified at temperatures ranging from 1800 to 2100 C. This research program accomplished all of its major objectives. Superior microstructures and properties were attained by using powders having ideal characteristics and special post-synthesis processing procedures.

  11. Metal powder production by gas atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, E. Y.; Grant, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    The confined liquid, gas-atomization process was investigated. Results from a two-dimensional water model showed the importance of atomization pressure, as well as delivery tube and atomizer design. The atomization process at the tip of the delivery tube was photographed. Results from the atomization of a modified 7075 aluminum alloy yielded up to 60 wt pct. powders that were finer than 45 microns in diameter. Two different atomizer designs were evaluated. The amount of fine powders produced was correlated to a calculated gas-power term. An optimal gas-power value existed for maximized fine powder production. Atomization at gas-power greater than or less than this optimal value produced coarser powders.

  12. LaRC dry powder towpreg process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The dry powder towpreg process overcomes many of the difficulties associated with melt, solution and slurry prepregging of advanced composite materials. In the process, fluidized powder is deposited on spread tow bundles and melted on the fibers by radiant heating to adhere the polymer to the fiber. Bench scale design and operating data have been correlated for use in process scale up to commercial operation. Powdered towpreg has been woven and molded into preform material of good quality. Cost estimates suggest that processing costs are comparable to those of conventional hot melt prepreg. In the future, from a part fabrication point of view, powder coated prepreg tape, woven broad goods and woven and braided preforms may be considered as options to similar materials made by other methods.

  13. Effects of milk powders in milk chocolate.

    PubMed

    Liang, B; Hartel, R W

    2004-01-01

    The physical characteristics of milk powders used in chocolate can have significant impact on the processing conditions needed to make that chocolate and the physical and organoleptic properties of the finished product. Four milk powders with different particle characteristics (size, shape, density) and "free" milk fat levels (easily extracted with organic solvent) were evaluated for their effect on the processing conditions and characteristics of chocolates in which they were used. Many aspects of chocolate manufacture and storage (tempering conditions, melt rheology, hardness, bloom stability) were dependent on the level of free milk fat in the milk powder. However, particle characteristics of the milk powder also influenced the physical and sensory properties of the final products. PMID:14765806

  14. Screening and classification of ceramic powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miwa, S.

    1983-01-01

    A summary is given of the classification technology of ceramic powders. Advantages and disadvantages of the wet and dry screening and classification methods are discussed. Improvements of wind force screening devices are described.

  15. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications... externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  16. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications... externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications... externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  18. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications... externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications... externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  20. Development of powder-forged connecting rods

    SciTech Connect

    Imahashi, K.; Tsumuki, C.; Nagare, I.

    1984-01-01

    In comparison with conventional hot forging process, powder forging process has much advantage such as good dimensional accuracy, minimum scattering of weight, etc. In spite of much advantage, the powder forged parts have not been mass-produced except for relatively simple shape parts because of technical and economic problems such as low productivity. Solving these problems, powder forging process was applied to connecting rods which required fatigue strength and minimum scattering of weight, and which were complex in shape. As a result, for the first time in the world, mass-production of powder forged connecting rods was carried out, and its properties are as follows: (1) Sufficient fatigue strength; (2) Minimum scattering of weight; and (3) Good dimensional accuracy.

  1. Advances in beryllium powder consolidation simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, B.J.

    1998-12-01

    A fuzzy logic based multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced and the algorithm is used to optimize micromechanical densification modeling parameters for warm isopressed beryllium powder, HIPed copper powder and CIPed/sintered and HIPed tantalum powder. In addition to optimizing the main model parameters using the experimental data points as objective functions, the GA provides a quantitative measure of the sensitivity of the model to each parameter, estimates the mean particle size of the powder, and determines the smoothing factors for the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 densification. While the GA does not provide a sensitivity analysis in the strictest sense, and is highly stochastic in nature, this method is reliable and reproducible in optimizing parameters given any size data set and determining the impact on the model of slight variations in each parameter.

  2. The technology and commercial status of powder-injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Animesh

    1995-08-01

    The process of powder-injection molding (PIM) is a viable and competitive commercial technique that is being used to process complex-shaped parts of various materials in moderate to high volumes. The hey advantage of the process is its unique ability to combine materials selection flexibility with the complex shape-forming ability of plastics. Although the PIM process has been discussed in the open literature for more than quarter of a century, it has become a commercial reality only during the last decade or so. Currently, there is a tremendous interest in this unique technology throughout the world. As a result, the PIM industry is poised for significant growth.

  3. Improving aerosolization of drug powders by reducing powder intrinsic cohesion via a mechanical dry coating approach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Qu, Li; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2010-07-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of coating on the aerosolization of three model micronized powders. Three model powder materials (salbutamol sulphate, salmeterol xinafoate, triamcinolone acetonide) were chosen not only for their different chemical properties but also for their different physical properties such as shape and size distribution. Each powder was coated with 5% (w/w) magnesium stearate using two different dry mechanofusion approaches. After mechanofusion, both poured and tapped densities for all three model drug powders significantly increased. There were significant improvements in aerosolization behavior from an inhaler device for all model powders after mechanofusion. Such improvements in aerosolization were attributed to the reduction in agglomerate strength caused by decreasing powder intrinsic cohesion via surface modification. The work also indicated that the effect of the coating was dependant on the initial particle properties. PMID:20435112

  4. Laminated composite of magnetic alloy powder and ceramic powder and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN); Kim, Hyoun-Ee (Seoul, KR)

    1999-01-01

    A laminated composite structure of alternating metal powder layers, and layers formed of an inorganic bonding media powder, and a method for manufacturing same are discosed. The method includes the steps of assembling in a cavity alternating layers of a metal powder and an inorganic bonding media of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. Heat, with or without pressure, is applied to the alternating layers until the particles of the metal powder are sintered together and bonded into the laminated composite structure by the layers of sintered inorganic bonding media to form a strong composite structure. The method finds particular application in the manufacture of high performance magnets wherein the metal powder is a magnetic alloy powder.

  5. Laminated composite of magnetic alloy powder and ceramic powder and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, A.J.; Kim, H.

    1999-08-10

    A laminated composite structure of alternating metal powder layers, and layers formed of an inorganic bonding media powder, and a method for manufacturing same are disclosed. The method includes the steps of assembling in a cavity alternating layers of a metal powder and an inorganic bonding media of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. Heat, with or without pressure, is applied to the alternating layers until the particles of the metal powder are sintered together and bonded into the laminated composite structure by the layers of sintered inorganic bonding media to form a strong composite structure. The method finds particular application in the manufacture of high performance magnets wherein the metal powder is a magnetic alloy powder. 9 figs.

  6. Nano spray-dried pyrazinamide-l-leucine dry powders, physical properties and feasibility used as dry powder aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kaewjan, Kanogwan; Srichana, Teerapol

    2014-10-21

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding l-leucine and using an ethanolic solvent on the physicochemical properties and aerodynamic behavior of nano spray-dried pyrazinamide (PZA)-l-leucine powders. Materials and methods: A nano spray dryer was employed to prepare PZA-l-leucine powders. The physicochemical properties were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The Andersen cascade impactor was used to evaluate the in vitro aerosolization performance of the sprayed powders. Results and discussion: The incorporation of l-leucine at 10% improved the percentage fine particle fraction (%FPF) in all ethanolic solvent formulations by up to nearly twofold (20.0-23.4%) compared to the normal spray-dried PZA of (8.8-13.0%). Changes in the particle density and morphology were also observed. The dense solid particles of PZA were completely converted to bulk hollow particles with a thin shell by increasing the l-leucine content up to 50%. Higher ethanol concentration resulted in larger dimensions of the hollow particle but did not directly affect the aerosolization performance. The co-spray dried PZA with 20% l-leucine in a 10% ethanol feed solvent gave the best aerosolization performance (FPF?=?33.0%). Conclusions: The co-spray dried PZA with a suitable l-leucine content using a nano spray drying technique could be applied to formulate the PZA DPI. PMID:25331092

  7. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Barringer, E.A.; Fegley, M.B. Jr.; Bowen, H.K.

    1985-09-24

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 microns can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed. 6 figs.

  8. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Barringer, Eric A. (Waltham, MA); Fegley, Jr., M. Bruce (Waban, MA); Bowen, H. Kent (Belmont, MA)

    1985-01-01

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 micron can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed.

  9. Relative flow rates of explosive powders

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, V.P.

    1988-05-31

    A study was performed to determine the relative flow rates of various explosive powders and evaluate their adaptability for use in automated dispensing systems. Results showed that PBX 9407, LX-15, RX-26-BH, and HNAB are potential candidates for use in these systems. It was also shown that powders with graphite and stearate additives generated the least amount of static and were the easiest to handle.

  10. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  11. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    A biaxially textured alloy article comprises Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacted and heat treated, then rapidly recrystallized to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  12. Formation of fine particle sinterable ceramic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Micheli, A.L.

    1986-12-09

    A method is described of preparing a sinterable metal oxide ceramic precursor powder, comprising: mixing an aqueous solution of polyvalent metal cations of one or more metals taken from the group consisting of yttrium and zirconium with an aqueous solution of ammonium polyacrylate to form a metal polyacrylate precipitate, separating the precipitate from the aqueous mother liquid, burning out the organic portion of the precipitate, and calcining the ash to form a sinterable ceramic percursor powder.

  13. Method and Apparatus for Production of Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storltzfus, Joel M. (Inventor); Sircar, Subhasish (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for producing oxides of metals and of metal alloys. The metal or alloy is placed in an oxygen atmosphere in a combustion chamber and ignited. Products of the combustion include one or more oxides of the metal or alloy in powdered form. In one embodiment of the invention a feeder is provided whereby material to be oxidized by combustion can be advanced into a combustion chamber continuously. A product remover receives the powder product of the combustion.

  14. Method and apparatus for production of powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolzfus, Joel M. (inventor.); Sircar, Subhasish (inventor.)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for producing oxides of metals and of metal alloys. The metal or alloy is placed in an oxygen atmosphere in a combustion chamber and ignited. Products of the combustion include one or more oxides of the metal or alloy in powdered form. In one embodiment of the invention a feeder is provided whereby material to be oxidized by combustion can be advanced into a combustion chamber continuously. A product remover receives the powder product of the combustion.

  15. Adjustable Powder Injector For Vacuum Plasma Sprayer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, D. H.; Woodford, W. H.; Mckechnie, T. N.; Mcferrin, D. C.; Davis, W. M.; Beason, G. P., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Attachment for plasma spray gun provides four degrees of freedom for adjustment of position and orientation at which powder injected externally into plasma flame. Manipulator provides for adjustment of pitch angle of injection tube: set to inject powder at any angle ranging from perpendicular to parallel to cylindrical axis. Scribed lines on extension bar and manipulator indicate pitch angle of extension tube. Collar changed to adapt injector to different gun.

  16. Characterization of proteins by powder diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Von Dreele, R.; X-Ray Science Division

    2009-01-01

    A simulation of a protein powder diffraction pattern was stunning in the apparent amount of information that was seen. A subsequent experiment on metmyoglobin gave a powder diffraction pattern that showed very little sample broadening; the peak widths were essentially limited by the instrument resolution. The challenge is to make use of this in protein structure analysis. This talk will recall some of those early experiments and data analyses as well as an overview of current progress and future possibilities.

  17. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  18. Fuel powder production from ductile uranium alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. R.

    1998-10-23

    Metallic uranium alloys are candidate materials for use as the fuel phase in very-high-density LEU dispersion fuels. These ductile alloys cannot be converted to powder form by the processes routinely used for oxides or intermetallics. Three methods of powder production from uranium alloys have been investigated within the US-RERTR program. These processes are grinding, cryogenic milling, and hydride-dehydride. In addition, a gas atomization process was investigated using gold as a surrogate for uranium. Grinding was found to be inefficient and introduced impurities into the fuel. Cryogenic milling of machine chips in a steel vial was found to have similar shortcomings. The hydride-dehydride process has historically been used to produce very fine powder that may not be suitable for fuel fabrication. Uranium is made to form its hydride by heating in a hydrogen atmosphere. Subsequent heating under vacuum drives off hydrogen gas and returns the hydride to a metallic state. The volume change on hydride formation results in a fine powder upon dehydriding. The effects of alloying elements, partial hydriding, and subsequent milling treatments on particle size distribution are being explored. Inert gas atomization is used on an industrial scale to produce metal powder. Current designs are not suitable for use with uranium. A system was specifically designed for uranium atomization. A prototype was built and tested using gold as a surrogate for uranium. The system operates efficiently and can produce powder in a variety of size ranges by changing the atomization nozzle.

