Sample records for kuwait oman qatar

  1. Kuwait.

    PubMed

    1988-03-01

    The Republic of Kuwait occupies an area of 6,880 square miles at the head of the Persian Gulf, bounded on the north and west by Iraq and on the south by Saudi Arabia. 1.7 million people live in Kuwait, of whom 680,000 are Kuwaitis; the rest are expatriate Arabs, Iranians, and Indians. The annual growth rate of Kuwaitis is 3.8%. The Kuwaitis are 70% Sunni and 30% Shi'a Muslims. Arabic is the official language, but English is widely spoken. Kuwait is a highly developed welfare state with a free market economy. Education is free and compulsory, and literacy is 71%. Infant mortality among Kuwaitis is 26.1/1000, and life expectancy is 70 years. Medical care is free. Kuwait was first settled by Arab tribes from Qatar. In 1899 the ruler, Sheikh Mubarak Al Sabah, whose descendents still rule Kuwait, signed a treaty with Britain; and Kuwait remained a British protectorate until it became independent in 1961. A constitution was promulgated in 1962, and a National Assembly was elected by adult male suffrage in 1963. However, the Assembly has since been suspended due to internal friction. Kuwait and Iraq have been disputing Kuwait's northern border since 1913, and the southern border includes a Divided Zone, where sovereignty is disputed by Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Despite the fall in oil prices in 1982 and the loss of trade due to the Iran-Iraq war, Kuwait is one of the world's wealthiest countries with a per capita gross domestic product of $10,175. Oil accounts for 85% of Kuwait's exports, which total $7.42 billion; income from foreign investments (about $60 billion) makes up most of the balance. All petroleum-related activities are managed by the Kuwait Petroleum Corporation (KPC), which includes the nationalized Kuwait Oil Company, petrochemical industries, the 22-vessel tanker fleet, and refineries and service stations in Europe, where Kuwaiti oil is marketed under the brand name Q8. Kuwait has more than 66 billion barrels of recoverable oil but limits production to 999,000 barrels per day. Other industrial products include ammonia, chemical fertilizers, fishing and water desalinization (215 million gallons a day). Kuwait imports machinery, manufactured goods, and food. Nevertheless exports exceed imports by $2 billion, and the Kuwaiti dinar is a strong currency (1 KD=US$3.57). About $75 billion is kept in 2 reserve funds: the Fund for Future Generations and the General Reserve Fund. In addition to domestic expenditures and imports, Kuwait has extended $5 billion worth of loans to developing countries, made through the Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development. Kuwait has been engaged in continuing border disputes with Iraq since 1961, but the most immediate threat to Kuwait has been the Iran-Iraq war. Kuwait lent Iraq $6 billion, in retaliation for which Iran bombed a Kuwaiti oil depot, and Shi'a Muslim terrorists bombed the French and US embassies and hijacked a Kuwaiti airliner in 1984. Iran also attacked Kuwaiti tankers. In 1987 the US reflagged 11 Kuwaiti tankers to protect them from Iranian attacks. Kuwait has been modernizing its own military forces as well as purchasing sophisticated weapons from the UK, the US, France, and the USSR. In 1981 Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman formed the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) for mutual defense, and in 1987 Kuwait was elected chairman of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC). Kuwait has diplomatic relations with the USSR and the People's Republic of China, as well as with the US, which has supplied Kuwait with $1.5 billion of sophisticated weaponry from foreign military sales (FMC). The US is Kuwait's largest supplier (after Japan), and Kuwait is the 5th largest market in the Middle East for US goods, despite the disincentives brought about by the Arab boycott of Israel. PMID:12177972

  2. UAE, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar Carnegie Mellon University

    E-print Network

    Presentation 28th October 2014 #12;Cigna Global Health Benefits in the Middle East Part of the global Cigna Arabia Insurance Company (SAICO) Operations in Abu Dhabi (UAE), Bahrain, Riyadh (KSA) and Delaware (USA% Prescribed Physiotherapy, Osteopathy, Chiropractic and other complementary therapies Paid in Full 80%l

  3. The Admission and Academic Placement of Students from: Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Yemen Arab Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. K., Ed.

    Information is provided on the educational systems of Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and the Yemen Arab Republic in order to assist U.S. colleges and universities as they work with international student agencies and representatives from these countries. For each country, placement recommendations are offered, along with notes to…

  4. Facing Human Capital Challenges of the 21st Century: Education and Labor Market Initiatives in Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gabriella; Karoly, Lynn A.; Constant, Louay; Salem, Hanine; Goldman, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    Countries in the Arab region are faced with the challenge of developing their populations' skills and technical knowledge, or human capital, in order to compete in the 21st century global economy. The authors describe the education and labor market initiatives implemented or under way in four countries in the Arab region -- Lebanon, Oman, Qatar,…

  5. 5. CORAL REEF STATUS IN THE ROPME SEA AREA: ARABIAN\\/PERSIAN GULF, GULF OF OMAN AND ARABIAN SEA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HAMID REZAI; SIMON WILSON; MICHEL CLAEREBOUDT; BERNARD RIEGL

    This report summarises the status of coral reefs in the ROPME Sea Area which includes Bahrain, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates (UAE); there are no coral reefs in Iraq. The region can be split into three parts according to the local marine climate, which strongly influences the nature of the coral communities: the Persian\\/Arabian Gulf

  6. Labor, nationalism, and imperialism in eastern Arabia: Britain, the Shaikhs, and the Gulf oil workers in Bahrain, Kuwait and Qatar, 1932-1956

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saleh; H. M. A

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the lack of a noticeable indigenous labor movement in the contemporary Gulf Arab countries of Bahrain, Kuwait and Qatar; it focuses on the emergence, after the discovery of oil, of an industrial Gulf labor force, and on the evolution of the British policy towards oil and Gulf oil workers. The period examined begins with the discovery of

  7. [Qatar].

    PubMed

    The capital of Qatar is Doha. As of 1995, Qatar had a population of 600,000 governed by an absolute monarchy. 1994 gross national product and per capita income were, respectively, $7.85 billion and $14,540. Per capita income declined by 0.8% per year over the period 1985-94. In 1994, Qatar owed $2.1 billion. For the same year, Qatar exported $3.1 billion in goods and services and imported $1.8 billion. As of 1995, the population was growing in size by 2.1% annually. In 1992-93, life expectancy at birth was 71 years, the infant mortality rate was 2.6 per 1000 births, 100% had access to health services, and 89% had access to drinkable water. Other data are presented on the country's topography, climate and vegetation, demographics, principal cities, population distribution, religions, political structure, economics and finances, foreign commerce, and transportation and communications. PMID:12347070

  8. Qatar.

    PubMed

    1987-11-01

    Qatar is an oil-exporting Arab country that juts out from the north coast of Saudi Arabia into the Persian Gulf. Fewer than half of the 320,000 population are Arabs, however, most are Pakistani, Indian, Iranian and Egyptian foreign workers. Education is compulsory to age 16, and 60% are literate. Oil and refined petroleum products account for the $2 billion trade surplus, amounting to a $27,000 annual per capita income. The government is centralized and run by consensus under the Amir, head of the Al Thani, or ruling family. Political parties are banned. Qatar is evolving from a traditional to a modern welfare state. PMID:12177955

  9. Species, sex, size and male maturity composition of previously unreported elasmobranch landings in Kuwait, Qatar and Abu Dhabi Emirate.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M; McCarthy, I D; Carvalho, G R; Peirce, R

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents data from the first major survey of the diversity, biology and fisheries of elasmobranchs in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf. Substantial landings of elasmobranchs, usually as gillnet by-catch, were recorded in Kuwait, Qatar and the Emirate of Abu Dhabi (part of the United Arab Emirates), although larger elasmobranchs from targeted line fisheries were landed in Abu Dhabi. The elasmobranch fauna recorded was distinctive and included species that are undescribed, rare and have a highly restricted known distribution. Numerical abundance was dominated by sharks (c. 80%), of which carcharhinids were by far the most important. The milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus and whitecheek shark Carcharhinus dussumieri together comprised just under half of all recorded individuals. Around 90% of recorded sharks were small (50-90 cm total length, L(T) ) individuals, most of which were mature individuals of species with a small maximum size (<100 cm L(T) ), although immature individuals of larger species (e.g. Carcharhinus sorrah and other Carcharhinus spp.) were also important. The most frequently recorded batoid taxa were cownose rays Rhinoptera spp., an undescribed whipray, and the granulated guitarfish Rhinobatos granulatus. The first size, sex and maturity data for a wide range of Gulf elasmobranch species are presented (including L(T) at 50% maturity for males of four shark species) and include some notable differences from other locations in the Indo-West Pacific Ocean. A number of concerns regarding the sustainability of the fishery were highlighted by this study, notably that most of the batoid species recorded are classed by the IUCN Red List as vulnerable, endangered, data deficient or not evaluated. Despite their considerable elasmobranch landings, none of the three countries sampled have developed a 'Shark Plan' as encouraged to do so under the FAO International Plan of Action: Sharks. Furthermore, Kuwait and Qatar currently report zero or no elasmobranch landings to the FAO. PMID:22497401

  10. [Oman].

    PubMed

    The capital of Oman is Muscat. As of 1995, Oman had a population of 2.2 million governed by an absolute monarchy. 1994 gross national product and per capita income were, respectively, $10.1 billion and $5200. Per capita income grew at 0.6% per year over the period 1985-94. In 1994, Oman owed $3.1 billion, then being serviced at $525 million. For the same year, Oman exported $5.839 billion in goods and services and imported $5.558 billion. As of 1995, the population was growing in size by 3.9% annually. In 1992-93, life expectancy at birth was 69.6 years, the infant mortality rate was 30 per 1000 births, 96% had access to health services, and 84% had access to drinkable water. Other data are presented on the country's topography, climate and vegetation, demographics, principal cities, population distribution, religions, political structure, economics and finances, foreign commerce, and transportation and communications. PMID:12347068

  11. [Kuwait].

    PubMed

    The capital of Kuwait is Kuwait City. As of 1995, Kuwait had a population of 1.8 million governed by a monarchy endowed with a parliament regime. 1994 gross national product and per capita income were, respectively, $25.14 billion and $14,360. Per capita income declined by 1.3% per year over the period 1985-94. In 1994, Kuwait owed $17.24 billion. For the same year, Kuwait exported $10.8 billion in goods and services and imported $6.6 billion. As of 1995, the population was growing in size by 3.2% annually. In 1992-93, life expectancy at birth was 74.9 years, the infant mortality rate was 18 per 1000 births, 100% had access to health services, and 100% had access to drinkable water. Other data are presented on the country's topography, climate and vegetation, demographics, principal cities, population distribution, religions, political structure, economics and finances, foreign commerce, and transportation and communications. PMID:12347066

  12. Qatar.

    PubMed

    1992-04-01

    Qatar is a country of 11,437 sq. km with 400,000 inhabitants, of whom 65% are literate. Independence was gained on September 3, 1971. The terrain consists of flat, barren desert, with a hot and dry climate. Arabic and English are spoken by Arab, South Asian, and Iranian ethnic groups who are largely of the Islamic faith. Life expectancy is 58 years. The gross domestic product is $5.2 billion, growing at a rate of 4%. Per capita income is $13,000. The country's natural resources include petroleum, natural gas, and fish. Oil production, refining, natural gas development, fishing, cement, power/desalinization plants, petrochemicals, steel, and fertilizers are areas of economic production. Industrial and consumer goods are imported and oil is exported. In-depth information is also given on the people and history, government and principal officials, political conditions, the economy, defense, foreign relations, relations with the US, and names of principal US officials in the country. PMID:12178044

  13. 76 FR 23830 - Removing Designated Countries From the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ...Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi...Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi...Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar,...

  14. Tectonic characterization of the area between Qatar-Kazerun and Oman lines (Iran): using spatial analysis of geological and geophysical variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, K.; Zadeh, R. Mehdi

    2009-04-01

    The Zagros thrust-and-fold belt is part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. The general tectonic framework of the area is located between Qatar-Kazerun and Oman lines, southern of this active orogenic belt, is define by Zagros thrust system which is parallel to the belt and a series of transfer fault zones or lateral ramp oblique to the belt, which are associated the crustal shortening in the region. The studies of the spatial patterns of tectonic characteristics of this area has been the subject of many researches. In this research, we introduce a quantitative approach for tectonic characteristic of the area, using of geostatistical modeling. Geostatistical modeling involves the estimation of the spatial correlation described in the sample variograms and fitting models to them. For this purpose, the study area of the Zagros thrust-and-fold belt is divided into blocks using a square grid at 0.5? × 0.5?. An overlapping area of 0.25? × 0.25? (moving step) is made for high resolution and comprehensive study, which inherently maintains the continuity of the data points from grid to grid. It seems that the geological and geophysical characteristics such as faulting, folding, lithology, topography and seismic activities could indicate reliably spatial variations of tectonics in the region. Thus, they have been calculated and recorded as quantitative variables for each block and spatial distribution of variables using of geostatistical modeling. The obtained results and their correlation with tectonic conditions of the region permit us to predict quantitatively characterizes of the tectonics of the study area. Although the Zagros presents a complex spatial distribution of tectonic, but it is possible to find some homogenous sub-areas. It is also possible to differentiate between areas with low and high probability values of the tectonic activities such as density of faulting and folding, frequency of earthquakes and diapirism, which can to be helpful for studies of the oil discovery.

  15. Saudi Arabia Afghanistan

    E-print Network

    Russell, Lynn

    Djibouti Kuwait Qatar Eritrea Bahrain 04705 #12;Iran India Pakistan Saudi Arabia Iraq Afghanistan Yemen Oman China Turkmenistan Turkey Tajikistan United Arab Emirates Kuwait Qatar Uzbekistan Eritrea Bahrain

  16. Evaluation of clinical pharmacy services offered for palliative care patients in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Wilby, Kyle John; Mohamad, Alaa Adil; AlYafei, Sumaya AlSaadi

    2014-09-01

    Palliative care is an emerging concept in the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council, a political and economic union of Arab states bordering the Persian Gulf, namely Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Clinical pharmacy services have not yet been evaluated in this region. The objectives of this study were to create a baseline inventory of clinical pharmacy interventions in palliative care and to assess the perceived importance of interventions made. This was a prospective, single-center characterization study. Interventions were documented from September 30 to December 1, 2013. They were characterized into predetermined categories and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Physician acceptance rate and intervention rate per patient were calculated. Classification categories were sent to 10 practicing pharmacists in each of Qatar and Canada, who ranked the categories on the basis of perceived importance. A total of 96 interventions were documented, giving 3 interventions per patient and an acceptance rate of 81%. Discontinuing therapy (29%), initiating therapy (25%), and provision of education/counseling (13.5%) were most common. No differences were found between rankings from pharmacists in Qatar or Canada. Clinical pharmacy interventions are frequent, and those relating to alterations in drug therapy are most common. Interventions align with the perceived importance from pharmacists in both Qatar and Canada. PMID:25076019

  17. Hassan B. Diab Vice President,

    E-print Network

    Shihadeh, Alan

    EGYPT IRAQ JORDAN KUWAIT LEBANON OMAN QATAR SAUDI ARABIA SUDAN SYRIA UNITED ARAB EMIRATES WEST BANK Regional External Programs BAHRAIN CYPRUS EGYPT IRAQ JORDAN KUWAIT LEBANON OMAN QATAR SAUDI ARABIA SUDAN

  18. Demersal Fisheries of the Arabian Sea, the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddeek, M. S. M.; Fouda, M. M.; Hermosa, G. V.

    1999-08-01

    The demersal fisheries of the Arabian Sea, the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Gulf are reviewed. The region comprises eight countries: Oman, United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.), Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Iraq and Iran. Over 350 commercial fish species, eight shrimp species, two spiny lobster species, one shovel nose lobster species, one cuttlefish species, one crab species, and one abalone species support the demersal fisheries in the continental shelves of the three regions. Artisanal and industrial vessels with over 120 000 fishermen were involved in demersal fisheries. Fishing boats include fish and shrimp trawlers (wooden and steel hulled), large wooden boats (dhow) with inboard engines, small dhows with outboard engines, and fibreglass boats. Fishing gear consists of trawls, bottom gill nets, traps (wire mesh and plastic types), barrier traps, hand lines, and bare hands and knives (to dislodge abalone). Demersal fish (primarily Lethrinidae, Sparidae, Serranidae, Siganidae, Sciaenidae, Stromateidae, Lutjanidae, Trichiuridae, and Nemipteridae) and shrimp (primarily Penaeus semisulcatus, Metapenaeus affinis, Parapenaeopsis stylifera, and Penaeus merguiensis) were the two commercial demersal resources. Approximately 198 000-214 000 tonnes (t) of demersals were landed annually during 1988-1993, accounting for nearly 40% of the total marine landings (475 000-552 000 t). This percentage, however varied among countries: 25% in Oman, 32% in U.A.E., 71% in Qatar, 52% in Saudi Arabia, 56% in Bahrain, 55% in Kuwait, close to 100% in Iraq, and 41% in Iran. Fishing effort on certain stocks may have been below the optimum level (e.g. certain Omani demersal fish), near the optimum level (e.g. Omani shrimp), or above the optimum level (e.g. Arabian Gulf shrimp and demersal fish). Overexploitation led to restriction of fishing effort by limiting fishing licences, regulating fishing gear (mesh size) and capture size, closing fishing areas, restricting fishing season, and banning certain fisheries. However, fisheries management was hampered by lack of appropriate management regulations, enforcement and data on most stocks. Pollution and degradation of nursery areas were also affecting the productivity of fisheries resources. To achieve sustainable demersal fisheries, maintaining a healthy marine environment, reducing fishing effort, and strictly enforcing closed seasons and closed areas are needed. These measures are being implemented with varying degrees of success by all the countries.

  19. Fracture-related diagenesis in the carbonate carapace of a salt dome, Jebel Madar, Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Lahr; C. M. John; J. W. Cosgrove; V. Vandeginste; C. N. Sena; A. Jourdan

    2010-01-01

    This study is being carried out in the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre (QCCSRC) at Imperial College and focuses on the interplay between fractures, diagenetic fluid flow and precipitation of diagenetic minerals in an exposed carbonate carapace of a salt dome in Oman. Understanding fault-related mineralization and the differences between diagenesis in the fractures and fracture walls compared

  20. 77 FR 63225 - Extension of Statutory Period for Compensation for Certain Disabilities Due to Undiagnosed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ...Southwest Asia theater of operations refers to Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, the neutral zone between Iraq and Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, the Gulf of Aden, the Gulf of Oman, the Persian Gulf, the Arabian Sea,...

  1. 38 CFR 3.317 - Compensation for certain disabilities due to undiagnosed illnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Southwest Asia theater of operations includes Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, the neutral zone between Iraq and Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, the Gulf of Aden, the Gulf of Oman, the Persian Gulf, the Arabian Sea,...

  2. Estimating PM 10 air concentrations from dust storms in Iraq, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roland R. Draxler; Dale A. Gillette; Jeffrey S. Kirkpatrick; Jack Heller

    2001-01-01

    A model for the emission of PM10 dust has been constructed using the concept of a threshold friction velocity which is dependent on surface roughness. Surface roughness in turn was correlated with geomorphology or soil properties for Kuwait, Iraq, part of Syria, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Oman. The PM10 emission algorithm was incorporated into a Lagrangian transport

  3. Water Conservation in Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hayder A. Abdel-Rahman; Isam Mohammed Abdel-Magid

    1993-01-01

    Limited resources and growing needs for water have triggered a nationwide campaign for water conservation in the Sultanate of Oman. A land and soil survey study of Oman shows the availability of more arable land than present water resources could support. Groundwater is the main source for agricultural production. Overpumping at rates higher than the natural recharge has resulted in

  4. Kuwait France Spain I taly

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Kuwait France Spain I taly Mexico Argentina China Kuwait Japan Korea Taiwan Brazil Chile Venezuela Turkey Saudi Arabia Kuwait France Spain I taly Mexico Argentina China Kuwait Japan Korea Japan Korea.L.M. degree? Q. Are you an English teacher in your own country hoping to improve your teaching and language

  5. Hepatoblastomas in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Rabah, Fatma; El-Banna, Nagwa; Bhuyan, Dipali; Al-Ghaithi, Ibrahim; Al-Hinai, Mohamed; Al-Sabahi, Amal; Al-Mashaikhi, Nawal; Beshlawi, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Primary malignant liver tumours account for more than 1% of all paediatric malignancies, with the most common form being hepatoblastomas (HB). Such malignancies among Arab populations have rarely been addressed in the literature. Using data from Oman’s sole national referral centre for childhood solid malignancies, this study aimed to present the nationwide Omani experience with HB over the past 21 years. Methods: This retrospective study reviewed the medical records of all children with HB who were managed in the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, between January 1991 and April 2012. Clinical, radiological and laboratory characteristics were examined as well as treatments and outcomes. Results: During the study period, 15 patients with HB were treated. Of these, 10 have survived to date. Nine of the survivors were no longer receiving treatment and one patient still had the disease but was in a stable condition. Of the remaining five patients, three did not survive and two were lost to follow-up. The survival rate among patients who completed therapy was 91%. Conclusion: HB has an excellent prognosis in Oman. The main obstacle to improving outcomes among Omani patients is non-compliance with therapy. PMID:25685391

  6. Qatar water challenges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Darwish; Rabi Mohtar

    2012-01-01

    Qatar has experienced rapid economic growth due to the discovery and production of fuel oil and natural gas (NG). The natural renewable water resources (rainfall and groundwater [GW]) are depleted; and are estimated as 71-m\\/per year per capita in 2005. This is far below the water poverty line of 1,000-m\\/yca. The GW withdrawal is excessive (compared to replenishment) and is

  7. Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar Education City, P.O. Box 24144, Doha, Qatar

    E-print Network

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar Education City, P.O. Box 24144, Doha, Qatar For more information, visit: www.qatar-weill.cornell.edu Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q) was established in 2001 as a partnership between Cornell University and Qatar Foundation. It is part of Weill

  8. Libraries and librarianship in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaban A. Khalifa

    1992-01-01

    The infrastructure of libraries and information cen tres in Qatar consists of a national library, 24 public libraries, 20 school libraries, h university libraries, 150 special libraries and 150 private collections. Statistics on the collections, man power and services in these libraries are presented. Private libraries and library education in Qatar are discussed in detail, while curricula, courses and credits

  9. 77 FR 59692 - 2014 Diversity Immigrant Visa Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ...Jordan Kuwait Laos Lebanon Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Nepal North Korea Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia Singapore Sri Lanka Syria Taiwan...does qualify and is listed among the qualifying areas. North America The Bahamas In North America, natives of...

  10. 76 FR 62134 - Bureau of Consular Affairs; Registration for the Diversity Immigrant (DV-2013) Visa Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ...Jordan Kuwait Laos Lebanon Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Nepal North Korea Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia Singapore Sri Lanka Syria Taiwan...does qualify and is listed among the qualifying areas. North America The Bahamas In North America, natives of...

  11. 78 FR 59743 - Bureau of Consular Affairs; Registration for the Diversity Immigrant (DV-2015) Visa Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ...Kuwait Laos Lebanon Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Nepal North Korea Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia Singapore Sri Lanka Syria* Taiwan...Macau S.A.R. does qualify and is listed above. North America The Bahamas In North America, natives of...

  12. Building insulation technology: Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Ezz Al Din, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Recommendations are reached through the use of a value analysis approach to adapt building insulation technology to Kuwait environment. The economical and technical aspects of using insulation influencing architectural and engineering decisions are presented. Research has confirmed that savings of 25% to 40% of electrical energy required in cooling and heating the building can be achieved by the proper use of insulating materials. Though the ideas of this study are tailored for Kuwait, yet it may be appropriate and applicable to many countries with hot climate.

  13. Record Alewife Harvest Hikes U.S. Great Lakes Commercial Fish Catch 16 Percent

    E-print Network

    School Set for Persian Gulf Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and Iran signed a draft agreement on 17 June 1975 in Kuwait to establish a Persian Gulf Regional Center to train their citi- zens in commercial fisheries, the U.S. Embassy, Kuwait, reports. Oman and Iraq were also expected

  14. The application of hyperspectral image techniques on MODIS data for the detection of oil spills in the RSA1

    E-print Network

    Quartly, Graham

    for the Protection of Marine Environment, Kuwait; b School of Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton by the eight Member States of ROPME: Bahrain, I.R. Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United (Kuwait Action Plan, 1978). * fa2x07@soton.ac.uk; fahad@ropme.org Remote Sensing for Environmental

  15. Water security for Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdulhadi Al-Otaibi; Mahmoud Abdel-Jawad

    2007-01-01

    Water security depends on the availability of enough water to meet the demand of all consumption sectors at all times. These conditions are hardly met in water rich countries, as the hydrological cycle is not fully reliable. In arid countries, such as Kuwait, where there is no enough natural fresh water, water security is generally based on enough storage capacity

  16. Seismic structure of Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, Michael E.; Tkal?i?, Hrvoje; Gök, Rengin; Al-Enezi, Abdullah; Rodgers, Arthur J.

    2007-07-01

    We have used data from the Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) to estimate the seismic structure of Kuwait using a limited amount of seismic data. First, we made surface wave dispersion measurements and calculated receiver functions from the relatively small amount of data available from the broad-band station, KBD. Models were derived from the joint inversion of teleseismic receiver functions and Rayleigh and Love fundamental mode surface wave group velocity dispersion. While both surface waves and receiver functions by themselves can be used to estimate lithospheric structure, we have successfully combined the two to reduce non-uniqueness in estimates based on the individual data sets. The resulting KUW1 model features a thick (8 km) sedimentary cover and crustal thickness of 45 km. Crustal velocities below the sedimentary cover are consistent with global averages for stable platforms. We infer upper-mantle velocities (7.84 km s-1 P-wave velocity; 4.40 km s-1 S-wave velocity) that are slightly lower than expected for a stable platform. In comparison with other crustal structure estimates for the Arabian platform to the west, the crust is thicker and the mantle is slower in Kuwait. This is consistent with the overall tectonic trends of the region that find increasing crustal thickness between the divergent plate boundary at the Red Sea and the convergent plate boundary at the Zagros Mts, as well as slow mantle velocities beneath this nearby orogenic zone. The resulting model fits the traveltimes of regional phases (Pn, Pg, Sn and Lg). Independent inversion of local earthquake traveltimes recorded by KNSN (allowing for event hypocentre relocation) results in a remarkably similar velocity structure, providing confidence that the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities can impose accurate constraints on crustal structure for local event location and network operations. Relocation of events in Kuwait improves the clustering of events and results in shallower hypocentres.

  17. The Reform of Qatar University. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moini, Joy S.; Bikson, Tora K.; Neu, C. Richard; DeSisto, Laura

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, the State of Qatar engaged the RAND-Qatar Policy Institute to assist Qatar University, the nation's first and only public higher education institution, with reform of its major administrative and academic structures, policies, and practices. This monograph summarizes that reform effort, which formally lasted from October 2003 through…

  18. Kuwait: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that the major event in Kuwait today is the ongoing effort to control blowouts stemming from Iraqi demolition of oil wells and producing facilities last February. A total of 732 wells---about two- thirds of all wells in Kuwait---were blown up. All but 80 caught on fire.

  19. The water problem in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Darwish; Najem Al-Najem

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the status of water desalination in Kuwait, and the limitations of current equipment in satisfying the increased water demand. It also gives the reasons for the water problem, and presents a more efficient and rapidly deployable solution for power and desalinated production. Kuwait has a serious water problem that can become a real crisis in the near

  20. Localized hyper saline waters in Arabian Gulf from desalination activity--an example from South Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Saif; Al Ghadban, Abdul Nabi; Khabbaz, Ahmed

    2011-10-01

    Desalination is the only means of reliable water supply in most of the Arabian Gulf States including Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, and United Arab Emirates. Huge desalination capacities are installed on the western margin of the Arabian Gulf contributing to increased salinity off the coast. This paper presents long term salinity observation made near outfall of Az Zour Power and Desalination Plant in South Kuwait. The salinity values peak at around 50 ppt at observation station located in open gulf around 5 km from the outfall of the power and desalination plant. The observation highlights the stress on the local marine environment continued incremental salinity can impair the marine biodiversity in the area. The study suggests that a stringent post construction and operational offshore water quality assessment can help in early detection of potentially complex environmental issues. PMID:21213041

  1. Petroleum geology of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Youash, Y.

    1988-02-01

    Kuwait is located in the Arabian platform geologic province and the stable shelf tectonic environment of the Mesopotamian geosyncline, a sedimentary basin extending from the Arabian shield on the west to the Zagros Mountains of complex folding and faulting history, on the east. The sedimentary cover in Kuwait consists of a complete succession 25,000 ft (7,600 m) thick on top of the basement and ranges in age from Paleozoic to Holocene. The relative geologic stability and homogeneity over virtually all its depositional history resulted in an extraordinary areal continuity of reservoirs, seals, and source rocks, giving rise to the accumulation of the largest concentration of the hydrocarbon reserves in the world in giant and super-giant oil and gas fields. The structures are very large, gentle with modest closure. The seals are very efficient. Because of the wide extent of the lithologic units and only gentle tectonic deformation, large-scale horizontal migration is very efficient and the large structures have great storage capacity.

  2. John Oman: Orkney’s theologian a contextual study of John Oman’s theology with reference to personal freedom as the unifying principle 

    E-print Network

    McKimmon, Eric George

    2012-06-26

    This thesis is a contextual study of the work of Orkney theologian John Oman (1860- 1939), with reference to personal freedom as the unifying principle. Oman’s early life in Orkney, his philosophical awakening in Edinburgh ...

  3. The Natural History of Oman & Arabia

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Natural History of Oman & Arabia Webpage is provided by the Germany-based Oman Studies Centre, an independent, non-governmental and nonprofit academic institution that facilitates research on Oman. Modest in presentation and content, this specialized Website gathers together published information (citations) and links to Web resources related to the "botany, climate, conservation, ecology, geology, marine biology, meteorology, palaeoclimate and zoology" of the region of Oman and Arabia. Also at the site is a Contact List of scientists with an interest in the Natural History of the region. For students or researchers planning to work in Oman or Arabia, this site will be a helpful resource.

  4. Oman: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that for the sixth consecutive year, Oman should retain its title as the biggest driller in the Middle East in 1991. An accelerated program in 1990 pushed production to an all-time record 700,000 bpd late in the year. Although not a member of Opec, Oman has cooperated with the group in restraining output as needed to support oil prices. Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), a partnership of the government (60%), Royal Dutch Shell (34%), Total (4%) and Partex (2%), remains by far the biggest producer. This year, PDO will begin work on its $500-million effort to boost production from its Lekhwair field from a current 24,000 bpd to 110,000 bpd by 1994. Last year, PDO also drilled 15 horizontal wells, most of which were successful in increasing per well production compared to conventional vertical holes. The horizontal program has been continued this year with two rings.

  5. Kuwait; The blowouts are history

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the capping of oil well blowouts in Kuwait. It reports on how access to the wells was gained, the well kill methods used, and future work that must be done in order to restore productivity.

  6. Breast feeding practices in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Kayyali, M M; Al-tawil, K

    1989-01-01

    Medical staff at the neonatal outpatient clinic of the Women's Hospital in Doha, Qatar randomly distributed a questionnaire about breast feeding and socioeconomic characteristics to 340 women (53.5% Qataris and 46.5% other Arabic speaking women) from February-August 1988. Only 32% of the mothers exclusively breast fed at birth. This low incidence could be due to excessive advertising by formula manufacturers and the increasing purchasing power of the Qataris. 5l5% used both breast milk and formula. 13% only bottle fed their infants. 50% of the mothers from the below average income group (5000 Qatar Riyals) breast fed their infants, while only 12% of those from the high income group (10,000 Qatar Riyals) did. Further, 55% of the mothers with less than secondary school education exclusively breast fed whereas 25% of those with secondary school and above breast fed. This result confirmed the downward trend for breast feeding in Qatar as identified in the early 1980s. Even though most mothers decided themselves not to breast feed, 31% reported that their physician suggested feeding formula to their infants. The longer infants stayed in the neonatal intensive care unit the less likely their mothers would breast feed them. For example, 72% were breast fed if discharged 1 week after admission while none were breast fed if discharged 3 weeks after admission. The leading reasons for bottle feeding included that the infant was still hungry (634%), night feeding (12%), mother worked (11%), and maternal diseases (5%). Regardless of the reasons for the downward trend in breast feeding in Qatar, public health professionals and health practitioners must begin direct and specific health education efforts about the benefits of breast feeding. PMID:12283357

  7. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O (Mobil Exploration and Producing Services, Inc., Dallas, TX); Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1982-11-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1981 totaled 5,741,096,000 bbl, or an average rate of 15,729,030 BOPD, down 14.9% from 1980. Increases were in Oman, Dubai, and Turkey. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were made in Oman, Saudi Arabia, and Abu Dhabi.

  8. Revitalizing Qatar's National University. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Although Qatar University (QU) had been well regarded in the past, its performance had deteriorated by 2003, and the country's leadership was concerned that the university was not meeting Qatar's needs. From 2003 to 2007, the university led a reform process facilitated by RAND and outside experts, which clarified QU's mission and reformed QU's…

  9. Money Supply in Qatar: An Empirical Investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Basher Abdulrazag; Manhal M. Shotar; Anwar Al-Quran

    2003-01-01

    Qatar Central Bank declares that its policy is designed to maintain price and currency stability. To identify the reaction function of the monetary agency in Qatar, Johansen procedure was employed. It appears that some of the suggested variables are integrated of order one; I~(1). Also, it appears that money supply, prices, real income, government expenditures, and international reserves share at

  10. HUMAN CAPITAL FORMATION : THE CASE OF QATAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hend A. Jolo

    This paper is an exploratory study that investigates human capital (HC) formation in the state of Qatar. It is carried out with the intention to provide an insight into such a process among Qataris and to ascertain how government's investment in education has been an effective influence on the formation of HC in Qatar. The study provides new evidence about

  11. QF-ARC 2013 The Qatar Foundation Annual Research Conference Towards Image-Guided Minimally Invasive Robotic Surgery

    E-print Network

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    QF-ARC 2013 The Qatar Foundation Annual Research Conference Towards Image, Canada 3Qatar Robotic Surgery Centre, Qatar Science & Technology Park, Doha, Qatar 4Urology Department, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Introduction: Surgery remains one of the primary methods

  12. Demand for gasoline in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. N. Eltony; N. H. Al-Mutairi

    1995-01-01

    This paper estimates the demand for gasoline in Kuwait for the period 1970–1989 using a cointegration and error correction model (ECM). It is found that gasoline demand is inelastic with respect to price in the short and long run, and while it is elastic in the long run, gasoline demand is inelastic with respect to income in the short run.

  13. Islamic work ethic in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abbas J. Ali; Ali A. Al-Kazemi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – To investigation the centrality of islamic work ethic (IWE) in the lives of managers in Kuwait and provide a useful insight into the nature of work environment and organizational culture. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The participants were 762 managers randomly selected from government and private sectors. Among participants 50 per cent were female; 73 per cent were Kuwaitis. Two measures

  14. Water demand management in Kuwait

    E-print Network

    Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

  15. In Brief: Monitoring ozone in Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    Qatar is establishing an ozone and pollution monitoring ground station in West Asia, following discussions between the government, the Qatar Foundation, and the United Nations Environment Programme, according to a 19 November announcement. The station will assist in understanding whether the ozone layer is actually recovering after being damaged by ozone-depleting chemicals. Qatar also announced plans to establish a global center of excellence for research and development of ozone and climate-friendly technology, equipment, and appliances. UNEP executive director Achim Steiner said the announcements by Qatar ``will help plug key data gaps relating to information gathering in West Asia and the Gulf to the benefit of the region and the world.''

  16. Flowmetering of drainage wells in Kuwait City, Kuwait

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, F.L.; Senay, Y.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Szekely, F.

    2000-01-01

    A heat-pulse flowmeter was used in six drainage wells in Kuwait City for flow profiling under both ambient and pumping conditions. The data collected were used in: (a) estimating the cross-flow among the screened intervals under ambient conditions; (b) estimating the relative transmissivity adjacent to the individual screen zones; and (c) determination of the hydraulic heads at the far boundaries of the large-scale aquifer zones. These inferences were cross-checked against known hydrogeology of the aquifer-aquitard system in the study area, and the calibration results of numerical flow modeling. The major conclusions derived from the flow measurements were: (a) the presence of natural downward cross-flow under ambient condition supported the hypothesis that the upper part of the Kuwait Group aquifer in the study area was divided into a series of permeable units (aquifers), separated by confining or semi-confining beds (aquitards); (b) the head differences between the different screened zones, derived through modeling of the flowmeter data of the wells, provided additional confirmation for the division of the upper part of the Kuwait Group aquifer into compartments in the study area; (c) flowmeter data indicated that the second and third aquifers were contributing most of the water to the well bores, compared with the uppermost (first) and the lowermost (fourth) aquifers; and (d) inflow to the wells during pumping was associated with discrete sub-intervals in the screened zones, controlled by local aquifer heterogeneity, and possibly clogging of screens and gravel pack.

  17. Qatar Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    In this view of the Qatar Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf, (25.0N, 51.0E) a large oil spill, seen as a large dark toned mass in the water covers much of the surface of the western Persian Gulf. Qatar is one of several of the oil rich United Arab Emirate states. Oil spills and oil pollution of the environment are common occurrances associated with oil tanker loading operations.

  18. Patient Safety Culture Assessment in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mandhari, Ahmed; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Kindi, Moosa; Tawilah, Jihane; Dorvlo, Atsu S.S.; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Objective To illustrate the patient safety culture in Oman as gleaned via 12 indices of patient safety culture derived from the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSPSC) and to compare the average positive response rates in patient safety culture between Oman and the USA, Taiwan, and Lebanon. Methods This was a cross-sectional research study employed to gauge the performance of HSPSC safety indices among health workers representing five secondary and tertiary care hospitals in the northern region of Oman. The participants (n=398) represented different professional designations of hospital staff. Analyses were performed using univariate statistics. Results The overall average positive response rate for the 12 patient safety culture dimensions of the HSPSC survey in Oman was 58%. The indices from HSPSC that were endorsed the highest included ‘organizational learning and continuous improvement’ while conversely, ‘non-punitive response to errors’ was ranked the least. There were no significant differences in average positive response rates between Oman and the United States (58% vs. 61%; p=0.666), Taiwan (58% vs. 64%; p=0.386), and Lebanon (58% vs. 61%; p=0.666). Conclusion This study provides the first empirical study on patient safety culture in Oman which is similar to those rates reported elsewhere. It highlights the specific strengths and weaknesses which may stem from the specific milieu prevailing in Oman. PMID:25170407

  19. Qatar: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on oil and gas operations that have taken a marked upturn in Qatar highlighted by production expansion projects. The long-delayed beginning of production from offshore supergiant North gas field was scheduled to begin at press time at a rate of 600 to 750 MMcfd and 50,000 bcpd. Delays in production startup were caused by gas leaks around casing strings in 14 of the 16 producing wells and by the Gulf war. The $1.3 billion Phase I of development included two 8-well platforms and three support structures, plus gas and condensate lines to an onshore NGL facility. Initially, gas will be utilized domestically. Eventually, 300 MMcfd will be re-injected into the old Dukhan oil field.

  20. Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhaohong

    2012-02-14

    reservoirs. Recently papers published from industry discussed the techniques, planning, and optimization of acid stimulation for Qatar carbonate. To the best of author’s knowledge, no study has focused on the acid reaction to Qatar carbonates. The lack...

  1. Developing and Implementing the Qatar Student Assessment System. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gabriella; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Broer, Markus; Mariano, Louis T.; Froemel, J. Enrique; Goldman, Charles A.; DaVanzo, Julie

    2009-01-01

    This research brief summarizes the development of a standards-based student assessment system in Qatar, lessons for policymakers in Qatar and elsewhere, and challenges in aligning the assessment with future changes in the curriculum standards. Analysis of Qatar's standards-based student assessment system, the first in the region, offers several…

  2. Holostratigraphy of the Kahmah regional Series in Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno R. C. GRANIER

    The stratigraphic framework of the uppermost Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous interval of the Gulf area is revised using both historical and recently acquired paleontological (ammonites, calpionellids, foraminifers, 'calcareous' algae), sedimentological and sequential information. The Kahmah regional Series ranging in age from Late Tithonian to Gargasian (= middle Aptian) times is subdivided into regional stages, named from bottom to top: Rayda

  3. Pharmacy practice in Qatar: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Nadir; Fahey, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The State of Qatar is a small oil and gas-rich Gulf country that is experiencing rapid development in health care services, including pharmaceutical services. To date, there is no autonomous professional pharmacy association or society that regulates or promotes the practice of pharmacy in Qatar, and the challenges that face the profession of pharmacy in Qatar mirror the challenges facing the profession in all other Middle Eastern countries. However, a set of initiatives and projects that include pioneering educational initiatives, close alignment of practice with the educational providers, stronger leadership from a National Health Strategy, and the development of pharmacy leadership groups at the practice level all contribute in the fast development of the practice of pharmacy in this country. In this commentary, we provide a snapshot of the pharmaceutical scene in Qatar, and in doing so, we shall discuss the challenges that face the practice, and the main landmarks and initiatives that are destined to move pharmacy forward in Qatar. PMID:23093888

  4. Strategic Brain Drain: Implications for Higher Education in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Barwani, Thuwayba; Chapman, David W.; Ameen, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Oman will soon be producing three times more college graduates than there are jobs available in the country each year, forcing graduates to seek employment outside of Oman. Their success in securing and holding employment will be based more on training and performance than might be the case if they were working in Oman. If graduates find that the…

  5. How postcapping put Kuwait`s wells back onstream

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D. [ABB Vetco Gray Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-01-01

    In late february 1991, the retreating Iraqi army blew up, or otherwise caused to blowout, some 700 wells in Kuwait. Between March and November, all of the fires were extinguished and the wells were capped. Work began in July 1991 to recomplete the damaged wells with replaced or reworked tubulars and well heads so that production could be resumed. Except for some of the earlier-capped wells into which cement was pumped, thus requiring more extensive downhole work, many of the damaged wells, particularly in Burgan field, were put back into production mode by the procedure described here, which became known as postcapping. This paper describes the equipment and techniques used in postcapping damaged wellheads.

  6. Kuwait poised for massive well kill effort

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-08

    This paper reports that full scale efforts to extinguish Kuwait's oil well fires are to begin. The campaign to combat history's worst oil fires, originally expected to begin in mid-March, has been hamstrung by logistical problems, including delays in equipment deliveries caused by damage to Kuwait's infrastructure. Meantime, production from a key field off Kuwait--largely unaffected by the war--is expected to resume in May, but Kuwaiti oil exports will still be hindered by damaged onshore facilities. In addition, Kuwait is lining up equipment and personnel to restore production from its heavily damaged oil fields. Elsewhere in the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia reports progress in combating history's worst oil spills but acknowledges a continuing threat.

  7. Analysis of Kuwait Temperature Records: Test of Heat Island Existence in Kuwait City Arid Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrallah, Hasan Ali

    Very few arid land cities have been studied to determine local climate effects developing from rapid urban growth in the twentieth century. Kuwait City in the State of Kuwait is examined to determine the significance of urban growth on heating in the region. The study examines recent changes in temperature for the State of Kuwait for the period 1958-1980. During this time period, Kuwait has experienced explosive urban growth from 0.2 million to 1.7 million population. Simple parametric inferential statistics are employed to monthly temperature records from seven locations in and adjacent to Kuwait City. These tests are conducted to determine the connection between urbanization and the development of urban heating effects. The statistical tests employ a national "benchmark" desert site; a rural, agricultural benchmark site in the State of Kuwait; and stations in Bahrain, Eilat, Riyadh, Abadan, and Baghdad. The analysis illustrates that there is only a modest level of urban heating detectable in temperature records from the region of Kuwait. This finding runs counter to prevailing literature on urban climatology, which generally states that urban heating depends strongly on urban extent and population growth. Upon inspection of geographic location and surficial characteristics of Kuwait City, two hypotheses are suggested for the low order urban heating detected: (1) cooling effects of advected Arabian Gulf air across the city, and, (2) the lack of substantive spatial differences of surface albedo, thermal inertia, surface moisture, and aerosol heating. However, Kuwait's morphological (i.e., building geometry) characteristics, according to urban canyon-heat island theory, should have promoted a 7 ^circC heat island in Kuwait City. A test of this theory revealed no such heat island of that magnitude. One major reason relates to station network inadequacy to portray the extent of Kuwait City's heat island development through time. More research, including modeling and field station sampling, is required to examine the nature of this arid land city's effect on local climate.

