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Sample records for kwong sak leung

  1. Assessing the Psychometric Properties of Kember and Leung's Reflection Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lethbridge, Kristen; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll; Laschinger, Heather K. S.; Fernando, Rajulton

    2013-01-01

    Reflective thinking is often stated as a learning outcome of baccalaureate nursing education, and as a characteristic of a competent professional; however, no consistent method exists to assess the extent to which students engage in reflective thinking. To address this need, Kember and Leung developed and tested a self-report questionnaire based…

  2. An evaluation of sex-age-kill (SAK) model performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Boyce, Mark S.; Hansen, Lonnie P.; Kammermeyer, Kent

    2009-01-01

    The sex-age-kill (SAK) model is widely used to estimate abundance of harvested large mammals, including white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Despite a long history of use, few formal evaluations of SAK performance exist. We investigated how violations of the stable age distribution and stationary population assumption, changes to male or female harvest, stochastic effects (i.e., random fluctuations in recruitment and survival), and sampling efforts influenced SAK estimation. When the simulated population had a stable age distribution and λ > 1, the SAK model underestimated abundance. Conversely, when λ < 1, the SAK overestimated abundance. When changes to male harvest were introduced, SAK estimates were opposite the true population trend. In contrast, SAK estimates were robust to changes in female harvest rates. Stochastic effects caused SAK estimates to fluctuate about their equilibrium abundance, but the effect dampened as the size of the surveyed population increased. When we considered both stochastic effects and sampling error at a deer management unit scale the resultant abundance estimates were within ±121.9% of the true population level 95% of the time. These combined results demonstrate extreme sensitivity to model violations and scale of analysis. Without changes to model formulation, the SAK model will be biased when λ ≠ 1. Furthermore, any factor that alters the male harvest rate, such as changes to regulations or changes in hunter attitudes, will bias population estimates. Sex-age-kill estimates may be precise at large spatial scales, such as the state level, but less so at the individual management unit level. Alternative models, such as statistical age-at-harvest models, which require similar data types, might allow for more robust, broad-scale demographic assessments.

  3. A Reflective Conversation with Ugur Sak: Gifted Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Sak, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    In this reflective conversation, Ugur Sak discusses the current "state of the art" of gifted education in Turkey. He reviews the use of enrichment, discusses acceleration and reviews curricular procedures in Turkey. He responds to questions about the identification of gifted students and discusses the age old debate of talent versus…

  4. On the Ozarow-Leung Scheme for the Gaussian Broadcast Channel with Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murin, Yonathan; Kaspi, Yonatan; Dabora, Ron

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we consider linear-feedback schemes for the two-user Gaussian broadcast channel with noiseless feedback. We extend the transmission scheme of [Ozarow and Leung, 1984] by applying estimators with memory instead of the memoryless estimators used by Ozarow and Leung (OL) in their original work. A recursive formulation of the mean square errors achieved by the proposed estimators is provided, along with a proof for the existence of a fixed point. This enables characterizing the achievable rates of the extended scheme. Finally, via numerical simulations it is shown that the extended scheme can improve upon the original OL scheme in terms of achievable rates, as well as achieve a low probability of error after a finite number of channel uses.

  5. Construction of novel chimeric proteins through the truncation of SEC2 and Sak from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jing; Yu, Xiao-jie; Cui, Xiao-jin; Mu, Teng; Lin, Jia-shuai; Ni, Pei; Li, Hui; You, Song; Hu, Feng-qing

    2014-01-01

    It is an usual clinical phenomenon that cancer patients are prone to thrombosis. Until now, there have been no efficient methods or appropriate drugs to prevent and cure tumor thrombus. Therefore, the construction of a bifunctional chimeric protein for the treatment of cancer, complicated with thrombosis, is of great significance. Utilizing the superantigenic activity of staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) and the thrombolytic activity of staphylokinase (Sak), Sak-linker-SEC2 and SEC2-linker-Sak were constructed which had good anti-tumor and thrombolytic activities at the same time. Due to the intrinsic emetic activity of SEC2 and high molecular weight (MW) of chimeric proteins (44 kDa), their clinical applications will be restricted. In this study, novel chimeric proteins including ΔSEC2-ΔSak and ΔSak-ΔSEC2 were constructed through the truncation of SEC2 and Sak without 9-Ala linker and His-tag. Compared with the former, both the truncated proteins preserved nearly the same anti-tumor and thrombolytic activities. In addition, their MWs were only 29 kDa and their immunoreactivities were slightly lower than that of Sak-linker-SEC2 and SEC2-linker-Sak, respectively. Therefore, the novel chimeric proteins possessed merits and characteristics, such as low MS, low immunogenicity, and difunctionality which the former had not. It will be of great interest if the above-mentioned proteins can be used to cure Trousseau syndrome in clinic. PMID:25209498

  6. Vessel Delineation in Retinal Images using Leung-Malik filters and Two Levels Hierarchical Learning

    PubMed Central

    Varnousfaderani, Ehsan S; Yousefi, Siamak; Bowd, Christopher; Belghith, Akram; Goldbaum, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessel segmentation is important for the analysis of ocular fundus images for diseases affecting vessel caliber, occlusion, leakage, inflammation, and proliferation. We introduce a novel supervised method to evaluate performance of Leung-Malik filters in delineating vessels. First, feature vectors are extracted for every pixel with respect to the response of Leung-Malik filters on green channel retinal images in different orientations and scales. A two level hierarchical learning framework is proposed to segment vessels in retinal images with confounding disease abnormalities. In the first level, three expert classifiers are trained to delineate 1) vessels, 2) background, and 3) retinal pathologies including abnormal pathologies such as lesions and anatomical structures such as optic disc. In the second level, a new classifier is trained to detect vessels and non-vessel pixels based on results of the expert classifiers. Qualitative evaluation shows the effectiveness of the proposed expert classifiers in modeling retinal pathologies. Quantitative results on two standard datasets STARE (AUC = 0.971, Acc=0.927) and DRIVE (AUC = 0.955, Acc =0.903) are comparable with other state-of-the-art vessel segmentation methods. PMID:26958253

  7. Study of asphalt/asphaltene precipitation during addition of solvents to West Sak crude

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.C.; Patil, S.L.; Kamath, V.A. )

    1990-07-01

    In this study, experimental data on the amount of asphalt and asphaltene precipitation due to addition of solvents to West Sak crude were gathered. The first set of tests were conducted for two types of West Sak stock tank oils. Solvents used include: ethane, carbon dioxide, propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-heptane, Prudhoe Bay natural gas (PBG) and natural gas liquids (NGL). Effect of solvent to oil dilution ratio on the amount of precipitation was studied. Alteration of crude oil composition due to asphalt precipitation was measured using gas-liquid chromatography. A second set of experiments were conducted to measure asphaltene precipitation due to addition of CO{sub 2} to live (recombined) West Sak crude.

  8. Mitogen activated protein kinases SakA(HOG1) and MpkC collaborate for Aspergillus fumigatus virulence.

    PubMed

    Bruder Nascimento, Ariane Cristina Mendes de Oliveira; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Hori, Juliana I; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; de Assis, Leandro José; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Rocha, Marina Campos; Malavazi, Iran; Brown, Neil Andrew; Valiante, Vito; Brakhage, Axel A; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2016-06-01

    Here, we investigated which stress responses were influenced by the MpkC and SakA mitogen-activated protein kinases of the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway in the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. The ΔsakA and the double ΔmpkC ΔsakA mutants were more sensitive to osmotic and oxidative stresses, and to cell wall damaging agents. Both MpkC::GFP and SakA::GFP translocated to the nucleus upon osmotic stress and cell wall damage, with SakA::GFP showing a quicker response. The phosphorylation state of MpkA was determined post exposure to high concentrations of congo red and Sorbitol. In the wild-type strain, MpkA phosphorylation levels progressively increased in both treatments. In contrast, the ΔsakA mutant had reduced MpkA phosphorylation, and surprisingly, the double ΔmpkC ΔsakA had no detectable MpkA phosphorylation. A. fumigatus ΔsakA and ΔmpkC were virulent in mouse survival experiments, but they had a 40% reduction in fungal burden. In contrast, the ΔmpkC ΔsakA double mutant showed highly attenuated virulence, with approximately 50% mice surviving and a 75% reduction in fungal burden. We propose that both cell wall integrity (CWI) and HOG pathways collaborate, and that MpkC could act by modulating SakA activity upon exposure to several types of stresses and during CW biosynthesis. PMID:26878695

  9. Effects of CO sub 2 addition to steam on recovery of West Sak crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbrook, M.W. ); Dehghani, K. )

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports on a high-pressure 1D laboratory displacement study which evaluated the effects of adding CO{sub 2} to steam on the recovery of West Sak crude oil. Results of the laboratory experiments indicate that the simultaneous injection of CO{sub 2} and steam increases recovery, reduces injection temperatures, and reduces the heat input required.

  10. Phosphoprotein SAK1 is a regulator of acclimation to singlet oxygen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Wakao, Setsuko; Chin, Brian L; Ledford, Heidi K; Dent, Rachel M; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2014-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a highly toxic and inevitable byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of acclimating specifically to singlet oxygen stress, but the retrograde signaling pathway from the chloroplast to the nucleus mediating this response is unknown. Here we describe a mutant, singlet oxygen acclimation knocked-out 1 (sak1), that lacks the acclimation response to singlet oxygen. Analysis of genome-wide changes in RNA abundance during acclimation to singlet oxygen revealed that SAK1 is a key regulator of the gene expression response during acclimation. The SAK1 gene encodes an uncharacterized protein with a domain conserved among chlorophytes and present in some bZIP transcription factors. The SAK1 protein is located in the cytosol, and it is induced and phosphorylated upon exposure to singlet oxygen, suggesting that it is a critical intermediate component of the retrograde signal transduction pathway leading to singlet oxygen acclimation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02286.001 PMID:24859755

  11. Fungi use the SakA (HogA) pathway for phytochrome-dependent light signalling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenzhong; Armant, Olivier; Fischer, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Stress-sensing in fungi depends on a signalling cascade comprised of a two-component phosphorylation relay plus a subsequent MAP kinase cascade to trigger gene expression. Besides osmotic or oxidative stress, fungi sense many other environmental factors, one of which is light(1,2). Light controls morphogenetic pathways but also the production of secondary metabolites such as penicillin. Here we show that phytochrome-dependent light signalling in Aspergillus nidulans involves the stress-sensing and osmosensing signalling pathway. In a screening for 'blind' mutants, the MAP kinase SakA (also known as HogA) was identified by whole-genome sequencing. The phytochrome FphA physically interacted with the histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein YpdA and caused light-dependent phosphorylation of the MAP kinase SakA and its shuttling into nuclei. In the absence of phytochrome, SakA still responded to osmotic stress but not to light. The SakA pathway thus integrates several stress factors and can be considered to be a hub for environmental signals. PMID:27572639

  12. Cloning and sequencing of sakP encoding sakacin P, the bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus sake LTH 673.

    PubMed

    Tichaczek, P S; Vogel, R F; Hammes, W P

    1994-02-01

    Sakacin P is a heat-stable, unmodified peptide bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus sake LTH 673. The strain was isolated from fermented dry sausages and is well adapted to this habitat. The bacteriocin inhibits the growth of the opportunistic food pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and Listeria monocytogenes and therefore, it may improve the hygienic status of fermented food, i.e. meat products. Oligonucleotide probes were designed from the N-terminal amino acid sequence of sakacin P and used to identify sakP, the structural gene of sakacin P, on the chromosome of L. sake LTH 673. SakP was cloned into Escherichia coli NM554 and the nucleotide sequence of the gene and its adjacent regions were determined. Sakacin P appears to be synthesized as a prepeptide of 61 amino acids which is proteolytically processed to the mature bacteriocin consisting of 43 amino acids. Sequencing of the cloned fragment also revealed the presence of two other open reading frames orfX and orfY, which are located upstream and downstream of sakP, respectively, putatively encoding proteins of 52 and 98 amino acids, respectively. The functions of both ORFs remain unknown. Primer extension analysis revealed a promoter upstream of sakP. Two transcripts of approximately 0.35 and 1.0 kb were detected by Northern hybridization encoding either only sakP, or both sakP and orfY, respectively. PMID:8180701

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: PAINT OVERSPRAY ARRESTOR, KOCH FILTER CORPORATION MULTI-SAK 6FZ159-S

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of March 19-23, 1999, tests of Koch Filter Corporation's Multi-Sak 6FZ159-S paint overspray arrestor (POA) as part of an evaluation of POAs by EPA's Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The basic per...

  14. Aspergillus nidulans transcription factor AtfA interacts with the MAPK SakA to regulate general stress responses, development and spore functions.

    PubMed

    Lara-Rojas, Fernando; Sánchez, Olivia; Kawasaki, Laura; Aguirre, Jesús

    2011-04-01

    Fungi utilize a phosphorelay system coupled to a MAP kinase module for sensing and processing environmental signals. In Aspergillus nidulans, response regulator SskA transmits osmotic and oxidative stress signals to the stress MAPK (SAPK) SakA. Using a genetic approach together with GFP tagging and molecular bifluorescence we show that SakA and ATF/CREB transcription factor AtfA define a general stress-signalling pathway that plays differential roles in oxidative stress responses during growth and development. AtfA is permanently localized in the nucleus, while SakA accumulates in the nucleus in response to oxidative or osmotic stress signals or during normal spore development, where it physically interacts with AtfA. AtfA is required for expression of several genes, the conidial accumulation of SakA and the viability of conidia. Furthermore, SakA is active (phosphorylated) in asexual spores, remaining phosphorylated in dormant conidia and becoming dephosphorylated during germination. SakA phosphorylation in spores depends on certain (SskA) but not other (SrrA and NikA) components of the phosphorelay system. Constitutive phosphorylation of SakA induced by the fungicide fludioxonil prevents both, germ tube formation and nuclear division. Similarly, Neurospora crassa SakA orthologue OS-2 is phosphorylated in intact conidia and gets dephosphorylated during germination. We propose that SakA-AtfA interaction regulates gene expression during stress and conidiophore development and that SAPK phosphorylation is a conserved mechanism to regulate transitions between non-growing (spore) and growing (mycelia) states. PMID:21320182

  15. Sak1 kinase interacts with Pso2 nuclease in response to DNA damage induced by interstrand crosslink-inducing agents in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Munari, Fernanda M; Revers, Luis F; Cardone, Jacqueline M; Immich, Bruna F; Moura, Dinara J; Guecheva, Temenouga N; Bonatto, Diego; Laurino, Jomar P; Saffi, Jenifer; Brendel, Martin; Henriques, João A P

    2014-01-01

    By isolating putative binding partners through the two-hybrid system (THS) we further extended the characterization of the specific interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair gene PSO2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nine fusion protein products were isolated for Pso2p using THS, among them the Sak1 kinase, which interacted with the C-terminal β-CASP domain of Pso2p. Comparison of mutagen-sensitivity phenotypes of pso2Δ, sak1Δ and pso2Δsak1Δ disruptants revealed that SAK1 is necessary for complete WT-like repair. The epistatic interaction of both mutant alleles suggests that Sak1p and Pso2p act in the same pathway of controlling sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. We also observed that Pso2p is phosphorylated by Sak1 kinase in vitro and co-immunoprecipitates with Sak1p after 8-MOP+UVA treatment. Survival data after treatment of pso2Δ, yku70Δ and yku70Δpso2Δ with nitrogen mustard, PSO2 and SAK1 with YKU70 or DNL4 single-, double- and triple mutants with 8-MOP+UVA indicated that ICL repair is independent of YKu70p and DNL4p in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, a non-epistatic interaction was observed between MRE11, PSO2 and SAK1 genes after ICL induction, indicating that their encoded proteins act on the same substrate, but in distinct repair pathways. In contrast, an epistatic interaction was observed for PSO2 and RAD52, PSO2 and RAD50, PSO2 and XRS2 genes in 8-MOP+UVA treated exponentially growing cells. PMID:24362320

  16. The SrkA Kinase Is Part of the SakA Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Interactome and Regulates Stress Responses and Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes-Arroyo, Rafael; Lara-Rojas, Fernando; Bayram, Özgür; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and many other eukaryotes use specialized mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) of the Hog1/p38 family to transduce environmental stress signals. In Aspergillus nidulans, the MAPK SakA and the transcription factor AtfA are components of a central multiple stress-signaling pathway that also regulates development. Here we characterize SrkA, a putative MAPK-activated protein kinase, as a novel component of this pathway. ΔsrkA and ΔsakA mutants share a derepressed sexual development phenotype. However, ΔsrkA mutants are not sensitive to oxidative stress, and in fact, srkA inactivation partially suppresses the sensitivity of ΔsakA mutant conidia to H2O2, tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), and menadione. In the absence of stress, SrkA shows physical interaction with nonphosphorylated SakA in the cytosol. We show that H2O2 induces a drastic change in mitochondrial morphology consistent with a fission process and the relocalization of SrkA to nuclei and mitochondria, depending on the presence of SakA. SakA-SrkA nuclear interaction is also observed during normal asexual development in dormant spores. Using SakA and SrkA S-tag pulldown and purification studies coupled to mass spectrometry, we found that SakA interacts with SrkA, the stress MAPK MpkC, the PPT1-type phosphatase AN6892, and other proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, mRNA stability and protein synthesis, mitochondrial function, and other stress-related responses. We propose that oxidative stress induces DNA damage and mitochondrial fission and that SakA and SrkA mediate cell cycle arrest and regulate mitochondrial function during stress. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SakA and SrkA regulate the remodelling of cell physiology during oxidative stress and development. PMID:25820520

  17. SOLVENT-BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES TO DEVELOP WEST SAK ALASKA NORTH SLOPE HEAVY OIL RESOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    David O. Ogbe; Tao Zhu

    2004-01-01

    A one-year research program is conducted to evaluate the feasibility of applying solvent-based enhanced oil recovery processes to develop West Sak and Ugnu heavy oil resources found on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The project objective is to conduct research to develop technology to produce and market the 300-3000 cp oil in the West Sak and Ugnu sands. During the first phase of the research, background information was collected, and experimental and numerical studies of vapor extraction process (VAPEX) in West Sak and Ugnu are conducted. The experimental study is designed to foster understanding of the processes governing vapor chamber formation and growth, and to optimize oil recovery. A specially designed core-holder and a computed tomography (CT) scanner was used to measure the in-situ distribution of phases. Numerical simulation study of VAPEX was initiated during the first year. The numerical work completed during this period includes setting up a numerical model and using the analog data to simulate lab experiments of the VAPEX process. The goal was to understand the mechanisms governing the VAPEX process. Additional work is recommended to expand the VAPEX numerical study using actual field data obtained from Alaska North Slope.

  18. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Gene and Newcastle Disease Virus Titre and Body Weight in Leung Hang Khao Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Molee, A.; Kongroi, K.; Kuadsantia, P.; Poompramun, C.; Likitdecharote, B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene on resistance to Newcastle disease virus and body weight of the Thai indigenous chicken, Leung Hang Khao (Gallus gallus domesticus). Blood samples were collected for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis from 485 chickens. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing was used to classify single nucleotide polymorphisms of class II MHC. Body weights were measured at the ages of 3, 4, 5, and 7 months. Titres of Newcastle disease virus at 2 weeks to 7 months were determined and the correlation between body weight and titre was analysed. The association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and body weight and titre were analysed by a generalized linear model. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified: C125T, A126T, C209G, C242T, A243T, C244T, and A254T. Significant correlations between log titre and body weight were found at 2 and 4 weeks. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and titre were found for C209G and A254T, and between all single nucleotide polymorphisms (except A243T) and body weight. The results showed that class II MHC is associated with both titre of Newcastle disease virus and body weight in Leung Hang Khao chickens. This is of concern because improved growth traits are the main goal of breeding selection. Moreover, the results suggested that MHC has a pleiotropic effect on the titre and growth performance. This mechanism should be investigated in a future study. PMID:26732325

  19. A Compensated-Redlich-Kwong (CORK) equation for volumes and fugacities of CO2 and H2O in the range 1 bar to 50 kbar and 100 1600°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Tim; Powell, Roger

    1991-12-01

    We present a simple virial-type extension to the modified Redlich-Kwong (MRK) equation for calculation of the volumes and fugacities of H2O and CO2 over the pressure range 0.001 50 kbar and 100 to 1400°C (H2O) and 100 to 1600°C (CO2). This extension has been designed to: (a) compensate for the tendency of the MRK equation to overestimate volumes at high pressures, and (b) accommodate the volume behaviour of coexisting gas and liquid phases along the saturation curve. The equation developed for CO2 may be used to derive volumes and fugacities of CO, H2, CH4, N2, O2 and other gases which conform to the corresponding states principle. For H2O the measured volumes of Burnham et al. are significantly higher in the range 4 10 kbar than those presented by other workers. For CO2 the volume behaviour at high pressures derived from published MRK equations are very different (larger volumes, steeper ( ∂P/ ∂T)V, and hence larger fugacities) from the virial-type equations of Saxena and Fei. Our CORK equation for CO2 yields fugacities which are in closer agreement with the available high pressure experimental decarbonation reactions.

  20. Potential predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami — Sedimentary evidence of extreme wave events at Ban Bang Sak, SW Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, D.; Brückner, H.; Jankaew, K.; Kelletat, D.; Scheffers, A.; Scheffers, S.

    2011-08-01

    Where historical records are short and/or fragmentary, geological evidence is an important tool to reconstruct the recurrence rate of extreme wave events (tsunamis and/or storms). This is particularly true for those coastal zones around the Indian Ocean, where predecessors of similar magnitude as the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (IOT) have not been reported by written sources. In this context, the sedimentary record of the Holocene coastal plain of Ban Bang Sak (Phang-nga province, Thailand) provides evidence of multiple prehistoric coastal flooding events in the form of allochthonous sand beds, which were radiocarbon dated to 700-500, 1350-1180, and younger than 2000 cal BP. The layers were assigned to high-energy events of marine origin, which could be either tsunamis or tropical storms, by means of granulometry, geochemistry, vertical structure, and macrofossil content. Although no landfall of a strong storm has occurred in the last 150 years of meteorological data recording, cyclones cannot be ruled out for the last centuries and millennia. However, discrimination between tsunami and storm origin was mainly based on the comparison of the palaeoevent beds with the local deposit of the IOT, which revealed similar characteristics in regard to spatial extend and sediment properties. Furthermore, the youngest palaeoevent correlates with contemporaneous deposits from Thailand and more distant coasts. Hence, we relate it to a basin wide tsunami which took place 700-500 years ago. For the sediments of older extreme events, deposited between 2000 and 1180 cal BP, we found no unambiguous counterparts at other sites; nevertheless, at least for now, they are treated as tsunami candidates.

  1. Obtaining a Well-Aligned ZnO Nanotube Array Using the Hydrothermal Growth Method / Labi Sakārtotu Zno Nanocauruļu Kopu Iegūšana, Izmantojot Hidrotermālo Metodi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasovska, M.; Gerbreders, V.; Paskevics, V.; Ogurcovs, A.; Mihailova, I.

    2015-10-01

    Optimal growing parameters have been found using the hydrothermal method to obtain well-aligned vertical ZnO nanorod and nanotube arrays. The influence of different growing factors (such as temperature, growing solution concentration, method of obtaining seed layer and condition) on nanotube morphology and size is described in the paper. Well-structured ZnO nanotubes have been obtained by using a selfselective etching method with lowering temperatures of growth during the hydrothermal process. It is shown that the optical properties of the nanostructure arrays obtained are sensitive to the medium in which they are placed, which is why they can be used as sensors for pure substance detection and in different solutions for impurity determination. Dotajā darbā tika noteikti optimāli parametri labi sakārtotu ZnO nanocaurulīšu kopu iegūšanai, izmantojot hidrotermālo metodi ar temperatūras pazemināšanu, jeb t.s. selektīvu pa\\vskodināšanas metodi (self-selective etching), ir uzsvērtas šās metodes priekšrocības salīdzinājumā ar ķīmiskās kodināšanas metodi, kā arī tika aprakstīta dažādu augšanas faktora (tādu, ka darba šķīduma koncentrācija, augšanas temperatūra un laiks, iedīgļu slāņa iegūšanas veids un iegūšanas parametri) ietekme uz iegūtu nanostraktūra morfoloģiju. Tika konstatēts, ka noteicošu lomu ZnO nanocaurulīšu audzēšanas procesā spēlē iedīgļu slāņa graudu izmēri, kas savā staipā nosaka augošu nanostieņu izmērus un to tendenci pie pa\\vskodināšanas. Rentgenogrannnas parāda, ka iegūtām pie noteiktiem parametriem ZnO nanostruktūrām piemīt augsta kristāliskuma pakāpe un sakārtotība vertikālā virzienā. Optiskie mērījumi parāda, ka ZnO nanocauralītes ir jutīgas gan pret tīrām vielām (ūdens, spirts), gan pret dažādiem šķīdumiem, kas ļauj izmantot tos kā pie­jaukumu sensora. Salīdzinājumā ar ZnO nanostieņiem caurulīšu jūtība pieaug, jo pieaug nanostrakt

  2. Letter to the editor: reply to Leung and Yew

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our trial was not powered to specifically examine the effect of treating underlying specific nutritional deficiencies among TB patients, or to assess interactions between an overall indicator of nutritional status like the body mass index and treatment, on the outcomes examined. It would be informa...

  3. The Roles of Attention and (Un)awareness in SLA: Conceptual Replication of N. C. Ellis & Sagarra (2010a) and Leung & Williams (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leow, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    There is no doubt that attention and (un)awareness in second/foreign language (L2 learning) are two constructs that have permeated, explicitly or implicitly, second language acquisition (SLA) studies since their inception. Indeed, we have witnessed several empirical studies attempting to probe more deeply into the roles of these two constructs in…

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, PAINT OVERSPRAY ARRESTOR KOCH FILTER CORPORATION MULTI-SAK 6FZ159-S

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paint overspray arrestors (POAs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center. The performance factor verified was the particle filtration efficiency as a function of size for particles smaller than 10 micrometers. The APCT Verification Center...

  5. Implicit Learning in SLA and the Issue of Internal Validity: A Response to Leung and Williams's (2011) "The Implicit Learning of Mappings between Forms and Contextually Derived Meanings"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leow, Ronald P.; Hama, Mike

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing theoretical, empirical, and methodological debate in the SLA field as to whether unawareness plays a role during attention to or processing of new incoming second language (L2) data. Indeed, studies that have methodologically addressed the construct of unawareness in their research designs offer both empirical support (e.g.,…

  6. 27 CFR 25.53 - Submissions of samples of fermented products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... submit samples of: (a) Cereal beverage, saké, or any fermented product produced at the brewery, (b) Materials used in the production of cereal beverage, saké, or any fermented product; and (c) Cereal...

  7. Climatic and Hydrologic Modeling in the Yellow River Basin in China Dr. Shourong Wang wangsr@cma.gov.cn China Meteorological Administration No.46, Zhongguancun Nandajie, Haidian District, Beijing 100081, China Dr. Ruby LEUNG, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.

    2012-12-01

    In order to enhance climatic and hydrologic prediction and assessment ability in the Yellow River Basin, the climatic and hydrologic modeling system is developed based on a joint international research. The system includes three sub-modeling systems, the seasonal climatic modeling system, the climate change modeling system, and the hydrologic modeling system. The seasonal climatic modeling system is composed of a regional climate model WRF3.3.1 developed by PNNL in 2011, with domain cover whole China and surrounding areas and horizontal resolution of 30 km, the Global general circulation models (GCMs) developed by China National Climate Center (NCC), providing lateral boundary conditions to WRF3.3.1, and both dynamic and statistic downscaling tools for providing detail modeling results in the Yellow River Basin. The climate change modeling system is composed of a regional climate model RegCM4.0 modified by NCC, with domain and horizontal resolution similar to WRF3.3.1, four GCMs MIROC3.2, ECHAM5, HadCM3 and NCC-CSM1.1, providing lateral boundary conditions to RegCM4.0, respectively, for comparing the nest modeling results, and also the downscaling tools. The hydrologic modeling system is composed of a large scale semi-distributed hydrologic mode VIC(Variable Infiltration Capacity) modified by PNNL, with domain cover whole Yellow River Basin and horizontal resolution of 50 km, and a distributed hydrologic mode DHSVM3.0 (Distributed Hydrology-Soil-vegetation Mode) also modified by PNNL, with domain cover the headstream of Yellow River Basin and horizontal resolution of 0.5 km. Both VIC and DHSVM3.0 are driven by the outputs of WRF3.3.1 and RegCM4.0, and provide seasonal hydrologic predictions and future hydrologic projections under IPCC AR5 climate change scenarios SRES RCP8.5 and RCP4.5. Now the simulated seasonal climatic and hydrologic results are compared and verified by recorded data sets, and VIC and DHSVM3.0 are running for the future hydrologic simulation driven by climate change modeling outputs.

  8. Atmospheric Rivers Coming to a Cloud Near You

    ScienceCinema

    Leung, Ruby

    2014-06-12

    Learn about the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign in this short video. Ruby Leung, PNNL's lead scientist on this campaign's observational strategy to monitor precipitation.

  9. Atmospheric Rivers Coming to a Cloud Near You

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ruby

    2014-03-29

    Learn about the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign in this short video. Ruby Leung, PNNL's lead scientist on this campaign's observational strategy to monitor precipitation.

  10. Staphylokinase has distinct modes of interaction with antimicrobial peptides, modulating its plasminogen-activation properties.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Leonard T; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-01-01

    Staphylokinase (Sak) is a plasminogen activator protein that is secreted by many Staphylococcus aureus strains. Sak also offers protection by binding and inhibiting specific antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here, we evaluate Sak as a more general interaction partner for AMPs. Studies with melittin, mCRAMP, tritrpticin and bovine lactoferricin indicate that the truncation of the first ten residues of Sak (SakΔN10), which occurs in vivo and uncovers important residues in a bulge region, improves its affinity for AMPs. Melittin and mCRAMP have a lower affinity for SakΔN10, and in docking studies, they bind to the N-terminal segment and bulge region of SakΔN10. By comparison, lactoferricin and tritrpticin form moderately high affinity 1:1 complexes with SakΔN10 and their cationic residues form several electrostatic interactions with the protein's α-helix. Overall, our work identifies two distinct AMP binding surfaces on SakΔN10 whose occupation would lead to either inhibition or promotion of its plasminogen activating properties. PMID:27554435

  11. Staphylokinase has distinct modes of interaction with antimicrobial peptides, modulating its plasminogen-activation properties

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Leonard T.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylokinase (Sak) is a plasminogen activator protein that is secreted by many Staphylococcus aureus strains. Sak also offers protection by binding and inhibiting specific antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here, we evaluate Sak as a more general interaction partner for AMPs. Studies with melittin, mCRAMP, tritrpticin and bovine lactoferricin indicate that the truncation of the first ten residues of Sak (SakΔN10), which occurs in vivo and uncovers important residues in a bulge region, improves its affinity for AMPs. Melittin and mCRAMP have a lower affinity for SakΔN10, and in docking studies, they bind to the N-terminal segment and bulge region of SakΔN10. By comparison, lactoferricin and tritrpticin form moderately high affinity 1:1 complexes with SakΔN10 and their cationic residues form several electrostatic interactions with the protein’s α-helix. Overall, our work identifies two distinct AMP binding surfaces on SakΔN10 whose occupation would lead to either inhibition or promotion of its plasminogen activating properties. PMID:27554435

  12. Specificity of Structural Assessment of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumpower, David L.; Sharara, Harold; Goldsmith, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the specificity of information provided by structural assessment of knowledge (SAK). SAK is a technique which uses the Pathfinder scaling algorithm to transform ratings of concept relatedness into network representations (PFnets) of individuals' knowledge. Inferences about individuals' overall domain knowledge based on the…

  13. The Problem of Untested Sexual Assault Kits: Why Are Some Kits Never Submitted to a Crime Laboratory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Debra; Campbell, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Victims of sexual assault are often advised to seek postassault medical care to have a forensic exam, which includes evidence collection (termed a "sexual assault kit" [SAK]). After the exam, law enforcement personnel are supposed to submit the SAK to a crime laboratory for analysis. However, recent media reports suggest that in many communities…

  14. Toxicology studies with recombinant staphylokinase and with SY 161-P5, a polyethylene glycol-derivatized cysteine-substitution mutant.