  19. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nmmore » to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.« less

  20. Electrostatic charge interactions in ordered powder mixes.

    PubMed

    Staniforth, J N; Rees, J E

    1982-02-01

    A method is described for measuring the electrostatic charge generated in powders following contact with a plane substrate. The method uses a Faraday well connected to an electrometer and allows the specific charge of powders to be determined. Of the various drugs and excipients studied, most charged electronegatively following contact with glass surfaces, but became electropositive after contact with polyethylene surfaces. The charge interactions of drug and excipient powders modified the behaviour of ordered mixes formed in similar conditions to those of charge measurement. Powders with like charges formed less stable ordered mixes than those in which drug and excipient particles carried opposite charges. Following triboelectrification in an air cyclone constructed of brass, powders had charges at least 100 times greater than those formed after contact with glass surfaces. Optimization of the triboelectric charging conditions allowed ordered mixes to be prepared in which a maximum electronegative charge was applied to the excipient whilst the drug was given a maximum electropositive charge. Studies of segregation/stability showed that ordered mixes subjected to triboelectrification were less prone to segregation than uncharged powders. PMID:6121883

  1. Does electrostatic charge affect powder aerosolisation?

    PubMed

    Adi, Handoko; Kwok, Philip Chi Lip; Crapper, John; Young, Paul M; Traini, Daniela; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2010-05-01

    To study if electrostatic charge initially present in mannitol powder plays a role in the generation of aerosols, mannitol was unipolarly charged to varying magnitudes by tumbling the powder inside containers of different materials. The resulting charge in the powder was consistent with predictions from the triboelectric charging theories, based on the work function values from literature and electron transfer tendencies from measurement of contact angle. The latter generated a parameter, gamma(-)/gamma+, which is a measure of the electron-donating capacity relative to the electron-accepting tendency of material. Lowering the work function value or increasing the gamma(-)/gamma+ ratio of the container material resulted in mannitol being more negatively charged, and vice versa. After charging, the powder was dispersed from an Aerolizer(R), at 30 and 60 L/min, to study the aerosol performance. Irrespective of the charge level, the powder showed similar fine particle fraction, emitted dose and device retention at a given flow rate, indicating that charge induced by different containers during tumbling does not play a significant role in mannitol powder aerosolisation. PMID:19941330

  2. Raman spectroscopic quantification of milk powder constituents.

    PubMed

    McGoverin, C M; Clark, A S S; Holroyd, S E; Gordon, K C

    2010-07-12

    Raman spectroscopy has significant potential for the quantification of food products. Milk powder is an important foodstuff and ingredient that is produced on large scale (over 20 million tonnes per annum). Raman spectroscopy, unlike near- and mid-infrared spectroscopies, has not been used extensively to quantify milk powder constituents. The effect of sample presentation on spectroscopic calibrations of protein and fat for 136 New Zealand milk powders was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Prediction models were produced to quantify a protein concentration range of 32.19-37.65% w/w for skim milk powder, and a protein concentration range of 23.34-25.02% w/w and a fat concentration range of 26.26-29.68% w/w for whole milk powder (where ratios of prediction to deviation exceeded 2.6 with one exception). The resultant calibrations were not influenced by sample orientation; the sample temperature during data collection did affect the calibrations. Calcium fortification in the form of calcium carbonate was identified within a sub-set of samples, reinforcing the efficacy of Raman spectroscopy for identifying both crystalline and non-crystalline constituents within milk powder. PMID:20630174

  3. Tantalum powder consolidation, modeling and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bingert, S.R.; Vargas, V.D.; Sheinberg, H.C.

    1996-10-01

    A systematic approach was taken to investigate the consolidation of tantalum powders. The effects of sinter time, temperature and ramp rate; hot isostatic pressing (HIP) temperature and time; and powder oxygen content on consolidation density, kinetics, microstructure, crystallographic texture, and mechanical properties have been evaluated. In general, higher temperatures and longer hold times resulted in higher density compacts with larger grain sizes for both sintering and HIP`ing. HIP`ed compacts were consistently higher in density than sintered products. The higher oxygen content powders resulted in finer grained, higher density HIP`ed products than the low oxygen powders. Texture analysis showed that the isostatically processed powder products demonstrated a near random texture. This resulted in isotropic properties in the final product. Mechanical testing results showed that the HIP`ed powder products had consistently higher flow stresses than conventionally produced plates, and the sintered compacts were comparable to the plate material. A micromechanics model (Ashby HIP model) has been employed to predict the mechanisms active in the consolidation processes of cold isostatic pressing (CIP), HIP and sintering. This model also predicts the density of the end product and whether grain growth should be expected under the applied processing conditions.

  4. Ti Multicomponent Alloy Bulks by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuibao; Wen, Guanjun; Dai, Hongchuan; Teng, Yuancheng; Li, Yuxiang

    2014-10-01

    In this study, CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti multicomponent alloy bulks were prepared by powder metallurgy of mechanical alloying and sintering. A simple body-centered cubic (bcc) solid solution was prepared after 40 h ball milling of the raw CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti metallic powder. Particles of the alloyed powder are in microsized structures, which are actually a soft agglomeration of lamellar grains with thicknesses less than 1 μm. Meanwhile, the lamellar granules are consisted of nanosized grains under rigid cold welding. The 80-h ball-milled powder was consolidated by cold pressing and subsequent sintering at 800°C. The observed main phase in the consolidated sample after milling for 80 h is still a bcc solid solution. The solidified sample of 80-h ball-milled powder exhibits a Vickers hardness of 468 HV, which is much higher than 171 HV of the counterpart prepared from the raw metallic powder.

  5. Hydroxyapatite ceramics from hydrothermally prepared powders

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.H.; Huang, C.W.; Chang, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH)) is an effective material for artificial human bone production. Hydroxyapatite powders were hydrothermally produced in this work by reacting Ca(OH){sub 2} with Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O in an autoclave at various temperature and for various times. The particle size of hydroxyapatite was observed to be very fine, uniform, around 50 nm, as well as independent of reaction time. The hydroxyapatite powders were compacted and sintered at various temperatures for 2 hrs. The density, grain size, and hardness of the hydroxyapatite ceramics were measured and compared with those of the hydroxyapatite ceramics produced by the powders from the commercial source. The hydroxyapatite ceramics from the hydrothermal powders were found to have a higher density, smaller grain size, and higher hardness. After the hydroxyapatite ceramics were dipped in a simulated biological body liquid for 10 days, the density and hardness of the hydroxyapatite ceramics from the hydrothermal powders were less deteriorated than those of the hydroxyapatite ceramics from the commercial powder.

  6. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  7. Nanosized oxide powder/polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, R.M.; Baranwal, R.

    1996-10-01

    Nanosized ceramic particles offer considerable potential for the manufacture of composite (ceramic, metal or polymer) with highly homogeneous microstructures, therefore properties. Two key issues must be resolved before nanocomposites can make a significant impact outside of the academic community. First, large quantities of low-cost, nanosized powders (other than silica) must become available. Second, well-defined methods of dispersing these particles must be developed to realize the desired homogeneity. We recently developed methods of producing aluminosilicate powders by aerosol flame pyrolysis of novel alkoxide and double alkoxide aluminate and silicate complexes. For example, we can make single crystal particle spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) powders (particle sizes 2-80 nm, surface areas of 40-60 m{sup 2}/g) at production rates {>=} 150 g/h. Single crystal titania powders can be produced with particle sizes 2-70 nm and surface areas of 60-80 m{sup 2}/g. We describe here efforts to develop dispersible powders (titania in particular) that can be incorporated into polymer composites through surface modification of these powders.

  8. Optimizing Powder Distribution in Production of Surface Nano-Composite via Friction Stir Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydarian, Arash; Dehghani, Kamran; Slamkish, Taymor

    2014-06-01

    Notwithstanding the extensive interest in using friction stir processing (FSP) for producing metal matrix composite (MMC), more uniform powder distribution along the composite zone is still needed. In most studies, one groove is machined out of the specimen, filled with powder, and then processed by identical passes. In this investigation, an innovative technique was used that involved machining out of three gradient grooves with increasing depth from the advancing side to the retreating side instead of using a conventional sample with just a groove. Macro, optical, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and microhardness test were used to evaluate the powder distribution. The images indicated that the most uniform distribution of SiC particles in the whole composite zone was related to a three-gradient grooves sample. Microohardness measurement of a three-gradient grooves sample, carried out along the cross section and perpendicular to the traverse direction of FSP, experiences less fluctuation in hardness compared with other techniques.

  9. Vibrational spectra, powder X-ray diffractions and physical properties of cyanide complexes with 1-ethylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Krko?lu, Gne? Sheyla; Kiraz, Fulya etinkaya; Say?n, Elvan

    2015-10-01

    The heteronuclear tetracyanonickelate(II) complexes of the type [M(etim)Ni(CN)4]n (hereafter, abbreviated as M-Ni-etim, M=Mn(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); etim=1-ethylimidazole, C5H8N2) were prepared in powder form and characterized by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal (TG; DTG and DTA), and elemental analysis techniques. The structures of these complexes were elucidated using vibrational spectra and powder X-ray diffraction patterns with the peak assignment to provide a better understanding of the structures. It is shown that the spectra are consistent with a proposed crystal structure for these compounds derived from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. Vibrational spectra of the complexes were presented and discussed with respect to the internal modes of both the etim and the cyanide ligands. The C, H and N analyses were carried out for all the complexes. Thermal behaviors of these complexes were followed using TG, DTG and DTA curves in the temperature range 30-700 C in the static air atmosphere. The FT-IR, Raman spectra, thermal and powder X-ray analyses revealed no significant differences between the single crystal and powder forms. Additionally, electrical and magnetic properties of the complexes were investigated. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, PXRD, thermal and elemental analyses results propose that these complexes are similar in structure to the Hofmann-type complexes. PMID:25919408

  10. Vibrational spectra, powder X-ray diffractions and physical properties of cyanide complexes with 1-ethylimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Kiraz, Fulya Çetinkaya; Sayın, Elvan

    2015-10-01

    The heteronuclear tetracyanonickelate(II) complexes of the type [M(etim)Ni(CN)4]n (hereafter, abbreviated as M-Ni-etim, M = Mn(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); etim = 1-ethylimidazole, C5H8N2) were prepared in powder form and characterized by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal (TG; DTG and DTA), and elemental analysis techniques. The structures of these complexes were elucidated using vibrational spectra and powder X-ray diffraction patterns with the peak assignment to provide a better understanding of the structures. It is shown that the spectra are consistent with a proposed crystal structure for these compounds derived from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. Vibrational spectra of the complexes were presented and discussed with respect to the internal modes of both the etim and the cyanide ligands. The C, H and N analyses were carried out for all the complexes. Thermal behaviors of these complexes were followed using TG, DTG and DTA curves in the temperature range 30-700 °C in the static air atmosphere. The FT-IR, Raman spectra, thermal and powder X-ray analyses revealed no significant differences between the single crystal and powder forms. Additionally, electrical and magnetic properties of the complexes were investigated. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, PXRD, thermal and elemental analyses results propose that these complexes are similar in structure to the Hofmann-type complexes.

  11. 49 CFR 173.170 - Black powder for small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cargo vessel; (c) The black powder must be packed in inner metal or heavy wall conductive plastic... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Black powder for small arms. 173.170 Section 173... Class 7 173.170 Black powder for small arms. Black powder for small arms that has been classed...

  12. 49 CFR 173.170 - Black powder for small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cargo vessel; (c) The black powder must be packed in inner metal or heavy wall conductive plastic... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Black powder for small arms. 173.170 Section 173... Class 7 173.170 Black powder for small arms. Black powder for small arms that has been classed...