  8. Feasibility study of photovoltaic technology in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A.-Hamid Marafia

    2001-01-01

    This study presents a comparative economic analysis of electricity generation using photovoltaic (PV) cells and conventional gas turbines. The generation cost per kWh was estimated for the two systems. The energy generated by PV cells was estimated using weather data for Qatar. A sensitivity analysis was carried out on some factors: installation capital cost, conversion efficiency and discount rate. The

  9. Frequency of Headache and Migraine in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdulbari Bener

    2006-01-01

    Background: Headache is a worldwide problem that affects all ages. To date there are no epidemiological data regarding headaches in Qatar. Aim: The aim of this study was to use the International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria to estimate the prevalence of migraine and headache in an adult population. Design: This is a cross-sectional population-based study. Setting: The study was

  10. Mycotoxins in food products available in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. W Abdulkadar; Abdulla A Al-Ali; Afrah M Al-Kildi; Jassim H Al-Jedah

    2004-01-01

    One hundred and six samples of various food products were collected from the market of Qatar and analysed for aflatoxin, ochratoxin, zearalenone and deoxynivalenone using immunoaffinity column clean up and HPLC. The samples were of cereal and cereal products, nuts and nut products, spices, dry fruits and beverages. Twenty eight samples were found contaminated with aflatoxin in the range of

  11. Liberal Arts Education in Qatar: Intercultural Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostron, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to sketch a historical, cultural and social background of recent educational developments in Qatar, briefly review the traditions of western liberal arts education with its goals and teaching and learning methodologies, explain its benefits and their relevance to Muslim Qatari students of universities in Education City in…

  12. Teaching across Cultures: Canada and Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prowse, Jacqueline; Goddard, J. Tim

    2010-01-01

    Findings from a comparative case study conducted in Canada and Qatar are presented in this article. The study examined the cultural context of a transnational post-secondary program offered by the Faculty of Business at a Canadian college, with campuses located in both St. John's and Doha. The instructors' perceptions of their students' cultures…

  13. Analysis of seismic events in and near Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D B; Mayeda, K M; Rodgers, A J; Ruppert, S D

    1999-05-11

    Seismic data for events in and around Kuwait were collected and analyzed. The authors estimated event moment, focal mechanism and depth by waveform modeling. Results showed that reliable seismic source parameters for events in and near Kuwait can be estimated from a single broadband three-component seismic station. This analysis will advance understanding of earthquake hazard in Kuwait.

  14. 77 FR 71777 - Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ...Administration Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait AGENCY: International Trade Administration...regarding the Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait March 10-14, 2013, published at 77...the U.S. Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait March 10-14, 2013, published at...

  15. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in marine biota and coastal sediments from the Gulf and the Gulf of Oman.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Imma; de Mora, Stephen J; Fowler, Scott W; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre; Bartocci, Jean; Cattini, Chantal

    2005-12-01

    The composition and spatial distribution of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in biota and coastal sediments from four countries surrounding the Gulf (Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and Oman). The levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), aliphatic unresolved mixture and PAHs in sediments and biota were relatively low compared to world-wide locations reported to be chronically contaminated by oil. Only in the case of the sediments collected near the BAPCO oil refinery in Bahrain, having concentrations of 779 microg g(-1) total petroleum hydrocarbon equivalents and 6.6 microg g(-1) Sigma PAHs, can they be categorized as chronically contaminated. Some evidence of oil contamination was also apparent in sediments and bivalves around Akkah Head and Abu Dhabi in the UAE, and near Mirbat in Oman. Contaminant patterns in sediments and biota indicated that the PAHs were mainly from fossil sources, with the exception of the high PAH concentrations in sediments near the BAPCO refinery that contained substantial concentrations of carcinogenic PAH combustion products. PMID:16038948

  16. Origin of sulfate in barite and calcite cements in the Jebel Madar salt dome (Oman)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandeginste, V.; John, C. M.; Gilhooly, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    Jebel Madar is a 500-m high mountain rising in the desert at the Oman Foothills. The Jebel consists of Triassic to Cretaceous carbonate host rocks forming the carapace of a salt dome. Halokinesis caused major fracturing and faulting at Jebel Madar, and the resulting structures acted as the main pathways for fluids that generated diagenetic cements composed of both barite and calcite. The spatial distribution of calcite and barite occurrences shows that calcite is formed in large abundance along the three main faults, whereas barite is more concentrated along faults further away from the three main ones. The stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of calcite and fluid inclusion data from both calcite and barite show a distinct evolution of the fluid with a highly saline component towards more mixing with meteoric water. This is in agreement with clumped isotopes data on calcite cements indicating an evolution towards lower temperatures, consistent with doming of the Jebel and greater input of lower-temperature descending meteoric fluids. Here, we present sulphur and oxygen isotopic data on barite that suggest a link between the barite formation and the Precambrian salt underlying Jebel Madar. The average ?34S measured in barite is 33‰ CDT (1? = 5‰; n = 33), which falls at the lower end of the ?34S range reported for the Ara Group anhydrite. The average ?18O in the same barite samples is 23‰ VSMOW (1? = 2‰; n = 33). Data from the barite will be compared with sulphur isotopes from the carbonate-associate sulfate in the calcite cements. The overall goal of our research is to gain a better insight in the formation process of barite and calcite in Jebel Madar and its link with salt tectonics. We would like to acknowledge the financial support of QCCSRC (funded jointly by Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science & Technology Park) and the GSA Laubach fund for this study.

  17. Calibration of seismic wave propagation in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Awadhi, J; Endo, E; Fryall, F; Harris, D; Mayeda, K; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S; Sweeney, J

    1999-07-23

    The Kuwait Institute of Scientific Research (KISR), the USGS and LLNL are collaborating to calibrate seismic wave propagation in Kuwait and surrounding regions of the northwest Arabian Gulf using data from the Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN). Our goals are to develop local and regional propagation models for locating and characterizing seismic events in Kuwait and portions of the Zagros mountains close to Kuwait. The KNSN consists of 7 short-period stations and one broadband (STS-2) station. Constraints on the local velocity structure may be derived from joint inversions for hypocenters of local events and the local velocity model, receiver functions from three-component observations of teleseisms, and surface wave phase velocity estimated from differential dispersion measurements made across the network aperture. Data are being collected to calibrate travel-time curves for the principal regional phases for events in the Zagros mountains. The available event observations span the distance range from approximately 2.5 degrees to almost 9 degrees. Additional constraints on structure across the deep sediments of the Arabian Gulf will be obtained from long-period waveform modeling.

  18. New Cultures of Critical Reflection in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNiff, Jean

    2011-01-01

    We speak about the need for critical reflection on practice, but what do we do when we do it; and how do we explain how and why we should do it? This paper explores these issues, and itself acts as the site for an exploration and explanation of what it means to be critically reflective. Drawing on recent research in Qatar, I give an account of how…

  19. Education in the Gulf Monarchies: Retrospect and Prospect

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gawdat Bahgat

    1999-01-01

    For the last several decades there has been tremendous expansion in the educational facilities in all the six Gulf monarchies (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates). The quality of education, however, does not correspond to the needs of Gulf societies. This study examines three of the apparent deficiencies in the educational system in the region:

  20. Environmental Engineering Education (E3) in the Gulf Co-Operation Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jassim, Majeed; Coskuner, Gulnur

    2007-01-01

    The six members of the Gulf Co-operation Countries (GCC)--Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates--are facing enormous environmental challenges associated with rapid urbanisation and industrialisation, especially in the last three decades, due to its role as a global hydrocarbon energy centre. None of these…

  1. Science Self-Beliefs and Science Achievement of Adolescents in Gulf Cooperation Council Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the predictive effects of science self-beliefs on science achievement for 24,680 13-year-old students from Gulf Cooperation Council member countries--Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates--who participated in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007. The…

  2. Selected Bibliography of Arab Educational Materials, Vol. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ahram Center for Scientific Translations, Cairo (Egypt).

    One hundred fifty-four English language annotations of books, articles, and government publications about education in 11 Arab countries are contained in this bibliography. Drawing from materials published in 1976, the bibliography examines education for all age groups and ability levels in Egypt, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi…

  3. Coordinated Economic Development and the Information Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, D. K.

    This is a discussion of some of the problems that the Advisory Organization for Gulf Industries (AOGI) will face when it undertakes (1) to organize both an information center (node) that will serve the information needs of the Gulf States of Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Oman; and (2) to compile an…

  4. University Library Development in the Arab Gulf Region: A Survey and Analysis of Six State University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehery, Mohamed H.

    1997-01-01

    This study of state university libraries in Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates provides information on library organization and analysis of collections, services, staffing, budgeting, expenditures, automation, and information technology. Suggests further research is needed in collections, services and…

  5. Selected Bibliography of Arab Educational Materials Vol. 2, No. 1, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ahram Center for Scientific Translations, Cairo (Egypt).

    A total of 176 English language notations of books, articles, and government publications about education in 11 Arab countries are contained in this bibliography. Drawing from materials published in 1977, the bibliography examines education for all age groups and ability levels in Egypt, Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia,…

  6. Books about the Middle East for Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia

    This bibliography comprises a list of 236 reviewed children's books about the Middle East. All books were published since 1970 in the United States. For the purpose of this document the countries of the Middle East number 16: Bahrain, Cyprus, Iraq, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, United Arab…

  7. Higher Education and Development in the Lower Gulf States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    The complex issues concerning expansion of higher education in the smaller states bordering the Persian Gulf (Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, and Oman) are examined, including who provides higher education and why, cultural vs. national identity, the role of mass education, and the difference between growth and development. (MSE)

  8. The lighting fixtures market in the Middle East and North Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aurelio Volpe

    2011-01-01

    This market research report analyses the lighting fixtures market in the Middle East and North Africa. The countries considered are: Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Bahrain, Qatar, Egypt, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Lebanon and Jordan. The report includes the production, consumption, trade, short profiles of main players and macro-economic and social indicators. The lighting fixtures scenario provides the production,

  9. Population, Labour and Education Dilemmas Facing GCC States at the Turn of the Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapiszewski, Andrzej

    This study describes and analyzes certain population, labor, and education issues in oil monarchies of the Persian Gulf. The countries profiled are Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (also known as the GCC [Gulf Cooperation Council] countries). Since the discovery of oil, these countries transformed themselves…

  10. Female Labor, Western Culture and Growth in the Gulf Cooperation Council Countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark David Witte

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the determinants of the female labor force and the impact of female labor on the growth rates of six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries: Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Using per capita spending on imported US books to approximate for western cultural sentiment, the paper finds a positive relationship between the

  11. Institutions, Natural Resources, and Economic Development in the MENA Countries

    E-print Network

    Alsayaary, Salah Saeed A.

    2013-12-31

    , Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The MENA region divides Asia and Africa. MENA’s large land mass contains resources including: rivers, oil fields, mines, and agricultural lands. According to OPEC... lands. For the purpose of this study, the MENA region are: Algeria, Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Oman, Mauritania, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen...

  12. Arsenic in shrimp from Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Olayan, A.H. [Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait); Al-Yakoob, S.; Al-Hossaini, M. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)

    1995-04-01

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the environment and can accumulate in food via contaminated soil, water or air. It enters the food chain through dry and wet atmospheric deposition. Combustion of oil and coal, use of arsenical fertilizers and pesticides and smelting of ores contributes significantly to the natural background of arsenic in soils and sediments. The metal can be transferred from soil to man through plants. In spite of variation in acute, subacute, and chronic toxic effects to plants and animals, evidence of nutritional essentiality of arsenic for rats, goats, and guinea pigs has been suggested, but has not been confirmed for humans. Adverse toxic effects of arsenic as well as its widespread distribution in the environment raises concern about levels of arsenic in man`s diet. Higher levels of arsenic in the diet can result in a higher accumulation rate. Arsenic levels in marine organisms are influenced by species differences, size of organism, and human activities. Bottom dwellers such as shrimp, crab, and lobster accumulate more arsenic than fish due to their frequent contact with bottom sediments. Shrimp constitute approximately 30% of mean total seafood consumption in Kuwait. This study was designed to determine the accumulation of arsenic in the commercially important jinga shrimp (Metapenaeus affinis) and grooved tiger prawn (Penaeus semisulcatus). 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Hatch, G.C.

    1983-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1982 totaled 4,499,464,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,162,915 BOPD), down 21.5% from 1981. Increases were in Iraq, Iran, and Oman. Significant decreases occurred in Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were reported in Oman, Syria, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Iran, and Saudi Arabia.

  14. Kuwait pressing toward preinvasion oil production capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Tippee, B.

    1993-03-15

    Oil field reconstruction is shifting focus in Kuwait as the country races toward prewar production capacity of 2 million b/d. Oil flow last month reached 1.7 million b/d, thanks largely to a massive workover program that has accomplished about as much as it can. By midyear, most of the 19 rigs in Kuwait will be drilling rather than working over wells vandalized by retreating Iraqi troops in February 1991. Seventeen gathering centers are at work, with capacities totaling 2.4 million b/d, according to state-owned Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC). This article describes current work, the production infrastructure, facilities strategy, oil recovery, well repairs, a horizontal pilot project, the drilling program, the constant reminders of war, and heightened tensions.

  15. Kuwait summons more fire fighting teams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-05

    Kuwait is calling in more muscle to help kill its wild wells. This paper reports on the latest action in Kuwait, the leasing of well control contracts to Abel Engineering/Well Control Inc., Houston, and China Petroleum Engineering Construction Co. (CPEC). Abel is the sixth North American well control company called to the scene, while CPEC is the first summoned from the East. In addition, the service responsible for combating well fires and blowouts in the U.S.S.R.'s Azerbaijan oil fields signed an agreement with Kuwait's government, apparently involving a contract valued at more than $100 million, to extinguish fires at 150 Kuwaiti wells, reported Eastern Bloc Energy, a publication of Eastern Bloc Research Ltd., Newton Kyme, U.K. More help likely is on the way.

  16. Texas A&M University at Qatar Petroleum Engineering Program

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    1 Texas A&M University at Qatar Petroleum Engineering Program Education City, Doha, Qatar Positions available for Petrophysics/Formation Evaluation, Production Engineering, Reservoir Engineering The Petroleum and formation evaluation, production engineering, or reservoir fluids for the petroleum engineering program; (2

  17. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Pickford, P.J.

    1984-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1983 totaled 4,275,054,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,712,476 BOPD), down 3.7% from the revised total of 4,440,841,000 bbl produced in 1982. Iran, Kuwait, the Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, and Oman had significant increases. Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi had significant decreases. 8 figures, 9 tables.

  18. Oil, development, and the environment in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Shuaib, H.A.

    1988-07-01

    As Kuwait transforms itself into a modern industrial economy, the nation faces a number of environmental challenges. With rapid modernization and dramatic increases in population come threats to Kuwait's desert and coastal ecosystems. In the past 15 years both government agencies and private organizations have been formed to develop environmental strategies, promote conservation, combat pollution, and improve the public's environmental awareness. The organizations described here are working to encourage regional cooperation on environmental issues and to ensure that development policies at all levels - local, regional, and international - are not only economically prudent but also environmentally sound.

  19. Indirect Effects of Salinity and Temperature on Kuwait’s Shrimp Stocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Marcus Bishop; Weizhong Chen; Adel Hasan Alsaffar; Hussain Mahmoud Al-Foudari

    Discharge of the Shatt Al-Arab is believed to be a dominating component of the northern Arabian Gulf’s ecology and largely\\u000a responsible for productivity of Kuwait’s fisheries. With major construction of dams on the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in\\u000a Turkey, river discharge has been substantially reduced, and flooding essentially eliminated. We attempted to relate river\\u000a flow and shrimp landings indirectly by

  20. Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar Education City, P.O. Box 24144, Doha, Qatar

    E-print Network

    Chen, Tsuhan

    and rehabilitation medicine. With Sidra Medical and Research Center students will have access to one of the most technologically advanced medical and research facilities in the world. RESEARCH Working closely with Qatar Medical Corporation medical facilities Summer 2006 WCMC-Q's research labs in use for the first time May

  1. Martian Meteorite Discovered in Oman Desert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sanders, Hilary C.

    2001-01-01

    A fist-sized meteorite with a mineralogy and isotopic signature suggesting Martian origin has been discovered by Swiss researchers in the Sayh al Uhaymir region of desert in Oman. On June 15, scientists at the University of Bern announced their finding of the Martian meteorite, named Sayh al Uhaymir 094 and one of only eighteen known on Earth. Only recently have scientists been combing the deserts for Martian meteorites; previously they were collected mainly from the Antarctic. Finding these rare rocks from Mars is an exciting and inexpensive way to collect data, including information on possible water or life, from the Red Planet. This week's In the News takes a look at the Oman discovery and Martian meteorites in general.

  2. Star Clocks and Water Management in Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Harriet

    For centuries, if not millennia, the farmers of Oman have used the stars and sun for timing their share of water from gravity-fed irrigation systems (afl?j). When wristwatches became widely available in the late 1960s, many communities abandoned the traditional methods. Today, the use of stars for this purpose survives in eight communities. This contribution focuses on the near extinct system of time reckoning with stars.

  3. Hydrographic Variability off the Coast of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbassi, L.; Dimarco, S. F.; Jochens, A. E.; Al Gheilani, H.; Wang, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Data from hydrographic transects made in 2001 and 2002 and between 2007 and 2009 were obtained from the Oman Ministry of Fisheries Wealth. Property-depth plots of temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen were produced for all transects and in all months for which data were available. These were analyzed for temporal and spatial variability. For all transects, there exist large variability on various timescales, with strong spatial variability. Two common features that are seen in the hydrographic data sets are the Persian Gulf Water (PGW) and a layer of continuous low oxygen concentrations in the lower part of the water column. Plots of salinity produced for transects located in the northern part of the Gulf of Oman show a one-unit increase in salinity of the water at the bottom of deepest station during the months of August and September as compared to the other months. Similarly, cross-shelf contour plots of temperature shows an increase in water temperature near the bottom station during the months of August and September. These indicate the presence of the PGW outflow in the northern part of the Gulf of Oman. For dissolved oxygen distributions, hydrographic transects that did not extend far offshore show monthly differences in the presence of water with low oxygen concentrations. For transects that do extend far offshore and also show a layer of low oxygen water throughout the year, there is generally a monthly difference on whether this water is found close to the surface or deeper in the water column. The variability seen in the data could only be explained by comparing these data to data collected from the real time cable ocean observing system installed by Lighthouse R &D Enterprise in the Oman Sea and the Arabian Sea in 2005. The analysis of these data reveal that the variability observed is related to processes such as ocean conditions, monsoonal cycle, and extreme weather events.

  4. Diversity in the Mideast; Kuwait and Yemen

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1991-12-02

    This paper reports on two types of action which mark oil industry activity at opposite ends of the Arabian Peninsula. In Kuwait, the astounding achievements of firefighting teams have captured world headlines. Some 1,200 miles to the south, Yemen is establishing itself as a center for exploration and production.

  5. New Perspectives on Teacher Education in Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Sharaf, Adel

    2006-01-01

    This brief paper is part of a larger research project which examined the historical background of teaching in the Kuwaiti educational system before and after the Gulf War in 1990 in order to propose a new perspective on teacher education in Kuwait, particularly with regard to religious education. The author is interested in whether others have a…

  6. Trace metals in marine sediments of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Anderlini, V.C. (Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research); Mohammad, O.S.; Zarba, M.A.; Fowler, S.W.; Miramand, P.

    1982-01-01

    The report presents the results of analyses for ten trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in marine surface sediments from Kuwait and discusses the effect of grain size and total organic content on the observed concentrations of these metals. (JMT)

  7. Would Rethinking Learning Disabilities Benefit Kuwait?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazna, Maysaa; Reid, D. Kim

    2009-01-01

    Learning disabilities education in Kuwait grew from Kuwaiti's wholesale importation of the Western, medical model of disability--a model basically incompatible with Kuwaiti culture. Conflicting factors include its problematic normal/abnormal binary, its assumption that the "deficit" is located in the student and the segregation of students by…

  8. Factors Affecting Students' Retention at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlKandari, Nabila

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the factors that affect students' retention at Kuwait University. Five hundred seventy students participated in the study. A survey of 22 retention factors was designed to measure student perceptions. Students presented their agreement on factors which included: achieving personal aspiration, getting jobs, free-of-charge…

  9. Automation in a Special Library in Kuwait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalid, Farooq A.

    1983-01-01

    Traces introduction of automation in National Scientific and Technical Information Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, highlighting online applications in English and Arabic. Systems developed (bibliographic control, union lists, circulation control, indexes) and use of STAIRS storage and retrieval system for integrated databases are…

  10. Political Advertising in Kuwait A Functional Analysis

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    Political Advertising in Kuwait A Functional Analysis Jasem Alqaseer Abstract: Most political advertising studies focus on the U.S. or other western democracies like the U.K. and other European countries (Kaid, 2006). In general, political advertising studies focused on the content of political advertising

  11. Minimizing Casing Corrosion in Kuwait Oil Fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. N. Agiza; S. A. Awar

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion in production strings is a well known problem in Kuwait oil fields. Failure to remedy the affected wells results mainly in undesirable dump flooding of the oil reservoirs, or in oil seepage and hydrocarbon contamination in shallow water bearing strata. Any of these situations (unless properly handled) leads to a disastrous waste of oil resources. This study discusses casing

  12. Biodiversity and climate change in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samira Omar Asem; Waleed Y. Roy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the various consequences of climate change on the biodiversity of Kuwait. Many world organizations have established strategic plans for climate change, such as The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation, which is adopted in 2002 by the Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper

  13. Proceedings of the EMNLP 2014 Workshop on Arabic Natural Langauge Processing (ANLP), pages 217224, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ­224, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics Arabizi Detection and Conversion to Arabic Kareem Darwish Qatar Computing Research Institute Qatar Foundation, Doha, Qatar kdarwish

  14. The Emergence of Libraries in the Sultanate of Oman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karim, Bakri Musa A.

    1991-01-01

    Describes developments in library services that took place in Oman from 1970-90 and discusses the current status of library development. Topics discussed include the rapid social and economic development in Oman, the lack of human and physical resources, the lack of a national library, and deficiencies in school libraries. (five references) (LRW)

  15. Additions to the rust fungi (Pucciniales) from northern Oman

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first compilation of the rust fungi occurring in the Sultanate of Oman is presented based on historical records and numerous recent collections, primarily from agricultural hosts. The study compiles data for 16 species of Pucciniales in northern Oman, along with voucher and sequence data and pre...

  16. Masirah Graben, Oman: A hidden Cretaceous rift basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Beauchamp; A. C. Ries; M. P. Coward

    1995-01-01

    Reflection seismic data, well data, geochemical data, and surface geology suggest that a Cretaceous rift basin exists beneath the thrusted allochthonous sedimentary sequence of the Masirah graben, Oman. The Masirah graben is located east of the Huqf uplift, parallel to the southern coast of Oman. The eastern side of the northeast-trending Huqf anticlinorium is bounded by an extensional fault system

  17. The Implementation of NVQs in the Sultanate of Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Explains that the Sultanate of Oman is the only country in the world, other than the UK, to have adopted the national vocational qualification NVQ as its national system for vocational training. Assesses the extent to which centres in Oman have been successful in implementing the NVQ, and the extent to which the NVQ has contributed towards…

  18. Howdy Ags! I am writing to inform you of a policy instituted by Qatar Foundation and the branch affiliates regarding

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    by Qatar Foundation and the branch affiliates regarding the requirements about what's happening in the world of wellness at Texas A&M at Qatar topics. Take some time to visit our website at http://www.qatar

  19. Proposed artificial recharge studies in northern Qatar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimrey, J.O.

    1985-01-01

    The aquifer system in northern Qatar comprises a water-table aquifer in the Rus Formation which is separated by an aquitard from a partially confined aquifer in the top of the overlying Umm er Radhuma Formation. These two aquifers are composed of limestone and dolomite of Eocene and Paleocene age and contain a fragile lens of freshwater which is heavily exploited as a source of water for agricultural irrigation. Net withdrawals are greatly in excess of total recharge, and quality of ground water is declining. Use of desalinated seawater for artificial recharge has been proposed for the area. Artificial recharge, on a large scale, could stabilize the decline in ground-water quality while allowing increased withdrawals for irrigation. The proposal appears technically feasible. Recharge should be by injection to the Umm er Radhuma aquifer whose average transmissivity is about 2,000 meters squared per day (as compared to an average of about 200 meters squared per day for the Rus aquifer). Implementation of artificial recharge should be preceded by a hydrogeologic appraisal. These studies should include test drilling, conventional aquifer tests, and recharge-recovery tests at four sites in northern Qatar. (USGS)

  20. Successful operation of a large LPG plant. [Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Shtayieh, S.; Durr, C.A.; McMillan, J.C.; Collins, C.

    1982-03-01

    The LPG plant located at Mina-Al Ahmadi, Kuwait, is the heart of Kuwait Oil Co.'s massive Gas Project to use the associated gas from Kuwait's oil production. Operation of this three-train plant has been very successful. A description is given of the three process trains consisting of four basic units: extraction, fractionation, product treating, and refrigeration. Initial problems relating to extraction, fractionation, product treating and, refrigeration are discussed. 1 ref.

  1. Kuwait Oil Fields as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A clear view of the northern Kuwait coast shows the southern part of Kuwait City, and the major oil fields to the south. Oil laden sands, where wells were set ablaze during the Gulf War in 1991, are visible south of Kuwait City as a dark, elongated patch surrounded by light-colored sand. Oil-stained sandbetween well sites (dots) and criss-crossing roads is gradually being covered by clean sand carried by strong, seasonal northwest winds.

  2. Diurnal and nocturnal catchability of Kuwait's commercial shrimps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Bishop; Y. Ye; A. H. Alsaffar; H. M. Al-Foudari; S. Al-Jazzaf

    2008-01-01

    In descending order of importance, the shrimps Penaeus semisulcatus De Haan, 1844; Metapenaeus affinis (H. Milne-Edwards, 1837); and Parapenaeopsis stylifera (H. Milne-Edwards, 1837) account for over 95% of Kuwait's commercial landings. Throughout its range, P. semisulcatus is nocturnal, but Kuwait trawlers are active 24h a day during season. Historically, all scientific shrimp surveys in Kuwait have been conducted during daylight

  3. New Kuwait company spearheads ambitious energy-industry plans

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-21

    The Kuwaiti Government organized the Kuwait Petroleum Corp. (KPC) in early 1980. KPC, capitalized at the equivalent of $3.7 billion, consists primarily of the Kuwait Oil Co., Kuwait National Petroleum Co., Kuwait Oil Tankers Co., and the Petrochemical Industries Co., which all retain their identity. KPC will be involved in exploration, production, drilling, refining, marketing, transportation, planning, and petrochemicals. Kuwait has built a $1 billion LPG plant at Mina Al-Ahmadi which came on stream in Feb. 1979; the facility has three identical trains with a total gas capacity of 1.68 billion std cu ft/day and a total gas liquids capacity of 197,530 bbl/day, consisting of 101,310 bbl/day of propane, 54,970 bbl/day of butane, and 41,250 bbl/day of natural gasoline. In 1979, Kuwait produced 2,297,508 bbl/day of oil, but on 4/1/80, Kuwait restricted oil production to 1.5 million bbl/day, which will reduce the associated gas and limit the LPG plant to functioning at about half capacity. Kuwait uses approx. 90% of the associated gas it produces. The country is planning to refine at least 50% of its crude output by 1985. New or expanded plants will provide oil refining, sulfur recovery, lubricant oil blending, gasoline manufacturing, and bitumen capacities. Kuwait is also expending its tanker fleet.

  4. Risk factors of young ischemic stroke in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fahmi Yousef Khan

    2007-01-01

    ObjectivesThere is limited information about risk factors of young ischemic stroke in Qatar. The aim of this study was to describe the risk factors and subtypes of young ischemic stroke among Qatari and non-Qatari residents.

  5. Prevalence, demographics and clinical characteristics of multiple sclerosis in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Deleu, Dirk; Mir, Danial; Al Tabouki, Ahmed; Mesraoua, Rim; Mesraoua, Boulenouar; Akhtar, Naveed; Al Hail, Hassan; D'souza, Atlantic; Melikyan, Gayane; Imam, Yahia Z B; Osman, Yasir; Elalamy, Osama; Sokrab, Tageldin; Kamran, Sadaat; Ruiz Miyares, Francisco; Ibrahim, Faiza

    2013-05-01

    No published epidemiologic data on multiple sclerosis (MS) in Qatar exist. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence, demographics and clinical characteristics of MS in the Middle Eastern country of Qatar. We analyzed data for Qatari MS patients fulfilling the McDonald diagnostic criteria. A total of 154 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. On 31 April 2010, the crude prevalence of MS in Qatar was 64.57 per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI: 58.31-70.37). The female-to-male ratio was 1.33:1. A positive family history was found in 10.4% of included MS patients. We conclude that Qatar is now a medium-to-high risk area for MS, with some important differences in clinical characteristics as compared to other countries in the region. PMID:22968545

  6. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1985 totaled 3,837,580,000 bbl (an average rate of 10,513,917 BOPD), down 2.2% from the revised 1984 total of 3,924,034,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Dubai, Oman, and Syria had significant increases; Kuwait, Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar had significant decreases. New fields went on production in Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Oman, and Syria. In North Yemen, the first ever oil production in that country was nearing the start-up stage at year end. 9 figures, 9 tables.

  7. Qatargas exporting LNG from Qatar`s new Ras Laffan Port

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-02-24

    When the 135,000 cu m LNG carrier Al Zubarah departed Ras Laffan Port in December, Qatar entered a new era of commerce that will both boost the emirate`s economic development and influence energy trade around the world. The event capped more than a decade of planning, design, and construction of Ras Laffan Port--the world`s newest and largest LNG exporting facility. During the 1980s, the focus in Qatar was on exploration and development of North field, which holds the world`s largest reserves of nonassociated natural gas. In the 1990s, efforts concentrated on establishing a direct production and export link between North field, the new multi-billion-dollar Qatar Liquefied Gas Co. (Qatargas) gas liquefaction plant at Ras Laffan, and LNG export facilities at the 8.5 sq km Ras Laffan Port. Markets of the Far East will be first to be served by LNG from Ras Laffan Port. Two 25-year LNG supply contracts have been signed with buyers in Japan and South Korea, and negotiations are under way with potential customers from China, Taiwan, and Thailand. The paper describes the port, its operations, and export projects.

  8. Ecological disaster in Kuwait; A burning question

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, T.K. (Waste Away Services, Perrysburg, OH (US))

    1991-10-01

    Six million barrels of oil are going up in smoke each day in Kuwait, dumping 3.7 million pounds of toxic gases, soot, and smoke - including cancer-causing compounds - into the air each hour. This paper reports that the prognosis for the situation is dim. Even as specialized firefighting companies from the United States and Canada began arriving in Kuwait in March, oil officials there predicted dousing the fires would take at least two years and pumping up oil production to pre-war levels would take between five and 10 years. An oil well fire is a disaster. The effect on the ozone, the ecology, the marine life is massive. We aren't even breathing air here, we're just breathing smog.

  9. Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Kuwait soil.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Akbar, Abrar

    2015-02-01

    Environmentally ubiquitous bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa evolved mechanisms to adapt and prevail under diverse conditions. In the current investigation, strains of P. aeruginosa demonstrating high rates of crude oil utilization and tolerance to high concentrations of heavy metals were found in both crude oil-contaminated and uncontaminated sites in Kuwait, and were dominant in the contaminated sites. The incidence of P. aeruginosa in tested soils implies the definitive pattern of crude oil contamination in the selection of the bacterial population in petroleum-contaminated sites in Kuwait. Surprisingly, the unculturable P. aeruginosa in different soil samples showed significant high similarity coefficients based on 16S-RFLP analyses, implying that the unculturable fraction of existing bacterial population in environmental samples is more stable and, hence, reliable for phylogenetic studies compared to the culturable bacteria. PMID:25014900

  10. Protected Agriculture in the State of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Afaf Y. Al-Nasser; N. R. Bhat

    Because of the country's harsh climate, scarce water resources and poor-quality land resources, protected agriculture (PA) has a significant role in Kuwait's agricultural development. Despite difficulties, PA made spectacular progress during the 1980s (area increased from 3.5 ha in 1979\\/80 to 425 ha in 1989\\/90) and was beginning to establish an important niche in the national economy just prior to

  11. Case histories of temperature surveys in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.S.

    1981-12-01

    Most crude produced in Kuwait is from naturally flowing wells. Casing, tubing, and cement in these wells remain unchanged after completion. This study discusses the major application of temperature surveys in indicating fluid movement both inside and behind the production string, hence locating any holes in the casing. Some significant cases of temperature anomalies are examined qualitatively, and suggestions are made for a more quantitative interpretation of temperature profiles. 9 refs.

  12. Abdominal trauma due to road traffic accidents in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ismail Helmi; Abdulazim Hussein; Abdel Hafeez Ali Ahmed

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To measure the incidence and severity of abdominal trauma due to road traffic accidents (RTA) in Qatar.Patient and methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients admitted with documented abdominal trauma to the only acute General Hospital in the state of Qatar in the period 1991–1995.Results: In the 5-year period, 3744 patients were admitted following an RTA. Of these, 667 (17.8%)

  13. School Oral Health Program in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Jitendra; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Nazar, Huda

    2014-01-01

    The School Oral Health Program (SOHP), Kuwait, is a joint venture between the Ministry of Health, Kuwait, and Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, Mass., USA. This program provides oral health education, prevention and treatment to almost 280,000 public school children in Kuwait. Services are delivered through a system of center- and school-based clinics and preventive mobile teams. One of the recent developments is the effective use of portable dental units for the delivery of preventive care to children in schools without the need for children to go to dental clinics. Preventive procedures performed under this program are the biannual application of fluoride varnish and the placement of pit and fissure sealants on newly erupted permanent molars and premolars. During recent years, the SOHP has improved its coverage of children, with prevention up to 80%. This has resulted in a considerable reduction in treatment needs, which is evident from the reduced number of composite restorations performed under this program during the last 6 years. This indicates that the disease level is on a decline, which can be confirmed from the results of the ongoing National Oral Health Survey on Kuwaiti school children. PMID:24335161

  14. NCAR to archive Kuwait oil fire data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-02-01

    In early 1991, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) initiated a large-scale, international effort to assess the atmospheric effects of pollution introduced by the burning of more than 500 oil wells in Kuwait. This effort resulted in a myriad of measurements from aircraft, satellite, and surface stations. In coordinating these programs, WMO assumed responsibility for integrating and disseminating these measurements to international research organizations in a systematic and timely fashion. As a first step in addressing this responsibility, a workshop was convened at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) July 22-24. It was decided there that NCAR would serve as the central archival site for the Kuwait oil fire data.Since that time, the NCAR Research Aviation Facility has hired new staff and begun development of the Kuwait Data Archive (KuDA). Examples of data resident in KuDA include various measurements from the NCAR Electra sensors, satellite imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, lidar data, and the National Meteorological Center model output. Other aircraft data sets and surface measurements are still undergoing processing and quality control before being submitted to the archive.

  15. A preliminary report on the distribution of lizards in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Cog?lniceanu, Dan; Castilla, Aurora M; Valdeón, Aitor; Gosá, Alberto; Al-Jaidah, Noora; Alkuwary, Ali; Saifelnasr, Essam O. H.; Mas-Peinado, Paloma; Richer, Renee; Al-Hemaidi, Ahmad Amer Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have updated the list of the lizard species present in Qatar and produced the first distribution maps based on two field surveys in 2012 and 2013. We used the QND95/Qatar National Grid with a grid of 10 × 10 km squares for mapping. Our results show the occurrence of 21 lizard species in Qatar, from the 15 species indicated in the last biodiversity report conducted in 2004. The most abundant family found in Qatar is Gekkonidae with nine species (Bunopus tuberculatus, Cyrtopodion scabrum, Hemidactylus robustus, H. flaviviridis, H. persicus, Stenodactylus arabicus, S. slevini, S. doriae, Pseudoceramodactylus khobarensis), followed by Lacertidae with four species (Acanthodactylus schmidti, A. opheodurus, Mesalina brevirostris, M. adramitana), Agamidae with three species (Trapelus flavimaculatus, Uromastyx aegyptia, Phrynocephalus arabicus), Scincidae with two species (Scincus mitranus, Trachylepis septemtaeniata), and Varanidae (Varanus griseus), Sphaerodactylidae (Pristurus rupestris) and Trogonophiidae (Diplometopon zarudnyi) with one species each. The species richness fluctuated largely across Qatar between one and eleven species per grid square. We believe that the lizard fauna records in Qatar are still incomplete and that additional studies are required. However, our study here fills a gap concerning lizard biodiversity knowledge in the Gulf Region. PMID:24493961

  16. A preliminary report on the distribution of lizards in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Cog?lniceanu, Dan; Castilla, Aurora M; Valdeón, Aitor; Gosá, Alberto; Al-Jaidah, Noora; Alkuwary, Ali; Saifelnasr, Essam O H; Mas-Peinado, Paloma; Richer, Renee; Al-Hemaidi, Ahmad Amer Mohd

    2014-01-01

    We have updated the list of the lizard species present in Qatar and produced the first distribution maps based on two field surveys in 2012 and 2013. We used the QND95/Qatar National Grid with a grid of 10 × 10 km squares for mapping. Our results show the occurrence of 21 lizard species in Qatar, from the 15 species indicated in the last biodiversity report conducted in 2004. The most abundant family found in Qatar is Gekkonidae with nine species (Bunopus tuberculatus, Cyrtopodion scabrum, Hemidactylus robustus, H. flaviviridis, H. persicus, Stenodactylus arabicus, S. slevini, S. doriae, Pseudoceramodactylus khobarensis), followed by Lacertidae with four species (Acanthodactylus schmidti, A. opheodurus, Mesalina brevirostris, M. adramitana), Agamidae with three species (Trapelus flavimaculatus, Uromastyx aegyptia, Phrynocephalus arabicus), Scincidae with two species (Scincus mitranus, Trachylepis septemtaeniata), and Varanidae (Varanus griseus), Sphaerodactylidae (Pristurus rupestris) and Trogonophiidae (Diplometopon zarudnyi) with one species each. The species richness fluctuated largely across Qatar between one and eleven species per grid square. We believe that the lizard fauna records in Qatar are still incomplete and that additional studies are required. However, our study here fills a gap concerning lizard biodiversity knowledge in the Gulf Region. PMID:24493961

  17. Uncommon opportunistic yeast bloodstream infections from Qatar.

    PubMed

    Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; AbdulWahab, Atqah; Kolecka, Anna; Deshmukh, Anand; Meis, Jacques F; Boekhout, Teun

    2014-07-01

    Eleven uncommon yeast species that are associated with high mortality rates irrespective of antifungal therapy were isolated from 17/187 (201 episodes) pediatric and elderly patients with fungemia from Qatar. The samples were taken over a 6-year period (January 2004-December 2010). Isolated species included Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Lindnera fabianii, Candida dubliniensis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Candida intermedia, Pichia kudriavzevii, Yarrowia lipolytica, Clavispora lusitaniae, Candida pararugosa, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry provided correct identifications compared with molecular analysis testing of the same isolates. Low minimal inhibitory concentrations were found when isavuconazole and voriconazole were used for all uncommon yeast species evaluated in this study. Resistance to antifungal drugs was low and remained restricted to a few species. PMID:24934803

  18. The Incidence of Dyslexia among Young Offenders in Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbeheri, Gad; Everatt, John; Malki, Mohammad Al

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the incidence of dyslexia among young offenders in Kuwait. A total of 91 children/young adults from 8 juvenile delinquent welfare centres across Kuwait were interviewed and tested. A measure of non-verbal reasoning ability was used to exclude those with low general ability. The remaining 53 participants were tested on their…

  19. Autosomal recessive disorders among Arabs: an overview from Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A S Teebi

    1994-01-01

    Kuwait has a cosmopolitan population of 1.7 million, mostly Arabs. This population is a mosaic of large and small minorities representing most Arab communities. In general, Kuwait's population is characterized by a rapid rate of growth, large family size, high rates of consanguineous marriages within the Arab communities with low frequency of intermarriage between them, and the presence of genetic

  20. Construction safety in Kuwait: issues, procedures, problems, and recommendations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. A Kartam; P Koushki

    2000-01-01

    The building construction industry plays a major role in the economy of the state of Kuwait. This paper evaluates existing safety regulations, describes safety procedures adopted by owners, designers, contractors and insurance companies, and assesses the suitability of these regulations and procedures for Kuwait's environment and workforce. It also discusses problems associated with enforcing safety regulations at construction sites. Furthermore,

  1. Hydrogeochemical processes operating within the main aquifers of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Saleh; F. Al-Ruwaih; M. Shehata

    1999-01-01

    The study area, Al-Wafra, is located in the extreme south of Kuwait and occupies an area of 325 km2. The objective of this study was to develop an interpretation and understanding of the geochemical processes and characteristics of the Kuwait Group and Dammam limestone aquifers. Therefore, hydrochemical data comprising the mean values and standard deviations of the major ion concentrations,

  2. Smoking, belt use, and road accidents of youth in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parviz A. Koushki; Mahmood Bustan

    2006-01-01

    Youth, worldwide, are involved in a disproportionate number of road accidents, in general, and fatal accidents, in particular. Kuwait is no exception to this trend. The objectives of this funded research were to identify the trends in belt use, smoking in motion, and road accidents of young drivers in Kuwait. Findings of a person-interview questionnaire survey of 1467 randomly selected

  3. Optical Multiple Access Network (OMAN) for advanced processing satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendez, Antonio J.; Gagliardi, Robert M.; Park, Eugene; Ivancic, William D.; Sherman, Bradley D.

    1991-01-01

    An OMAN breadboard for exploring advanced processing satellite circuit switch applications is introduced. Network architecture, hardware trade offs, and multiple user interference issues are presented. The breadboard test set up and experimental results are discussed.

  4. 76 FR 697 - United States-Oman Free Trade Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ...Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, or Bahrain, no bond or other security will be required...Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Bahrain, or Oman and entered under Chapter 98,...

  5. Cyanobacterial Soil Crust Distribution in the State of Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, R. A.; Anchassi, D.; El Assad, I.; El Matbouly, M.; Fares, F.; Metcalf, J.; Makki, I.

    2009-12-01

    Despite the importance of biological soils crusts (BSCs) to ecosystem function, the distribution of BSCs in Qatar have not been documented. We sought to document terrestrial BSC coverage for the State of Qatar using a transect system to sample 91 (10 km X 10 km) blocks accounting for 80% of the landmass of the country. Smooth crusts were found to contain Microcoleus species, while hypolithic communities had unicellular cyanobacteria and filamentous Oscillatoriaceae. Biological soil crust coverage ranged from 0% to 87%, with a gradient in coverage from north to south. This gradient correlated with corresponding patterns of rainfall, soil type and topographical features. Overall country coverage is 26% comparable to value found in the Kalahari desert in southern Africa and other desert regions. The predominance of high BSC coverage areas in the northern half of Qatar may be attributed to soil composition and water availability. Qatar is characterized by shallow, natural depressions. These depressions predominate in the northern half of Qatar and may facilitate BSC development by affecting soil composition and water pooling. The southern area of the country shows little BSC coverage, which may be attributed to the predominance of sand (i.e. mobile surface substrate) which inhibits the formation of BSCs. The southwestern area of Qatar is characterized by an alluvial fan system with quartz pebbles being common. While BSC mat formation was not common in these areas, hypolithic cyanobacteria located on quartz was present. The current rate of development and development related disturbance in Qatar may threaten biological soil crusts, with larger ecosystem impacts. Disturbance of the soil surface has been shown to destroy current BSCs and inhibit the development of new BSCs. Destruction of BSC organisms is important to consider since they provide both carbon and nitrogen which support the larger plant community and reduce wind and water erosion. In addition, disturbance of the soil during construction activities may result in aerosolization of cyanobacteria and associated toxins.