    PubMed

    Moons, L; Vanlinthout, I; Roelants, I; Moreadith, R; Collen, D; Rapold, H J

    2001-01-01

    SY 161-P5, a polyethylene glycol derivatized (PEGylated) mutant of the recombinant Staphylokinase (rSak) variant SakSTAR, exhibiting reduced antigenicity is in clinical development for treatment of acute myocardial infarction as a single bolus injection. A series of safety studies were performed in vivo as a routine toxicology program with SY 161-P5 (PEG-rSakSTAR) and with the recombinant Staphylokinase variant Sak42D (rSak42D). For both compounds, intravenous single bolus injections of up to 100-fold therapeutic equivalent, as well as repeated injections during 7 to 28 days revealed no significant pathological findings in mice, rats or hamsters. However, New Zealand white rabbits developed clinically silent, multifocal myocarditis following single or repeat doses of SY 161-P5 or of Sak42D. These findings were dose-independent and reversible. A similar species-specific cardiotoxic effect has previously been described for other proteolytic proteins, including the approved drugs Streptokinase and Acetylated Plasminogen Streptokinase Complex (APSAC). The large experience with these drugs, as well as the clinical data accumulated both with PEGylated and non-PEGylated rSak variants to date, do not indicate cardiotoxic hazards associated with the use of these drugs in humans. PMID:11442014

  15. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . 2014 Aug ... MD, Medical Oncologist, Fresno, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  16. 78 FR 10692 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... ANTHONY BRIGGS THOMAS MARTIN BROWN LAVINA RUTH BUCHANAN ROBERT CHRISTIAN CHEUNG ALLISON CHO MICHAEL KIM DE... HIGHFIELD TUCKER M JONSSON N STEPHAN W LEUNG JANICE T L LEVY-LANG LAURENCE MARTINE MARC MICHAEL...

  17. Adolescent Sexuality: Promoting the Search for Hidden Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBlasio, Frederick A.

    1989-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy and AIDS warrant a reexamination of child welfare workers' professional values toward adolescent sexuality. Presents an exercise designed to assist practitioners in understanding the hidden values that influence intervention. (SAK)

  18. An Intergenerational Support System for Child Welfare Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnett, Joan

    1989-01-01

    Describes a program developed by the Children's Aid Society of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, called Intergenerational Support System (ISS), in which senior volunteers serve as support persons for problem families. (SAK)

  19. Sea Anemone Toxins Affecting Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diochot, Sylvie; Lazdunski, Michel

    The great diversity of K+ channels and their wide distribution in many tissues are associated with important functions in cardiac and neuronal excitability that are now better understood thanks to the discovery of animal toxins. During the past few decades, sea anemones have provided a variety of toxins acting on voltage-sensitive sodium and, more recently, potassium channels. Currently there are three major structural groups of sea anemone K+ channel (SAK) toxins that have been characterized. Radioligand binding and electrophysiological experiments revealed that each group contains peptides displaying selective activities for different subfamilies of K+ channels. Short (35-37 amino acids) peptides in the group I display pore blocking effects on Kv1 channels. Molecular interactions of SAK-I toxins, important for activity and binding on Kv1 channels, implicate a spot of three conserved amino acid residues (Ser, Lys, Tyr) surrounded by other less conserved residues. Long (58-59 amino acids) SAK-II peptides display both enzymatic and K+ channel inhibitory activities. Medium size (42-43 amino acid) SAK-III peptides are gating modifiers which interact either with cardiac HERG or Kv3 channels by altering their voltage-dependent properties. SAK-III toxins bind to the S3C region in the outer vestibule of Kv channels. Sea anemones have proven to be a rich source of pharmacological tools, and some of the SAK toxins are now useful drugs for the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  20. [Effect of long-term shallow tillage and straw returning on soil potassium content and stratification ratio in winter wheat/summer maize rotation system in Guanzhong Plain, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiang-lan; Li, Xiu-shuang; Wang, Shu-juan; Li, Shuo; Li, You-bing; Tian, Xiao-hong

    2015-11-01

    Soil stratified sampling method and potassium chemical fractionation analysis were used to investigate effects of long-term shallow tillage and straw returning on soil K contents and stratification ratios in winter wheat/summer maize rotation system in Guanzhong Plain of Northwest China. The results showed that after 13-year continuous shallow tillage and straw returning, surface accumulation and stratification effect obviously occurred for soil available K (SAK) and non-exchangeable K (NEK), which was particularly remarkable for SAK and its fractions. Serious depletion of SAK occurred in 15-30 cm soil layer, and the SAK value was lower than the critical value of soil potassium deficiency. Meanwhile, significant differences were found between SR1 and SR2 values of SAK and its fractions, SR was obtained by values of topsoil layer (0-5 cm) divided by corresponding values of lower soil layers (5-15 cm layer, SR1, or 15-30 cm layer, SR2). However, no significant difference was observed between SR values of NEK and mineral K. In conclusion, returning of all straw over 10 years in the winter wheat/summer maize rotation system contributed greatly to maintaining soil K pool balance, while special attention should be paid to the negative effects of surface accumulation and stratification of SAK on soil K fertility. PMID:26915186

  1. New Horizons in Education, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kwok Keung, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Articles in the May 2001 issue include the following: "Utilizing the Approach of Educational Evaluation on the Methodology of Research on Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature" (Chun Kwong Wong); "An Examination of the Binet Intelligence Test and Multiple Intelligence Constructs" (Kwok Cheung Cheung); "Developmental Change on the Duration of…

  2. New Horizons in Education, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kwok Keung, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This journal, written in English and Chinese, includes the following papers: "Values for Creativity: A Study among Undergraduates in Hong Kong and Guangzhou" (Xia Dong Yue and Kok Leung); "The Present Situation of Family Education at the Turn of the Century: An Investigation in Three South-Eastern Provinces in China" (Feng Luo); "Philosophers…

  3. Multicultural Women's History: A Curriculum Unit for the Elementary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomin, Barbara; Burgoa, Carol

    This guide offers a curriculum unit for elementary schools to help increase student awareness of multicultural women's history. The unit contains five short biographies of women from different ethnic backgrounds. The women featured are Mary Shadd Cary, Frances Willard, Tye Leung Schulze, Felisa Rincon de Gautier, and Ada Deer. Vocabulary exercises…

  4. An Investigation of Visual Contour Integration Ability in Relation to Writing Performance in Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li-Tsang, Cecilia W. P.; Wong, Agnes S. K.; Chan, Jackson Y.; Lee, Amos Y. T.; Lam, Miko C. Y.; Wong, C. W.; Lu, Zhonglin

    2012-01-01

    A previous study found a visual deficit in contour integration in English readers with dyslexia (Simmers & Bex, 2001). Visual contour integration may play an even more significant role in Chinese handwriting particularly due to its logographic presentation (Lam, Au, Leung, & Li-Tsang, 2011). The current study examined the relationship between…

  5. The Impact of Unstructured Case Studies on Surface Learners: A Study of Second-Year Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn-Williams, Kate; Beatson, Nicola; Anderson, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    The empirical study described here uses the R-SPQ-2F questionnaire [Biggs, J., Kember, D., & Leung, D. Y. (2001). The revised two-factor study process questionnaire: R-SPQ-2F. "British Journal of Educational Psychology," 71(1), 133-149] to test deep and surface approaches to learning in a university intermediate-level accounting…

  6. Challenges and Management Frameworks of Residential Schools for Students with Severe Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chong, Stella Suk-ching; Leung, Ka-wai

    2012-01-01

    This study by Stella Suk-Ching Chong, an assistant professor, and Ka-wai Leung, a teaching fellow, both at the Hong Kong Institute of Education, focuses on the perspectives of hostel staff from six residential schools for students with severe emotional and behavioural difficulties. Individual or focus group interviews were conducted to explore the…

  7. Cultural Issues of School Dropouts in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Yuk King; Tsang, Bill Y. P.; Kwok, Diana K.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the 150 years of British colonial governance in Hong Kong, Chinese collectivist culture continues to be a dominant source of influence in the learning context of students (Cheng, 1998; Salili, Lai and Leung, 2004; Tao and Hong, 2000), placing a great emphasis on education and effort (Salili and Lai, 2003). Education is viewed as the…

  8. Exploring Necessary and Sufficient Conditions in Dynamic Geometry Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Allen; Chan, Yip-Cheung

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a possible dragging experiment in a dynamic geometry environment (DGE) that explores a necessary and sufficient condition for cyclic quadrilateral. The dragging modalities identified by Arzarello, Olivero, Paola, and Robutti (2002) and the functions of variation realized in DGE discussed by Leung (2003) will be used as tools…

  9. The Development of a New Measure of Global Work Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breaugh, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Results of 3 studies, involving 80 adult employees, 6,810 defense contractor employees, and 88 graduate students, support the reliability and validity of a new measure of global work autonomy, the Global Work Autonomy Scale (B. Ashforth and A. Saks, 1995). (SLD)

  10. The pharmaceutics from the foreign empire: the molecular pharming of the prokaryotic staphylokinase in Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Hnatuszko-Konka, Katarzyna; Łuchniak, Piotr; Wiktorek-Smagur, Aneta; Gerszberg, Aneta; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Gatkowska, Justyna; Kononowicz, Andrzej K

    2016-07-01

    Here, we present the application of microbiology and biotechnology for the production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in plant cells. To the best of our knowledge and belief it is one of few examples of the expression of the prokaryotic staphylokinase (SAK) in the eukaryotic system. Despite the tremendous progress made in the plant biotechnology, most of the heterologous proteins still accumulate to low concentrations in plant tissues. Therefore, the composition of expression cassettes to assure economically feasible level of protein production in plants remains crucial. The aim of our research was obtaining a high concentration of the bacterial anticoagulant factor-staphylokinase, in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds. The coding sequence of staphylokinase was placed under control of the β-phaseolin promoter and cloned between the signal sequence of the seed storage protein 2S2 and the carboxy-terminal KDEL signal sequence. The engineered binary vector pATAG-sak was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Analysis of the subsequent generations of Arabidopsis seeds revealed both presence of the sak and nptII transgenes, and the SAK protein. Moreover, a plasminogen activator activity of staphylokinase was observed in the protein extracts from seeds, while such a reaction was not observed in the leaf extracts showing seed-specific activity of the β-phaseolin promoter. PMID:27263008

  11. Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gondouin, M.

    1991-10-31

    The West Sak (Upper Cretaceous) sands, overlaying the Kuparuk field, would rank among the largest known oil fields in the US, but technical difficulties have so far prevented its commercial exploitation. Steam injection is the most successful and the most commonly-used method of heavy oil recovery, but its application to the West Sak presents major problems. Such difficulties may be overcome by using a novel approach, in which steam is generated downhole in a catalytic Methanator, from Syngas made at the surface from endothermic reactions (Table 1). The Methanator effluent, containing steam and soluble gases resulting from exothermic reactions (Table 1), is cyclically injected into the reservoir by means of a horizontal drainhole while hot produced fluids flow form a second drainhole into a central production tubing. The downhole reactor feed and BFW flow downward to two concentric tubings. The large-diameter casing required to house the downhole reactor assembly is filled above it with Arctic Pack mud, or crude oil, to further reduce heat leaks. A quantitative analysis of this production scheme for the West Sak required a preliminary engineering of the downhole and surface facilities and a tentative forecast of well production rates. The results, based on published information on the West Sak, have been used to estimate the cost of these facilities, per daily barrel of oil produced. A preliminary economic analysis and conclusions are presented together with an outline of future work. Economic and regulatory conditions which would make this approach viable are discussed. 28 figs.

  12. Becoming Dean: Selection and Socialization Processes of an Academic Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enomoto, Ernestine; Matsuoka, Jon

    2007-01-01

    In this qualitative case study, we offer an insider's perspective on the selection and socialization processes of an academic leader. The primary method of data collection was through a series of interviews with the candidate over a five-year period. Analysis drew from an organizational socialization model devised by Saks and Ashforth, which…

  13. The Best of ESL: Practical-Strategy Guide for ESL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Wesley; Blue, Jama; Bosma, Amy Sak; Gillet, Rosemary; Korzhenyak, Ida; McCoy, Angelita Lopez; Nikiforov, Victoria; Nowak, Charlotte; Rande, Eileen; Rice, Susan M.

    The guide consists of essays on classroom practice and strategy in adult English-as-a-second-language (ESL) instruction. Essays on practice include: "Benefits of Cooperative Learning: A Guide for Beginning ESL Teachers" (Amy Sak Bosma); "Process Writing in the Adult Education Classroom" (Rosemary Gillet); "Grammar for Pre-Literates" (Ida…

  14. Altering Depth and Complexity in the Science Curriculum for the Gifted: Results of an Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çalikoglu, Burcu Seher; Kahveci, Nihat Gürel

    2015-01-01

    The Republic of Turkey has developed democratic support for equity in education for groups who have various learning needs (Levent, 2011, p. 89-91). In connection with Turkey's central policy of education, current educational applications have addressed these diverse needs to a certain extent. Sak (2011) drew our attention to the insufficiency of…

  15. Targeting the oxidative stress response system of fungi with safe, redox-potent chemosensitizing agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One mode of action of the antimycotics amphotericin B (AMB) or itraconazole (ITZ) against filamentous fungi involves cellular oxidative stress response. Aspergillus fumigatus sakA', a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) gene deletion mutant in the antioxidation system, was more sensitive to AMB ...

  16. An Expert System for Environmental Data Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berka, Petr; Jirku, Petr

    1995-01-01

    Examines the possibility of using expert system tools for environmental data management. Describes the domain-independent expert system shell SAK and Knowledge EXplorer, a system that learns rules from data. Demonstrates the functionality of Knowledge EXplorer on an example of water quality evaluation. (LZ)

  17. Characteristics of Families at Risk of Problems in Parenting: Findings from a Home-Based Secondary Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Loretta W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes a study of the effects of the Good Start program, which provides home-based intervention to families at risk of child maltreatment. Finds that families appear to improve over the course of treatment. Notes signs that indicate which families are most likely to improve. (SAK)

  18. Pharmacokinetic and thrombolytic properties of cysteine-linked polyethylene glycol derivatives of staphylokinase.

    PubMed

    Vanwetswinkel, S; Plaisance, S; Zhi-Yong, Z; Vanlinthout, I; Brepoels, K; Lasters, I; Collen, D; Jespers, L

    2000-02-01

    Recombinant staphylokinase (SakSTAR) variants obtained by site-directed substitution with cysteine, in the core (lysine 96 [Lys96], Lys102, Lys109, and/or Lys135) or the NH(2)-terminal region that is released during activation of SakSTAR (serine 2 [Ser2] and/or Ser3), were derivatized with thiol-specific (ortho-pyridyl-disulfide or maleimide) polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules with molecular weights of 5,000 (P5), 10,000 (P10), or 20,000 (P20). The specific activities and thrombolytic potencies in human plasma were unaltered for most variants derivatized with PEG (PEGylates), but maleimide PEG derivatives had a better temperature stability profile. In hamsters, SakSTAR was cleared at 2.2 mL/min; variants with 1 P5 molecule were cleared 2-to 5-fold; variants with 2 P5 or 1 P10 molecules were cleared 10-to 30-fold; and variants with 1 P20 molecule were cleared 35-fold slower. A bolus injection induced dose-related lysis of a plasma clot, fibrin labeled with 125 iodine ((125)I-fibrin plasma clot), and injected into the jugular vein. A 50% clot lysis at 90 minutes required 110 microg/kg SakSTAR; 50 to 110 microg/kg of core-substitution derivatives with 1 P5; 25 microg/kg for NH(2)-terminal derivatives with 1 P5; 5 to 25 microg/kg with derivatives with 2 P5 or 1 P10; and 7 microg/kg with P20 derivatives. Core substitution with 1 or 2 P5 molecules did not significantly reduce the immunogenicity of SakSTAR in rabbits. Derivatization of staphylokinase with a single PEG molecule allows controllable reduction of the clearance while maintaining thrombolytic potency at a reduced dose. This indicates that mono-PEGylated staphylokinase variants may be used for single intravenous bolus injection. PMID:10648406

  19. Murine J774 Macrophages Recognize LPS/IFN-g, Non-CpG DNA or Two-CpG DNA-containing Sequences as Immunologically Distinct

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Lynn; Casey, Warren; Morgan, Kevin; Ni, Hong; Yoon, Lawrence; Easton, Marilyn; Misukonis, Mary; Burleson, Gary; Ghosh, Dipak K.

    2010-01-01

    Specific bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), IFN-γ, and unmethylated cytosine or guanosine-phosphorothioate containing DNAs (CpG) activate host immunity, influencing infectious responses. Macrophages detect, inactivate and destroy infectious particles, and synthetic CpG sequences invoke similar responses of the innate immune system. Previously, murine macrophage J774 cells treated with CpG induced the expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) and cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2) mRNA and protein. In this study murine J774 macrophages were exposed to vehicle, interferon γ + lipopolysaccharide (IFN-g/LPS), non-CpG (SAK1), or two-CpG sequence-containing DNA (SAK2) for 0–18 hr and gene expression changes measured. A large number of immunostimulatory and inflammatory changes were observed. SAK2 was a stronger activator of TNFα- and chemokine expression-related changes than LPS/IFN-g. Up regulation included tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily genes (TNFRSF’s), IL-1 receptor signaling via stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), NF-κB activation, hemopoietic maturation factors and sonic hedgehog/wingless integration site (SHH/Wnt) pathway genes. Genes of the TGF-β pathway were down regulated. In contrast, LPS/IFN-g -treated cells showed increased levels for TGF-β signaling genes, which may be linked to the observed up regulation of numerous collagens and down regulation of Wnt pathway genes. SAK1 produced distinct changes from LPS/IFN-g or SAK2. Therefore, J774 macrophages recognize LPS/IFN-g, non-CpG DNA or two-CpG DNA-containing sequences as immunologically distinct. PMID:20097302

  20. Droplet Vaporization in a Supercritical Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which describes single liquid droplet vaporization at nearly critical liquid pressures and temperatures. A modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state is used to evaluate the fugacities and liquid and vapor mole fractions at the interface under the assumption of interface equilibrium. Results obtained for different droplet sizes and conditions indicate significant differences in behavior in comparison with low-pressure quasi-steady droplet vaporization.

  1. Steady state, oscillations and chaotic behavior of a gas inside a cylinder with a mobile piston controlled by PI and nonlinear control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Molina, Manuel; Gil-Chica, Javier; Fernández-Varó, Elena; Pérez-Polo, Manuel F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzes the behavior of nitrogen inside a closed cylinder with a mobile piston actuated by a nonlinear spring, a viscous damper and a control force which compensates partially the effect of the high gas pressure. Two helical heating coils are placed inside the cylinder and with their flow rates controlled by means of a linear controller of type proportional plus integral (PI) and another nonlinear control law to provide an approximately isothermal gas behavior. Based on the analysis of the mechanical and thermal subsystems and the control laws, a justification of the parameter values is presented and corroborated through analytical solutions that are obtained by approximate methods. To investigate the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the Soave-Redlich-Kwong and the Redlich-Kwong state equations are analyzed and compared, showing that the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation is superior. The Melnikov method has been used to obtain sufficient conditions for chaotic behavior, which has also been investigated by means of the sensitive dependence, Lyapunov exponents and the power spectral density. The validity of the proposed model has been analyzed by using the compressibility chart for the nitrogen, and the analytical calculations have been verified through full numerical simulations.

  2. Two-Component Signaling Regulates Osmotic Stress Adaptation via SskA and the High-Osmolarity Glycerol MAPK Pathway in the Human Pathogen Talaromyces marneffei.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Kylie J; Cao, Cunwei; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2016-01-01

    For successful infection to occur, a pathogen must be able to evade or tolerate the host's defense systems. This requires the pathogen to first recognize the host environment and then signal this response to elicit a complex adaptive program in order to activate its own defense strategies. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, two-component signaling systems are utilized to sense and respond to changes in the external environment. The hybrid histidine kinases (HHKs) at the start of the two-component signaling pathway have been well characterized in human pathogens. However, how these HHKs regulate processes downstream currently remains unclear. This study describes the role of a response regulator downstream of these HHKs, sskA, in Talaromyces marneffei, a dimorphic human pathogen. sskA is required for asexual reproduction, hyphal morphogenesis, cell wall integrity, osmotic adaptation, and the morphogenesis of yeast cells both in vitro at 37°C and during macrophage infection, but not during dimorphic switching. Comparison of the ΔsskA mutant with a strain in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway (SakA) has been deleted suggests that SskA acts upstream of this pathway in T. marneffei to regulate these morphogenetic processes. This was confirmed by assessing the amount of phosphorylated SakA in the ΔsskA mutant, antifungal resistance due to a lack of SakA activation, and the ability of a constitutively active sakA allele (sakA(F316L) ) to suppress the ΔsskA mutant phenotypes. We conclude that SskA regulates morphogenesis and osmotic stress adaptation in T. marneffei via phosphorylation of the SakA MAPK of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway. IMPORTANCE This is the first study in a dimorphic fungal pathogen to investigate the role of a response regulator downstream of two-component signaling systems and its connection to the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway. This study will inspire further research into the

  3. Two-Component Signaling Regulates Osmotic Stress Adaptation via SskA and the High-Osmolarity Glycerol MAPK Pathway in the Human Pathogen Talaromyces marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Cunwei; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For successful infection to occur, a pathogen must be able to evade or tolerate the host’s defense systems. This requires the pathogen to first recognize the host environment and then signal this response to elicit a complex adaptive program in order to activate its own defense strategies. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, two-component signaling systems are utilized to sense and respond to changes in the external environment. The hybrid histidine kinases (HHKs) at the start of the two-component signaling pathway have been well characterized in human pathogens. However, how these HHKs regulate processes downstream currently remains unclear. This study describes the role of a response regulator downstream of these HHKs, sskA, in Talaromyces marneffei, a dimorphic human pathogen. sskA is required for asexual reproduction, hyphal morphogenesis, cell wall integrity, osmotic adaptation, and the morphogenesis of yeast cells both in vitro at 37°C and during macrophage infection, but not during dimorphic switching. Comparison of the ΔsskA mutant with a strain in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway (SakA) has been deleted suggests that SskA acts upstream of this pathway in T. marneffei to regulate these morphogenetic processes. This was confirmed by assessing the amount of phosphorylated SakA in the ΔsskA mutant, antifungal resistance due to a lack of SakA activation, and the ability of a constitutively active sakA allele (sakAF316L) to suppress the ΔsskA mutant phenotypes. We conclude that SskA regulates morphogenesis and osmotic stress adaptation in T. marneffei via phosphorylation of the SakA MAPK of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway. IMPORTANCE This is the first study in a dimorphic fungal pathogen to investigate the role of a response regulator downstream of two-component signaling systems and its connection to the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway. This study will inspire further research into

  4. Learning an Efficient Texture Model by Supervised Nonlinear Dimensionality Reduction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barshan, Elnaz; Behravan, Mina; Azimifar, Zohreh

    This work investigates the problem of texture recognition under varying lighting and viewing conditions. One of the most successful approaches for handling this problem is to focus on textons, describing local properties of textures. Leung and Malik [1] introduced the framework of this approach which was followed by other researchers who tried to address its limitations such as high dimensionality of textons and feature histograms as well as poor classification of a single image under known conditions.

  5. Evaluation of a multifunctional staphylokinase variant with thrombin inhibition and antiplatelet aggregation activities produced from salt-inducible E. coli GJ1158.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anmol; Pulicherla, Krishna Kanth; Mayuren, Candasamy; Kotra, Seetharam; Rao, Krothapalli Rajasurya Sambasiva

    2013-10-01

    Reocclusion is one of the major root causes for secondary complications that arise during thrombolytic therapy. A multifunctional staphylokinase variant SRH (staphylokinase (SAK) linked with tripeptide RGD and didecapeptide Hirulog) with antiplatelet and antithrombin activities in addition to clot specific thrombolytic function, was developed to address the reocclusion problem. We preferred to use Escherichia coli GJ1158 as the host in this study for economic production of SRH by osmotic (0.3 mol/L sodium chloride) induction, to overcome the problems associated with the yeast expression system. The therapeutic potential of SRH was evaluated in the murine model of vascular thrombosis. The SAK protein (1 mg/kg body mass) and SRH protein (1 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg) were administered intravenously to the different treatment groups. The results have shown a dose-dependent antithrombotic effect in carrageenan-induced mouse tail thrombosis. The thrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and prothrombin time were significantly prolonged (p < 0.05) in the SRH-infused groups. Moreover, SRH inhibited platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05), while the bleeding time was significantly (p < 0.05) prolonged. All of these results inferred that the osmotically produced multifunctional fusion protein SRH (SAK-RGD-Hirulog) is a promising thrombolytic agent, and one which sustained its multifunctionality in the animal models. PMID:24144055

  6. Molecular Evaluation of Genetic Diversity in Wild-Type Mastic Tree (Pistacia lentiscus L.).

    PubMed

    Abuduli, Alimu; Aydin, Yıldız; Sakiroglu, Muhammet; Onay, Ahmet; Ercisli, Sezai; Uncuoglu, Ahu Altinkut

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the patterns of genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus L.) genotypes including 12 males and 12 females were evaluated using SSR, RAPD, ISSR, and ITS markers yielding 40, 703, 929 alleles, and 260-292 base pairs for ITS1 region, respectively. The average number of alleles produced from SSR, RAPD, and ISSR primers were 5.7, 14, and 18, respectively. The grouping pattern obtained from Bayesian clustering method based on each marker dataset was produced. Principal component analyses (PCA) of molecular data was investigated and neighbor joining dendrograms were subsequently created. Overall, the results indicated that ISSR and RAPD markers were the most powerful to differentiate the genotypes in comparison with other types of molecular markers used in this study. The ISSR results indicated that male and female genotypes were distinctly separated from each other. In this frame, M9 (Alaçatı) and M10 (Mesta Sakız Adası-Chios) were the closest genotypes and while F11 (Seferihisar) and F12 (Bornova/Gökdere) genotypes fall into same cluster and showing closer genetic relation. The RAPD pattern indicated that M8 (Urla) and M10 (Mesta Sakız Adası-Chios), and F10 (Mesta Sakız Adası-Chios) and F11 (Seferihisar) genotypes were the closest male and female genotypes, respectively. PMID:27246402

  7. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  8. Prediction of cloud point temperatures and amount of wax precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, K.S. )

    1995-02-01

    The paper presents a vapor-liquid-solid model for predicting phase equilibria of oil mixtures taking into account the possible formation of a wax phase. The gas and liquid phases are described using the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state while the wax phase is assumed to be an ideal mixture. Only part of the heavy hydrocarbons are considered to be able to potentially enter into a wax phase. A procedure is developed for estimating the fraction of the heavy hydrocarbons which may potentially form wax. Calculation results agree very well with experimental wax precipitation data.

  9. Vapor-liquid equilibria for the difluoromethane (HFC-32) + 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) system

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.Y.; Kim, M.S.

    1997-11-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibrium data of the binary mixture of difluoromethane (HFC-32) + 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) have been measured in the temperature range between 263 K and 323 K. The experiment was carried out with a circulation type apparatus with the measurement of temperature, pressure, and compositions of the liquid and vapor phases. The experimental data were correlated with the Peng-Robinson and Redlich-Kwong-Soave equations of state, and comparison with literature results has been made.

  10. Functional calculus and *-regularity of a class of Banach algebras II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chi-Wai; Ng, Chi-Keung

    2006-10-01

    In this article, we define a natural Banach *-algebra for a C*-dynamical system (A,G,[alpha]) which is slightly bigger than L1(G;A) (they are the same if A is finite-dimensional). We will show that this algebra is *-regular if G has polynomial growth. The main result in this article extends the two main results in [C.W. Leung, C.K. Ng, Functional calculus and *-regularity of a class of Banach algebras, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc., in press].

  11. Consistent lattice Boltzmann equations for phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Siebert, D N; Philippi, P C; Mattila, K K

    2014-11-01

    Unlike conventional computational fluid dynamics methods, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) describes the dynamic behavior of fluids in a mesoscopic scale based on discrete forms of kinetic equations. In this scale, complex macroscopic phenomena like the formation and collapse of interfaces can be naturally described as related to source terms incorporated into the kinetic equations. In this context, a novel athermal lattice Boltzmann scheme for the simulation of phase transition is proposed. The continuous kinetic model obtained from the Liouville equation using the mean-field interaction force approach is shown to be consistent with diffuse interface model using the Helmholtz free energy. Density profiles, interface thickness, and surface tension are analytically derived for a plane liquid-vapor interface. A discrete form of the kinetic equation is then obtained by applying the quadrature method based on prescribed abscissas together with a third-order scheme for the discretization of the streaming or advection term in the Boltzmann equation. Spatial derivatives in the source terms are approximated with high-order schemes. The numerical validation of the method is performed by measuring the speed of sound as well as by retrieving the coexistence curve and the interface density profiles. The appearance of spurious currents near the interface is investigated. The simulations are performed with the equations of state of Van der Waals, Redlich-Kwong, Redlich-Kwong-Soave, Peng-Robinson, and Carnahan-Starling. PMID:25493907

  12. Universal thermodynamics at the liquid-vapor critical point.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Isaac C; Boening, Kevin L

    2014-11-26

    For 68 fluids that include hydrogen bonding and quantum fluids, the fugacity coefficient that defines the residual chemical potential adopts a near universal value of 2/3 at the critical point. More precisely, the reciprocal of the fugacity coefficient equals 1.52 ± 0.02 and includes fluids as diverse as helium (1.50), dodecafluoropentane (1.50), and water (1.53). For 65 classical fluids, a dimensionless thermal pressure coefficient and internal pressure attain critical values of 1.88 ± 0.11 and 1.61 ± 0.11, respectively. From equations of state, values of these new critical constants have been calculated and agree favorably with experimental values. Specifically, for the critical fugacity coefficient, the following results were obtained for its reciprocal: van der Waals (1.44), lattice gas (1.43), scaled particle theory (1.46), and the Redlich-Kwong eq (1.50). The semiempirical Redlich-Kwong equation is also the most accurate for the thermal pressure coefficient (1.86) and internal pressure (1.53). Physical interpretations of these results are discussed as well as their implications for other critical phenomena. PMID:25369319

  13. Solubility of caffeine from green tea in supercritical CO2: a theoretical and empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Gadkari, Pravin Vasantrao; Balaraman, Manohar

    2015-12-01

    Decaffeination of fresh green tea was carried out with supercritical CO2 in the presence of ethanol as co-solvent. The solubility of caffeine in supercritical CO2 varied from 44.19 × 10(-6) to 149.55 × 10(-6) (mole fraction) over a pressure and temperature range of 15 to 35 MPa and 313 to 333 K, respectively. The maximum solubility of caffeine was obtained at 25 MPa and 323 K. Experimental solubility data were correlated with the theoretical equation of state models Peng-Robinson (PR), Soave Redlich-Kwong (SRK), and Redlich-Kwong (RK). The RK model had regressed experimental data with 15.52 % average absolute relative deviation (AARD). In contrast, Gordillo empirical model regressed the best to experimental data with only 0.96 % AARD. Under supercritical conditions, solubility of caffeine in tea matrix was lower than the solubility of pure caffeine. Further, solubility of caffeine in supercritical CO2 was compared with solubility of pure caffeine in conventional solvents and a maximum solubility 90 × 10(-3) mol fraction was obtained with chloroform. PMID:26604372

  14. Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Results from Tasks 8 and 9 are presented. Task 8 addressed the cost of materials and manufacturing of the Downhole Methanator and the cost of drilling and completing the vertical cased well and two horizontal drain holes in the West Sak reservoir. Task 9 addressed the preliminary design of surface facilities to support the enhanced recovery of heavy oil. Auxiliary facilities include steam reformers for carbon dioxide-rich natural gas reforming, emergency electric generators, nitrogen gas generators, and an ammonia synthesis unit. The ammonia is needed to stabilize the swelling of clays in the reservoir. Cost estimations and a description of how they were obtained are given.