  13. 49 CFR 173.170 - Black powder for small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cargo vessel; (c) The black powder must be packed in inner metal or heavy wall conductive plastic... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Black powder for small arms. 173.170 Section 173... Class 7 173.170 Black powder for small arms. Black powder for small arms that has been classed...

  14. 49 CFR 173.170 - Black powder for small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cargo vessel; (c) The black powder must be packed in inner metal or heavy wall conductive plastic... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Black powder for small arms. 173.170 Section 173... Class 7 173.170 Black powder for small arms. Black powder for small arms that has been classed...

  15. 49 CFR 173.170 - Black powder for small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cargo vessel; (c) The black powder must be packed in inner metal or heavy wall conductive plastic... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Black powder for small arms. 173.170 Section 173... Class 7 173.170 Black powder for small arms. Black powder for small arms that has been classed...

  16. The filling of powdered herbs into two-piece hard capsules using hydrogenated cotton seed oil as lubricant.

    PubMed

    Aling, Joanna; Podczeck, Fridrun

    2012-11-20

    The aim of this work was to investigate the plug formation and filling properties of powdered herbal leaves using hydrogenated cotton seed oil as an alternative lubricant. In a first step, unlubricated and lubricated herbal powders were studied on a small scale using a plug simulator, and low-force compression physics and parameterization techniques were used to narrow down the range in which the optimum amount of lubricant required would be found. In a second step these results were complemented with investigations into the flow properties of the powders based on packing (tapping) experiments to establish the final optimum lubricant concentration. Finally, capsule filling of the optimum formulations was undertaken using an instrumented tamp filling machine. This work has shown that hydrogenated cotton seed oil can be used advantageously for the lubrication of herbal leaf powders. Stickiness as observed with magnesium stearate did not occur, and the optimum lubricant concentration was found to be less than that required for magnesium stearate. In this work, lubricant concentrations of 1% or less hydrogenated cotton seed oil were required to fill herbal powders into capsules on the instrumented tamp-filling machine. It was found that in principle all powders could be filled successfully, but that for some powders the use of higher compression settings was disadvantageous. Relationships between the particle size distributions of the powders, their flow and consolidation as well as their filling properties could be identified by multivariate statistical analysis. The work has demonstrated that a combination of the identification of plug formation and powder flow properties is helpful in establishing the optimum lubricant concentration required using a small quantity of powder and a powder plug simulator. On an automated tamp-filling machine, these optimum formulations produced satisfactory capsules in terms of coefficient of fill weight variability and capsule weight. PMID:22960627

  17. Granulating titania powder by colloidal route using polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Pringuet, Antoine; Pagnoux, Cécile; Videcoq, Arnaud; Baumard, Jean-François

    2008-10-01

    A new, convenient, and inexpensive approach to process and granulate titania powders by a chemical route is proposed. It is based on the use of a formulation that includes a polyanion such as poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS). Such a polyelectrolyte is most often considered to achieve dispersion of oxide powders in water. Basically, it adsorbs onto the surface of particles and induces electrical and/or steric interactions between particles in the suspension, which prevents agglomeration and rapid sedimentation. The advantages of polyelectrolytes in ceramic processing is well documented in the literature to produce low viscosity suspensions that are further used to form ceramic parts. In the case of TiO2 powders, such aqueous dispersions were obtained by adding small quantities of PSS. However, when exploring the behavior of mixtures containing lower contents of dispersant, we have discovered that, well below the optimum concentration required to get stable dispersions, the polyelectrolyte can act as a binder for titania particles. This can confer cohesion to the agglomerates, which can be processed to form large size (e.g., millimeter size) spheres. This phenomenon takes place when the oxide surface carries both positive and negative electrical charges and can be explained on a simple basis involving surface chemistry. For the optimum concentration of PSS that disperses titania, a polycation such as chitosan should be added to get spheres. This simple technique is expected to receive increasing attention due its potentialities and strong advantages with respect to other granulation techniques, such as spray-drying, which are energy consuming. PMID:18774832

  18. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Changela, Kinesh; Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5-10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine models (3/11; 27.3%). No procedure-related adverse events were associated with the use of Hemospray. Hemospray appears to be a safe and effective approach in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26082803

  19. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine models (3/11; 27.3%). No procedure-related adverse events were associated with the use of Hemospray. Hemospray appears to be a safe and effective approach in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26082803

  20. Modelling of the aging behavior of polyamide 12 powder during laser melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, Dietmar; Wudy, Katrin; Drexler, Maximilian

    2015-05-01

    Concerning individualization, the requirements to products have increased. Additive manufacturing technologies, such as selective laser melting allow manufacturing of complex parts without tools and forms. Due to this additive manufacturing processes comply, in opposite to conventional techniques, with these increased demands on processing technology. Due to the high temperature during processing, a degradation of the used plastic powder occurs. The non-molten material in the building chamber, the so-called partcake, can be removed after building from the finished component and reused for another process. To realize reproducible part properties refreshing of partcake powder with 30 up to 50 % virgin powder is necessary. However, these refreshing strategies lead to varying component properties due to an undefined aging state. Previous investigations on oven aged powder for selective laser melting showed for short periods of storage near the melting point thermally induced post condensation is the predominate aging effect. Due to post condensation the molecular weight and thus the viscosity increases. This paper focuses on the modeling of the post condensation process to define the aging state of polyamide 12 powder in laser melting process. Therefore the rheological behavior of PA 12 powder in dependency of time and temperature is investigated. Isothermal viscosity measurements are conducted in order to describe the post condensation reaction with a model. With knowledge of the kinetics of the post condensation reaction the state of aging can be predicted in a second step. Thus expected useful life of the powder can be calculated in dependency of the building chamber temperature. These results are then compared with viscosity values of defined aged PA 12 powder to validate the determined model.

  1. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  2. Waterproof Anti-Explosive Powders for Coal Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronis?aw; Vogt, El?bieta

    2014-03-01

    Limestone powder characterized by hydrophobic properties is used as an anti-explosive agent in coal mining industry. Unfortunately, the standard method of producing such powder by milling limestone with stearic acid is practically unprofitable in many modernized quarries and plants, and sometimes literally impossible due to the introduction of technological changes and implementation of modern mills. Then new methods of hydrophobization of limestone surfaces ought be searched. In the work two methods hydrophobization: from the stearic acid vapour phase and from silicone solutions are proposed. Lime dust from the Czatkowice Quarry of Lime was used as a raw material during investigations. It is a good agent for research because it is possible to compare the properties of samples modified in this work to the properties of anti-explosive lime powder (Polish Standard, 1994) used in mining industry in Poland. The first technique of limestone powder hydrophobization was carried out in an apparatus of own design (Vogt, 2008, 2011), and it consisted in free sedimentation of the powder layer dispersed by stearic acid vapour in powder counter current flow. The second way of modification consisted in mixing in the evaporating dish substrates: limestone powder and dope - silicone solution - Sarsil H-15 (Vogt & Opali?ski, 2009; Vogt & Ho?ownia, 2010). Evaluation of properties so-obtained waterproof powders was carried out according to the Polish Standard, as well as using original powder determination ways, with the Powder Characteristic Tester (Index tables, Tablets & Capsules, 2005). Moreover water vapour adsorption isotherms were obtained and the thermal decomposition of powder was made. All modified samples acquired the hydrophobic character. Therefore we can state that the both proposed methods of hydrophobization of the limestone powder are useful. The parameters obtained with the use of Powder Characteristics Tester enable us to make a characterization of limestone properties not only as a water resistant material but also from the cohesion point of view. On the base of TG, DTG or DTA and EGA curves for all investigated materials was stated that the character of the thermal decomposition of modified samples is the same as this one for raw powder, what is profitable for application of hydrophobized powders as an anti-explosive agent. W grnictwie w?gla kamiennego u?ywany jest hydrofobowy py? wapienny jako substancja stosowana w systemie zabezpiecze? przeciwwybuchowych (Cybulski, 2004). Niestety, dotychczasowy sposb wy- twarzania takiego produktu polegaj?cy na wsp?mieleniu kamienia wapiennego z kwasem stearynowym staje si? praktycznie niemo?liwy do stosowania w nowoczesnych zak?adach np. kamienio?omy. Sytuacja taka jest wynikiem wprowadzania zmian technologicznych, g?wnie zwi?zanych z wymian? starych konstrukcji m?ynw na nowe urz?dzenia. Tym samym istnieje potrzeba poszukiwania nowych metod hydrofobizacji powierzchni py?w wapiennych. W pracy omwiono dwie nowe metody hydrofobizacji py?u wapiennego: za pomoc? par kwasu stearynowego oraz roztworu silikonowego - Sarsil H-15. Podczas bada? u?ywano surowego py?u wapiennego pochodz?cego z Kopalni Kamienia Wapiennego w Czatkowicach. Materia? ten jest dobrym materia?em do bada? gdy? istnieje mo?liwo?? porwnywania w?a?ciwo?ci materia?w hydrofobowych otrzymanych w pracy z w?a?ciwo?ciami handlowego py?u przeciwwybuchowego (Polska Norma, 1994), u?ywanego w polskich kopalniach. Pierwszy sposb hydrofobizacji py?u wapiennego, polegaj?cy na swobodnym opadaniu py?u wapiennego w oparach kwasu stearynowego przep?ywaj?cych w przeciwpr?dzie, przeprowadzono w aparacie w?asnej konstrukcji (Vogt, 2008, 2011). Aparat gwarantuje dobry kontakt modyfikatora z ziarnami py?u. Py? opadaj?c, nie napotyka ?adnych przeszkd ulega? rozproszeniu, a wprowadzony w stanie parowym kwas stearynowy mo?e swobodnie osiada? na jego powierzchni zewn?trznej oraz penetrowa? w g??b porw, blokuj?c je dla wilgoci. Drugi sposb hydrofobizacji sprowadza? si? w uproszczeniu do zmieszania substratw: py?u wapiennego i domieszki silikonowej - Sarsil H-15, w parownicy (Vogt i Opali?ski, 2009; Vogt i Ho?ownia, 2010). We wst?pnych badaniach okre?lono obj?to?? preparatu, jak? trzeba doda? do py?u w celu uzyskania optymalnych warunkw kontaktu preparatu z cia?em sta?ym. Otrzymany po modyfikacji materia? by? zbrylony w niewielkim stopniu, a jego ca?kowite rozdrobnienie uzyskano poprzez przecieranie py?u przez sito o odpowiednim wymiarze oczek. Badanie w?a?ciwo?ci tak otrzymanych hydrofobowych materia?w przeprowadzono w oparciu o PN (Polska Norma, 1994), jak rwnie? w oparciu o standardowe metody badania materia?w proszkowych z u?yciem aparatu Powder Characteristic Tester (Index tables, Tablets & Capsules, 2005) (Tablica 2,3). Oceny stopnia hydrofobizacji materia?w po modyfikacji dokonano, w przypadku proszku hydrofobizowanego parami kwasu stearynowego, w oparciu o procedur? opisan? w Polskiej Normie (1994), oznaczaj?c procentow? zawarto?? kwasu stearynowego. Otrzymany podczas bada? py? hydrofobizowany kwasem stearynowym zawiera? 0,18% modyfikatora, co jest ilo?ci? dopuszczaln? przez Polsk? Norm? (1994).W celu oceny w?a?ciwo?ci hydrofobowych materia?u modyfikowanego roztworem silikonowym do bada? zaadaptowano technik? pomiaru zwil?alno?ci ziaren w?glowych "film flotation" (Fuerstenau i Williams, 1987) przyjmuj?c, jako materia? odniesienia hydrofobizowan? m?czk? wapienn? z Kopalni Kamienia Wapiennego w Ma?ogoszczy. Opracowano metod? wyznaczania wsp?czynnika C okre?lonego, jako stopie? hydrofobizacji (Vogt i Opali?ski, 2009). ?rednia warto?? C = 84% wskazuje, ?e materia? modyfikowany preparatem silikonowym uzyska? odpowiednie w?a?ciwo?ci hydrofobowe. Tym samym oba materia?y po modyfikacji uzyska?y zadowalaj?ce w?a?ciwo?ci wodoodporne. Ponadto, dla badanych py?w wyznaczono izotermy adsorpcji pary wodnej (Rys. 1). Uzyskane ni?sze warto?ci adsorpcji dla materia?w po modyfikacji ni? dla proszku surowego potwierdzaj?, ?e materia?y posiadaj? charakter hydrofobowy, co pozwala stwierdzi?, ?e obie proponowane metody hydrofobizacji s? u?yteczne do produkcji wodoodpornego py?u wapiennego. Analiz? termiczn? py?w wapiennych wykonano w celu porwnania efektu cieplnego przemian zachodz?cych podczas ogrzewania py?w modyfikowanych z efektem cieplnym zachodz?cym podczas ogrzewania surowego py?u wapiennego. W trakcie bada? u?yto termowag? firmy TA Instruments 2960 SDT ze sprz??onym spektrometrem masowym firmy Balzers TermoStar 300. Otrzymane wynikiprzedstawiono na Rys. 2. Linie ci?g?e na Rys. 2a i 2b przedstawiaj? przebieg krzywych TG, DTG oraz DTA dla py?u surowego. Linie przerywane zosta?y otrzymane dla py?u modyfikowanego kwasem stearynowym (Rys. 2a) oraz preparatem SARSIL H-15 (Rys. 2b). Na Rys. 3 zobrazowano wyniki analizy zawarto?ci tlenku w?gla IV w sk?adzie gazw otrzymywanych podczas rozk?adu termicznego py?u wapiennego (EGA). Krzywa otrzymana dla py?u modyfikowanego kwasem stearynowym w zasadzie pokrywa si? z krzyw? otrzyman? dla py?u surowego. Parametry uzyskane z u?yciem aparatu Powder Characteristics Tester umo?liwi?y scharakteryzowanie py?w wapiennych nie tylko pod k?tem ich w?a?ciwo?ci hydrofobowych, ale tak?e w?a?ciwo?ci kohezyjnych i przep?ywowych.