  6. qatar.cmu.edu Biological Sciences | Business Administration | Computational Biology | Computer Science | Information Systems

    E-print Network

    Sycara, Katia

    qatar.cmu.edu Biological Sciences | Business Administration | Computational Biology | Computer Mellon University in Qatar Undergraduate Bulletin 2012-2013 The Dietrich College of Humanities and Social;Foreword Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar is Carnegie Mellon's first undergraduate branch campus

  7. Making Connections With Impact 1 Welcome to Northwestern University in Qatar

    E-print Network

    Staum, Jeremy

    Making Connections With Impact #12;#12;Contents 1 Welcome to Northwestern University in Qatar 2 Why Qatar 8 Education City 10 A Tradition of Excellence 12 New Building--New Horizons 14 A US Degree, internships and interaction with elite faculty push students to the next level. Through study at the Qatar

  8. Qatar's School Transportation System: Supporting Safety, Efficiency, and Service Quality. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Keith; Younossi, Obaid; Al-Dafa, Maryah; Culbertson, Shelly; Mattock, Michael G.; Light, Thomas; Rohr, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    In consideration of the many challenges associated with Qatar's continued growth and demographic changes, the government of Qatar is interested in updating its school transportation system (STS). This volume assesses the perspectives of parents and school administrators on Qatar's STS, identifies a vision and goals for the STS, reviews…

  9. Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

    2006-01-26

    The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times. We obtained {approx}1500 absolute P and S arrival times and {approx}3200 P and S wave arrival time differences. Event locations do not change greatly when 3D velocity structure is included. Three-dimensional velocity structure, where resolvable, does not differ greatly from our optimized 1D model, indicating that the improved 1D model is adequate for routine event location. Finally, we calculated moment magnitudes, MW, for nearly 155 events using the coda magnitude technique of Mayeda et al., (2003). The fact that most of the relocated events occur below the known sedimentary structures extending to 7 km suggests that they are tectonic in origin. Shallow events within the sedimentary crust in the (southern) Minagish region may be related to oil field activities, although the current study cannot unambiguously determine the source of current seismicity in Kuwait. The improved velocity model reduces the scatter of travel time residuals relative to the locations reported in the KNSN bulletin and may be used for ground motion prediction and hazard estimate studies in Kuwait.

  10. Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gok, R.; Rodgers, A.; Al-Enezi, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband). Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. We have analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the KNSN bulletin locations. We observe a consistency of this model with the model obtained from the joint inversion of receiver function and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick (~ 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform and normal velocities for stable continental crust. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) and the optimized 1D model to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) structure by tomographic inversion. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times. We obtained ~1500 absolute P and S arrival times and ~3200 P and S wave arrival time differences. Finally, we calculated Mw's of nearly 100 events using the coda magnitude technique of Mayeda et al., (2003). Although the current studies will not be able to reveal the source of current seismicity in Kuwait, we obtain a considerable amount of improvement in the velocity model and the reduced scatter of travel time residuals relative to the routine KNSN bulletin. The new velocity model and moment magnitudes will be utilized in ground motion prediction and hazard estimate studies in the region. *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  11. Shaded relief, color as height, Salalah, Oman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This elevation map shows a part of the southern coast of the Arabian Peninsula including parts of the countries of Oman and Yemen. The narrow coastal plain on the right side of the image includes the city of Salahlah, the second largest city in Oman. Various crops, including coconuts, papayas and bananas, are grown on this plain. The abrupt topography of the coastal mountains wrings moisture from the monsoon, enabling agriculture in the otherwise dry environment of the Arabian Peninsula. These mountains are historically significant as well: Some scholars believe these mountains are the 'southern mountains' of the book of Genesis.

    This image brightness corresponds to shading illumination from the right, while colors show the elevation as measured by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to brown at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1400 meters (4600 feet) of total relief. The Arabian Sea is colored blue.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI)space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 149 by 40 kilometers (92 by 25 miles) Location: 16.9 deg. North lat., 53.7 deg. East lon. Orientation: North at top right Date Acquired: February 15, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA

  12. An option pricing theory explanation of the invasion of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Muhtaseb, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to explain the invasion of Kuwait by making an analogy between a call option and the Iraq-Kuwait situation before the invasion on August 2, 1990. A number of factors contributed to the issuance of a deep-in-the money European call option to Iraq against Kuwait. The underlying asset is the crude oil reserves under Kuwait. Price of crude oil is determined in world spot markets. The exercise price is equal to the cost of permanently annexing and retaining Kuwait. The volatility is measured by the annualized variance of the weekly rate of return of the spot price of crude oil. Time-to-expiration is equal to the time period between decision date and actual invasion date. Finally, since crude oil prices are quoted in U.S. dollars, the U.S. Treasury bill rate is assumed to be the risk-free rate. In a base-case scenario, Kuwait`s oil reserves amount to 94,500 million barrels valued at $18 a barrell in early February 1990 resulting in a market value of $1,701 billion. Because the cost of the war to Iraq is not known, we assume it is comparable to that of the U.S.-led coalition of $51.0 billion. Time-to-expiration is six months. The treasury bill rate in early 1990 was around 7.5 percent. Annualized standard deviation of weekly rates of return is 0.216. The value of Kuwait`s invasion option is $1,642.25 billion. Depending on the scenario, the value of this special option ranged between $1,450 billion and $3.624 billion. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Subsidence in magma chamber and the development of magmatic foliation in Oman ophiolite gabbros

    E-print Network

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Subsidence in magma chamber and the development of magmatic foliation in Oman ophiolite gabbros Keywords: Oman ophiolite fast spreading ridges magma chamber gabbro subsidence In the Oman ophiolite to the upper gabbros unit have been mapped in great detail, in selected areas of the southern massifs

  14. Oil slicks off the coast of Qatar, Persian Gulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A detailed view the port facility of Musay'id on the Qatar Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf (25.0N, 52.5E). Part of a large oil spill seen as a dark toned mass in the water, covering much of the surface of the western Persian Gulf, has moved offshore in this scene. Qatar is one of several of the oil rich United Arab Emirate states. Oil spills and oil pollution of the environment commonly occur in oil tanker operations.

  15. An examination of the perceived need and recommended body of knowledge for architectural internship programs in Kuwait

    E-print Network

    Abdullah, Mohammad

    2007-09-17

    in Kuwait is the lack of professional development systems. Internship (being one professional development system) is not a requirement for graduation from the architectural program at Kuwait University or to practice architecture in Kuwait and to earn...

  16. Laboratory investigations of compatibility of the Kuwait Group aquifer, Kuwait, with possible injection waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, A.; Al-Awadi, E.; Oskui, R.; Hadi, K.; Al-Ruwaih, F.; Turner, M.; Akber, A.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory investigation of the compatibility of the Kuwait Group aquifer of Kuwait with desalinated seawater and reverse osmosis processed treated wastewater was carried out in anticipation of the artificial recharge of the aquifer in future. Even with the use of wax coating and freezing with liquid nitrogen, no core plugs could be extracted from the unconsolidated sections, and only the consolidated to semi-consolidated sections could be studied. The aquifer consists of silty and gravelly sand, and is often highly calcareous. The clay minerals present in the aquifer mostly belong to the montmorillonite and illite groups, with some palygorskite. Mercury injection porosimetry experiments on core plugs from the more cemented parts of the aquifer suggest that, to avoid significant clogging from suspended solids, particles down to a diameter of 8 ?m should be filtered out of the injection water. Core flow experiments suggest that, for the samples examined, loss of permeability due to clay swelling is not very important. The blocking of pore throats by moving fines may be a more serious problem during injection. The geochemical simulation indicates that the possibility of scale formation when the injection waters come in contact with the Kuwait Group formation water is remote. Rather, there is a possibility of dissolution of carbonate minerals in the aquifer in contact with the injection waters.

  17. Improving Operational Strategies of an Institutional Building in Kuwait

    E-print Network

    Al-Ragom, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Building and Energy Technologies Department (BET) of the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research has pledged to achieve 10% reduction in buildings energy consumption by the year 2005. Working in line with the Kuwaiti government that highly...

  18. Analysis of sustainable water supply options for Kuwait

    E-print Network

    Murtaugh, Katharine A. (Katharine Ann)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis considers several options for improving the sustainability of Kuwait's water supply system. The country currently relies heavily on desalination and brackish groundwater extraction. The options considered for ...

  19. Multiple sclerosis in Kuwait: clinical and epidemiological study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A S Al-Din

    1986-01-01

    Eighty-nine cases of multiple sclerosis (70 Arabs) are reported from Kuwait. The prevalence is estimated to be 8.33 per 100,000 (age and sex adjusted to USA population). Kuwait thus emerges to be in the medium risk zone. No differences were found in the age of onset, clinical pattern and disability from the disease found in Europeans and North Americans.

  20. Kuwait City and Fire Scars in the Oil Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the northern Persian Gulf shows Kuwait City and the Tigris and Euphrates River Deltas (29.5N, 48.5E). The oil laden sands and oil lakes of the Kuwait Oil Fields to the north and south of the city are clearly visible as dark patches surrounded by oil free desert sands. Comparison with earlier photos indicate that the oil laden sands are slowly being covered with clean sand carried by strong NW winds called Shmals.

  1. The Kuwait oil fires as seen by Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    A mosaic of two Landsat thematic mapper images acquired May 30, 1991, reveals a dark smoke plume 30-60 km wide extending hundreds of kilometers south of Kuwait City along the Persian Gulf. Smoke coming from the Raudhatain and Sabriyah oil fields blew across the Gulf of Kuwait and over Kuwait City, joined with smoke from the Greater Burgan and Minagish fields, and continued southward over smaller villages and regions of desert agriculture consisting of hundreds of axially irrigated fields in both Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. One agricultural region in Kuwait was completely obscured by the smoke. The light colored limestone gravel and sand surface was darkened by oil lakes near the wells, and by oil drizzling out of the plume downwind of the wells. Most fires produced either a light or dark plume, and the separate plumes mixed to form a combined plume much darker than the land surface, but slightly more reflective than the Gulf waters. A few of the hottest fires had no visible plume, and are presumably associated with methane combustion. The last of the Kuwait fires was reportedly extinguished in November of 1991. Continued monitoring is needed to assess the impact of emissions from both burning and nonburning oil wells on the region's climate, as well as on the agriculture, fishing, and other activities essential to life in the region.

  2. Physical properties of soils contaminated by oil lakes, Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, A.S. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait); Wahba, S.A.; Al-Khatieb, S.O. [Arabian Gulf Univ. (Bahrain)

    1996-08-01

    In preparation for a marine assault by the coalition forces, the Iraqi Army heavily mined Kuwait`s coastal zone and the oil fields. Over a million mines were placed on the Kuwait soil. Burning of 732 oil wells in the State of Kuwait due to the Iraqi invasion caused damages which had direct and indirect effect on environment. A total of 20-22 million barrels of spilled crude oil were collected in natural desert depressions and drainage network which formed more than 300 oil lakes. The total area covered with oil reached 49 km{sup 2}. More than 375 trenches revealed the existence of hard, massive caliche (CaCO{sub 3}) subsoil which prevent leached oil from reaching deeper horizons, and limited the maximum depth of penetration to 1.75 m. Total volume of soil contaminated reached 22,652,500 m{sup 3} is still causing environmental problems and needs an urgent cleaning and rehabilitation. Kuwait Oil Company has recovered approximately 21 million barrels from the oil lakes since the liberation of Kuwait. In our examined representative soil profiles the oil penetration was not deeper than 45 cm. Infiltration rate, soil permeability, grain size distribution, aggregates formation and water holding capacity were assessed. 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Proceedings of the EMNLP 2014 Workshop on Arabic Natural Langauge Processing (ANLP), pages 132136, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ­136, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics Automatic Correction of Arabic Text: a Cascaded Approach Hamdy Mubarak, Kareem Darwish Qatar Computing Research Institute Qatar

  4. Proceedings of the EMNLP 2014 Workshop on Arabic Natural Langauge Processing (ANLP), pages 196206, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ­206, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics Domain and Dialect}@cs.cmu.edu 2 Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar hbouamor@qatar.cmu.edu, ko@cs.cmu.edu 3 New York University

  5. Proceedings of SSST-8, Eighth Workshop on Syntax, Semantics and Structure in Statistical Translation, pages 132134, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    Translation, pages 132­134, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics`arquez Qatar Computing Research Institute Qatar Foundation lluism@lsi.upc.edu Abstract Distributed vector

  6. Proceedings of the EMNLP 2014 Workshop on Arabic Natural Langauge Processing (ANLP), pages 137142, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ­142, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics CMUQ@QALB-2014: An SMT Oflazer2 1 Carnegie Mellon University sjeblee@cs.cmu.edu 2 Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar {hbouamor,wajdiz}@qatar

  7. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  8. Renal transplantation: Seventeen years of follow-up in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Rashed; O. Aboud

    2004-01-01

    Among 432 patients receiving renal transplants (RT) between 1986 and 2002, 238 were Qatari nationals and 194, expatriates of mixed nationalities. Since 1986 when we started a local transplant program, 70 cases were performed at our center and 362 abroad. Diabetic nephropathy was the most common cause of end-stage renal disease among Qatar and chronic glomerulonephritis among expatriate patients. New-onset

  9. Teacher Retention Problem in Girls Primary Schools in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al. Sabbagh, Samah; Al. Megbali, Aisha

    2008-01-01

    Qatar has recently faced a tremendous reform in education that requires changes in many domains and causes a lot of challenges. A very serious challenge is teachers' retention where many teachers tend to leave their schools looking for new jobs. In independent schools as well as governmental schools, teachers switch jobs and therefore schools…

  10. The development of total quality management in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Khalifa N. Al-khalifa; Elaine M. Aspinwall

    2000-01-01

    Presents the key findings of a study into quality practices of a number of organisations in one of the Arab countries, Qatar, which is recognised as one of the leading liquefied natural gas-exporting regions since its reserves of gas represent about 7.4 per cent of the world total. The purposes of the study were to assess: the awareness, the understanding,

  11. 2006 Qatar Asian Games: A ‘Modernization’ Project from Above?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahfoud Amara

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the 15th Asian Games, which will be staged in Doha. Qatar is the first Arab Middle Eastern country to host the Asian Games, which will be the biggest ever organized, with 45 countries and 40 sports represented. The paper examines the political discourse around the games, and more specifically explores how state leaders, politicians, sports personalities

  12. Type 2 diabetes in the sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Shookri, A; Khor, G L; Chan, Y M; Loke, S C; Al-Maskari, M

    2011-04-01

    During the past four decades, Oman has undergone a rapid socioe-conomic and epidemiological transition leading to a substantial reduction in the prevalence of various communicable diseases, including vaccine-preventable diseases. Health care planning together with the commitment of policy makers has been a critical factor in this reduction. However, with rapid social and economic growth, lifestyle-related non communicable diseases have emerged as new health challenges to the country. Diabetes and obesity are leading risks posed by the chronic diseases. The burden of diabetes has increased sharply in Oman over the last decade, rising from 8.3% in 1991 to 11.6% in 2000 among adults aged 20 years and older. The World Health Organization (WHO) predicted an increase of 190% in the number of subjects living with diabetes in Oman over the next 20 years, rising from 75,000 in 2000 to 217,000 in 2025. There is a lack of awareness of the major risk factors for diabetes mellitus in the Omani population generally. As education is often the most significant predictor of knowledge regarding risk factors, complications and the prevention of diabetes, health promotion in Oman is deemed critical, along with other prevention and control measures. Suitable prevention strategies for reducing the prevalence of diabetes in Oman are discussed. Recommendations are made for reforms in the current health care system; otherwise, diabetes will constitute a major drain on Oman's human and financial resources, threatening the advances in health and longevity achieved over the past decades. PMID:22135872

  13. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Kuwait University

    E-print Network

    Cãlugãreanu, Grigore

    PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Kuwait University] On: 19 February-mail: gfb1127@usl.edu 673 Copyright C 2001 by Marcel Dekker, Inc. www.dekker.com DownloadedBy:[Kuwait

  14. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Kuwait University

    E-print Network

    Cãlugãreanu, Grigore

    PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Kuwait University] On: 19 February AVENUE · NEW YORK, NY 10016 DownloadedBy:[KuwaitUniversity]At:06:4819February2009 #12; If G is torsion

  15. Characterizing Surface Temperature and Clarity of Kuwait's Seawaters Using Remotely Sensed Measurements and GIS Analyses

    E-print Network

    Alsahli, Mohammad M. M.

    2009-11-30

    Kuwait sea surface temperature (SST) and water clarity are important water characteristics that influence the entire Kuwait coastal ecosystem. The aim of this project was to study the spatial and temporal distributions of ...

  16. Recreational Value of an Oasis in Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekri, Slim; Mbaga, Msafiri; Fouzai, Ayoub; Al-Shaqsi, Saif

    2011-07-01

    Increasing demand for water to develop non-agricultural activities is causing water to be diverted to high-value uses at the expense of irrigation. However, agriculture provides a flow of amenities in the desert environment which are not either accounted or paid. Oases are spread all over the globe and are threatened for various reasons among which is the high pressure of demand for fresh water. This paper estimates the recreation use value of an oasis. The paper is based on the Misfat Al-Abryeen oasis in Oman, a man-made area of streams and woodland. The travel cost method is used through an on-site questionnaire distributed to 230 visitors. Around 75% of visitors to the oasis also visited other historical or ecological sites during the same day-trip. The econometric model is estimated using negative binomial regression with endogenous stratification. The average consumer surplus, or benefit, from visiting Misfat Al-Abryeen is estimated at US 104.74 per individual per trip. The total social benefit from this oasis is estimated at 366,590 per year. These results underscore the importance of the role played by irrigated agriculture in the provision of amenity services for the tourism sector in a desert environment. The sustainability of the irrigation activity depends on the recognition of the recreation role of oases and the transfer of part of these benefits to the farmers who maintain the irrigation system. The implementation of an entrance fee to the oasis might increase farmers' profit by 6-21%.

  17. Recreational value of an oasis in Oman.

    PubMed

    Zekri, Slim; Mbaga, Msafiri; Fouzai, Ayoub; Al-Shaqsi, Saif

    2011-07-01

    Increasing demand for water to develop non-agricultural activities is causing water to be diverted to high-value uses at the expense of irrigation. However, agriculture provides a flow of amenities in the desert environment which are not either accounted or paid. Oases are spread all over the globe and are threatened for various reasons among which is the high pressure of demand for fresh water. This paper estimates the recreation use value of an oasis. The paper is based on the Misfat Al-Abryeen oasis in Oman, a man-made area of streams and woodland. The travel cost method is used through an on-site questionnaire distributed to 230 visitors. Around 75% of visitors to the oasis also visited other historical or ecological sites during the same day-trip. The econometric model is estimated using negative binomial regression with endogenous stratification. The average consumer surplus, or benefit, from visiting Misfat Al-Abryeen is estimated at US$ 104.74 per individual per trip. The total social benefit from this oasis is estimated at $366,590 per year. These results underscore the importance of the role played by irrigated agriculture in the provision of amenity services for the tourism sector in a desert environment. The sustainability of the irrigation activity depends on the recognition of the recreation role of oases and the transfer of part of these benefits to the farmers who maintain the irrigation system. The implementation of an entrance fee to the oasis might increase farmers' profit by 6-21%. PMID:21519874

  18. Incidence and severity of ketoacidosis in childhood-onset diabetes in Kuwait. Kuwait Diabetes Study Group.

    PubMed

    al Khawari, M; Shaltout, A; Qabazard, M; Abdella, N; al Moemen, J; al-Mazidi, Z; Mandani, F; Moussa, M A

    1997-03-01

    In 1992, the diabetes registry was started in Kuwait, as part of DiaMond, a WHO multinational collaborative project on the incidence of childhood-onset diabetes. Children (243) aged below 15 years, were identified between 1 January 1992 and 31 December 1995. Children (203) were Kuwaiti and 40 were non-Kuwaiti children but resident of Kuwait. For the years 1992, 1993, the annual incidence of childhood onset diabetes for Kuwaiti children was 15.4 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval 12.9-19), and the degree of ascertainment was 92%. Polyuria, polydypsia, weight loss and nocturia were the most frequently reported symptoms; four children were in coma and one in shock at presentation. Nearly half of the children (49%) presented ketoacidosis (venous pH < 7.3 and/or plasma bicarbonate level < 18 mmol/l). and in 53 children (23.5%) it was severe (venous pH < 7.1 and/or plasma bicarbonate level < 10 mmol/l). In 62 children (25.5%) it was mild to moderate (venous pH 7.1-7.3 and/or plasma bicarbonate level 10.1-18 mmol/l). The incidence of severe ketoacidosis was similar in all age groups and sexes. All children recovered completely without major complications and no deaths were recorded. We conclude that diabetic ketoacidosis is a common presentation at the onset of diabetes in childhood in Kuwait and attests to the lack of awareness of general practitioners and parents to the symptoms and signs of diabetes in childhood. PMID:9179467

  19. Influence of the Kuwait oil fires plume (1991) on the microphysical development of clouds

    E-print Network

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    1991-01-01

    Influence of the Kuwait oil fires plume (1991) on the microphysical development of clouds Yinon methods to old satellite data allowed us to study the effects of smoke from the Kuwait oil fires in 1991 heating, at least in the case of the Kuwait fires. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition and Structure

  20. Hussain M. A. Mohammed Mariculture and Fisheries Department, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research

    E-print Network

    145 Xucai Xu· Hussain M. A. Mohammed Mariculture and Fisheries Department, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research P. O. Box J638, 22017 Salmiya, Kuwait ·Present address: Department of Mathematics-frequency data was proposed and applied to green tiger prawns, Penaeus semisulcatus, from Kuwait waters

  1. Aquifer characteristics and water quality of Miocene–Pleistocene sediments, Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. M. Al-Ruwaih; H. A. Qabazard

    2005-01-01

    Al-Atraf is one of the water well fields of Kuwait supplying Kuwait City with the brackish groundwater obtained from the Kuwait Group aquifer of Miocene–Pleistocene age. The study determined the hydrogeological and hydrochemical characteristics of the groundwater in order to identify the major chemical processes that influence the groundwater quality of the study area. The results of the aquifer test

  2. Characterizing surface temperature and clarity of Kuwait's seawaters using remotely sensed measurements and GIS analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad M. M. Alsahli

    2009-01-01

    Kuwait sea surface temperature (SST) and water clarity are important water characteristics that influence the entire Kuwait coastal ecosystem. The spatial and temporal distributions of these important water characteristics should be well understood to obtain a better knowledge about this productive coastal environment. The aim of this project was therefore to study the spatial and temporal distributions of: Kuwait SST

  3. User's Satisfaction of Kuwait E-Government Portal; Organization of Information in Particular

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    User's Satisfaction of Kuwait E-Government Portal; Organization of Information in Particular Huda that was developed to evaluate Kuwait e-government user's satisfaction while seeking information via Kuwait e-government indicated that the suggested factors predict the overall user satisfaction. Keywords: User's satisfaction, e-government

  4. GIS assessment of large CSP plant in Duqum, Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yassine Charabi; Adel Gastli

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses solar power prospects in Wilayat Duqum in Oman. First, the geographic and topographic information about the selected region is presented. The methodology of producing solar radiation map for Duqum using GIS tools is then presented. The results obtained show very high potential of solar radiation over Wilayat Duqum during the whole year. A slope analysis has allowed

  5. FIRST REPORT OF PUCCINIA SORGHI ON MAIZE IN OMAN.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is an important annual forage crop cultivated in the Sultanate of Oman during the summer months. It is used both for green fodder and grains and often intercropped in fruit orchards especially under date palms. In April 2005, leaf samples showing rust symptoms were collected fro...

  6. The early cretaceous evolution of carbonate platforms from northern Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Masse; J. Borgomano; S. Al. Maskiry

    1993-01-01

    In northern Oman (Jebel Akhdar and foothills) Hauterivian to early Aptian shallow carbonate platforms are widely extending and pass laterally to slope and basin environments in the Nakhl zone. Progradational geometries are identified in that zone where significant correlation between thickness and sediment types supports a prominent tectonic control. The platform records four main sedimentary breaks (drowning events). Early Barremian

  7. Water-resource facilities and management strategy for Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Al-Ismaily; D. Probert

    1998-01-01

    Catastrophic floods and prolonged periods of drought are the main ‘water’ challenges facing Oman. So the inhabitants have had to resort to ingenious ways of utilising the available-water resources, such as through building falaj systems and the optimal selection of suitable crops, but nevertheless when exposed to extremely-dry weather conditions, temporary and even permanent migration is still the only option

  8. Autosomal recessive disorders among Arabs: an overview from Kuwait.

    PubMed Central

    Teebi, A S

    1994-01-01

    Kuwait has a cosmopolitan population of 1.7 million, mostly Arabs. This population is a mosaic of large and small minorities representing most Arab communities. In general, Kuwait's population is characterized by a rapid rate of growth, large family size, high rates of consanguineous marriages within the Arab communities with low frequency of intermarriage between them, and the presence of genetic isolates and semi-isolates in some extended families and Bedouin tribes. Genetic services have been available in Kuwait for over a decade. During this time it has become clear that Arabs have a high frequency of genetic disorders, and in particular autosomal recessive traits. Their pattern is unique and some disorders are relatively common. Examples are Bardet-Biedl and Meckel syndromes, phenylketonuria, and familial Mediterranean fever. A relatively large number of new syndromes and variants have been delineated in Kuwait's population, many being the result of homozygosity for autosomal recessive genes that occurred because of inbreeding. Some of these syndromes have subsequently been found in other parts of the world, negating the concept of the private syndrome. This paper provides an overview of autosomal recessive disorders among the Arabs in Kuwait from a personal perspective and published studies, and highlights the need for genetic services in Arab countries with the goal of prevention and treatment of genetic disorders. PMID:8014972

  9. Fi in Gulf Pidgin Arabic

    E-print Network

    Potsdam, Eric; Alanazi, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    GPA because COP person come ‘Because there is someone coming.’ (Bakir 2010:215, (19c)) c. fi aqlam baqala GPA COP pen.PL grocery ‘There are pens in the grocery.’ Smart 1990 is the first discussion...: Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, and nearby areas (Lewis, Simons, Fennig 2013). Smart 1990, Næss 2008, and Bakir 2010 further discuss the sociolinguistic situation of GPA. The syntax of GPA has been little studied in the linguistic...

  10. A Center for Mideast Oceanographic Data in Muscat, Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingle, S.; Belabbassi, L.; Du Vall, K.; Wang, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Lighthouse designed and installed a real-time cabled ocean observing system off the northern coast of the Sultanate of Oman in 2005 and a second system, farther to the south, existed as autonomous moorings from 2005-2009 and was upgraded to a real-time cabled system in early 2010. Since 2005 Lighthouse has operated and maintained those systems to produce a wealth of data on a poorly understood region of the global oceans. The systems record data hourly on current velocities over a range of depths, and temperature, pressure, conductivity, dissolved oxygen and turbidity at the depth of the sensor; the northern system also collects seismic and bottom pressure (tsunami detection) information continuously. Processing codes for all data have been developed and honed over the years in cooperation with oceanographers from Texas A&M University. As a joint and complementary effort, ocean circulation and tsunami impact models have been developed for the regional waters near Oman. In Oman, our work is coordinated through the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth. From the beginning, Lighthouse has intended to transition data processing and analysis over to the Sultanate. To facilitate this transition, we propose to establish a Center for Mideast Oceanographic Data located in Muscat, Oman that may also serve as a regional oceanographic data depository and research center. Main activities to be carried out include: marine data processing and management, training of Omani professionals in data processing and analysis, facilitating regional and international collaboration by hosting workshops or short courses, and employing the models for research purposes. The center would work with the newly-established Hazard Monitoring Center to develop modeled now- and forecast products for marine operations and safety. The goal is to house, in a single location, datasets and models that will help Oman manage and maintain its marine environment and resources for generations to come.

  11. Impact of Kuwait`s oil-fire smoke cloud on the sky of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect

    Alnaser, W.E. [Univ. of Bahrain (Bahrain)] [Univ. of Bahrain (Bahrain)

    1995-06-01

    The effects of the Kuwaiti oil well fires of 1991 on the atmospheric parameters of Bahrain (approximately 600 km southeast of Kuwait) were observed. Solar radiation, optical thickness, ultraviolet radiation, horizontal visibility, temperature, and solar spectral distribution were measured for 1991 and compared to the long-term values of 1985-1990. The relative monthly solar radiation in Bahrain was reduced by 8% (February) when 50 oil wells were burning and reduced further to 20% when 470 oil wells were on fire (April-July). In November 1991, when there were 12 oil wells burning, the recorded solar radiation became nearly equal to the long-term average. The monthly average daily optical thickness, {tau}, for the direct or beam solar radiation was calculated. The values of {tau} were found to be larger in 1991 than the average for the years 1985-1990 by nearly 58% during June and returned to normal in October (after nearly all the oil well fires were extinguished). The clear and smoked sky solar spectra distribution were detected before and during the burning of the Kuwait oil wells. Large absorption of the solar radiation was noticed on the 2nd and 3rd of March, 1991. The daily average infrared radiation during 1990 was found to be 6700.4 Whm{sup -2} and shifted to 9182.1 Whm{sup -2} in 1991. Comparison was also made between 1990 and 1991 data of the global solar radiation and the temperature. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Stratigraphic and regional distribution of fractures in Barremian–Aptian carbonate rocks of Eastern Oman: outcrop data and their extrapolation to Interior Oman hydrocarbon reservoirs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Bertotti; A. Immenhauser; J. K. J. Taal-van Koppen

    2005-01-01

    The carbonates of the Barremian to Aptian Qishn Formation are outcrop equivalents to major hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Middle East and in Oman specifically. The rocks are exposed in the Haushi–Huqf area of eastern Oman where they are affected by pervasive jointing and localized folding and faulting. Information gathered in the Huqf outcrops can be used to formulate predictions on

  13. Radon concentrations in elementary schools in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Maged, A F

    2006-03-01

    Measurements of indoor radon concentrations were performed in 25 classrooms in the capital city of Kuwait from September 2003 to March 2004 using track etch detectors. The investigation was focused on area, ventilation, windows, air conditioners, fans, and floor number. All the schools have nearly the same design. Mean indoor radon concentration was higher for case subjects (classrooms) than for control subjects (locations in inert gas, p < 0.001). The mean alpha dose equivalent rate for case subjects, 0.97 +/- 0.25 mSv y, was higher than the radiation dose equivalent rate value of control subjects, 0.43 +/- 0.11 mSv y. The average radon concentrations were found to be 16 +/- 4 Bq m for the first floor and 19 +/- 4.8 Bq m for the second floor after subtraction of the control. These values lead to average effective dose equivalent rates of 0.40 +/- 0.10 and 0.48 +/- 0.12 mSv y, respectively. The equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny was found to be 0.6 +/- 0.2. PMID:16505623

  14. Radar Image, Color as Height , Salalah, Oman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This radar image includes the city of Salalah, the second largest city in Oman. It illustrates how topography determines local climate and, in turn, where people live. This area on the southern coast of the Arabian Peninsula is characterized by a narrow coastal plain (bottom) facing southward into the Arabian Sea, backed by the steep escarpment of the Qara Mountains. The backslope of the Qara Mountains slopes gently into the vast desert of the Empty Quarter (at top). This area is subject to strong monsoonal storms from the Arabian Sea during the summer, when the mountains are enveloped in a sort of perpetual fog. The moisture from the monsoon enables agriculture on the Salalah plain, and also provides moisture for Frankincense trees growing on the desert (north) side of the mountains. In ancient times, incense derived from the sap of the Frankincense tree was the basis for an extremely lucrative trade. Radar and topographic data are used by historians and archaeologists to discover ancient trade routes and other significant ruins.

    This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to brown at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1070 meters (3500 feet) of total relief. White speckles on the face of some of the mountains are holes in the data caused by steep terrain. These will be filled using coverage from an intersecting pass.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

    Size: 56 by 50 kilometers (35 by 32 miles) Location: 17 deg. North lat., 54 deg. East lon. Orientation: North at top Date Acquired: February 15, 2000

  15. Ground level concentration of sulfur dioxide at Kuwait`s major population centers during the oil-field fires

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ajmi, D.N.; Marmoush, Y.R. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)] [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (Kuwait)

    1996-08-01

    During the Iraqi occupation, Kuwait`s oil wells were ignited. the fires were damaging to the country`s oil resources and air quality. The impact of the oil-field fires on the air quality was studied to determine the level of exposure to pollutants in major population centers. The period of July-September 1991 was selected for examination. A mathematical model was used to compute the ground-level concentration isopleths. The results of these computations are supported by significant concentrations measured and reported by the Environmental Protection Council, Kuwait. The ground-level concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the major population centers, whether measure or estimated, were less than the ambient standards of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s air pollution index. The dispersive characteristics were classified according to wind conditions. The results of this assessment provide historical data on Kuwait`s oil fires and may be useful in assessing risks resulting from this catastrophe. 6 refs., 10 fig., 2 tab.

  16. Modelling of air pollution impacts from power stations in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ajmi, D.N.; Abdal, Y. (Kuwait Inst. of Scientific Research (Kuwait))

    1987-01-01

    Kuwait is undergoing rapid development with fast growth of both urban and industrial areas. The environmental impact of such activities is already noticeable. Conditions are therefore favorable for the use of air pollution models to supply adequate tools for effective air quality management in Kuwait. The Industrial Source Complex Long Term (ISCLT) dispersion model was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in response to the need for comprehensive analytical techniques that can be used to evaluate the air quality impact of emissions from industrial sources. This model was used to predict the air quality impact of SO{sub 2} emissions from the Doha East and West Power Stations in Kuwait. The meteorological and emissions data and the seasonal and annual SO{sub 2} concentrations emitted from the power stations are described.

  17. Industrialization of housing construction adapting building technology to Kuwait environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ezz Al Din, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    A major study of the industrialization of housing construction was conducted by Kuwait University, Department of Civil Engineering in conjunction with Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, to compare and contrast limited and average income group housing. Data from this study permit a preliminary assessment of the impact of the building technology change and other aspects on construction costs. A case study and identification of the designers and users' point of view concerning the sorts of issues addressed in the paper is followed by an evaluation and a concept for public and private space. The findings of the study are then presented and considered, also their meaning and significance for Kuwait as well as for other developing countries, are assessed. Concluding remarks and recommendations complete the paper.

  18. McDonaldization, Islamic teachings, and funerary practices in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on George Ritzer's sociological concept of McDonaldization, this article explores the transformation of burial practices in Kuwait. It is argued that traditional, religious, and private ways of dealing with death have been modernized using the fast-food model of McDonald's. This article examines Islamic teachings on burial and how that model has been applied to the traditional Muslim funerary services, including cemetery management, grave excavation, funeral prayers, burial, and condolences, to make them more efficient vis-a-vis more profitable. Based on personal observations and random interviews, the study finds that the state bureaucracy in Kuwait has made burial rituals more efficient, standardized, calculable, and controlled. Furthermore, several associated irrationalities are also considered. Findings suggest that some individuals may not be happy with these changes but there is no popular resistance to McDonaldization of the burial practices, probably due to the authoritarian and welfare nature of the State of Kuwait. PMID:21748923

  19. Aflatoxin contamination in edible nuts imported in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. W Abdulkadar; Abdulla Al-Ali; Jassim Al-Jedah

    2000-01-01

    Edible nuts imported in Qatar from June 1997 to December 1998 were anlaysed for aflatoxins. Eighty-one nut samples were analysed in the second half of 1997 and contamination was detected in 19 samples with total aflatoxin level varied from a low of about 0.53 to a high of 289 ?g\\/kg. Aflatoxin contamination was detected in pistachios and peanuts, while other

  20. Fracture-related diagenesis in the carbonate carapace of a salt dome, Jebel Madar, Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahr, J.; John, C. M.; Cosgrove, J. W.; Vandeginste, V.; Sena, C. N.; Jourdan, A.

    2010-12-01

    This study is being carried out in the Qatar Carbonates and Carbon Storage Research Centre (QCCSRC) at Imperial College and focuses on the interplay between fractures, diagenetic fluid flow and precipitation of diagenetic minerals in an exposed carbonate carapace of a salt dome in Oman. Understanding fault-related mineralization and the differences between diagenesis in the fractures and fracture walls compared to diagenesis in the rock matrix will help prediction of the reservoir quality of such fractured carapaces in the subsurface. The research questions addressed here are a) what controls the timing, distribution and geometry of fractures in the carapace of a salt dome? b) what controls the timing of the precipitation of minerals in the fracture network? To answer these questions, a dual approach combining structural geology with carbonate diagenesis is being applied. The origin of the fluids and their role in fracturing and diagenesis is being investigated by means of geochemistry and petrography and the processes of fracturing, fluid flow and the migration of fluids along pathways will be determined by reconstructing the structural history by a combination of field mapping and seismic interpretation. This dual approach is powerful and can be used to determine the history of fluid flow. Ultimately, the aim is to develop conceptual models linking fracturation and fluid flow during halokinesis with diagenesis. Jebel Madar is situated in the southern foothills of the Oman Mountains and is a folded and fractured salt dome carapace comprising Jurassic and Cretaceous limestones. The structural history of the Jebel is currently being reconstructed using fracture analysis of structural data gathered during fieldwork. This will be augmented with the interpretation of seismic profiles. Initial results indicate that the dominant fracture orientations are ~ N-S and NE-SW. Using the cross-cutting relationships of the fractures an attempt is being made to establish their chronology. To understand the diagenetic history of the fracture infill, several techniques are being used including petrography, major and trace elemental analysis, fluid inclusion, and stable oxygen and carbon isotope analysis. An important observation made in the fractures of the Jebel Madar is that several generations of calcite cements exist, with crystals ranging in size from several cm in the centre of the fracture to compact, mm- sized crystals close to the host rock. In addition, in some fractures barite and calcite have been co-precipitated, an observation which, with the aid of fluid inclusion studies, could yield the composition and possible origin of the parent diagenetic fluids. The presence of minerals in fractures indicates that these latter acted as fluid pathways. Initial stable isotope results suggest that the precipitating fluids were hot, with average values of ? 18O of -9.74 ‰ PDB and ? 13C of 1.19 ‰ PDB. Initial results indicate that the regional stress stimulated the local development of salt diapirs which produced local stress fields that totally dominated the timing and pattern of fracturing and fluid migration.

  1. Proceedings of the EMNLP 2014 Workshop on Arabic Natural Langauge Processing (ANLP), pages 8792, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    .thunderstorme@gmail.com mrashwan@rdi-eg.com Hazem Raafat Mohamed A. Zahran Computer Science Department, Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait Computer Engineering Department, Cairo University, Egypt hazem@cs.ku.edu.kw moh

  2. Proceedings of the EMNLP 2014 Workshop on Arabic Natural Langauge Processing (ANLP), pages 3947, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ­47, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics The First QALB Shared Task , Ossama Obeid1 1 Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar 2 Center for Computational Learning Systems, Columbia.habash@nyu.edu wajdiz@qatar.cmu.edu,owo@qatar.cmu.edu Abstract We present a summary of the first shared task

  3. This book is dedicated to the people of Qatar His Highness

    E-print Network

    Saltzman, Wendy

    · Auditory treatment · Organs regeneration · Venom and tissues for drugs · Lizard usage as traditional support to the publication and aims of this book,The Lizards Living in Qatar First edition, Published, Saifelnasr EOH,Al-Yafei M,Alkuwari AJ,Al-Hemaidi AAM.The lizards living in Qatar. Eds Al-Hemaidi AAM

  4. Education for a New Era: Design and Implementation of K-12 Education Reform in Qatar. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Dominic J.; Augustine, Catherine H.; Zellman, Gail L.; Ryan, Gery; Goldman, Charles A.; Stasz, Cathleen; Constant, Louay

    2007-01-01

    The leadership of Qatar has a social and political vision that calls for improving the outcomes of the Qatari K-12 education system. With this vision in mind, the leadership asked RAND to examine Qatar's K-12 education system, to recommend options for building a world-class system, and, subsequently, to develop the chosen option and support its…

  5. Teacher Perceptions of Professional Development in the Context of National Educational Reform: The Case of Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasser, Ramzi; Romanowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In light of nationally mandated educational changes in Qatar, this study investigates in-service teachers' perceptions of professional development (PD). The aims are to identify challenges facing teachers' PD. The respondents were 40 in-service teachers from two schools in Doha, Qatar, who had received PD connected with national educational…

  6. The nutritional importance to local communities of fish caught off the coast of Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Al-Jedah; M. Z. Ali; R. K. Robinson

    1999-01-01

    This article focuses on the consumption of fish in Qatar and its health benefits for those living in the region. The nutritional value of fish from traditional fishing areas such as the UK has been much discussed but this article addresses the value of fish from warmer regions. Samples of popular fish were purchased from the local market in Qatar

  7. Small Steps Lead to Quality Assurance and Enhancement in Qatar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Attiyah, Asma; Khalifa, Batoul

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of Qatar University's history since it was started in 1973. Its primary focus is on the various small, but important, steps taken by the University to address the needs of quality assurance and enhancement. The Qatar University Reform Plan is described in detail. Its aims are to continually improve the quality…

  8. The Migrant Effect: An Evaluation of Native Academic Performance in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheema, Jehanzeb R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent data have suggested that despite massive outlays on educational reform Qatar consistently ranks as one of the least academically proficient countries in key areas of literacy. Of the seventy-four countries that participated in PISA 2009 Qatar ranked between sixty-seven and sixty-nine in mathematics, reading and science literacy. Although…

  9. Implementation of the K-12 Education Reform in Qatar's Schools. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellman, Gail L.; Ryan Gery W.; Karam, Rita; Constant, Louay; Salem, Hanine; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Orr, Nate; Goldman, Charles A.; Al-Thani, Hessa; Al-Obaidli, Kholode

    2009-01-01

    The leadership of Qatar is greatly invested in its K-12 education reform, "Education for a New Era," because it views education as the key to the nation's economic and social progress. This study, one of a number of RAND studies that trace and document the reform process in Qatar, was designed to assess progress made in the first years of the K-12…

  10. Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field

    E-print Network

    Miller, Nathan

    2010-07-14

    , and North Field in Qatar. The main focus of this thesis is to evaluate condensate blockage problems in the North Field, Qatar, and then propose solutions to increase well productivity in these gas condensate wells. The first step of the study involved...

  11. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed. 4 figures, 9 tables.

  12. Fate and control of blistering chemical warfare agents in Kuwait`s desalination industry

    SciTech Connect

    Khordagui, H.K. [United Nations Economic and Social Commission for West Asia, Amman (Jordan)

    1997-01-01

    Kuwait, as most of the other states located along the Western shores of the Arabian Gulf, relies upon the Gulf as its main drinking water resource via desalination. In case of seawater contamination with blistering chemical warfare agents, traces of the agents and/or degradation products in the finished water might pose a serious health hazard. The objective of the present review is to study the potential contamination, transport, fate, effect and control of blistering chemical warfare agents (CWAs), in the Kuwaiti desalination industry. In general, all the environmental factors involved in the aquatic degradation of CWAs in Kuwait marine environment except for the high salinity in case of blistering agents such as sulphur mustard, and in favor of a fast degradation process. In case of massive releases of CWAs near the Kuwaiti shorelines, turbulence resulting from tidal cycles and high temperature will affect the dissolution process and extend the toxicity of the insoluble agent. Post- and pre-chlorination during the course of seawater desalination will catalyze and significantly accelerate the hydrolysis processes of the CWAs. The heat exerted on CWAs during the power generation-desalination processes is not expected to thermally decompose them. However, the steam heat will augment the agent`s rate of hydrolysis with subsequent acceleration in their rate of detoxification. Conventional pretreatment of feed seawater for reverse-osmosis desalination is theoretically capable of reducing the concentration of CWAs by coprecipitation and adsorption on flocs formed during coagulation. Prechlorination and prolonged detention in time in pretreatment units will simultaneously promote hydrolysis reactions. 50 refs.

  13. Permian age from radiolarites of the Hawasina nappes, Oman Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Wever, P.D. (Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (France)); Grissac C.B. (Bureau de Recherche Geologique et Miniere, Orleans, (France)); Bechennec, F. (Bureau de recherche Geologique et Miniere, Nantes (France))

    1988-10-01

    The Hawasina napper of the Oman Mountains yielded Permian radiolarians from cherts stratigraphically overlying a thick volcanic basement (Al Jil Formation) at the base of the Hamrat Duru Group. This fauna represents the first Permian radiolarians and radiolarites in the central and western Tethyan realm. A Permain age for pelagic sequences within the Hawasina Complex of Oman has major significance for regional paleogeographic reconstruction. A clear differentiation between platform (reefal sediments) and basin (radiolarites) from the base of the Late Permian (255 Ma) is implied. It suggests a flexure of the platform during Permian time; the present data implies that a zone of rifting was already developed adjacent to the northeast Gondwana platform margin during the Late Permian. The Hamrat Duru Basin corresponds to an opening intracontinental rift area (sphenochasm) between Arabia and northeast Gondwana, a reentrant of the paleo-Tethys.