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new

  16. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  17. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Annual report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  18. Modeling of Far-IR Emission From G34.3+0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. M.; Campbell, M. F.; Harvey, P. M.; Lester, D. M.

    2001-05-01

    Photometric scans at 47 and 95 μ m made on the KAO of the bright source centered on G34.3+0.2 are presented and analyzed. The 47 and 95 μ m scans are similar, showing sharp central peaks and very similar diffuse extended emission wings. Maximum entropy method deconvolutions indicate that the peaks are quite compact with FWHM values of 11 by 14 \\arcsec and 18 by 20 \\arcsec at 47 and 95 μ m respectively. The Egan, Leung, & Spagna (1988) radiative transfer code has been used to model the emission from the central peak at 47 and 95 μ m as Draine and Lee (1985) dust surrounding the O star(s) which ionize the ultracompact HII regions A, B, and C. The emission optical depth in the far-ir model is comparable to the amount of dust assumed to be in absorption in the models of mid-ir emission from G34.3+02C presented by Campbell et al. (2000). This work was supported by NASA Grants 2-67 & 2-546 and by Colby College. Campbell, M.F. et al. 2000, ApJ, 536, 816 Draine, B.T. & Lee, H.M. 1984, ApJ, 289, 89 Egan, M.P., Leung, C.M., & Spagna, G.F. 1988, CPC, 48, 271

  19. Implementation of two-equation soot flamelet models for laminar diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, D.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.

    2009-03-15

    The two-equation soot model proposed by Leung et al. [K.M. Leung, R.P. Lindstedt, W.P. Jones, Combust. Flame 87 (1991) 289-305] has been derived in the mixture fraction space. The model has been implemented using both Interactive and Non-Interactive flamelet strategies. An Extended Enthalpy Defect Flamelet Model (E-EDFM) which uses a flamelet library obtained neglecting the soot formation is proposed as a Non-Interactive method. The Lagrangian Flamelet Model (LFM) is used to represent the Interactive models. This model uses direct values of soot mass fraction from flamelet calculations. An Extended version (E-LFM) of this model is also suggested in which soot mass fraction reaction rates are used from flamelet calculations. Results presented in this work show that the E-EDFM predict acceptable results. However, it overpredicts the soot volume fraction due to the inability of this model to couple the soot and gas-phase mechanisms. It has been demonstrated that the LFM is not able to predict accurately the soot volume fraction. On the other hand, the extended version proposed here has been shown to be very accurate. The different flamelet mathematical formulations have been tested and compared using well verified reference calculations obtained solving the set of the Full Transport Equations (FTE) in the physical space. (author)

  20. Nanoconfined water under electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzar, Alenka; Bratko, D.; Daub, C. D.

    2010-03-01

    We study the effect of electric field on interfacial tension of nanoconfined water [1,2] using molecular simulations. Our analysis and simulations confirm that classical electrostriction characterizes usual electrowetting behavior in nanoscale hydrophobic channels and nanoporous materials [3]. We suggest a new mechanism to orient nanoparticles by an applied electric field even when the particles carry no charges or dipoles of their own. Coupling to the field can be accomplished trough solvent-mediated interaction between the electric field and a nanoparticle [4]. For nanoscale particles in water, we find the response to the applied field to be sufficiently fast to make this mechanism relevant for biological processes, design of novel nanostructures and sensors, and development of nanoengineering methods [5]. [1]C. D. Daub, D. Bratko, K. Leung and A. Luzar, J. Phys. Chem. C 111, 505 (2007). [2] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub, K. Leung and A. Luzar, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 2504 (2007) [3] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub and A. Luzar, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 6807 (2008). [4] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub and A. Luzar, Faraday Discussions 141, 55 (2009). [5] C. D. Daub, D. Bratko, T. Ali and A. Luzar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 207801 (2009).

  1. Nest survival of piping plovers at a dynamic reservoir indicates an ecological trap for a threatened population.

    PubMed

    Anteau, Michael J; Shaffer, Terry L; Sherfy, Mark H; Sovada, Marsha A; Stucker, Jennifer H; Wiltermuth, Mark T

    2012-12-01

    In the past 60 years, reservoirs have reshaped riverine ecosystems and transformed breeding habitats used by the threatened piping plover (Charadrius melodus; hereafter plover). Currently, 29 % of the Northern Great Plains plover population nests at reservoirs that might function as ecological traps because reservoirs have more diverse habitat features and greater dynamics in water levels than habitats historically used by breeding plovers. We examined factors influencing daily survival rates (DSR) of 346 plover nests at Lake Sakakawea (SAK; reservoir) during 2006-2009 by evaluating multiple a priori models, and we used our best model to hindcast nest success of plovers during 1985-2009. Our observed and hindcast estimates of nest success were low compared to published estimates. Previous findings indicate that plovers prefer nest sites that are low relative to water level. We found that elevation of nests above the water level had a strong positive correlation with DSR because water levels of SAK typically increased throughout the nesting period. Habitat characteristics on the reservoir differ from those that shaped nest-site selection for plovers. Accordingly, extraordinary nest loss occurs there in many years, largely due to inundation of nests, and based on low fledging rates those losses were not compensated by potential changes in chick survival. Therefore, our example supports the concept of ecological traps in birds because it addresses quantitative assessments of habitat preference and productivity over 25 years (since species listing) and affects a large portion of the population. PMID:22700065

  2. Nest survival of piping plovers at a dynamic reservoir indicates an ecological trap for a threatened population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, Michael J.; Shaffer, Terry L.; Sherfy, Mark H.; Sovada, Marsha A.; Stucker, Jennifer H.; Wiltermuth, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    In the past 60 years, reservoirs have reshaped riverine ecosystems and transformed breeding habitats used by the threatened piping plover (Charadrius melodus; hereafter plover). Currently, 29 % of the Northern Great Plains plover population nests at reservoirs that might function as ecological traps because reservoirs have more diverse habitat features and greater dynamics in water levels than habitats historically used by breeding plovers. We examined factors influencing daily survival rates (DSR) of 346 plover nests at Lake Sakakawea (SAK; reservoir) during 2006–2009 by evaluating multiple a priori models, and we used our best model to hindcast nest success of plovers during 1985–2009. Our observed and hindcast estimates of nest success were low compared to published estimates. Previous findings indicate that plovers prefer nest sites that are low relative to water level. We found that elevation of nests above the water level had a strong positive correlation with DSR because water levels of SAK typically increased throughout the nesting period. Habitat characteristics on the reservoir differ from those that shaped nest-site selection for plovers. Accordingly, extraordinary nest loss occurs there in many years, largely due to inundation of nests, and based on low fledging rates those losses were not compensated by potential changes in chick survival. Therefore, our example supports the concept of ecological traps in birds because it addresses quantitative assessments of habitat preference and productivity over 25 years (since species listing) and affects a large portion of the population.

  3. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity; Final report, November 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Alaskan North Slope comprises one of the Nation`s and the world`s most prolific oil province. Original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at nearly 70 BBL (Kamath and Sharma, 1986). Generalized reservoir descriptions have been completed by the University of Alaska`s Petroleum Development Laboratory over North Slope`s major fields. These fields include West Sak (20 BBL OOIP), Ugnu (15 BBL OOIP), Prudhoe Bay (23 BBL OOIP), Kuparuk (5.5 BBL OOIP), Milne Point (3 BBL OOIP), and Endicott (1 BBL OOIP). Reservoir description has included the acquisition of open hole log data from the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (AOGCC), computerized well log analysis using state-of-the-art computers, and integration of geologic and logging data. The studies pertaining to fluid characterization described in this report include: experimental study of asphaltene precipitation for enriched gases, CO{sup 2} and West Sak crude system, modeling of asphaltene equilibria including homogeneous as well as polydispersed thermodynamic models, effect of asphaltene deposition on rock-fluid properties, fluid properties of some Alaskan north slope reservoirs. Finally, the last chapter summarizes the reservoir heterogeneity classification system for TORIS and TORIS database.

  4. Paired Insulators and High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, T. H.; Kivelson, S. A.

    In common with all condensed matter physicists of our generations, our way of thinking about our field was shaped and greatly inspired by countless seminal works of Phil Anderson -- a debt we are pleased to have the opportunity to acknowledge. Discussing plans for this article, we spent many pleasant times debating which particular contribution to highlight -- super-exchange (THG), Anderson-Higgs (SAK), the Anderson--Morel pseudopotential (THG), poor man's scaling (SAK), etc. In the end, we opted to highlight a single specific paper which greatly affected each of us at the time, and which has continued to exert a strong intellectual influence on us in the ensuing years. Almost 40 years ago in Ref. 1, Phil introduced the negative U center to account for the fact that most glasses and amorphous semiconductors are diamagnetic. This paper has been highly influential, but certainly does not rank among Phil's most famous works; however, focusing on it enables us to re-acquaint a younger generation with another of Phil's contributions, and to use this as a springboard to discuss some forward-looking extensions that continue to fascinate us...

  5. Bacteriocin production and inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei 2a in a potentially synbiotic cheese spread.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Rafael Chacon Ruiz; Staliano, Cristina Dini; Vieira, Antonio Diogo Silva; Villarreal, Martha Lissete Morales; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Saad, Susana Marta Isay; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo

    2015-06-01

    Survival, bacteriocin(s) production, and antilisterial effect of Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei 2a were evaluated in a potentially synbiotic cheese spread, throughout storage at 4 °C and 15 °C for up to 28 days, using culture-dependent (plate count) and culture-independent (qPCR) methods. Bacteriocin(s) production in the food product was monitored by phenotypic and molecular (RT-qPCR) techniques. Three cheese spread trials (T) containing the prebiotic fiber inulin were produced in duplicates and studied: T1 (control - without inoculation of lactic acid bacteria); T2 (inoculated with the non-bacteriocinogenic Lb. sakei ATCC 15521 strain), and T3 (inoculated with the bacteriocinogenic Lb. sakei 2a strain). The cheese spreads were challenged with Listeria monocytogenes serotypes 4b and 1/2a, individually added to the food product. The counts of Lb. sakei 2a in the cheese spread T3 remained high during storage and the growth of L. monocytogenes was inhibited at both temperatures, especially L. monocytogenes 4b in the food product kept at 15 °C due to the production of bacteriocins (up to 6,400 AU/mL). Expression of the genes sakP and sakQ encoding for bacteriocins production during the cheese spread storage was demonstrated. Lb. sakei 2a can be used for production of potentially synbiotic cheese spreads with increased safety. PMID:25791002

  6. Calculations of phase equilibria for mixtures of triglycerides, fatty acids, and their esters in lower alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, D. A.; Ermakova, A.; Anikeev, V. I.

    2011-01-01

    The objects of study were mixtures containing triglycerides and lower alcohols and also the products of the transesterification of triglycerides, glycerol and fatty acid esters. The Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state was used as a thermodynamic model for the phase state of the selected mixtures over wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges. Group methods were applied to determine the critical parameters of pure substances and their acentric factors. The parameters obtained were used to calculate the phase diagrams and critical parameters of mixtures containing triglycerides and lower alcohols and the products of the transesterification of triglycerides, glycerol and fatty acid esters, at various alcohol/oil ratios. The conditions of triglyceride transesterification in various lower alcohols providing the supercritical state of reaction mixtures were selected.

  7. Municipal solid waste to electricity recommendations for project in Bangkok, Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) is charged with the responsibility of public cleansing and waste disposal in the metropolitan area. BMA operates 600 trucks which collect the waste twice a day and dump it at its three sites located in the Huai Kwong, Bangkok Noi and Rataburana districts. Presently these trucks collect 3,000 metric tons of garbage per day. At the waste dump sites, which are rapidly overflowing, BMA presently operates four compost plants, three with input capacity of 320 tons per day each and a fourth which uses about 160 tons of garbage per day--thus utilizing about 1,120 tons of garbage per day. Creation of new sites would require going even farther away from the city, resulting in excessive transportation costs.

  8. Isomorphic Viscosity Equation of State for Binary Fluid Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Behnejad, Hassan; Cheshmpak, Hashem; Jamali, Asma

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of the simple binary mixtures in the vicinity of critical line has a universal character and can be mapped from pure components using the isomorphism hypothesis. Consequently, based upon the principle of isomorphism, critical phenomena and similarity between P-ρ-T and T-η-(viscosity)-P relationships, the viscosity model has been developed adopting two cubic, Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) and Peng-Robinson (PR), equations of state (EsoS) for predicting the viscosity of the binary mixtures. This procedure has been applied to the methane-butane mixture and predicted its viscosity data. Reasonable agreement with the experimental data has been observed. In conclusion, we have shown that the isomorphism principle in conjunction with the mapped viscosity EoS suggests a reliable model for calculating the viscosity of mixture of hydrocarbons over a wide pressure range up to 35 MPa within the stated experimental errors. PMID:26680701

  9. Experimental measurements and equation of state modeling of liquid densities for long-chain n-alkanes at pressures to 265 MPa and temperatures to 523 K

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu; Bamgbade, Babatunde; Liu, Kun; McHugh, Mark A.; Baled, Hseen; Enick, Robert M.; Burgess, Ward; Tapriyal, Deepak; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2011-12-15

    Experimental densities are reported for n-hexadecane, n-octadecane, and n-eicosane at pressures to ∼265 MPa and temperatures of 323.15, 423.15, and 523.15 K. The reported densities are in good agreement with the available literature data that cover limited pressure and temperature ranges. The Peng–Robinson equation of state (PR EOS), a new high-temperature high-pressure volume-translated Soave–Redlich–Kwong equation of state (HTHP-VT SRK EOS), and the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) are used to predict the reported densities. Both the HTHP-VT SRK and PC-SAFT equations exhibit mean absolute percent deviation (MAPD) values of 2.4–1.3% for the densities of all three hydrocarbons while the MAPD values for the PR EOS are all near 16%.

  10. A Pyrolysis and Primary Migration Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-08-11

    PMOD-Version 1.6 is a copyrighted computer program for simulating oil generation, cracking, and other chemical reactions occurring during the pyrolysis of petroleum source rocks over a specified history of temperature and either depth or hydrostatic pressure. The chemical reaction mechanism is defined by the user and, within limits, can be as simple or complex as desired. The model also simulates compaction of the source rock and expulsion of a liquid water phase and a liquidmore » hydrocarbon phase. The expulsion is done by either a simple, constant-fluid-density model or by a more rigorous model using a modified Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state. The latter model also calculates overpressuring. An auxiliary program, PLOTPMOD, permits graphical display and hardcopy of the results, as well as preparation of ASCII-file subsets of the results for use with a spreadsheet or other graphics program.« less

  11. Bioethanol Production Optimization: A Thermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Víctor H.; Rivera, Elmer Ccopa; Costa, Aline C.; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf; Aznar, Martín

    In this work, the phase equilibrium of binary mixtures for bioethanol production by continuous extractive process was studied. The process is composed of four interlinked units: fermentor, centrifuge, cell treatment unit, and flash vessel (ethanol-congener separation unit). A proposal for modeling the vapor-liquid equilibrium in binary mixtures found in the flash vessel has been considered. This approach uses the Predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state, with original and modified molecular parameters. The congeners considered were acetic acid, acetaldehyde, furfural, methanol, and 1-pentanol. The results show that the introduction of new molecular parameters r and q in the UNIFAC model gives more accurate predictions for the concentration of the congener in the gas phase for binary and ternary systems.

  12. The clinical outcome of 137 rape victims in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chu, L C; Tung, W K

    2005-10-01

    From 1 August 2001 to 31 July 2004, 137 patients were referred from the Association Concerning Sexual Violence Against Women to the Accident and Emergency Department at the Kwong Wah Hospital for alleged rape. Approximately half of the patients presented within 3 days of the alleged assault. Fifty-one patients were prescribed emergency contraception: one patient remained pregnant despite treatment and was referred with a further six patients to the Gynaecology Department for termination of pregnancy. Thirty-two patients received hepatitis B immunoglobulin injection. One patient had a positive result for rapid plasma reagin 3 months following the assault and was referred to the Social Hygiene Clinic. All tests for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus were negative. Antimicrobial therapy was prescribed for women who had an endocervical and/or high vaginal swab positive for Chlamydia trachomatis (n=9), Trichomonas vaginalis (n=1), and gonococcus (n=1). PMID:16219959

  13. EOS7C Version 1.0 TOUGH2 Module for Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen in Natural Gas

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-11

    EOS7C is a TOUGH2 module for multicomponent gas mixtures in the systems methane-carbon dioxide (CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}) or methane-nitrogen (CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2}) with or without an aqueous phase and H{sub 2}O vapor. EOS7C uses a cubic equation of state and an accurate solubility formulation along with a multiphase Darcy's Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a wide range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to subsurface geologic carbon sequestrationmore » sites and natural gas reservoirs. EOS7C models supercritical CO{sub 2{ and subcritical CO{sub 2} as a non-condensible gas, hence EOS7C does not model the transitions to liquid or solid CO{sub 2} conditions. The components modeled in EOS7C are water, brine, non-condensible gas, gas tracer, methane, and optional heat. The non-condensible gas (NCG) can be selected by the user to be CO{sub 2} or N{sub 2}. The real gas properties module has options for Peng-Robinson, Redlich-Kwong, or Soave-Redlich-Kwong equations of state to calculate gas mixture density, enthalpy departure, and viscosity. Partitioning of the NCG and CH{sub 4} between the aqueous and gas phases is calculated using a very accurate chemical equilibrium approach. Transport of the gaseous and dissolved components is by advection and Fickian molecular diffusion. EOS7C is written in FORTAN77.« less

  14. CO 2-H 2O mixtures in the geological sequestration of CO 2. I. Assessment and calculation of mutual solubilities from 12 to 100°C and up to 600 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten; Ennis-King, Jonathan

    2003-08-01

    Evaluating the feasibility of CO 2 geologic sequestration requires the use of pressure-temperature-composition ( P- T- X) data for mixtures of CO 2 and H 2O at moderate pressures and temperatures (typically below 500 bar and below 100°C). For this purpose, published experimental P- T- X data in this temperature and pressure range are reviewed. These data cover the two-phase region where a CO 2-rich phase (generally gas) and an H 2O-rich liquid coexist and are reported as the mutual solubilities of H 2O and CO 2 in the two coexisting phases. For the most part, mutual solubilities reported from various sources are in good agreement. In this paper, a noniterative procedure is presented to calculate the composition of the compressed CO 2 and liquid H 2O phases at equilibrium, based on equating chemical potentials and using the Redlich-Kwong equation of state to express departure from ideal behavior. The procedure is an extension of that used by King et al. (1992), covering a broader range of temperatures and experimental data than those authors, and is readily expandable to a nonideal liquid phase. The calculation method and formulation are kept as simple as possible to avoid degrading the performance of numerical models of water-CO 2 flows for which they are intended. The method is implemented in a computer routine, and inverse modeling is used to determine, simultaneously, (1) new Redlich-Kwong parameters for the CO 2-H 2O mixture, and (2) aqueous solubility constants for gaseous and liquid CO 2 as a function of temperature. In doing so, mutual solubilities of H 2O from 15 to 100°C and CO 2 from 12 to 110°C and up to 600 bar are generally reproduced within a few percent of experimental values. Fugacity coefficients of pure CO 2 are reproduced mostly within one percent of published reference data.

  15. Dynamical Downscaling of GCM Simulations: Toward the Improvement of Forecast Bias over California

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H S

    2008-09-24

    The effects of climate change will mostly be felt on local to regional scales. However, global climate models (GCMs) are unable to produce reliable climate information on the scale needed to assess regional climate-change impacts and variability as a result of coarse grid resolution and inadequate model physics though their capability is improving. Therefore, dynamical and statistical downscaling (SD) methods have become popular methods for filling the gap between global and local-to-regional climate applications. Recent inter-comparison studies of these downscaling techniques show that both downscaling methods have similar skill in simulating the mean and variability of present climate conditions while they show significant differences for future climate conditions (Leung et al., 2003). One difficulty with the SD method is that it relies on predictor-predict and relationships, which may not hold in future climate conditions. In addition, it is now commonly accepted that the dynamical downscaling with the regional climate model (RCM) is more skillful at the resolving orographic climate effect than the driving coarser-grid GCM simulations. To assess the possible societal impacts of climate changes, many RCMs have been developed and used to provide a better projection of future regional-scale climates for guiding policies in economy, ecosystem, water supply, agriculture, human health, and air quality (Giorgi et al., 1994; Leung and Ghan, 1999; Leung et al., 2003; Liang et al., 2004; Kim, 2004; Duffy et al., 2006). Although many regional climate features, such as seasonal mean and extreme precipitation have been successfully captured in these RCMs, obvious biases of simulated precipitation remain, particularly the winter wet bias commonly seen in mountain regions of the Western United States. The importance of regional climate research over California is not only because California has the largest population in the nation, but California has one of the most

  16. CO2 exchange following peat extraction - a comparison of two paired restored/unrestored peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Ian; Strack, Maria; Pelletier, Luc; Nugent, Kelly; Rankin, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    Peat extraction is an important industry in parts of Canada and elsewhere globally. The resulting disturbance from drainage and vacuum-harvesting is mitigated through best practices which now incorporate restoration intended to return the peatland's biodiversity and greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange to that resembling the pre-disturbance state. We examine the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) in two sets of paired peatlands. Within each pair, the extraction year was the same and the sites were treated identically post-extraction in terms of management (blocking drains or leveling as applicable). The first pair is located in the vicinity of Rivière-du-Loup, Québec, Canada and were harvested in 1980. The Bois-des-Bel (BDB) site was restored in 1999 following the methods of Quinty and Rochefort (2003). GHG fluxes have been studied at various points since restoration (e.g. Strack and Zuback, 2013) largely using chamber measurements. The site now hosts a thriving bog ecosystem with Sphagnum, Eriophorum and shrub communities. A site 30 km away near Saint-Alexandre de Kamouraska (SAK) was managed post-harvest as BDB with drains blocked but was left unrestored and now has only sparse Eriophorum with invasive species. The second pair of peatlands represents a newly extracted site near Seba Beach, Alberta, Canada. One field was restored (SBR) in autumn 2012 as per the Québec sites but with ditches infilled when the fields were levelled while the other (SBU) was left unrestored. In the summer of 2013, eddy covariance towers were installed at each location and measured NEE continuously at 10Hz throughout the subsequent periods. BDB and SBR remain operational today while SBU was removed in fall 2014 and SAK in fall 2015. In this presentation, we will focus on the coincident years of operation. After 15 years, BDB has measured NEE in the range of that observed at natural peatlands. A summer sink and winter release lead to annual uptake of CO2. At SAK, the lack of establishment

  17. Static Chemistry in Disks or Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Wiebe, D.

    2006-11-01

    This FORTRAN77 code can be used to model static, time-dependent chemistry in ISM and circumstellar disks. Current version is based on the OSU'06 gas-grain astrochemical network with all updates to the reaction rates, and includes surface chemistry from Hasegawa & Herbst (1993) and Hasegawa, Herbst, and Leung (1992). Surface chemistry can be modeled either with the standard rate equation approach or modified rate equation approach (useful in disks). Gas-grain interactions include sticking of neutral molecules to grains, dissociative recombination of ions on grains as well as thermal, UV, X-ray, and CRP-induced desorption of frozen species. An advanced X-ray chemistry and 3 grain sizes with power-law size distribution are also included. An deuterium extension to this chemical model is available.

  18. A statistical study of the relative difficulty of freehand simulation of form, proportion, and line quality in Arabic signatures.

    PubMed

    Al-Musa Alkahtani, Abdulaziz; Platt, Andrew W G

    2010-06-01

    This article compares the skill with which a large sample of Arabic writers was able to simulate different handwriting elements in two Arabic signatures. The data agree with the consensus of experts about Roman script: Form is significantly better simulated than Proportion, and Proportion is significantly better simulated than Line Quality. The fact that patterns long observed in Roman script simulation can be statistically demonstrated to exist in the simulation of Arabic signatures suggests that these may be widespread, if not universal, patterns of simulation among writing systems. This is also supported by similar results from a study of abstract characters (Leung et al. 1993), which suggests that these tendencies may even transcend linguistic writing systems. Among the Proportional elements are slant, alignment, spacing, and size. PMID:20470739

  19. Reply to “Comments on ‘The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Phase I Results’”

    SciTech Connect

    Mearns, L. O.; Bukovsky, Melissa; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Arritt, R.; Gutowski, William; Takle, Eugene S.; Biner, S.; Caya, Daniel; Correia Jr., James; Jones, Richard; Sloan, Lisa; Snyder, Mark A.

    2013-07-01

    The authors of Mearns et al. (2012) are well aware of the role of driving RCMs with reanalyses and have written extensively on the roles of different types of RCM simulations (e.g., Giorgi and Mearns, 1999; Leung et al., 2003). Thus, we agree that the skill of dynamical downscaling in which global reanalysis is used to provide boundary conditions in general indicates an upper bound of skill compared to dynamical downscaling in which the boundary conditions come from global climate model simulations. This finding has long been established as global climate model simulations cannot outperform global reanalysis in providing boundary conditions since the latter is constrained by observations through data assimilation (that is unless the reanalyses themselves have been shown to have serious deficiences, e.g. Cerezo-Mota et al, 2011). The classification of different types of dynamical downscaling introduced by Castro et al. (2005) further adds clarity to this point.

  20. Shining a new narrow band of light on old problems.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel K; Wang, Kenneth K

    2014-06-01

    Improvements in narrow band imaging (NBI) may provide an improved view of colonic mucosa for detection of polyps and adenomas. In this issue, Leung et al. report findings to suggest that this next-generation NBI technology is superior to conventional high-definition white light endoscopy in polyp detection. These findings are based on brighter illumination, which has been a problem with older generations of NBI, which did not increase polyp detection but were useful for polyp characterization. Although these findings are very promising for this new role of second-generation NBI in polyp detection, the study must be viewed with consideration of the history of the older NBI system, the analysis of which through multiple positive and negative studies ultimately led to the conclusion that it was not beneficial for detection. PMID:24896757

  1. Permutation-invariant quantum codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Yingkai

    2014-12-01

    A quantum code is a subspace of a Hilbert space of a physical system chosen to be correctable against a given class of errors, where information can be encoded. Ideally, the quantum code lies within the ground space of the physical system. When the physical model is the Heisenberg ferromagnet in the absence of an external magnetic field, the corresponding ground space contains all permutation-invariant states. We use techniques from combinatorics and operator theory to construct families of permutation-invariant quantum codes. These codes have length proportional to t2; one family of codes perfectly corrects arbitrary weight t errors, while the other family of codes approximately correct t spontaneous decay errors. The analysis of our codes' performance with respect to spontaneous decay errors utilizes elementary matrix analysis, where we revisit and extend the quantum error correction criterion of Knill and Laflamme, and Leung, Chuang, Nielsen and Yamamoto.

  2. An arbitrated quantum signature scheme with fast signing and verifying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Qin, Su-Juan; Su, Qi

    2013-11-01

    Existing arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) schemes are almost all based on the Leung quantum one-time pad (L-QOTP) algorithm. In these schemes, the receiver can achieve an existential forgery of the sender's signatures under the known message attack, and the sender can successfully disavow any of her/his signatures by a simple attack. In this paper, a solution of solving the problems is given, through designing a new QOTP algorithm relying largely on inserting decoy states into fixed insertion positions. Furthermore, we present an AQS scheme with fast signing and verifying, which is based on the new QOTP algorithm. It is just using single particle states and is unconditional secure. To fulfill the functions of AQS schemes, our scheme needs a significantly lower computational costs than that required by other AQS schemes based on the L-QOTP algorithm.

  3. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  4. IR Emission Models from High-Mass Star Formation Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M. F.; Deutsch, L. K.

    2001-12-01

    Recognition that high-mass stars form only in clusters has motivated us to make new radiative transfer models for infrared emission from compact, dense cloud cores surrounding very young high-mass stars. We assume outer cloud radii are limited by the formation of stars in clusters to 0.1 pc. Since there is a high efficiency of conversion of gas into stars within clusters, we assumed the mass of gas and dust in the cloud models is equal or less than the mass of the central star. We assumed Draine and Lee (1984) dust properties with 100:1 gas to dust mass ratio, and used the Egan, Leung, and Spagna (1988) radiative transfer code. The central star in all models is an O8 ZAMS type at 1700 pc distance (the distance to NGC6334). The dust emitting clouds were assumed to have inner cavities of radius 0.006 pc, just outside an ultracompact HII region. Density distributions were taken as uniform or proportional to r-3/2. Except for the highest mass clouds, the models showed the 10 micron silicate feature in emission rather than self absorption. All models' spectral energy distributions peak shortward of 50 microns. The lack of silicate self absorption and the SEDs peaking shortward of 50 microns are apparently due to the small size of these models. In order to match observed silicate absorption in UCHIIs, an external cold absorbing component must be added to the models. The results suggest that individual high mass star-formation cores should be searched for in mid-infrared rather than far-infrared wavelengths, and that SEDs which peak in the far- infrared are at least partly produced by separate, larger outer cloud envelopes. Draine, B. T. & Lee, H. M. 1984 ApJ, 285, 89; Egan, M.P., Leung, C.M., & Spagna, G.F, Jr. 1988 Comput. Phys. Comm., 48, 271

  5. Microwave spectrum and molecular structure of the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene-hydrogen fluoride complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Helen O.; Marshall, Mark D.; Bozzi, Aaron T.; Cohen, Paul M.; Lam, Mable

    2011-05-01

    Guided by ab initio calculations, Fourier transform microwave spectra in the 8-22 GHz region are obtained for six isotopomers of the complex formed between 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene and hydrogen fluoride. These include both 35Cl- and 37Cl-containing CH 2CClF with HF and DF, as well as 13CH 2C 35ClF and CH 213C 35ClF with HF. Analysis of the spectra determines the rotational constants, the complete chlorine quadrupole hyperfine coupling tensors in both the inertial and principal electric field gradient axis systems, and where appropriate, the diagonal components of the deuterium quadrupole coupling tensors. Spin-spin hyperfine structure is resolved and analyzed for CH 2C 35ClF-HF and CH 2C 37ClF-HF. The inertial information contained in the rotational constants combined with the HF and DF hyperfine interaction constants provides the structure for CH 2CClF-HF: a primary, hydrogen bonding interaction existing between the HF donor and the F atom acceptor on the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene moiety, while a secondary interaction occurs between the fluorine atom on the HF molecule and the H atom cis to the hydrogen-bonded F atom on the substituted ethylene, which causes the hydrogen bond to deviate from linearity. This is analogous to the structure obtained for 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene-acetylene [H.O. Leung, M.D. Marshall, D.D. Grimes, J. Chem. Phys. 134 (2011) 034303] and similar to that of 1,1-difluoroethylene-HF [H.O. Leung, M.D. Marshall, T.L. Drake, T. Pudlik, N. Savji, D.W. McCune, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 204301], and indeed as with the acetylene complexes, to within experimental uncertainty, the intermolecular interactions in CH 2CClF-HF and its 1,1-difluoroethylene counterpart are practically indistinguishable.

  6. The Distribution of Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) in MRSA CC398 Is Associated with Both Host and Country

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Alex J.; Witney, Adam A.; Gould, Katherine A.; Moodley, Arshnee; Guardabassi, Luca; Voss, Andreas; Denis, Olivier; Broens, Els M.; Hinds, Jason; Lindsay, Jodi A.