  3. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of bioactive glass-forsterite nanocomposite powder for oral bone defects treatment applications.

    PubMed

    Saqaei, Mahboobe; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Edris, Hossein; Mortazavi, Vajihesadat

    2015-11-01

    Bone defects which emerge around dental implants are often seen when implants are placed in areas with insufficient alveolar bone, in extraction sockets, or around failing implants. Bone regeneration in above-mentioned defects using of bone grafts or bone substitutes may cure the long-term prognoses of dental implants. Biocompatibility, bioactivity and osteogenic properties are key factors affecting the applications of a bone substitute. This study was aimed at preparation, characterization, biocompatibility and bioactivity evaluation of the bioactive glass-forsterite nanocomposite powder as a desired candidate for oral bone defect treatments. Nanocomposite powders containing 58S bioactive glass and different amounts of forsterite nanopowder were synthesized in situ by sol-gel technique. Characterization of the prepared nanocomposite powders and their cytotoxicity assessment was performed via MTT test. Bioactivity assessment was done by immersing the prepared powder in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Results showed that nanocomposite powders containing forsterite with crystallite size of 20-50nm were successfully fabricated by calcination at 600°C. The prepared bioactive glass-forsterite nanocomposite powders revealed high in vitro biocompatibility; besides, the nanocomposite containing 20wt.% forsterite showed a substantial increase in the cell viability compared with control groups. During immersion in SBF, the formation of apatite layer confirmed the bioactivity of bioactive glass-forsterite nanocomposite powders. According to the results, the fabricated nanocomposite powders can be introduced as a promising candidate for oral bone imperfection treatments and hard tissue mend. PMID:26249608

  4. Numerical simulation of powder transport behavior in laser cladding with coaxial powder feeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; He, XiuLi; Yu, Gang; Wang, ZhongBin; Li, ShaoXia; Zheng, CaiYun; Ning, WeiJian

    2015-10-01

    Laser cladding with coaxial powder feeding is one of the new processes applied to produce well bonding coating on the component to improve performance of its surface. In the process, the clad material is transported by the carrying gas through the coaxial nozzle, generating gas-powder flow. The powder feeding process in the coaxial laser cladding has important influence on the clad qualities. A 3D numerical model was developed to study the powder stream structure of a coaxial feeding nozzle. The predicted powder stream structure was well agreed with the experimental one. The validated model was used to explore the collision behavior of particles in the coaxial nozzle, as well as powder concentration distribution. It was found that the particle diameter and restitution coefficient greatly affect the velocity vector at outlet of nozzle due to the collisions, as well as the powder stream convergence characteristics below the nozzle. The results indicated a practical approach to optimize the powder stream for the coaxial laser cladding.

  5. Water Outgassing from PBX-9502 powder by isoconversional thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Glascoe, E L; Small, W

    2009-01-12

    Temperature programmed desorption/decomposition (TPD) were performed on PBX-9502 after 3 hours of vacuum pump. TPD data were analyzed by the technique of isoconversional analysis to obtain outgassing kinetics and moisture content of PBX-9502 powder as well as to construct water outgassing models for PBX-9502 powder as a function of time and temperature. Following 3 hours of vacuum pump, dry storage of PBX-9502 at 300K, quickly gives rise to 180-330 ppm moisture in the first few years. Thereafter, the moisture outgassing continues at a much slower rate, totaling only to {approx} 210-380 ppm after 100 years of storage. In an effort to understand the nature of the moisture outgassing in PBX-9502, we have measured moisture content and outgassing kinetics in PBX-9502 by the experimental technique of TPD and the isoconversional thermal analysis. The results of these measurements were then used to construct moisture outgassing models for PBX-9502 in a dry environment (following 3 hours of vacuum pump).

  6. GRADIENT INDEX SPHERES BY THE SEQUENTIAL ACCRETION OF GLASS POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    MARIANO VELEZ

    2008-06-15

    The Department of Energy is seeking a method for fabricating mm-scale spheres having a refractive index that varies smoothly and continuously from the center to its surface [1]. The fabrication procedure must allow the creation of a range of index profiles. The spheres are to be optically transparent and have a refractive index differential greater than 0.2. The sphere materials can be either organic or inorganic and the fabrication technique must be capable of scaling to low cost production. Mo-Sci Corporation proposed to develop optical quality gradient refractive index (GRIN) glass spheres of millimeter scale (1 to 2 mm diameter) by the sequential accretion and consolidation of glass powders. Other techniques were also tested to make GRIN spheres as the powder-accretion method produced non-concentric layers and poor optical quality glass spheres. Potential ways to make the GRIN spheres were (1) by "coating" glass spheres (1 to 2 mm diameter) with molten glass in a two step process; and (2) by coating glass spheres with polymer layers.

  7. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Landingham, Richard Lee (Livermore, CA); Hollingsworth, Joel P. (Oakland, CA)

    2011-04-12

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  8. A review of ceramic powder compositions and their manufacturing routes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, M.S.H.; Rae, A.W.J.M.

    1995-12-01

    The selection of a proper powder is a very important strategic decision for a ceramic component manufacturing company. Performance, processing conditions, and cost of ownership of the powder composition are critical parameters to consider. This paper gives a brief summary of commercially available ceramic powder compositions for producing capacitor, filter and resonator components. Highlights and technical issues of each composition category are presented for discussion. Various routes to produce the powders and future demands in powder performance and quality are discussed.

  9. Determination of flow properties of pharmaceutical powders by near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarraguça, Mafalda C; Cruz, Ana V; Soares, Sandra O; Amaral, Helena R; Costa, Paulo C; Lopes, João A

    2010-08-01

    The physical properties of pharmaceutical powders are of upmost importance in the pharmaceutical industry. The knowledge of their flow properties is of critical significance in operations such as blending, tablet compression, capsule filling, transportation, and in scale-up operations. Powders flow properties are measured using a number of parameters such as, angle of repose, compressibility index (Carr's index) and Hausner ratio. To estimate these properties, specific and expensive equipment with time-consuming analysis is required. Near infrared spectroscopy is a fast and low-cost analytical technique thoroughly used in the pharmaceutical industry in the quantification and qualification of products. To establish the potential of this technique to determine the parameters associated with the flow properties of pharmaceutical powders, blended powders based on paracetamol as the active pharmaceutical ingredient were constructed in pilot scale. Spectra were recorded on a Fourier-transform near infrared spectrometer in reflectance mode. The parameters studied were the angle of repose, aerated and tapped bulk density. The correlation between the reference method values and the near infrared spectrum was performed by partial least squares and optimized in terms of latent variables using cross-validation. The near infrared based properties predictions were compared with the reference methods results. Prediction errors, which varied between 2.35% for the angle of repose, 2.51% for the tapped density and 3.18% for the aerated density, show the potential of NIR spectroscopy in the determination of physical properties affecting the flowability of pharmaceutical powders. PMID:20167448

  10. Innovative technologies for powder metallurgy-based disk superalloys: Progress and proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong-Lin, Jia; Chang-Chun, Ge; Qing-Zhi, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Powder metallurgy (PM) superalloys are an important class of high temperature structural materials, key to the rotating components of aero engines. In the purview of the present challenges associated with PM superalloys, two novel approaches namely, powder preparation and the innovative spray-forming technique (for making turbine disk) are proposed and studied. Subsequently, advanced technologies like electrode-induction-melting gas atomization (EIGA), and spark-plasma discharge spheroidization (SPDS) are introduced, for ceramic-free superalloy powders. Presently, new processing routes are sought after for preparing finer and cleaner raw powders for disk superalloys. The progress of research in spray-formed PM superalloys is first summarized in detail. The spray-formed superalloy disks specifically exhibit excellent mechanical properties. This paper reviews the recent progress in innovative technologies for PM superalloys, with an emphasis on new ideas and approaches, central to the innovation driving techniques like powder processing and spray forming. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 50974016 and 50071014).

  11. Die-target for dynamic powder consolidation

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Korth, Gary E. (Blackfoot, ID)

    1986-01-01

    A die/target is disclosed for consolidation of a powder, especially an atomized rapidly solidified metal powder, to produce monoliths by the dynamic action of a shock wave, especially a shock wave produced by the detonation of an explosive charge. The die/target comprises a rectangular metal block having a square primary surface with four rectangular mold cavities formed therein to receive the powder. The cavities are located away from the geometrical center of the primary surface and are distributed around such center while also being located away from the geometrical diagonals of the primary surface to reduce the action of reflected waves so as to avoid tensile cracking of the monoliths. The primary surface is covered by a powder retention plate which is engaged by a flyer plate to transmit the shock wave to the primary surface and the powder. Spawl plates are adhesively mounted on other surfaces of the block to act as momentum traps so as to reduce reflected waves in the block.

  12. Die-target for dynamic powder consolidation

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.; Korth, G.E.

    1985-06-27

    A die/target is disclosed for consolidation of a powder, especially an atomized rapidly solidified metal powder, to produce monoliths by the dynamic action of a shock wave, especially a shock wave produced by the detonation of an explosive charge. The die/target comprises a rectangular metal block having a square primary surface with four rectangular mold cavities formed therein to receive the powder. The cavities are located away from the geometrical center of the primary surface and are distributed around such center while also being located away from the geometrical diagonals of the primary surface to reduce the action of reflected waves so as to avoid tensile cracking of the monoliths. The primary surface is covered by a powder retention plate which is engaged by a flyer plate to transmit the shock wave to the primary surface and the powder. Spawl plates are adhesively mounted on other surfaces of the block to act as momentum traps so as to reduce reflected waves in the block. 4 figs.

  13. Development of a pungency measuring system for red-pepper powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capsaicinoids are the main components that determine the spiciness level of red-pepper powders. Current pungency measurement is mostly dependent on HPLC measurement technique, which is a sample-destructive, labor-intensive, time-consuming, and expensive method. In this research, a nondestructive on-...

  14. Non-destructive and rapid prediction of moisture content in red pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) powder using near-infrared spectroscopy and a partial least squares regression model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a technique for the non-destructive and rapid prediction of the moisture content in red pepper powder using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and a partial least squares regression (PLSR) model. Methods: Three red pepper powder products were separated in...