  14. Refining Procedures: A Needs Analysis Project at Kuwait University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basturkmen, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the procedures followed in the needs analysis (NA) project carried out in 1996 at the College of Petroleum and Engineering at Kuwait University. Focuses on the steps taken in the project and the rationale behind them. Offers an illustration of an NA project and to show the procedural steps involved. (Author/VWL)

  15. Secondary Education Programs in Kuwait: An Evaluation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eid, Ghada K.; Koushki, Parviz A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the semester and the credit programs of high school education in Kuwait in terms of their graduating students' preparedness for continued and successful academic performance in programs of higher education. Students' percentile graduation rank from high school and their performances in the English, math…

  16. Evaluation of Section Heads' Performance at Kuwait Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hamdan, Jasem M.; Al-Yacoub, Ali M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The study attempts to examine the viewpoints of those involved in evaluating the performance of section heads in Kuwait secondary schools; mainly section heads themselves, supervisors and principals. It sets out to determine the strength and weaknesses in the performance evaluation form designed for section heads.…

  17. Airborne Studies of the Smoke From the Kuwait Oil Fires

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter V. Hobbs; Lawrence F. Radke

    1992-01-01

    Airborne studies of smoke from the Kuwait oil fires were carried out in the spring of 1991 when ~4.6 million barrels of oil were burning per day. Emissions of sulfur dioxide were ~57% of that from electric utilities in the United States; emissions of carbon dioxide were ~2% of global emissions; emissions of soot were ~3400 metric tons per day.

  18. The Efficiency of Public Schools: The Case of Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, Nadeem A.; Johnes, Jill; Al-Enezi, Mohammed; Al-Musallam, Marwa

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the technical, and allocative efficiencies of public schools in Kuwait over four levels of schooling (kindergartens, primary, intermediate and secondary) and two periods (1999/2000 and 2004/2005) using data envelopment analysis. Mean pure technical efficiency varies between 0.695 and 0.852 across all levels of education;…

  19. Investigating Students' Beliefs about Arabic Language Programs at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shaye, Shaye S.

    2009-01-01

    The current study attempted to identify students' of Arabic programs beliefs about their chosen programs. To achieve this purpose, a survey was developed to collect the data from randomly selected students in liberal-arts and education-based programs at Kuwait University. The results showed that students were statistically differentiated as a…

  20. Oxidation states of uranium in depleted uranium particles from Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Salbu; K. Janssens; O. C. Lind; K. Proost; L. Gijsels; P. R. Danesi

    2004-01-01

    The oxidation states of uranium in depleted uranium (DU) particles were determined by synchrotron radiation based ?-XANES, applied to individual particles isolated from selected samples collected at different sites in Kuwait. Based on scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalysis prior to ?-XANES, DU particles ranging from submicrons to several hundred micrometers were observed. The median particle size depended on sources

  1. Environmental effects from burning oil wells in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Browning; R. J. Allam; S. P. Ballard; R. T. H. Barnes; D. A. Bennetts; R. H. Maryon; P. J. Mason; D. McKenna; J. F. B. Mitchell; C. A. Senior; A. Slingo; F. B. Smith

    1991-01-01

    Model calculations, constrained by satellite observations, indicate that most of the smoke from the oil fires in Kuwait will remain in the lowest few kilometres of the troposphere. Beneath the plume there is a severe reduction in daylight, and a day-time temperature drop of ~10 °C within ~200 km of the source. Episodic events of acid rain and photochemical smog

  2. Deformities in silver pomfret Pampus argenteus caught from Kuwait waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almatar, Sulaiman; Chen, Weizhong

    2010-11-01

    During sampling for spawning stock of the silver pomfret, Pampus argenteus in Kuwait waters, a few seriously deformed individuals were captured. These individuals had been attacked and wounded, but had healed and survived. The fish body deformities are believed to be caused by predation attempts on silver pomfret by predators such as sharks, groupers, and croakers.

  3. 77 FR 33439 - Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ...the sector. As an active importing and exporting country with a trade volume reaching...cutting-edge technologies will have an advantage in these export opportunities. Kuwait...Delegation members will be able to take advantage of Embassy rates for hotel...

  4. The Lost Kuwait Initiative: The Failure Has Come from Within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2011-01-01

    A conference titled "Preparing Special Education Teachers in Mild/Moderate Disabilities: Programs, Models, and Exemplary Field Experiences" was organized by College of Education at Kuwait University between April 11-13, 2010. This conference was intended to lead to a better teacher preparation program in the region in the area of mild and moderate…

  5. Some problems and the importance of reptile biodiversity in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Meakins; S. Y. Al-Mohanna

    2003-01-01

    The snakes and marine turtles of Kuwait are discussed with reference to unreported varieties and to their conservation. The needs to conserve and carry out research into the breeding, migration and varieties of marine turtles of the Arabian Gulf is emphasized due to their endangered status and their greatly reduced nesting grounds. The study of local populations, their breeding sites,

  6. Shore litter along sandy beaches of the Gulf of Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michel R. Claereboudt

    2004-01-01

    Beach debris abundance and weight were estimated from surveys on 11 beaches of the Gulf of Oman along the Omani coast. Debris were collected on two occasions from 100 m transects, sorted and categorized by origin and type. Overall contaminations ranged from 0.43 to 6.01 items m?1 of beach front on different beaches with a mean value of 1.79±1.04 gm?1

  7. Development of blood transfusion service in Sultanate of Oman

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sanmukh R.; Shah Al-Bulushi, Shahnaz N.; Ashraf, Thamina

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sultanate of Oman is geographically situated in south-west of Asia, having common borders on western side by the land with United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Yemen and with the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Oman in the east and the north respectively. The country enjoys one of the best health care facilities including blood transfusion services in the region. Study design: Information was collected through informal personal interviews, digging out the past records, and the report presentations at various forums. Results: A modest start by providing blood units through import, the country is now self-reliant on procuring blood units from voluntary non-remunerate blood donors within the sultanate. A steady growth of blood banks is witnessed in every aspect of blood banking including blood collection, blood processing and supply. Various modalities are adapted in promoting voluntary blood donation programme. Conclusion: Sultanate of Oman has created one of the best blood transfusion services in the region in providing safe blood for transfusion through voluntary donation, a use of blood components and irradiating blood products. PMID:20376265

  8. 75 FR 13421 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; FAR Case 2008-036, Trade Agreements-Costa Rica, Oman, and Peru

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ...2008-036, Trade Agreements--Costa Rica, Oman, and Peru AGENCIES: Department...Free Trade Agreement with respect to Costa Rica, the United States-Oman Free Trade...interim rule. The interim rule added Costa Rica, Oman, and Peru to the...

  9. Running Header and front cover: "Post-obduction evolution of Oman" Late Cretaceous to Paleogene Post-obduction extension

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) obduction of the Samail Ophiolite in northern Oman (Figure 2a); (2) #12;obduction of the Masirah Ophiolite Lepvrier, Philippe Razin and Laurent Jolivet ABSTRACT After the obduction of the Samail ophiolitic nappe-nappe sedimentary succession. TECTONIC SETTING OF THE OMAN MOUNTAINS In north Oman, the Samail Ophiolite associated

  10. Qatar biomedical and cancer publications in PubMed between 2000 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A.; Taha, Fatma Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this work was to analyse the past trends of biomedical and cancer publications from Qatar listed on PubMed for the years 2000–2012. These findings were then compared with the corresponding global number of publications. Methods: PubMed was searched for cancer publications, clinical trials, publications on humans or other species. Searching for “Qatar*” in the “Affiliation” field yielded the lowest number of publications; searching for “Qatar*” in the “Affiliation” or in “Title/Abstract” yielded a moderate number of results and searching for “Qatar*” in the “Affiliation” or “Title/Abstract” or “Text Word” fields yielded the highest number of publications. The annual percentage change (APC) from one year to the next was calculated for the population and each type of publication. Information on the population of Qatar was gathered from the website of Qatar Statistics Authority to determine the correlation of papers published per 1000 population. Results: The number of publications retrieved from PubMed was not particularly different for each variation of search carried out. However, the most representative number of publications was retrieved upon searching for “Qatar*” in the “Affiliation” or in “Title/Abstract” fields. Between the years 2000 and 2012, the total number of biomedical publications from Qatar increased 24 times with an average APC of 33.4%, which was found to be more than the APC of the population in Qatar which averaged at 9%. The number of biomedical publications per 1000 population increased from 0.02 in 2000 to 0.15% in 2012. Most publications retrieved were humans studies and occasionally were for other animal species. Cancer publications in Qatar represented 16.9% of the total publications and the number of cancer publications per 1000 population increased from 0% in 2000 to 0.02% in 2012. Publications classified as clinical trials represented 4.6% of Qatar biomedical publications. Publication of cancer clinical trials were very rare (0.4%). Conclusions: Despite the obvious increase in Qatar biomedical and cancer publications in PubMed, the absolute numbers were relatively small. While strategies are in place, leaders of Qatar biomedical research need to consider increasing cancer research and clinical trials to meet the country's needs. Linking research output to researchers, research facilities and research funding is needed. PMID:25320690

  11. Solar water heating initiative in Oman energy saving and carbon credits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adel Gastli; Yassine Charabi

    2011-01-01

    By the virtue of its position astride the tropic of cancer, Oman has an important potential of solar energy. Despite these important resources the uses of this renewable energy was limited to few and simple utilization as public lighting or park meter. Recently, the renewable energy sector in Oman is considered as a national priority to supply the future energy

  12. Mobile phone users attitude towards Mobile Commerce (m-commerce) and Mobile Services in Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naser-Nick Manochehri; Y. AlHinai

    2006-01-01

    As the number of mobile phone users is growing, purchasing products and services using mobile phones and other mobile devices are also increasing. The purpose of this study was to provide the status of m-commerce in Oman in term of consumers' attitudes towards mobile commerce and mobile services provided by mobile operators in Oman. The study showed that there is

  13. The prevalence and causes of blindness in the Sultanate of Oman: the Oman Eye Study (OES)

    PubMed Central

    Khandekar, R; Mohammed, A J; Negrel, A D; Al Riyami, A

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To estimate the magnitude and the causes of blindness through a community based nationwide survey in Oman. This was conducted in 1996–7. Methods: A stratified cluster random sampling procedure was used to select 12 400 people. The WHO/PBD standardised survey methodology was used, with suitable adaptation. The major causes of blindness were identified among those found blind. Results: A total of 11 417 people were examined (response rate 91.8%) The prevalence of blindness in the Omani population was estimated to be 1.1% (95% CI 0.9 to 1.3), blindness being defined according to the WHO Tenth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases. Prevalence of blindness was clearly related to increasing age, with estimates of 0.08% for the 0–14 age group, 0.1% for the 15–39 age group, 2.3% for the 40–59 age group, and 16.8% for the group aged 60 +. There was a statistically significant difference between the prevalence in females (1.4%) and males (0.8%). The northern and central regions had a higher prevalence of blindness (1.3% to 3%). The major causes of blindness were unoperated cataract (30.5%), trachomatous corneal opacities (23.7%), and glaucoma (11.5%) Conclusions: Despite an active eye healthcare programme, blindness due to cataract and trachoma remains a public health problem of great concern in several regions of the sultanate. These results highlight the need, when planning effective intervention strategies, to target the eye healthcare programme to the ageing population, with special emphasis on women. PMID:12185115

  14. Characterization of cyclic and acyclic alkanes in Forties and Kuwait petroleum crudes

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.W. (Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Univ. of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (GB)); Pakdel, H. (Dept. de Genie Chimique, Univ. Laval, Cite Univ., Quebec G1K 6P4 (CA)); Bartle, K.D. (School of Chemistry, Univ. of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (GB))

    1990-01-01

    Alkane hydrocarbon fractions from Forties (North Sea) and Kuwait petroleum crudes, separated by distillation, solvent extraction and silicagel column chromatography and sub-fractionated by molecular-sieve adsorption, have been examined by gas chromatography (GC), {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, GC-mass spectrometry (MS) and field desorption (FD)MS. GC indicates that Forties contains rather more acyclic isoprenoids and cyclic alkanes than Kuwait; FDMS of Kuwait shows molecular-weight ranges for mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, and pentacyclic alkanes. {sup 13}C NMR spectra provide evidence of higher aromatic carbon, C{sub A}, in Forties than Kuwait and longer T{sub 1} relaxation times.

  15. Seismic lateral prediction in chalky limestone reservoirs offshore Qatar

    SciTech Connect

    Rubbens, I.B.H.M.; Murat, R.C.; Vankeulen, J.

    1983-03-01

    Following the discovery of non-structurally trapped oil accumulations in Cretaceous chalky reservoirs on the northern flank of the North Dome offshore QATAR, a seismic lateral prediction study was carried out for QATAR GENERAL PETROLEUM CORPORATION (Offshore Operations). The objectives of this study were to assist in the appraisal of these oil accumulations by predicting their possible lateral extent and to investigate if the technique applied could be used as a basis for further exploration of similar oil prospects in the area. Wireline logs of eight wells and some 1000 km of high quality seismic data were processed into acoustic impedance (A.I.) logs and seismic A.I. sections. Having obtained a satisfactory match of the A.I. well logs and the A.I. of the seismic traces at the well locations, relationships were established by the use of well log data which allowed the interpretation of the seismic A.I. in terms of reservoir quality. Measurements of the relevant A.I. characteristics were then carried out by computer along all seismic lines and porosity distribution maps prepared for some of the reservoirs. These maps, combined with detailed seismic depth contour maps at reservoir tops, lead to definition of good reservoir development areas downdip from poor reservoir quality zones i.e. of the stratigraphic trap areas, and drilling locations could thus be proposed. The system remains to be adequately calibrated when core material becomes available in the area of study.

  16. Effects of airborne dust collected from Kuwait on human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, S.M.; Khan, S.A.; Ahmad, S.; Beg, M.U.

    1992-01-01

    Air borne dust as deposited on air conditioner's filter was collected from most polluted regions of Kuwait and for comparison also from Dubai. Kuwait dust samples were found to contain high concentrations of Ni, Mn and Pb and a number of organic compounds different from the oil samples collected from the oil pool in the oil fields. Toxicity evaluation against human erythrocytes showed strong hemolytic nature of the dust. Treatment of erythrocytes with the dust exhibited peroxidative damage of the membrane. The dust collected from Dubai was innocuous. The present data suggest that erythrocyte damaging potential of the dust can be used as a marker of toxicity and provide information about the dissipation of toxic factors from airborne dust with time. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Allied health manpower in Kuwait: issues and answers.

    PubMed

    Shah, M A; Shah, N M; Yunis, M K

    1990-01-01

    This article focuses on the salient issues and problems regarding allied health manpower in Kuwait, an oil-rich Gulf country. The health system in Kuwait has expanded very rapidly since the country's independence 29 years ago. A major feature of the health system is its heavy reliance on expatriate workers, constituting 80% of all doctors and over 90% of all nurses. Local training facilities have started producing some of the required allied health professionals. Continued shortages of indigenous allied health professionals are, however, inevitable in most areas. The presence of a highly diverse expatriate workforce raises serious problems, concerning worker conflict, differential skills and competencies, and adjustment to the Kuwaiti culture. Standardizing local training facilities, curricular expansion to accommodate emerging health concepts, and improving the system of hiring expatriates are needed. PMID:2365633

  18. Pharmaceutical care education in Kuwait: pharmacy students’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Katoue, Maram G.; Awad, Abdelmoneim I.; Schwinghammer, Terry L.; Kombian, Samuel B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical care is defined as the responsible provision of medication therapy to achieve definite outcomes that improve patients’ quality of life. Pharmacy education should equip students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to practise pharmaceutical care competently. Objective To investigate pharmacy students’ attitudes towards pharmaceutical care, perceptions of their preparedness to perform pharmaceutical care competencies, opinions about the importance of the various pharmaceutical care activities, and the barriers to its implementation in Kuwait. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of pharmacy students (n=126) was conducted at Faculty of Pharmacy, Kuwait University. Data were collected via a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics including percentages, medians and means Likert scale rating (SD) were calculated and compared using SPSS, version 19. Statistical significance was accepted at a p value of 0.05 or lower. Results The response rate was 99.2%. Pharmacy students expressed overall positive attitudes towards pharmaceutical care. They felt prepared to implement the various aspects of pharmaceutical care, with the least preparedness in the administrative/management aspects. Perceived pharmaceutical care competencies grew as students progressed through the curriculum. The students also appreciated the importance of the various pharmaceutical care competencies. They agreed/strongly agreed that the major barriers to the integration of pharmaceutical care into practice were lack of private counseling areas or inappropriate pharmacy layout (95.2%), lack of pharmacist time (83.3%), organizational obstacles (82.6%), and pharmacists’ physical separation from patient care areas (82.6%). Conclusion Pharmacy students’ attitudes and perceived preparedness can serve as needs assessment tools to guide curricular change and improvement. Student pharmacists at Kuwait University understand and advocate implementation of pharmaceutical care while also recognizing the barriers to its widespread adoption. The education and training provided at Kuwait University Faculty of Pharmacy is designed to develop students to be the change agents who can advance pharmacist-provided direct patient care. PMID:25243027

  19. Energy Conservation Program in Kuwait: A Local Perspective

    E-print Network

    Hajiah, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    the fuel consumption at the power plants and will indeed result in less emission of Carbon Dioxide and better environment. Key words: energy efficiency, air-conditioning, control strategies, thermal storage, greenhouse gas emission. 1... of day control of the cooling system) and energy efficient technologies (use of ice storage system) resulted from case studies and research work done at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. The savings in energy use and production will reduce...

  20. Violence against nurses in healthcare facilities in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salim M Adib; Ahmad K Al-Shatti; Shadia Kamal; Najwa El-Gerges; Mariam Al-Raqem

    2002-01-01

    A national cross-sectional survey was conducted to document the prevalence and determinants of violence against nurses in healthcare facilities in Kuwait. It involved all nurses employed in all types of health-related facilities and available in the country in May 1999. The questionnaire was completed by 5876 nurses (85% females, 88% non-Kuwaitis). Verbal violence had been experienced in the 6 previous

  1. Potential wind power generation in the State of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Al-Nassar; S. Alhajraf; A. Al-Enizi; L. Al-Awadhi

    2005-01-01

    The wind characteristics of six locations in the State of Kuwait have been assessed. The annual average wind speed for the considered sites ranged from 3.7 to 5.5m\\/s and a mean wind power density from 80 to 167W\\/m2 at standard height of 10m. The Weibull parameters and power density of each station have been determined using Weibull distribution. The wind

  2. Paediatric burns in Kuwait: Incidence, causes and mortality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Prem N. Sharma; Rameshwar L. Bang; Ahmad N. Al-Fadhli; Promila Sharma; Sarla Bang; Ibrahim E. Ghoneim

    2006-01-01

    From a prospective study on burn patients admitted at the Burn Center in Kuwait during 1993–2001, 826 paediatric burn cases, in 0–14 years age group, were retrieved to study incidence, causes, and mortality among children. The demographic characteristics, clinical features, and outcome constituted our data file in Statistical Software, SPSS. Overall incidence rate was 17.5\\/100,000 children aged 0–14 years, being

  3. Living Arrangements of Older Women and Men in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nasra M. Shah; Kathryn M. Yount; Makhdoom A. Shah; Indu Menon

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this article are toanalyze the correlates of living arrangementsof persons aged 60 or above in the oil-rich,Muslim country of Kuwait and to examine whetheror not patterns of co-residence differ bygender. Data were obtained from a nationallyrepresentative survey of households of Kuwaitinationals, and this paper is based on the 687older Kuwaiti residents of these households.Living arrangements were

  4. Mutations Associated with Beta-Thalassemia intermedia in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adekunle Adekile; Mohammad Haider; Ferdane Kutlar

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To identify the ?-globin gene mutations associated with ?-thalassemia (?-thal) intermedia in Kuwait. Subjects and Methods: Eighteen patients from 13 unrelated families, mean age 12.7 ± 8.1 years, range 4–31 years, were involved in the study. They did not require regular blood transfusion. Complete blood count and cation exchange high-performance liquid chromatography hemoglobin quantitation were carried out using standard

  5. The efficiency of public schools: the case of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadeem A. Burney; Jill Johnes; Mohammed Al-Enezi; Marwa Al-Musallam

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the technical, and allocative efficiencies of public schools in Kuwait over four levels of schooling (kindergartens, primary, intermediate and secondary) and two periods (1999\\/2000 and 2004\\/2005) using data envelopment analysis. Mean pure technical efficiency varies between 0.695 and 0.852 across all levels of education; the majority of schools at kindergarten, primary and intermediate levels are operating at

  6. Performance of autoclaved aerated-concrete masonry walls in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hayfaa A. Al-Mudhaf; Emmanuel K. Attiogbe

    1996-01-01

    The masonry walls used in building construction in Kuwait are non-load bearing. Traditionally, normalweight concrete blocks\\u000a have been used throughout the region. However, with the enforcement of the Kuwaiti energy conservation code, autoclaved aerated-concrete\\u000a blocks were introduced in 1985 as an efficient masonry material that can provide the necessary thermal insulation properties\\u000a without the use of specific thermal insulation materials.

  7. Cost effectiveness of a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Oman

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) is the leading cause of diarrhea in young children in Oman, incurring substantial healthcare and economic burden. We propose to formally assess the potential cost effectiveness of implementing universal vaccination with a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) on reducing the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) in Oman Methods A Markov model was used to compare two birth cohorts, including children who were administered the RV5 vaccination versus those who were not, in a hypothetical group of 65,500 children followed for their first 5 years of life in Oman. The efficacy of the vaccine in reducing RGE-related hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) and office visits, and days of parental work loss for children receiving the vaccine was based on the results of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST). The outcome of interest was cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained from health care system and societal perspectives. Results A universal RV5 vaccination program is projected to reduce, hospitalizations, ED visits, outpatient visits and parental work days lost due to rotavirus infections by 89%, 80%, 67% and 74%, respectively. In the absence of RV5 vaccination, RGE-related societal costs are projected to be 2,023,038 Omani Rial (OMR) (5,259,899 United States dollars [USD]), including 1,338,977 OMR (3,481,340 USD) in direct medical costs. However, with the introduction of RV5, direct medical costs are projected to be 216,646 OMR (563,280 USD). Costs per QALY saved would be 1,140 OMR (2,964 USD) from the health care payer perspective. An RV5 vaccination program would be considered cost saving, from the societal perspective. Conclusions Universal RV5 vaccination in Oman is likely to significantly reduce the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis and may be cost-effective from the payer perspective and cost saving from the societal perspective. PMID:24941946

  8. Epidemiological transition of some diseases in Oman: a situational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, S S; Al-Lawati, A; Al-Shafaee, M A; Duttagupta, K K

    2009-01-01

    During the past 35 years Oman has undergone a rapid socioeconomic and epidemiological transition leading to a steep reduction in child and adult mortality and morbidity due to the decline of various communicable diseases, including vaccine-preventable diseases. Good governance and planning, together with leadership and commitment by the government, has been a critical factor in this reduction. However, with increasing prosperity, lifestyle-related noncommunicable diseases have emerged as new health challenges to the country, with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and obesity in the lead among other chronic conditions. Appropriate prevention strategies for reducing the burden of noncommunicable diseases are discussed. PMID:19670522

  9. Epidemiological transition of some diseases in Oman: a situational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, S S; Al-Shafaee, M A; Al-Lawati, J A; Dutta, P K; Duttagupta, K K

    2009-01-01

    During the past 35 years Oman has undergone a rapid socioeconomic and epidemiological transition leading to a steep reduction in child and adult mortality and morbidity due to the decline of various communicable diseases, including vaccine-preventable diseases. Good governance and planning, together with leadership and commitment by the government, has been a critical factor in this reduction. However, with increasing prosperity, lifestyle-related noncommunicable diseases have emerged as new health challenges to the country, with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and obesity in the lead among other chronic conditions. Appropriate prevention strategies for reducing the burden of noncommunicable diseases are discussed. PMID:19469445

  10. Spatial and temporal characterizations of water quality in Kuwait Bay.

    PubMed

    Al-Mutairi, N; Abahussain, A; El-Battay, A

    2014-06-15

    The spatial and temporal patterns of water quality in Kuwait Bay have been investigated using data from six stations between 2009 and 2011. The results showed that most of water quality parameters such as phosphorus (PO4), nitrate (NO3), dissolved oxygen (DO), and Total Suspended Solids (TSS) fluctuated over time and space. Based on Water Quality Index (WQI) data, six stations were significantly clustered into two main classes using cluster analysis, one group located in western side of the Bay, and other in eastern side. Three principal components are responsible for water quality variations in the Bay. The first component included DO and pH. The second included PO4, TSS and NO3, and the last component contained seawater temperature and turbidity. The spatial and temporal patterns of water quality in Kuwait Bay are mainly controlled by seasonal variations and discharges from point sources of pollution along Kuwait Bay's coast as well as from Shatt Al-Arab River. PMID:24768174

  11. Satellite monitoring of smoke from the Kuwait oil fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Sanjay S.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Isa, Majeed; Ali, Habib; Ali, Ghulam; Wright, Allan; Rangno, Art

    1992-09-01

    The smoke from the oil fires in Kuwait was easily visible in observations from weather satellites in polar and geosynchronous orbits. A portable work station provided these data for planning the National Center for Atmospheric Research and University of Washington research aircraft flights out of Bahrain during the Kuwait Oil-Fire Smoke Experiment. Meteosat visible and infrared satellite observations indicate that the smoke often traveled southeast along the west shore of the Persian Gulf as far as Bahrain, at which point it typically turned west or continued south toward the Arabian coast. The smoke was difficult to detect from satellite observations as it moved over water and at large distances from the source during the night from infrared observations. Also notable among the daily satellite images were the frequent, intense dust storms that seemed to form in Syria and northern Iraq and transport dust southeastward over Kuwait, and often to northwestern Saudi Arabia. Clouds were virtually absent during the months of May and June within the first several hundred kilometers along the plume direction. Surface temperatures in Bahrain during April and August 1991 were lower than average by as much as 1°-3.2°C, and are significant compared to the climatological variability of average minimum and mean temperatures for the summer months.

  12. The outcome of congenital cataract surgery in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmoaty, Sidky M.A.; Behbehani, Abdulmutalib H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Congenital cataract is the most common cause of treatable blindness in children and the outcome of congenital cataract surgery has not been studied in Kuwait, so the purpose of this study is to evaluate the visual outcome and the postoperative complications. Methods Medical records of children who underwent congenital cataract surgery between September 2000 and December 2008 at Al-Bahar Eye Center, Ministry of Health of Kuwait were retrospectively reviewed. In 100 eyes that fill the inclusion criteria visual acuity and postoperative complications were recorded. The mean follow up was 3.9 ± 1.7 years with range from 3 to 6 years. Results The mean age of congenital/developmental cataract surgery is 8.9 ± 8.7 months for bilateral cases and it was 5.75 ± 4.61 months for unilateral cases. The mean final postoperative BCVA in unilateral cases was 1.0 (20/200) log MAR unit and it was 0.3 (20/40) log MAR unit for the bilateral cases. Four percent of the cases developed postoperative glaucoma and 2% of them developed significant opacification of the posterior capsule. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence of recent improvement over time in the visual prognosis in bilateral, and to a lesser degree, unilateral cataract, in children in Kuwait. PMID:23960940

  13. Managing disposal of water produced with petroleum in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Hubail, J; El-Dash, K

    2006-04-01

    Disposal of water produced with petroleum has been of great interest in Kuwait for the last 20 years. The current problem arose when the Burgan oil field, which is the second largest field in the world, experienced successive increases in the water content of the produced oil. This study introduces a decision-making analysis of the considered alternatives for the disposal of the produced water. Four alternative solutions exist for the industry as practical solutions for the disposal of water produced in Kuwait. The first method utilizes a large number of pits to discharge water. The second alternative depends on discharging water into sealed pits. The third approach to dispose water is by injecting the water underground. The last method is similar to the previous one, but takes into consideration the recovery of reservoir pressure to maintain the rate of oil production. A questionnaire was distributed to 48 experts at the top management level of the petroleum companies and the governmental authority. The data collected considered cost, efficiency, and environmental parameters. Based on the data, a statistical analysis was conducted using the factor analysis method to reduce the number of investigated variables. The analysis concluded that the optimal solution is to use the effluent injection method to discharge water produced with oil in Burgan and similar fields in Kuwait. PMID:16171934

  14. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among midlife Arab women living in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Gerber, L M; Mamtani, R; Chiu, Y-L; Bener, A; Murphy, M; Cheema, S; Verjee, M

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread and is growing worldwide. This cross-sectional study in Qatar examined the use of CAM and its correlates among Arab women in their midlife years. Women aged 40-60 years (n = 814) were recruited at primary care centres in Qatar and completed a specially designed, pre-tested questionnaire. Overall, 38.2% of midlife women in Qatar had used CAM in the previous 12 months. Nutritional remedies and herbal remedies were the most commonly used CAM therapies, followed by physical methods. Qatari nationality and higher level of education were independently associated with CAM use. Menopause transition status was not independently associated with use of CAM. The prevalence of CAM use by women in Qatar was high, consistent with other reports worldwide. It is essential to educate and inform patients and health-care providers about the benefits and limitations associated with CAM. PMID:25343468

  15. Mothers' Perceptions of Community Integration Opportunities for Children with Disabilities in Qatar

    E-print Network

    Abbs, Alyn K

    2009-12-14

    in the community. Community integration or lack thereof, affected the family life of those with children with disabilities in Qatar. These data reflected a lack of resources in a community where mothers expressed a desire for a more inclusive atmosphere...

  16. Geology and hydrocarbon potential in the state of Qatar, Arabian Gulf

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Alsharhan; A. E. M. Nairn

    1990-01-01

    The state of Qatar is situated in the southern Arabian Gulf and covers an area of 12,000 km². It is formed by a large, broad anticline, which is part of the regional south-southwest-north-northeast-trending Qatar-South Fars arch. The arch separates the two Infracambrian salt basins. The Dukhan field was the first discovery, made in 1939, in the Upper Jurassic limestones. Since

  17. Stroke in Qatar: A one-year, hospital-based study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed Hamad; Ayman Hamad; Tag Eldin O. Sokrab; Samir Momeni; Bonauar Mesraoua; Arne Lingren

    2001-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Stroke is a major health problem in Qatar, yet no stroke studies have been reported from this region. This hospital-based study was conducted to determine the types and the 30-day fatality rate of stroke. The data were collected from the only hospital in Qatar and, therefore, are considered to be community-based estimations. Methods: Clinical information was collected

  18. Dynamic simulation solves process control problem in Oman

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-11-16

    A dynamic simulation study solved the process control problems for a Saih Rawl, Oman, gas compressor station operated by Petroleum Development of Oman (PDO). PDO encountered persistent compressor failure that caused frequent facility shutdowns, oil production deferment, and gas flaring. It commissioned MSE (Consultants) Ltd., U.K., to find a solution for the problem. Saih Rawl, about 40 km from Qarn Alam, produces oil and associated gas from a large number of low and high-pressure wells. Oil and gas are separated in three separators. The oil is pumped to Qarn Alam for treatment and export. Associated gas is compressed in two parallel trains. Train K-1115 is a 350,000 standard cu m/day, four-stage reciprocating compressor driven by a fixed-speed electric motor. Train K-1120 is a 1 million standard cu m/day, four-stage reciprocating compressor driven by a fixed-speed electric motor. Train K-1120 is a 1 million standard cu m/day, four-stage centrifugal compressor driven by a variable-speed motor. The paper describes tripping and surging problems with the gas compressor and the control simplifications that solved the problem.

  19. Adolescents and Adults with Congenital Heart Diseases in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balushi, Asim; Al-Kindi, Hamood; Al-Shuaili, Hamood; Kumar, Suresh; Al-Maskari, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of our study was to examine the spectrum, demographics, and mortality rate among adolescents and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHD) in Oman. Methods Data was collected retrospectively from the Royal Hospital, Muscat, electronic health records for all patients with a diagnosis of CHD aged 13 years and above. Data was analyzed according to the type of CHD and in-hospital mortality was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results A total of 600 patients with CHD were identified, among them 145 (24%) were aged 18 years or below. The median age was 24 years. The majority of patients had a simple form of CHD. Atrial and ventricular septal defects together constituted 62.8% of congenital heart diseases. Most patients were clustered in Muscat (32%) and the Batinah regions (31.1%) of Oman. Patients with tetralogy of Fallot and Fontan had shorter survival time than recorded in the published literature. Conclusion Mostly simple forms of CHD in younger patients was observed. The survival rate was significantly shortened in more complex lesions compared to simple lesions. A national data registry for CHD is needed to address the morbidities and mortality associated with the disease.

  20. Masirah Graben, Oman: A hidden Cretaceous rift basin

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, W.H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Ries, A.C. [Ries-Coward Associates Ltd., Caversham (United Kingdom); Coward, M.P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Reflection seismic data, well data, geochemical data, and surface geology suggest that a Cretaceous rift basin exists beneath the thrusted allochthonous sedimentary sequence of the Masirah graben, Oman. The Masirah graben is located east of the Huqf uplift, parallel to the southern coast of Oman. The eastern side of the northeast-trending Huqf anticlinorium is bounded by an extensional fault system that is downthrown to the southeast, forming the western edge of the Masirah graben. This graben is limited to the east by a large wedge of sea floor sediments and oceanic crust, that is stacked as imbricate thrusts. These sediments/ophiolites were obducted onto the southern margin of the Arabian plate during the collision of the Indian/Afghan plates at the end of the Cretaceous. Most of the Masirah graben is covered by an allochthonous sedimentary sequence, which is complexly folded and deformed above a detachment. This complexly deformed sequence contrasts sharply with what is believed to be a rift sequence below the ophiolites. The sedimentary sequence in the Masirah graben was stable until further rifting of the Arabian Sea/Gulf of Aden in the late Tertiary, resulting in reactivation of earlier rift-associated faults. Wells drilled in the Masirah graben in the south penetrated reservoir quality rocks in the Lower Cretaceous Natih and Shuaiba carbonates. Analyses of oil extracted from Infracambrian sedimentary rocks penetrated by these wells suggest an origin from a Mesozoic source rock.

  1. Seismic hazard evaluation of the Oman India pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.W.; Thenhaus, P.C.; Mullee, J.E.; Preston, R.

    1996-12-31

    The proposed Oman India pipeline will traverse approximately 1,135 km of the northern Arabian Sea floor and adjacent continental shelves at depths of over 3 km on its route from Ra`s al Jifan, Oman, to Rapar Gadhwali, India. The western part of the route crosses active faults that form the transform boundary between the Arabian and Indian tectonic plates. The eastern terminus of the route lies in the vicinity of the great (M {approximately} 8) 1829 Kutch, India earthquake. A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis was used to estimate the values of peak ground acceleration (PGA) with return periods of 200, 500 and 1,000 years at selected locations along the pipeline route and the submarine Indus Canyon -- a possible source of large turbidity flows. The results defined the ground-shaking hazard along the pipeline route and Indus Canyon for evaluation of risks to the pipeline from potential earthquake-induced geologic hazards such as liquefaction, slope instability, and turbidity flows. 44 refs.

  2. Primary School Teachers' Perceptions regarding ICT Usage and Equipment in Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alharbi, Ghazwa

    2012-01-01

    Education institutions around the world have seen rapid advances in ICT (Information Communication Technology) within the classroom since the mid 90's. Kuwait has realized the need for a high quality education system, and has seen huge increases in government funding for schools over the last 10 years. However, Kuwait's spending on technology and…

  3. Managing Time: A Study among Arab Open University Tutors in Kuwait Branch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharif, Abdin M.; Ismail, Omer H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate how tutors at the Arab Open University (AOU) in Kuwait Branch manage their time given workloads they are assigned. Group interviews were conducted with a sample that was selected from AOU tutors in Kuwait branch. The findings showed that tutors do not ask for more time or cut down workloads; instead,…

  4. Curriculum Implementation and Reform: Teachers' Views about Kuwait's New Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alshammari, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The MoE (Ministry of Education) in the state of Kuwait is starting to reform the science curriculum in all school academic stages: primary (1-5) grades, intermediate (6-9) grades, and secondary (10-12) grades. The purpose of this study was to explore the opinions of science teachers about Kuwait's new sixth and seventh grade science curriculum,…

  5. Meeting the Challenge: Quality Systems in Private Higher Education in Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Atiqi, Imad M.; Alharbi, Lafi M.

    2009-01-01

    In Kuwait, as in other rapidly-developing higher education systems, one major area of concern is ensuring the quality of education offered by private providers. This paper briefly reviews the history of the development of higher education in Kuwait since its inception in 1936. It considers various quality systems currently in place in other…

  6. Evaluation of the In-Service Education and Training Programme for Kuwait Army Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Mutawa, Najat; Al-Furaih, Suad

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the In-Service Education and Training (INSET) programme organised for Kuwait Army instructors. The focus is on their perceptual gain in related topics and skills, as they attended 10 courses at the College of Education--Kuwait University. Pre- and post-assessments involved 20 trainees. The analysis indicates significant…

  7. Investigating Students' Attitudes and Preferences towards Learning English at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Bustan, Suad Ahmed; Al-Bustan, Lamees

    2009-01-01

    This study is performed by conducting a survey analysis to investigate students' attitudes and preferences towards learning English at Kuwait University in non-English major ESL students. The sample size will be roughly 21-22% of a total of 4950 college level English Language learners at Kuwait University where specific English courses are part of…

  8. Sources, distribution and composition of the suspended sediments, Kuwait Bay, Northern Arabian Gulf

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Al-Ghadban; A. El-Sammak

    2005-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative assessment of suspended sediment levels and transport pathways in Kuwait's northern territorial waters are described, with special reference to Kuwait Bay. Near-surface water samples were collected from 12 stations, covering the whole of the embayment. Suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) were derived. Heavy metal concentrations, mineralogical composition and grain size constituents were derived for the suspended sediments retained

  9. Parental Attitude toward Behavioral Management Techniques in Dental Practice with Schoolchildren in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saleh Muhammad; Maddi Shyama; Sabiha A. Al-Mutawa

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the parental attitude toward different management techniques used during dental treatment of schoolchildren in Kuwait. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and eighteen parents who accompanied their children to the clinics of Hawally School Oral Health Program in Kuwait participated in this study. The parents viewed a videotape which showed scenes of

  10. Nonlinear pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis among migrants at entry in Kuwait: 1997–2006

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saeed Akhtar; Hameed GHH Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of published data on the pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis among migrant workers entering Middle Eastern countries particularly Kuwait. The objectives of this study were to use routine health surveillance data i) to estimate the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis among migrant workers at entry in Kuwait and ii) to determine the occurrence of any time trends

  11. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard assessment for Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hussain, I. W.; Deif, A.; El-Hady, S.; Toksoz, M. N.; Al-Jabri, K.; Al-Hashmi, S.; Al-Toubi, K. I.; Al-Shijbi, Y.; Al-Saifi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic hazard assessment for Oman is conducted utilizing probabilistic approach. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA) has been performed within a logic tree framework. An earthquake catalogue for Oman was compiled and declustered to include only independent earthquakes. The declustered catalogue was used to define seismotectonic source model with 26 source zones that characterize earthquakes in the tectonic environments in and around Oman. The recurrence parameters for all the seismogenic zones are determined using the doubly bounded exponential distribution except the seismogenic zones of Makran subduction zone which were modeled using the characteristic distribution. The maximum earthquakes on known faults were determined geologically and the remaining zones were determined statistically from the compiled catalogue. Horizontal ground accelerations in terms of geometric mean were calculated using ground-motion prediction relationships that were developed from seismic data obtained from the shallow active environment, stable craton environment, and from subduction earthquakes. In this analysis, we have used alternative seismotectonic source models, maximum magnitude, and attenuation models and weighted them to account for the epistemic uncertainty. The application of this methodology leads to the definition of 5% damped seismic hazard maps at rock sites for 72, 475, and 2475 year return periods for spectral accelerations at periods of 0.0 (corresponding to peak ground acceleration), 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 1.0 and 2.0 sec. Mean and 84th percentile acceleration contour maps were represented. The results also were displayed as uniform hazard spectra for rock sites in the cities of Khasab, Diba, Sohar, Muscat, Nizwa, Sur, and Salalah in Oman and the cities of Abu Dhabi and Dubai in UAE. The PGA across Oman ranges from 20 cm/sec2 in the Mid-West and 115 cm/sec2 at the northern part for 475 years return period and between 40 cm/sec2 and 180 cm/sec2 for 2475 years return period. The highest hazard is found in the most northern city (Khasab) close to both Zagros and Makran Zones with maximum spectral accelerations at 0.2 sec period reaching 243 cm/s2 for a return period of 475 years and 397 cm/s2 for 2475 years. Earthquakes at a distance of 90 km from Khasab City contribute most to the hazard of this city at both 475 and 2475 year return period hazard levels for all considered spectral periods. For the cities of Diba, Muscat, Nizwa, Sur, and Salalah, the hazard is dominated by large distant earthquakes at all response periods for 475 year return period, while for the 2475 year return period, the hazard is dominated by nearby small to moderate earthquakes for short spectral periods and by distant larger events for longer ones. The results support the UBC97 classification of Sohar, Muscat, Nizwa, Sur, and Salalah cities to be in Zone 0 (no seismic design required), whereas in Khasab and Diba Zone 1 would be appropriate.

  12. New heat flow measurements in Oman in the Arabian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandone, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Jaupart, C.; Leroy, S.; Bache, F.; Amerjeed, M.; Lally, J.

    2009-04-01

    Precambrian shields are viewed as low heat flow provinces but detailed studies in Canada, South Africa and India shields demonstrate that large heat flow differences exist between them and within a single province, related to differences of crustal structures. Very few heat flow measurements are available on the Arabian shield and its thermal structure is poorly constrained. Heat flow reported for the Arabian Shield and its immediate platform (36-88 mWm-2) is broad. Thermal regime has a control on rheology and on deformation and the Arabian shield is of particular interest because it was affected by geodynamic processes such as the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden riftings starting around 30 Ma ago and the formation of the Dead Sea Transform fault starting at about 20 Ma. In December 2006, a marine heat-flow survey in the Gulf of Aden provided 169 new heat-flow measurements along multi-channel seismic profiles. One of the main results is that the high heat-flow (~120 mWm-2), characteristic of oceanic domains, extends into the deep continental margin and switches abruptly in the proximal margin to a low value (~40 mWm-2) typical of stable Precambrian domain. These low values have been confirmed by estimates derived from oil exploration data in few locations south of Oman. These data indicate a strong contrast of thermal regimes within the continental margin. Recent tomography studies on Arabia in Oman show that the lithosphere is significantly affected within Arabia in the vicinity of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. This pattern is apparently different from the observed heat-flow pattern, which needs to be confirmed and extended into the Arabian platform. The survey we conducted in October 2008 was to evaluate the thermal regime in the onshore domains of Oman. We measured the temperature gradient in 9 water wells in Dhofar south of Oman and in 8 mining wells in northern Oman in the ophiolite belt. The goal is to investigate the thermal structure of the Arabian plate and to study its variations within different geological contexts. Measurements in water wells depend strongly on how the reservoirs interact with the thermal regime and water circulations perturbed some wells. Others show a stable temperature gradient (14-28 mKm-1) leading to a surface heat flow in the range of 35-56 mWm-2 if we assume a conductivity of 2 Wm-1K-1 based on oil exploration wells. A more detailed analysis of the lithology is still needed. Measurements in mining wells in northern Dhofar give low gradients (7- 22 mKm-1). The thermal conductivity of basalts, in the range 1.5-2.5 Wm-1K-1, leads to a heat flow lower than 50 mWm-2. Thermal conductivities of rock samples will be measured but the overall trend seems to indicate a low heat flow for the Arabian shield.

  13. Metal distribution in marine sediment along the Doha Bay, Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Naimi, Hajer A; Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Al-Shaikh, Ismail; Al-Yafe, Mehsin; Al-Meer, Saeed

    2015-03-01

    Concentrations of 25 heavy metals (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, V, Zn and Hg) in surface sediments along the Doha Bay from 10 transects each with five stations were studied. Significant differences were observed in metal concentrations between the sampling locations and durations. Higher concentrations were observed in areas where there are a lot of anthropological activities. The distribution of selected metals was presented in contour maps showing the variation between the two periods. In order to further study particle size effect on metal uptake, two different grinding times were administered on four randomly selected samples and the results showed no significant difference on the analysis in the inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) instrument. The overall results of metal analyses were within the international standards criteria, and the results were comparable to the previous studies conducted around Qatar. PMID:25701472

  14. Advection of upwelled waters in the form of plumes off Oman during the Southwest Monsoon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vijayakumar Manghnani; John M. Morrison; Thomas S. Hopkins; Emanuele Böhm

    1998-01-01

    Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery of sea-surface-temperature, TOPEX\\/POSEIDON measurements of sea-level-anomaly (SLA), and modeled surface winds and wind-stress fields are used in concert with other ancillary data to describe the influence of the 1995 Southwest Monsoon on the distribution of upwelled waters off the coast of Oman. The Oman upwelling zone is characterized by the entrainment of cold

  15. Quaternary coastal evolution of Oman (Arabian Peninsula) - a quantitative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, G.; Rupprechter, M.; Roepert, A.; Quraishi, K. Al; Balushi, N. Al; Grützner, C.; Reicherter, K.