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 398 has emerged from pigs to cause human infections in Europe and North America. We used a new 62-strain S. aureus microarray (SAM-62) to compare genomes of isolates from three geographical areas (Belgium, Denmark, and Netherlands) to understand how CC398 colonizes different mammalian hosts. The core genomes of 44 pig isolates and 32 isolates from humans did not vary. However, mobile genetic element (MGE) distribution was variable including SCCmec. φ3 bacteriophage and human specificity genes (chp, sak, scn) were found in invasive human but not pig isolates. SaPI5 and putative ruminant specificity gene variants (vwb and scn) were common but not pig specific. Virulence and resistance gene carriage was host associated but country specific. We conclude MGE exchange is frequent in CC398 and greatest among populations in close contact. This feature may help determine epidemiological associations among isolates of the same lineage. PMID:21920902

  7. Is Lebesgue measure the only [sigma]-finite invariant Borel measure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elekes, Marton; Keleti, Tamas

    2006-09-01

    S. Saks and recently R.D. Mauldin asked if every translation invariant [sigma]-finite Borel measure on is a constant multiple of Lebesgue measure. The aim of this paper is to investigate the versions of this question, since surprisingly the answer is "yes and no," depending on what we mean by Borel measure and by constant. According to a folklore result, if the measure is only defined for Borel sets, then the answer is affirmative. We show that if the measure is defined on a [sigma]-algebra containing the Borel sets, then the answer is negative. However, if we allow the multiplicative constant to be infinity, then the answer is affirmative in this case as well. Moreover, our construction also shows that an isometry invariant [sigma]-finite Borel measure (in the wider sense) on can be non-[sigma]-finite when we restrict it to the Borel sets.

  8. The Weakly Coupled Pfaffian as a Type I Quantum Hall Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran, S. A.; Kivelson, S. A.; Sondhi, S. L.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2011-03-01

    The Pfaffian phase of electrons in the proximity of a half-filled Landau level is understood to be a p + ip superconductor of composite fermions. We consider the properties of this paired quantum Hall phase when the pairing scale is small, i.e. in the weak-coupling, BCS, limit, where the coherence length is much larger than the charge screening length. We find that, as in a Type I superconductor, the vortices attract so that, upon varying the magnetic field from its magic value at ν = 5 / 2 , the system exhibits Coulomb frustrated phase separation. We propose that the weakly and strongly coupled Pfaffian states exemplify a general dichotomy between Type I and Type II quantum Hall fluids. This work was supported in part by NSF grants DMR-1006608 and PHY-1005429 (SAP, SLS), DMR-0758356 (SAK) and DMR-0704151 (BZS).

  9. Electronic Pair-Binding and Hund's Rule Violations in Doped C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong-Chen; Kivelson, Steven

    We calculate the electronic properties of the t-J model on a C60 molecule using the density-matrix renormalization group and show that Hund's first rule is violated and that for an average of three added electron per molecule, an effective attraction (pair-binding) arises for intermediate values of t=J. Specifically, it is energetically favorable to put four electrons on one C60 and two on a second rather than putting three on each. Our results show that a dominantly electronic mechanism of superconductivity is possible in doped C60. HCJ and SAK were supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  10. Enhancement of Commercial Antifungal Agents by Kojic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong H.; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Chan, Kathleen L.; Faria, Natália C. G.; Mahoney, Noreen; Kim, Young K.; Martins, Maria de L.; Campbell, Bruce C.

    2012-01-01

    Natural compounds that pose no significant medical or environmental side effects are potential sources of antifungal agents, either in their nascent form or as structural backbones for more effective derivatives. Kojic acid (KA) is one such compound. It is a natural by-product of fungal fermentation commonly employed by food and cosmetic industries. We show that KA greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC) or fungicidal (MFC) concentrations of commercial medicinal and agricultural antifungal agents, amphotericin B (AMB) and strobilurin, respectively, against pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi. Assays using two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mutants, i.e., sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, of Aspergillus fumigatus, an agent for human invasive aspergillosis, with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or AMB indicate such chemosensitizing activity of KA is most conceivably through disruption of fungal antioxidation systems. KA could be developed as a chemosensitizer to enhance efficacy of certain conventional antifungal drugs or fungicides. PMID:23203038

  11. [Influence of long-used staphylokinase derivative on hemoagglutinative and fibrinolytic systems].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Long, Min-Hui; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhu, He; Wang, Min; Zou, Min-Ji; Liu, Shen; Xu, Tao; Wang, Jia-Xi; Xu, Dong-Gang

    2009-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the influence of staphylokinase derivative (SAKD) on the hemoagglutinative and fibrinolytic systems, and to determine the safety of the staphylokinase derivative in application. The normal and model rats each 30 were divided into normal saline, SAKD and rSAK groups. The hemorrhage, bleeding time (BT), blood platelet count (BPC), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), thrombin time (TT), fibrinogen (Fg), D-dimer (D-D), plasminogen (PLG) and plasmin inhibitor activity (PI) were detected before and after the administration with staphylokinase derivative 0.5 mg/kg body weight, once three days for consecutive 15 days. The results indicated that one case of normal rats with SAKD and two cases of high fat diet model group had mild hemorrhage, all of which showed automatic hemostasis; and 3 cases in rSAK group had mild hemorrhage. And the platelet counting, D-D, PLG and PI in all groups did not significantly change. The rats of high fat diet group treated with SAKD showed the significant extension of APTT, PT and TT times, and the decrease of Fg time (p < 0.05). All the experimental results demonstrated that the influence of SAKD on the hemagglutination of the normal animals was lower, however, which can improve the high-hemagglutination status of the rats with high fat diet. It is concluded that the SAKD at the dosage of this study has the higher safety, which can alleviate the high hemagglutination symptoms of the rats with high fat diet. PMID:19549385

  12. Poultry-Like pA+ Biotype of Staphylococcus aureus CC346/084 Clone in Human Population.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Lidia; Garbacz, Katarzyna

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was (1) to analyse the prevalence of P-like pA+ biotype of S. aureus in material from healthy and diseased individuals, not employed at slaughterhouses or meat processing plants, and (2) to analyse the relatedness of these strains and their genetic variability. The study included 344 strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from hospitalized patients with staphylococcal infections and from healthy carriers. The biotypes of S. aureus were determined on the basis of fibrinolysin and β-haemolysin production, coagulation of bovine plasma, and type of growth on crystal violet agar. Additionally, the strains were tested for the synthesis of protein A in order to distinguish between P-like pA+ and poultry biotypes. Fibrinolysin gene (sak) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected by means of PCR. The clonal structure of studied strains was analysed using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and sequencing of spa gene. Finally, the strains were typed with a basic set of 23 bacteriophages. The strains belonging to P-like pA+ biotype corresponded to nearly 20 % of all the studied strains. In contrast to the human biotype, they formed one clonal complex, spa-CC346/084. The P-like pA+ biotype strains did not synthesize fibrinolysin, lacked the sak gene, and showed susceptibility to methicillin. In contrast to the human biotype strains, they belonged mostly to phage group II. The P-like pA+ biotype strains, previously described solely in meat products and meat industry workers, can be also present in hospitalized patients and extra-hospital carriers. These strains form a single, fibrinolysin-negative, clonal complex t084/CC346. PMID:27061586

  13. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G; Chill, Jordan H; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2015-12-15

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1-4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  14. Selection Indicates Preference in Diverse Habitats: A Ground-Nesting Bird (Charadrius melodus) Using Reservoir Shoreline

    PubMed Central

    Anteau, Michael J.; Sherfy, Mark H.; Wiltermuth, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Animals use proximate cues to select resources that maximize individual fitness. When animals have a diverse array of available habitats, those selected could give insights into true habitat preferences. Since the construction of the Garrison Dam on the Missouri River in North Dakota, Lake Sakakawea (SAK) has become an important breeding area for federally threatened piping plovers (Charadrius melodus; hereafter plovers). We used conditional logistic regression to examine nest-site selection at fine scales (1, 3, and 10 m) during summers 2006–2009 by comparing characteristics at 351 nests to those of 668 random sites within nesting territories. Plovers selected sites (1 m2) that were lower than unused random sites, increasing the risk of nest inundation. Plovers selected nest sites that were flat, had little silt, and at least 1 cobble; they also selected for 3-m radius nest areas that were relatively flat and devoid of vegetation and litter. Ninety percent of nests had <38% coverage of silt and <10% slope at the site, and <15% coverage of vegetation or litter and <31% slope within the 3-m radius. Gravel was selected for at nest sites (11% median), but against in the area 10-m from the nest, suggesting plovers select for patches or strips of gravel. Although elevation is rarely evaluated in studies of ground-nesting birds, our results underscore its importance in habitat-selection studies. Relative to where plovers historically nested, habitat at SAK has more diverse topography, substrate composition, vegetation communities, and greater water-level fluctuations. Accordingly, our results provide an example of how habitat-selection results can be interpreted as habitat preferences because they are not influenced by desired habitats being scarce or absent. Further, our results will be useful for directing habitat conservation for plovers and interpreting other habitat-selection studies. PMID:22299037

  15. Assessment of Alaska's North Slope Oil Field Capacity to Sequester CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Umekwe, Pascal; Mongrain, Joanna; Ahmadi, Mohabbat; Hanks, Catherine

    2013-03-15

    The capacity of 21 major fields containing more than 95% of the North Slope of Alaska's oil were investigated for CO{sub 2} storage by injecting CO{sub 2} as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agent. These fields meet the criteria for the application of miscible and immiscible CO{sub 2}-EOR methods and contain about 40 billion barrels of oil after primary and secondary recovery. Volumetric calculations from this study indicate that these fields have a static storage capacity of 3 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2}, assuming 100% oil recovery, re-pressurizing the fields to pre-fracturing pressure and applying a 50% capacity reduction to compensate for heterogeneity and for water invasion from the underlying aquifer. A ranking produced from this study, mainly controlled by field size and fracture gradient, identifies Prudhoe, Kuparuk, and West Sak as possessing the largest storage capacities under a 20% safety factor on pressures applied during storage to avoid over-pressurization, fracturing, and gas leakage. Simulation studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} Prophet to determine the amount of oil technically recoverable and CO{sub 2} gas storage possible during this process. Fields were categorized as miscible, partially miscible, and immiscible based on the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with their oil. Seven sample fields were selected across these categories for simulation studies comparing pure CO{sub 2} and water-alternating-gas injection. Results showed that the top two fields in each category for recovery and CO{sub 2} storage were Alpine and Point McIntyre (miscible), Prudhoe and Kuparuk (partially miscible), and West Sak and Lisburne (immiscible). The study concludes that 5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} can be stored while recovering 14.2 billion barrels of the remaining oil.

  16. Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

  17. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G.; Chill, Jordan H.; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1–4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  18. CO₂-H₂O mixtures in the geologic sequestration of CO₂. I. Assessment and calculation of mutual solubilities from 12 to 100 degrees C and up to 600 bar

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten; Ennis-King, Jonathan

    2002-07-29

    Evaluating the feasibility of CO₂ geologic sequestration requires the use of pressure-temperature-composition (P-T-X) data for mixtures of CO₂ and H₂O at moderate pressures and temperatures (typically below 500 bar and below 100°C). For this purpose, published experimental P-T-X data in this temperature and pressure range are reviewed. These data cover the two-phase region where a CO₂-rich phase (generally gas) and an H₂O-rich liquid coexist and are reported as the mutual solubilities of H₂O and CO₂ in the two coexisting phases. For the most part, mutual solubilities reported from various sources are in good agreement. The mixing behavior of H₂O in the compressed gas phase is highly nonideal. A noniterative procedure is presented to calculate the composition of the compressed CO₂ and liquid H₂O phases at equilibrium, based on equating chemical potentials and using the Redlich-Kwong equation of state to express departure from ideal behavior. The procedure is an extension of that used by King et al. (1992), covering a broader range of temperatures and experimental data than those authors, and is readily expandable to a nonideal liquid phase. The calculation method and formulation are kept as simple as possible to avoid degrading the performance of numerical models of water-CO₂ flows for which they are intended. The method is implemented in a computer routine, and inverse modeling is used to determine, simultaneously, new Redlich-Kwong parameters for the H₂O-CO₂ mixture, as well as aqueous solubility constants for gaseous and liquid CO₂ as a function of temperature. In doing so, mutual solubilities of H₂O from 12 to 100°C and CO₂ from 15 to 110°C and up to 600 bar are generally reproduced within a few percent of experimental values. Fugacity coefficients of pure CO₂ are reproduced mostly within one percent of published reference data.

  19. Modeling the Submillimeter Dust Continuum Emission from Nearby Low Mass Star Forming Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Y. L.; Young, C. H.; Evans, N. J., II; Rawlings, J. M. C.

    2001-12-01

    Current theories of a low mass star formation predict the evolution of the density distribution, n({r}, t), temperature distribution, T({r}, t), and the velocity field ,{v}({r}, t), of the envelope of protostellar cores with time. Optically thin dust emission at submillimeter wavelengths provides a powerful diagnostic to constrain the envelope density and temperature structure. In this study, thirty-nine low mass cores were mapped with SCUBA at 850 and 450 μ m on the JCMT during sixteen nights between January 1998 and February 2000. The sources were selected from the earliest phases (pre-T Tauri) in the proposed evolutionary scheme for low mass protostars (6 Pre-protostellar Cores (PPCs), 15 Class 0, 18 Class I) with luminosities indicative of low mass star formation (Lbol < 50 Lsun) and with distances less than 450 pc. High signal-to-noise maps allowed azimuthally averaged radial profiling out to 60 arcseconds from the continuum centroid. The similarities and differences in the submillimeter continuum emission properties of the envelopes of PPCs, Class 0, and Class I sources on 103 to 104 AU scales are summarized. We have modeled the normalized radial intensity distributions and spectral energy distributions (SED) for sixteen sources from the SCUBA survey (3 PPCs, 7 Class 0, and 6 Class I) using a one dimensional radiative transfer code (Egan, Leung, & Spagna 1988) with internal heating from a central protostar (Class 0 and I objects) and external heating from the interstellar radiation field (all objects) to calculate the dust temperature distribution. Power law, Bonnor-Ebert, Shu inside-out collapse, and Plummer density distributions were tested to match the observed normalized radial profiles and observed SED simultaneously. Realistic beam profiles and chopping were used to simulate the observations. We find Bonnor-Ebert spheres with central densities of 105 to 106 cm-3 reproduce the PPC radial profiles while power law models (n(r) ~ r-p, p = 1.1 - 2

  20. Two equations of state assembled for basic analysis of multiphase CO 2 flow and in deep sedimentary basin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, Brian J. O. L.; Han, Weon Shik; Cole, Barret S.

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of the study presented in this manuscript is to describe and make available two equation-of-state (EOS) algorithms assembled for multiphase flow and transport of carbon dioxide (CO2). The algorithms presented here calculate solubility, compressibility factor, density, viscosity, fugacity, and enthalpy of CO2 in gaseous and supercritical phases, and mixtures or solutions of CO2 in water, as functions of pressure and temperature. Several features distinguish the two algorithms, but the primary distinction concerns treatment of supercritical/gas-phase CO2: one EOS we assembled is based on Redlich and Kwong's original algorithm developed in 1949, and the other is based on an algorithm developed by Span and Wagner in 1996. Both were modified for application to sedimentary basin studies of multiphase CO2 flow processes, including carbon sequestration applications. We present a brief comparison of these two EOS algorithms. Source codes for both algorithms are provided, including "stand-alone" Matlab © scripts for the interactive calculation of fluid properties at specified P-T conditions and FORTRAN subroutines for inclusion in existing FORTRAN multiphase fluid simulation packages. These routines are intended for fundamental analyses of CO2 sequestration and the like; more advanced studies, such as brine processes and reactive transport, require more advanced EOS algorithms.

  1. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX FROM CATALYST BY SUPERCRITICAL EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick C. Joyce; Mark C. Thies

    1999-03-31

    The objective of this research project was to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, is to be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300 C. Aspen Plus{trademark} was used to perform process simulation studies on the proposed extraction process, with Redlich-Kwong-Soave (RKS) being used for the thermodynamic property model. In summary, we have made comprehensive VLE measurements for short alkane + long alkane systems over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, dramatically increasing the amount of high-quality data available for these simple, yet highly relevant systems. In addition, our work has demonstrated that, surprisingly, no current thermodynamic model can adequately predict VLE behavior for these systems. Thus, process simulations (such as those for our proposed SCF extraction process) that incorporate these systems can currently only give results that are qualitative at best. Although significant progress has been made in the past decade, more experimental and theoretical work remain to be done before the phase equilibria of asymmetric alkane mixtures can be predicted with confidence.

  2. Phase equilibria of carbon dioxide hydrate system in the presence of sucrose, glucose, and fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, M.K.; Lee, H.

    1999-09-01

    The three-phase (H-L{sub w}-V) equilibria of the carbon dioxide hydrate formation system in aqueous solutions containing sucrose, glucose, and fructose were experimentally determined at pressures ranging from 1.580 to 4.355 MPa and at temperatures between 273.6 and 281.7 K. The upper quadruple points (H-L{sub w}-L{sub CO{sub 2}}-V) were also measured at concentrations of 10, 20, and 30 mass % sucrose, glucose, and fructose. The addition of carbohydrates exhibited a similar inhibition effect as that observed for electrolytes and alcohols. A thermodynamic model predicting the three- and four-phase hydrate equilibria while accounting for the inhibition effect of carbohydrates was developed on the basis of the van der Waals-Platteeuw model and the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state with a modified version of the Huron-Vidal mixing rule. The calculated results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Maternal protein-energy malnutrition during early pregnancy in sheep impacts the fetal ornithine cycle to reduce fetal kidney microvascular development

    PubMed Central

    Dunford, Louise J.; Sinclair, Kevin D.; Kwong, Wing Y.; Sturrock, Craig; Clifford, Bethan L.; Giles, Tom C.; Gardner, David S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies a common nutritional pathway relating maternal through to fetal protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and compromised fetal kidney development. Thirty-one twin-bearing sheep were fed either a control (n=15) or low-protein diet (n=16, 17 vs. 8.7 g crude protein/MJ metabolizable energy) from d 0 to 65 gestation (term, ∼145 d). Effects on the maternal and fetal nutritional environment were characterized by sampling blood and amniotic fluid. Kidney development was characterized by histology, immunohistochemistry, vascular corrosion casts, and molecular biology. PEM had little measureable effect on maternal and fetal macronutrient balance (glucose, total protein, total amino acids, and lactate were unaffected) or on fetal growth. PEM decreased maternal and fetal urea concentration, which blunted fetal ornithine availability and affected fetal hepatic polyamine production. For the first time in a large animal model, we associated these nutritional effects with reduced micro- but not macrovascular development in the fetal kidney. Maternal PEM specifically impacts the fetal ornithine cycle, affecting cellular polyamine metabolism and microvascular development of the fetal kidney, effects that likely underpin programming of kidney development and function by a maternal low protein diet.—Dunford, L. J., Sinclair, K. D., Kwong, W. Y., Sturrock, C., Clifford, B. L., Giles, T. C., Gardner, D. S.. Maternal protein-energy malnutrition during early pregnancy in sheep impacts the fetal ornithine cycle to reduce fetal kidney microvascular development. PMID:25077559

  4. A Multiphase Equation of State for Hydrazine and Monomethylhydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle; Woods, Steve; Julien, Howard L.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain a validated equation of state for hydrazine and monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and use this equation to calculate thermodynamic properties. The approach was based on using both reliable critical property values and a value of the acentric factor in the Soave Redlich Kwong and the Peng Robinson model equations of state. These equations were validated by comparing calculated molar volumes for phase equilibrium with published experimental values and comparing calculated vapor pressures with published experimental values over the temperature range appropriate for the corresponding state equations. The equation of state giving the best results was used to calculate enthalpy and entropy departure functions and fugacity values. Additional thermodynamic property calculations were performed to produce partial Mollier diagrams and thermodynamic properties containing internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy values for hydrazine and MMH. The analyses of systems in which either adiabatic or near-adiabatic compression of liquid or vapor hydrazine or low velocity detonations occur require a validated equation of state for representing occurring molar volumes and for energy calculations. Other calculations for thermodynamic properties of hydrazine are available, but the values are for a strict ideal gas state. This work characterized destructive events using hydrazine by calculating for isentropic compression temperatures. The final temperatures were calculated and compared using the ideal and real gas fluid equations of state.

  5. Isentropic Compression of Multicomponent Mixtures of Fuels and Inert Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle; Julien, Howard L.; Woods, Stephen S.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2000-01-01

    In selected aerospace applications of the fuels hydrazine and monomethythydrazine, there occur conditions which can result in the isentropic compression of a multicomponent mixture of fuel and inert gas. One such example is when a driver gas such as helium comes out of solution and mixes with the fuel vapor, which is being compressed. A second example is when product gas from an energetic device mixes with the fuel vapor which is being compressed. Thermodynamic analysis has shown that under isentropic compression, the fuels hydrazine and monomethylhydrazine must be treated as real fluids using appropriate equations of state. The appropriate equations of state are the Peng-Robinson equation of state for hydrazine and the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state for monomethylhydrazine. The addition of an inert gas of variable quantity and input temperature and pressure to the fuel compounds the problem for safety design or analysis. This work provides the appropriate thermodynamic analysis of isentropic compression of the two examples cited. In addition to an entropy balance describing the change of state, an enthalpy balance is required. The presence of multicomponents in the system requires that appropriate mixing rules are identified and applied to the analysis. This analysis is not currently available.

  6. A finite difference method with reciprocity used to incorporate anisotropy in electroencephalogram dipole source localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallez, Hans; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Hese, Peter; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace; Van de Walle, Rik

    2005-08-01

    Many implementations of electroencephalogram (EEG) dipole source localization neglect the anisotropical conductivities inherent to brain tissues, such as the skull and white matter anisotropy. An examination of dipole localization errors is made in EEG source analysis, due to not incorporating the anisotropic properties of the conductivity of the skull and white matter. First, simulations were performed in a 5 shell spherical head model using the analytical formula. Test dipoles were placed in three orthogonal planes in the spherical head model. Neglecting the skull anisotropy results in a dipole localization error of, on average, 13.73 mm with a maximum of 24.51 mm. For white matter anisotropy these values are 11.21 mm and 26.3 mm, respectively. Next, a finite difference method (FDM), presented by Saleheen and Kwong (1997 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 44 800-9), is used to incorporate the anisotropy of the skull and white matter. The FDM method has been validated for EEG dipole source localization in head models with all compartments isotropic as well as in a head model with white matter anisotropy. In a head model with skull anisotropy the numerical method could only be validated if the 3D lattice was chosen very fine (grid size <=2 mm).

  7. Numerical simulation of a twin screw expander for performance prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papes, Iva; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing use of twin screw expanders in waste heat recovery applications, the performance prediction of these machines plays an important role. This paper presents a mathematical model for calculating the performance of a twin screw expander. From the mass and energy conservation laws, differential equations are derived which are then solved together with the appropriate Equation of State in the instantaneous control volumes. Different flow processes that occur inside the screw expander such as filling (accompanied by a substantial pressure loss) and leakage flows through the clearances are accounted for in the model. The mathematical model employs all geometrical parameters such as chamber volume, suction and leakage areas. With R245fa as working fluid, the Aungier Redlich-Kwong Equation of State has been used in order to include real gas effects. To calculate the mass flow rates through the leakage paths formed inside the screw expander, flow coefficients are considered as constant and they are derived from 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic calculations at given working conditions and applied to all other working conditions. The outcome of the mathematical model is the P-V indicator diagram which is compared to CFD results of the same twin screw expander. Since CFD calculations require significant computational time, developed mathematical model can be used for the faster performance prediction.

  8. Multipseudopotential interaction: A consistent study of cubic equations of state in lattice Boltzmann models.

    PubMed

    Khajepor, Sorush; Chen, Baixin

    2016-01-01

    A method is developed to analytically and consistently implement cubic equations of state into the recently proposed multipseudopotential interaction (MPI) scheme in the class of two-phase lattice Boltzmann (LB) models [S. Khajepor, J. Wen, and B. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023301 (2015)]10.1103/PhysRevE.91.023301. An MPI forcing term is applied to reduce the constraints on the mathematical shape of the thermodynamically consistent pseudopotentials; this allows the parameters of the MPI forces to be determined analytically without the need of curve fitting or trial and error methods. Attraction and repulsion parts of equations of state (EOSs), representing underlying molecular interactions, are modeled by individual pseudopotentials. Four EOSs, van der Waals, Carnahan-Starling, Peng-Robinson, and Soave-Redlich-Kwong, are investigated and the results show that the developed MPI-LB system can satisfactorily recover the thermodynamic states of interest. The phase interface is predicted analytically and controlled via EOS parameters independently and its effect on the vapor-liquid equilibrium system is studied. The scheme is highly stable to very high density ratios and the accuracy of the results can be enhanced by increasing the interface resolution. The MPI drop is evaluated with regard to surface tension, spurious velocities, isotropy, dynamic behavior, and the stability dependence on the relaxation time. PMID:26871187

  9. Multipseudopotential interaction: A consistent study of cubic equations of state in lattice Boltzmann models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajepor, Sorush; Chen, Baixin

    2016-01-01

    A method is developed to analytically and consistently implement cubic equations of state into the recently proposed multipseudopotential interaction (MPI) scheme in the class of two-phase lattice Boltzmann (LB) models [S. Khajepor, J. Wen, and B. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023301 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.023301. An MPI forcing term is applied to reduce the constraints on the mathematical shape of the thermodynamically consistent pseudopotentials; this allows the parameters of the MPI forces to be determined analytically without the need of curve fitting or trial and error methods. Attraction and repulsion parts of equations of state (EOSs), representing underlying molecular interactions, are modeled by individual pseudopotentials. Four EOSs, van der Waals, Carnahan-Starling, Peng-Robinson, and Soave-Redlich-Kwong, are investigated and the results show that the developed MPI-LB system can satisfactorily recover the thermodynamic states of interest. The phase interface is predicted analytically and controlled via EOS parameters independently and its effect on the vapor-liquid equilibrium system is studied. The scheme is highly stable to very high density ratios and the accuracy of the results can be enhanced by increasing the interface resolution. The MPI drop is evaluated with regard to surface tension, spurious velocities, isotropy, dynamic behavior, and the stability dependence on the relaxation time.

  10. Computing Isentropic Flow Properties of Air/R-134a Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Ray

    2006-01-01

    MACHRK is a computer program that calculates isentropic flow properties of mixtures of air and refrigerant R-134a (tetrafluoroethane), which are used in transonic aerodynamic testing in a wind tunnel at Langley Research Center. Given the total temperature, total pressure, static pressure, and mole fraction of R-134a in a mixture, MACHRK calculates the Mach number and the following associated flow properties: dynamic pressure, velocity, density, static temperature, speed of sound, viscosity, ratio of specific heats, Reynolds number, and Prandtl number. Real-gas effects are taken into account by treating the gases comprising the mixture as both thermally and calorically imperfect. The Redlich-Kwong equation of state for mixtures and the constant-pressure ideal heat-capacity equation for the mixture are used in combination with the departure- function approach of thermodynamics to obtain the equations for computing the flow properties. In addition to the aforementioned calculations for air/R-134a mixtures, a research version of MACHRK can perform the corresponding calculations for mixtures of air and R-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) and for air/SF6 mixtures. [R-12 was replaced by R-134a because of environmental concerns. SF6 has been considered for use in increasing the Reynolds-number range.

  11. Solubility of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenhuis, P.J.G.; Agrawal, N.J.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2009-04-15

    In this work, 72 new experimental solubility data points for H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} mixtures in aqueous N-methyldiethanol amine (MDEA) solutions at different methane partial pressures (up to 69 bara) are presented. They are correlated using an electrolyte equation of state (E-EOS) thermodynamic model. This model has already been used to estimate the CO{sub 2} solubility in aqueous MDEA (Huttenhuis et al. Fluid Phase Equilib. 2008, 264, 99-112) and the H{sub 2}S solubility in aqueous MDEA (Huttenhuis et al. Int. J. Oil, Gas Coal Technol. 2008, 1, 399-424). Here, the model is further extended to predict the behavior of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S when they are present simultaneously in aqueous MDEA. The application of an equation of state is a new development for this type of system, i.e., of acid-gas-amine systems. The molecular interactions are described by Schwarzentruber et al.'s modification of the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state, with terms added to account for ionic interactions in the liquid phase. The model is used to describe acid-gas solubility data for the CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}S-MDEA-H{sub 2}O system reported in the open literature and experimental data reported here for the CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}S-MDEA-H{sub 2}O-CH{sub 4} system.

  12. Numerical investigation of nitrogen spontaneous condensation flow in cryogenic nozzles using varying nucleation theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wan; Niu, Lu; Chen, Shuangtao; Sun, Xiaodong; Hou, Yu

    2015-06-01

    The thermodynamic irreversible loss by condensation can have an important influence on the flow characteristics and thermal efficiency in air or nitrogen cryogenic turbo-expander involving spontaneous condensation flow. However, the design of wet type turbo-expander for cryogenic liquid plants has been constrained due to the complexity of nucleation theory and the difficulty of data measurement in cryogenic environments. This paper presents numerical simulations for prediction of nitrogen spontaneous condensation flow in cryogenic nozzles. The non-equilibrium simulations were performed using three nucleation theories with the help of ANSYS CFX solver. The standard Redlich-Kwong gas state equation and Eulerian-Eulerian governing equations were used in simulations. Comparison with the equilibrium condensation model the non-equilibrium condensation model achieves a better prediction of the flow characteristics for spontaneous condensation flow in cryogenic environments. The nucleation theory which is based on classical nucleation theory (CNT) and improved by Kantrowitz for non-isothermal effects shows a better prediction of pressure drop, location of condensation onset and supercooling compared with experimental data. The influence of varying nucleation theories on the calculation of nucleation rate, the supercooling distribution and the liquid mass fraction distribution were also analyzed.

  13. Gas-liquid solubilities of the methanol synthesis components in various solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, G.H.; Smit, H.J.; Stamhuls, E.J.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M. )

    1992-04-01

    The solubilities of CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}OH, and H{sub 2}O were measured in hexadecane, octadecane, squalane, and benzophenone at 293-573 K and 1.013-90 bar using volume displacement and material balance techniques. The experimental results, consisting of 260 solubility data for 16 binary mixtures, were used to test the applicability of four solubility models. When using literature model parameters, the Skjold-Jorgensen group-contribution equation of state gives the best agreement with the experimental results with an average deviation of 15%. The Soave-Redlich-Kwong and Peng-Robinson equations of state give an excellent agreement with the experimental results when optimized binary interaction coefficients are used. The regular solutions theory gives reasonable results except for the methanol- and water-containing systems when using no optimized binary parameters. This paper reports that the authors' results show a reasonable agreement with the available literature data.

  14. An Extended Equation of State Modeling Method II. Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, G.; Marchi, P.; Stringari, P.; Richon, D.

    2006-09-01

    This work is the extension of previous work dedicated to pure fluids. The same method is extended to the representation of thermodynamic properties of a mixture through a fundamental equation of state in terms of the Helmholtz energy. The proposed technique exploits the extended corresponding-states concept of distorting the independent variables of a dedicated equation of state for a reference fluid using suitable scale factor functions to adapt the equation to experimental data of a target system. An existing equation of state for the target mixture is used instead of an equation for the reference fluid, completely avoiding the need for a reference fluid. In particular, a Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation with van der Waals mixing rules is chosen. The scale factors, which are functions of temperature, density, and mole fraction of the target mixture, are expressed in the form of a multilayer feedforward neural network, whose coefficients are regressed by minimizing a suitable objective function involving different kinds of mixture thermodynamic data. As a preliminary test, the model is applied to five binary and two ternary haloalkane mixtures, using data generated from existing dedicated equations of state for the selected mixtures. The results show that the method is robust and straightforward for the effective development of a mixture- specific equation of state directly from experimental data.

  15. An Extended Equation of State Modeling Method I. Pure Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, G.; Bettio, L.; Marchi, P.; Piazza, L.; Richon, D.