  15. Synthesis and characterization of nano crystalline BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} powders by low temperature combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jianguo; Zhuang Hanrui; Li Wenlan

    2003-01-01

    Nano crystalline BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} powders have been prepared at a relatively low calcination temperature by a gel combustion technique using citric acid as a fuel/reductant and nitrates as oxidants. The effects of processing parameters, such as Ba/Fe ratio, citric acid/nitrates ratio, reaction temperature on the powder characteristics and magnetic properties of the resultant barium ferrites were investigated. By controlling the molar ratio of citric acid to metal nitrates, nano crystalline BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} powders with different particle sizes have been obtained. Phase attributes, microstructures and magnetic properties of the powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray line-broadening technique, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. The maximum saturation magnetization value and intrinsic coercivity value for the obtained barium hexaferrites are 59.36 emu/g and 5540 Oe.

  16. A review on powder-based additive manufacturing for tissue engineering: selective laser sintering and inkjet 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid Seyed Shirazi, Seyed; Gharehkhani, Samira; Mehrali, Mehdi; Yarmand, Hooman; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Adib Kadri, Nahrizul; Azuan Abu Osman, Noor

    2015-06-01

    Since most starting materials for tissue engineering are in powder form, using powder-based additive manufacturing methods is attractive and practical. The principal point of employing additive manufacturing (AM) systems is to fabricate parts with arbitrary geometrical complexity with relatively minimal tooling cost and time. Selective laser sintering (SLS) and inkjet 3D printing (3DP) are two powerful and versatile AM techniques which are applicable to powder-based material systems. Hence, the latest state of knowledge available on the use of AM powder-based techniques in tissue engineering and their effect on mechanical and biological properties of fabricated tissues and scaffolds must be updated. Determining the effective setup of parameters, developing improved biocompatible/bioactive materials, and improving the mechanical/biological properties of laser sintered and 3D printed tissues are the three main concerns which have been investigated in this article.

  17. Innovative processing techniques for intermetallic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoloff, N. S.; Alman, D. E.

    A wide range of innovative techniques for processing intermetallic matrix composites is surveyed. The majority of processes involve the use of powders, although increasing attention is being directed towards vapor phase techniques. Most intermetallic composites produced to date are reinforced by particulates or random fibers. Several techniques have been successfully employed to produce continuous fiber reinforcements. Injection molding is feasible for producing aligned short fiber reinforced composites. The major success of the various new processing techniques is improved strength (monotonic and creep).

  18. Application of powder metallurgy to an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy, NASA-TRW 6-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ashbrook, R. L.; Waters, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Bar stock of the NASA-TRW 6-A alloy was made by prealloyed powder techniques and its properties evaluated over a range of temperatures. Room temperature ultimate tensile strength was 1894 MN/sq m (274 500 psi). The as-extruded powder product showed substantial improvements in strength over the cast alloy up to 649 C (1200 F) and superplasticity at 1093 C (2000 F). Both conventional and autoclave heat treatments were applied to the extruded powder product. The conventional heat treatment was effective in increasing rupture life at 649 and 704 C (1200 and 1300 F); the autoclave heat treatment, at 760 and 816 C (1400 and 1500 F).

  19. A hydroxycarbonate route to superconductor precursor powders

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, J.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Doughty, D.H.; Lamppa, D.L.; Kimball, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A precipitation process is described for the preparation of powders that can be thermally decomposed to form high critical temperature superconductors such as YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/. In the process, a cationic solution (a concentrated chloride or nitrate solution) is instantaneously mixed with an anionic solution (a mixture of tetramethylammonium hydroxide and carbonate) to produce a metal-hydroxycarbonate precipitate having the metal stoichiometry of the desired superconducting oxide. The calcining and sintering of the precipitates is critical in controlling the structural integrity and morphology of the superconducting cermaics made from the chem-prep powders, as well as controlling superconducting properties. Under appropriate conditions, high density (>95%) materials that exhibit good superconducting characteristics can be prepared with the chem-prep powders. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  20. A hydroxycarbonate route to superconductor precursor powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, J. A.; Bunker, B. C.; Doughty, D. H.; Lamppa, D. L.; Kimball, K. M.

    A precipitation process is described for the preparation of powders that can be thermally decomposed to form high critical temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O7. In the process, a cationic solution (a concentrated chloride or nitrate solution) is instantaneously mixed with an anionic solution (a mixture of tetramethylammonium hydroxide and carbonate) to produce a metal-hydroxycarbonate precipitate having the metal stoichiometry of the desired superconducting oxide. The calcining and sintering of the precipitates is critical in controlling the structural integrity and morphology of the superconducting ceramics made from the chem-prep powders, as well as controlling superconducting properties. Under appropriate conditions, high density (greater than 95 percent) materials that exhibit good superconducting characteristics can be prepared with the chem-prep powders.

  1. Metrology Needs for Metal Additive Manufacturing Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, John A.; Garboczi, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) processes can produce highly complex and customized parts without the need for dedicated tooling and can produce parts directly from the part design information. These types of processes are poised to revolutionize the manufacturing industry, yet several challenges are currently preventing more widespread adoption of AM technologies. Among these challenges are metrology issues associated with the measurement and characterization of the metal powders used for AM systems. This article will describe the technical challenges and needs for characterizing metal AM powders, recent research efforts to address those needs, and current work to standardize characterization methods in ASTM and ISO, such as the recently released ASTM F3049, Standard Guide for Characterizing Properties of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing Processes.

  2. Agglomeration of food powder and applications.

    PubMed

    Dhanalakshmi, K; Ghosal, S; Bhattacharya, S

    2011-05-01

    Agglomeration has many applications in food processing and major applications include easy flow table salt, dispersible milk powder and soup mix, instant chocolate mix, beverage powder, compacted cubes for nutritional-intervention program, health bars using expanded/puffed cereals, etc. The main purpose of agglomeration is to improve certain physical properties of food powders such as bulk density, flowability, dispersability, and stability. Agglomerated products are easy to use by the consumers and hence are preferred over the traditional non-agglomerated products that are usually non-flowable in nature. The properties of food agglomerates and the process of agglomeration like employing pressure, extrusion, rewetting, spray-bed drying, steam jet, heat/sintering, and binders have been reviewed. The physical and instant properties of agglomerated food products have also been discussed. PMID:21491268

  3. Volume 7. Copper base powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Taubenblat, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    This book is based on a series of lectures on copper and copper base P/M materials sponsored by the Metal Powder Industries Federation. It covers recent developments in the fields of copper powder metallurgy and offers a comprehensive survey of copper and copper-base P/M materials. It begins with a chapter on the production of copper and copper alloy powders followed by discussions of specific applications of P/M materials in bronzes and bearings, in brasses and nickel silvers, and in electrically conductive parts. Also discussed are iron composition containing copper, copper-based alloys for infiltration of iron and other special copper-base alloys. It concludes with chapters on consolidation, sintering and review of specifications.

  4. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-10-21

    A strengthened, biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed, compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: Ni, Ag, Ag--Cu, Ag--Pd, Ni--Cu, Ni--V, Ni--Mo, Ni--Al, Ni--Cr--Al, Ni--W--Al, Ni--V--Al, Ni--Mo--Al, Ni--Cu--Al; and at least one fine metal oxide powder; the article having a grain size which is fine and homogeneous; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  5. Nitridation of chromium powder in ammonia atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Zhen, Qiang; Li, Rong

    2015-03-01

    CrN powder was synthesized by nitriding Cr metal in ammonia gas flow, and its chemical reaction mechanism and nitridation process were studied. Through thermodynamic calculations, the Cr-N-O predominance diagrams were constructed for different temperatures. Chromium nitride formed at 7002-1200C under relatively higher nitrogen and lower oxygen partial pressures. Phases in the products were then investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the Cr2N content varied with reaction temperature and holding time. The results indicate that the Cr metal powder nitridation process can be explained by a diffusion model. Further, Cr2N formed as an intermediate product because of an incomplete reaction, which was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). After nitriding at 1000C for 20 h, CrN powder with an average grain size of 63 nm was obtained, and the obtained sample was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  6. Reactive plasma atomization of aluminum nitride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Prichard, P.; Besser, M.; Sordelet, D.; Anderson, I.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments were performed to synthesize AlN powders by reacting Al with N using a conventional dc arc plasma as heat source. Feeding Al powder into Ar/N plasma open to atmosphere produced mainly Al oxide. Experiments using a chamber backfilled with nitrogen suppressed the Al oxide, but little AlN was formed. A furnace and crucible assembly was designed to feed molten Al directly into a DeLaval nozzle attached to the face of the dc arc plasma gun. Resulting submicron powders show a significant increase in AlN formation. This was dependent on chamber pressure, plasma velocity, and molten liquid feed rate. Experimental parameters, equipment design, effects of atomization/vaporization/condensation are discussed.

  7. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.

    2000-02-08

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: (a) forming a melt comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; (b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and (c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}.

  8. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Charles H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hyde, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: a) forming a melt comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1.

  9. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1994-01-01

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  10. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1995-01-01

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  11. Desensitizing nano powders to electrostatic discharge ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Steelman, Ryan; Clark, Billy; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is a main cause for ignition in powder media ranging from grain silos to fireworks. Nanoscale particles are orders of magnitude more ESD ignition sensitive than their micron scale counterparts. This study shows that at least 13 vol. % carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to nano-aluminum and nano-copper oxide particles (nAl + CuO) eliminates ESD ignition sensitivity. The CNT act as a conduit for electric energy and directs electric charge through the powder to desensitize the reactive mixture to ignition. For nanoparticles, the required CNT concentration for desensitizing ESD ignition acts as a diluent to quench energy propagation.

  12. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-12-06

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figures.

  13. Alternative carriers in dry powder inhaler formulations.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Yahya; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2014-05-01

    The aerosolization efficiency of a powder is highly dependent on carrier characteristics, such as particle size distribution, shape and surface properties. The main objective in the inhalation field is to achieve a high and reproducible pulmonary deposition. This can be provided by successful carrier selection and careful process optimization for carrier modification. Lactose is the most common and frequently used carrier in dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations. But lactose shows some limitations in formulation with certain drugs and peptides that prohibit its usage as a carrier in DPI formulations. Here, we criticality review the most important alternative carriers to lactose with merits, demerits and applications in DPI formulations. PMID:24269834

  14. Synthesis of ultrafine powders by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Sheinberg, H.; Blake, R.D.

    1987-04-24

    A method of synthesizing ultrafine powders using microwaves is described. A water soluble material is dissolved in water and the resulting aqueous solution is exposed to microwaves until the water has dissolved. The resulting material is an ultrafine powder. This method can be used to make Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, NiO /plus/ Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and NiO as well as a number of other materials including GaBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub x/. 1 tab.

  15. Synthesis of ultrafine powders by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A method of synthesizing ultrafine powders using microwaves is described. A water soluble material is dissolved in water and the resulting aqueous solution is exposed to microwaves until the water has been removed. The resulting material is an ultrafine powder. This method can be used to make Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, NiO+Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and NiO as well as a number of other materials including GaBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x.

  16. Removing Undesired Fine Powder From Silicon Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flagella, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Fluidized-bed reactor produces highly pure polycrystalline silicon particles with diameters approximately greater than 400 micrometers. Operates by pyrolysis of silane in reaction zone, which is bed of silicon seed particles fluidized by flow of silane and carrier gas. Above reaction zone, gas mixture flows rapidly enough to entrain silicon powders, but not larger seed and product particles. Entrained particles swept out of reactor. Applicable to other processes such as production of fine metal and ceramic powders where control of sizes of product needed.

  17. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1995-12-26

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figs.

  18. A mechanistic analysis of bulk powder caking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, G.; Curcic, N.; Ghadiri, M.

    2013-06-01

    Bulk powder transformations, such as caking, can lead to numerous problems within industry when storing or processing materials. In this paper a new Environmental Caking Rig (ECR) is introduced and has been used to evaluate the caking propensity of a hygroscopic powder as a function of temperature, Relative Humidity (RH), mechanical stress and also when RH is cycled. A linear relationship exists between cake strength and the extent of bulk deformation, here defined by the engineering strain. An empirical model has been used to predict the caking behaviour based on consolidation stress and environmental conditions.