    2012-04-01

    The paper reviews the Quaternary coastal evolution of Oman. Emphasise is put on quantifying the different forcing factors. The plate tectonic setting, the Quaternary climate evolution, the sea-level history and the impact of natural hazards are identified as key factors of coastal evolution. The Arabian Plate is characterized by a northward movement forming a continent-continent collision zone in the west and the Makran Subduction Zone in the east. As a result differential land movement is observable in Oman. The Quaternary climate evolution is well understood. Besides other proxies notably spelothems and aeolian deposits allow to draw a consistent picture. It is understood that changes in the position of the intertropical convergence zone result in intensity-changes of the summer monsoon. These changes are related to global atmospheric circulation patterns. Data on the sea-level history are sparse; despite general assumptions of a sea-level lowstand, correlating with the last glacial maximum, resulting in terrestrial conditions within the Arabian Gulf. Furthermore, a mid-Holocene sea level highstand in the range of +2m is documented in several locations. The coastlines of Oman are affected by tsunami and hurricanes. However, almost no instrumental or historical data on the impact of such natural hazards are available due to the isolation of the country in the past. Several Quaternary deposits have been investigated in a reconnaissance survey. There is sound geological evidence for a tsunami to have affected the coastline in 1945, with the possibility of older tsunami events being also recorded in the geological record. There is strong evidence of differential land movement along the coastline; locally indicated by marine terraces in elevations of up to 400m (Rupprechter at al. 2012). By quantifying the differential land movement for numerous sites, the sea-level history will be revealed. Ultimately the data will be utilized to form the base of a modeling approach. Furthermore, a sedimentary archive of past precipitation events is documented which will allow reconstructing frequency and intensity of precipitation events and may indicate the impact of past hurricanes. It is concluded that the geological archives are suitable to quantify the forcing factors of Quaternary coastal evolution on different time scales and that the recurrence intervals of natural hazards will be revealed. Proxy data will be gained in subsequent investigations. This allows a scientific based holistic approach for an integrated coastal zone management that helps to formulate adaptation strategies with regard to global warming and expected environmental changes.

  16. Trace gas measurements in the Kuwait oil fire smoke plume

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, W.T.; Kok, G.L.; Schillawski, R.D.; Zimmerman, P.R.; Greenberg, J.P.; Kadavanich, M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1992-09-20

    The authors report trace gas measurements made both inside and outside the Kuwait oil-fire smoke plume during a flight of an instrumented research aircraft on May 30, 1991. Concentrations of SO{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub x} averaged vertically and horizontally throughout the plume 80 km downwind of Kuwait City were 106, 127, and 9.1 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), respectively, above background concentrations. With the exception of SO{sub 2}, trace gas concentrations were far below typical US urban levels and primary national ambient air quality standards. Ambient ozone was titrated by NO in the dark, dense core of the smoke plume close to the fires, and photochemical ozone production was limited to the diffuse edge of the plume. Photochemical O{sub 3} production was noted throughout the plume at a distance of 160 km downwind of Kuwait City, and averaged 2.3 ppbv per hour during the first 3 hours of transport. Little additional photochemical production was noted at a downwind range of 340 km. The fluxes of sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and reactive nitrogen from the roughly 520 fires still burning on May 30, 1991 are estimated at 1.4 x 10{sup 7} kg SO{sub 2}/d, 6.9 x 10{sup 6} kg CO/d, and 2.7 x 10{sup 5} kg N/d, respectively. Generally low concentrations of CO and NO{sub x} indicate that the combustion was efficient and occurred at low temperatures. Low total nonmethane hydrocarbon concentrations suggest that the volatile components of the petroleum were burned efficiently. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Selection criteria of residents for residency programs in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Kuwait, 21 residency training programs were offered in the year 2011; however, no data is available regarding the criteria of selecting residents for these programs. This study aims to provide information about the importance of these criteria. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from members (e.g. chairmen, directors, assistants …etc.) of residency programs in Kuwait. A total of 108 members were invited to participate. They were asked to rate the importance level (scale from 1 to 5) of criteria that may affect the acceptance of an applicant to their residency programs. Average scores were calculated for each criterion. Results Of the 108 members invited to participate, only 12 (11.1%) declined to participate. Interview performance was ranked as the most important criteria for selecting residents (average score: 4.63/5.00), followed by grade point average (average score: 3.78/5.00) and honors during medical school (average score: 3.67/5.00). On the other hand, receiving disciplinary action during medical school and failure in a required clerkship were considered as the most concerning among other criteria used to reject applicants (average scores: 3.83/5.00 and 3.54/5.00 respectively). Minor differences regarding the importance level of each criterion were noted across different programs. Conclusions This study provided general information about the criteria that are used to accept/reject applicants to residency programs in Kuwait. Future studies should be conducted to investigate each criterion individually, and to assess if these criteria are related to residents' success during their training. PMID:23331670

  18. Characterizing surface temperature and clarity of Kuwait's seawaters using remotely sensed measurements and GIS analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsahli, Mohammad M. M.

    Kuwait sea surface temperature (SST) and water clarity are important water characteristics that influence the entire Kuwait coastal ecosystem. The spatial and temporal distributions of these important water characteristics should be well understood to obtain a better knowledge about this productive coastal environment. The aim of this project was therefore to study the spatial and temporal distributions of: Kuwait SST using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images collected from January 2003 to July 2007; and Kuwait Secchi Disk Depth (SDD), a water clarity measure, using Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and MODIS data collected from November 1998 to October 2004 and January 2003 to June 2007, respectively. Kuwait SST was modeled based on the linear relationship between level 2 MODIS SST data and in situ SST data. MODIS SST images showed a significant relationship with in situ SST data ( r2= 0.98, n = 118, RMSE = 0.7°C). Kuwait SST images derived from MODIS data exhibited three spatial patterns of Kuwait SST across the year that were mainly attributed to the northwestern counterclockwise water circulation of the Arabian Gulf, and wind direction and intensity. The temporal variation of Kuwait SST was greatly influenced by the seasonal variation of solar intensity and air temperatures. Kuwait SDD was measured through two steps: first, computing the diffuse light attenuation coefficient at 490 nm, Kd(490), and 488 nm, Kd(488), derived from SeaWiFS and MODIS, respectively, using a semi-analytical algorithm; second, establishing two SDD models based on the empirical relationship of Kd(490) and Kd(488) with in situ SDD data. Kd(490) and Kd(488) showed a significant relationship with in situ SDD data ( r2= 0.67 and r2= 0.68, respectively). Kuwait SDD images showed distinct spatial and temporal patterns of Kuwait water clarity that were mainly attributed to three factors: the Shatt Al-Arab discharge, water circulation, and coastal currents. The SeaWiFS and MODIS data compared to in situ measurements provided a comprehensive view of the studied seawater characteristics that improved their overall estimation within Kuwait's waters. Also, the near-real-time availability of SeaWiFS and MODIS data and their highly temporal resolution make them a very advantageous tool for studying coastal environments. Thus, I recommend involving this method in monitoring Kuwait coastal environments.

  19. Proceedings of the EMNLP 2014 Workshop on Arabic Natural Langauge Processing (ANLP), pages 7886, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ­86, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics Named Entity RecognitionSir `insistent'; qTr may be `Qatar' if qaTar, `sugar syrup' if qaTor, `diameter' if quTor. Previously proposed

  20. Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP), pages 14651468, October 25-29, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ), pages 1465­1468, October 25-29, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics Verifiably Effective Arabic Dialect Identification Kareem Darwish, Hassan Sajjad, Hamdy Mubarak Qatar Computing Research Institute Qatar Foundation {kdarwish,hsajjad,hmubarak}@qf.org.qa Abstract Several recent

  1. Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP), pages 207213, October 25-29, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ), pages 207­213, October 25-29, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics Mohit and Kemal Oflazer Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar {hbouamor). In the same direc- 1 The dataset and the software are available at: http://nlp.qatar.cmu.edu/resources/ AL

  2. Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP), pages 13911395, October 25-29, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ), pages 1391­1395, October 25-29, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics¨oz Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study Wassenaar, Netherlands a.s.dogruoz@gmail.com Preslav Nakov Qatar Computing Research Institute Tornado Tower floor 10, P.O. Box 5825, Doha, Qatar pnakov@qf.org.qa Abstract

  3. Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP), pages 214220, October 25-29, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ), pages 214­220, October 25-29, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics`arquez Alessandro Moschitti Preslav Nakov Massimo Nicosia ALT Research Group Qatar Computing Research Institute -- Qatar Foundation {fguzman,sjoty,lmarquez,amoschitti,pnakov,mnicosia}@qf.org.qa Abstract We present

  4. Proceedings of the EMNLP 2014 Workshop on Arabic Natural Langauge Processing (ANLP), pages 207216, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    ­216, October 25, 2014, Doha, Qatar. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics Unsupervised Word Khader2 , Fahad Al Obaidli1 , Preslav Nakov1 , Stephan Vogel1 Qatar Computing Research Institute1 , Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar2 {kamlmannai,hsajjad,faalobaidli,pnakov,svogel}@qf.org.qa1 , akhader

  5. On the source of the 24 September 2013 tsunami in Oman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Omira, Rachid; Miranda, Jorge Miguel; El Hussain, Issa; Deif, Ahmed; Habsi, Zaid Al

    2014-05-01

    Tsunami hazard along the coast of Makran and Oman is mainly due to the seismic activity at the Makran subduction zone. Large earthquakes along the Makran subduction zone are infrequent but they have the potential to generate destructive tsunamis along the coasts of Pakistan, Iran and Oman, all bordering the Oman Sea. The most recent tsunami occurred on November 1945 following an earthquake of magnitude 8.1, causing extensive damage along the Makran coast in Pakistan. On September 24, 2013 an earthquake of magnitude 7.7 occurred in south Pakistan, 64 km onshore north of Awaran. The location is consistent with rupture within the Eurasian plate above the Makran subduction zone. The tide stations in the Oman sea recorded a tsunami less than one hour after the earthquake. The first wave reached Ormara in Pakistan with an amplitude of 15 cm. The highest amplitudes were observed along the coast of Oman between Muscat and Sur with a maximum of 40 cm in Qurayat. In this study, we collected tsunami data recorded in the Oman sea. All records were filtered in order to isolate the tsunami signal and analyzed the in terms of travel times and amplitudes. The use of inversion techniques points to a submarine source located south of Ormara in the Murray ridge. Finally, we discuss the possible of tsunami induced landslide as a secondary effect of earthquake.

  6. Toxic metals in imported fruits and vegetables marketed in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, A.; Baroon, Z.; Al-Khalafawi, M. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)] [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)

    1995-12-31

    The concentration of lead, cadmium, and mercury in 134 samples of imported fruits and vegetables marketed in Kuwait were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer with a graphite furnace and the cold vapor technique. Results obtained showed that the concentration of these metal ions in most cases did not exceed the maximum permissible concentration of metals in fresh fruits and vegetables as restricted by some countries. Only a few samples of fruits and vegetables contained levels of mercury, cadmium, and lead which exceeded these maximum permissible levels.

  7. Heavy metals in marine algae of the Kuwait coast

    SciTech Connect

    Buo-Olayan, A.H.; Subrahmanyam, M.N.V. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait)] [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait)

    1996-12-31

    Marine algae are considered as important primary producers in the coastal region. Several marine algal species are being considered as raw material for various economically important products and this has resulted in their increasing demand. Marine algal species also have been suggested to be the indicators of pollution. Keeping in view the importance of marine algal species for direct or indirect human and cattle consumption, it is necessary to monitor the bioaccumulation of certain elements in these species. This study was aimed at establishing the concentration levels of trace metals in marine algae of the Kuwait coast. 26 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Geomorphic changes in Ras Al-Subiyah area, Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Hurban, A.; El-Gamily, H.; El-Sammak, A.

    2008-06-01

    The Ras Al-Subiyah area is considered one of the most promising areas in Kuwait for future development. This development will include a new town called Subiyah and its associated infrastructure. This area is also being considered as the location for connection between Boubyan Island, which is now undergoing major development and the Kuwait mainland. The present study investigates the geomorphology of the Ras Al-Sabiyah area in the northern sector of Kuwait. The study area is generally flat, and it is located west of the Jal Az-Zor escarpment. It is bordered on the east by the Khor Al-Sabiyah tidal channel and on the south by Kuwait Bay. The area receives sediments from several sources; currently the most important are aeolian sediments and the deposition of mud delivered through the Khor Al-Sabiyah from the Iraqi marshes. The study area has been subjected to severe environmental changes due to the Gulf wars and the drainage of Iraqi marshes and the associated artificial changes in fluvial system. Twenty-two surface sediments were collected from the Ras Al-Subiyah area. Samples were collected to include the main geomorphologic characteristic features of the study area. Field observations and remote sensing images from 1990 and 2001 were used to produce an updated geomorphologic map for the Ras Al-Subiyah and a map showing geomorphic changes between 1990 and 2001. Grain size of the surface sediment ranges from gravel to medium sand. In general, grain size statistical analysis indicates that most of the areas are composed of two or more classes of sands transported and deposited from different sources including aeolian, sabkhas, river and the bays. The variability in the grain size statistical parameters may be attributed to the complexity of surface morphology as well as the diversity in the type of depositional environment in the Ras Al-Subiyah area. The total area subjected to change during the 12-year period (1990 2001) is about 32 km2 as calculated using GIS techniques.

  9. Acute rheumatic fever in Kuwait: The declining incidence.

    PubMed

    Majeed, H A; Doudin, K; Lubani, M; Shaltout, A; Doussary, L; Suliman, M A

    1993-01-01

    The incidence of acute rheumatic fever in children aged 5-14 years in Kuwait was studied prospectively over a period of five years (1984 through 1988). The mean annual incidence in the study period was 2.9/100,000 children. There was a decline in the incidence from 3.7/100,000 in 1984 to 2.5/100,000 in 1988. Twenty-seven percent of children with acute rheumatic fever presented as recurrences in 1985; this also declined to 11% in 1988. PMID:17587993

  10. Towards improving care for children with diabetes in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Shaltout, A A; Qabazard, M A; al Khawari, M; Bushnaq, R; Abdella, N A; Abdul Salam, R; Mughal, H

    1995-01-01

    Presents the results of a medical audit of the records of 199 children diagnosed as diabetic and admitted to Al-Amiri Hospital, Kuwait. Uses the measurement of glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1) to indicate the levels of control achieved. Finds that the degree of glycaemic control compares favourably with studies done in other hospitals, but unfavourably with specialized diabetic clinics. Proposes that glycaemic control could be improved by provision of the services of specialized support staff such as dietitian, educator, psychologist and health visitor. PMID:10152597

  11. Getting Its Ducks in a Row? Qatar Foundation's Agreement with HEC Paris and the Launch of the Qatar Foundation Management, Education and Research Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Observatory on Borderless Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Last week, private, non-profit organisation the Qatar Foundation (QF) announced a partnership agreement with French business institution HEC Paris to offer executive education programmes. According to the terms of the agreement, a full-time faculty will provide executive and short certificate programmes and corporate-specific training, including…

  12. Identifying tsunami deposits using shell taphonomy: Sur lagoon, Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, S.; Reinhardt, E.; Rothaus, R.; Boyce, J.

    2007-05-01

    On November 28th, 1945 an 8.1 magnitude earthquake focused in the eastern portion of the Makran subduction zone (Arabian Sea) generated a powerful tsunami that destroyed many coastal villages in Pakistan and India. Reports indicate that the tsunami also caused significant damage in Muscat, Oman, although its effects elsewhere in Oman are unknown. A thick bivalve dominated shell horizon was discovered inside the Sur lagoon, which is located on the eastern promontory of Oman (200 km south of Muscat). This shell deposit is significant because it is laterally extensive (> 1 km2), extends deep within the lagoon (>2 km), ranges in thickness from 5 - 25 cm at the sample localities, contains numerous subtidal and offshore bivalve species, and articulated subtidal and offshore bivalve species are abundant. Although there is an absence of typical tsunami indicators such as allochthonous sediment in and around the lagoon, verbal accounts, cultural evidence recovered during coring, and the absence of strong storms during the past 100 years indicates that this shell unit was caused by the 1945 tsunami. In this setting, it would be advantageous to have another proxy for tsunami detection and risk prediction. The use of shell taphonomy is one of the potential indicators and here we present new evidence of its utility. We sampled this unit in eight locations, and compared the shell taphonomy to surface shell samples collected from beach and reworked horizons in the lagoon, and to shell samples from a known tsunami and corresponding storm/ballast deposit in Israel (Reinhardt et al., 2006). Taphonomic analysis yielded promising results, as the two tsunami horizons shared excellent agreement between the amount of fragmented shells, and the percentage of shells displaying angular breaks. Both of these categories were significantly different from the percentage of fragments and angular fragments recovered from the reworked, beach, and storm/ballast deposits, indicating different environmental factors acting upon the shell assemblages. These results suggest that tsunamigenic shell deposits can be identified based on their taphonomic characteristics when compared to beach and storm deposits in the same setting. Our data indicates that the following diagnostic taphonomic characteristics may indicate a tsunamigenic deposit: 1) presence/absence of articulated bivalves, 2) increased percentage of fragmented valves, 3) increased percentage of angular fragments, and 4) the large number of offshore bivalves in the lagoon. This study highlights the potential benefits and opportunity for using bivalve taphonomy as a useful indicator of paleotsunami deposits, particularly in protected coastal embayments in arid regions where stratified deposits might not readily preserve. This technique holds potential, as shell deposits are easy to identify in the field by non-experts, is very low cost, and analysis uses simple, easily applicable and recognizable taphonomic characteristics. Furthermore, this proxy can be used for risk assessment purposes in coastal areas with a seismic history but lacking a paleotsunami record. Further testing of this hypothesis should be conducted along the Omani coastline, particularly in the lagoons along the Eastern promontory. Key Words: tsunami, taphonomy, Oman, bivalve

  13. Oman's low latitude "Snowball Earth" pole revisited: Late Cretaceous remagnetisation of Late Neoproterozoic carbonates in Northern Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, C. J.; Tait, J.

    2010-12-01

    Glaciogenic diamictites and associated ‘cap’ carbonates within the Neoproterozoic Huqf Supergroup of Oman record a period of extreme, possibly global, glaciations between 750-635 Ma (the "Snowball Earth"). We have performed high-resolution paleomagnetic sampling of two sections through ~635 Ma cap carbonates in the Jebel Akhdar region of northern Oman. Stepwise thermal demagnetisation reveals a low temperature component carried by goethite, and a high temperature component carried by haematite, that are both aligned with the modern dipole field direction. Occasional reversed polarity directions antipodal to the present day field indicate pervasive weathering of these outcrops over timescales of at least 1 Ma. Between these two overprints an intermediate component with typical unblocking temperatures of 300-550 C, probably carried by magnetite, can also be isolated in most samples. A robust fold test clearly demonstrates that this component was acquired after Paleozoic folding of the carbonates, and was most likely acquired during exhumation associated with emplacement of the Semail ophiolite during the Late Cretaceous (95-68 Ma). In geographic co-ordinates, the intermediate component has an almost horizontal NNW or SSE direction, similar to directions previously reported from outcrops of the ophiolite close to the Jebel Akhdar region, and from thermally altered basement rocks in the the Saih Hatat window further to the east [Feinberg et al. 1999]. Hints of an older, Permian, remagnetisation of the carbonates, which is also observed in the Saih Hatat basement rocks, have also produced a false polarity stratigraphy in one of the sampled sections. Our results contrast with the previously reported low latitude pole from the Huqf Supergroup [Kilner et al., 2005], which was considered to be amongst the more reliable paleomagnetic data supporting glaciations extending to low latitudes during the late Neoproterozoic. However, this interpretation was made on the basis of lower resolution sampling of only shallowly dipping sequences, and it is clear that this low-latitude pole was calculated from the same magnetic component that we have definitively shown to be a later remagnetisation. The paleolatitude of Oman during the Late Neoproterozoic glaciations therefore remains unconstrained, although paleomagnetic analysis of volcanic and sedimentary units in the Huqf Supergroup that bracket the glacial formations may yet yield a primary remanence.

  14. All That Glitters Is Not Gold: Challenges of Teacher and School Leader Licensure Licensing System in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellili-Cherif, Maha; Romanowski, Michael H.; Nasser, Ramzi

    2012-01-01

    In 2001, the Government of Qatar began a comprehensive education reform (Education for a New Era) based on RAND's recommendations and options for building an educational system that would meet the country's changing needs. Nine years later, Qatar's educational landscape has significantly changed. Among these changes is the introduction of…

  15. Aligning Post-Secondary Educational Choices to Societal Needs: A New Scholarship System for Qatar. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustine, Catherine H.; Krop, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    Qatar is experiencing previously unprecedented social and economic development, linked to increased participation in the global market. Growing employment opportunities for Qatari nationals require greater attention to post-secondary education and the development of specific high-demand skills. Since the 1970s, Qatar has complemented its…

  16. Education for a New Era: Design and Implementation of K-12 Education Reform in Qatar. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Dominic J.; Augustine, Catherine H.; Zellman, Gail L.; Ryan, Gery; Goldman, Charles A.; Stasz, Cathleen; Constant, Louay

    2007-01-01

    The leadership of Qatar has a social and political vision that calls for improving the outcomes of the Qatari K-12 education system. With this vision in mind, the leadership asked RAND to examine Qatar's K-12 education system, to recommend options for building a world-class system, and, subsequently, to develop the chosen option and support its…

  17. Aligning Post-Secondary Educational Choices to Societal Needs: A New Scholarship System for Qatar. Technical Report Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustine, Catherine H.; Krop, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    Qatar is experiencing previously unprecedented social and economic development, linked to increased participation in the global market. Growing employment opportunities for Qatari nationals require greater attention to post-secondary education and the development of specific high-demand skills. Since the 1970s, Qatar has complemented its…

  18. A road map to Translational Medicine in Qatar and a model for the world

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Translational Medicine (TM) in Qatar is part of a concerted effort of the Qatari medical and scientific leadership supported by a strong political will by Qatari authorities to deliver world-class health care to Qatari residents while participating in the worldwide quest to bridge the gap between bench-to-bedside-to-community. TM programs should embrace the Qatar National vision for research to become an international hub of excellence in research and development, based on intellectual merit, contributing to global knowledge and adhering to international standards, to innovate by translating new and original ideas into useful applications, to be inclusive at the national and international level, to build and maintain a competitive and diversified economy and ultimately improve the health and well-being of the Qatar’s population. Although this writing focuses on Qatar, we hope that the thoughts expressed here may be of broader use for the development of any TM program particularly in regions where an established academic community surrounded by a rich research infrastructure and/or a vibrant biotechnology enterprise is not already present. PMID:22929646

  19. Groundwater control for construction purposes: a case study from Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaqour, Fathi M.; Hasan, Syed E.

    2008-02-01

    One of the major rehabilitation projects in Kuwait during the 1990s was improvement of the wastewater treatment plant at Jahra, a town 30 km north of Kuwait City. The project incorporates construction of a pumping station to collect the sewage via a network of sewer lines throughout the city. Groundwater occurs 4 m below the ground surface and construction specifications required lowering the groundwater table by 16 m to the foundation grade, 20 m below the ground surface. Open excavation with four stage well point system of dewatering was selected to ensure dry foundation conditions; but the system failed to lower the groundwater table down to the desired depth. Review of site investigation records and recalculation of field hydraulic conductivity resulted in design changes, augmenting the well point system with a number of deep wells and sumps to lower the water table down to the foundation grade. The paper discusses subsurface conditions and presents an analysis of the cause of failure of the well point system. The actual hydraulic conductivity proved to be several folds higher than the calculated one that was determined using Hazen’s formula. It was found that use of Hazen’s formula led to serious underestimation of field hydraulic conductivity. It is advised not to use such formulas without thorough investigation and proper interpretation of borehole data.

  20. Chemical and physical properties of emissions from Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.; Pinto, J.; Mamane, Y.; Ondov, J.; Abdulraheem, M.

    1992-01-01

    After the Iraqi retreat from Kuwait in 1991, airborne sampling was conducted in the oil fire plumes near Kuwait City and ground-level samples were taken of the air within the city. For the airborne sampling, a versatile air pollution sampler was used to determine the SO(2), elemental concentrations, the aerosol mass loadings and SO4(2-) and NO3(1-) concentrations. Striking differences between the black and white plumes were associated with high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl(2) measured in the white plumes and large numbers of carbon chain agglomerates in the black plumes. For the ground-based measurements, an annular denuder system was used to determine levels of SO(2), SO4(2-), trace elements, and mass loadings. Certain pollutant levels rose in the city during inversion conditions, when winds were too weak to continue moving the combustion products directly to the Persian Gulf, and the increased levels of Pb and certain trace elements were comparable to those in other large urban areas in Europe.

  1. Dust fallout in Kuwait city: deposition and characterization.

    PubMed

    Al-Awadhi, Jasem M; Alshuaibi, Arafat A

    2013-09-01

    Dust fallouts in Kuwait city was monitored on monthly basis during the period from March 2011 to February 2012 at 10 locations. The results of this study reveal that: (1) monthly dust deposition rates ranged from 0.002 to 0.32 kg/m(2) with average deposition rate of 0.053 kg/m(2) and annual average deposition rate of 0.59 kg/m(2), ranking the first out of 56 dust deposition rates observed throughout the world; (2) on average, about 55.9% of the settled dust have fine to very fine sand fraction sizes, while silt and clay comprise an average of 37.4 and 1.4% of the total sample, respectively; (3) the concentrations for Zn and Mo out of 15 other elements analyzed from the dust were up to 11 times higher than their soil background values in Kuwait, while Pb and Ni were about seven times higher; (4) Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn show maximum enrichment relative to the upper continental crustal component (Mn); (5) Sr, Zr and Zn show highest concretions among all collected samples; and (6) quartz and calcite were the dominant minerals in the dust samples. The distribution of the heavy metals in dust seems to be controlled mainly by the land uses and the volume of traffic emissions. PMID:23722090

  2. Effect of oil pollution on fresh groundwater in Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sulaimi, J.; Viswanathan, M. N.; Székely, F.

    1993-11-01

    Massive oil fires in Kuwait were the aftermath of the Gulf War. This resulted in the pollution of air, water, and soil, the magnitude of which is unparalleled in the history of mankind. Oil fires damaged several oil well heads, resulting in the flow of oil, forming large oil lakes. Products of combustion from oil well fires deposited over large areas. Infiltrating rainwater, leaching out contaminants from oil lakes and products of combustion at ground surface, can reach the water table and contaminate the groundwater. Field investigations, supported by laboratory studies and mathematical models, show that infiltration of oil from oil lakes will be limited to a depth of about 2 m from ground surface. Preliminary mathematical models showed that contaminated rainwater can infiltrate and reach the water table within a period of three to four days, particularly at the Raudhatain and Umm Al-Aish regions. These are the only regions in Kuwait where fresh groundwater exists. After reaching the water table, the lateral movement of contaminants is expected to be very slow under prevailing hydraulic gradients. Groundwater monitoring at the above regions during 1992 showed minor levels of vanadium, nickel, and total hydrocarbons at certain wells. Since average annual rainfall in the region is only 120 mm/yr, groundwater contamination due to the infiltration of contaminated rainwater is expected to be a long-term one.

  3. Effect of oil pollution on fresh groundwater in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sulaimi, J.; Viswanathan, M.N.; Szekely, F. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)

    1993-11-01

    Massive oil fires in Kuwait were the aftermath of the Gulf War. This resulted in the pollution of air, water, and soil, the magnitude of which is unparalleled in the history of mankind. Oil fires damaged several oil well heads, resulting in the flow of oil, forming large oil lakes. Products of combustion from oil well fires deposited over large areas. Infiltrating rainwater, leaching out contaminants from oil lakes and products of combustion at ground surface, can reach the water table and contaminate the groundwater. Field investigations, supported by laboratory studies and mathematical models, show that infiltration of oil from oil lakes will be limited to a depth of about 2 m from ground surface. Preliminary mathematical models showed that contaminated rainwater can infiltrate and reach the water table within a period of three to four days, particularly at the Raudhatain and Umm Al-Aish regions. These are the only regions in Kuwait where fresh groundwater exists. After reaching the water table, the lateral movement of contaminants is expected to be very slow under prevailing hydraulic gradients. Groundwater monitoring at the above regions during 1992 showed minor levels of vanadium, nickel, and total hydrocarbons at certain wells. Since average annual rainfall in the region is only 120 mm/yr, groundwater contamination due to the infiltration of contaminated rainwater is expected to be a long-term one. 13 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Biomedical Publications Profile and Trends in Gulf Cooperation Council Countries

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Al Busadi, Ahmed; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There is a dearth of studies examining the relationship between research output and other socio-demographic indicators in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates). The three interrelated aims of this study were, first, to ascertain the number of biomedical publications in the GCC from 1970 to 2010; second, to establish the rate of publication according population size during the same period and, third, to gauge the relationship between the number of publications and specific socio-economic parameters. Methods: The Medline database was searched in October 2010 by affiliation, year and publication type from 1970 to 2010. Data obtained were normalised to the number of publications per million of the population, gross domestic product, and the number of physicians in each country. Results: The number of articles from the GCC region published over this 40 year period was 25,561. Saudi Arabia had the highest number followed by Kuwait, UAE, and then Oman. Kuwait had the highest profile of publication when normalised to population size, followed by Qatar. Oman is the lowest in this ranking. Overall, the six countries showed a rising trend in publication numbers with Oman having a significant increase from 1990 to 2005. There was a significant relationship between the number of physicians and the number of publications. Conclusion: The research productivity from GGC has experienced complex and fluctuating growth in the past 40 years. Future prospects for increasing research productivity are discussed with particular reference to the situation in Oman. PMID:22375257

  5. Do socioeconomic factors influence breast cancer screening practices among Arab women in Qatar?

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Al Khater, Al-Hareth; Al Kuwari, Mohamed Ghaith; Al-Bader, Salha Bujassoum; Al-Meer, Nabila; Abdulmalik, Mariam; Singh, Rajvir; Chaudhry, Sofia; Fung, Tak

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Breast cancer incidence rates are rising in Qatar. Although the Qatari government provides subsidised healthcare and screening programmes that reduce cost barriers for residents, breast cancer screening (BCS) practices among women remain low. This study explores the influence of socioeconomic status on BCS among Arab women in Qatar. Setting A multicentre, cross-sectional quantitative survey was conducted with 1063 Arab women (87.5% response rate) in Qatar from March 2011 to July 2011. Women who were 35?years or older and had lived in Qatar for at least 10?years were recruited from seven primary healthcare centres and women's health clinics in urban and semiurban regions of Qatar. Associations between socioeconomic factors and BCS practice were estimated using ?2 tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results Findings indicate that less than one-third of the participants practised BCS appropriately, whereas less than half of the participants were familiar with recent BCS guidelines. Married women and women with higher education and income levels were significantly more likely to be aware of and to practise BCS than women who had lower education and income levels. Conclusions Findings indicate low levels of awareness and low participation rates in BCS among Arab women in Qatar. Socioeconomic factors influence these women's participation in BCS activities. The strongest predictors for BCS practice are higher education and higher income levels. Recommendations Additional research is needed to explore the impact of economic factors on healthcare seeking behaviours in the Middle Eastern countries that have a high national gross domestic product where healthcare services are free or heavily subsidised by the government; promotion of BCS and intervention strategies in these countries should focus on raising awareness about breast cancer, the cost and benefit of early screening for this disease, particularly among low-income women. PMID:25613951

  6. 78 FR 39712 - Critical Infrastructure Protection and Cyber Security Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia and Kuwait...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...Administration Critical Infrastructure Protection and Cyber Security Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia and Kuwait Clarification...participants is selected, all interested U.S. IT and cyber-security firms and trade organizations which have not...

  7. Implementation of Simple Measures for Savings Water and Energy Consumption in Kuwait Government Buildings

    E-print Network

    Albaharani, H.; Al-Mulla, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives in details the efforts made by the Public Services Department (PSD) to reduce water and energy consumptions in the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labour's (MOSAL) buildings in Kuwait. PSD manages around 125 buildings distributed...

  8. Carbon recycling in ophiolite-hosted carbonates, Oman-UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, A.; Jenkin, G. R.; Smith, D. J.; Styles, M. T.; Naden, J.; Boyce, A. J.; Bryant, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale surface and subsurface freshwater carbonate deposits of probable Quaternary age have formed on the Oman-UAE ophiolite. Here, serpentinisation reactions in ultramafic rocks have produced calcite and magnesite. These carbonates are frequently cited as examples of natural atmospheric CO2 sequestration, but the possibility of carbon recycling has not been addressed. The aim of this study is to assess the degree of atmospheric CO2 being incorporated into carbonates versus that which has been recycled from alternative sources such as soil CO2, or limestones that underlie the ophiolite. This has been determined through ?13C/?18O, 87Sr/86Sr and 14C analysis of all major carbonate lithofacies identified. Our analyses of modern carbonate crusts forming on the surface of stagnant hyperalkaline (pH >11) waters show highly depleted ?13C and ?18O values (-25.5‰ ×0.5 PDB and -16.8‰ ×0.5 PDB respectively). This depletion has been attributed to a kinetic isotope effect occurring during atmospheric CO2 exchange with Ca(OH)2 hyperalkaline waters [1]. By comparison, inactive travertine deposits show a large range in ?13C (-10.5 to -21.8‰ PDB) which lies on a trajectory from the composition of modern crusts towards bicarbonate fluids in equilibrium with soil CO2. We interpret this trend as being produced by the mixing of different carbon sources, either at the time of formation or during later alteration. Modern carbonates and inactive travertines also have 87Sr/86Sr ratios and Sr concentrations similar to Cretaceous and Tertiary limestones which surround the ophiolite, whilst subsurface veins also display 87Sr/86Sr ratios similar to these Cretaceous limestones. Carbon recycling can also be determined with 14C. Modern atmospheric CO2 has a global average of 105-106% modern 14C (pMC), therefore freshwater carbonates forming solely from atmospheric CO2 would be expected to contain >100 pMC. However, modern carbonates display varied results from 94.5-101.4 pMC. Low values could be caused by meteoric waters incorporating 14C 'dead' carbon through the dissolution of limestones and/or uptake of soil CO2. This 'dead' carbon would then be assimilated into veins and surface deposits, offsetting pMC values. Inactive travertines show significant fluctuations in 14C values within a single hand sample, where stratigraphically younger samples give older radiocarbon 'ages' outside of error. These fluctuations may have been caused by the presence of limestone sourced 'dead' carbon in waters at time of formation, surface runoff containing soil CO2 or by later recrystallisation. Isotopic evidence indicates that mixing of contemporary atmospheric carbon and recycled older carbon has taken place during the on-going carbonation of the Oman-UAE ophiolite sequence. Failure to account for this recycled carbon could lead to inaccurate estimates of natural CO2 sequestration rates. References [1] Clark, I.D. and Fontes, J. (1990) Palaeoclimatic reconstruction in Northern Oman based on carbonates from hyperalkaline groundwaters. Quaternary Res, 33, 320-336

  9. Probing Shallow Aquifers in Northern Kuwait Using Airborne Sounding Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggy, E.; Fadlelmawla, A.; Farr, T. G.; Al-Rashed, M.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the global warming observations, scientific interest and data analyses have concentrated on the earth Polar Regions and forested areas, as they provide direct measurable impacts of large scale environmental changes. Unfortunately, the arid environments, which represent ~20% of the earth surface, have remained poorly studied. Yet water rarity and freshness, drastic changes in rainfall, flash floods, high rates of aquifer discharge and an accelerated large-scale desertification process are all alarming signs that suggest a substantial large-scale climatic variation in those areas that can be correlated to the global change that is affecting the volatile dynamic in arid zones. Unfortunately the correlations, forcings and feedbacks between the relevant processes (precipitation, surface fresh water, aquifer discharge, sea water rise and desertification) in these zones remain poorly observed, modeled, let alone understood. Currently, local studies are often oriented toward understanding small-scale or regional water resources and neither benefit from nor feedback to the global monitoring of water vapor, precipitation and soil moisture in arid and semi-arid areas. Furthermore techniques to explore deep subsurface water on a large scale in desertic environments remain poorly developed making current understanding of earth paleo-environment, water assessment and exploration efforts poorly productive and out-phased with current and future needs to quantitatively understand the evolution of earth water balance. To address those deficiencies we performed a comprehensive test mapping of shallow subsurface hydro-geological structures in the western Arabic peninsula in Kuwait, using airborne low frequency sounding radars with the main objectives to characterize shallow fossil aquifers in term of depth, sizes and water freshness. In May 2011, an experimental airborne radar sounder operating at 50 MHz was deployed in Kuwait and demonstrated an ability to penetrate down to the water table ~35 m deep in Um-Al-Aish and Al-Rawdateen aquifers located on the northern part of Kuwait. In addition the radar achieved penetration into several dry sediments down to 65 m deep mapping the succession of residual gravel deposits. The obtained radargrams of several kilometers-long traced the variability in the water table depth and identified the discharge location of the Al-Rawdateen aquifer. These radar cross-sections were verified through comparisons with water wells, Transient Electromagnetic Method and Resistivity profiles. We will discuss the implication of these results for performing future airborne and orbital detailed mapping of the occurrence and spatial distribution of shallow aquifers in the most arid desert regions on Earth to understand ground water hydrology, enhance ground water flow models and provide new insights into available water resources and recent paleo-climate changes.

  10. 75 FR 78338 - Meeting of the United States-Oman Joint Forum on Environmental Cooperation Pursuant to the United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ...January 9, 2011, at a venue to be announced...Oman Memorandum of Understanding on Environmental...gov for the specific time and place. See below...background and purpose of the meeting. During...Oman will present a brief history of...

  11. Cost of Cultivation of Tomato in Kuwait in Uncooled Plastic Tunnel System - A Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Abdal; M. Suleiman; N. R. Bhat; S. Jacob

    Tomato is one of the main vegetable crops in Kuwait with a total greenhouse production of 39,218.3 tonnes and with a value of $ 9.58 million in 2004. Because of the country's harsh climate, scarce water resources and poor-quality land resources, protected agriculture has a significant role in Kuwait's agricultural development. Tomato is grown in 25% of total area under

  12. Live food production using batch culture and chemostat systems in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tawfiq S. Abu-Rezq; Jaber Al-Shimmari; Peter Dias

    1997-01-01

    A comparison of live food production using batch andchemostat systems between the facilities initiated in1988 and the re-establishment of new larger chemostatsystems, after Kuwait‘s liberation, is made. The livefood production dynamics achieved during the 1995–1996 spawning season of Shaem (Acanthopagrus latus)are discussed. Growth rate of the rotifers (Brachionusplicatilis) treated 24 h with a mixture of marinealgal species (Nannochloropsis, Isochrysis,Tetraselmis, Chlorella)

  13. Radioactivity concentrations in sediments and their correlation to the coastal structure in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. R. Saad; D. Al-Azmi

    2002-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometric measurements were performed on sediment samples from the coast of Kuwait to study the concentration of natural as well as man-made radioactive sources. The coast of Kuwait, which extends for some 170km is mainly soft sedimentary colitic limestones or sandstones, overlaid in many areas with beach or wind-blown sand. In the north, suspended material from the Shatt Al-Arab

  14. Late Precambrian-Cambrian sediments of Huqf group, Sultanate of Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Gorin, G.E. (Shell U.K. Exploration and Production, London, England); Racz, L.G.; Walter, M.R.

    1982-12-01

    The Huqf Group is the oldest known sedimentary sequence overlying crystalline basement in the Sultanate of Oman. It crops out on a broad regional high, the Huqf Axis, which forms a dominating structural element on the southeastern edge of the Arabian peninsula. Subsurface and outcrop evidence within and outside of Oman suggests that the sediments of the Huqf Group lie within the age span of late Precambrian to Early-Middle Cambrian. The Huqf Group is subdivided into five formations corresponding to an alternation of clastics (Abu Mahara and Shuram Formations) and carbonates (Khufai and Buah Formations) deposited in essentially shallow marine to supratidal (or fluviatile) conditions and terminated by an evaporitic sequence (Ara Formation). Evaporites are absent on the Huqf Axis, but they are thickly developed to the west over a large part of southern and central Oman, where they acted as the major structure former of most of Oman's fields, and even locally pierced up to the surface. Regional correlations suggest that the predominantly carbonate-evaporitic facies of the Huqf Group was widely distributed in late Precambrian-Early Cambrian time: the Huqf basin is tentatively considered part of a belt of evaporitic basins and intervening carbonate platforms, which stretched across the Pangea landmass from the Indian subcontinent (Salt Range of Pakistan) through South Yemen, Oman, and Saudi Arabia into the gulf states and Iran (Hormuz Series and carbonate platform north of the Zagros).

  15. Spatio-temporal pattern of sylvatic rabies in the Sultanate of Oman, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Muhammad Hammad; Ward, Michael P; Body, Mohammed; Al-Rawahi, Abdulmajeed; Wadir, Ali Awlad; Al-Habsi, Saif; Saqib, Muhammad; Ahmed, Mohammed Sayed; Almaawali, Mahir Gharib

    2013-07-01

    Rabies was first reported in the Sultanate of Oman is 1990. We analysed passive surveillance data (444 samples) collected and reported between 2006 and 2010. During this period, between 45 and 75% of samples submitted from suspect animals were subsequently confirmed (fluorescent antibody test, histopathology and reverse transcription PCR) as rabies cases. Overall, 63% of submitted samples were confirmed as rabies cases. The spatial distribution of species-specific cases were similar (centred in north-central Oman with a northeast-southwest distribution), although fox cases had a wider distribution and an east-west orientation. Clustering of cases was detected using interpolation, local spatial autocorrelation and scan statistical analysis. Several local government areas (wilayats) in north-central Oman were identified where higher than expected numbers of laboratory-confirmed rabies cases were reported. For fox rabies, more clusters (local spatial autocorrelation analysis) and a larger clustered area (scan statistical analysis) were detected. In Oman, monthly reports of fox rabies cases were highly correlated (rSP>0.5) with reports of camel, cattle, sheep and goat rabies. The best-fitting ARIMA model included a seasonality component. Fox rabies cases reported 6 months previously best explained rabies reported cases in other animal species. Despite likely reporting bias, results suggest that rabies exists as a sylvatic cycle of transmission in Oman and an opportunity still exists to prevent establishment of dog-mediated rabies. PMID:23375085

  16. The clumped isotopic record of Neoproterozoic carbonates, Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, K. D.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Osburn, M. R.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Huqf Supergroup of the Sultanate of Oman records several important events in latest Precambrian time, including two glaciations in the Abu Mahara Group (ca. 725 - <645 Ma), the enigmatic Shuram carbon isotope excursion in the Nafun Group (ca. <645-547 Ma), and the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary in the Ara Group (ca. 547-540 Ma). This interval contains several extreme isotopic excursions, hypothesized to record perturbations of the surficial Earth carbon cycle or post-depositional diagenetic processes. Rigorous interpretation of these records requires a more thorough assessment of diagenetic processes. To better understand the significance and cause of these large amplitude isotopic excursions, we employed carbonate clumped isotope thermometry. This method allows us to estimate the absolute temperature of carbonate precipitation, including recrystallization, based on the temperature dependent abundance of carbonate ions containing both 13C and 18O. These estimates are accompanied by a measurement of carbonate ?18O, which in conjunction with temperature, can be used to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the fluid from which the carbonate precipitated. We analyzed stratigraphically constrained samples from a range of paleoenvironments with differing burial histories (1 - >10km maximum burial depth) to constrain the temperature and fluid composition of recrystallization. Clumped isotope temperatures from Huqf Supergroup samples range from 35-175°C. The isotopic composition of the fluid these rocks equilibrated with ranges from -3.7 to 15.7% VSMOW. This large range in temperature and fluid composition separates into distinct populations that differ systematically with independent constraints on petrography, stratigraphy and burial history. The data indicate the Abu Mahara, Nafun and Ara groups have unique diagenetic histories. In central Oman, the post-glacial Abu Mahara cap dolostone shows high temperature, rock buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 176°C; ?18Ofluid = 15% VSMOW), the Nafun Group generally experienced lower temperature, fluid buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 69°C; ?18Ofluid = 1% VSMOW) and the Ara Group exhibits higher temperature, rock buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 85°C; ?18Ofluid = 6% VSMOW). Together these data help constrain the differential influence of carbonate diagenesis on the profound isotope excursions of the latest proterozoic.