    2006-09-01

    A new technique is proposed here to represent the thermodynamic surface of a pure fluid in the fundamental Helmholtz energy form. The peculiarity of the present method is the extension of a generic equation of state for the target fluid, which is assumed as the basic equation, through the distortion of its independent variables by individual shape functions, which are represented by a neural network used as function approximator. The basic equation of state for the target fluid can have the simple functional form of a cubic equation, as, for instance, the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation assumed in the present study. A set of nine fluids including hydrocarbons, haloalkane refrigerants, and strongly polar substances has been considered. For each of them the model has been regressed and then validated against volumetric and caloric properties generated in the vapor, liquid, and supercritical regions from highly accurate dedicated equations of state. In comparison with the underlying cubic equation of state, the prediction accuracy is improved by a factor between 10 and 100, depending on the property and on the region. It has been verified that about 100 density experimental points, together with from 10 to 20 coexistence data, are sufficient to guarantee high prediction accuracy for different thermodynamic properties. The method is a promising modeling technique for the heuristic development of multiparameter dedicated equations of state from experimental data.

  16. Measurements of Speed of Sound in Lean and Rich Natural Gas Mixtures at Pressures up to 37 MPa Using a Specialized Rupture Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botros, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the speed of sound in 42 different compositions of lean, medium, and rich natural-gas mixtures using a specialized high-pressure rupture tube have been conducted. The rupture tube is made of stainless steel (internal diameter = 38.1 mm and length = 42 m), and is instrumented with 13 high-frequency-response dynamic pressure transducers (Endevco) mounted very close to the rupture end and along the length of the tube to capture the pressure-time traces of the decompression wave. Tests were conducted for initial pressures ranging from 10 MPa to 37 MPa and a temperature range from -25°C to+68°C. Gas mixture compositions were controlled by mixing conventional natural-gas mixtures from an adjacent gas pipeline with richer components of alkanes. Temperature control is achieved by a heat tracer along the tube with a set point at the desired gas temperature of the particular test. Uncertainty analysis indicated that the uncertainty in the experimentally determined speed of sound in the undisturbed gas mixture at the initial pressure and temperature is on the order of 0.306 %. The measured speeds of sound were compared to predictions by five equations of state, namely; the Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling (BWRS), AGA-8, Peng-Robinson (PR), Redlich-Kwong-Soave (RK-Soave), and Groupe Européen de Recherches Gaziéres (GERG-2004) equations.

  17. Investigation of two and three parameter equations of state for cryogenic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Susan L.; Majumdar, Alok K.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    Two-phase flows are a common occurrence in cryogenic engines and an accurate evaluation of the heat-transfer coefficient in two-phase flow is of significant importance in their analysis and design. The thermodynamic equation of state plays a key role in calculating the heat transfer coefficient which is a function of thermodynamic and thermophysical properties. An investigation has been performed to study the performance of two- and three-parameter equations of state to calculate the compressibility factor of cryogenic fluids along the saturation loci. The two-parameter equations considered here are van der Waals and Redlich-Kwong equations of state. The three-parameter equation represented here is the generalized Benedict-Webb-Rubin (BWR) equation of Lee and Kesler. Results have been compared with the modified BWR equation of Bender and the extended BWR equations of Stewart. Seven cryogenic fluids have been tested; oxygen, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, argon, neon, and air. The performance of the generalized BWR equation is poor for hydrogen and helium. The van der Waals equation is found to be inaccurate for air near the critical point. For helium, all three equations of state become inaccurate near the critical point.

  18. Exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor induces malformed and hyperfused vessels during embryonic neovascularization.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, C J; Little, C D

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and specific endothelial mitogen that is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo [Leung, D. W., Cachianes, G., Kuang, W.-J., Goeddel, D. V. & Ferrara, N. (1989) Science 246 1306-1309]. To determine if VEGF also influences the behavior of primordial endothelial cells, we used an in vivo vascular assay based on the de novo formation of vessels. Japanese quail embryos injected with nanomolar quantities of the 165-residue form of VEGF at the onset of vasculogenesis exhibited profoundly altered vessel development. In fact, the overall patterning of the vascular network was abnormal in all VEGF-injected embryos. The malformations were attributable to two specific endothelial cell activities: (i) inappropriate neovascularization in normally avascular areas and (ii) the unregulated, excessive fusion of vessels. In the first instance, supernumerary vessels directly linked the inflow channel of the heart to the aortic outflow channel. The second aberrant activity led to the formation of vessels with abnormally large lumens. Ultimately, unregulated vessel fusion generated massive vascular sacs that obliterated the identity of individual vessels. These observations show that exogenous VEGF has an impact on the behavior of primordial endothelial cells engaged in vasculogenesis, and they strongly suggest that endogenous VEGF is important in vascular patterning and regulation of vessel size (lumen formation). Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7543999

  19. Structure of the Soot Growth Region of Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the soot growth region of laminar premixed methane/oxygen flames (fuel-equivalence ratios of 1.60-2.77) was studied both experimentally and computationally. Measurements were carried out in flames stabilized on a flat flame burner operated at standard temperature and pressure, and included velocities by laser velocimetry, soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and hydrogen atom concentrations by the Li/LiOH technique in conjunction with atomic absorption to find the proportion of free lithium in the flames. The measured concentrations of major gas species were in reasonably good agreement with predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Leung and Lindstedt, and Frenklach and coworkers. The measurements also confirmed predictions of both these mechanisms that H-atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot growth region even through the concentrations of major gas species are not. Thus, present findings support recent evaluations of the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanism in similar flames, where the approximation that H-atom concentrations were in local thermodynamic equilibrium was adopted, based on predictions using the two mechanisms, due to the absence of direct H-atom concentration measurements.

  20. Structure of the Soot Growth Region of Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames. Appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the soot growth region of laminar premixed methane/oxygen flames (fuel-equivalence ratios of 1.60-2.77) was studied both experimentally and computationally. Measurements were carried out in flames stabilized on a flat flame burner operated at standard temperature and pressure, and included velocities by laser velocimetry, soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and hydrogen atom concentrations by the Li/LiOH technique in conjunction with atomic absorption to find the proportion of free lithium in the flames. The measured concentrations of major gas species were in reasonably good agreement with predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Leung and Lindstedt, and Frenklach and coworkers. The measurements also confirmed predictions of both these mechanisms that H-atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot growth region even through the concentrations of major gas species are not. Thus, present findings support recent evaluations of the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanism in similar flames, where the approximation that H-atom concentrations were in local thermodynamic equilibrium was adopted, based on predictions using the two mechanisms, due to the absence of direct H-atom concentration measurements.

  1. Structure of Soot Growth Region of Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the soot growth region of laminar premixed methane/oxygen flames (fuel-equivalence ratios of 1.60 - 2.77) was studied both experimentally and computationally. Measurements were carried out in flames stabilized on a flat flame burner operated at standard temperature and pressure, and included velocities by laser velocimetry, soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and hydrogen atom concentrations by the Li/LiOH technique in conjunction with atomic absorption to find the proportion of free lithium in the flames. The measured concentrations of major gas species were in reasonably good agreement with predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Leung and Lindstedt, and Frenklach and coworkers. The measurements also confirmed predictions of both these mechanisms that H-atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot growth region even through the concentrations of major gas species are not. Thus, present findings support recent evaluations of the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanism in similar flames, where the approximation that H-atom concentrations were in local thermodynamic equilibrium was adopted, based on predictions using the two mechanisms, due to the absence of direct H-atom concentration measurements.

  2. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed mc1hane/oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt: the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames. for reasons that still must be explained.

  3. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed methanefoxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt; the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogenabstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames, for reasons that still must be explained.

  4. An evaluation of higher-order model methods for calculating transient structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Riley, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    A higher-order modal method proposed by Leung for transient structural analysis entitled the force-derivative method is evaluated. This method repeatedly integrates by parts with respect to time the convolution-integral form of the structural response to produce successively better approximations to the contribution of the higher modes which are neglected in the modal summation. Comparisons are made of the force-derivative, the mode-displacement, and the mode-acceleration methods for several numerical example problems for various times, levels of damping, and forcing functions. The example problems include a tip-loaded cantilevered beam and a simply-supported multispan beam. The force-derivative method is shown to converge to an accurate solution in fewer modes than either the mode-displacement or the mode-acceleration methods. In addition, for problems in which there are a large number of closely-spaced frequencies whose mode shapes have a negligible contribution to the response, the force-derivative method is very effective in representing the effect of the important, but otherwise neglected, higher modes.

  5. Abnormal Image Detection in Endoscopy Videos Using a Filter Bank and Local Binary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Nawarathna, Ruwan; Oh, JungHwan; Muthukudage, Jayantha; Tavanapong, Wallapak; Wong, Johnny; de Groen, Piet C.; Tang, Shou Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Finding mucosal abnormalities (e.g., erythema, blood, ulcer, erosion, and polyp) is one of the most essential tasks during endoscopy video review. Since these abnormalities typically appear in a small number of frames (around 5% of the total frame number), automated detection of frames with an abnormality can save physician’s time significantly. In this paper, we propose a new multi-texture analysis method that effectively discerns images showing mucosal abnormalities from the ones without any abnormality since most abnormalities in endoscopy images have textures that are clearly distinguishable from normal textures using an advanced image texture analysis method. The method uses a “texton histogram” of an image block as features. The histogram captures the distribution of different “textons” representing various textures in an endoscopy image. The textons are representative response vectors of an application of a combination of Leung and Malik (LM) filter bank (i.e., a set of image filters) and a set of Local Binary Patterns on the image. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed method achieves 92% recall and 91.8% specificity on wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) images and 91% recall and 90.8% specificity on colonoscopy images. PMID:25132723

  6. Remote state preparation without oblivious conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Horibe, M.

    2003-05-01

    In quantum teleportation, neither Alice nor Bob acquires any classical knowledge on teleported states. The teleportation protocol is said to be oblivious to both parties. In remote state preparation (RSP), it is assumed that Alice is given complete classical knowledge on the state that is to be prepared by Bob. Recently, Leung and Shor [e-print quant-ph/0201008] showed that the same amount of classical information as that in teleportation needs to be transmitted in any exact and deterministic RSP protocol that is oblivious to Bob. Assuming that the dimension of subsystems in the prior-entangled state is the same as the dimension of the input space, we study similar RSP protocols, but not necessarily oblivious to Bob. We show that in this case Bob's quantum operation can be safely assumed to be a unitary transformation. We then derive an equation that is a necessary and sufficient condition for such a protocol to exist. By studying this equation, we show that one-qubit RSP requires two classical bits of communication, which is the same amount as in teleportation, even if the protocol is not assumed oblivious to Bob. For higher dimensions, it is still an open question whether the amount of classical communication can be reduced by abandoning oblivious conditions.

  7. Spin squeezing a cold molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we present a concrete proposal for spin squeezing the cold ground-state polar paramagnetic molecule OH, a system currently under fine control in the laboratory. In contrast to existing work, we consider a single, noninteracting molecule with angular momentum greater than 1 /2 . Starting from an experimentally relevant effective Hamiltonian, we identify an adiabatic regime where different combinations of static electric and magnetic fields can be used to realize the single-axis twisting Hamiltonian of Kitagawa and Ueda [M. Kitagawa and M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. A 47, 5138 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevA.47.5138], the uniform field Hamiltonian proposed by Law et al. [C. K. Law, H. T. Ng, and P. T. Leung, Phys. Rev. A 63, 055601 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.63.055601], and a model of field propagation in a Kerr medium considered by Agarwal and Puri [G. S. Agarwal and R. R. Puri, Phys. Rev. A 39, 2969 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevA.39.2969]. We then consider the situation in which nonadiabatic effects are quite large and show that the effective Hamiltonian supports spin squeezing even in this case. We provide analytical expressions as well as numerical calculations, including optimization of field strengths and accounting for the effects of field misalignment. Our results have consequences for applications such as precision spectroscopy, techniques such as magnetometry, and stereochemical effects such as the orientation-to-alignment transition.

  8. Determining the Ground State Geometry of the (E)-1-CHLORO-1,2-DIFLUOROETHYLENE--HYDROGEN Fluoride Complex Using Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzi, Aaron T.; Leung, Helen O.; Marshall, Mark D.

    2010-06-01

    To better understand the effects of chlorine substitution on the intermolecular interactions between fluorinated ethylenes and linear, protic acids, the structure of the (E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene--hydrogen fluoride complex has been investigated via ab initio calculations and microwave spectroscopy. It was necessary first to determine an improved experimental structure of (E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene itself, and the rotational spectra of four isotopologues of this monomer have been obtained in the 6-21 GHz range using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy for this purpose. Ab initio calculations for the van der Waals complex with hydrogen fluoride, performed at the MP2 level of theory, predict that the lowest energy conformation is similar to that observed for the trifluoroethylene--HF dimer. Based on these predictions, rotational spectra of three isotopologues of the (E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene--hydrogen fluoride complex spanning 7-19 GHz are collected. Rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and chlorine quadrupole coupling constants are determined using a least-squares fitting program. The data obtained so far are consistent with a planar ground-state structure in which the HF molecule binds to the side of the substituted ethylene by forming a hydrogen bond to fluorine and a secondary interaction with the geminal hydrogen. H.O. Leung and M.D. Marshall, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 114310 (2007).

  9. Multipolar universal relations between f -mode frequency and tidal deformability of compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. K.; Sham, Y.-H.; Leung, P. T.; Lin, L.-M.

    2014-12-01

    Though individual stellar parameters of compact stars usually demonstrate obvious dependence on the equation of state (EOS), EOS-insensitive universal formulas relating these parameters remarkably exist. In the present paper, we explore the interrelationship between two such formulas, namely the f -I relation connecting the f -mode quadrupole oscillation frequency ω2 and the moment of inertia I , and the I -Love-Q relations relating I , the quadrupole tidal deformability λ2, and the quadrupole moment Q , which have been proposed by Lau, Leung, and Lin [Astrophys. J. 714, 1234 (2010)] and Yagi and Yunes [Science 341, 365 (2013)], respectively. A relativistic universal relation between ωl and λl with the same angular momentum l =2 ,3 ,… , the so-called "diagonal f -Love relation" that holds for realistic compact stars and stiff polytropic stars, is unveiled here. An in-depth investigation in the Newtonian limit is further carried out to pinpoint its underlying physical mechanism and hence leads to a unified f -I -Love relation. We reach the conclusion that these EOS-insensitive formulas stem from a common physical origin—compact stars can be considered as quasiincompressible when they react to slow time variations introduced by f -mode oscillations, tidal forces and rotations.

  10. Interactive Software "Isotonic Design using Normalized Equivalent Toxicity Score (ID-NETS©TM)" for Cancer Phase I Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengjia; Wang, Zhibo; Wang, Haibin; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Kowalski, Jeanne; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2013-01-01

    Isotonic Design using Normalized Equivalent Toxicity Score (ID-NETS) is a novel Phase I design that integrates the novel toxicity scoring system originally proposed by Chen et al. [1] and the original Isotonic Design proposed by Leung et al. [2]. ID-NETS has substantially improved the accuracy of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) estimation and trial efficiency in the Phase I clinical trial setting by fully utilizing all toxicities experienced by each patient and treating toxicity response as a quasi-continuous variable instead of a binary indicator of dose limiting toxicity (DLT). To facilitate the incorporation of the ID-NETS method into the design and conduct of Phase I clinical trials, we have designed and developed a user-friendly software, ID-NETS(©TM), which has two functions: 1) Calculating the recommended dose for the subsequent patient cohort using available completed data; and 2) Performing simulations to obtain the operating characteristics of a trial designed with ID-NETS. Currently, ID-NETS(©TM)v1.0 is available for free download at http://winshipbbisr.emory.edu/IDNETS.html. PMID:23847695

  11. An Fe2+-dependent cyclic phosphodiesterase catalyzes the hydrolysis of 7,8-dihydro-D-neopterin 2',3'-cyclic phosphate in methanopterin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Xu, Huimin; White, Robert H

    2009-10-13

    7,8-Dihydro-D-neopterin 2',3'-cyclic phosphate (H(2)N-cP) is the first intermediate in biosynthesis of the pterin portion of tetrahydromethanopterin (H(4)MPT), a C(1) carrier coenzyme first identified in the methanogenic archaea. This intermediate is produced from GTP by MptA (MJ0775 gene product), a new class of GTP cyclohydrolase I [Grochowski, L. L., Xu, H., Leung, K., and White, R. H. (2007) Biochemistry 46, 6658-6667]. Here we report the identification of a cyclic phosphodiesterase that hydrolyzes the cyclic phosphate of H(2)N-cP and converts it to a mixture of 7,8-dihydro-D-neopterin 2'-monophosphate and 7,8-dihydro-d-neopterin 3'-monophosphate. The enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannachii is designated MptB (MJ0837 gene product) to indicate that it catalyzes the second step of the biosynthesis of methanopterin. MptB is a member of the HD domain superfamily of enzymes, which require divalent metals for activity. Direct metal analysis of the recombinant enzyme demonstrated that MptB contained 1.0 mol of zinc and 0.8 mol of iron per protomer. MptB requires Fe(2+) for activity, the same as observed for MptA. Thus the first two enzymes involved in H(4)MPT biosynthesis in the archaea are Fe(2+) dependent. PMID:19746965

  12. GIANT CONVECTION CELL TURNOVER AS AN EXPLANATION OF THE LONG SECONDARY PERIODS IN SEMIREGULAR RED VARIABLE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Stothers, Richard B.

    2010-12-10

    Giant convection cells in the envelopes of massive red supergiants turn over in a time comparable in order of magnitude with the observed long secondary periods in these stars, according to a theory proposed some years ago by Stothers and Leung. This idea is developed further here by using improved theoretical data, especially a more accurate convective mixing length and a simple calculation of the expected radial-velocity variations at the stellar surface. The theory is applied to the two best-observed red supergiants, Betelgeuse and Antares, with more success than in the earlier study. The theory can also explain the long secondary periods seen in the low-mass red giants, thus providing a uniform and coherent picture for all of the semiregular red variables. How the turnover of a giant convection cell might account for the observed slow light and radial-velocity variations, their relative phasing, and the absence of these variations in certain stars is discussed here in a qualitative way, but follows naturally from the theory.

  13. The novel β2-selective proteasome inhibitor LU-102 synergizes with bortezomib and carfilzomib to overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Marianne; Bader, Juergen; Geurink, Paul P.; Weyburne, Emily S.; Mirabella, Anne C.; Silzle, Tobias; Shabaneh, Tamer B.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; de Bruin, Gerjan; Haile, Sarah R.; van Rooden, Eva; Appenzeller, Christina; Li, Nan; Kisselev, Alexei F.; Overkleeft, Herman; Driessen, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitor resistance is a challenge for myeloma therapy. Bortezomib targets the β5 and β1 activity, but not the β2 activity of the proteasome. Bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells down-regulate the activation status of the unfolded protein response, and up-regulate β2 proteasome activity. To improve proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant myeloma and to achieve more efficient UPR activation, we have developed LU-102, a selective inhibitor of the β2 proteasome activity. LU-102 inhibited the β2 activity in intact myeloma cells at low micromolar concentrations without relevant co-inhibition of β1 and β5 proteasome subunits. In proteasome inhibitor-resistant myeloma cells, significantly more potent proteasome inhibition was achieved by bortezomib or carfilzomib in combination with LU-102, compared to bortezomib/carfilzomib alone, resulting in highly synergistic cytotoxic activity of the drug combination via endoplasmatic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Combining bortezomib/carfilzomib with LU-102 significantly prolonged proteasome inhibition and increased activation of the unfolded protein response and IRE1-a activity. IRE1-α has recently been shown to control myeloma cell differentiation and bortezomib sensitivity (Leung-Hagesteijn, Cancer Cell 24:3, 289-304). Thus, β2-selective proteasome inhibition by LU-102 in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib results in synergistic proteasome inhibition, activation of the unfolded protein response, and cytotoxicity, and overcomes bortezomib/carfilzomib resistance in myeloma cells in vitro PMID:26069288

  14. PDEs on moving surfaces via the closest point method and a modified grid based particle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petras, A.; Ruuth, S. J.

    2016-05-01

    Partial differential equations (PDEs) on surfaces arise in a wide range of applications. The closest point method (Ruuth and Merriman (2008) [20]) is a recent embedding method that has been used to solve a variety of PDEs on smooth surfaces using a closest point representation of the surface and standard Cartesian grid methods in the embedding space. The original closest point method (CPM) was designed for problems posed on static surfaces, however the solution of PDEs on moving surfaces is of considerable interest as well. Here we propose solving PDEs on moving surfaces using a combination of the CPM and a modification of the grid based particle method (Leung and Zhao (2009) [12]). The grid based particle method (GBPM) represents and tracks surfaces using meshless particles and an Eulerian reference grid. Our modification of the GBPM introduces a reconstruction step into the original method to ensure that all the grid points within a computational tube surrounding the surface are active. We present a number of examples to illustrate the numerical convergence properties of our combined method. Experiments for advection-diffusion equations that are strongly coupled to the velocity of the surface are also presented.

  15. An investigation of visual contour integration ability in relation to writing performance in primary school students.

    PubMed

    Li-Tsang, Cecilia W P; Wong, Agnes S K; Chan, Jackson Y; Lee, Amos Y T; Lam, Miko C Y; Wong, C W; Lu, Zhonglin

    2012-01-01

    A previous study found a visual deficit in contour integration in English readers with dyslexia (Simmers & Bex, 2001). Visual contour integration may play an even more significant role in Chinese handwriting particularly due to its logographic presentation (Lam, Au, Leung, & Li-Tsang, 2011). The current study examined the relationship between children's performance in visual contour (VC) integration and Chinese handwriting. Twenty students from grade 3 to grade 6 were recruited (M=9.51, SD=1.02) from a mainstream primary school using the convenience sampling method. Ten students were identified by teachers as having handwriting problems, and the other 10 were typical students. Participants performed the VC tasks and their handwriting performance was assessed by a Chinese Handwriting Assessment Tool (CHAT) in a classroom setting. Correlation analyses revealed that VC accuracy was significantly and negatively correlated with on paper time and total writing duration. t-Test analyses revealed statistically significant differences in VC accuracy between students with typical and poor handwriting, with consistently better VC accuracy performance in all conditions in the typical handwriting group. The results may have important implications for interventions aiming at improving children's handwriting. PMID:22846174

  16. Predicting future threats to the long-term survival of Gila Trout using a high-resolution simulation of climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Thomas L.; Gutzler, David S.; Leung, Lai R.

    2008-11-20

    Regional climates are a major factor in determining the distribution of many species. Anthropogenic inputs of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere have been predicted to cause rapid climatic changes in the next 50-100 years. Species such as the Gila Trout (Onchorhynchus gilae) that have small ranges, limited dispersal capabilities, and narrow physiological tolerances will become increasingly susceptible to extinction as their climate envelope changes. This study uses a regional climate change simulation (Leung et al. 2004) to determine changes in the climate envelope for Gila Trout, which is sensitive to maximum temperature, associated with a plausible scenario for greenhouse gas increases. The model predicts approximately a 2° C increase in temperature and a doubling by the mid 21st Century in the annual number of days during which temperature exceeds 37°C, and a 25% increase in the number of days above 32°C, across the current geographical range of Gila Trout. At the same time summer rainfall decreases by more than 20%. These climate changes would reduce their available habitat by decreasing the size of their climate envelope. Warmer temperatures coupled with a decrease in summer precipitation would also tend to increase the intensity and frequency of forest fires that are a major threat to their survival. The climate envelope approach utilized here could be used to assess climate change threats to other rare species with limited ranges and dispersal capabilities.

  17. Interactive Software “Isotonic Design using Normalized Equivalent Toxicity Score (ID-NETS©TM)” for Cancer Phase I Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengjia; Wang, Zhibo; Wang, Haibin; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Kowalski, Jeanne; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2013-01-01

    Isotonic Design using Normalized Equivalent Toxicity Score (ID-NETS) is a novel Phase I design that integrates the novel toxicity scoring system originally proposed by Chen et al. [1] and the original Isotonic Design proposed by Leung et al. [2]. ID-NETS has substantially improved the accuracy of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) estimation and trial efficiency in the Phase I clinical trial setting by fully utilizing all toxicities experienced by each patient and treating toxicity response as a quasi-continuous variable instead of a binary indicator of dose limiting toxicity (DLT). To facilitate the incorporation of the ID-NETS method into the design and conduct of Phase I clinical trials, we have designed and developed a user-friendly software, ID-NETS©TM, which has two functions: 1) Calculating the recommended dose for the subsequent patient cohort using available completed data; and 2) Performing simulations to obtain the operating characteristics of a trial designed with ID-NETS. Currently, ID-NETS©TMv1.0 is available for free download at http://winshipbbisr.emory.edu/IDNETS.html. PMID:23847695

  18. Manipulating the electron distribution through a combination of electron injection and MacKenzie’s Maxwell Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2015-06-01

    Experiments on electron heating are performed in a biased hot filament-produced argon plasma. Electrons are confined by multi-dipole magnetic fields on the radial wall of the cylindrical chamber but not the planar end walls. Electron heating is provided by a combination of cold electron injection (Hershowitz N and Leung K N 1975 Appl. Phys. Lett. 26 607) and a MacKenzie Maxwell Demon (Mackenzie K R et al 1971 Appl. Phys. Lett. 18 529). This approach allows the manipulation of the electrons by introducing a depleted tail into the electron energy distribution function or by removing a depleted tail. It is found that the injected electrons mimic and thermalize with the electron species with the closest average energy or temperature. The effect of the injected electrons is optimal when they mimic the secondary electrons emitted from the wall instead of the degraded primary electrons. Both approaches combine to achieve increases in electron temperature Te from 0.67 to 2.8 eV, which was not significantly higher than using each approach alone.

  19. Gas Adsorption and Selectivity in Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks from First Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Keith; Olmsted, David; He, Ning; Houndonougbo, Yao; Laird, Brian; Asta, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework (ZIFs) are excellent candidate materials for carbon capture and gas separation. Here we employ the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) [1] in an analysis of the binding energetics for CO2, CH4 and N2 molecules in a set of ZIFs featuring different chemical functionalizations. We investigate multiple low-energy binding sites, which differ in their positions relative to functional groups on the imidazole linkers. In all cases an accurate treatment of van der Waals forces appears essential to provide reasonable binding energy magnitudes. We report results obtained from different parameterizations of the vdW-DF, providing comparisons between calculations and experimental values of the heat of adsorption [2]. This research is supported by the Energy Frontier Research Center ``Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials,'' funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001342. [1] M. Dion, H. Rydberg, E. Schroder, D. C. Langreth, B. I. Lundqvist, Phys. Rev. Let. 92, 246401 (2004) [2] W. Morris, B. Leung, H. Furukawa, O. K. Yaghi, N. He, H. Hayashi, Y. Houndonougbo, M. Asta, B. B. Laird, O. M. Yaghi, J. AM. CHEM. SOC. 2010, 132, 11006-11008

  20. Abnormal Image Detection in Endoscopy Videos Using a Filter Bank and Local Binary Patterns.

    PubMed

    Nawarathna, Ruwan; Oh, JungHwan; Muthukudage, Jayantha; Tavanapong, Wallapak; Wong, Johnny; de Groen, Piet C; Tang, Shou Jiang

    2014-11-20

    Finding mucosal abnormalities (e.g., erythema, blood, ulcer, erosion, and polyp) is one of the most essential tasks during endoscopy video review. Since these abnormalities typically appear in a small number of frames (around 5% of the total frame number), automated detection of frames with an abnormality can save physician's time significantly. In this paper, we propose a new multi-texture analysis method that effectively discerns images showing mucosal abnormalities from the ones without any abnormality since most abnormalities in endoscopy images have textures that are clearly distinguishable from normal textures using an advanced image texture analysis method. The method uses a "texton histogram" of an image block as features. The histogram captures the distribution of different "textons" representing various textures in an endoscopy image. The textons are representative response vectors of an application of a combination of Leung and Malik (LM) filter bank (i.e., a set of image filters) and a set of Local Binary Patterns on the image. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed method achieves 92% recall and 91.8% specificity on wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) images and 91% recall and 90.8% specificity on colonoscopy images. PMID:25132723

  1. Global pattern analysis and classification of dermoscopic images using textons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Maryam; Lee, Tim K.; McLean, David; Lui, Harvey; Atkins, M. Stella

    2012-02-01

    Detecting and classifying global dermoscopic patterns are crucial steps for detecting melanocytic lesions from non-melanocytic ones. An important stage of melanoma diagnosis uses pattern analysis methods such as 7-point check list, Menzies method etc. In this paper, we present a novel approach to investigate texture analysis and classification of 5 classes of global lesion patterns (reticular, globular, cobblestone, homogeneous, and parallel pattern) in dermoscopic images. Our statistical approach models the texture by the joint probability distribution of filter responses using a comprehensive set of the state of the art filter banks. This distribution is represented by the frequency histogram of filter response cluster centers called textons. We have also examined other two methods: Joint Distribution of Intensities (JDI) and Convolutional Restricted Boltzmann Machine (CRBM) to learn the pattern specific features to be used for textons. The classification performance is compared over the Leung and Malik filters (LM), Root Filter Set (RFS), Maximum Response Filters (MR8), Schmid, Laws and our proposed filter set as well as CRBM and JDI. We analyzed 375 images of the 5 classes of the patterns. Our experiments show that the joint distribution of color (JDC) in the L*a*b* color space outperforms the other color spaces with a correct classification rate of 86.8%.

  2. Breast density characterization using texton distributions.

    PubMed

    Petroudi, Styliani; Brady, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Breast density has been shown to be one of the most significant risks for developing breast cancer, with women with dense breasts at four to six times higher risk. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) has a four class classification scheme that describes the different breast densities. However, there is great inter and intra observer variability among clinicians in reporting a mammogram's density class. This work presents a novel texture classification method and its application for the development of a completely automated breast density classification system. The new method represents the mammogram using textons, which can be thought of as the building blocks of texture under the operational definition of Leung and Malik as clustered filter responses. The new proposed method characterizes the mammographic appearance of the different density patterns by evaluating the texton spatial dependence matrix (TDSM) in the breast region's corresponding texton map. The TSDM is a texture model that captures both statistical and structural texture characteristics. The normalized TSDM matrices are evaluated for mammograms from the different density classes and corresponding texture models are established. Classification is achieved using a chi-square distance measure. The fully automated TSDM breast density classification method is quantitatively evaluated on mammograms from all density classes from the Oxford Mammogram Database. The incorporation of texton spatial dependencies allows for classification accuracy reaching over 82%. The breast density classification accuracy is better using texton TSDM compared to simple texton histograms. PMID:22255462

  3. Human Microbiota of the Argentine Population- A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetto, Belén; Fabbro, Mónica C.; Sciara, Mariela; Seravalle, Analía; Méjico, Guadalupe; Revale, Santiago; Romero, María S.; Brun, Bianca; Fay, Marcelo; Fay, Fabián; Vazquez, Martin P.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiota is the collection of microorganisms living in or on the human body. An imbalance or dysbiosis in these microbial communities can be associated with a wide variety of human diseases (Petersen and Round, 2014; Pham and Lawley, 2014; Zaura et al., 2014). Moreover, when the microbiota of the same body sites is compared between different healthy individuals, specific microbial community features are apparent (Li et al., 2012; Yatsunenko et al., 2012; Oh et al., 2014; Relman, 2015). In addition, specific selective pressures are found at distinct body sites leading to different patterns in microbial community structure and composition (Costello et al., 2009; Consortium, 2012b; Zhou et al., 2013). Because of these natural variations, a comprehensive characterization of the healthy microbiota is critical for predicting alterations related to diseases. This characterization should be based on a broad healthy population over time, geography, and culture (Yatsunenko et al., 2012; Shetty et al., 2013; Leung et al., 2015; Ross et al., 2015). The study of healthy individuals representing different ages, cultural traditions, and ethnic origins will enable to understand how the associated microbiota varies between populations and respond to different lifestyles. It is important to address these natural variations in order to later detect variations related to disease. PMID:26870014

  4. Polarized Synchrotron Emissivities and Absorptivities for Relativistic Thermal, Power-law, and Kappa Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Alex; Zhang, Zhaowei; Chandra, Mani; Gammie, Charles F.