  19. Radio frequency (rf) plasma spheroidized HA powders: powder characterization and spark plasma sintering behavior.

    PubMed

    Xu, J L; Khor, K A; Gu, Y W; Kumar, R; Cheang, P

    2005-05-01

    The present study describes the synthesis of spheroidized hydroxyapatite (HA) powders using a radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch. The spheroidized powders were consolidated through a spark plasma sintering (SPS) system. The microstructure and crystallographic phases in the synthesized powders were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Raman spectrometry. Results showed that the HA feedstock decomposed after rf plasma processing. Crystalline HA, alpha-tri-calcium phosphate (alpha-TCP), tetra-calcium phosphate (TTCP) and calcium oxide (CaO) were detected in the plasma-spheroidized powders. Raman spectra results indicated strong presence of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) in the spheroidized powders. The particle size distribution and specific surface area were influenced through the rf plasma working plate power levels. The sintering behavior of the rf plasma synthesized powders was analyzed through the SPS process and the results indicated that the spheroidized powders commence sintering at approximately 900 degrees C and through to 1150 degrees C. After sintering above 1100 degrees C for 3min, the relative densities of the SPS compacts reached 96% of the theoretical value. The SPS compacts were immersed in simulated body fluids (SBF) for different durations and the results confirmed their bioactivities. PMID:15585221

  20. Structural investigation of Lisinopril by powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Xenia; Tripon, Carmen; Borodi, Gheorghe; Oprean, Lumini?a; Filip, Claudiu

    2009-08-01

    Structural studies on polycrystalline Lisinopril (N-N-[(s)-1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-L-lysil-L-proline) are performed by combined powder X-Ray diffraction and 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The crystal structure of this drug, used primarily for the treatment of hypertension, has not yet been determined due to the impossibility of synthesizing single crystals of sufficient quality. It is shown here that valuable insights into the crystal and molecular structure of Lisinopril can be obtained on polycrystalline powder based on the complementary character of the information provided by the two techniques.

  1. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  2. Mechanical and morphological properties of kenaf powder filled natural rubber latex foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Ahmad Fikri Abdul; Ismail, Hanafi; Ariff, Zulkifli Mohamad

    2015-07-01

    This research is carried out by incorporate kenaf powder with natural rubber latex (NRL) compound and is foamed to make natural rubber latex foam (NRLF) by using a well known technique called Dunlop method. Different loading of kenaf powder was added to NRL compound and was foamed to make NRLF. The tensile properties, and morphology of kenaf filled NRLF was studied. Increase in kenaf loading reduced the tensile strength and elongation at break and of a compound. Modulus at 100% elongation of the compound increased with increased in filler loading. The morphological and micro structural characterization has been performed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  3. Aluminium Foams Fabricated by the PM Route using Nickel-coated Titanium Hydride Powders of Controlled Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proa-Flores, Paula Mercedes

    To establish the effect of reducing the temperature mismatch between the TiH2 decomposition temperature and the aluminium melting point on the foams morphological features and their mechanical compression behavior, a nickel coating on TiH2 powders was used as a hydrogen diffusion barrier and the size of TiH2 powders was controlled to modify the hydrogen evolution temperature. The nickel diffusion barrier was produced by an electroless deposition technique and the hydrogen evolution behavior of coated powders was investigated by thermogravimetrical analysis. The effect of particle size was determined with powders of five particle size fractions along with powders of different particle size obtained from a supplier. Foamable precursors were obtained by hot pressing a mix of aluminium powders with 1 wt.% of TiH2 powders and foams were fabricated at 750 and 800 C. The foams mechanical strength was investigated by uni-axial compression on foam cylinders with and without outer skin. Coating produced a continuous and homogeneous deposit of 96.5 wt.% nickel and reduced the initial temperature mismatch by approximately 70C. Additionally, the coating adhesion proved to be good enough to withstand the mixing and compaction processes. Nickel-coated TiH2 powders generated foams with a more homogeneous and reproducible pore structure than foams produced with powders in the as-received and passivated condition. On the other hand, the hydrogen evolution onset of TiH2 shifted towards higher temperatures as the particle size increased. The particle size influenced the foam expansion and the porosity features. Powders of larger particle size produced foams with a more uniform pore distribution and size. Finally, compression tests on skinless foams containing nickel displayed quasi-horizontal energy regimes with longer stroke lengths than the rest, however the final energy absorption efficiencies (above 7.2 kJkg-1) were not remarkably increased.

  4. [Identification of pearl powder using microscopic infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Chao; Yan, Yan; Yang, Hai-Feng; Li, Jun-Fang; Bai, Hua; Xi, Guang-Cheng; Liao, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Pearl is a precious ornament and traditional Chinese medicine, which application history in China is more than 2000 years. It is well known that the chemical ingredients of shell and pearl are very similar, which all of them including calcium carbonate and various amino acids. Generally, shell powders also can be used as medicine; however, its medicinal value is much lower than that of pearl powders. Due to the feature similarity between pearl powders and shell powders, the distinguishment of them by detecting chemical composition and morphology is very difficult. It should be noted that shell powders have been often posing as pearl powders in markets, which seriously infringes the interests of consumers. Identification of pearl powder was investigated by microscopic infrared reflectance spectroscopy, and pearl powder as well as shell powder was calcined at different temperatures for different time before infrared reflectance spectroscopy analysis. The experimental results indicated that when calcined at 400 °C for 30 minutes under atmospheric pressure, aragonite in pearl powder partly transformed into calcite, while aragonite in shell powder completely transformed into calcite. At the same time, the difference in phase transition between the pearl powders 'and shell powders can be easily detected by using the microscopic infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Therefore, based on the difference in their phase transition process, infrared reflectance spectroscopy can be used to identify phase transformation differences between pearl powder and shell powder. It's more meaningfully that the proposed infrared reflectance spec- troscopy method was also investigated for the applicability to other common counterfeits, such as oyster shell powders and abalone shell powders, and the results show that the method can be a simple, efficiently and accurately method for identification of pearl powder. PMID:25532338

  5. Soil amendement by green supplement : Dry cowdung powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barot, N.; Bagla, H.

    2009-04-01

    Soil is a heavenly resource, a living, breathing and ever changing dynamic ecosystem. Retrogression and degradation of soil system is the result of continuous encroachment done by global anthropogenic activities. Mother earth's monition has increased the local concern to explore solution for the healthy sustainability of soil. At this hour of need it is crucial to regain the health of soil by utilizing eco-friendly solution and the promising one is Dry Cow Dung powder. Cow Dung is bio- organic, complex, polymorphic fecal matter of the bovine species, enriched with Humic acid' (HA), Fulvic Acid' etc. The HA in Cow Dung has been extracted using Neutralization Reaction and its presence is confirmed by comparing it with FTIR spectra of Std HA (IHSS). Property of metal ion adsorption of Standard and Extracted HA has been confirmed using Tracer Technique'. Cow Dung is renewable, easy and freely available with least contaminants as the process of Humification takes place during drying stage hence speciation of any type is not required due to its Biological matrix. Any pre or post conditioning of cow dung powder is not required reducing undesired chemical sink in milieu. It will surely contribute in closing the natural nutrient cycle and increase the fertility as well as carbon pool of soil due to abundance of useful microflora. If compared to present day usage of synthetic and semi- synthetic products, employing Dry Cow Dung powder as agrarian booster will be surely a Green solution! It's rightly said that "The nation which destroys its soil, destroys itself!", hence we need to pursue instant remedies to mitigate our self destruction because healthy soil is the only life line for Survival!

  6. Soil Amendement by green supplement: dry cowdung powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barot, N. S.; Bagla, H.

    2009-04-01

    Soil is a heavenly resource, a living, breathing and ever changing dynamic ecosystem. Retrogression and degradation of soil system is the result of continuous encroachment done by global anthropogenic activities. Mother earth's monition has increased the local concern to explore solution for the healthy sustainability of soil. At this hour of need it is crucial to regain the health of soil by utilizing eco-friendly solution and the promising one is Dry Cow Dung powder. Cow Dung is bio- organic, complex, polymorphic fecal matter of the bovine species, enriched with Humic acid' (HA), Fulvic Acid' etc. The HA in Cow Dung has been extracted using Neutralization Reaction and its presence is confirmed by comparing it with FTIR spectra of Std HA (IHSS). Property of metal ion adsorption of Standard and Extracted HA has been confirmed using Tracer Technique'. Cow Dung is renewable, easy and freely available with least contaminants as the process of Humification takes place during drying stage hence speciation of any type is not required due to its Biological matrix. Any pre or post conditioning of cow dung powder is not required reducing undesired chemical sink in milieu. It will surely contribute in closing the natural nutrient cycle and increase the fertility as well as carbon pool of soil due to abundance of useful microflora. If compared to present day usage of synthetic and semi- synthetic products, employing Dry Cow Dung powder as agrarian booster will be surely a Green solution! It's rightly said that "The nation which destroys its soil, destroys itself!", hence we need to pursue instant remedies to mitigate our self destruction because healthy soil is the only life line for Survival!

  7. Characterization of Hafnia Powder Prepared from an Oxychloride Sol Gel

    SciTech Connect

    McGilvery, Catriona M.; De Gendt, S; Payzant, E Andrew; MacKenzie, M; Craven, A J; McComb, D W

    2011-01-01

    Hafnium containing compounds are of great importance to the semiconductor industry as a replacement for Si(O,N) with a high- gate dielectric. Whilst Hf is already being incorporated into working devices1, much is still to be understood about it. Here we investigate the crystallisation processes and chemistry of bulk HfO2 powders which will aid in interpretation of reactions and crystallisation events occurring in thin films used as gate dielectrics. Amorphous HfO2 powder was prepared via a sol-gel route using hafnium oxychloride (HfOCl2 xH2O) as a precursor. The powders were subjected to various heat treatments and analysed using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis techniques. It was found that a large change in the crystallisation pathway occurred when the sample was heated in an inert environment compared with in air. Instead of the expected monoclinic phase (m-HfO2), tetragonal HfO2 (t-HfO2) also formed under these conditions and was observed up to temperatures of ~760 C. The t-HfO2 particles, which are less than 30nm in size, eventually transform into m-HfO2 on further heating. Possible mechanisms for the crystallisation of t-HfO2 are discussed. It is proposed that within this temperature range t-HfO2 is stabilised due to the presence of oxygen vacancies in the inert environment, forming by the reduction of HfIV to HfIII. As the crystal grows in size as the temperature increases there are too few oxygen vacancies left in the structure to continue stabilising the t-HfO2 phase and so transformation to m-HfO2 occurs.

  8. Structural studies of magnesium nitride fluorides by powder neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, Michael A.; Hughes, Robert W.; Smith, Ronald I.; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2012-01-15

    Samples of ternary nitride fluorides, Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF have been prepared by solid state reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} at 1323-1423 K and investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} is cubic (space group: Pm3m) and has a structure related to rock-salt MgO, but with one cation site vacant. Mg{sub 2}NF is tetragonal (space group: I4{sub 1}/amd) and has an anti-LiFeO{sub 2} related structure. Both compounds are essentially ionic and form structures in which nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered. The nitride fluorides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 5 and 300 K. - Graphical abstract: Definitive structures of the ternary magnesium nitride fluorides Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and the lower temperature polymorph of Mg{sub 2}NF have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. The nitride halides are essentially ionic and exhibit weak temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definitive structures of Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF were determined by neutron diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered in both structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds exhibit weak, temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compounds are essentially ionic with ionicity increasing with F{sup -} content.

  9. Hot Superplastic Powder Forging for Transparent nanocrystalline Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, W. Roger

    2006-05-22

    The program explored a completely new, economical method of manufacturing nanocrystalline ceramics, Hot Superplastic Powder Forging (HSPF). The goal of the work was the development of nanocrystalline/low porosity optically transparent zirconia/alumina. The high optical transparency should result from lack of grain boundary scattering since grains will be smaller than one tenth the wavelength of light and from elimination of porosity. An important technological potential for this process is manufacturing of envelopes for high-pressure sodium vapor lamps. The technique for fabricating monolithic nanocrystalline material does not begin with powder whose particle diameter is <100 nm as is commonly done. Instead it begins with powder whose particle diameter is on the order of 10-100 microns but contains nanocrystalline crystallites <<100 nm. Spherical particles are quenched from a melt and heat treated to achieve the desired microstructure. Under a moderate pressure within a die or a mold at temperatures of 1100C to 1300C densification is by plastic flow of superplastic particles. A nanocrystalline microstructure results, though some features are greater than 100nm. It was found, for instance, that in the fully dense Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic specimens that a bicontinuous microstructure exists containing <100 nm ZrO2 particles in a matrix of Al2O3 grains extending over 1-2 microns. Crystallization, growth, phase development and creep during hot pressing and forging were studied for several compositions and so provided some details on development of polycrystalline microstructure from heating quenched ceramics.