  17. Trends in extreme temperature and precipitation in Muscat, Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawardhana, L. N.; Al-Rawas, G. A.

    2014-09-01

    Changes in frequency and intensity of weather events often result in more frequent and intensive disasters such as flash floods and persistent droughts. In Oman, changes in precipitation and temperature have already been detected, although a comprehensive analysis to determine long-term trends is yet to be conducted. We analysed daily precipitation and temperature records in Muscat, the capital city of Oman, mainly focusing on extremes. A set of climate indices, defined in the RClimDex software package, were derived from the longest available daily series (precipitation over the period 1977-2011 and temperature over the period 1986-2011). Results showed significant changes in temperature extremes associated with cooling. Annual maximum value of daily maximum temperature (TX), on average, decreased by 1°C (0.42°C/10 year). Similarly, the annual minimum value of daily minimum temperature (TN) decreased by 1.5°C (0.61°C/10 year), which, on average, cooled at a faster rate than the maximum temperature. Consequently, the annual count of days when TX > 45°C (98th percentile) decreased from 8 to 3, by 5 days. Similarly, the annual count of days when TN < 15°C (2nd percentile) increased from 5 to 15, by 10 days. Annual total precipitation averaged over the period 1977-2011 is 81 mm, which shows a tendency toward wetter conditions with a 6 mm/10 year rate. There is also a significant tendency for stronger precipitation extremes according to many indices. The contribution from very wet days to the annual precipitation totals steadily increases with significance at 75% level. When The General Extreme Value (GEV) probability distribution is fitted to annual maximum 1-day precipitation, the return level of a 10-year return period in 1995-2011 was estimated to be 95 mm. This return level in the recent decade is about 70% higher than the return level for the period of 1977-1994. These results indicate that the long-term wetting signal apparent in total precipitation can be attributed largely to the increases in extreme precipitation in recent decades.

  18. Ozone chemistry in the smoke from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.A.; Hobbs, P.V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1992-09-20

    Ozone depletion occurred in the core of the plume of smoke from the Kuwait oil fires within 100 km of the fires, primarily in regions where NO{sub x} concentrations were high and ultraviolet flux was near zero. Rapid conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} can explain almost all of the ozone loss. Ozone was produced in diffuse regions of the plume, where the ultraviolet flux was higher than in the core. However, due to the relatively high ratio of nonmethane hydrocarbons to NO{sub x}, ozone production was slow. Since ozone was produced in a much larger volume than it was depleted, the plume as a whole was a source of ozone on a regional scale. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Determinants of job satisfaction among selected care providers in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Shah, M A; Chowdhury, R I; al-Enezi, N; Shah, N M

    2001-01-01

    The study reports job satisfaction among a sample of 370 physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and medical laboratory technologists in the Ministry of Health hospitals in Kuwait. Job satisfaction was measured using Dunnette's scale. The respondents in all four categories were satisfied with all aspects of their jobs except salary. The medical laboratory technologists were, however, dissatisfied with professional advancement as well. The physicians were found to be most satisfied, closely followed by nurses and pharmacists, while medical laboratory technologists were least satisfied. Multivariate analysis was used to assess the net effects of background and work environment characteristics on overall job satisfaction. Introduction to job, in-service training, and monthly income had significant positive effects on overall job satisfaction. These findings may have serious implications for health care delivery systems that recruit expatriate care providers. PMID:11398232

  20. Celiac disease in children: is it a problem in Kuwait?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qabandi, Wafa’a; Buhamrah, Eman; Al-Abdulrazzaq, Dalia; Hamadi, Khaled; Al Refaee, Fawaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine triggered by gluten ingestion. The objective of this study is to describe our experience with CD children in Kuwait. Methods The records of children with CD seen in the pediatric gastroenterology unit between February 1998 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were referred because of symptoms or positive CD antibody screening of a high-risk group (type 1 diabetes and Down syndrome). Results Forty-seven patients were diagnosed: 53% were symptomatic and 47% were identified by screening. The median age at diagnosis was 66 (range 7–189) months. All cases were biopsy-proven except one. The symptomatic patients were significantly younger than those identified following screening (P<0.004). In the whole group, 66% were females and 77% were Kuwaitis; 9% had a positive family history of CD. The estimated cumulative incidence was 6.9/105. The median duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 8.5 (range 2–54) months. Failure to thrive was the most common presenting complaint (72%) followed by diarrhea (64%) and abdominal distension (56%). Atypical manifestations were seen in 60% of patients. Underweight and short stature were confirmed in 19% and 17% of patients, respectively. Overweight and obesity were detected in 14% and 6%, respectively. CD serology was based on a combination of antiendomysial and antigliadin antibodies. The median follow up was 24 (range 12–144) months. All patients were commenced on a gluten free diet, but good compliance was only achieved in 78%. Conclusion The low frequency of childhood CD in Kuwait could probably be attributed to either an underestimation of the atypical presentations or failure of proper screening. Also, adherence to a gluten free diet is a major problem in our population. PMID:25565879

  1. Weed vegetation ecology of arable land in Salalah, Southern Oman.

    PubMed

    El-Sheikh, Mohamed A

    2013-07-01

    This paper applies multivariate statistical methods to a data set of weed relevés from arable fields in two different habitat types of coastal and mountainous escarpments in Southern Oman. The objectives were to test the effect of environmental gradients, crop plants and time on weed species composition, to rank the importance of these particular factors, and to describe the patterns of species composition and diversity associated with these factors. Through the application of TWINSPAN, DCA and CCA programs on data relating to 102 species recorded in 28 plots and farms distributed in the study area, six plant communities were identified: I- Dichanthium micranthum, II- Cynodon dactylon-D. micranthum, III- Convolvulus arvensis, IV- C. dactylon-Sonchus oleraceus, V- Amaranthus viridis and VI- Suaeda aegyptiaca-Achyranthes aspera. The ordination process (CCA) provided a sequence of plant communities and species diversity that correlated with some anthropogenic factors, physiographic variables and crop types. Therefore, length of time since farm construction, disturbance levels and altitude are the most important factors related to the occurrence of the species. The perennial species correlated with the more degraded mountain areas of new farm stands, whereas most of the annuals correlated with old lowland and less disturbed farms. PMID:23961246

  2. Discharge against Medical Advice among Children in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sadoon, Muna; Al-Shamousi, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Discharge against medical advice (DAMA) is a major problem in healthcare delivery as it can complicate the health problems from which patients are suffering. The aim of this study was to understand DAMA among children in a tertiary teaching hospital in Oman and to evaluate the documentation of the events in the medical records. Methods: A retrospective survey of the medical records of patients discharged against medical advice over a two-year interval was performed (2004–2006). Results: Of the 11,802 admissions, there were 38 cases of DAMA, giving a prevalence rate of 0.32%. In 39.5% of the cases, the discharge happened within 24 hours of hospital admission. The majority of the cases were infants (n = 24; 63.25%). The diagnosis at discharge in some cases included life-threatening conditions. However, in 57.9% of the cases, the reasons for DAMA were neither reported nor documented in the patients’ medical records. Conclusion: Although the results of this study yielded a low prevalence rate compared to the rates reported in other studies, the occurrence of DAMA for children in a tertiary hospital is a distressing phenomenon. It was evident that the documentation of the DAMA process was poor. More studies should be conducted to understand the details of the problem. Policies should be established and implemented in order to attempt to reduce DAMA among child patients and to protect them from the consequences of such discharges. PMID:24273663

  3. Weed vegetation ecology of arable land in Salalah, Southern Oman

    PubMed Central

    El-Sheikh, Mohamed A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper applies multivariate statistical methods to a data set of weed relevés from arable fields in two different habitat types of coastal and mountainous escarpments in Southern Oman. The objectives were to test the effect of environmental gradients, crop plants and time on weed species composition, to rank the importance of these particular factors, and to describe the patterns of species composition and diversity associated with these factors. Through the application of TWINSPAN, DCA and CCA programs on data relating to 102 species recorded in 28 plots and farms distributed in the study area, six plant communities were identified: I- Dichanthium micranthum, II- Cynodon dactylon–D. micranthum, III- Convolvulus arvensis, IV- C. dactylon–Sonchus oleraceus, V- Amaranthus viridis and VI- Suaeda aegyptiaca–Achyranthes aspera. The ordination process (CCA) provided a sequence of plant communities and species diversity that correlated with some anthropogenic factors, physiographic variables and crop types. Therefore, length of time since farm construction, disturbance levels and altitude are the most important factors related to the occurrence of the species. The perennial species correlated with the more degraded mountain areas of new farm stands, whereas most of the annuals correlated with old lowland and less disturbed farms. PMID:23961246

  4. Shore litter along sandy beaches of the Gulf of Oman.

    PubMed

    Claereboudt, Michel R

    2004-11-01

    Beach debris abundance and weight were estimated from surveys on 11 beaches of the Gulf of Oman along the Omani coast. Debris were collected on two occasions from 100 m transects, sorted and categorized by origin and type. Overall contaminations ranged from 0.43 to 6.01 items m(-1) of beach front on different beaches with a mean value of 1.79+/-1.04 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of weight, contamination levels ranged from 7.8 to 75.44 gm(-1) of beach front with a mean contamination of 27.02+/-14.48 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of numbers of items, plastic debris ranked first on all beaches followed by either wood items or other organic materials such as cigarette butts. Industrial debris remained few on all beaches (<10%). Most debris had a local origin and, in terms of numbers, were associated with beach recreational activities whereas fishing debris represented the largest proportion of the debris in terms of weight. There were notable differences between beaches in the relative abundance of recreation-related and fishing-related debris. PMID:15530520

  5. Case studies from Oman for coiled tubing deployed completion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.W.; Conrad, B.

    1996-09-01

    Although the use of ultra-large coiled tubing to complete wells is relatively new, it is gaining widespread industry application. This paper will detail the equipment necessary to perform an operation of this type and will present information from several case studies in Oman in which an operator has successfully deployed completion equipment on 3-1/2-inch-OD coiled tubing. In addition to a discussion of the equipment required to perform the necessary operations, the trial parameters that were established by this operator will be given. The information presented has been selected to allow an initial evaluation to be made of coiled tubing completions in general and will help to determine whether this method can prove to be less expensive than traditional rig-based completions. The topics presented have been chosen to provide the reader with a thorough understanding of the techniques and preparation needed to execute a coiled tubing completion. The summary of experiences will conclude that this innovative completion technique can be a viable method for completing wells. Although long-term advantages regarding production and well maintenance cannot yet be determined, the operator`s experiences to date have confirmed his initial belief that use of coiled tubing in ultra-large continuous-pipe applications can be cost effective.

  6. Monitoring Microseismicity in a Carbonate Oil Field, North Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hussain, I.; Al-Lazki, A.; Al-Hashmi, S.; Al-Toubi, K.; Al-Shijbi, Y.; Al-Saifi, M.; Al-Kindy, F.; Ibi, O.

    2006-12-01

    Microseismicity was monitored continuously for 2003 and 2004 years using shallow downhole seismic network in a carbonate oil field in Northern Oman. A total of 406 microearthquake events were analyzed to assess events location relative to producing horizons. The depth of the microearthquakes ranges from 0 to 2.95 km below the ground surface. The events location is confined to the carbonate reservoir boundary and temporally correlates well with the gas production, total fluid productions and water injection for the 2003 year. There is no temporal correlation between oil production and seismic activity for the 2003. Direct month to month temporal correlation is not apparent between any of oil, gas, fluid productions/water injections and the microseismic activity for the 2004 year. However, a strong temporal correlation between gas production and the number of events and an improved correlation between the oil production and the number of events were obtained when applying a time lag of one month. The focal plane solutions for the largest events in the 2003 indicate normal faulting with extensional stress is in the NW-SE directions. The spatial and temporal distribution of seismic events in the carbonate field fit the characteristics of reservoir induced seismicity and the triggering mechanism can be explained by the Mohr envelope criterion. This indicates that the reservoir layers are critically stressed and the pore pressure is changing at variable rate.

  7. Cabled ocean observatories in Sea of Oman and Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMarco, Steven F.; Wang, Zhankun; Jochens, Ann; Stoessel, Marion; Howard, Matthew K.; Belabbassi, Leila; Ingle, Stephanie; du Vall, Ken

    2012-07-01

    An ocean observatory—consisting of a real-time, cabled array in the Sea of Oman and an internally recording, autonomous mooring array recently upgraded to a cabled array in the northern Arabian Sea—celebrated more than 2500 days of continuous operation in July 2012. The observatory, which measures a range of properties, such as water current velocities, temperature, salinity, pressure, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity, is part of the Lighthouse Ocean Research Initiative (LORI) project [du Vall et al., 2011], which was designed as a pilot project and installed in 2005 in the region off Abu Bakara (Figures 1a and 1b). The initial goal of the project was to prove that an in situ, cabled ocean observatory can return high-quality scientific data on a real-time basis over longer time periods than conventional moored systems. That same year, an autonomous array was deployed off Ras al Hadd and on Murray Ridge in the Arabian Sea (Figure 1a).

  8. An analysis of wind and solar energy resources for the State of Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhusainan, Haya Nasser

    Kuwait is an important producer of oil and gas. Its rapid socio-economic growth has been characterized by increasing population, high rates of urbanization, and substantial industrialization, which is transforming it into a large big energy consumer as well. In addition to urbanization, climatic conditions have played an important function in increasing demand for electricity in Kuwait. Electricity for thermal cooling has become essential in the hot desert climate, and its use has developed rapidly along with the economic development, urbanization, and population growth. This study examines the long-term wind and solar resources over the Kuwait to determine the feasibility of these resources as potential sustainable and renewable energy sources. The ultimate goal of this research is to help identify the potential role of renewable energy in Kuwait. This study will examine the drivers and requirements for the deployment of these energy sources and their possible integration into the electricity generation sector to illustrate how renewable energy can be a suitable resource for power production in Kuwait and to illustrate how they can also be used to provide electricity for the country. For this study, data from sixteen established stations monitored by the meteorological department were analyzed. A solar resource map was developed that identifies the most suitable locations for solar farm development. A range of different relevant variables, including, for example, electric networks, population zones, fuel networks, elevation, water wells, streets, and weather stations, were combined in a geospatial analysis to predict suitable locations for solar farm development and placement. An analysis of recommendations, future energy targets and strategies for renewable energy policy in Kuwait are then conducted. This study was put together to identify issues and opportunities related to renewable energy in the region, since renewable energy technologies are still limited in Kuwait because, compared to the cost of conventional electricity in Kuwait, the cost of renewable energy-based electricity is very high. However, the abundant availability of the solar and wind energy as clean renewable energy in Kuwait offers the country significant opportunities to become a leader in the renewable energy sector. In a competition with subsidized oil and gas energy, the success of renewable energy technologies in Kuwait will be subject to the ability of the state to introduce supporting policies, including financial incentives and a regulatory framework to encourage deployment and reduce cost.

  9. Sedimentary facies, mineralogy, and geochemistry of the sulphate-bearing Miocene Dam Formation in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. G. Dill; R. Botz; Z. Berner; D. Stüben; S. Nasir; H. Al-Saad

    2005-01-01

    The Miocene deposits of the Dam Formation were deposited in a narrow seaway stretching along the western edge of the Qatar Arch. During the initial stages of basin evolution the rising Zagros Mts. delivered debris in this fore deep basin. The paleocurrent and paleogeographic zonation are reflected by the heavy mineral assemblage, by the spatial distribution of phyllosilicates and the

  10. The neglected epidemic: Road traffic accidents in a developing country, State of Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdulbari Bener

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the study is to explore the pattern of road traffic accidents (RTA) and their causes in the State of Qatar. A total of 52?160 RTA, 1130 injuries and 85 fatalities were registered during the year 2000. The data on RTA, injuries and fatalities was obtained from the Traffic Department of the Ministry of Interior, Supreme Council for

  11. Fatty acid composition of eleven algae from coastal zones of Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. I. Heiba

    1989-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of eleven species of algae belonging to Rhodophyceae, collected from the coastal zones of Qatar, are reported. The major fatty acids identified were palmitic (16:0), myristic (14:0), oleic (18:1), eicosodienoic (20:2), linoleic (18:2), stearic (18:0) and hexadecaenoic acid (16:1).

  12. Roles and Responsibilities of Teaching Assistants in Primary Independent Schools of Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Eman; Allen, Nancy; Almula, Badriya; Al Motawaha, Fatma; Fakhro, Aisha

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the roles and responsibilities of teaching assistants in the primary independent schools in the State of Qatar and to determine whether these roles and responsibilities differed for subgroups in our sample. Results from the study were used to inform and improve certificate programs for teaching assistants.…

  13. Mothers' Perceptions of the Treatment of Their Children with Disabilities in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alyn K.

    2011-01-01

    This article constitutes one part of a study of the perceptions of mothers of children with disabilities in Qatar with the purpose of obtaining mothers' unique perceptions of treatment of their children within their community. Participants included 40 mothers of one or more children with disabilities from ages 4 to 19 who attended the same…

  14. Aspects of the safety of fish caught off the coast of Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H Al-Jedah; R. K Robinson

    2001-01-01

    Uncooked, edible portions (including skin) of 20 species of marine fish popular with consumers in Qatar were examined for levels of copper, zinc, lead and mercury, as well as for the presence of enteric pathogens that might indicate faecal pollution of fishing grounds or careless handling during landing of the catch. The maximum level of detected mercury was 0.24mgkg?1, while

  15. Lessons Learned from Developing and Implementing the Qatar Student Assessment System. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gabriella; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Broer, Markus; Mariano, Louis T.; Froemel, J. Enrique; Goldman, Charles A.; DaVanzo, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of Qatar's standards-based student assessment system, the first in the region, offers several lessons for other nations instituting similar reforms. These include the need to coordinate on standards and assessment development, allow sufficient time for a fully aligned assessment, and communicate about the purposes and uses of testing.…

  16. An International Collaboration: Establishing an Education Collection in a Library in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Texas A&M University has a history of international collaboration, cooperation and global outreach. Texas A&M University at Qatar provides engineering students in the Middle East with an education, and ultimately, a degree comparable to that found on our home campus in College Station. The Texas A&M University Libraries have provided curricular…

  17. Exploring the Relationship between Organizational Learning and Career Resilience among Faculty Members at Qatar University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Two main purposes guide this study. The first is to assess the level of individual, group, and organizational learning at Qatar University (QU), and the level of career resilience among its faculty members. The second is to explore the relationships between these levels of learning at QU and the career resilience of its faculty members.…

  18. Adequacy, Accountability, Autonomy and Equity in a Middle Eastern School Reform: The Case of Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Tanner, Jeffery C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines Qatar's recent and ambitious school reform in the early stages of its implementation against a set of four criteria for successful education systems drawn from guidelines developed by the international community: adequacy, accountability, autonomy and gender equity. We investigate both the initial structure of the reform and…

  19. National Student Research Fairs as Evidence for Progress in Qatar's Education for a New Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Margery K.; Alnaimi, Tarfa Nasser; Alhajri, Shaikha Hamad

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, the State of Qatar has positioned itself as a leader of educational reform. In 2004, Education for a New Era (ENE) established internationally benchmarked curriculum in Qatari "Independent Schools". Educational reform was to provide an educated workforce and economic prosperity based on a competitive, knowledge-based…

  20. "Hope in the Life": The Children of Qatar Speak about Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Attiyah, Asma; Lazarus, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    Qatar supports the rights of children with special needs to obtain suitable opportunities to learn and be included with other children. However, the concept of inclusion in education is relatively new in this country. In 2001, the Special Needs Committee of the Supreme Council for Family Affairs set up a task force to begin planning for including…

  1. Promoting Quality and Variety through the Public Financing of Privately Operated Schools in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constant, Louay; Goldman, Charles A.; Zellman, Gail L.; Augustine, Catherine H.; Galama, Titus; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Guarino, C. A.; Karam, Rita; Ryan, Gery W.; Salem, Hanine

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, Qatar began establishing publicly funded, privately operated "independent schools" in parallel with the existing, centralized Ministry of Education system. The reform that drove the establishment of the independent schools included accountability provisions such as (a) measuring school and student performance and (b) distributing school…

  2. Identifying Priorities for Post-Secondary Education in Qatar. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasz, Cathleen; Eide, Eric R.; Martorell, Francisco; Salem, Hanine; Constant, Louay; Goldman, Charles A.; Moini, Joy S.; Nadareishvili, Vazha

    2007-01-01

    Although Qatar has improved its post-secondary educational opportunities, the country's efforts have not undergone a broad strategic review. This study analyzed the extent to which the current offerings can meet the country's future needs and identified priorities for developing further educational options. Researchers found that Qataris' current…

  3. Post-Secondary Education in Qatar: Employer Demand, Student Choice, and Options for Policy. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasz, Cathleen; Eide, Eric R.; Martorell, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Qatar has made significant efforts to improve post-secondary educational opportunities to ensure that its citizens are able to contribute to the country's social and economic goals. These initiatives, however, have not been subjected to a broad strategic review. The authors describe RAND's analysis of skill and occupational demands and related…

  4. Occurrence of aflatoxin in commodities imported into Qatar, 1997-2000

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. W. Abdulkadar; Abdulla Al-Ali; Jassim H. Al-Jedah

    2002-01-01

    The occurrence of aflatoxin in commodities imported into Qatar was investigated from 1999 to 2000. During the 4 years, 351 samples of susceptible commodities were analysed. Aflatoxin was detected in 71 (20%) samples in the range 0.1-20 ?g kg and in 50 (14%) samples above the permitted level of 20 ?g kg. The highest incidence and levels of aflatoxin contamination

  5. Developing a School Finance System for K-12 Reform in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Galama, Titus; Constant, Louay; Gonzalez, Gabriella; Tanner, Jeffery C.; Goldman, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Reform-minded leaders of Qatar, who have embarked on a sweeping reform of their nation's education system, asked RAND to evaluate the education finance system that has been adopted and to offer suggestions for improvements. The authors analyze the system's evolution and resource allocation patterns between 2004 and 2006 and develop analytic tools…

  6. Nutritional Value and Microbiological Safety of Fresh Fruit Juices sold through Retail Outlets in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2002-01-01

    The nutritional value of ten fresh fruit juices purchased from retail outlets in Doha, Qatar was calculated on the basis that approximately 100 g of fruit is used to make one glass of juice (250 ml). Avocado juice was the best source of energy and potassium followed by banana juice, while guava juice was an outstanding source of vitamin C

  7. Qatar's K-12 Education Reform Has Achieved Success in Its Early Years. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Judy

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate progress made in the first years of Qatar's implementation of K-12 education reform, RAND analyzed data from school-level observations, national surveys, and national student assessments. The study found that students in the new, Independent schools were performing better than those in Ministry schools, and there was greater student…

  8. A New System for K-12 Education in Qatar. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Dominic J.; Augustine, Catherine H.; Zellman, Gail L.; Ryan, Gery; Goldman, Charles A.; Stasz, Cathleen; Constant, Louay

    2007-01-01

    The leadership of the Arabian Gulf nation of Qatar, like that of many other countries, views education as the key to future economic, political, and social progress. Many have concluded that a country's ability to compete in the global economy and enable its citizens to take full advantage of technological advances relies on upgrading the quality…

  9. Quality of Life of Caregivers of Children with Autism in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kheir, Nadir; Ghoneim, Ola; Sandridge, Amy L.; Al-Ismail, Muna; Hayder, Sara; Al-Rawi, Fadhila

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Caring for a child diagnosed with autism could affect the quality of life of the caregiver in various different ways. No previous research has assessed the quality of lives of caregivers of children with autism in Qatar. Methods: Caregivers of a child with autism between 3 and 17 years old were recruited from child rehabilitation…

  10. Exploring the relationship between organizational learning and career resilience among faculty members at Qatar University

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdullah M. Abu-Tineh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – Two main purposes guide this study. The first is to assess the level of individual, group, and organizational learning at Qatar University (QU), and the level of career resilience among its faculty members. The second is to explore the relationships between these levels of learning at QU and the career resilience of its faculty members. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This

  11. Development of Education in Qatar (1975/76 and 1976/77).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education and Youth Welfare (Qatar).

    The national educational system of Qatar was established in 1956, when the discovery of oil provided a financial base for educational expansion. The government provides free education from primary school through the university and has stressed a system of incentives for students rather than declaring education compulsory on any level. Four types…

  12. The implications of the relative risk for road mortality on road safety programmes in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Consunji, Rafael J; Peralta, Ruben R; Al-Thani, Hassan; Latifi, Rifat

    2015-04-01

    The epidemiology of road deaths and in particular the relative risk for road mortality (RRRM) in Qatar has not been fully defined. This study will analyse and compare the proportionate mortality and age-specific death rates from road traffic injuries (RTIs) and make recommendations for targeted injury prevention programmes for road safety in Qatar. Data from the Qatar Statistics Authority (QSA), for the year 2010, was collected and analysed. All deaths classified as 'ICD-10 (V89) Motor- or Nonmotor-Vehicle, Accident Type of Vehicle Unspecified' were included. There were 247 RTI related deaths in Qatar in 2010. An overall death rate was computed at 14.4 deaths per 100?000 population. The RRRM varied over 10 times among different populations with Qatari males (QM) having an increased RRRM from 10?years of age, those aged 20-29?years had the highest RRRM of 10.2. The lowest RRRM was for Qatari females who did not have a single reported road fatality in 2010. Populations with a significantly elevated RRRM (ie, RRRM>1.0) were non-Qatari men older than 50?years and Qatari males from the age of 10 onward. Proven and definite programmes must be implemented to reduce these unnecessary deaths among the populations at the highest risk. Multidisciplinary approaches must be implemented and their efficacy evaluated. PMID:24473538

  13. Mapping in the Oman ophiolite using enhanced Landsat Thematic Mapper images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.; Rothery, D. A.; Pontual, A.

    1988-01-01

    The level of apparent lithological discrimination possible with Landsat TM images in the Oman are discussed. It is found that by using parts of the short-wavelength IR spectrum, the discrimination revealed by the TM data is sufficiently uniform throughout the Oman ophiolite to produce lithological maps at 1:100,000 scale. Decorrelation stretching of the data produces images in which allows for the recognition of variations in gabbro composition, the identification of small acidic, gabbroic, and ultramafic intrusions, the discrimation of the uppermost mantle from the deeper mantle, the precise location of the Moho, and the delineation of gossans and areas subject to choritic-epidotic alteration.

  14. "I Found it on the Internet": Preparing for the e-patient in Oman.

    PubMed

    Masters, Ken; Ng'ambi, Dick; Todd, Gail

    2010-08-01

    In the Information Age, the communication patterns between doctor and patient are changing. Using Everett Rogers' theory of Diffusion of Innovations, this paper begins by examining the diffusion of the Internet in the world and in Oman. It then considers the emergence of e-patients. The characteristics of e-patients are described in some detail. The paper ends by describing steps that should be taken when teaching medical students in Oman so that they can be prepared for e-patients. PMID:21509226

  15. Health workforce development planning in the Sultanate of Oman: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Basu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Oman's recent experience in health workforce development may be viewed against the backdrop of the situation just three or four decades ago, when it had just a few physicians and nurses (mostly expatriate). All workforce categories in Oman have grown substantially over the last two decades. Increased self-reliance was achieved despite substantial growth in workforce stocks. Stocks of physicians and nurses grew significantly during 1985–2007. This development was the outcome of well-considered national policies and plans. This case outlines how Oman is continuing to turn around its excessive dependence on expatriate workforce through strategic workforce development planning. Case description The Sultanate's early development initiatives focused on building a strong health care infrastructure by importing workforce. However, the policy-makers stressed national workforce development for a sustainable future. Beginning with the formulation of a strategic health workforce development plan in 1991, the stage was set for adopting workforce planning as an essential strategy for sustainable health development and workforce self-reliance. Oman continued to develop its educational infrastructure, and began to produce as much workforce as possible, in order to meet health care demands and achieve workforce self-reliance. Other policy initiatives with a beneficial impact on Oman's workforce development scenario were: regionalization of nursing institutes, active collaboration with universities and overseas specialty boards, qualitative improvement of the education system, development of a strong continuing professional development system, efforts to improve workforce management, planned change management and needs-based micro/macro-level studies. Strong political will and bold policy initiatives, dedicated workforce planning and educational endeavours have all contributed to help Oman to develop its health workforce stocks and gain self-reliance. Discussion and evaluation Oman has successfully innovated workforce planning within a favorable policy environment. Its intensive and extensive workforce planning efforts, with the close involvement of policy-makers, educators and workforce managers, have ensured adequacy of suitable workforce in health institutions and its increased self-reliance in the health workforce. Conclusion Oman's experience in workforce planning and development presents an illustration of a country benefiting from successful application of workforce planning concepts and tools. Instead of being complacent about its achievements so far, every country needs to improve or sustain its planning efforts in this way, in order to circumvent the current workforce deficiencies and to further increase self-reliance and improve workforce efficiency and effectiveness. PMID:19519912

  16. Contribution of GIS and digital archaeology to the interpretation of stratigraphic relations on the Bronze Age site al-Khidr, Failaka island, State of Kuwait1

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on the Bronze Age site al-Khidr, Failaka island, State of Kuwait1 Imagery analyses of trenches 22S and 22T, State of kuwait, was excavated from 2004 till 2008 by the kuwaiti ­ Slovak archaeological Mission (fig

  17. Public’s attitudes towards community pharmacy in Qatar: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Salem, Samah; Mansoor, Hend

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the public’s attitudes towards the community pharmacist’s role in Qatar, to investigate the public’s use of community pharmacy, and to determine the public’s views of and satisfaction with community pharmacy services currently provided in Qatar. Materials and methods Three community pharmacies in Qatar were randomly selected as study sites. Patients 16 years of age and over who were able to communicate in English or Arabic were randomly approached and anonymously interviewed using a multipart pretested survey. Results Over 5 weeks, 58 patients were interviewed (60% response rate). A total of 45% of respondents perceived community pharmacists as having a good balance between health and business matters. The physician was considered the first person to contact to answer drug- related questions by 50% of respondents. Most patients agreed that the community pharmacist should provide them with the medication directions of use (93%) and advise them about the treatment of minor ailments (79%); however, more than 70% didn’t expect the community pharmacist to monitor their health progress or to perform any health screening. Half of the participants (52%) reported visiting the pharmacy at least monthly. The top factor that affected a patient’s choice of any pharmacy was pharmacy location (90%). When asked about their views about community pharmacy services in Qatar, only 37% agreed that the pharmacist gave them sufficient time to discuss their problem and was knowledgeable enough to answer their questions. Conclusion This pilot study suggested that the public has a poor understanding of the community pharmacist’s role in monitoring drug therapy, performing health screening, and providing drug information. Several issues of concern were raised including insufficient pharmacist– patient contact time and unsatisfactory pharmacist knowledge. To advance pharmacy practice in Qatar, efforts may be warranted to address identified issues and to promote the community pharmacist’s role in drug therapy monitoring, drug information provision, and health screening. PMID:21949604

  18. Introverted architecture and the human dimension : the conflict of placemaking in the disconnected urban fabric of Doha, Qatar

    E-print Network

    Sabouni, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    Doha, the capital city of Qatar, has become a metropolis of disconnected inward-facing mega-projects with no regard to the remaining fabric of the city. This can be owed to the relatively short urbanization period that the ...

  19. The early cretaceous evolution of carbonate platforms from northern Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Masse, J.P.; Borgomano, J.; Maskiry, S.Al. (Univ. of Provence, Marseille (France))

    1993-09-01

    In northern Oman (Jebel Akhdar and foothills) Hauterivian to early Aptian shallow carbonate platforms are widely extending and pass laterally to slope and basin environments in the Nakhl zone. Progradational geometries are identified in that zone where significant correlation between thickness and sediment types supports a prominent tectonic control. The platform records four main sedimentary breaks (drowning events). Early Barremian (lower Lekhwair Formation), Late Barremian (basal Kharaib Formation), lowermost early Aptian (upper Kharaib Formation) and middle Aptian (Shuaiba-Al Hassanat formations boundary). The late Aptian-early Albian hiatus (pre-Nahr Umr unconformity) is regarded as an early Albian tectonically driven erosion. In the Nakhl zone, coral-rudist limestones of late Aptian-early Albian (lower Al Hassanat Formation) document an east-west ribbon platform, the southward extension of which was obscured by the middle Albian erosions and rudist limestones of middle to late Albian (upper Al Hassanat Formation), a lateral equivalent of the Nahr Umr circa littoral shaly sediments, document an east-west-trending linear platform. The foregoing points out a northward progradation coeval with a southward transgressive major trend for the Hauterivian-early Aptian interval, a faulted margin corresponding with the Nakhl zone active during the Aptian-Albian, a late Aptian ribbon platform coeval with the Bab basin initiation southward, a regional uplifting and truncation during the early-Albian (Austrian phase), whereas shallow-water carbonates are still forming at the edge of the former platform, and an active linear platform at the northern edge of the Nahr Umr basin, the corresponding drowning contemporaneous with the onset of the Cenomanian platform eastward.

  20. An overview of the Tertiary geology and hydrogeology of the northern part of the Arabian Gulf region with special reference to Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mukhopadhyay; J. Al-Sulaimi; E. Al-Awadi; F. Al-Ruwaih

    1996-01-01

    Tertiary sediments constitute the main source of usable groundwater in Kuwait. Tectonics, depositional environment, lithology and the hydrogeology of these sediments have been reviewed on a regional scale, with special reference to Kuwait. The review showed that Kuwait was situated at the boundary of the stable shelf towards southwest and the unstable shelf towards northeast throughout the Tertiary period. The

  1. This paper provides the first estimates of SGD to the Kuwait coastline in the Arabian Gulf. Seawater evaporation leads to density driven exchange between surface water and groundwater.

    E-print Network

    Highlights This paper provides the first estimates of SGD to the Kuwait coastline in the Arabian. Irrigation is likely a driver of SGD in Kuwait City and other arid urban megacities. Together these process and natural controls on coastal groundwater exchange in an arid region8 (Kuwait)9 10 11 A. Fadlelmawlaa , M

  2. Education in the Gulf Monarchies: Retrospect and Prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahgat, Gawdat

    1999-03-01

    For the last several decades there has been tremendous expansion in the educational facilities in all the six Gulf monarchies (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates). The quality of education, however, does not correspond to the needs of Gulf societies. This study examines three of the apparent deficiencies in the educational system in the region: the mismatch between traditional and modern learning, the imbalance between indigenous and expatriate labor forces, and the gap between men and women. The paper concludes that a fundamental change in the quality of education needs to be made in order to overcome these imbalances.

  3. History in the News: Middle East History, Society, and Culture Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Department of History, University at Albany, SUNY (last reviewed in the January 21, 2000 Scout Report) has put together a useful and straightforward metasite covering resources on the history and culture of the Middle East. History in the News focuses specifically on Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, UAE, and Yemen. Resources are easily browseable by topic (History, Religion, Economics, Maps) or by country. This is a nice place to start one's reading on this newsworthy region of the world.

  4. Gravity field of Kuwait and its relevance to major geological structures

    SciTech Connect

    Warsi, W.E.K. (Univ. of Kuwait, Safat (Kuwait))

    1990-10-01

    Regional gravity surveys were done in the state of Kuwait during 1986-1988. The new gravity maps show a good correlation with geomorphological features as well as with deeper geological structures. The free-air anomaly map clearly reflects the topography of the Jal Az Zor and Ahmadi ridges, and Wadi Al-Batin. The Bouguer anomaly map is dominated by two prominent gravity highs correlatable with subsurface structural arches. The north-trending gravity high in eastern Kuwait represents the effect of a major structure, the Kuwait arch, along which many important oil fields are located. A smaller northwest-trending high mapped in western Kuwait indicates the presence of a second subsurface arch, which in this paper is named the Dibdibba arch. The two gravity highs are separated by a wedge-shaped gravity low presumably caused by thicker sediments of the Dibdibba basin. Magnetic measurements along selected profiles show the two arches to be associated with 100-200-nT (nannotesla) anomalies apparently reflecting the positive subsurface relief of the crystalline basement. Along the length of the Kuwait arch, magnetic data also indicate lateral susceptibility variations possibly related to lithological variations within the basement.

  5. A Review of Adult Obesity Prevalence, Trends, Risk Factors, and Epidemiologic Methods in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Alsmadi, Osama; Behbehani, Kazem

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Kuwait is among the countries with the highest obesity rates worldwide; however, little is known about the state of obesity epidemiology research in Kuwait. In this paper, we therefore review the findings and methodology of studies on the prevalence, trends and risk factors of obesity in Kuwait. Methods. The PubMed database was searched using the keyword combination: obesity and adults and Kuwait. Out of 111 articles, 39 remained after abstract review, and 18 were selected after full-text review. Results. The studies were all cross-sectional and published in the last fifteen years (1997–2012). The sample size ranged from 177 to 38,611 individuals. Only 30% of studies used random sampling. The prevalence (BMI ? 30) in studies with a nationally representative sample ranged from 24% to 48% overall and in adults >50 years was greater than 52%. Rates were significantly higher in women than those in men. Studies that examined trends showed an increase in obesity prevalence between 1980 and 2009. Multiple risk factors including sociocultural factors were investigated in the studies; however, factors were only crudely assessed. Conclusion. There is a need for future studies, particularly surveillance surveys and prospective cohort studies utilizing advanced methods, to monitor trends and to comprehensively assess the factors contributing to the obesity epidemic in Kuwait. PMID:24455212

  6. Water Mangement Intricacies in the Sultanate of Oman The Augmenation—Conservation Conundrum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hassan A. Al-Ajmi; Hayder A. Abdel Rahman

    2001-01-01

    As with most arid regions, the gap between increasing demands for freshwater and the limited available natural resources has increased dramatically in the Sultanate of Oman. This is mainly due to the expansion in agricultural production and improvements in the standard of living with increasing demands per capita for good quality water. Major aquifers are affected from excessive pumping at

  7. Size distributions and sex ratios of sharks caught by Oman's artisanal fishery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Henderson; J. L. McIlwain; H. S. Al-Oufi; S. Al-Sheile; N. Al-Abri

    2009-01-01

    Oman's fishery resources are exploited by artisanal and industrial fisheries, but the former accounts for almost 90% of landings. Within the artisanal fishery, sharks have traditionally been harvested for their flesh, but the development of a valuable export market for shark fin has led to increased utilisation of this resource, and anecdotal information suggests that shark abundance has decreased in

  8. Progress in Developing a National Quality Management System for Higher Education in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Martin; Razvi, Salim; Goodliffe, Tess; Al-Habsi, Fakhriya

    2009-01-01

    The post-secondary education sector in Oman consists of a complex suite of public and private institutions, in a number of distinct segments, offering local and foreign programmes developed through their respective quality assurance systems. The Omani higher education quality management system is undergoing significant advances to address this…

  9. Brief Report: Prevalence of Autistic Spectrum Disorders in the Sultanate of Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Farsi, Yahya M.; Al-Sharbati, Marwan M.; Al-Farsi, Omar A.; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed S.; Brooks, Daniel R.; Waly, Mostafa I.

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) in Oman is unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of ASD among 0-14 year old children. Diagnoses were made as per DSM-IV-TR criteria and supplemented with information collected with the standard Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) questionnaire. A total 113 cases of…

  10. The Tethyan plume: geochemical diversity of Middle Permian basalts from the Oman rifted margin

    E-print Network

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    The Tethyan plume: geochemical diversity of Middle Permian basalts from the Oman rifted margin H in the Saih Hatat tectonic window. They consist predominantly of pillowed basaltic flows among which three trace element contents, and a large range of eNdi values. Group 1 basalts are associated with distal

  11. Magma chambers in the Oman ophiolite: fed from the top and the bottom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Françoise Boudier; Adolphe Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    Recent models of magma chambers at fast-spreading ridges are based on the idea that the entire gabbro section of the oceanic crust crystallizes from a thin melt lens located just below the sheeted dike complex. The shape of the lens has been deduced from seismic reflection data at fast-spreading ridges. On the basis of structural studies in the Oman ophiolite,

  12. Awareness about Autism among School Teachers in Oman: A Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Sharbati, Marwan M.; Al-Farsi, Yahya M.; Ouhtit, Allal; Waly, Mostafa I.; Al-Shafaee, Mohamed; Al-Farsi, Omar; Al-Khaduri, Maha; Al-Said, Mona F.; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Children with special needs such as those with autism spectrum disorder have been recorded as ostracized and stigmatized in many parts of the world. Little is known about whether such negative views are present among mainstream teachers in Oman. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate school teachers' awareness about autism spectrum…

  13. Rotation of the Semail ophiolite (Oman): Additional Paleomagnetic data from the volcanic sequence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mireille Perrin; Guillaume Plenier; Jean-Marie Dautria; Emmanuel Cocuaud; Michel Prévot

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-two flows (247 cores) were sampled in the V1 (Geotimes) and V2 (Lasail) volcanic units of the Semail ophiolite, Oman (Aswad, Fizh, Hilti, Sarami, Wuqbah, and Tayin massifs). Paleomagnetic analysis of the samples was complicated by a large overlap of the two components of magnetization carried by the rocks: a crystalline remanent magnetization (CRM) acquired in the present day field,

  14. Petrogenesis of crustal wehrlites in the Oman ophiolite: Experiments and natural rocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Koepke; S. Schoenborn; M. Oelze; H. Wittmann; S. T. Feig; E. Hellebrand; F. Boudier; R. Schoenberg

    2009-01-01

    In the Wadi Haymiliyah of the Oman ophiolite (Haylayn block), discordant wehrlite bodies ranging in size from tens to hundreds of meters intrude the lower crust at different levels. We combined investigations on natural wehrlites from the Wadi Haymiliyah section with an experimental study on the phase relations in a wehrlitic system in order to constrain the petrogenesis of the

  15. Dhofar 301, 302 and 303: Three New Lunar Highland Meteorites from Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, M. A.; Demidova, S. I.; Patchen, A.; Taylor, L. A.

    2002-03-01

    Three new lunar meteorites were found in the Dhofar region of Oman. They are highland impact breccias, but each is distinct and distinguishable from other lunar meteorites collected nearby. There should be at least 5 different falls of lunar meteorites in the Dhofar region.

  16. Desalination by solar-powered reverse osmosis in a remote area of the Sultanate of Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zaher Al Suleimani; V. Rajendran Nair

    2000-01-01

    The Ministry of Water Resources successfully conducted an experimental study on the use of solar power to desalinate brackish ground water at their Heelat ar Rakah camp, a remote location some 900 km south of Muscat, the capital of Oman. The system comprises components for pre-treatment of pumped well water to separate hydrogen sulphide, acid dosing to correct the pH,

  17. Considerations for introduction of a rotavirus vaccine in Oman: rotavirus disease and economic burden.

    PubMed

    Al Awaidy, S A; Bawikar, S; Al Busaidy, S; Baqiani, S; Al Abedani, I; Varghese, R; Abdoan, H S; Al Abdoon, H; Bhatnagar, S; Al Hasini, K S; Mohan, P; Shah, S; Elamir, E; Klena, J; Ahmed, S F; Teleb, N; Parashar, U; Patel, M M

    2009-11-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of fatal childhood diarrhea worldwide. We provide the first estimates of the health care and economic burden of severe rotavirus disease in Oman. We conducted active, hospital-based surveillance of rotavirus disease at 11 regional public hospitals in Oman, using the guidelines suggested by the generic World Health Organization protocol. From July 2006 through June 2008, all children aged <5 years who were hospitalized for acute gastroenteritis were enrolled in the surveillance program, and their stool samples were tested for rotavirus using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (ID EIA Rotavirus Test; Dako Diagnostics). Rotavirus was detected in samples from 1712 (49%) of 3470 children. These children were hospitalized for a median of 3 days for severe diarrhea. A marked seasonal peak was evident with a majority of the cases occurring from December through May. Of the rotavirus cases, 69% occurred in children aged 6-17 months. We identified a diverse strain pattern in Oman, with G2 (37%), G1 (38%), and G9 (11%) accounting for most of typeable strains. By our burden estimates, the Omani government spends an estimated US$791,817 and US$1.8 million annually to treat rotavirus-associated diarrhea in the outpatient and hospital settings, respectively. A rotavirus vaccination program might substantially reduce the burden of severe diarrhea among children in Oman. PMID:19817605

  18. Education of Children with Vision Impairments in the Sultanate of Oman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadidi, Muna S. Z.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the prevalence and patterns of vision impairment in the Sultanate of Oman. Reviews the types of special education and rehabilitation services offered and future priorities. Concludes that, although at present, few visually impaired children are receiving services, a special education system is evolving into a community-based approach to…

  19. English Language Teaching Reform in Sultanate of Oman: The Case of Theory and Practice Disparity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Issa, Ali S.; Al-Bulushi, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    Sultanate of Oman is one out of many developing countries around the world which have valued English as a very important international language and a tool for achieving multiple purposes. When His Majesty the Sultan came to power in 1970, the government accepted English as the only official foreign language and allocated huge budgets and resources…

  20. FIRST REPORT OF THE RUST MELAMPSORA EUPHORBIAE ON EUPHORBIA HETEROPHYLLA IN OMAN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Euphorbia heterophylla L. or painted spurge or is a serious weed in many parts of the world and considerable efforts have been made to limit its invasiveness and impact on crop productivity. This has included evaluation of fungi as biocontrol agents. In Oman, E. heterophylla is a rare, introduced ...