    2016-05-01

    Synchrotron emission and absorption determine the observational appearances of many astronomical systems. In this paper, we describe a numerical scheme for calculating synchrotron emissivities and absorptivities in all four Stokes parameters for arbitrary gyrotropic electron distribution functions, building on earlier work by Leung, Gammie, and Noble. We use this technique to evaluate the emissivities and the absorptivities for a thermal (Maxwell–Jüttner), isotropic power-law, and an isotropic kappa distribution function. The latter contains a power-law tail at high particle energies that smoothly merges with a thermal core at low energies, as is characteristic of observed particle spectra in collisionless plasmas. We provide fitting formulae and error bounds on the fitting formulae for use in codes that solve the radiative transfer equation. The numerical method and the fitting formulae are implemented in a compact C library called symphony. We find that the kappa distribution has a source function that is indistinguishable from a thermal spectrum at low frequency and transitions to the characteristic self-absorbed synchrotron spectrum, \\propto {ν }5/2, at high frequency; the linear polarization fraction for a thermal spectrum is near unity at high frequency; and all distributions produce O(10%) circular polarization at low frequency for lines of sight sufficiently close to the magnetic field vector.

  5. An Arbitrated Quantum Signature with Bell States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Qin, Su-Juan; Huang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Entanglement is the main resource in quantum communication. The main aims of the arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) scheme are to present an application of the entanglement in cryptology and to prove the possibility of the quantum signature. More specifically, the main function of quantum entangled states in the existing AQS schemes is to assist the signatory to transfer quantum states to the receiver. However, teleportation and the Leung quantum one-time pad (L-QOTP) algorithm are not enough to design a secure AQS scheme. For example, Pauli operations commute or anticommute with each other, which makes the implementation of attacks easily from the aspects of forgery and disavowal. To conquer this shortcoming, we construct an improved AQS scheme using a new QOTP algorithm. This scheme has three advantages: it randomly uses the Hadamard operation in the new QOTP to resist attacks by using the anticommutativity of nontrivial Pauli operators and it preserves almost all merits in the existing AQS schemes; even in the process of handling disputes, no party has chance to change the message and its signature without being discovered; the receiver can verify the integrity of the signature and discover the disavow of the signatory even in the last step of verification.

  6. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  7. The novel β2-selective proteasome inhibitor LU-102 synergizes with bortezomib and carfilzomib to overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marianne; Bader, Juergen; Geurink, Paul P; Weyburne, Emily S; Mirabella, Anne C; Silzle, Tobias; Shabaneh, Tamer B; van der Linden, Wouter A; de Bruin, Gerjan; Haile, Sarah R; van Rooden, Eva; Appenzeller, Christina; Li, Nan; Kisselev, Alexei F; Overkleeft, Herman; Driessen, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Proteasome inhibitor resistance is a challenge for myeloma therapy. Bortezomib targets the β5 and β1 activity, but not the β2 activity of the proteasome. Bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells down-regulate the activation status of the unfolded protein response, and up-regulate β2 proteasome activity. To improve proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant myeloma and to achieve more efficient UPR activation, we have developed LU-102, a selective inhibitor of the β2 proteasome activity. LU-102 inhibited the β2 activity in intact myeloma cells at low micromolar concentrations without relevant co-inhibition of β1 and β5 proteasome subunits. In proteasome inhibitor-resistant myeloma cells, significantly more potent proteasome inhibition was achieved by bortezomib or carfilzomib in combination with LU-102, compared to bortezomib/carfilzomib alone, resulting in highly synergistic cytotoxic activity of the drug combination via endoplasmatic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Combining bortezomib/carfilzomib with LU-102 significantly prolonged proteasome inhibition and increased activation of the unfolded protein response and IRE1-a activity. IRE1-α has recently been shown to control myeloma cell differentiation and bortezomib sensitivity (Leung-Hagesteijn, Cancer Cell 24:3, 289-304). Thus, β2-selective proteasome inhibition by LU-102 in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib results in synergistic proteasome inhibition, activation of the unfolded protein response, and cytotoxicity, and overcomes bortezomib/carfilzomib resistance in myeloma cells in vitro. PMID:26069288

  8. Low occurrence of the new species Staphylococcus argenteus in a Staphylococcus aureus collection of human isolates from Belgium.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M A; Dodémont, M; Vandendriessche, S; Rottiers, S; Tribes, C; Roisin, S; de Mendonça, R; Nonhoff, C; Deplano, A; Denis, O

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus argenteus is a novel Staphylococcus species closely related to Staphylococcus aureus that has been recently described. In this study, we investigated the proportion and the characteristics of S. argenteus recovered from humans in Belgium. S. aureus. human isolates collected in Belgium from 2006 to 2015 (n = 1,903) were retrospectively characterised via the presence of non-pigmented colonies on chocolate agar, spa typing and rpoB sequencing to determine if some of them were in fact S. argenteus. Out of 73 strains non-pigmented on chocolate plates, 3 isolates (0.16 %) showed rpoB sequences, in addition to spa and sequence types (ST2250/t5787, ST2250/t6675, ST3240/t6675), related to S. argenteus. Two of them were methicillin-resistant, harbouring a SCCmec type IV. The three S. argenteus isolates carried genes (sak, scn) of the immune evasion cluster. This first Belgian nationwide analysis showed a low occurrence of S. argenteus. Further studies should be conducted to identify the distribution range and the clinical impact of this new species. PMID:27044019

  9. Re-evolution of the 2-phenylquinolines: ligand-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a potent new class of Staphylococcus aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors to combat antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Gosetto, Francesca; Iraci, Nunzio; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Massari, Serena; Sancineto, Luca; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Dimovska, Mirjana; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2013-06-27

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade the effects of antimicrobial agents that are substrates. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus efflux pump that confers reduced susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, biocides, and dyes, resulting in a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. In this work, a series of 2-phenylquinoline derivatives was designed by means of ligand-based pharmacophore modeling in an attempt to identify improved S. aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Most of the 2-phenylquinoline derivatives displayed potent EPI activity against the norA overexpressing strain SA-1199B. The antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin, when used in combination with some of the synthesized compounds, was completely restored in SA-1199B and SA-K2378, a strain overexpressing norA from a multicopy plasmid. Compounds 3m and 3q also showed potent synergistic activity with the ethidium bromide dye in a strain overexpressing the MepA MDR efflux pump. PMID:23710549

  10. Evolution from a natural flavones nucleus to obtain 2-(4-Propoxyphenyl)quinoline derivatives as potent inhibitors of the S. aureus NorA efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Gosetto, Francesca; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Kaatz, Glenn W; Patel, Diixa; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2011-08-25

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade the effects of substrate antimicrobial agents. Inhibition of such pumps is a promising strategy to circumvent this resistance mechanism. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus efflux pump that confers reduced susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, resulting in a multidrug resistant phenotype. In this work, a series of 2-phenyl-4(1H)-quinolone and 2-phenyl-4-hydroxyquinoline derivatives, obtained by modifying the flavone nucleus of known efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), were synthesized in an effort to identify more potent S. aureus NorA EPIs. The 2-phenyl-4-hydroxyquinoline derivatives 28f and 29f display potent EPI activity against SA-1199B, a strain that overexpresses norA, in an ethidium bromide efflux inhibition assay. The same compounds, in combination with ciprofloxacin, were able to completely restore its antibacterial activity against both S. aureus SA-K2378 and SA-1199B, norA-overexpressing strains. PMID:21751791

  11. Systematic Global Analysis of Genes Encoding Protein Phosphatases in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Fernanda dos Reis, Thaila; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Alowni, Raneem; Jones, Gary W.; Doyle, Sean; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo H.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that causes several invasive and noninvasive diseases named aspergillosis. This disease is generally regarded as multifactorial, considering that several pathogenicity determinants are present during the establishment of this illness. It is necessary to obtain an increased knowledge of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes. Protein phosphatases are essential to several signal transduction pathways. We identified 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit-encoding genes in A. fumigatus, of which we were able to construct 24 viable deletion mutants. The role of nine phosphatase mutants in the HOG (high osmolarity glycerol response) pathway was evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. We were also able to identify 11 phosphatases involved in iron assimilation, six that are related to gliotoxin resistance, and three implicated in gliotoxin production. These results present the creation of a fundamental resource for the study of signaling in A. fumigatus and its implications in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:25943523

  12. Augmenting the Activity of Monoterpenoid Phenols against Fungal Pathogens Using 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde that Target Cell Wall Integrity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong H; Chan, Kathleen L; Mahoney, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of cell wall integrity system should be an effective strategy for control of fungal pathogens. To augment the cell wall disruption efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols (carvacrol, thymol), antimycotic potency of benzaldehyde derivatives that can serve as chemosensitizing agents were evaluated against strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type (WT), slt2Δ and bck1Δ (mutants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase kinase, respectively, in the cell wall integrity pathway). Among fourteen compounds investigated, slt2Δ and bck1Δ showed higher susceptibility to nine benzaldehydes, compared to WT. Differential antimycotic activity of screened compounds indicated "structure-activity relationship" for targeting the cell wall integrity, where 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (2H4M) exhibited the highest antimycotic potency. The efficacy of 2H4M as an effective chemosensitizer to monoterpenoid phenols (viz., 2H4M + carvacrol or thymol) was assessed in yeasts or filamentous fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium) according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing or Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M38-A protocols, respectively. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory or fungicidal concentrations of the co-administered compounds. 2H4M also overcame the tolerance of two MAPK mutants (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ) of Aspergillus fumigatus to fludioxonil (phenylpyrrole fungicide). Collectively, 2H4M possesses chemosensitizing capability to magnify the efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols, which improves target-based (viz., cell wall disruption) antifungal intervention. PMID:26569223

  13. High osmolarity glycerol response PtcB phosphatase is important for Aspergillus fumigatus virulence.

    PubMed

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Brown, Neil Andrew; Rajendran, Ranjith; Ramage, Gordon; Bovier, Elodie; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Savoldi, Marcela; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that is capable of adapting to different host niches and to avoid host defenses. An enhanced understanding of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes is essential for the development of improved disease control strategies. Protein phosphatases are central to numerous signal transduction pathways. To comprehend the functions of protein phosphatases in A. fumigatus, 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit encoding genes were identified. We have recognized PtcB as one of the phosphatases involved in the high osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway. The ΔptcB mutant has both increased phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. The ΔptcB strain was more sensitive to cell wall damaging agents, had increased chitin and β-1,3-glucan, and impaired biofilm formation. The ΔptcB strain was avirulent in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results stress the importance of the HOG pathway in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in A. fumigatus. PMID:25597841

  14. Systematic Global Analysis of Genes Encoding Protein Phosphatases in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K; Dolan, Stephen K; Fernanda Dos Reis, Thaila; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Alowni, Raneem; Jones, Gary W; Doyle, Sean; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2015-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that causes several invasive and noninvasive diseases named aspergillosis. This disease is generally regarded as multifactorial, considering that several pathogenicity determinants are present during the establishment of this illness. It is necessary to obtain an increased knowledge of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes. Protein phosphatases are essential to several signal transduction pathways. We identified 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit-encoding genes in A. fumigatus, of which we were able to construct 24 viable deletion mutants. The role of nine phosphatase mutants in the HOG (high osmolarity glycerol response) pathway was evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. We were also able to identify 11 phosphatases involved in iron assimilation, six that are related to gliotoxin resistance, and three implicated in gliotoxin production. These results present the creation of a fundamental resource for the study of signaling in A. fumigatus and its implications in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:25943523

  15. Relations between short-range and long-range Ising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Maria Chiara; Parisi, Giorgio; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2014-06-01

    We perform a numerical study of the long-range (LR) ferromagnetic Ising model with power law decaying interactions (J ∝r-d-σ) on both a one-dimensional chain (d =1) and a square lattice (d =2). We use advanced cluster algorithms to avoid the critical slowing down. We first check the validity of the relation connecting the critical behavior of the LR model with parameters (d,σ) to that of a short-range (SR) model in an equivalent dimension D. We then study the critical behavior of the d =2 LR model close to the lower critical σ, uncovering that the spatial correlation function decays with two different power laws: The effect of the subdominant power law is much stronger than finite-size effects and actually makes the estimate of critical exponents very subtle. By including this subdominant power law, the numerical data are consistent with the standard renormalization group (RG) prediction by Sak [Phys. Rev. B 8, 281 (1973), 10.1103/PhysRevB.8.281], thus making not necessary (and unlikely, according to Occam's razor) the recent proposal by Picco [arXiv:1207.1018] of having a new set of RG fixed points in addition to the mean-field one and the SR one.

  16. Dissemination of Methicillin-Susceptible CC398 Staphylococcus aureus Strains in a Rural Greek Area

    PubMed Central

    Sarrou, Styliani; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Chasioti, Markella; Foka, Antigoni; Fthenakis, Georgios; Billinis, Charalampos; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Pantelidi, Kleoniki; Roussaki-Schulze, Angeliki; Lachanas, Vassilios; Makaritsis, Konstantinos; Skoulakis, Charalampos; Daikos, Georgios L.; Dalekos, Georgios; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Petinaki, Efthymia

    2015-01-01

    A large collection of Staphylococcus aureus including a. 745 clinically significant isolates that were consecutively recovered from human infections during 2012–2013, b. 19 methicillin-susceptible (MSSA), randomly selected between 2006–2011 from our Staphylococcal Collection, c. 16 human colonizing isolates, and d. 10 strains from colonized animals was investigated for the presence and the molecular characteristics of CC398. The study was conducted in Thessaly, a rural region in Greece. The differentiation of livestock-associated clade from the human clade was based on canSNPs combined with the presence of the φ3 bacteriophage and the tetM, scn, sak, and chp genes. Among the 745 isolates, two MRSA (0.8% of total MRSA) and thirteen MSSA (2.65% of total MSSA) were found to belong to CC398, while, between MSSA of our Staphylococcal Collection, one CC398, isolated in 2010, was detected. One human individual, without prior contact with animals, was found to be colonized by a MSSA CC398. No CC398 was identified among the 10 S. aureus isolated from animals. Based on the molecular markers, the 17 CC398 strains were equally placed in the livestock-associated and in the human clades. This is the first report for the dissemination of S. aureus CC398 among humans in Greece. PMID:25835293

  17. From phenothiazine to 3-phenyl-1,4-benzothiazine derivatives as inhibitors of the Staphylococcus aureus NorA multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Kaatz, Glenn W; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Brandini, David; Fravolini, Arnaldo

    2008-07-24

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade effects of substrate antimicrobial agents and inhibition of such pumps is a promising strategy to circumvent this resistance mechanism. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus multidrug efflux pump, the activity of which confers decreased susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, resulting in a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. In this work, a series of 1,4-benzothiazine derivatives were designed and synthesized as a minimized structural template of phenothiazine MDR efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) in an effort to identify more potent S. aureus NorA EPIs. Almost all derivatives evaluated showed good activity in combination with ciprofloxacin against S. aureus ATCC 25923; some were capable of completely restoring ciprofloxacin activity in a norA-overexpressing strain (SA-K2378). Compounds 6k and 7j displayed good activity against SA-1199B, a strain that also overexpresses norA, in an ethidium bromide (EtBr) efflux inhibition assay. PMID:18578473

  18. Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The National Energy Strategy Plan (NES) has called for 900,000 barrels/day production of heavy oil in the mid-1990s to meet our national needs. To achieve this goal, it is important that the Alaskan heavy oil fields be brought to production. Alaska has more than 25 billion barrels of heavy oil deposits. Conoco, and now BP Exploration have been producing from Schrader Bluff Pool, which is part of the super heavy oil field known as West Sak Field. Schrader Bluff reservoir, located in the Milne Point Unit, North Slope of Alaska, is estimated to contain up to 1.5 billion barrels of (14 to 21{degrees}API) oil in place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion; however, the primary recovery will be much smaller than expected. Hence, waterflooding will be implemented earlier than anticipated. The eventual use of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques, such as hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process, is vital for recovery of additional oil from this reservoir. The purpose of this research project was to determine the nature of miscible solvent slug which would be commercially feasible, to evaluate the performance of the hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug process, and to assess the feasibility of this process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir. The laboratory experimental work includes: slim tube displacement experiments and coreflood experiments. The components of solvent slug includes only those which are available on the North Slope of Alaska.

  19. Lysine-acetylation as a fundamental regulator of Ran function: Implications for signaling of proteins of the Ras-superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Knyphausen, Philipp; Kuhlmann, Nora; de Boor, Susanne; Lammers, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The small GTP-binding protein Ran is involved in the regulation of essential cellular processes in interphase but also in mitotic cells: Ran controls the nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins and RNA, it regulates mitotic spindle formation and nuclear envelope assembly. Deregulations in Ran dependent processes were implicated in the development of severe diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. To understand how Ran-function is regulated is therefore of highest importance. Recently, several lysine-acetylation sites in Ran were identified by quantitative mass-spectrometry, some being located in highly important regions such as the P-loop, switch I, switch II and the G5/SAK motif. We recently reported that lysine-acetylation regulates nearly all aspects of Ran-function such as RCC1 catalyzed nucleotide exchange, intrinsic nucleotide hydrolysis, its interaction with NTF2 and the formation of import- and export-complexes. As a hint for its biological importance, we identified Ran-specific lysine-deacetylases (KDACs) and -acetyltransferases (KATs). Also for other small GTPases such as Ras, Rho, Cdc42, and for many effectors and regulators thereof, lysine-acetylation sites were discovered. However, the functional impact of lysine-acetylation as a regulator of protein function has only been marginally investigated so far. We will discuss recent findings of lysine-acetylation as a novel modification to regulate Ras-protein signaling. PMID:26507377

  20. Augmenting the Activity of Monoterpenoid Phenols against Fungal Pathogens Using 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde that Target Cell Wall Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong H.; Chan, Kathleen L.; Mahoney, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of cell wall integrity system should be an effective strategy for control of fungal pathogens. To augment the cell wall disruption efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols (carvacrol, thymol), antimycotic potency of benzaldehyde derivatives that can serve as chemosensitizing agents were evaluated against strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type (WT), slt2Δ and bck1Δ (mutants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase kinase, respectively, in the cell wall integrity pathway). Among fourteen compounds investigated, slt2Δ and bck1Δ showed higher susceptibility to nine benzaldehydes, compared to WT. Differential antimycotic activity of screened compounds indicated “structure-activity relationship” for targeting the cell wall integrity, where 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (2H4M) exhibited the highest antimycotic potency. The efficacy of 2H4M as an effective chemosensitizer to monoterpenoid phenols (viz., 2H4M + carvacrol or thymol) was assessed in yeasts or filamentous fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium) according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing or Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M38-A protocols, respectively. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory or fungicidal concentrations of the co-administered compounds. 2H4M also overcame the tolerance of two MAPK mutants (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ) of Aspergillus fumigatus to fludioxonil (phenylpyrrole fungicide). Collectively, 2H4M possesses chemosensitizing capability to magnify the efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols, which improves target-based (viz., cell wall disruption) antifungal intervention. PMID:26569223

  1. Relations between short-range and long-range Ising models.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Maria Chiara; Parisi, Giorgio; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2014-06-01

    We perform a numerical study of the long-range (LR) ferromagnetic Ising model with power law decaying interactions (J∝r{-d-σ}) on both a one-dimensional chain (d=1) and a square lattice (d=2). We use advanced cluster algorithms to avoid the critical slowing down. We first check the validity of the relation connecting the critical behavior of the LR model with parameters (d,σ) to that of a short-range (SR) model in an equivalent dimension D. We then study the critical behavior of the d=2 LR model close to the lower critical σ, uncovering that the spatial correlation function decays with two different power laws: The effect of the subdominant power law is much stronger than finite-size effects and actually makes the estimate of critical exponents very subtle. By including this subdominant power law, the numerical data are consistent with the standard renormalization group (RG) prediction by Sak [Phys. Rev. B 8, 281 (1973)], thus making not necessary (and unlikely, according to Occam's razor) the recent proposal by Picco [arXiv:1207.1018] of having a new set of RG fixed points in addition to the mean-field one and the SR one. PMID:25019738

  2. The influence of chemical composition on the properties of Cepheid stars. I. Period-Luminosity relation vs. iron abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniello, M.; Primas, F.; Mottini, M.; Groenewegen, M.; Bono, G.; François, P.

    2005-01-01

    We have assessed the influence of the stellar iron content on the Cepheid Period-Luminosity (PL) relation by relating the V band residuals from the Freedman et al. (\\cite{fre01}) PL relation to [Fe/H] for 37 Galactic and Magellanic Clouds Cepheids. The iron abundances were measured from FEROS and UVES high-resolution and high-signal to noise optical spectra. Our data indicate that the stars become fainter as metallicity increases, until a plateau or turnover point is reached at about solar metallicity. Our data are incompatible with both no dependence of the PL relation on iron abundance, and with the linearly decreasing behavior often found in the literature (e.g. Kennicutt et al. \\cite{ken98}; Sakai et al. \\cite{sak04}). On the other hand, non-linear theoretical models of Fiorentino et al. (\\cite{fio02}) provide a fairly good description of the data. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at La Silla and Paranal Observatories under proposal ID 66.D-0571. Table \\ref{tab:log} is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  3. Geotourism Features of Sinop (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehra Seyyah, Memnune; Güngör, Yıldırım

    2016-04-01

    Sinop and its surrounding area presents pretty interesting geological formations formed between Trias and Quaternary. Permo-Trias aged Boyabat Metamorphites is found at the bottom. Above this formation, Jurassic aged Akgöl and Bürnük Formations and Lower Cretaceous aged İnaltı Formation comes. After these, respectively Çaǧlayan Formation, Upper Cretaceous aged Kaplanboǧazı, Yemişliçay, Hamsaros, Görsökü Formations is observed. These units are also overlaid by Paleocene aged Akveren Formation, Eocene aged Atbaşı, Sakızdaǧı Formations and Miocene aged Sinop Formation. Plio-Quaternary aged Sarıkum Formation is located on this sequence. Boyabat columnar basalts and Bedire Formation are the youngest formations of Sinop and its surrounding area. 
 In this geological sequence, columnar basalts, different forms of laminated rocks, fossil containing levels, various sedimentological processes, faults and folds located in laminated rocks, canyons which has been occurred related tectonism in the region, waterfalls run through fault steps take place among the important geotouristical pieces of Sinop and surroundings. In this study, it will be discussed how these geological features contribute to Sinop district that's most important source of income is tourism. 
 Key Words: Geological Heritage, Geopark, Geosite, Geotourism, Sinop

  4. Quantum oscillations in a bilayer with broken mirror symmetry: a minimal model for YBa2Cu3O6+δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharaj, Akash; Zhang, Yi; Ramshaw, Brad; Kivelson, Steven

    Using an exact numerical solution and semiclassical analysis, we investigate quantum oscillations (QOs) in a model of a bilayer system with an anisotropic (elliptical) electron pocket in each plane. Key features of QO experiments in the high temperature superconducting cuprate YBCO can be reproduced by such a model, in particular the pattern of oscillation frequencies (which reflect ``magnetic breakdown'' between the two pockets) and the polar and azimuthal angular dependence of the oscillation amplitudes. However, the requisite magnetic breakdown is possible only under the assumption that the horizontal mirror plane symmetry is spontaneously broken and that the bilayer tunneling, t⊥, is substantially renormalized from its `bare' value. Under the assumption that t⊥ = Z ~t⊥(0), where Z ~ is a measure of the quasiparticle weight, this suggests that Z ~ <~ 1 / 20 . Detailed comparisons with new YBa2Cu3O6.58 QO data, taken over a very broad range of magnetic field, confirm specific predictions made by the breakdown scenario. Supported in part by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515 (A.V.M.), the US DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences ``Science at 100 T,'' (B.J.R.) and the National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR 1265593 (S.A.K., YZ).

  5. Calcite solubility in supercritical CO 2H 2O fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jeremy B.; Walther, John V.

    1987-06-01

    An extraction-quench apparatus was used to measure calcite solubilities in supercritical CO 2H 2O mixtures. Experiments were conducted at 1 kbar and 2 kbar, between 240°C and 620°C and from XCO 2 = .02 toXCO 2 = .15 in order to determine the solubility behavior as a function of pressure, temperature and CO 2 content. The results indicate that calcite solubilities under these conditions behave similarly to previously investigated calcite solubilities at lower pressures and temperatures (SHARP and Kennedy, 1965). At constant XCO 2, the solubility increases with increasing pressure, but it decreases with increasing temperature. When the temperature and pressure are constant, the calcite solubility rises with increasing XCO 2 to a maximum value at XCO 2 between 0.02 and 0.05. For higher CO 2 contents, up to XCO 2 = .15, the calcite solubility decreases, probably due to the decrease of H 2O activities to values significantly below unity. The solubility behavior can be successfully modeled by making the assumption that Ca ++ is the dominant calcium species and that the carbon-bearing species are CO 2(aq) and HCO -3. Since for these dilute H 2OCO 2 fluids, all activity coefficients can be assumed to not differ significantly from unity, ionization constants for the reaction H 2O + CO 2(aq) H + + HCO -3 can be calculated at 1 and 2 kbar between 250°C and 550°C. These calculated values are in good agreement with the low temperature determinations of the ionization constants for this reaction determined by Read (1975). Values of the molal Gibbs free energy of CO 2(aq) obtained in our study exhibit a much greater positive departure from ideality than those calculated with the modified Redlich-Kwong equations of either Flowers (1979) or Kerrick and Jacobs (1981) for dilute CO 2 aqueous solutions.

  6. W-transform method for feature-oriented multiresolution image retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, M.K.; Lin, B.

    1995-07-01

    Image database management is important in the development of multimedia technology. Since an enormous amount of digital images is likely to be generated within the next few decades in order to integrate computers, television, VCR, cables, telephone and various imaging devices. Effective image indexing and retrieval systems are urgently needed so that images can be easily organized, searched, transmitted, and presented. Here, the authors present a local-feature-oriented image indexing and retrieval method based on Kwong, and Tang`s W-transform. Multiresolution histogram comparison is an effective method for content-based image indexing and retrieval. However, most recent approaches perform multiresolution analysis for whole images but do not exploit the local features present in the images. Since W-transform is featured by its ability to handle images of arbitrary size, with no periodicity assumptions, it provides a natural tool for analyzing local image features and building indexing systems based on such features. In this approach, the histograms of the local features of images are used in the indexing, system. The system not only can retrieve images that are similar or identical to the query images but also can retrieve images that contain features specified in the query images, even if the retrieved images as a whole might be very different from the query images. The local-feature-oriented method also provides a speed advantage over the global multiresolution histogram comparison method. The feature-oriented approach is expected to be applicable in managing large-scale image systems such as video databases and medical image databases.

  7. On the abundances of noble and biologically relevant gases in Lake Vostok, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mousis, Olivier; Lakhlifi, Azzedine; Picaud, Sylvain; Pasek, Matthew; Chassefière, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Motivated by the possibility of comparing theoretical predictions of Lake Vostok's composition with future in situ measurements, we investigated the composition of clathrates that are expected to form in this environment from the air supplied to the lake by melting ice. To establish the best possible correlation between the lake water composition and that of air clathrates formed in situ, we used a statistical thermodynamic model based on the description of the guest-clathrate interaction by a spherically averaged Kihara potential with a nominal set of potential parameters. We determined the fugacities of the different volatiles present in the lake by defining a "pseudo" pure substance dissolved in water owning the average properties of the mixture and by using the Redlich-Kwong equation of state to mimic its thermodynamic behavior. Irrespective of the clathrate structure considered in our model, we found that xenon and krypton are strongly impoverished in the lake water (a ratio in the 0.04-0.1 range for xenon and a ratio in the ≈ 0.15-0.3 range for krypton) compared to their atmospheric abundances. Argon and methane were also found to be depleted in the Lake Vostok water by factors in the 0.5-0.95 and 0.3-0.5 ranges, respectively, compared to their atmospheric abundances. On the other hand, the carbon dioxide abundance was found to be substantially enriched in the lake water compared to its atmospheric abundance (by a factor in the 1.6-5 range at 200 residence times). The comparison of our predictions of the CO2 and CH4 mole fractions in Lake Vostok with future in situ measurements will allow disentangling between the possible supply sources. PMID:23758192

  8. Cascade Storage and Delivery System for a Multi Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagoda, Evan; Swickrath, Michael; Stambaugh, Imelda

    2012-01-01

    NASA is developing a Multi Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The MMSEV is a pressurized vehicle used to extend the human exploration envelope for Lunar, Near Earth Object (NEO), and Deep Space missions. The Johnson Space Center is developing the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) for the MMSEV. The MMSEV s intended use is to support longer sortie lengths with multiple Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs) on a higher magnitude than any previous vehicle. This paper presents an analysis of a high pressure oxygen cascade storage and delivery system that will accommodate the crew during long duration Intra Vehicular Activity (IVA) and capable of multiple high pressure oxygen fills to the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) worn by the crew during EVAs. A cascade is a high pressure gas cylinder system used for the refilling of smaller compressed gas cylinders. Each of the large cylinders are filled by a compressor, but the cascade system allows small cylinders to be filled without the need of a compressor. In addition, the cascade system is useful as a "reservoir" to accommodate low pressure needs. A regression model was developed to provide the mechanism to size the cascade systems subject to constraints such as number of crew, extravehicular activity duration and frequency, and ullage gas requirements under contingency scenarios. The sizing routine employed a numerical integration scheme to determine gas compressibility changes during depressurization and compressibility effects were captured using the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation of state. A multi-dimensional nonlinear optimization routine was used to find the minimum cascade tank system mass that meets the mission requirements. The sizing algorithms developed in this analysis provide a powerful framework to assess cascade filling, compressor, and hybrid systems to design long duration vehicle ECLSS architecture. 1

  9. Development of functional imaging in the human brain (fMRI); the University of Minnesota experience

    PubMed Central

    Uğurbil, Kâmil

    2012-01-01

    The human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments performed in the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR), University of Minnesota, were planned between two colleagues who had worked together previously in Bell Laboratories in the late nineteen seventies, namely myself and Seiji Ogawa. These experiments were motivated by the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast developed by Seiji. We discussed and planned human studies to explore imaging human brain activity using the BOLD mechanism on the 4 Tesla human system that I was expecting to receive for CMRR. We started these experiments as soon as this 4 Tesla instrument became marginally operational. These were the very first studies performed on the 4 Tesla scanner in CMRR; had the scanner became functional earlier, they would have been started earlier as well. We had positive results certainly by August 1991 annual meeting of the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (SMRM) and took some of the data with us to that meeting. I believe, however, that neither the MGH colleagues nor us, at the time, had enough data and/or conviction to publish these extraordinary observations; it took more or less another six months or so before the papers from these two groups were submitted for publication within five days of each other to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, after rejections by Nature. Based on this record, it is fair to say that fMRI was achieved independently and at about the same time at MGH, in an effort credited largely to Ken Kwong, and in CMRR, University of Minnesota in an effort led by myself and Seiji Ogawa. PMID:22342875

  10. Real-time Kadanoff-Baym approach to nuclear response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, H. S.; Kwong, N. H.