  10. NiTi Powder Sintering from TiH2 Powder: An In Situ Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Cao, Peng

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, an in situ observation of NiTi powder sintering from TiH2 powder is presented, using an environmental scanning electron microscope. It is found that hydrogen release during dehydrogenation significantly affects the sintering behavior and resultant microstructure. In comparison to the blended Ni/Ti powders, dehydrogenation occurring in the Ni/TiH2 blend leads to higher porosity, less densification, and a lower degree of chemical homogenization after being sintered at 1173 K (900 C) for 1 hour.

  11. Thin transparent films formed from powdered glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Glass film less than five mils thick is formed from powdered glass dispersed in an organic liquid, deposited on a substrate, and fused into place. The thin films can be cut and shaped for contact lenses, optical filters and insulating layers.

  12. 30 CFR 57.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Black powder. 57.6901 Section 57.6901 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives General Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6901...

  13. 30 CFR 57.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Black powder. 57.6901 Section 57.6901 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives General Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6901...

  14. 30 CFR 57.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Black powder. 57.6901 Section 57.6901 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives General Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6901...

  15. 30 CFR 57.6901 - Black powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Black powder. 57.6901 Section 57.6901 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives General Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6901...

  16. Balanced mechanical resonator for powder handling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrazin, Philippe C. (Inventor); Brunner, Will M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system incorporating a balanced mechanical resonator and a method for vibration of a sample composed of granular material to generate motion of a powder sample inside the sample holder for obtaining improved analysis statistics, without imparting vibration to the sample holder support.

  17. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any mixture prepared therefrom... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive... is free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color additive mixtures for external drug use...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any mixture prepared therefrom... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive... is free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color additive mixtures for external drug use...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any mixture prepared therefrom... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive... is free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color additive mixtures for external drug use...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... good manufacturing practice. (d) Labeling. The color additive and any mixture prepared therefrom... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive... is free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color additive mixtures for external drug use...

  1. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  2. Frontal dynamics of powder snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, C. S.; Louge, M. Y.; Turnbull, B.

    2013-06-01

    We analyze frontal dynamics of dilute powder snow avalanches sustained by rapid blow-out behind the front. Such material injection arises as a weakly cohesive snow cover is fluidized by the very pore pressure gradient that the particle cloud induces within the snowpack. We model cloud fluid mechanics as a potential flow consisting of a traveling source of denser fluid thrust into a uniform airflow. Stability analysis of a mass balance involving snow cover and powder cloud yields relations among scouring depth, frontal height, speed, mixed-mean density, and impact pressure when the frontal region achieves a stable growth rate. We compare predictions with field measurements, show that powder clouds cannot reach steady frontal speed on a uniform snowpack with constant cloud width and derive a criterion for cloud ignition. Because static pressure is continuous across the mean air-cloud interface and deviatoric stresses are negligible, frontal acceleration is insensitive to local slope, but instead arises from a deficit of flow-induced suction in the wake. We calculate how far a powder cloud travels until its frontal mixed-mean density becomes stable, and show how topographic spread can hasten its collapse.

  3. Sol-Gel Synthesis Of Aluminoborosilicate Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey; Leiser, Daniel; Selvaduray, Guna

    1992-01-01

    Application of sol-gel process to synthesis of aluminoborosilicate powders shows potential for control of microstructures of materials. Development of materials having enhanced processing characteristics prove advantageous in extending high-temperature endurance of fibrous refractory composite insulation made from ceramic fibers.

  4. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported (i.e., pesticides and herbicides, synthetic organic chemicals, and trihalom...

  5. Vacuum handling system for powdered samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkebak, R. C.; Cremers, C. J.; Lyons, W. E.

    1971-01-01

    A sample system for handling powdered material under vacuum conditions is described. The system features linear motion of up to 0.25 m and the means for complete isolation of the sample and sample system from external apparatus. The system was designed for the measurement of thermophysical properties of lunar material from Apollo missions under thoroughest possible prevention of contamination.

  6. 21 CFR 529.2464 - Ticarcillin powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ticarcillin powder. 529.2464 Section 529.2464 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS 529.2464...

  7. Plated Metal Powders for Electrode Pastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Metal grains to be sintered precoated with frit metal. Coated metal powders used to make ink-like electrode pastes for printing and sintering electrode-fabrication process. Grains of base metal coated with lowmelting-point--, lead or tin-- by electroless deposition.

  8. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY...

  9. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY...

  10. 30 CFR 57.6133 - Powder chests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available at MSHA, 1100 Wilson Blvd... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Powder chests. 57.6133 Section 57.6133 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY...

  11. Characterization of nal powders for rocket propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merotto, L.; Galfetti, L.; Colombo, G.; DeLuca, L. T.

    2011-10-01

    Nanosized metal powders are known to significantly improve both solid and hybrid rocket performance, but have some drawbacks in terms of cost, safety, and possible influence on propellant mechanical properties. Performance enhancement through nanosized metal or metal hydride addition to solid fuels is currently under investigation also for hybrid propulsion. Therefore, a preburning characterization of the powders used in solid propellant or fuel manufacturing is useful to assess their effects on the ballistic properties and engine performance. An investigation concerning the comparative characterization of several aluminum powders having different particle size, age, and coating is presented. Surface area, morphology, chemical species concentration and characteristics, surface passivation layers, surface and subsurface chemical composition, ignition temperature and ignition delay are investigated. The aim of this characterization is to experimentally assess the effect of the nAl powder properties on ballistic characteristics of solid fuels and solidrocket composite-propellant performance, showing an increase in terms of Is caused by the decrease of two-phase losses in solid and a possible significant rf increase in hybrid rockets.

  12. High-Performance Polyimide Powder Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have developed advanced powder coatings for longer-lasting, improved corrosion control. The results of preliminary tests of the coatings and their resistance to salt spray corrosion are very encouraging, and commercial partners are sought for further development.

  13. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  14. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a project to develop a process for press and sinter of net shape Titanium components. All of these project objectives have been successfully completed.

  15. Formation of microporous NiTi by transient liquid phase sintering of elemental powders.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Muhammad Hussain; Goodall, Russell; Davies, Hywel A; Todd, Iain

    2012-08-01

    Porous metallic structures are attractive for biomedical implant applications as their open porosity simultaneously improves the degree of fixation and decreases the mismatch in stiffness between bone and implant, improving bonding and reducing stress-shielding effects respectively. NiTi alloys exhibit both the shape memory effect and pseudoelasticity, and are of particular interest, though they pose substantial problems in their processing. This is because the shape memory and pseudoelastic behaviours are exceptionally sensitive to the presence of oxygen, and other minor changes in alloy chemistry. Thus in processing careful control of composition and contamination is vital. In this communication, we investigate these issues in a novel technique for producing porous NiTi parts via transient liquid phase sintering following metal injection moulding (MIM) of elemental Ni and Ti powders, and report a new mechanism for pore formation in the powder processing of metallic materials from elemental powders. PMID:24364948

  16. Growth, spectral and thermal studies of an efficient NLO material: Diaquadicinnamatocadmium(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sunalya M.; Sudarsanakumar, M. R.; Dhanya, V. S.

    2014-01-28

    A nonlinear metal–organic crystal, diaquadicinnamatocadmium(II) has been grown by controlled gel diffusion technique. Sodium metasilicate was used to prepare the gel. The chemical composition of the crystal has been determined by CHN analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction studies confirm the crystalline nature of the grown crystal. Functional groups present in the compound were identified by FT-IR spectral analysis. The thermal decomposition of the compound was studied using thermogravimetry (TG). The optical transparency range and the lower cut-off wavelength were identified from the UV-Visible-NIR spectrum. The NLO activity of the grown crystal was confirmed using Kurtz and Perry powder test.

  17. Effect of amino acid dopants on the spectral, optical, mechanical and thermal properties of potassium acid phthalate crystals for possible optoelectronic and frequency doubling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, J. Thomas Joseph; Gnanaraj, J. Martin Sam; Dhavud, S. Shek; Ekadevasena, S.

    2015-09-01

    Undoped and amino acid (L-Arginine and L-Valine) doped KAP crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The changes in the structural, spectral, optical, mechanical and thermal properties were observed. The sharp prominent peaks in the indexed powder XRD pattern confirms the crystalline nature of the sample. Optical studies reveal that the crystal is transparent in the entire visible light region. Thermal stability was checked by TG/DTA analysis. The mechanical stability was evaluated from Vicker's microhardness test. The SHG efficiency for the title materials was tested with different particle sizes by the Kurtz and Perry powder method, which established the existence of phase matching.

  18. Improved Small-Particle Powders for Plasma Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QuynhGiao, N.; Miller, Robert A.; Leissler, George W.

    2005-01-01

    Improved small-particle powders and powder-processing conditions have been developed for use in plasma spray deposition of thermal-barrier and environmental barrier coatings. Heretofore, plasma-sprayed coatings have typically ranged in thickness from 125 to 1,800 micrometers. As explained below, the improved powders make it possible to ensure complete coverage of substrates at unprecedently small thicknesses of the order of 25 micrometers. Plasma spraying involves feeding a powder into a hot, high-velocity plasma jet. The individual powder particles melt in the plasma jet as they are propelled towards a substrate, upon which they splat to build up a coating. In some cases, multiple coating layers are required. The size range of the powder particles necessarily dictates the minimum thickness of a coating layer needed to obtain uniform or complete coverage. Heretofore, powder particle sizes have typically ranged from 40 to 70 micrometers; as a result, the minimum thickness of a coating layer for complete coverage has been about 75 micrometers. In some applications, thinner coatings or thinner coating layers are desirable. In principle, one can reduce the minimum complete-coverage thickness of a layer by using smaller powder particles. However, until now, when powder particle sizes have been reduced, the powders have exhibited a tendency to cake, clogging powder feeder mechanisms and feed lines. Hence, the main problem is one of synthesizing smaller-particle powders having desirable flow properties. The problem is solved by use of a process that begins with a spray-drying subprocess to produce spherical powder particles having diameters of less than 30 micrometers. (Spherical-particle powders have the best flow properties.) The powder is then passed several times through a commercial sifter with a mesh to separate particles having diameters less than 15 micrometers. The resulting fine, flowable powder is passed through a commercial fluidized bed powder feeder into a plasma spray jet.

  19. TiNi synthesis from elemental powder components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, Janet C.; Jardine, A. Peter

    1994-05-01

    Commercially, the shape memory alloy TiNi is produced by either vacuum induction melting or by vacuum arc remelting of the pure metal ingots. Powder metallurgy techniques provide an alternative fabrication route but problems arise achieving chemical homogeneity. In this study TiNi compacts were cold pressed from the blended elemental powders and sintered in vacuum for varying times at temperatures from 800 degree(s)C to 1000 degree(s)C. Two heating rates were used, 5 K/min and 10 K/min. A TiNi microstructure could be produced after annealing at 1000 degree(s)C for 6 hrs, although some TiNi3 was still observed. This is likely to be difficult to completely remove as TiNi3 is thermodynamically more stable than TiNi. Thus, homogenization is unlikely to be completed by solid-state diffusion processes. The martensitic B19' structure was observed to be highly oriented after processing.