  1. Geology and seismic structure of the northern section of the Oman ophiolite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikolas I. Christensen; John D. Smewing

    1981-01-01

    In the north Oman mountains, a continuous ophiolite succession is exposed, from tectonized harzuburgities and dunities at the base, through layered gabbros and peridotities, high-level gabbros and plagiogranite, to a dike swarm and pillowed volcanic overlain by pelagic shales. The upper part of this sequence possesses a static metamorphic overprint, which passes downward from greenschist facies in the lowermost volcanics

  2. Similar Paths, Different Destinations: Gender Differences in Teacher Career Paths in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W.; Al-Barwani, Thuwayba; Al Maawali, Fathiya; Jones, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Jones ABSTRACT: Across Oman, girls outnumber and outperform boys at the secondary school level. While welcoming girls' success, the government is concerned that low male achievement may have negative consequences on national competitiveness and economic growth. One reason posited for this discrepancy in achievement is differences in the…

  3. Pregnancy outcomes of diabetic women: Charting Oman’s progress towards the goals of the Saint Vincent Declaration

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Mohammed N.; Youssef, Randa M.; Al-Lawati, Jawad A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Oman provides comprehensive care for the detection and management of diabetes during pregnancy with the goal of reducing or eliminating adverse outcomes for mothers and newborns. We assessed the outcome of pregnancies complicated with diabetes as compared to healthy controls. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A 1-year retrospective review of registry records was conducted on pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pre-gestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM). Of the 5394 women registered, 225 had GDM and 56 had PGDM. Fourteen cases of GDM and 2 cases of PGDM were excluded. For each patient recruited, the next healthy control of the same age and parity was selected. RESULTS: Nearly 80% of diabetic women achieved good glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c <7%). Adjusted for hypertension and body mass index, the risk of macrosomia was three times higher among women with GDM (OR=3.03, 95% CI=1.36-6.75) and up to seven times higher among those with PGDM (OR=7.20, 95% CI=2.30-22.61). A significantly higher risk of cesarean delivery was observed among women with GDM (OR=2.70, 95% CI=1.17-4.03) and PGDM (OR=4.39, 95% CI=1.68-11.49). Admission to the special care baby unit was higher among infants born to mothers with PGDM (OR=5.70, 95% CI=2.40-13.51) and GDM (OR=2.85, 95% CI=1.68-4.83). CONCLUSION: The findings indicate that many of the unfavorable pregnancy outcomes of diabetes for women and infants have not been brought under control despite the comprehensive care provided. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the system of care provided to pregnant women and to identify gaps in achieving the goals of the St. Vincent Declaration. PMID:20622342

  4. Natural recharge and localization of fresh ground water in Kuwait

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstrom, R.E.; Aten, R.E.

    1965-01-01

    Fresh ground water (200 parts per million total dissolved solids and upwards) occurs in portions of Pleistocene sandstone aquifers beneath basins and wadis in north Kuwait where the mean rainfall is about five inches per year. The fresh water is surrounded and underlain by brackish water (> 4000 ppm TDS). Drilling and testing show that fresh water saturation is restricted to wadis and basin areas; in Rawdatain basin it attains a maximum thickness of about 110 feet and a lateral extent of about seven miles. The fresh ground water represents recharge localized, during infrequent, torrential rain storms, in areas of concentrated runoff where sediments in the vadose zone are moderately permeable and depth to the water table is generally less than a hundred feet. Concentration of runoff appears to be the primary control in the localization of recharge. The fresh water percolates downward to the ground-water reservoir following rare storms, then flows in the direction of hydraulic gradient and gradually becomes brackish. Theoretical delineation of the recharge area and ground-water flow pattern in Rawdatain was confirmed by tritium and C14 dating of the water. Brackish ground-water conditions prevail from water table downward in areas where rainfall infiltrates essentially where it falls, permeability of sediments in the vadose zone is low, or the water table is several hundred feet below land surface. In these areas, rainfall is retained and lost within the soil zone or becomes mineralized during deep percolation. ?? 1964.

  5. Application of indices for air quality management in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Khordagui, H.K.; Al-Ajmi, D.N. [Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to adapt an earlier uniform ambient air quality index structure to fit the unique local environmental conditions prevailing in Kuwait. The new index is based on linear segmented functions for calculating subindices and a maximum operator function for calculating the overall index. It incorporates five regularly monitored air pollutants (total suspended particulates. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and ozone), and their corresponding descriptive categories. Due to the very special nature of the natural arid environment in the region and the frequent occurrence of dust storms, total suspended particulates was found to be responsible for the highest values of the ambient air quality index. To overcome this problem in applying the index, a statement should be attached to indicate the {open_quotes}critical air pollutant{close_quotes} causing the index to exceed the permissible standard and the natural origin of the pollutant in the case of dust storms. In general, the index developed was able to reflect the day-to-day variations in ambient air quality in a reasonable fashion. It also reduced the volume of reported data for better dissemination, while retaining the meaning of the information to be communicated. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Impact of aerosol on air temperature in Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, I.

    2010-08-01

    This work uses MODIS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) data observed over Kuwait during the 7-year interval 2000-2007. The values of AOT and the Ångström wavelength exponent ( ?) show a clear annual cycle. These data are categorized into two catalogues in terms of the values of the AOT of the 870 nm channel ( ?870). One catalogue (71 days) includes days with high values of AOT ( ?870 ? 0.75). The most probable "modal" value of ? for these days is 0.52. The other catalogue (1162 days) consists of the background days with a modal value ~ 1.1 for the exponent ?. This analysis is extended to include water vapor content (WVC), surface wind speed (V), visibility (Vis) and the diurnal temperature range (DTR). Chree's method of superposed-epoch analysis is applied to these parameters in order to compare the variation in the daily averages during days with high AOT values with respect to background days. The high values of AOT during the 71 days are positively correlated with aerosol size, near-surface winds and poor visibility. This concludes that the aerosol particles during these days were mostly dust. The mean daily value of the DTR (? T) and visibility reduced significantly during these days. This reduction on DTR is a direct result of increasing the atmospheric opacity due to the presence of dust.

  7. Optical extinction of smoke from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.E. [Radiance Research, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Hobbs, P.V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1992-09-20

    Aircraft-based measurements of optical extinction, optical scattering, and particle mass concentrations were obtained in the smoke from the Kuwait oil fires during May and June 1991. These measurements were used to derive optical absorption, single-scattering albedo ({anti {omega}}), specific absorption and the amount of soot in the smoke. Measurements were made in smoke from individual oil wells, pool fires and in composite smoke plumes. The value of {anti {omega}} for smoke from the individual fires was either 0.35-0.4 (for the black smoke) or 0.85-0.95 (for the white smoke). For the aged composite plume from all of the fires, {anti {omega}} ranged from 0.52 to 0.6. The specific absorption of the composite smoke varied from about 2 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1} near the fires to about 1.5 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1} well downwind. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Drought Analysis for Kuwait Using Standardized Precipitation Index

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of adequate measures to assess and monitor droughts is recognized as a major matter challenging researchers involved in water resources management. The objective of this study is to assess the hydrologic drought characteristics from the historical rainfall records of Kuwait with arid environment by employing the criterion of Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). A wide range of monthly total precipitation data from January 1967 to December 2009 is used for the assessment. The computation of the SPI series is performed for intermediate- and long-time scales of 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The drought severity and duration are also estimated. The bivariate probability distribution for these two drought characteristics is constructed by using Clayton copula. It has been shown that the drought SPI series for the time scales examined have no systematic trend component but a seasonal pattern related to rainfall data. The results are used to perform univariate and bivariate frequency analyses for the drought events. The study will help evaluating the risk of future droughts in the region, assessing their consequences on economy, environment, and society, and adopting measures for mitigating the effect of droughts. PMID:25386598

  9. Modeling Pan Evaporation for Kuwait by Multiple Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    Almedeij, Jaber

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation is an important parameter for many projects related to hydrology and water resources systems. This paper constitutes the first study conducted in Kuwait to obtain empirical relations for the estimation of daily and monthly pan evaporation as functions of available meteorological data of temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. The data used here for the modeling are daily measurements of substantial continuity coverage, within a period of 17 years between January 1993 and December 2009, which can be considered representative of the desert climate of the urban zone of the country. Multiple linear regression technique is used with a procedure of variable selection for fitting the best model forms. The correlations of evaporation with temperature and relative humidity are also transformed in order to linearize the existing curvilinear patterns of the data by using power and exponential functions, respectively. The evaporation models suggested with the best variable combinations were shown to produce results that are in a reasonable agreement with observation values. PMID:23226984

  10. COOL: Crust of the Oman Ophiolite and its Lithosphere - a passive seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidle, Christian; Agard, Philippe; Ducassou, Céline; El-Hussain, Issa; Prigent, Cécile; Meier, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Plate tectonics has established a framework for geoscientists to understand most geologic/tectonic processes that shaped our present-day Earth. 'Obduction', the emplacement of young, dense oceanic lithosphere (ophiolites) on top of older lighter continental lithosphere remains, however, a rather odd phenomenon. Some ophiolites are fundamentally similar to young oceanic crust and it is hence assumed that they were obducted as thrust sheets at the onset of continental subduction in a previously intra-oceanic subduction setting. The Peri-Arabic obduction corresponded to a spectacular, almost synchronous thrust movement along thousands of km from Turkey to Oman. At the eastern margin of the Arabian plate, the world's largest and best preserved ophiolite was emplaced in only a few My during Upper Cretaceous and is exposed today atop the Oman Mountain range. Although being the best studied ophiolite in the world, rather little is still known about the internal structure of the ophiolite and the Oman Mountains. The dimension of the ophiolite is large enough (~700 km) to be studied with seismological methods, providing thus a rare setting to investigate oceanic crust on land without ocean bottom installations. We have deployed a network of 40 broadband seismometers across the Oman Mountains in Oct/Nov 2013 for passive seismic registration for a duration of ca. 15 months. The network is complemented by 10 permanent stations in the area operated by the Earthquake Monitoring Center in Oman. Aims of the project include: - Seismological imaging of the geometry and internal properties of obducted oceanic, and its underlying continental lithosphere. - Regional tomographic velocity models will provide constraints on geodynamic processes that led to large scale obduction. - Investigating the "quiet" Makran subduction zone for local seismicity will improve understanding of seismic hazard on the eastern Arabian plate.

  11. Defining a Mutational Panel and Predicting the Prevalence of Cystic Fibrosis in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Fass, Uwe W.; Al-Salmani, Majid; Bendahhou, Said; Shivalingam, Ganji; Norrish, Catherine; Hebal, Kallesh; Clark, Fiona; Heming, Thomas; Al-Khusaiby, Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations form distinct mutational panels in different populations and subgroups. The frequency of cystic fibrosis (CF) mutations and prevalence are unknown in Oman. This study aimed to elucidate the mutational panel and prevalence of CF for the North Al Batinah (NAB) region in Oman and to estimate the national prevalence of CF based on the carrier screening of unrelated volunteers. Methods: The study included retrospective and prospective analyses of CF cases in the NAB region for 1998–2012. Genetic analysis of disease-causing mutations was conducted by screening of the entire coding sequence and exon-intron borders. The obtained mutational panel was used for the carrier screening of 408 alleles of unrelated and unaffected Omani individuals. Results: S549R and F508del were the major mutations, accounting for 89% of mutations in the patient population. Two private mutations, c.1733–1734delTA and c.1175T>G, were identified in the patient cohort. Two carriers, one for F508del and another for S549R, were identified by screening of the volunteer cohort, resulting in a predicted prevalence for Oman of 1 in 8,264. The estimated carrier frequency of CF in Oman was 1 in 94. The carrier frequency in the NAB region was 3.9 times higher. Conclusion: The mutational panel for the NAB region and the high proportion of S549R mutations emphasises the need for specific screening for CF in Oman. The different distribution of allele frequencies suggests a spatial clustering of CF in the NAB region. PMID:25097766

  12. Genotoxicity to human cells induced by air particulates isolated during the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.; Xia, F.; Christiani, D.C.; Liber, H.L.; Spengler, J.D.; Dockery, D.W. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)); Bodell, W.J. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to examine the potential of exposure to soot from the 1991 oil fires in the Kuwait desert for inducing genetic effects we studied the in vitro genotoxicity of this materials. Air particulates isolated near the Kuwait oil fires were studied using three assays. Dose-dependent increases were observed for both sister chromatid exchanges in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and mutation at the hprt locus in the metabolically competent human lymphoblast cell line AHH-1. Similar magnitudes of response were seen using these two assays when testing a standard air particulate sample which had been isolated from the Washington, DC, area. Using the [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay, no increase in DNA adduct formation was observed in AHH-1 cells treated with particulates isolated from sampling in Kuwait. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Extent and nature of hydrocarbon occurrence in the groundwater of Kuwait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Awadi, Eman; Quinn, Michael; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Hauser, Andre; Akber, Adnan; Al-Haddad, Adel; Al-Rashedi, Majed

    2009-01-01

    A study, aimed at characterizing the nature of anthropogenic and biogenic hydrocarbon contamination in the groundwater of Kuwait, was carried out using fluorescence spectroscopy and other analytical techniques. The results of these analyses have demonstrated that the groundwater in certain areas of northern Kuwait has been significantly impacted by contamination originating from the oil-contaminated surface soils. The study revealed that a water-soluble fraction (WSF) of the crude oil surface contamination appeared to be slowly leaching into the freshwater lenses located in the area. The study also showed that hydrocarbon pollutants were practically absent in the brackish water areas of central and southern Kuwait, except for a few isolated sites. However, nonpetroleum hydrocarbons, with ultraviolet-visible absorption characteristics and fluorescence characteristics typically associated with humic substances, were observed at a few sites in the brackish water fields.

  14. A conceptual approach to selection of a control measure for residual chlorine discharge in Kuwait bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khordagui, Hosny K.

    1992-05-01

    It is estimated that some 17 metric tons of residual oxidants (chlorine) are discharged into the enclosed coastal seawater of Kuwait on a daily basis from power-desalination plants alone. Alarmed by the unlimited number of reported cases of damage to marine aquatic systems due to chlorine discharge around the world, several alternatives were proposed to control such a massive discharge of residual oxidant into seawaters. Most of the proposed alternatives lacked the basic criteria necessary for their evaluation, justification, and then selection. The objective of this article is to provide a conceptual approach that can be used to select a control measure for residual oxidant discharge in Kuwait coastal seawaters. This approach is based on state-of-the-art knowledge and the unique operational and environmental factors involved. A matrix system was designed whereby the cost of residual chlorine control alternative, its effectiveness, and environmental and public health impact, performance, and reliability in Kuwait can be compared and evaluated. The selection approach considered currently operating power plants in terms of their engineering design and material (cast iron or steel condensers), current operational conditions, operator's perception, acceptability, and projected problems associated with the environmental management of proposed modifications. The proposed approach revealed that in Kuwait, conventinal chlorination was marginally superseded only by chlorination/dechlorination using SO2 and operation alteration using process optimization. The overall cost-effective assessment matrix classified other alternatives as worse than chlorination by various degrees. Ozone and UV were found to be the worst and the least desirable alternatives for biofouling control of seawater in Kuwait. In light of the available information on the consequences of the Gulf War on the marine environment, and the potential formation of additional halogenated organic compounds through the reaction of residual chlorine with the released petroleum hydrocarbons, it is essential to control residual chlorine discharged into the nearshore environment of Kuwait.

  15. Lessons Learned from Adopting Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porcaro, David S.; Al Musawi, Ali S.

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent investments in and rapid modernization of university campuses in places like Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, higher education in the Middle East still faces many obstacles. One of the greatest has been a fundamental disconnect between education and employment, a possible factor contributing to many of the recent riots in the Arab World. In…

  16. Diurnal fluctuations in polybrominated diphenyl ether concentrations during and after a severe dust storm episode in Kuwait City, Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Gevao, Bondi; Jaward, Foday M; MacLeod, Matthew; Jones, Kevin C

    2010-11-01

    Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were quantified in four-hour integrated air samples obtained serially over a five day period in May 2007 in Kuwait City during and after a severe dust storm. The ?PBDE concentrations ranged from 51 to 1307 pg m(-3) for the first two days of sampling and 20 to 148 pg m(-3) for the rest of the sampling period. The first two days of sampling occurred during a severe dust storm episode when the total suspended particulates (TSP) in air exceeded 1000 ?g/m(3) with concentrations peaking during the day and decreasing at night. During this dust episode, the peak nighttime PBDE concentration was 30 times higher than the minimum daytime concentration. Although ?PBDE concentrations peaked at night during the first two sampling days, the fluctuations in the BDE 47:99 ratio tracked changes in ambient temperature remarkably well, following a clear diurnal pattern. The fraction of congeners in the gas phase varied inversely with solar flux and was lower on days with a high number of hours of sunshine, suggesting that photolytic degradation of gas-phase PBDEs was occurring. PMID:20942478

  17. Radioactivity levels in the marine environment along the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Qaradawi, Ilham; Abdel-Moati, Mohamed; Al-Yafei, Mohsin Al-Ansi; Al-Ansari, Ebrahim; Al-Maslamani, Ibrahim; Holm, Elis; Al-Shaikh, Ismail; Mauring, Alexander; Pinto, Primal V; Abdulmalik, Dana; Amir, Amina; Miller, Mark; Yigiterhan, Oguz; Persson, Bertil

    2015-01-15

    A study on (137)Cs, (40)K, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, and (238)U was carried out along the EEZ of Qatar. Results serve as the first ever baseline data. The level of (137)Cs (mean value 1.6 ± 0.4 Bq m(-3)) in water filters was found to be in the same order of magnitude as reported by others in worldwide marine radioactivity studies. Results are also in agreement with values reported from other Gulf regions. The computed values of sediment-water distribution coefficients Kd, are lower than the values given by IAEA. Measurements were carried out for bottom sediments, biota samples like fish, oyster, sponge, seashell, mangrove, crab, shrimp, starfish, dugong and algae. The 'concentration factors' reported for biota samples are below the levels published by IAEA and cause no significant impact on human health for seafood consumers in Qatar. PMID:25480154

  18. Measles surveillance in Qatar, 2008: quality of surveillance data and timeliness of notification.

    PubMed

    Nazzal, Z A; Said, H; Horeesh, N A

    2011-11-01

    Disease surveillance systems require that data are complete and submitted on time so that effective prevention and control measures can be initiated promptly. Qatar is in the elimination phase of measles control. A retrospective review of records was conducted in Qatar to evaluate the timeliness of notification and completeness of measles surveillance data. All the notification and investigation forms for the year 2008 were analysed. About 85% of the notification forms were missing at least 2 of the WHO recommended minimum data elements, and only 27.8% of the suspected measles cases were reported within 2 days. Lack of vaccination status information and blood specimen collection were the most prominent defects in the notification forms. The major deficiency in the investigation forms were information on the source of infection, measles serology results and date of blood specimen collection. Ways to improve the quality of the notification system need to be investigated. PMID:22276487

  19. Adequacy, accountability, autonomy and equity in a Middle Eastern school reform: The case of Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Tanner, Jeffery C.

    2012-04-01

    This study examines Qatar's recent and ambitious school reform in the early stages of its implementation against a set of four criteria for successful education systems drawn from guidelines developed by the international community: adequacy, accountability, autonomy and gender equity. We investigate both the initial structure of the reform and its sustainability in light of concerns that movements in these directions might be politically unfeasible. To some degree, these concerns are substantiated by the developments we trace. However, it is important to note that the reform has changed the landscape of primary and secondary education in Qatar and that many reform principles, though diluted, have been retained. This paper highlights lessons learned - both hopeful and cautionary - in the first few years of reform and presents a methodology for evaluating progress along key dimensions that can be applied to school systems in many nations.

  20. Chemical composition of some ready-to-eat meals consumed in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Al-Jedah; R. K. Robinson

    2000-01-01

    Ready-to-eat meals, such as pizzas and filled rolls, purchased from “take-away” outlets in Qatar were found to contain sufficient protein in the form of meat, fish or cheese to supply approximately 50 per cent of the recommended daily intake (RDI) for a young adult male. Sufficient energy to utilise this protein was provided in the form of associated fat or

  1. Economics of off-shore\\/on-shore wind energy systems in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A-Hamid Marafia; Hamdy A. Ashour

    2003-01-01

    This work presents an assessment of the potential and economical feasibility of adopting off-shore\\/on-shore wind energy as a renewable source of energy in Qatar. An analysis is presented for the long term measured on-shore wind speed (1976–2000) at Doha International Airport. A similar analysis is presented for the measured off-shore wind speed at the Qatari Haloul Island. For the on-shore

  2. The potential of gas-to-liquid technology in the energy market: The case of Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Chedid; M. Kobrosly; R. Ghajar

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive methodology for evaluating the economic attractiveness of gas-to-liquid (GTL) technology in a gas rich country like Qatar. The Qatari gas volume needed to fully satisfy the projected long-term market demand of GTL products (mainly diesel oil) in the Asia-Pacific region is evaluated. Based on the state-of-the-art GTL technology, the number, size and the commissioning dates

  3. Developing an interprofessional continuing education symposium for health care educators in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Pamela S; Chappell, Kathy; Decker, Sharon; Moore, Donald; Pilcher, Jobeth; Scanlon, Noel; Sherman, Lawrence

    2014-12-01

    An international interprofessional continuing education symposium was developed and implemented by a global faculty team in Qatar in March 2014. This symposium was undertaken as part of the country's goal of improving the quality of health care. After an extensive planning process, health care educators engaged in multiple types of learning experiences to enrich their knowledge and skills. Evaluation data support the value of this experience. PMID:25695121

  4. An Overview of Solid Waste Management and Plastic Recycling in Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Al-Maaded; N. K. Madi; Ramazan Kahraman; A. Hodzic; N. G. Ozerkan

    Municipal solid waste management (MSWM) constitutes one of the most crucial health and environmental problems facing authorities\\u000a in the Arabian Gulf. Recent literature on current solid waste management (SWM) in Qatar has been reviewed in this paper, and\\u000a a focused study has been carried out to provide a review on the total amount of municipal solid waste generated, stored, collected,

  5. Medical education and research environment in Qatar: a new epoch for translational research in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Chouchane, Lotfi; Mamtani, Ravinder; Al-Thani, Mohammed H; Al-Thani, Al-Anoud M; Ameduri, Marco; Sheikh, Javaid I

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in medical technology and key discoveries in biomedical research have the potential to improve human health in an unprecedented fashion. As a result, many of the Arab Gulf countries, particularly Qatar are devoting increasing resources toward establishing centers of excellence in biomedical research. However, there are challenges that must be overcome. The low profile of private medical institutions and their negligible endowments in the region are examples of such challenges. Business-type government controlled universities are not the solution for overcoming the challenges facing higher education and research programs in the Middle East.During the last decade, Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development has attracted six branch campuses of American Institutions of higher learning to the Education City in Qatar, a 2500-acre area, which is rapidly becoming a model of integrating higher education and research in the region. Not-for profit, time-tested education institutions from abroad in public-private partnership with local organizations offer favorable conditions to build robust research programs in the region. Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q) of Cornell University is an example such an institution. It is the first and only medical school in Qatar.WCMC-Q's interwoven education, research and public health based framework lays a sturdy foundation for developing and implementing translational medicine research programs of importance to the State of Qatar and Middle Eastern nations. This approach is yielding positive results. Discoveries from this program should influence public policy in a positive fashion toward reducing premature mortality and morbidity due to diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer, examples of health conditions commonly encountered in Qatar. PMID:21272322

  6. Medical education and research environment in Qatar: a new epoch for translational research in the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in medical technology and key discoveries in biomedical research have the potential to improve human health in an unprecedented fashion. As a result, many of the Arab Gulf countries, particularly Qatar are devoting increasing resources toward establishing centers of excellence in biomedical research. However, there are challenges that must be overcome. The low profile of private medical institutions and their negligible endowments in the region are examples of such challenges. Business-type government controlled universities are not the solution for overcoming the challenges facing higher education and research programs in the Middle East. During the last decade, Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development has attracted six branch campuses of American Institutions of higher learning to the Education City in Qatar, a 2500-acre area, which is rapidly becoming a model of integrating higher education and research in the region. Not-for profit, time-tested education institutions from abroad in public-private partnership with local organizations offer favorable conditions to build robust research programs in the region. Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q) of Cornell University is an example such an institution. It is the first and only medical school in Qatar. WCMC-Q's interwoven education, research and public health based framework lays a sturdy foundation for developing and implementing translational medicine research programs of importance to the State of Qatar and Middle Eastern nations. This approach is yielding positive results. Discoveries from this program should influence public policy in a positive fashion toward reducing premature mortality and morbidity due to diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer, examples of health conditions commonly encountered in Qatar. PMID:21272322

  7. The private-public literacy divide amid educational reform in Qatar: What does PISA tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheema, Jehanzeb R.

    2015-03-01

    The education system in Qatar comprises of both private schools, which receive money through student fees, and public schools, which are fully government-funded. In the mid-2000s, Qatar started its transition towards an independent school model with the aim of eventually converting all public schools into government-supported independent schools. The idea was to give public schools more autonomy in terms of hiring decisions, adoption of curriculum and textbooks, and budget spending, enabling them to emulate some of the private schools' strategies for turning out successful students. This study examines evidence from the 2006-2012 administrations of the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) in Qatar in order to evaluate whether or not recent educational reform efforts in this country have succeeded in bridging the literacy divide between private and public schools. The results, presented in a number of detailed tables and discussed in the last part of the article, indicate that there is a significant difference in key literacy skills between the two types of schools. Private schools were found to outperform their public counterparts in areas such as mathematics, reading and science, both before and after controlling for important student-level differences, and this gap has evidently persisted from 2006 to 2012.

  8. Perspective View, Landsat Overlay, Salalah, Oman, Southern Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view includes the city of Salalah, the second largest city in Oman. The city is located on the broad, generally bright coastal plain and includes areas of green irrigated crops. This view was generated from a Landsat image draped over a preliminary elevation model produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The edges of the dataset are to the upper right, left, and lower left. The Arabian Sea (lower right) is represented by the blue false-colored area. Vertical exaggeration of topography is 3X.

    This scene illustrates how topography determines local climate and, in turn, where people live. The Arabian Peninsula is very arid. However, the steep escarpment of the Qara Mountains wrings moisture from the summer monsoons allowing for growth of natural vegetation (green along the mountain fronts and in the canyons), and soil development (dark brown areas), as well as cultural development of the coastal plain. The monsoons also provide moisture for Frankincense trees growing on the desert (north) side of the mountains. In ancient times, incense derived from the sap of the Frankincense tree was the basis for an extremely lucrative trade.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot)spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 45 kilometers (28 miles) across x 178 kilometers (110 miles) distance Location: 17 deg. North lat., 54 deg. East lon. Orientation: North toward upper left Image Data: Landsat bands 1, 2+4, 3 in blue, green, red Date Acquired: February 15, 2000 (SRTM), November 9, 1999 (Landsat) Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA

  9. Insight in Ridge Axial Melt Lens in the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, F.; Nicolas, A.; Daignieres, M.

    2008-12-01

    As in fast spreading ridges, the Oman ophiolite had a melt lens perched on top of the magma chamber where the gabbro unit was crystallizing. This melt lens is now reduced to an horizon where its roof and floor are coinciding and this horizon is now identified in the field. It is generally marked by a sharp discordance between the isotropic gabbros from the root zone of sheeted dike complex (RZSDC) and steeply dipping foliated gabbros. These gabbros are issued from the mush settled on the floor of the melt lens, after subsidence inside the magma chamber. After stretching, compaction and rotation in the chamber, the mush has drifted through the wall of the chamber with, as a result, the observed steep foliated gabbros. Depending on its vertical distance beneath the lens horizon, a given gabbro derives from increasing distances inside the melt lens. Insights in the active melt lens are possible in three ways. 1) Looking at gabbros from the lens horizon, which virtually have not subsided. 2) Considering uncommon areas which display flat-lying foliated gabbros, below the contact with RZSDC and which grade down section into the steep foliated gabbros. Such situations are ascribed to a retreat of the melt lens, exposing gabbros which crystallized on its floor. Their good foliation points to a dynamic deposition on the floor, presumably by convection currents. 3) Considering the ubiquitous occurrence of anorthosites which are interlayered with the foliated gabbros. The anorthosites carry several important messages such as: - compaction of the mush at early stage of subsidence; - chemical nature of the rising melt which drops plagioclase first, followed by either olivine or clinopyroxene; - frequency and volume of melt intrusions, each one coming as short and massive melt surge; - spacing of areas of melt delivery on the lens floor. These results are essentially derived from anorthosites description and distribution in the field. It is concluded that melt lens activity is rhythmic, following different tempos. 1) The lower frequency of tens of thousands years, related to vertical migration of lenses, recognized at fast spreading ridges. 2) The frequency of a few hundreds years, related to horizontal displacements and to melt surges. This timing is compatible with the ~500 years deduced from the ~50 m spacing of abyssal hills, in the 10 cm/year western side of 18° S East Pacific Rise (Carbotte et al., 2003)1. Lens inflation, with possibly small swelling, is controlled by a melt surge, whereas lens deflation is illustrated by the "tide" effect, uncovering the flat foliations of the lens floor. 3) The highest frequency at the scale of ~10 years, related to basaltic extrusions on seafloor, as they are recorded by sheeted dikes. Deflation of the melt lens would result from these periodic basaltic extrusions. (1) Carbotte, S.M. et al., 2003., G3, vol.4/1, 1-21.

  10. Structure of Submarine Large Lobate Sheet from the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umino, S.

    2009-12-01

    Coalescence and inflation of flow lobes are common to fluidal basaltic lava emplaced on a gentle slope and a flat field, which are fundamental mechanisms to form vast sheet-like lava flows. Flow-lobe coalescence and inflation are also known from submarine sheet flows from mid-ocean ridges and submarine extensions of Hawaiian rift zones. The V3 extrusive unit (Salahi Volcanics) of the Oman Ophiolite has an extensive sheet flow of alkali basalt attaining 12 km in length and as thick as 100 m. We propose that this unusually thick sheet flow was formed by complex flow-lobe coalescence and inflation of subaqueous lava lobes extruded at low supply rates of lava. V3 mainly consists of 3 sheet flows separated by red shale beds associated with pillow and pahoehoe flows. An alkali dolerite dyke >30 m in thickness to the southern end of V3 distribution is assumed to be the source of V3 lavas, intruding into the Alley Volcanics (V2) beneath V3. Ropy wrinkles are commonly observed on the top and bottom of the sheets, indicating north to north-westerly flow directions. Sheet flows occasionally grade into pillows and pahoehoe lobes both laterally and downward. Pillows and pahoehoe lobes directly broke out from the base or peripherals of sheet flows are observed. Red shale fills interstices between pillows and fractures along the cooling joints in the base of sheet flows. Because pillows are formed on slopes >5 degrees, the above occurrence indicates that the slowly advancing lava formed pillows as it flowed down into a depression filled with unconsolidated mud. When the depression was filled with the pillows, the lava form changed into pahoehoe lobes which were coalesced and inflated to a thick sheet flow. The lowest sheet flow (SF-1) has the largest extension and thickness among the three flows. It has columnar jointed upper and lower crusts, and massive cores, among which the upper crust is thickest. Such joint structures also develop in subaerial flood basalts, but are more complex in the Salahi SF-1. Most part of SF-1 has only one core between the upper and lower crusts, while in places double cores are present separated by a columnar jointed layer, or no core appears in other places. The core lacks dendritic clinopyroxene, showing a typical doleritic texture. In contrast, the crust contains thin and elongated clinopyroxene, suggestive of crystallization under a large degree of supercooling.The roof of the sheet develops domed structures several metres to a few hundred metres across. Finely jointed zones beneath such domed roofs sometimes continue into and thin out within the crust below the neighbouring roof. Such finely jointed layers and lenses are most plausibly seal zones of coalesced flow lobes. Hyaloclastite veins and lenses are found along vertical joints in the lower part of the upper crust. Repeated fragmentation of chilled margins along the joints indicates that molten lava was in contact with water, which entered through deep cracks into the upper crust. All these observations led us to conclude that the crusts were formed by coalescence of partially overlapped or stacked flow lobes, while the core developed endogenously as the sheet inflated. Meanwhile inflation cracks opened and penetrated deep into the crust.

  11. Expected scenarios of environmental threats in Iraq compared with Kuwait's case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Mohamed Al-Damkhi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to review the literature about the environment as one of the victims of war throughout the history of mankind. Kuwait's environment, as a victim of the scorched-earth tactic carried out by the retreating Iraqi forces in 1991, is also reviewed. The probable scenarios of an environmental threat in Iraq as a result

  12. A Study in Kuwait of Health Risks Associated with Using Cell Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khamees, Nedaa

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a link between cell phone use and various symptoms. Analysis of 3,274 completed questionnaires from throughout Kuwait show a significant effect of exposure to cell phones for burning sensation on the ear, temporal pain, pain in the back of the head, auricular pain, noises in the ear, ear numbness, heartbeat…

  13. Humanistic Qualities of the Teacher as Perceived by Undergraduate Students in Bahrain and Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Musawi, Nu'man; Karam, Ebraheem M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the main qualities of the teacher as a person as perceived by university students in Bahrain and Kuwait. A 25-item questionnaire, which reflected the basic humanistic qualities of the teacher as related to effective teaching, was designed and then administered to a random sample of 520 students enrolled…

  14. Factors Influencing Long-Term Psychiatric Hospitalisation of the Elderly in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Malasi; Iman A. Mirza; M. Fakhr El-Islam

    1989-01-01

    In this study both psychosocial and clinical aspects of elderly patients were investigated in relation to long hospital stay in the only psychiatric hospital in Kuwait. Patients with longer stay did not differ statistically from short stay patients in distributions of sex, age, nationality, marital status, family system, diagnostic categories or factors blocking patients' discharge from hospital. Significant association was

  15. The Attitudes, Knowledge and Beliefs of Arab Parents in Kuwait about Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khaledi, Maram; Lincoln, Michelle; McCabe, Patricia; Packman, Ann; Alshatti, Tariq

    2009-01-01

    An Arabic version of the Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes Inventory [POSHA-E; St Louis, K. O. (2005), a global instrument to measure public attitudes about stuttering. ("The ASHA Leader," 22, 2-13)] was administered to 424 Arab parents of preschool and school age children in 18 government schools across all six governorates in Kuwait. The…

  16. Students' Perceptions of the Residence Hall Living Environment at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Kandari, Nabila

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore students' perceptions of the residence hall living environment at Kuwait University. The researcher developed a questionnaire for this purpose that included 36 items. The sample of the study consisted of 191 residential students, of whom 98 were male and 93 were female. The research findings indicated that:…

  17. Comparing nurses' and patients' pain evaluations: A study of hospitalized patients in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann Harrison

    1993-01-01

    All eligible patients hospitalized on the general medical, surgical and pediatric wards of a distinct hospital in Kuwait during the first 2 weeks of April 1990 (N = 199) were interviewed about their pain and the medical care provided. Patients rated their current pain using a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS) on which 0 was labelled 'no pain' and 10

  18. Predictors of non-urgent utilization of hospital emergency services in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nasra M. Shah; Makhdoom A. Shah; Behbehani Jaafar

    1996-01-01

    Utilization of the emergency rooms (ERs) in Kuwait has increased considerably during the last decade. Such an increase is a concern for health planners because of the burden on ER services, lack of continuous service provided by the ER and the higher cost of such services. Based on a study of 2011 patients attending the medical ERs in the six

  19. The Impact of Private Sector Competition on Public Schooling in Kuwait: Some Socio-Educational Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shehab, Ali Jasem

    2010-01-01

    With the diminishing model of the welfare state, public education in Kuwait is facing the challenges of the competition of private schools, while the private sector has always struggled against the monopolistic power of the public schools that educate a broad spectrum of K-12 students. This article presents estimates of the effect of private…

  20. Extent of Parental Involvement in Improving the Students' Levels in Special Education Programs in Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shammari, Zaid; Yawkey, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    This research study investigates the degree to which parental involvement impacts students' levels in special education programs in Kuwait. More specifically, this research discusses several scientific methods for research included within the significance of the study and research questions for this study. Research methods and results using a…

  1. Energy consumption in equivalent work by different desalting methods: case study for Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Darwish; F. Al Asfour; N. Al-Najem

    2003-01-01

    Kuwait needs to add more desalting units to its present installed capacity to satisfy the growing need of potable water. The energy consumed by different desalting system is one of the main parameters affecting the choice of new desalting system. Every desalting system consumed either thermal, or mechanical energy or both. This paper presents a method to compare these energies

  2. Sedimentological and morphological characteristics of some nabkha deposits in the northern coastal plain of Kuwait, Arabia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. I. Khalaf; R. Misak; A. Al-Dousari

    1995-01-01

    Nabkhas in the sabkha flat of the northern coastal plain of Kuwait are generallylocated in areas slightly higher than the evaporitic sabkha pans, and facing the alluvium fans descending from the bordering cliffs and slopes. They are developed by the deposition of wind-driven sediments around Nitraria retusa shrubs. The nabkhas vary in shape and size. However, they mostly have an

  3. NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-06-23

    On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

  4. Mastering Leadership Concepts through Utilizing Critical Thinking Strategies within Educational Administration Courses at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alqahtani, Abdulmuhsen Ayedh; Al-Enezi, Mutlaq M.

    2012-01-01

    The current study aims at exploring the students' perceptions of mastering leadership concepts and critical thinking strategies implemented by faculty members in the college of education at Kuwait University, and the impact of the later on former. The data was collected using a questionnaire on a sample consisting of 411 students representing…

  5. New Private Universities in Kuwait Pin Their Hopes on U.S. Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    When Kuwait lifted a ban on private higher education less than a decade ago, it decided that the best way to ensure the development of academically sound universities was to require all new institutions to have foreign partners. That policy has helped the country rapidly build a credible private higher-education system where none existed before.…

  6. A Survey of Leadership Standards for Professional Preparation of Public School Principals in Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alansari, Amal EEHE

    2012-01-01

    Problem: Over the last decade, the Ministry of Education in Kuwait undertook the responsibility of reforming the Kuwaiti education system. While it noted the importance of school principals in this reform process, it has not yet focused on the development of school leaders through formal preparation. There were no standards set to guide school…

  7. Teachers' Perceptions toward the Secondary Physical Education Program in the State of Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Kandari, Khaled A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the perceptions of physical education teachers and supervisors toward the secondary physical education program in eight domains in the State of Kuwait. Stratified and cluster sampling were used to select two schools of female teachers and two schools of male teachers from each district (6 districts);…

  8. LIS Students' ICT Skills in Kuwait: Perspectives of Employers, Teaching Staff and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buarki, Hanadi; Hepworth, Mark; Murray, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In Kuwait and elsewhere, developments in electronic information resources have led to the demand for employees with ICT (information and communication technology) skills especially in information handling institutions. There is, therefore, a need to prepare the students for this workplace. As a result, the ICT skills of current LIS (library and…

  9. Description of outdoor air quality in a typical residential area in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. S Bouhamra; S. A Abdul-Wahab

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of the data collected by the air pollution mobile laboratory operated by Kuwait University. The experimental work was based on operating the mobile laboratory in the Mansouriya residential area for a period of 1 month (May 1994). The site was selected to represent a typical residential area which is impacted mainly by the heavy

  10. The Attitudes of Kuwait University Faculty Members and Undergraduate Students toward the Use of Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AL-Masoud, Fawzeah A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the attitude of the faculty members and the undergraduate students of the College of Education at Kuwait University toward Distance of Education. The study illustrates a comparison in the attitude between the two groups toward Distance Education. In addition, the study tries to find if there are significant…

  11. Seasonal and spatial differences in the fish assemblage of the non-estuarine Sulaibikhat Bay, Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Wright

    1988-01-01

    In the period September 1986 to August 1987 fish were captured once a month, using an otter trawl, from the intertidal and subtidal regions of Sulaibikhat Bay, Kuwait. Correlation analysis revealed that numbers were not directly related to temperature at the time of sampling. The recruitment of large numbers of young of the year Liza carinata (Valenciennes) during March was

  12. Vocational Education and Training in Kuwait: Vocational Education versus Values and Viewpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilboe, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Since the opening up of private universities and colleges in the Kuwait education system in the late 1990s, there has been an explosion of tertiary institutions (both domestic and international) established in the country, with many of them offering vocational education and training. The move towards vocational and educational training forms part…

  13. Implementation of Cooperative Learning in the Center for Community Service and Continuing Education at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alansari, Eissa M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the success of implementation of cooperative learning in various courses delivered at the Center for Community Service and Continuing Education at Kuwait University. According to recent research in the field of social cognition, learning situations which make use of the social context often achieve superior…

  14. Climate response to smoke from the burning oil wells in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Bakan; A. Chlond; U. Cubasch; J. Feichter; H. Graf; H. Grassl; K. Hasselmann; I. Kirchner; M. Latif; E. Roeckner; R. Sausen; U. Schlese; D. Schriever; I. Schult; U. Schumann; F. Sielmann; W. Welke

    1991-01-01

    The response of the global climate system to smoke from burning oil wells in Kuwait is investigated in a series of numerical experiments using a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model with an interactive soot transport model and extended radiation scheme. The results show a decrease in surface air temperature of ~4 °C in the Gulf region. Outside this region the

  15. Prospect of using alternative energy for power and desalted water productions in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Darwish

    2011-01-01

    Extensive research is conducted in Kuwait to apply renewable energy (RE) for electric power (EP) generation. The Kuwaiti Ministry of Electricity and Water (MEW) formed a committee to study the introduction of solar energy to generate EP. Meanwhile, the government formed a committee to take the necessary steps to build the first nuclear power plant (NPP) for EP production and

  16. Environmental impact assessment: Integrated methodology—a case study of Kuwait, Arabian Gulf

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1993-01-01

    Kuwait's coastal area is considered to have special importance because most urban, industrial, commercial, and recreational activities are concentrated in this zone. It is also the country's site for production of fresh water and electricity. Moreover, the coastal zone has a unique ecosystem and is one of the primary nursery ground sites for fish and shrimp. The characteristics of a

  17. Some PsychoSocial Aspects of Old People Living Outside Their Families in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Malasi; S. M. El-Hilu; I. A. Mirza; M. F. El-Islam

    1988-01-01

    One hundred and ninety four elderly subjects were studied, 133 of whom were living away from their families, in the only old people's home and in the only psychiatric hospital in Kuwait. They were compared to 61 consecutive elderly subjects atten ding a psychiatric out-patient clinic. Psychiatric, social and clinical characteristics of subjects admitted and those living with their families

  18. ENROLLED WSU GRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 1 Algeria 1 35 Kuwait 2 69 Taiwan 29

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    ENROLLED WSU GRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 1 Algeria 1 35 Kuwait 2 69 Taiwan 29 2 Angola 1 36 Uzbekistan 3 10 Chile 3 44 Netherlands 2 78 Venezuela 1 11 China - Mainland 297 45 New Zealand 1 79 Vietnam Sciences ................................................................................. 98 Veterinary

  19. ENROLLED WSU GRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 1 Algeria 1 35 Kuwait 2 69 Switzerland 1

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    ENROLLED WSU GRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 1 Algeria 1 35 Kuwait 2 69 Switzerland 1 2 Argentina 1 Colombia 9 46 Netherlands 2 80 Vietnam 9 13 Costa Rica 6 47 New Zealand 1 81 Zambia 1 14 Cyprus 1 48 Sciences ................................................................................. 106 Veterinary

  20. A new snapping shrimp (Crustacea Decapoda, Alpheidae, Alpheus) from the estuarine mudflats of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Anker; Grave De S

    2009-01-01

    A new snapping shrimp, Alpheus lutosus spec. nov., is described from the intertidal mudflats of Bubiyan Island, northern Kuwait, south of the vast Shatt-Al-Arab delta. The new species appears to be closely related to Alpheus hoplocheles Coutière, 1897 from similar estuarine habitats in China and Japan, differing mainly in the absence of a sharp distolateral tooth on the palm of

  1. Mangrove, Avicennia marina, Establishment and Growth under the Arid Climate of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. R. BHAT; M. K. SULEIMAN; S. A. SHAHID

    2004-01-01

    The State of Kuwait is making concerted efforts to enhance greenery along its coastline. This study was conducted during 1999–2002 for identifying key soil factors associated with successful establishment and rapid growth in Avicennia marina. Based on the review of available data, repeated visits to potential sites, on-site assessment and laboratory characterization of soils, five sites (Shuwaikh, Sulaibikhat I, Sulaibikhat

  2. An exploratory study of influences on retail service quality: a focus on Kuwait and Lebanon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Raven; Dianne H. B. Welsh

    2004-01-01

    The Middle East is a growing and lucrative marketplace. This exploratory study examines retail service in Kuwait and Lebanon, regions with long histories of trade. Retail service, however, has not been well documented in this region. As far as is known, this is the first study that examines customer and salespeople perceptions of service encounters in these countries in light

  3. Pattern of antibiotic prescription in the management of oral diseases among dentists in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. O Salako; V. O Rotimi; S. M Adib; S Al-Mutawa

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. The use and abuse of antibiotics have been of concern to the medical and the dental profession for sometime now, due mainly to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The objective of this project was to determine the rationale and the pattern of antibiotic prescription for dental management in Kuwait.Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to 200 dental practitioners working in

  4. Prevalence of Candida dubliniensis among Oral Candida Isolates in Patients Attending the Kuwait University Dental Clinic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arjuna N. B. Ellepola; Zia U. Khan; Bobby Joseph; Rachel Chandy; Leeba Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the oral candidal carriage of patients seeking dental treatment at the Kuwait University Dental Clinic and to ascertain the Candida species composition among them. Methods: 370 oral rinse samples were collected from patients. The germ tube test, CHROMagar Candida medium and VITEK 2 yeast identification system were used for species identification.