    2016-03-01

    Linear density response functions are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter of normal density by time-evolving two-time Green's functions in real time. Of particular interest is the effect of correlations. The system is therefore initially time-evolved with a collision term calculated in a direct Born approximation until fully correlated. An external time-dependent potential is then applied. The ensuing density fluctuations are recorded to calculate the density response. This method was previously used by Kwong and Bonitz for studying plasma oscillations in a correlated electron gas. The energy-weighted sum-rule for the response function is guaranteed by using conserving self-energy insertions as the method then generates the full vertex-functions. These can alternatively be calculated by solving a Bethe -Salpeter equation as done in works by Bozek et al. The (first order) mean field is derived from a momentum-dependent (non-local) interaction while 2nd order self-energies are calculated using a particle-hole two-body effective (or residual) interaction given by a gaussian local potential. We show results of calculations of the response function S(ɷ,q0 ) for q0 = 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8fm -1. Comparison is made with the nucleons being un-correlated i.e. with only the first order mean field included. We discuss the relation of our work with the Landau quasi-particle theory as applied to nuclear systems by Babu and Brown and followers.

  11. Volume-translated cubic EoS and PC-SAFT density models and a free volume-based viscosity model for hydrocarbons at extreme temperature and pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Morreale, Bryan D.; Soong, Yee; Baled, Hseen O.; Enick, Robert M.; Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; McHugh, Mark A.

    2013-12-01

    This research focuses on providing the petroleum reservoir engineering community with robust models of hydrocarbon density and viscosity at the extreme temperature and pressure conditions (up to 533 K and 276 MPa, respectively) characteristic of ultra-deep reservoirs, such as those associated with the deepwater wells in the Gulf of Mexico. Our strategy is to base the volume-translated (VT) Peng–Robinson (PR) and Soave–Redlich–Kwong (SRK) cubic equations of state (EoSs) and perturbed-chain, statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) on an extensive data base of high temperature (278–533 K), high pressure (6.9–276 MPa) density rather than fitting the models to low pressure saturated liquid density data. This high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) data base consists of literature data for hydrocarbons ranging from methane to C{sub 40}. The three new models developed in this work, HTHP VT-PR EoS, HTHP VT-SRK EoS, and hybrid PC-SAFT, yield mean absolute percent deviation values (MAPD) for HTHP hydrocarbon density of ~2.0%, ~1.5%, and <1.0%, respectively. An effort was also made to provide accurate hydrocarbon viscosity models based on literature data. Viscosity values are estimated with the frictional theory (f-theory) and free volume (FV) theory of viscosity. The best results were obtained when the PC-SAFT equation was used to obtain both the attractive and repulsive pressure inputs to f-theory, and the density input to FV theory. Both viscosity models provide accurate results at pressures to 100 MPa but experimental and model results can deviate by more than 25% at pressures above 200 MPa.

  12. Regulation of expression of venom toxins: silencing of prothrombin activator trocarin D by AG-rich motifs.

    PubMed

    Han, Summer Xia; Kwong, Shiyang; Ge, Ruowen; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Woods, Anthony E; Blanchet, Guillaume; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2016-06-01

    Trocarin D (TroD), a venom prothrombin activator from Tropidechis carinatus, shares similar structure and function with blood coagulation factor Xa [Tropidechis carinatus FX (TrFX) a]. Their distinct physiologic roles are due to their distinct expression patterns. The genes of TroD and TrFX are highly similar, except for promoter and intron 1, indicating that TroD has probably evolved by duplication of FX, the plasma counterpart. The promoter insertion in TroD accounts for the elevated but not venom gland-specific expression. Here we examined the roles of 3 insertions and 2 deletions in intron 1 of TroD in the regulation of expression using luciferase as a reporter. By systematic deletions, we showed that a 209 bp region within the second insertion silences expression in mammalian and unmilked venom gland cells. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified 5 AG-rich motifs in this region. All except the 5th motif are important for silencing function. YY1, Sp3 and HMGB2 were identified to bind these AG-rich motifs and silence gene expression in mammalian cells. Similar AG-rich motif clusters are also found in other toxin genes but not in their physiologic counterparts. Thus, AG-rich motifs contribute to regulation of expression of TroD, and probably other toxin genes.-Han, S. X., Kwong, S., Ge, R., Kolatkar, P. R., Woods, A. E., Blanchet, G., Kini, R. M. Regulation of expression of venom toxins: silencing of prothrombin activator trocarin D by AG-rich motifs. PMID:26985007

  13. Development of functional imaging in the human brain (fMRI); the University of Minnesota experience.

    PubMed

    Uğurbil, Kâmil

    2012-08-15

    The human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments performed in the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR), University of Minnesota, were planned between two colleagues who had worked together previously in Bell Laboratories in the late nineteen seventies, namely myself and Seiji Ogawa. These experiments were motivated by the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast developed by Seiji. We discussed and planned human studies to explore imaging human brain activity using the BOLD mechanism on the 4 Tesla human system that I was expecting to receive for CMRR. We started these experiments as soon as this 4 Tesla instrument became marginally operational. These were the very first studies performed on the 4 Tesla scanner in CMRR; had the scanner become functional earlier, they would have been started earlier as well. We were aware of the competing effort at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and we knew that they had been informed of our initiative in Minneapolis to develop fMRI. We had positive results certainly by August 1991 annual meeting of the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (SMRM). I believe, however, that neither the MGH colleagues nor us, at the time, had enough data and/or conviction to publish these extraordinary observations; it took more or less another six months or so before the papers from these two groups were submitted for publication within five days of each other to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, after rejection by Nature in our case. Thus, fMRI was achieved independently and at about the same time at MGH, in an effort credited largely to Ken Kwong, and in CMRR, University of Minnesota in an effort led by myself and Seiji Ogawa. PMID:22342875

  14. A model of vapor-liquid equilibria for acid gas-alkanolamine-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Austgen, D.M. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A physico-chemical model was developed for representing liquid phase chemical equilibria and vapor-liquid (phase) equilibria of H{sub 2}SCO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water systems. The equilibrium composition of the liquid phase is determined by minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Activity coefficients are represented with the Electrolyte-NRTL equation treating both long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range binary interactions between liquid phase species. Vapor phase fugacity coefficients are calculated using the Redlich-Kwong-Soave Equation of State. Adjustable parameters of the model, binary interaction parameters and carbamate stability constants, were fitted on published binary system alkanolamine-water and ternary system (H{sub 2}S-alkanolamine-water, CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water) VLE data. The Data Regression System of ASPEN PLUS, based upon the Maximum Likelihood Principle, was used to estimate adjustable parameters. Ternary system measurements used in parameter estimation ranged in temperature from 25 to 120{degree}C in alkanolamine concentration from 1 to 5 M, in acid gas loading from 0 to 1.5 moles per mole alkanolamine, and in acid gas partial pressure from 0.1 to 1,000 kPa. Maximum likelihood estimates of ternary system H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} equilibrium partial pressures and liquid phase concentrations were found to be in good agreement with measurements for aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), diglycolamine (DGA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) indicating that the model successfully represents ternary system data. The model was extended to represent CO{sub 2} solubility in aqueous mixtures of MDEA with MEA or DEA. The solubility was measured at 40 and 80{degree}C over a wide range of CO{sub 2} partial pressures. These measurements were used to estimate additional binary parameters of the mixed solvent systems.

  15. A Comparison Between PSRK and GERG-2004 Equation of State for Simulation of Non-Isothermal Compressible Natural Gases Mixed with Hydrogen in Pipelines / Porównanie równań stanu opracowanych według metody PSRK oraz GERG-2004 wykorzystanych do symulacji zachowania ściśliwych mieszanin gazu ziemnego i wodoru w rurociągach, w warunkach przepływów nie-izotermicznych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uilhoorn, Frits E.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the GERG-2004 equation of state based on a multi-fluid approximation explicit in the reduced Helmholtz energy is compared with the predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong group contribution method. In the analysis, both equations of state are compared by simulating a non-isothermal transient flow of natural gas and mixed hydrogen-natural gas in pipelines. Besides the flow conditions also linepack-energy and energy consumption of the compressor station are computed. The gas flow is described by a set of partial differential equations resulting from the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. A pipeline section of the Yamal-Europe gas pipeline on Polish territory has been selected for the case study. W artykule dokonano porównania wyników uzyskanych przy wykorzystaniu równania stanu GERG- 2004 opartego na jawnym przybliżeniu wyników dla wielu cieczy w oparciu o zredukowaną energię Helmhotza oraz wyników uzyskanych w oparciu o metodę Soave-Redlich Kwonga. Obydwa równania stanu porównano poprzez przeprowadzenie symulacji stanów przejściowych przepływów gazu ziemnego oraz mieszanin gazu ziemnego i wodoru w rurociągach w warunkach przepływów nie-izotermicznych. Oprócz warunków przepływu, określono energię w napełnionym układzie oraz zużycie energii przez stację kompresora. Przepływ gazu opisano zbiorem równań różniczkowych cząstkowych, wyprowadzonych w oparciu o prawa zachowania masy, pędu i energii. Jako studium przypadku wybrano fragment rurociągu jamalskiego (Yamal- Europa) przebiegającego przez terytorium Polski.

  16. Development of an Advanced Simulator to Model Mobility Control and Geomechanics during CO{sub 2} Floods

    SciTech Connect

    Delshad, Mojdeh; Wheeler, Mary; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Pope, Gary

    2013-12-31

    The simulator is an isothermal, three-dimensional, four-phase, compositional, equation-of– state (EOS) simulator. We have named the simulator UTDOE-CO2 capable of simulating various recovery processes (i.e., primary, secondary waterflooding, and miscible and immiscible gas flooding). We include both the Peng-Robinson EOS and the Redlich-Kwong EOS models. A Gibbs stability test is also included in the model to perform a phase identification test to consistently label each phase for subsequent property calculations such as relative permeability, viscosity, density, interfacial tension, and capillary pressure. Our time step strategy is based on an IMPEC-type method (implicit pressure and explicit concentration). The gridblock pressure is solved first using the explicit dating of saturation-dependent terms. Subsequently, the material balance equations are solved explicitly for the total concentration of each component. The physical dispersion term is also included in the governing equations. The simulator includes (1) several foam model(s) for gas mobility control, (2) compositional relative permeability models with the hysteresis option, (3) corner point grid and several efficient solvers, (4) geomechanics module to compute stress field as the result of CO{sub 2} injection/production, (5) the format of commercial visualization software, S3graf from Science-soft Ltd., was implemented for user friendly visualization of the simulation results. All tasks are completed and the simulator was fully tested and delivered to the DOE office including a user’s guide and several input files and the executable for Windows Pcs. We have published several SPE papers, presented several posters, and one MS thesis is completed (V. Pudugramam, 2013) resulting from this DOE funded project.

  17. PFLOTRAN Simulation of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Single Waste Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H.; Hammond, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the deep geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. WIPP performance assessment (PA) calculations estimate the probability and consequence of potential radionuclide releases from the repository to the accessible environment arising from events and processes that could occur over the 10,000 year regulatory period. The conceptual model estimates three possible cases and the combinations of these cases: 1) undisturbed condition of the repository, 2) human borehole intrusion condition that penetrates the repository, and 3) human borehole intrusion that penetrates pressurized brine underlying the repository. To date, WIPP PA calculations have employed multiple two-dimensional (2D) numerical models requiring simplification of the mesh and processes including homogenization of materials and regions while maintaining volume aspect ratio. Introducing three-dimensional (3D) numerical models within WIPP PA enables increasingly realistic representations of the WIPP subsurface domain and improved flexibility for incorporating relevant features. PFLOTRAN is a state-of-art massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport code that will be implemented to enhance PA with more physically realistic 3D flow and transport models; eliminating the need for multiple related, but decoupled 2D models. This paper demonstrates PFLOTRAN simulation of a single waste panel of the WIPP undisturbed condition in 3D. The simulation also employs newly implemented WIPP specific functionalities to PFLOTRAN: 1) gas generation from the wastes, 2) creep closure of bedded salt formation, 3) fractures of marker beds near the excavation, 4) Klinkenberg effect on gas permeability in low-permeable materials, and 5) Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state for gas density.

  18. CFD analysis of straight and flared vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Aman Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Syamalendu S.

    2015-12-01

    Vortex tube (VT) is a simple low refrigeration producing device having no moving part. However, the flow inside it is very complex. Recent studies show that the performance of VT improves with the increase in the divergence angle of a flared VT. To explore the temperature separation phenomenon in the VT, a three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of VT has been carried out. For the present work, a VT having diameter of 12 mm, length of 120 mm, cold outlet diameter of 7 mm and hot outlet annulus of 0.4 mm with 6 straight rectangular nozzles having area of 0.5 sq. mm each is considered. The turbulence in the flow field of the VT is modeled by standard k-e turbulence model considering Redlich-Kwong real gas model. The effect of variation of divergence angle of hot tube in the VT is studied and compared with the experimental results available in the literature. The temperature separation between the hot outlet and cold outlet, in both straight and 2 degree flared tube is studied. Analysis results indicate that for a hot mass fraction above 0.5, the flared tube shows better cold production capacity compared to the straight tube. Effect of important parameters like temperature gradient, velocities (axial, radial and tangential), velocity gradients, effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of fluid etc., on heat transfer and shear work transfer in the VT have been investigated. To understand the temperature separation mechanism, heat transfer and work transfer along the axial direction have been evaluated in both straight and flared tubes. The isentropic efficiency and COP as a refrigerator as well as a heat pump of straight tube and flared tube have been computed.

  19. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of phenol degradation by a non-catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Sébastien; Boutin, Olivier; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Malleret, Laure; Faucherand, Rémy; Viand, Alain

    2011-08-01

    This work is dedicated to an accurate evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetics aspects of phenol degradation using wet air oxidation process. Phenol is a well known polluting molecule and therefore it is important having data of its behaviour during this process. A view cell is used for the experimental study, with an internal volume of 150 mL, able to reach pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 350°C. Concerning the thermodynamic phase equilibria, experimental and modelling results are obtained for different binary systems (water/nitrogen, water/air) and ternary system (water/nitrogen/phenol). The best model is the Predictive Soave Redlich Kwong one. This information is necessary to predict the composition of the gas phase during the process. It is also important for an implementation in a process simulation. The second part is dedicated to kinetics evaluation of the degradation of phenol. Different compounds have been detected using GC coupled with a MS. A kinetic scheme is deduced, taking into account the evolution of phenol, hydroquinones, catechol, resorcinol and acetic acid. The kinetic parameters are calculated for this scheme. These data are important to evaluate the evolution of the concentration of the different polluting molecules during the process. A simplified kinetic scheme, which can be easily implemented in a process simulation, is also determined for the direct degradation of phenol into H(2)O and CO(2). The Arrhenius law data obtained for the phenol disappearance are the following: k=1.8×10(6)±3.9×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) (pre-exponential factor) and E(a)=77±8 kJ mol(-1) (activation energy). PMID:21700312

  20. Separation of carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide gases using room-temperature ionic liquid (hmim)(Tf2N)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Yokozeki; Mark B. Shiflett

    2009-09-15

    To understand capturing and/or enhanced gaseous selectivity of industrial flue gases containing CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} using room-temperature ionic liquids, we have developed a ternary equation of state (EOS) model for a CO{sub 2}/SO{sub 2}/1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((hmim)(Tf2N)) system. The present model is based on a generic RK (Redlich-Kwong) EOS, with empirical binary interaction parameters of each binary system. These interaction parameters have been determined using our measured VLE (vapor-liquid-equilibrium) data for SO{sub 2}/(hmim)(Tf2N) and CO{sub 2}/(hmim)(Tf2N) and literature data for CO{sub 2}/SO{sub 2}. The validity of the present EOS has been checked by conducting ternary VLE experiments for the present system. With this EOS, isothermal ternary phase diagrams and solubility (VLE) behaviors have been calculated for various (T, P, and feed compositions) conditions. For large and equimolar CO{sub 2}/SO{sub 2} mole ratios, the gaseous selectivity is nearly independent of the amount of the ionic liquid addition. However, for small CO{sub 2}/SO{sub 2} mole ratios the addition of the ionic liquid significantly increases the selectivity. The strong absorption of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} in this ionic liquid may be practical for the simultaneous capture of these acid gases. 39 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Rotational spectroscopy and molecular structure of the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene-acetylene complex.

    PubMed

    Leung, Helen O; Marshall, Mark D; Grimes, David D

    2011-01-21

    Guided by ab initio calculations, Fourier transform microwave spectra in the 6-21 GHz region are obtained for seven isotopomers of the complex formed between 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene and acetylene. These include the four possible combinations of (35)Cl- and (37)Cl-containing CH(2)CClF with the most abundant acetylene isotopic modification, HCCH, and its H(13)C(13)CH analogue, as well as three singly substituted deuterated isotopomers. Analysis of the spectra determines the rotational constants and additionally, the complete chlorine quadrupole hyperfine coupling tensors in both the inertial and principal electric field gradient axis systems, and where appropriate, the diagonal components of the deuterium quadrupole coupling tensors. The inertial information contained in the rotational constants provides the structure for CH(2)CClF-HCCH: a primary, hydrogen bonding interaction existing between the HCCH donor and the F atom acceptor on the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene moiety, while a secondary interaction occurs between the acetylenic bond on the HCCH molecule and the H atom cis to the hydrogen-bonded F atom on the substituted ethylene, which causes the hydrogen bond to deviate from linearity. This is similar to the structure obtained for 1,1-difluoroethylene-HCCH [H. O. Leung and M. D. Marshall, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 154301 (2006)], and indeed, to within experimental uncertainty, the intermolecular interactions in CH(2)CClF-HCCH and its 1,1-difluoroethylene counterpart are practically indistinguishable, even though ab initio calculations at the MP2∕6-311G++(2d, 2p) level suggest that the former complex is more strongly bound. PMID:21261349

  2. A statistical approach to material classification using image patch exemplars.

    PubMed

    Varma, Manik; Zisserman, Andrew

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate material classification from single images obtained under unknown viewpoint and illumination. It is demonstrated that materials can be classified using the joint distribution of intensity values over extremely compact neighborhoods (starting from as small as 3 \\times 3 pixels square) and that this can outperform classification using filter banks with large support. It is also shown that the performance of filter banks is inferior to that of image patches with equivalent neighborhoods. We develop novel texton-based representations which are suited to modeling this joint neighborhood distribution for Markov random fields. The representations are learned from training images and then used to classify novel images (with unknown viewpoint and lighting) into texture classes. Three such representations are proposed and their performance is assessed and compared to that of filter banks. The power of the method is demonstrated by classifying 2,806 images of all 61 materials present in the Columbia-Utrecht database. The classification performance surpasses that of recent state-of-the-art filter bank-based classifiers such as Leung and Malik (IJCV 01), Cula and Dana (IJCV 04), and Varma and Zisserman (IJCV 05). We also benchmark performance by classifying all of the textures present in the UIUC, Microsoft Textile, and San Francisco outdoor data sets. We conclude with discussions on why features based on compact neighborhoods can correctly discriminate between textures with large global structure and why the performance of filter banks is not superior to that of the source image patches from which they were derived. PMID:19762929

  3. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Ethylene/Air Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation was studied within laminar premixed ethylene/air flames (C/O ratios of 0.78-0.98) stabilized on a flat-flame burner operating at atmospheric pressure. Measurements included soot volume fractions by both laser extinction and gravimetric methods, temperatures by multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscopy, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbons by gravimetric sampling. and velocities by laser velocimetry. These data were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary soot particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates were correlated successfully by predictions based on typical hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall. These results suavest that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time seen in the present and other similar flames were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease as a result of radiative heat losses. Primary soot particle nucleation rates exhibited variations with temperature and acetylene concentrations that were similar to recent observations for diffusion flames; however, nucleation rates in the premixed flames were significantly lower than in, the diffusion flames for reasons that still must be explained. Finally, predictions of yields of major gas species based on mechanisms from both Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt were in good agreement with present measurements and suggest that H atom concentrations (relevant to HACA mechanisms) approximate estimates based on local thermodynamic equilibrium in the present flames.

  4. Memory under pressure: secondary-task effects on contextual cueing of visual search.

    PubMed

    Annac, Efsun; Manginelli, Angela A; Pollmann, Stefan; Shi, Zhuanghua; Müller, Hermann J; Geyer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Repeated display configurations improve visual search. Recently, the question has arisen whether this contextual cueing effect (Chun & Jiang, 1998) is itself mediated by attention, both in terms of selectivity and processing resources deployed. While it is accepted that selective attention modulates contextual cueing (Jiang & Leung, 2005), there is an ongoing debate whether the cueing effect is affected by a secondary working memory (WM) task, specifically at which stage WM influences the cueing effect: the acquisition of configural associations (e.g., Travis, Mattingley, & Dux, 2013) versus the expression of learned associations (e.g., Manginelli, Langer, Klose, & Pollmann, 2013). The present study re-investigated this issue. Observers performed a visual search in combination with a spatial WM task. The latter was applied on either early or late search trials--so as to examine whether WM load hampers the acquisition of or retrieval from contextual memory. Additionally, the WM and search tasks were performed either temporally in parallel or in succession--so as to permit the effects of spatial WM load to be dissociated from those of executive load. The secondary WM task was found to affect cueing in late, but not early, experimental trials--though only when the search and WM tasks were performed in parallel. This pattern suggests that contextual cueing involves a spatial WM resource, with spatial WM providing a workspace linking the current search array with configural long-term memory; as a result, occupying this workspace by a secondary WM task hampers the expression of learned configural associations. PMID:24190911

  5. Systems Toxicology of Male Reproductive Development: Profiling 774 Chemicals for Molecular Targets and Adverse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Maxwell C.K.; Phuong, Jimmy; Baker, Nancy C.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Klinefelter, Gary R.; Martin, Matthew T.; McLaurin, Keith W.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Darney, Sally Perreault; Judson, Richard S.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumors, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias, which have been associated with prenatal environmental chemical exposure based on human and animal studies. Objective: In the present study we aimed to identify significant correlations between environmental chemicals, molecular targets, and adverse outcomes across a broad chemical landscape with emphasis on developmental toxicity of the male reproductive system. Methods: We used U.S. EPA’s animal study database (ToxRefDB) and a comprehensive literature analysis to identify 774 chemicals that have been evaluated for adverse effects on male reproductive parameters, and then used U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB) to profile their bioactivity across approximately 800 molecular and cellular features. Results: A phenotypic hierarchy of testicular atrophy, sperm effects, tumors, and malformations, a composite resembling the human testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) hypothesis, was observed in 281 chemicals. A subset of 54 chemicals with male developmental consequences had in vitro bioactivity on molecular targets that could be condensed into 156 gene annotations in a bipartite network. Conclusion: Computational modeling of available in vivo and in vitro data for chemicals that produce adverse effects on male reproductive end points revealed a phenotypic hierarchy across animal studies consistent with the human TDS hypothesis. We confirmed the known role of estrogen and androgen signaling pathways in rodent TDS, and importantly, broadened the list of molecular targets to include retinoic acid signaling, vascular remodeling proteins, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and cytochrome P450s. Citation: Leung MC, Phuong J, Baker NC, Sipes NS, Klinefelter GR, Martin MT, McLaurin KW, Setzer RW, Darney SP, Judson RS, Knudsen TB. 2016. Systems toxicology of male

  6. From Foreground to Background: How Task-Neutral Context Influences Contextual Cueing of Visual Search

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Xuelian; Geyer, Thomas; Assumpção, Leonardo; Müller, Hermann J.; Shi, Zhuanghua

    2016-01-01

    Selective attention determines the effectiveness of implicit contextual learning (e.g., Jiang and Leung, 2005). Visual foreground-background segmentation, on the other hand, is a key process in the guidance of attention (Wolfe, 2003). In the present study, we examined the impact of foreground-background segmentation on contextual cueing of visual search in three experiments. A visual search display, consisting of distractor ‘L’s and a target ‘T’, was overlaid on a task-neutral cuboid on the same depth plane (Experiment 1), on stereoscopically separated depth planes (Experiment 2), or spread over the entire display on the same depth plane (Experiment 3). Half of the search displays contained repeated target-distractor arrangements, whereas the other half was always newly generated. The task-neutral cuboid was constant during an initial training session, but was either rotated by 90° or entirely removed in the subsequent test sessions. We found that the gains resulting from repeated presentation of display arrangements during training (i.e., contextual-cueing effects) were diminished when the cuboid was changed or removed in Experiment 1, but remained intact in Experiments 2 and 3 when the cuboid was placed in a different depth plane, or when the items were randomly spread over the whole display but not on the edges of the cuboid. These findings suggest that foreground-background segmentation occurs prior to contextual learning, and only objects/arrangements that are grouped as foreground are learned over the course of repeated visual search. PMID:27375530

  7. Precession and accretion in circumbinary discs: the case of HD 104237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunhill, A. C.; Cuadra, J.; Dougados, C.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the disc around the young, eccentric stellar binary HD 104237. We find that the binary clears out a large cavity in the disc, driving a significant eccentricity at the cavity edge. This then precesses around the binary at a rate of dot{\\varpi } = 0.48°Tb^{-1}, which for HD 104237 corresponds to a precession period of 40 years. We find that the accretion pattern into the cavity and on to the binary changes with this precession, resulting in a periodic accretion variability driven purely by the physical parameters of the binary and its orbit. For each star we find that this results in order of magnitude changes in the accretion rate. We also find that the accretion variability allows the primary to accrete gas at a higher rate than the secondary for approximately half of each precession period. Using a large number of three-body integrations of test particles orbiting different binaries, we find good agreement between the precession rate of a test particle and our SPH disc precession. These rates also agree very well with the precession rates predicted by the analytic theory of Leung & Lee, showing that their prescription can be accurately used to predict long-term accretion variability time-scales for eccentric binaries accreting from a disc. We discuss the implications of our result, and suggest that this process provides a viable way of preserving unequal-mass ratios in accreting eccentric binaries in both the stellar and supermassive black hole regimes.

  8. The influences of harmony motives and implicit beliefs on conflict styles of the collectivist.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lena L

    2009-12-01

    The collectivist preference for nonconfrontational conflict styles is usually attributed to the influences of the Confucian value of harmony, which promotes tolerance of interpersonal transgression. Harmony has two distinct motives in collectivistic Asian societies (Leung, 1997 ): harmony enhancement is affective in nature and represents a genuine concern for relationship harmony, while disintegration avoidance is instrumental in nature and sees harmony maintenance as a means to other ends. Hence, as predicted, harmony enhancement is positively related to the use of integrating and compromising, while disintegration avoidance is positively related to the use of avoiding and obliging and is negatively related to the use of integrating during a conflict with a peer in a collectivistic society, Singapore. Besides examining this from a motivational perspective, the study also examines the role of implicit beliefs of personality on one's choice of conflict styles. The two implicit theories of personality refer to the two different assumptions the lay person has about the mutability of personal attributes; an entity theorist believes that personal attributes are fixed and nonmalleable qualities, while an incremental theorist sees personal attributes as qualities that can be developed and changed. Results reveal that incrementalist implicit beliefs also significantly predicted the use of integrating. Harmony enhancement represents a genuine concern for relationship harmony and involves feelings of closeness, unity, and trust. The finding that integrating is predicted by a harmony enhancement motivation suggests the importance of fostering collectivist values of interdependence and feelings of unity and trust so as to encourage the use of integrating to discuss the opposing views openly and constructively. The present study also underscores the benefit of learning an incremental theory to be open to the positive changes in others and work toward improving the relationship

  9. "Shifts in attention during mental fatigue: Evidence from subjective, behavioral, physiological, and eye-tracking data": Correction to Hopstaken et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Reports an error in "Shifts in attention during mental fatigue: Evidence from subjective, behavioral, physiological, and eye-tracking data" by Jesper F. Hopstaken, Dimitri van der Linden, Arnold B. Bakker, Michiel A. J. Kompier and Yik Kiu Leung (, 2016[Jun], Vol 42[6], 878-889). In the article, there were formatting errors in columns 1 through 8 of Table 2. The correct table is present in the erratum. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record .) There is an increasing amount of evidence that during mental fatigue, shifts in motivation drive performance rather than reductions in finite mental energy. So far, studies that investigated such an approach have mainly focused on cognitive indicators of task engagement that were measured during controlled tasks, offering limited to no alternative stimuli. Therefore it remained unclear whether during fatigue, attention is diverted to stimuli that are unrelated to the task, or whether fatigued individuals still focused on the task but were unable to use their cognitive resources efficiently. With a combination of subjective, EEG, pupil, eye-tracking, and performance measures the present study investigated the influence of mental fatigue on a cognitive task which also contained alternative task-unrelated stimuli. With increasing time-on-task, task engagement and performance decreased, but there was no significant decrease in gaze toward the task-related stimuli. After increasing the task rewards, irrelevant rewarding stimuli where largely ignored, and task engagement and performance were restored, even though participants still reported to be highly fatigued. Overall, these findings support an explanation of less efficient processing of the task that is influenced by motivational cost/reward tradeoffs, rather than a depletion of a finite mental energy resource. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27571023

  10. Do people's world views matter? The why and how.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sylvia Xiaohua; Lam, Ben C P; Wu, Wesley C H; Ng, Jacky C K; Buchtel, Emma E; Guan, Yanjun; Deng, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Over the past decades, personality and social psychologists have extensively investigated the role of self-views in individual functioning. Research on world views, however, has been less well studied due to overly specific conceptualizations, and little research about how and why they impact life outcomes. To answer why and how world views matter, we conducted 7 studies to examine the functions, antecedents, and consequences of generalized beliefs about the world, operationalized as social axioms (Leung et al., 2002). This research focused on 2 axiom factors, namely, social cynicism and reward for application. These axioms were found to explain individual differences in self-views over and above personality traits in Hong Kong and U.S. samples (Study 1) and to explain cultural differences in self-views in addition to self-construals among Mainland Chinese, Hong Kong Chinese, East Asian Canadians, and European Canadians (Study 2). Endorsement of social axioms by participants, their parents, and close friends was collected from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Canada to infer parental and peer influences on world views (Study 3). World views affected psychological well-being through the mediation of positive self-views across 3 age groups, including children, adolescents, and young adults (Study 4) and over time (Study 5). The mediation of negative self-views was through comparative self-criticism rather than internalized self-criticism (Study 6). Holistic thinking moderated the effect of social cynicism on self-views and psychological well-being (Study 7). These results converge to show that world views as a distal force and self-views as a proximal force matter in people's subjective evaluation of their lives. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26436843

  11. On-road remote sensing of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) vehicle emissions measurement and emission factors estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Z.; Chan, T. L.

    In the present study, the real-world on-road liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) vehicle/taxi emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) and nitric oxide (NO) were investigated. A regression analysis approach based on the measured LPG vehicle emission data was also used to estimate the on-road LPG vehicle emission factors of CO, HC and NO with respect to the effects of instantaneous vehicle speed and acceleration/deceleration profiles for local urban driving patterns. The results show that the LPG vehicle model years and driving patterns have a strong correlation to their emission factors. A unique correlation of LPG vehicle emission factors (i.e., g km -1 and g l -1) on different model years for urban driving patterns has been established. Finally, a comparison was made between the average LPG, and petrol [Chan, T.L., Ning, Z., Leung, C.W., Cheung, C.S., Hung, W.T., Dong, G., 2004. On-road remote sensing of petrol vehicle emissions measurement and emission factors estimation in Hong Kong. Atmospheric Environment 38, 2055-2066 and 3541] and diesel [Chan, T.L., Ning, Z., 2005. On-road remote sensing of diesel vehicle emissions measurement and emission factors estimation in Hong Kong. Atmospheric Environment 39, 6843-6856] vehicle emission factors. It has shown that the introduction of the replacement of diesel taxis to LPG taxis has alleviated effectively the urban street air pollution. However, it has demonstrated that proper maintenance on the aged LPG taxis should also be taken into consideration.