  20. The Development of a Two-Powder Process for Bi-2212 Precursor Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Holesinger, Terry

    2010-10-01

    Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2Oy (Bi-2212) is a prime candidate for high-field (>20 T) superconducting magnet applications, as it can be formed into a round wire conductor, a unique characteristic among all the high-temperature supercondutors (HTS) discovered to date. Round wires are manufactured by conventional oxide powder-in-tube processes (OPIT). A critical part of this process is the quality of the starting oxide powder precursor, affecting the drawing processes to form wire, the development of the superconducting phase in-situ during heat treatments and the connectivity along the wire length. To better manipulate the partial-melt behavior while better controlling the formation of 2212 by reducing the number of phases present, as 2-powder process was developed. A set of anneals has been completed on the resulting precursor powder. Initial characterization indicates the process can produce Bi-2212, though further development is necessary.

  1. Does a powder surface contain all necessary information for particle size distribution analysis?

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Niklas; Antikainen, Osmo; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to utilise a new approach where digital image information is used in the characterisation of particle size distributions of a large set of pharmaceutical powders. A novel optical set-up was employed to create images and calculate a stereometric parameter from the digital images of powder surfaces. Analysis was made of 40 granule batches with varying particle sizes and compositions prepared with fluidised bed granulation. The extracted digital image information was then connected to particle size using multivariate modelling. The modelled particle size distributions were compared to particle size determinations with sieve analysis and laser diffraction. The results revealed that the created models corresponded well with the particle size distributions measured with sieve analysis and laser diffraction. This study shows that digital images taken from powder surfaces contain all necessary data that is needed for particle size distribution analysis. To obtain this information from images careful consideration has to be given on the imaging conditions. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the new approach is a powerful means of analysis in particle size determination. The method is fast, the sample size needed is very small and the technique enables non-destructive analysis of samples. The method is suitable in the particle size range of approximately 20-1500 microm. However, further investigations with a broad range of powders have to be made to obtain information of the possibilities and limitations of the introduced method in powder characterisation. PMID:12453611

  2. Assessment of blending ratio of powdered medicine mixtures by image analysis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Miyawaki, Kaoru; Uchino, Tomonobu; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    In the dispensing process, powdered medicines are often blended with diluents or different kinds of powder. With blending, the mass percent of the medicine in the mixture is unknown until the active pharmaceutical ingredient is determined with techniques such as spectroscopy and chromatography. However, pharmacists need to confirm the exact blending ratio of the dispensing mixture in pharmacies. We aimed to develop a precise and concise method to measure the mass percent of powdered medicine mixtures without an expensive analytical apparatus. Digital photographs of three kinds of mixture of lactose powder, as diluents, with Adona, Anginal, or Asverin powder were taken with a microscope at a 30 magnification. Thereafter, the mass percent was calculated from digital images of the mixture using calibrated color information in the YCbCr color space. A linear regression, between the mass percent and color difference signal, Cb, value was obtained from 10 to 90% of the medicines (r(2)=0.9806-9993) in all systems. The intra-day accuracy and precision were 0.67-12% (relative error) and <5% (relative standard deviation), respectively. Moreover, the mass percent measured using image analysis was consistent with the concentration of the active pharmaceutical ingredient determined spectrophotometrically. This effective image analysis method enables pharmacists to nondestructively ensure the exact mass percent of the medicine in the dispensing mixture in pharmacies. PMID:24695341

  3. Spray-dried powders enhance vaginal siRNA delivery by potentially modulating the mucus molecular sieve structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Na; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Feifei; Zhang, Tao; Gan, Yong; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery provides a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of vaginal diseases. However, the densely cross-linked mucus layer on the vaginal wall severely restricts nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery to the vaginal epithelium. In order to overcome this barrier and enhance vaginal mucus penetration, we prepared spray-dried powders containing siRNA-loaded nanoparticles. Powders with Pluronic F127 (F127), hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), and mannitol as carriers were obtained using an ultrasound-assisted spray-drying technique. Highly dispersed dry powders with diameters of 5–15 μm were produced. These powders showed effective siRNA protection and sustained release. The mucus-penetrating properties of the powders differed depending on their compositions. They exhibited different potential of opening mesh size of molecular sieve in simulated vaginal mucus system. A powder formulation with 0.6% F127 and 0.1% HPMC produced the maximum increase in the pore size of the model gel used to simulate vaginal mucus by rapidly extracting water from the gel and interacting with the gel; the resulting modulation of the molecular sieve effect achieved a 17.8-fold improvement of siRNA delivery in vaginal tract and effective siRNA delivery to the epithelium. This study suggests that powder formulations with optimized compositions have the potential to alter the steric barrier posed by mucus and hold promise for effective vaginal siRNA delivery. PMID:26347257

  4. Investigation of oxidation process of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, E. N.; Nikolaev, E. V.; Vlasov, V. A.; Zhuravkov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders was studied using X- ray powder diffraction and thermogravimetric analyzes. The powders with average particles size of 100 nm were made by the electric explosion of wire, and were subjected to mechanical activation in planetary ball mill for 15 and 40 minutes. It was shown that a certain amount of FeO phase is formed during mechanical activation of ultrafine iron powders. According to thermogravimetric analysis, the oxidation process of non-milled ultrafine iron powders is a complex process and occurs in three stages. The preliminary mechanical activation of powders considerably changes the nature of the iron powders oxidation, leads to increasing in the temperature of oxidation onset and shifts the reaction to higher temperatures. For the milled powders, the oxidation is more simple process and occurs in a single step.

  5. Characterization and Control of Powder Properties for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strondl, A.; Lyckfeldt, O.; Brodin, H.; Ackelid, U.

    2015-03-01

    Powder characterization and handling in powder metallurgy are important issues and the required powder properties will vary between different component manufacturing processes. By understanding and controlling these, the final material properties for different applications can be improved and become more reliable. In this study, the metal powders used in additive manufacturing (AM) in terms of electron beam melting and selective laser melting have been investigated regarding particle size and shape using dynamic image analysis. In parallel, powder flow characteristics have been evaluated with a powder rheometer. Correlations within the results have been found between particle shape and powder flow characteristics that could explain certain effects of the powder processing in the AM processes. The impact, however, in the processing performance as well as in ultimate material properties was found to be limited.

  6. Photocatalysis of phenol and salicyclic acid by nanostructured titania powders

    SciTech Connect

    Fotou, G.P.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    The photocatalytic destruction of phenol and salicylic acid was studied in aqueous suspensions of titania powders made in flame reactors. These powders were made in six hydrocarbon diffusion flames by hydrolysis and oxidation of TiCl{sub 4} that resulted in powders of high specific surface area and high anatase content. The photoactivity of the flame-made titania powders was compared with that of commercially available powders. Doping the titania with SiO{sub 2} was detrimental to the photoactivity of the powders in aerated solutions in contrast to non-aerated solutions. Titania powders in the range of 20-40 nm containing small amounts of rutile were more active than pure anatase powders. The phenol degradation reaction followed a first-order law while the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model was found to most accurately represent the photodegradation of salicylic acid.

  7. Method for controlling density and permeability of sintered powdered metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, H. H.

    1968-01-01

    Improved, relatively low-cost method has been developed to produce porous metals with predetermined pore size, pore spacing, and density, utilizing powder-metal processes. The method uses angular not spherical tungsten powder.

  8. Synthesis and colloidal processing of nanocrystalline (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized) ZrO{sub 2} powders by a surface free energy controlled process

    SciTech Connect

    Burgard, D.; Nass, R.; Schmidt, H.

    1997-08-01

    Using the controlled growth technique, nanocrystalline ZrO{sub 2} powders have been prepared from solution. By variation of the Y-content (0--8 mol%), redispersable monoclinic, tetragonal or cubic ZrO{sub 2} powders with particle sizes between 5 and 10 nm were obtained after crystallization at elevated temperature and pressure. Nanodisperse suspensions of the powders have been used for colloidal processing techniques such as tape casting, slip casting or extrusion. The resulting green bodies with densities of 55% and average pore sizes of 5 nm could be sintered at temperatures below 1,100 C leading to monoclinic, tetragonal or cubic ZrO{sub 2} ceramics.

  9. Calculation of laser absorption by metal powders in additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Boley, C D; Khairallah, S A; Rubenchik, A M

    2015-03-20

    We have calculated the absorption of laser light by a powder of metal spheres, typical of the powder employed in laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing. Using ray-trace simulations, we show that the absorption is significantly larger than its value for normal incidence on a flat surface, due to multiple scattering. We investigate the dependence of absorption on powder content (material, size distribution, and geometry) and on beam size. PMID:25968537

  10. Pre-evaluation method for the spectroscopic properties of YAG bulk materials by sol-gel synthetic powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, K.; Fujimoto, Y.; Motokoshi, S.; Fujita, H.; Nakatsuka, M.

    2011-05-01

    The sol-gel synthetic powder evaluation method is the most effective and the easiest technique for pre-evaluating the spectroscopic properties of luminescent impurity doped YAG. The luminescent elements doped sol-gel powder agrees well with that of a single crystal or ceramic YAG regarding the luminescent spectra, the intensity, and the lifetime, even though the powder sintered at a low temperature of 1100C in comparison with the YAG crystal melting point of 1970C, because a good crystallinity of the sol-gel powder is led by the hard agglomerates of very small primary particles. It is considered that the significance of this method is to apply for not only of YAG but also of other oxides, for instance Y2O3, ZrO2, TiO2, and MgAl2O4

  11. Rietveld analysis of the effect of annealing atmosphere on phase evolution of nanocrystalline TiO2 powders.

    PubMed

    Salari, M; Rezaee, M; Chidembo, A T; Konstantinov, K; Liu, H K

    2012-06-01

    The structural evolution of nanocrystalline TiO2 was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Rietveld refinement method (RRM). TiO2 powders were prepared by the sol-gel technique. Post annealing of as-synthesized powders in the temperature range from 500 degrees C to 800 degrees C under air and argon atmospheres led to the formation of TiO2 nanoparticles with mean crystallite size in the range of 37-165 nm, based on the Rietveld refinement results. It was found that the phase structure, composition, and crystallite size of the resulting particles were dependent on not only the annealing temperature, but also the annealing atmosphere. Rietveld refinement of the XRD data showed that annealing the powders under argon atmosphere promoted the polymorphic phase transformation from anatase to rutile. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was employed to investigate the morphology and size of the annealed powders. PMID:22905522

  12. 21 CFR 520.44 - Acetazolamide sodium soluble powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetazolamide sodium soluble powder. 520.44... Acetazolamide sodium soluble powder. (a) Specifications. The drug is in a powder form containing acetazolamide sodium, USP equivalent to 25 percent acetazolamide activity. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in §...

  13. 21 CFR 520.44 - Acetazolamide sodium soluble powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetazolamide sodium soluble powder. 520.44... Acetazolamide sodium soluble powder. (a) Specifications. The drug is in a powder form containing acetazolamide sodium, USP equivalent to 25 percent acetazolamide activity. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in §...

  14. 21 CFR 872.6660 - Porcelain powder for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Porcelain powder for clinical use. 872.6660... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices 872.6660 Porcelain powder for clinical use. (a) Identification. Porcelain powder for clinical use is a device consisting of a mixture of...

  15. 21 CFR 872.6660 - Porcelain powder for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Porcelain powder for clinical use. 872.6660... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices 872.6660 Porcelain powder for clinical use. (a) Identification. Porcelain powder for clinical use is a device consisting of a mixture of...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6660 - Porcelain powder for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Porcelain powder for clinical use. 872.6660... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices 872.6660 Porcelain powder for clinical use. (a) Identification. Porcelain powder for clinical use is a device consisting of a mixture of...

  17. 49 CFR 173.171 - Smokeless powder for small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Smokeless powder for small arms. 173.171 Section 173.171 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... Class 7 173.171 Smokeless powder for small arms. Smokeless powder for small arms which has...

  18. 49 CFR 173.171 - Smokeless powder for small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Smokeless powder for small arms. 173.171 Section 173.171 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... Class 7 173.171 Smokeless powder for small arms. Smokeless powder for small arms which has...

  19. 49 CFR 173.171 - Smokeless powder for small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Smokeless powder for small arms. 173.171 Section 173.171 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... Class 7 173.171 Smokeless powder for small arms. Smokeless powder for small arms which has...

  20. 49 CFR 173.171 - Smokeless powder for small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Smokeless powder for small arms. 173.171 Section 173.171 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... Class 7 173.171 Smokeless powder for small arms. Powders that have been classed in Division 1.3...