  5. Perception of Teachers on Health Education and Nutrition for Kindergarten Students in Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Amari, Hanaa

    2012-01-01

    This study is designed to assess the perception of Kindergarten teachers in Kuwait regarding the role of health education in Promoting healthy nutrition for children in KG Level. For this purpose, a questionnaire was administered to 250 Kindergarten female teachers. Percentage, mean and standard deviation scores were obtained. The results of the…

  6. Students Opinions and Attitudes towards Physical Education Classes in Kuwait Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Heyam Reda; Mohammad, Mona Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of study was to investigate student opinion and attitude toward physical education classes. Two thousand seven hundred (2700) students answered the survey: 1239 (45.3%) were male students and 1497 (54.7%) were female from Kuwait six districts: Al_Hawalli, Al_Asimah, Al_Jahra, Al_Mobarak, Al_Farwniah, Al_Ahmadi. Weight Status was determined…

  7. Toxic Metals in Food Products Originating from Locally Reared Animals in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Husain; A. Al-Rashdan; A. Al-Awadhi; B. Mahgoub; H. Al-Amiri

    1996-01-01

    Since traces of heavy metals are found in almost every food commodity, an estimation of the intake of food contaminants is essential and differs considerably from country to country (Louekari and Salminen, 1986). In Kuwait, data are not available on the levels of toxic metals in foods consumed by the various age groups nor are there any Kuwaiti standards at

  8. Laboratory-scale bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil of Kuwait with soil amendment materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byung-Hoop Cho; Hiroyuki Chino; Hirokazu Tsuji; Takashi Kunito; Kazunari Nagaoka; Shigeto Otsuka; Kazuhiro Yamashita; Satoshi Matsumoto; Hiroshi Oyaizu

    1997-01-01

    A huge amount of oil-contaminated soil remains unremediated in the Kuwait desert. The contaminated oil has the potentiality to cause pollution of underground water and to effect the health of people in the neighborhood. In this study, laboratory scale bioremediation experiments were carried out.Hyponex (Hyponex, Inc.) and bark manure were added as basic nutrients for microorganisms, and twelve kinds of

  9. Enhancing Services for Students with Mild Disabilities in the Middle East Gulf Region: A Kuwait Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; Koch, Kourtland R.; Braaten, Sheldon R.

    2008-01-01

    At a conference, titled: "Childhood Disabilities: Assessment and Early Intervention" held between March 20-22, 2006, at Kuwait University, a range of discussion topics were considered that would enhance and design specific best practices in special education for the Middle East Arab Gulf region. Governmental representatives, post-secondary…

  10. NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    ScienceCinema

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

  11. The affective and cognitive components of country image : Perceptions of American products in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amro A. Maher; Larry L. Carter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to utilize the BIAS map from the social psychology literature to operationalize and simultaneously examine the effects of the affective and cognitive components of country image. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The researchers collected survey data using a snowball sample of undergraduates from a prominent university in Kuwait. The final sample consisted of 410 Kuwaitis

  12. Barriers in participant recruitment of diverse ethnicities in the state of Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High rejection rates of subject recruitments for research studies have been reported in immigrants in many countries. However, the barriers in recruiting members of the expatriate population in Kuwait have not yet been investigated. This study was therefore designed to identify barriers in recruiting expatriates for research studies in the state of Kuwait. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted on expatriate subject’s aged 18 years and older living in Kuwait. Difference between groups of continuous independent variables was analyzed using the t-test. Different categories such as ethnicity and gender were compared using the chi-square test. Results 3460 (85.1%) participants were recruited and 617 (14.2%) refused to participate in the study while 2530 (38%) calls were unreachable from the total of 6607 calls placed. Younger subjects (mean age 41.1 years) were more hesitant to be part of the study compared to older participants. The rejections among South Asians was (41.8%), Arabs (32.6%), Southeast Asians (18.9%) while the others (6.6%) category was least to refuse among all the nationalities. Gender was not significantly associated with refusal. Conclusion There is an acute lack of appropriate recording of the problems faced while recruiting the participants. The findings suggest important messages for the decision makers in the area of expatriate recruitments, to understand the challenge and design new strategies to overcome the problem of recruitment in the state of Kuwait for research studies. PMID:24257144

  13. The Language Needs Analysis Project at the College of Petroleum and Engineering, Kuwait University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basturkmen, Helen; Al-Huneidi, Amal

    A study of the English language needs and attitudes of students and faculty in Kuwait University's College of Petroleum and Engineering is reported. The objective was to create a basis for assessing the relevance of the institution's current English second language program. Data were gathered through: (1) interviews with faculty, teaching…

  14. Phytochemistry and biologic activities of caulerpa peltata native to oman sea.

    PubMed

    Movahhedin, Nasrin; Barar, Jaleh; Fathi Azad, Fatemeh; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Nazemiyeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    General toxicity, antiproliferative, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Caulerpa peltata J.V.Lamouroux (Caulerpaceae) collected from Oman Sea were investigated. Dried, ground alga was Soxhlet-extracted with hexane, dichloromethane and methanol successively. The methanol extract was subjected to vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC) fractionation on silica gel using a step gradient of different mixture of solvents. A known alkaloid, caulerpin, was subsequently isolated from the fraction eluted by ethyl acatete100%. The antioxidant activity of all extracts was assessed by using the (DPPH) assay. Antiproliferative activity of the all extracts and caulerpin against the cancerous cell line was evaluated using MTT assay. General toxicity of extracts was determined using Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay (BSLA). Based on our results, a weak activity observed for all extracts in MTT assay, while they were toxic toward brine shrimp nauplii comparing to the podophylotoxin. This is the first report on phytochemistry and bioactivity of C. peltata which collected from Oman Sea. PMID:25237346

  15. Deceased donor renal transplantation and the disruptive effect of commercial transplants: the experience of Oman.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, N; Al-Busaidy, Q; Al-Marhuby, H; Al-Lawati, J; Daar, A S

    2014-01-01

    The Oman Renal Transplantation Program was established in 1988 as a joint venture between Sultan Qaboos University and the Ministry of Health. It began with both living related donor (LRD) and deceased donor (DD) transplants. Over the next nine years, while the LRD programme progressed relatively well, there were only thirteen DD transplants. Two of the DD kidneys were obtained from overseas via an active collaboration with the Euro-transplant organisation, and one DD kidney was obtained from Saudi Arabia within the Gulf Cooperative Council exchange programme. The rest of the DD kidneys were obtained in Oman. The Omani DD programme, although it was a pioneering effort in the Gulf region at the time, was not entirely sustainable. In this paper we focus on the challenges we encountered. Among the major challenges was the absence of resources to establish a dedicated DD programme and particularly the failure to develop a cadre of dedicated transplant coordinators. PMID:25160966

  16. New species of Stenodactylus (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from the Sharqiyah Sands in northeastern Oman.

    PubMed

    Metallinou, Margarita; Carranza, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    A new species of gecko of the genus Stenodactylus (Squamata: Gekkonidae) is described from the dune desert of Al Sharqiyah Sands in northeastern Oman. Stenodactylus sharqiyahensis sp. nov. is characterized morphologically by its small size, snout shape, webbing between fingers not very extended, relatively short limbs, and scalation. It is genetically distinct in the mitochondrial DNA and the nuclear MC1R gene from Stenodactylus arabicus to which it has previously been referred. The new species seems to have a restricted distribution confined to the Sharqiyah Sands, which remain isolated from other sand deserts in Arabia. In addition, the data presented herein confirm new locality records for Stenodactylus arabicus in the easternmost limit of its distribution range in western central Oman.  PMID:25113361

  17. Phytochemistry and Biologic Activities of Caulerpa Peltata Native to Oman Sea

    PubMed Central

    Movahhedin, Nasrin; Barar, Jaleh; Fathi Azad, Fatemeh; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Nazemiyeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    General toxicity, antiproliferative, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Caulerpa peltata J.V.Lamouroux (Caulerpaceae) collected from Oman Sea were investigated. Dried, ground alga was Soxhlet-extracted with hexane, dichloromethane and methanol successively. The methanol extract was subjected to vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC) fractionation on silica gel using a step gradient of different mixture of solvents. A known alkaloid, caulerpin, was subsequently isolated from the fraction eluted by ethyl acatete100%. The antioxidant activity of all extracts was assessed by using the (DPPH) assay. Antiproliferative activity of the all extracts and caulerpin against the cancerous cell line was evaluated using MTT assay. General toxicity of extracts was determined using Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay (BSLA). Based on our results, a weak activity observed for all extracts in MTT assay, while they were toxic toward brine shrimp nauplii comparing to the podophylotoxin. This is the first report on phytochemistry and bioactivity of C. peltata which collected from Oman Sea. PMID:25237346

  18. The Nubian Complex of Dhofar, Oman: An African Middle Stone Age Industry in Southern Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jeffrey I.; Usik, Vitaly I.; Marks, Anthony E.; Hilbert, Yamandu H.; Galletti, Christopher S.; Parton, Ash; Geiling, Jean Marie; ?erný, Viktor; Morley, Mike W.; Roberts, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the numerous studies proposing early human population expansions from Africa into Arabia during the Late Pleistocene, no archaeological sites have yet been discovered in Arabia that resemble a specific African industry, which would indicate demographic exchange across the Red Sea. Here we report the discovery of a buried site and more than 100 new surface scatters in the Dhofar region of Oman belonging to a regionally-specific African lithic industry - the late Nubian Complex - known previously only from the northeast and Horn of Africa during Marine Isotope Stage 5, ?128,000 to 74,000 years ago. Two optically stimulated luminescence age estimates from the open-air site of Aybut Al Auwal in Oman place the Arabian Nubian Complex at ?106,000 years ago, providing archaeological evidence for the presence of a distinct northeast African Middle Stone Age technocomplex in southern Arabia sometime in the first half of Marine Isotope Stage 5. PMID:22140561

  19. Water quality mapping and assessment, and weathering processes of selected aflaj in Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Habes Ahmad Ghrefat; Ahmad Jamarh; Ahmed Al-Futaisi; Badr Al-Abri

    There are more than 4,000 falaj (singular of a peculiar dug channel) distributed in different regions in Oman. The chemical\\u000a characteristics of the water in 42 falaj were studied to evaluate the major ion chemistry; geochemical processes controlling\\u000a water composition; and suitability of water for drinking, domestic, and irrigation uses. GIS-based maps indicate that the\\u000a spatial distribution of chemical properties

  20. Integral assessment of air pollution dispersion regimes in the main industrialized and urban areas in Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yassine Charabi; Sultan Al-Yahyai

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a rather complete picture of conditions of stagnation, recirculation and ventilation factors in the main\\u000a industrialized and urban areas in Oman, developed along the coastal area. This study focuses on four sites; Sohar, Muscat,\\u000a Sur, and Salalah. Each site has a local emission sources from transportation, industry and energy production activities. For\\u000a the calculation of the integral

  1. Coastal evolution of the Sultanate Oman (Arabian Peninsula) - tectonic versus sea-level forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Goesta; Gruetzner, Christoph; Reicherter, Klaus

    2010-05-01

    Along the coastline of the Sultanate of Oman (SE Arabian Peninsula) we find geological evidences for tsunamis, neotectonic movements and differential crustal uplift. These evidences are used to describe the Quaternary evolution of the coastline and to construct future scenarios. Coastal areas are dynamic and fast changing natural environments. Several factors, acting on different time scales control their evolution. Furthermore, coastal areas are densely populated, especially in the Sultanate of Oman where more than half of the population is living at the coast. Due to economic improvements Oman experiences substantial changes in land utilization, particularly in Al Batinah and Muscat regions. With the given natural boundary conditions different interests of various user groups are in conflict. Ongoing global climate change will result in further intensification of the situation. Coastal evolution is a function of several forcing factors e.g.: differential land movement which in turn is an effect of local variations in the tectonic stress field; climate and sediment availability. The various forcing factors are quantified by analysing Quaternary coastal sediments and geomorphologic features (e.g. terraces, notches) as archives and indicators. Long-term changes are described by the reconstruction and comparison of the relative sea-level development along the coastline. Short-term coastal changes are often related to natural hazards. Hurricanes as well as tsunamis are known to have affected Oman's coastline in the past. By analysing geological archives information regarding recurrence intervals and potential damages are revealed which allows assessing the risk and estimating the vulnerability. This is done for different areas along the coast which have been identified as key-locations. Sediment cores and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys are used to analyse Quaternary coastal sediments.

  2. The root zones of oceanic hydrothermal systems: Constraints from the Samail ophiolite (Oman)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Nehlig; Thierry Juteau; Valerie Bendel; Joseph Cotten

    1994-01-01

    The Cretaceous Samali ophiolite in Oman exposes an almost complete, 500-km-long, along-axis section of oceanic crust, providing a unique opportunity to study the geometry, physical conditions, and effects of the hydrothermal circulation that fed the volcanic-hosted massive-sulfide deposits. These fossil discharge zones are rooted in the sheeted-dike complex, down to the transition zone with the plutonic sequence. The sheeted-dike complex

  3. Ramadan fasting triggering koro-like symptoms during acute alcohol withdrawal: a case report from Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Sinawi, Hamed; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al-Guenedi, Amr

    2008-12-01

    This article describes a case of koro-like symptoms from Oman associated with alcohol withdrawal and illustrates how the socio-cultural practices of Ramadan-fasting affected the patterning and timing of presentation of severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms. The patient was severely distressed by the delusion that his penis had been amputated. The acute anxiety involving this delusion appears to be conceptually and phenomenologically similar to koro. PMID:19091733

  4. An overview of waste materials recycling in the Sultanate of Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Taha; A Al-Rawas; K Al-Jabri; A Al-Harthy; H Hassan; S Al-Oraimi

    2004-01-01

    Various wastes and by-product materials are generated in the Sultanate of Oman including reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) aggregate, demolition concrete, cement by-pass dust (CBPD), copper slag, petroleum-contaminated soils (PCS), discarded tires, incinerator ash, and others. Recycling of such materials in construction is not practiced. Research data are also minimal into the potential use of selected materials in construction applications. This

  5. Rapid emplacement of young oceanic lithosphere: argon geochronology of the oman ophiolite.

    PubMed

    Hacker, B R

    1994-09-01

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar dates of emplacement-related metamorphic rocks beneath the Samail ophiolite in Oman show that cooling to <525 degrees C occurred within approximately 1 million years of igneous crystallization of the ophiolite. This unexpectedly short time span and rapid cooling means that old, cold continental or oceanic lithosphere must have been adjacent to the ophiolite during spreading and then been thrust beneath the ophiolite almost immediately afterward. PMID:17801534

  6. Trends in the Risk for Cardiovascular Disease among Adults with Diabetes in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lawati, Jawad; Morsi, Magdi; Al-Riyami, Asya; Mabry, Ruth; El-Sayed, Medhat; El-Aty, Mahmoud Abd; Al-Lawati, Hawra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate trends in the estimated 10-year risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) among adults with diagnosed diabetes in Oman. In addition, the effect of hypothetical risk reductions in this population was examined. Methods: Data from 1,077 Omani adults aged ?40 years with diagnosed diabetes were collected and analysed from three national surveys conducted in 1991, 2000 and 2008 across all regions of Oman. The estimated 10-year CVD risk and hypothetical risk reductions were calculated using risk prediction algorithms from the Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE), Diabetes Epidemiology Collaborative Analysis of Diagnostic Criteria in Europe (DECODE) and World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) risk tools. Results: Between 1991 and 2008, the estimated 10-year risk of CVD increased significantly in the total sample and among both genders, regardless of the risk prediction algorithm that was used. Hypothetical risk reduction models for three scenarios (eliminating smoking, controlling systolic blood pressure and reducing total cholesterol) identified that reducing systolic blood pressure to ?130 mmHg would lead to the largest reduction in the 10-year risk of CVD in subjects with diabetes. Conclusion: The estimated 10-year risk for CVD among adults with diabetes increased significantly between 1991 and 2008 in Oman. Focused public health initiatives, involving recognised interventions to address behavioural and biological risks, should be a national priority. Improvements in the quality of care for diabetic patients, both at the individual and the healthcare system level, are required. PMID:25685383

  7. Structural and tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Upper Cretaceous-Eocene sequence in Malaqet-Mundassah-El Saah Range, Oman Mountains, United Arab Emirates and Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Allah, Ali M. A.; Hashem, Waheed A.; Abdelghany, Osman

    2013-03-01

    The Malaqet-Mundassah area lies on the western flank of the Northern Oman Mountains in the UAE and Oman. This area is a well-exposed example of Alpine thrusted and folded Ophiolitic assemblage and post-obduction autochthonous sequences. The hinge zones of the thrust propagation folds accommodated stronger deformation compared with the weaker deformation that occurred in the other parts of these folds. In this area, there have been three main tectonic shortening events, two associated with the formation of unconformities (pre-Late Campanian and Cretaceous/Tertiary) and one during the deposition of megabreccia and conglomerates units (Early-Middle Eocene). Each event continued mildly during the deposition of sediments above. Tectonism was accompanied by sea level changes so that the Malaqet-Mundassah area experienced two marine regressions and two transgressions between the Late Cretaceous and the Oligocene times. Activity of northwest striking (NE-dipping) thrust faults and similarly trending thrust-propagation folds is responsible for the formation of a local basin, the Malaqet-El Saah basin in which the Simsima, Muthaymimah, Saah, and Tawi Uwayyir formations of the area were deposited. The syn-sedimentary activity of thrusts, folds and strike-slip faults is documented in thickness variations, stratigraphic onlapping of formations towards the fold hinges, and the presence of megabreccia and conglomerate deposits not found elsewhere in the foreland basin.

  8. Sustainable water resources development in Kuwait : an integrated approach with comparative analysis of the case of Singapore

    E-print Network

    Nazerali, Nasruddin A

    2007-01-01

    This thesis assesses the water resource status of Kuwait and Singapore, both countries considered as water scarce. The institutional aspect of Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) efforts in both countries is closely ...

  9. Critical Assessment of the Environmental Consequences of the Invasion of Kuwait, the Gulf War, and the Aftermath

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samira A. S. Omar; N. R. Bhat; Adel Asem

    The invasion, occupation and liberation warfare severely impacted all aspects of desert environment, the soil, native vegetation\\u000a and other natural resources of Kuwait. The State of Kuwait adopted immediate measures after liberation to restore the oil\\u000a sector and clear the ammunition from the desert. Several studies were conducted by local and international organizations to\\u000a understand the nature of the damage

  10. Relationships between fishing gear, size frequency and reproductive patterns for the kingfish (Scomberomorus commerson Lacépède) fishery in the Gulf of Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michel R. G. Claereboudt; Hamed S. Al-Oufi; Jennifer McIlwain; J. Steven Goddard

    A survey of fishing gears used in the traditional kingfish fishery along the Gulf of Oman coast of the Sultanate of Oman revealed significant differences in the type of gear and mesh size of nets used by fishers. In two regions of the coast, Al-Batinah and Muscat, different fishing gears (trolling, hooks and line, drift nets, set nets) were used

  11. Hyperpycnal-fed turbidite lobe architecture and recent sedimentary processes: A case study from the Al Batha turbidite system, Oman margin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Bourget; S. Zaragosi; T. Mulder; J.-L. Schneider; T. Garlan; A. Van Toer

    2009-01-01

    article i nfo Available online xxxx The main sediment depocenter along the Oman margin is the Al Batha turbidite system that develops in the Gulf of Oman basin. It is directly connected to the wadi Al Batha, and forms a typical sand and mud rich point source system that acts as regional sediment conduit and feeds a ~1000 km 2

  12. Twenty years of sedimentary change and diagenesis, Qatar Peninsula, Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Re-examination in February 1986 of areas studied by the author in 1966 and 1967 revealed rapid rates of sedimentation and diagenesis along the east coast of the Qatar Peninsula. At Ras UmSa on the northeast side of Qatar, a series of chenier-like beaches and curved spits is building southward under the influence of longshore currents. Beach and spit growth increasingly protects the shoreline and allows tidal flats to form in their lee. As these spits accrete, they become armored on their lagoonal side by beachrock formation. In the last 20 years a spit approximately 1/2 km long has grown, and beachrock has already armored its recurved lagoonal side. At Umm Said on the southeast side of Qatar, seawardly accreting barchan dunes composed of quartz sand have built a 40-km long, 10-km wide sabkha as thick as 30 m. Aerial and ground photographs show that certain dunes near the seaward edge of the sabkha have migrated into the sea and have contributed to shoreline accretion. The observed rate of dune migration suggests that within approximately 100 years the remaining quartz sands are depleted and blown into the sea because there is no replenishment of the dune field. Subsequently, the area reverts to one of carbonate deposition. Fine-grained dolomite is presently precipitating in interstitial brines in the landwardmost portions of this unusual sabkha. In the geologic record, such a deposit would be an anomalous, porous and permeable, cross-bedded, linear, 30-m thick, dolomite-cemented sandstones body encased in carbonate sediments. A modern model such as the one at Umm Said can provide useful clues for determining the origin of similar deposits in ancient rocks.

  13. Twenty years of sedimentary change and diagenesis, Qatar Peninsula, Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, E.A.

    1988-02-01

    Re-examination in February 1986 of areas studied by the author in 1966 and 1967 revealed rapid rates of sedimentation and diagenesis along the east coast of the Qatar Peninsula. At Ras Um Sa on the north-east side of Qatar, a series of chenier-like beaches and curved spits is building southward under the influence of longshore currents. Beach and spit growth increasingly protects the shoreline and allows tidal flats to form in their lee. As these spits accrete, they become armored on their lagoonal side by beachrock formation. In the last 20 years a spit approximately 1/2 km long has grown, and beachrock has already armored its recurved lagoonal side. At Umm Said on the southeast side of Qatar, seawardly accreting barchan dunes composed of quartz sand have built a 40-km long, 10-km wide sabkha as thick as 30 m. Aerial and ground photographs show that certain dunes near the seaward edge of the sabkha have migrated into the sea and have contributed to shoreline accretion. The observed rate of dune migration suggests that within approximately 100 years the remaining quartz sands will be depleted and blown into the sea because there is no replenishment of the dune field. Subsequently, the area will revert to one of carbonate deposition. Fine-grained dolomite is presently precipitating in interstitial brines in the landwardmost portions of this unusual sabkha. In the geologic record, such a deposit would be an anomalous, porous and permeable, cross-bedded, linear, 30-m thick, dolomite-cemented sandstone body encased in carbonate sediments. A modern model such as the one at Umm Said can provide useful clues for determining the origin of similar deposits in ancient rocks.

  14. Prevalence of dental caries among 12–14 year old children in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Darwish, Mohammed; El Ansari, Walid; Bener, Abdulbari

    2014-01-01

    Background To ensure the oral health of a population, clinicians must deliver appropriate dental services, and local communities need to have access to dental care facilities. However, establishment of this infrastructure must be based on reliable information regarding disease prevalence and severity in the target population. Objectives The aims of this study were to measure the incidence of dental caries in school children aged 12–14 throughout Qatar, including the influence of socio-demographic factors. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Qatar from October 2011 to March 2012. A total of 2113 children aged 12–14 were randomly selected from 16 schools located in different geographic areas. Three calibrated examiners using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria to diagnose dental caries performed the clinical examinations. Data analyses were subsequently conducted. Results The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth index values were respectively 4.62 (±3.2), 4.79 (±3.5), and 5.5 (±3.7), for 12, 13, and 14 year-old subjects. Caries prevalence was 85%. The mandibular incisors and canines were least affected by dental caries, while maxillary and mandibular molars exhibited the highest incidence of dental caries. Dental caries were affected by socio-demographic factors; significant differences were detected between female and male children, where more female children showed dental caries than male children. In addition, children residing in semi-urban areas showed more dental caries than in urban areas. Conclusion Results indicated that dental caries prevalence among school children in Qatar has reached critical levels, and is influenced by socio-demographic factors. The mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth values obtained in this study were the second highest detected in the Eastern Mediterranean region. PMID:25057232

  15. THE u.s. ARMYAND nn: Rf:cONSTRUC'llON OF KUWAIT JANET A. M cDoNNELl.

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    THE u.s. ARMYAND nn: Rf:cONSTRUC'llON OF KUWAIT JANET A. M cDoNNELl. · #12;Alter DESERT STORM The U.S. Army and the Reconstruction of Kuwait by janet A. McDonnell DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY WASHINGTON, D Storm : the U.S. Army and the reconstruction of Kuwait I by janet A. McDonnell. p. em. Includes

  16. Bottom sediments of the Arabian Gulf--II. TPH and TOC contents as indicators of oil pollution and implications for the effect and fate of the Kuwait oil slick.

    PubMed

    Massoud, M S; Al-Abdali, F; Al-Ghadban, A N; Al-Sarawi, M

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations in 77 core samples collected in 1992 from the bottom sediments of the Arabian Gulf were used to delineate oil pollution levels and their distribution in the region. Seven chronic moderately (TPH 50-89 microg g(-1)) and heavily (TPH 266-1448 microg g(-1)) polluted areas were identified; three in the northern part of the region and four in the southern part. Oil pollution in these areas was attributed to natural oil seepage, accidental damage to pipelines, accidental spillage from tankers, the Nowruz oil slick, and tanker deballasting. Present-day intermediate (TPH 50-114 microg g(-1)) and high (TPH 200-1122 microg g(-1)) pollution levels were identified in 10 areas. Of these, three polluted areas in the northeastern corner, offshore Saudi Arabia and offshore Bahrain, Qatar and United Arab Emirates are probably directly affected by the Kuwait oil slick. A new scenario is suggested for the movement and fate of the oil slick, in which additional large oil discharges from northern sources, as well as substantial quantities of eroded oiled sediments and oil floating from heavily impacted tidal flats along the Saudi Arabian coastline, serve as sources of oil pollution. A definite relationship exists between the grain-size distribution and the TPH content of bottom sediments, with the highest TPH concentrations in the muddy sediments, suggesting that adsorption onto muds is the primary mechanism of oil pollutant accumulation in the Arabian Gulf. Total organic carbon measurements do not correlate positively with the grain-size distribution and TPH contents of the sediments, and hence cannot be used as indicators for petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in the Arabian Gulf. PMID:15093526

  17. Emission factors for particles, elemental carbon, and trace gases from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, K.K.; Ferek, R.J.; Hobbs, P.V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rasmussen, R.A. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States)

    1992-09-20

    Emission factors are presented for particles, elemental carbon (i.e., soot), total organic carbon in particles and vapor, and for various trace gases from the 1991 Kuwait oil fires. Particle emissions accounted for {approximately} 2% of the fuel burned. In general, soot emission factors were substantially lower than those used in recent {open_quotes}nuclear winter{close_quotes} calculations. Differences in the emissions and appearances of some of the individual fires are discussed. Carbon budget data for the composite plumes from the Kuwait fires are summarized; most of the burned carbon in the plumes was in the form of CO{sub 2}. Fluxes are presented for several combustion products. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  18. Adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons onto inhalable particulate matter during the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Yakoob, S.N.; Al-Sudairawi, M.M. (Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research (Kuwait)); Nasrallah, H.A. (Public Authority for Applied Education and Training (Kuwait)); Al-Majed, N. (Ministry of Public Health (Kuwait))

    1993-10-01

    During the Kuwait oil fires (Feb-Nov., 1991), exposure to inhalable particulate matter (PM[sub 10]) was significant and data on PM[sub 10]-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was scarce. Based on daily measurements of PM[sub 10] ambient levels and 4 measurements of associated PAHs (10, 15, 23, and 31 May, 1991), particle adsorption characteristics were utilized to describe the patterns of daily levels of PM[sub 10]-bound PAHs in Al-Mansoria residential area (Kuwait city) during the period 10-31 May, 1991. Contrary to what is currently perceived, low levels of PM[sub 10] did not reflect low inhalation exposures to adsorbed PAHs. Patterns of daily levels of PM[sub 10]-bound PAHs were more related to the extent of PM[sub 10] occupancy by PAHs than to PM[sub 10] levels in air. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Sustainable fresh water resources management in northern Kuwait—A remote sensing view from Raudatain basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ud Din, Saif; Al Dousari, Ahmad; Al Ghadban, Abdul Nabi

    2007-02-01

    The paper presents time and cost effective remote sensing technology to estimate recharge potential of fresh water shallow aquifers for their sustainable management of water resources in arid ecosystem. Precipitation measurement of Raudatain basin in Kuwait from TRMM data has been made and integrated with geological, geomorphological and hyrological data, to estimate the recharge potential of this basin. The total precipitation in the basin is estimated at 334 MCM for the year 2003. The initial losses are estimated at 78.43% and the transmission loss at 14.866% of the net precipitation. For sustainable management of the ground water resources, recharge wells have been proposed in the higher order streams to augment the Raudatain aquifer in Kuwait. If the available quantity of precipitation can be successfully utilized, it will reduce considerable pressure on desalination, which leads to increased salinity at the coast in Arabian Gulf.

  20. Prospective study of alcoholism treatment in Kuwait: a 5-year follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Bilal, A M; Al-Ansari, E A; Kristof, J; Shaltout, A; el-Islam, M F

    1989-01-01

    The outcome of a 5-year prospective follow-up study of 100 patients treated in the Kuwait Hospital for alcohol-related problems is reported using two parameters computed from weighted follow-up variables, i.e., Offset Score measuring patients' initial follow-up status and Direction of Slope summarizing consequent follow-up scores. Nineteen patients had died representing 14 times the age-corrected national rate. Univariate and multivariate analyses of outcome measures against prefollow-up patients' characteristics revealed that variables indicating heavy alcohol use independent of each other predicted negative outcome and mortality. The tendency of the group score distribution towards normalization uninfluenced by treatment is demonstrated. The pertinence of these findings to the medical profession in Kuwait is stressed. PMID:2920671

  1. Price and income elasticities of energy demand: Some estimates for Kuwait using two econometric models

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mutairi, N.H.; Eltony, M.N.

    1995-12-31

    This paper estimates the demand for energy in Kuwait for the period 1965-1989 using two econometric models: a cointegration and error correction model (ECM) and a simultaneous-equation model (SEM). The results obtained from both models are similar. It is found that the energy demand is inelastic with respect to price in the short and long run, and while it is elastic in the long run, the energy demand is inelastic with respect to income in the short run. Both models` validation shows that the ECM performed better in replicating the past than the simultaneous model, suggesting the need to use the ECM to identify future prospects for energy demand in Kuwait.

  2. Morbidity, ?s Haplotype and ?-Globin Gene Patterns among Sickle Cell Anemia Patients in Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Adekile; M. Z. Haider

    1996-01-01

    Admission records of children with sickle cell anemia (SS), in the two main teaching hospitals in Kuwait, were reviewed for a 1-year period. The haplotypes of 92 ?s chromosomes (from 39 SS, 11 AS, 2 S?-thalassemia [S? -thal] and 1 SD individuals) were determined using an allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization technique, while the ?-globin gene status of 27 SS and

  3. Age at menarche and its relationship to body mass index among adolescent girls in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing rates of childhood obesity and rapid change in socio-economic status, the mean age at menarche remains mostly unknown among contemporary girls in Kuwait and other countries in the Gulf region. This study aimed to estimate the mean age at menarche among schoolgirls in Kuwait and investigate the association between age at menarche and obesity. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1,273 randomly selected female high school students from all governorates in Kuwait. Overweight was defined as higher than or equal to the 85th percentile and obesity as higher than or equal to the 95th percentile using growth charts provided by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2000). Data on menarche, socio-demographic status, physical activity and diet were collected using confidential self-administered questionnaire. Results Out of 1,273 students, 23 (1.8%) were absent or refused to participate. The mean age at menarche was 12.41 years (95% CI: 12.35-12.48). The prevalence of early menarche, defined as less than 11 years of age, was 8.5% (95% CI: 7.0-10.2%). The prevalence of obesity and overweight was 18.3% (95% CI: 16.2-20.6%) and 25.8% (95% CI: 23.42-28.30%), respectively. Age at menarche was inversely and significantly associated with odds of overweight and obesity after adjusting for potential confounders, odds ratio 0.84 (0.77-0.93); (p?=?0.001). Conclusion Age at menarche among contemporary girls in Kuwait is similar to that in industrialized countries. There is an inverse association between age at menarche and obesity or overweight. Trends in menarcheal age should be monitored and time of sexual maturation and its related factors should be taken into account in strategies that aim to combat obesity. PMID:23311596

  4. Identification of nonhydrocarbon aromatic compounds in the gas oil fraction of Kuwait petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Ijam, M.J.; Arif, S.F. (Virginia State Univ., Blacksburg (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The amounts of individual components in the nonhydrocarbon aromatic portion of a Kuwait gas oil boiling in the range from 218 to 345C are reported. Twenty-eight nonhydrocarbon aromatic components were isolated and identified from their separated fractions. The majority are C{sub 1}-C{sub 5} benzo- and dibenzothiophenes. The compounds were isolated principally by using preparative scale high performance liquid chromatography, and identified by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography supplemented by mass spectrometry.

  5. A study of fungal spore poupulations in the atmosphere of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Moustafa; Susan M. Kamel

    1976-01-01

    The fungal air-spora of Kuwait was investigated using the Petri-dish trapping technique. During the period from 1st April, 1974 to 30th June, 1975, a total of 3685 colonies were recorded from 2 % malt agar plates. Fifty-five genera and 116 species were identified. Alternaria occupied the first place in the order of percentage incidence, being represented by 18.3% of the

  6. Estimating the concentration of uranium in some environmental samples in Kuwait after the 1991 gulf war

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Firyal Bou-Rabee

    1995-01-01

    The concentration of uranium in Kuwait soil samples as well as in solid fall-out and surface air-suspended matter samples has been assayed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It was found that average U concentration in the soil samples (?0.7 ?g\\/g) is half of that in solid fall-out and air particulate matter samples. The average U concentration in the

  7. Directional and Spectral Reflectance of the Kuwait Oil-Fire Smoke

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL D. KING

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory for Atmospheres, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland The angular reflectance pattern of the Kuwait oil-fire smoke was measured from an aircraft at 13 discrete wavelengths between 0.5 and 2.3 pm. Measurements at 0.75 and 1.64 pm showed that the reflectance of the smoke layer was about 12% in the nadir direction with considerable limb brightening toward the

  8. Variations in 7Be concentrations in the atmosphere of Kuwait during the period 1994 to 1998

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D Al-Azmi; A. M Sayed; H. A Yatim

    2001-01-01

    The Beryllium-7 (7Be) concentrations in the atmosphere of Kuwait, as found by gamma-ray measurements for 243 air filters collected over a five-year period, produced variable values ranging from 0.2 to 14.9mBq\\/m3 with a behavior pattern which has oscillatory characteristics, with increased activities occurring in the summer months of each year. The annual levels of occurrence of 7Be were found to

  9. Factors influencing the total mercury and methyl mercury in the hair of the fishermen of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. B Al-Majed; M. R Preston

    2000-01-01

    Total and methyl mercury (MeHg) levels in the hair of fishermen are described anticipating that they represent the critical group for dietary exposure. One-hundred human hair samples were collected from fishermen (Egyptians: age range 25–60), living in Doha Fishing Village, Kuwait. Thirty-five additional samples were taken from a control group working in a local construction company (age range 26–35). Overall

  10. Effect of Kuwait's oil-fire smoke cloud on global horizontal irradiance at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Elhadidy; S. M. Shaahid

    1994-01-01

    The influence of Kuwait's 1991 Oil-Fire smoke cloud on incident total horizontal solar radiation has been investigated using measurements made at the automatic solar radiation and meteorological monitoring station in Dhahran (26[degrees] 32'N, 50[degrees] 13'E), Saudi Arabia. Results indicate that the global horizontal irradiance on smoky days was 70-87% of that on clear\\/non-smoky days and that the Clearness Index was

  11. Geomorphological analysis of paleo drainage systems and their environmental implications in the desert of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Al-Sulaimi; F. J. Khalaf; A. Mukhopadhyay

    1997-01-01

    A well-developed drainage network is carved in the hard calcretized and gypcretized gravelly sand of the Pleistocene Dibdibba\\u000a Formation in northern Kuwait. The present-day aridity suggests that these drainages were developed during pluvial episodes\\u000a that took place in the post-Pleistocene time and, therefore, are considered as paleo-drainage. Detailed morphometrical analysis\\u000a of the endoeric drainage systems was performed and the degree

  12. A reconnaissance study of a clastic coastal sabkha in Northern Kuwait, Arabian Gulf

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Saleh; F. Al-Ruwaih; A. Al-Reda; A. Gunatilaka

    1999-01-01

    A clastic, tidal flat-sabkha complex characterizes the mesotidal coastline of Northern Kuwait. The Holocene tidal sediments of this area represent the western-most limit of the Shatt Al-Arab delta sediments. The area under study in Bahrah is subdivided according to its geomorphological features and depositional setting into eight sub-environments. The sediments are characterized by two distinct size populations; a coarse fraction

  13. Representation of Expatriates Among Cancer Patients in Kuwait and the Need for Culturally-Competent Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salem H. Alshemmari; Samar M. Refaat; Amani A. Elbasmi; Samy A. Alsirafy

    2012-01-01

    From 2000 to 2007, 11,793 cancer patients received treatment in Kuwait. Non-Kuwaitis accounted for 6,016 (51%) patients. They came from 68 countries, mainly from the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean (59%) and South-East Asian (20%) regions. The majority (69%) was from low- and low-middle income countries. Thirty-seven percent were from non-Arabic speaking countries. To provide culturally-competent care for expatriate patients,

  14. The Influence of Air-Conditioning Efficiency in the Peak Load Demand for Kuwait

    E-print Network

    Ali, A. A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

    2007-01-01

    THE INFLUENCE OF AIR-CONDITIONING EFFICIENCY IN THE PEAK LOAD DEMAND FOR KUWAIT Ahmad Al-Mulla Ali* G.P. Maheshwari Associate Research Scientist Senior Research Specialist Building and Energy Technologies Environmental... leading to reduction in consumption of fuel and release of green house gasses. 6 REFERENCES Alsayegh, O.A., F.A., Fairouz, O.A., Al-Matar, and A., Al-Mulla Ali, 2005, “Electric peak power forecasting by the year...

  15. Seroprevalence and epidemiological correlates of Toxoplasma gondii infections among patients referred for hospital-based serological testing in Doha, Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marawan A Abu-Madi; Naema Al-Molawi; Jerzy M Behnke

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The city of Doha in Qatar has a high density of feral cats and there is a high risk of toxoplasmosis for the resident human population. No data currently exist for the prevalence of infection with Toxoplasma gondii in the city. METHODS: We analysed the serological response to Toxoplasma gondii of 1625 subjects referred for routine hospital based serological

  16. Investigation of Solar Energy Applications with Design and Implementation of Photovoltaic Traffic Light Signal System for Qatar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hassan Moghbelli; Khaled Ellithy; Zohreh Eslami; R. Vartanian; D. Wannous; A. El Ghamrawy; O. Basha; A. Fayad; M. Qaraqe; S. Nicola

    The objective of this paper is to promote the use of solar energy in powering traffic signal systems for rural areas in Qatar with no power grid. A photovoltaic system is needed in order to use this energy continuously. The results of the investigation of components, design, and market availability are shown in the paper. Solar cells, which are used

  17. Lessons from the Field: Developing and Implementing the Qatar Student Assessment System, 2002-2006. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gabriella; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Broer, Markus; Mariano, Louis T.; Froemel, J. Enrique; Goldman, Charles A.; DaVanzo, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Qatar has recently positioned itself to be a leader in education. Central to the country's efforts is the implementation of reforms to its K-12 education system. Central to the reform initiatives was the development of internationally benchmarked curriculum standards in four subjects: Arabic, English as a foreign language, mathematics, and…

  18. Developing Intercultural Competence in Future Student Affairs Professionals through a Graduate Student Global Study Course to Doha, Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Paige; Getz, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a 2-week global study course to Doha, Qatar for graduate students in the higher education leadership and student affairs program at the University of San Diego. The course sought to develop intercultural competence with a specific focus on understanding Qatari and Middle Eastern perspectives and culture, understanding the…

  19. Patterns of infection with intestinal parasites in Qatar among food handlers and housemaids from different geographical regions of origin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marawan A. Abu-Madi; Jerzy M. Behnke; Ahmed Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections were surveyed among recently arrived immigrant workers in Qatar destined for employment in food handling occupations. Two overlapping datasets (female workers surveyed in 2005 and 2006, and both sexes in 2006) were analyzed. Seven species were detected, 3 nematodes (Trichuris trichiura, hookworms and Ascaris lumbricoides) and 4 protozoans (Entamoeba histolytica\\/dispar, non-pathogenic Entamoebae, Blastocystis hominis and Giardia lamblia).

  20. QATAR-2: A K DWARF ORBITED BY A TRANSITING HOT JUPITER AND A MORE MASSIVE COMPANION IN AN OUTER ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Marta L. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Alsubai, Khalid A. [Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Latham, David W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Carter, Joshua A.; Berlind, Perry; Brown, Warren R.; Calkins, Michael L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Furesz, Gabor; Stefanik, Robert P.; Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Parley, Neil R.; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Horne, Keith D. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Fulton, Benjamin J.; Street, Rachel A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A.; Jorgensen, Uffe Grae [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); West, Richard G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-05-01

    We report the discovery and initial characterization of Qatar-2b, a hot Jupiter transiting a V = 13.3 mag K dwarf in a circular orbit with a short period, P{sub b} = 1.34 days. The mass and radius of Qatar-2b are M{sub P} = 2.49 M{sub J} and R{sub P} = 1.14 R{sub J}, respectively. Radial-velocity monitoring of Qatar-2 over a span of 153 days revealed the presence of a second companion in an outer orbit. The Systemic Console yielded plausible orbits for the outer companion, with periods on the order of a year and a companion mass of at least several M{sub J}. Thus, Qatar-2 joins the short but growing list of systems with a transiting hot Jupiter and an outer companion with a much longer period. This system architecture is in sharp contrast to that found by Kepler for multi-transiting systems, which are dominated by objects smaller than Neptune, usually with tightly spaced orbits that must be nearly coplanar.