  12. Regulation and targeting of recombination in extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin switch region sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H; Maizels, N

    1994-01-01

    We have used extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin heavy-chain S mu and S gamma 3 switch region sequences to study activation and targeting of recombination by a transcriptional enhancer element. Substrates are transiently introduced into activated primary murine B cells, in which recombination involving S-region sequences deletes a conditionally lethal marker, and recombination is measured by transformation of Escherichia coli in the second step of the assay. Previously we found that as many as 25% of replicated substrates recombined during 40-h transfection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary cells and that efficient recombination was dependent on the presence of S-region sequences as well as a transcriptional activator region in the constructs (H. Leung and N. Maizels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:4154-4158, 1992). Here we show that recombination of the switch substrates is threefold more efficient in LPS-cultured primary B cells than in the T-cell line EL4; the activities responsible for switch substrate recombination thus appear to be more abundant or more active in cells which can carry out chromosomal switch recombination. We test the role of the transcriptional activator region and show that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain intron enhancer (E mu) alone stimulates recombination as well as E mu combined with a heavy-chain promoter and that mutations that diminish enhancer-dependent transcription 500-fold diminish recombinational activation less than 2-fold. These observations suggest that the enhancer stimulates recombination by a mechanism that does not depend on transcript production or that is insensitive to the level of transcript production over a very broad range. Furthermore, we find that E mu stimulates recombination when located either upstream or downstream of S mu but that the position of the recombinational activator does affect the targeting of recombination junctions, suggesting that the relatively imprecise targeting of

  13. Pollution from China increases cloud droplet number, suppresses rain over the East China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Bennartz, Ralph; Fan, Jiwen; Rausch, J; Leung, Lai-Yung R; Heidinger, Andrew K

    2011-05-18

    Rapid economic growth over the last 30 years in China has led to a significant increase in aerosol loading, which is mainly due to the increased emissions of its precursors such as SO2 and NOx. Here we show that these changes significantly affect wintertime clouds and precipitation over the East China Sea downwind of major emission sources. Satellite observations show an increase of cloud droplet number concentration from less than 200 cm-3 in the 1980s to more than 300 cm-3 in 2005. In the same time period, precipitation frequency reported by voluntary ship observers was reduced from more than 30% to less than 20% of the time. A back trajectory analysis showed the pollution in the investigation area to originate from the Shanghai-Nanjing and Jinan industrial areas. A model sensitivity study was performed, isolating the effects of changes in emissions of the aerosol precursors SO2 and NOx on clouds and precipitation using a state-of-the-art mesocale model including chemistry and aerosol indirect effects. Similar changes in cloud droplet number concentration over the East China Sea were obtained when the current industrial emissions in China were reduced to the 1980s levels. Simulated changes in precipitation were somewhat smaller than the observed changes but still significant. Citation: Bennartz, R., J. Fan, J. Rausch, L. R. Leung, and A. K. Heidinger (2011), Pollution from China increases cloud droplet number, suppresses rain over the East China Sea, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L09704, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL047235.

  14. A further assessment of the Hall-Rodriguez theory of latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hiu Tin; Killcross, A S; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2013-04-01

    The Hall-Rodriguez (G. Hall & G. Rodriguez, 2010, Associative and nonassociative processes in latent inhibition: An elaboration of the Pearce-Hall model, in R. E. Lubow & I. Weiner, Eds., Latent inhibition: Data, theories, and applications to schizophrenia, pp. 114-136, Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press) theory of latent inhibition predicts that it will be deepened when a preexposed target stimulus is given additional preexposures in compound with (a) a novel stimulus or (b) another preexposed stimulus, and (c) that deepening will be greater when the compound contains a novel rather than another preexposed stimulus. A series of experiments studied these predictions using a fear conditioning procedure with rats. In each experiment, rats were preexposed to 3 stimuli, 1 (A) taken from 1 modality (visual or auditory) and the remaining 2 (X and Y) taken from another modality (auditory or visual). Then A was compounded with X, and Y was compounded with a novel stimulus (B) taken from the same modality as A. A previous series of experiments (H. T. Leung, A. S. Killcross, & R. F. Westbrook, 2011, Additional exposures to a compound of two preexposed stimuli deepen latent inhibition, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, Vol. 37, pp. 394-406) compared A with Y, finding that A was more latently inhibited than Y, the opposite of what was predicted. The present experiments confirmed that A was more latently inhibited than Y, showed that this was due to A entering the compound more latently inhibited than Y, and finally, that a comparison of X and Y confirmed the 3 predictions made by the theory. PMID:23586536

  15. Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and molecular structure of the trans-1,2-difluoroethylene-hydrogen fluoride complex.

    PubMed

    Leung, Helen O; Marshall, Mark D; Amberger, Brent K

    2009-11-28

    Guided by ab initio calculations, Fourier transform microwave rotation spectra in the 6.5-22 GHz region are obtained for the complex formed between trans-1,2-difluoroethylene and hydrogen fluoride, including the normal isotopomer and two singly substituted (13)C species in natural abundance. Spectra are also obtained for the analogous three species formed using deuterium fluoride. Analysis of the spectra provides rotational and hyperfine constants that are used to determine a structure for trans-CHFCHF-HF. This structure is similar to that obtained for 1,1-difluoroethylene-HF [H. O. Leung et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 204301 (2009)] in that a primary, hydrogen bonding interaction exists between the HF donor and a F atom acceptor on the 1,2-difluoroethylene moiety, while a secondary interaction occurs between the F atom on the HF molecule and the H atom cis to the hydrogen-bonded F atom on the substituted ethylene and causes the hydrogen bond to deviate from linearity. Because the two F atoms and the two H atoms in trans-1,2-difluoroethylene form electrostatically equivalent pairs, the structure of the complex with HF provides insight into the contribution of steric effects to the observed geometries of fluoroethylene-protic acid complexes. A comparison of the observed hydrogen bond lengths and deviations from linearity in 1,1-difluoroethylene-HF and trans-1,2-difluoroethylene-HF suggests that the F atoms in trans-1,2-difluoroethylene are more nucleophilic than those in 1,1-difluoroethylene and that the H atoms are similarly more acidic. Ab initio calculations of electrostatic potentials mapped onto total electron density surfaces for these two molecules support these conclusions. PMID:19947675

  16. A self-consistent MoD-WM/MM structural refinement method: characterization of hydrogen bonding in the orytricha nova G-1uar

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, Enrique R; Newcomer, Micharel B; Raggin, Christina M; Gascon, Jose A; Loria, J Patrick; Batista, Victor S

    2008-01-01

    This paper generalizes the MoD-QM/MM hybrid method, developed for ab initio computations of protein electrostatic potentials [Gasc6n, l.A.; Leung, S.S.F.; Batista, E.R.; Batista, V.S. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2006,2, 175-186], as a practical algorithm for structural refinement of extended systems. The computational protocol involves a space-domain decomposition scheme for the formal fragmentation of extended systems into smaller, partially overlapping, molecular domains and the iterative self-consistent energy minimization of the constituent domains by relaxation of their geometry and electronic structure. The method accounts for mutual polarization of the molecular domains, modeled as Quantum-Mechanical (QM) layers embedded in the otherwise classical Molecular-Mechanics (MM) environment according to QM/MM hybrid methods. The method is applied to the description of benchmark models systems that allow for direct comparisons with full QM calculations, and subsequently applied to the structural characterization of the DNA Oxytricha nova Guanine quadruplex (G4). The resulting MoD-QM/MM structural model of the DNA G4 is compared to recently reported highresolution X-ray diffraction and NMR models, and partially validated by direct comparisons between {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts that are highly sensitive to hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions and the corresponding theoretical values obtained at the density functional theory DFT QM/MM (BH&H/6-31 G*:Amber) level in conjunction with the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method for the ab initio self consistent-field (SCF) calculation of NMR chemical shifts.

  17. Automatic tissue segmentation of breast biopsies imaged by QPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Nguyen, Tan; Kandel, Mikhail; Marcias, Virgilia; Do, Minh; Tangella, Krishnarao; Balla, Andre; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    The current tissue evaluation method for breast cancer would greatly benefit from higher throughput and less inter-observer variation. Since quantitative phase imaging (QPI) measures physical parameters of tissue, it can be used to find quantitative markers, eliminating observer subjectivity. Furthermore, since the pixel values in QPI remain the same regardless of the instrument used, classifiers can be built to segment various tissue components without need for color calibration. In this work we use a texton-based approach to segment QPI images of breast tissue into various tissue components (epithelium, stroma or lumen). A tissue microarray comprising of 900 unstained cores from 400 different patients was imaged using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy. The training data were generated by manually segmenting the images for 36 cores and labelling each pixel (epithelium, stroma or lumen.). For each pixel in the data, a response vector was generated by the Leung-Malik (LM) filter bank and these responses were clustered using the k-means algorithm to find the centers (called textons). A random forest classifier was then trained to find the relationship between a pixel's label and the histogram of these textons in that pixel's neighborhood. The segmentation was carried out on the validation set by calculating the texton histogram in a pixel's neighborhood and generating a label based on the model learnt during training. Segmentation of the tissue into various components is an important step toward efficiently computing parameters that are markers of disease. Automated segmentation, followed by diagnosis, can improve the accuracy and speed of analysis leading to better health outcomes.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-12-01

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. Coreflood, quarter 5-spot study, compositional simulation, wettability, relative permeability study and streamline-based simulation were conducted in this project. 1D compositional simulation results agree reasonably well with those of the slim tube experiments. Injection of CO{sub 2}-NGL is preferable over that of PBG-NGL. MME is sensitive to pressure (in the range of 1300-1800 psi) for the injection of PBG-NGL, but not for CO{sub 2}-NGL. Three hydrocarbon phases form in this pressure range. As the mean thickness of the adsorbed organic layer on minerals increases, the oil-water contact angle increases. The adsorbed organic films left behind after extraction of oil by common aromatic solvents used in core studies, such as toluene and decalin, are thinner than those left behind by non-aromatic solvents, such as cyclohexane. The force of adhesion for minerals aged with just the asphaltene fraction is similar to that of the whole oil implying that asphaltenes are responsible for the mixed-wettability in this reservoir. A new relative permeability model for a four-phase, mixed-wet system has been proposed. A streamline module is developed which can be incorporated in an existing finite-difference based

  19. Operational Challenges in Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) Transportation Through Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin A. Chukwu; Santanu Khataniar; Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

    2006-06-30

    Oil production from Alaskan North Slope oil fields has steadily declined. In the near future, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level (200,000 to 400,000 bbl/day) that maintaining economic operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) will require pumping alternative products through the system. Heavy oil deposits in the West Sak and Ugnu formations are a potential resource, although transporting these products involves addressing important sedimentation issues. One possibility is the use of Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) technology. Estimated recoverable gas reserves of 38 trillion cubic feet (TCF) on the North Slope of Alaska can be converted to liquid with GTL technology and combined with the heavy oils for a product suitable for pipeline transport. Issues that could affect transport of this such products through TAPS include pumpability of GTL and crude oil blends, cold restart of the pipeline following a prolonged winter shutdown, and solids deposition inside the pipeline. This study examined several key fluid properties of GTL, crude oil and four selected blends under TAPS operating conditions. Key measurements included Reid Vapor Pressure, density and viscosity, PVT properties, and solids deposition. Results showed that gel strength is not a significant factor for the ratios of GTL-crude oil blend mixtures (1:1; 1:2; 1:3; 1:4) tested under TAPS cold re-start conditions at temperatures above - 20 F, although Bingham fluid flow characteristics exhibited by the blends at low temperatures indicate high pumping power requirements following prolonged shutdown. Solids deposition is a major concern for all studied blends. For the commingled flow profile studied, decreased throughput can result in increased and more rapid solid deposition along the pipe wall, resulting in more frequent pigging of the pipeline or, if left unchecked, pipeline corrosion.

  20. Oral cancer malnutrition impacts weight and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Handschel, Jörg; Holtmann, Henrik; Krüskemper, Gertrud

    2015-04-01

    Diet is important for both quality of life (QoL) and survival of patients with oral cancer. Their intake of food is impeded by functional restrictions in chewing and swallowing. In the DÖSAK REHAB STUDY 1652 patients from 38 hospitals within the German-language area of Germany; Austria and Switzerland were examined with regard to functional and psychological variables having an impact on diet. Chewing and swallowing are correlated with mobility of the tongue and the mandible as well as opening of the mouth. Thirty five percent of the patients lost weight; 41% maintained their weight and 24% gained weight. The QoL of patients who were able to maintain their weight and of those who gained weight was significantly better than that of patients who lost weight. A normal diet was important for maintaining weight. Mashed food; liquid food and loss of appetite were closely associated with loss of weight; although it was possible for nutritional counseling and dietary support to be implemented particularly favorably in this respect. Due to problems with eating patients' strength deteriorated; thus restricting activity. Radiotherapy had a negative impact on diet and weight. It influenced sense of taste; dryness of the mouth; swelling and discomfort when ingesting food. Pain and scars in the region of the operation also cause patients to dislike hard; spicy and sour food. Support from a nutritional counselor in implementing a calorie-rich diet remedied this and such support needs to be integrated into patient management. The fact that a poor nutritional status is of such great importance is well-known; but what is often lacking is the systematic implementation of continued professional nutritional counseling over a long period of time; weight control and psycho-social support of the operated patients; particularly those who also have had radiotherapy. PMID:25825828

  1. Oral Cancer Malnutrition Impacts Weight and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Handschel, Jörg; Holtmann, Henrik; Krüskemper, Gertrud

    2015-01-01

    Diet is important for both quality of life (QoL) and survival of patients with oral cancer. Their intake of food is impeded by functional restrictions in chewing and swallowing. In the DÖSAK REHAB STUDY 1652 patients from 38 hospitals within the German-language area of Germany; Austria and Switzerland were examined with regard to functional and psychological variables having an impact on diet. Chewing and swallowing are correlated with mobility of the tongue and the mandible as well as opening of the mouth. Thirty five percent of the patients lost weight; 41% maintained their weight and 24% gained weight. The QoL of patients who were able to maintain their weight and of those who gained weight was significantly better than that of patients who lost weight. A normal diet was important for maintaining weight. Mashed food; liquid food and loss of appetite were closely associated with loss of weight; although it was possible for nutritional counseling and dietary support to be implemented particularly favorably in this respect. Due to problems with eating patients’ strength deteriorated; thus restricting activity. Radiotherapy had a negative impact on diet and weight. It influenced sense of taste; dryness of the mouth; swelling and discomfort when ingesting food. Pain and scars in the region of the operation also cause patients to dislike hard; spicy and sour food. Support from a nutritional counselor in implementing a calorie-rich diet remedied this and such support needs to be integrated into patient management. The fact that a poor nutritional status is of such great importance is well-known; but what is often lacking is the systematic implementation of continued professional nutritional counseling over a long period of time; weight control and psycho-social support of the operated patients; particularly those who also have had radiotherapy. PMID:25825828

  2. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant and Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type (CC)1 in European Farmed Animals: High Genetic Relatedness of Isolates from Italian Cattle Herds and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Patricia; Feltrin, Fabiola; Cordaro, Gessica; Porrero, María Concepción; Kraushaar, Britta; Argudín, María Angeles; Nykäsenoja, Suvi; Monaco, Monica; Stegger, Marc; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Sequence Type (ST)1, Clonal Complex(CC)1, SCCmec V is one of the major Livestock-Associated (LA-) lineages in pig farming industry in Italy and is associated with pigs in other European countries. Recently, it has been increasingly detected in Italian dairy cattle herds. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences between ST1 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from cattle and pig herds in Italy and Europe and human isolates. Sixty-tree animal isolates from different holdings and 20 human isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa-typing, SCCmec typing, and by micro-array analysis for several virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and strain/host-specific marker genes. Three major PFGE clusters were detected. The bovine isolates shared a high (≥90% to 100%) similarity with human isolates and carried the same SCCmec type IVa. They often showed genetic features typical of human adaptation or present in human-associated CC1: Immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes sak and scn, or sea; sat and aphA3-mediated aminoglycoside resistance. Contrary, typical markers of porcine origin in Italy and Spain, like erm(A) mediated macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB, and of vga(A)-mediated pleuromutilin resistance were always absent in human and bovine isolates. Most of ST(CC)1 MRSA from dairy cattle were multidrug-resistant and contained virulence and immunomodulatory genes associated with full capability of colonizing humans. As such, these strains may represent a greater human hazard than the porcine strains. The zoonotic capacity of CC1 LA-MRSA from livestock must be taken seriously and measures should be implemented at farm-level to prevent spill-over. PMID:26322785

  3. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases BcPtpA and BcPtpB in regulation of vegetative development, virulence and multi-stress tolerance in Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianqian; Yu, Fangwei; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation have emerged as fundamentally important mechanisms of signal transduction and regulation in eukaryotic cells, governing many processes, but little has been known about their functions in filamentous fungi. In this study, we deleted two putative protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) genes (BcPTPA and BcPTPB) in Botrytis cinerea, encoding the orthologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ptp2 and Ptp3, respectively. Although BcPtpA and BcPtpB have opposite functions in conidiation, they are essential for sclerotial formation in B. cinerea. BcPTPA and BcPTPB deletion mutants ΔBcPtpA-10 and ΔBcPtpB-4 showed significantly increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses, and to cell wall damaging agents. Inoculation tests showed that both mutants exhibited dramatically decreased virulence on tomato leaves, apples and grapes. In S. cerevisiae, it has been shown that Ptp2 and Ptp3 negatively regulate the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway and the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway. Although both BcPtpA and BcPtpB were able to inactive Hog1 and Mpk1 in S. cerevisiae, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, they positively regulate phosphorylation of BcSak1 (the homologue of Hog1) and BcBmp3 (the homologue of Mpk1) in B. cinerea under stress conditions. These results demonstrated that functions of PTPs in B. cinerea are different from those in S. cerevisiae, and BcPtpA and BcPtpB play important roles in regulation of vegetative development, virulence and in adaptation to oxidative, osmotic and cell-wall damage stresses in B. cinerea. PMID:23585890

  4. DNA microarray analysis of Staphylococcus aureus causing bloodstream infection: bacterial genes associated with mortality?

    PubMed

    Blomfeldt, A; Aamot, H V; Eskesen, A N; Monecke, S; White, R A; Leegaard, T M; Bjørnholt, J V

    2016-08-01

    Providing evidence for microbial genetic determinants' impact on outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (SABSI) is challenging due to the complex and dynamic microbe-host interaction. Our recent population-based prospective study reported an association between the S. aureus clonal complex (CC) 30 genotype and mortality in SABSI patients. This follow-up investigation aimed to examine the genetic profiles of the SABSI isolates and test the hypothesis that specific genetic characteristics in S. aureus are associated with mortality. SABSI isolates (n = 305) and S. aureus CC30 isolates from asymptomatic nasal carriers (n = 38) were characterised by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. Fisher's exact test, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and elastic net regressions were performed to discern within four groups defined by patient outcome and characteristics. No specific S. aureus genetic determinants were found to be associated with mortality in SABSI patients. By applying LASSO and elastic net regressions, we found evidence suggesting that agrIII and cna were positively and setC (=selX) and seh were negatively associated with S. aureus CC30 versus non-CC30 isolates. The genes chp and sak, encoding immune evasion molecules, were found in higher frequencies in CC30 SABSI isolates compared to CC30 carrier isolates, indicating a higher virulence potential. In conclusion, no specific S. aureus genes were found to be associated with mortality by DNA microarray analysis and state-of-the-art statistical analyses. The next natural step is to test the hypothesis in larger samples with higher resolution methods, like whole genome sequencing. PMID:27177754

  5. Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Annual report, January 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1995-07-01

    Alaska is the second largest oil producing state in the nation and currently contributes nearly 24% of the nations oil production. It is imperative that Alaskan heavy oil fields be brought into production. Schrader Bluff reservoir, located in the Milne Point Unit, which is part of the heavy oil field known as West Sak is estimated to contain 1.5 billion barrels of (14 to 21 degree API) oil-in-place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion. The eventual implementation of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques will be vital for the recovery of additional oil from this reservoir. The availability of hydrocarbon gases (solvents) on the Alaska North Slope make the hydrocarbon miscible solvent injection process an important consideration for the EOR project in Schrader Bluff reservoir. Since Schrader Bluff oil is heavy and viscous, a water-alternating-gas (WAG) type of process for oil recovery is appropriate since such a process tends to derive synergetic benefits from both water injection (which provides mobility control and improvement in sweep efficiency) and miscible gas injection (which provides improved displacement efficiency). A miscible solvent slug injection process rather than continuous solvent injection is considered appropriate. Slim tube displacement studies, PVT data and asphaltene precipitation studies are needed for Schrader bluff heavy oil to define possible hydrocarbon solvent suitable for miscible solvent slug displacement process. Coreflood experiments are also needed to determine the effect of solvent slug size, WAG ratio and solvent composition on the recovery and solvent breakthrough. A compositional reservoir simulation study will be conducted later to evaluate the complete performance of the hydrocarbon solvent slug process and to assess the feasibility of this process for improving recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir.

  6. Wilson's disease: An Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Taly, A B; Prashanth, L K; Sinha, S

    2009-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disease involving a defect of copper transport by the hepatic lysosomes. It leads to excess copper deposition in the liver, the brain, the kidneys and the skeletal system, affecting most commonly children or young adults and running an invariably fatal course if not adequately treated by de-coppering therapy. The last century has witnessed several changes, notable among these are: Increased awareness, improved diagnostic facilities leading to earlier recognition even in the pre-symptomatic phase, clear distinction from its mimics, aggressive therapeutic approaches owing to availability of effective treatment and an overall reduction in the morbidity and mortality. It is widely acknowledged that the disease is not as rare as once believed. Sir SAK Wilson published his landmark article in 1912, but it was only in 1968 that the first patient of WD was reported from our country. Publications from India on WD have focused on phenotypic characterization, documentations of lesser recognized aspects of the disease e.g. seizures, behavior abnormality, speech and cognitive impairment, sub-clinical affection of visual pathway, heart and autonomic function and pre-symptomatic detection. Attempts have been made to understand the clinical heterogeneity of the disease through identification of biochemical and immunological markers, magnetic resonance imaging, neuropathological study and genetic analysis for novel and/or known mutations. Assessment of impairment and severity and effect of various therapeutic interventions namely zinc sulphate on the long-term outcome and quality of life have also been studied. Nevertheless, clinicians often face difficulties in long-term care of these patients. Diagnostic errors leading to delay in diagnosis and initiation of treatment are common, even in patients with positive family history. There is no consensus regarding therapeutic protocols since the use of penicillamine, once a 'gold standard

  7. Characterization of gprK Encoding a Putative Hybrid G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mun-Gu; Kim, Sung Su; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most varied collection of membrane embedded proteins that are sensitized by ligand binding and interact with heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite their presumed critical roles in fungal biology, the functions of the GPCR family members in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are largely unknown, as only two (GprC and GprD) of the 15 predicted GPCRs have been studied. Here, we characterize the gprK gene, which is predicted to encode a hybrid GPCR with both 7-transmembrane and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) domains. The deletion of gprK causes severely impaired asexual development coupled with reduced expression of key developmental activators. Moreover, ΔgprK results in hyper-activation of germination even in the absence of carbon source, and elevated expression and activity of the protein kinase A PkaC1. Furthermore, proliferation of the ΔgprK mutant is restricted on the medium when pentose is the sole carbon source, suggesting that GprK may function in external carbon source sensing. Notably, the absence of gprK results in reduced tolerance to oxidative stress and significantly lowered mRNA levels of the stress-response associated genes sakA and atfA. Activities of catalases and SODs are severely decreased in the ΔgprK mutant, indicating that GprK may function in proper activation of general stress response. The ΔgprK mutant is also defective in gliotoxin (GT) production and slightly less virulent toward the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Transcriptomic studies reveal that a majority of transporters are down-regulated by ΔgprK. In summary, GprK is necessary for proper development, GT production, and oxidative stress response, and functions in down-regulating the PKA-germination pathway. PMID:27584150

  8. Expression of modified gene encoding functional human alpha-1-antitrypsin protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Singh, Rahul; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2008-10-01

    Transgenic plants offer promising alternative for large scale, sustainable production of safe, functional, recombinant proteins of therapeutic and industrial importance. Here, we report the expression of biologically active human alpha-1-antitrypsin in transgenic tomato plants. The 1,182 bp cDNA sequence of human AAT was strategically designed, modified and synthesized to adopt codon usage pattern of dicot plants, elimination of mRNA destabilizing sequences and modifications around 5' and 3' flanking regions of the gene to achieve high-level regulated expression in dicot plants. The native signal peptide sequence was substituted with modified signal peptide sequence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pathogenesis related protein PR1a, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamineA and with dicot-preferred native signal peptide sequence of AAT gene. A dicot preferred translation initiation context sequence, 38 bp alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated region were incorporated at 5' while an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (KDEL) was incorporated at 3' end of the gene. The modified gene was synthesized by PCR based method using overlapping oligonucleotides. Tomato plants were genetically engineered by nuclear transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring three different constructs pPAK, pSAK and pNAK having modified AAT gene with different signal peptide sequences under the control of CaMV35S duplicated enhancer promoter. Promising transgenic plants expressing recombinant AAT protein upto 1.55% of total soluble leaf protein has been developed and characterized. Plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein with molecular mass of around approximately 50 kDa was biologically active, showing high specific activity and efficient inhibition of elastase activity. The enzymatic deglycosylation established proper glycosylation of the plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein in contrast to unglycosylated rAAT expressed in E. coli ( approximately 45 kDa). Our results demonstrate

  9. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant and Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type (CC)1 in European Farmed Animals: High Genetic Relatedness of Isolates from Italian Cattle Herds and Humans.

    PubMed

    Alba, Patricia; Feltrin, Fabiola; Cordaro, Gessica; Porrero, María Concepción; Kraushaar, Britta; Argudín, María Angeles; Nykäsenoja, Suvi; Monaco, Monica; Stegger, Marc; Aarestrup, Frank M; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Sequence Type (ST)1, Clonal Complex(CC)1, SCCmec V is one of the major Livestock-Associated (LA-) lineages in pig farming industry in Italy and is associated with pigs in other European countries. Recently, it has been increasingly detected in Italian dairy cattle herds. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences between ST1 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from cattle and pig herds in Italy and Europe and human isolates. Sixty-tree animal isolates from different holdings and 20 human isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa-typing, SCCmec typing, and by micro-array analysis for several virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and strain/host-specific marker genes. Three major PFGE clusters were detected. The bovine isolates shared a high (≥90% to 100%) similarity with human isolates and carried the same SCCmec type IVa. They often showed genetic features typical of human adaptation or present in human-associated CC1: Immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes sak and scn, or sea; sat and aphA3-mediated aminoglycoside resistance. Contrary, typical markers of porcine origin in Italy and Spain, like erm(A) mediated macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB, and of vga(A)-mediated pleuromutilin resistance were always absent in human and bovine isolates. Most of ST(CC)1 MRSA from dairy cattle were multidrug-resistant and contained virulence and immunomodulatory genes associated with full capability of colonizing humans. As such, these strains may represent a greater human hazard than the porcine strains. The zoonotic capacity of CC1 LA-MRSA from livestock must be taken seriously and measures should be implemented at farm-level to prevent spill-over. PMID:26322785

  10. Effects of Alternative Fuels and Aromatics on Gas-Turbine Particle Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, K. L., II; Moore, R.; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.; Klettlinger, J. L.; Ross, R. C.; Surgenor, A.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes experiments conducted with a Honeywell GTCP36-150 Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) to evaluate the effects of varying fuel composition on particle emissions. The APU uses a single-stage compressor stage, gas turbine engine with a can-type combustor to generate bypass flow and electrical power for supporting small aircraft and helicopters. It is installed in a "hush-house" at NASA Glenn Research Center and is configured as a stand-alone unit that can be fueled from an onboard tank or external supply. It operates at constant RPM, but its fuel flow can be varied by changing the electrical load or volume of bypass flow. For these tests, an external bank of resistors were attached to the APU's DC and AC electrical outlets and emissions measurements were made at low, medium and maximum electrical current loads. Exhaust samples were drawn from several points downstream in the exhaust duct and fed to an extensive suite of gas and aerosol sensors installed within a mobile laboratory parked nearby. Aromatic- and sulfur-free synthetic kerosenes from Rentech, Gevo, UOP, Amyris and Sasol were tested and their potential to reduce PM emissions evaluated against a single Jet A1 base fuel. The role of aromatic compounds in regulating soot emissions was also evaluated by adding metered amounts of aromatic blends (Aro-100, AF-Blend, SAK) and pure compounds (tetracontane and 1-methylnaphthalene) to a base alternative fuel (Sasol). Results show that, relative to Jet A1, alternative fuels reduce nonvolatile particle number emissions by 50-80% and--by virtue of producing much smaller particles—mass emissions by 65-90%; fuels with the highest hydrogen content produced the greatest reductions. Nonvolatile particle emissions varied in proportion to fuel aromatic content, with additives containing the most complex ring structures producing the greatest emission enhancements.

  11. Intramanchette transport (IMT): managing the making of the spermatid head, centrosome, and tail.

    PubMed

    Kierszenbaum, Abraham L

    2002-09-01

    Intramanchette transport (IMT) and intraflagellar transport (IFT) share similar molecular components: a raft protein complex transporting cargo proteins mobilized along microtubules by molecular motors. IFT, initially discovered in flagella of Chlamydomonas, has been also observed in cilia of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans and in mouse ciliated and flagellated cells. IFT has been defined as the mechanism by which protein raft components (also called IFT particles) are displaced between the flagellum and the plasma membrane in the anterograde direction by kinesin-II and in the retrograde direction by cytoplasmic dynein 1b. Mutation of the gene Tg737, encoding one of the components of the raft protein complex, designated Polaris in the mouse and IFT88 in both Chlamydomonas and mouse, results in defective ciliogenesis and flagellar development as well as asymmetry in left-right axis determination. Polaris/IFT88 is detected in the manchette of mouse and rat spermatids. Indications of an IMT mechanism originated from the finding that two proteins associated with the manchette (Sak57/K5 and TBP-1, the latter a component of the 26S proteasome) repositioned to the centrosome and sperm tail once the manchette disassembled. IMT has the features of the IFT machinery but, in addition, facilitates nucleocytoplasmic exchange activities during spermiogenesis. An example is Ran, a small GTPase present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of round spermatids and in the manchette of elongating spermatids. Upon disassembly of the manchette, Ran GTPase is found in the centrosome region of elongating spermatids. Because defective molecular motors and raft proteins result in defective flagella, cilia, and cilia-containing photoreceptor cells in the retina, IMT and IFT are emerging as essential mechanisms for managing critical aspects of sperm development. Details of specific role of Ran GTPase in nucleocytoplasmic transport and its relocation from the manchette to the centrosome to the sperm

  12. Ambient Fine Particulate Matter and Mortality among Survivors of Myocardial Infarction: Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Burnett, Richard T.; Copes, Ray; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Villeneuve, Paul J.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Brook, Robert D.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Jerrett, Michael; Martin, Randall V.; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Kopp, Alexander; Tu, Jack V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Survivors of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are at increased risk of dying within several hours to days following exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. Little is known, however, about the influence of long-term (months to years) air pollution exposure on survival after AMI. Objective: We conducted a population-based cohort study to determine the impact of long-term exposure to fine particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) on post-AMI survival. Methods: We assembled a cohort of 8,873 AMI patients who were admitted to 1 of 86 hospital corporations across Ontario, Canada in 1999–2001. Mortality follow-up for this cohort extended through 2011. Cumulative time-weighted exposures to PM2.5 were derived from satellite observations based on participants’ annual residences during follow-up. We used standard and multilevel spatial random-effects Cox proportional hazards models and adjusted for potential confounders. Results: Between 1999 and 2011, we identified 4,016 nonaccidental deaths, of which 2,147 were from any cardiovascular disease, 1,650 from ischemic heart disease, and 675 from AMI. For each 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR10) of nonaccidental mortality was 1.22 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.45]. The association with PM2.5 was robust to sensitivity analyses and appeared stronger for cardiovascular-related mortality: ischemic heart (HR10 = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.83) and AMI (HR10 = 1.64; 95% CI: 1.13, 2.40). We estimated that 12.4% of nonaccidental deaths (or 497 deaths) could have been averted if the lowest measured concentration in an urban area (4 μg/m3) had been achieved at all locations over the course of the study. Conclusions: Long-term air pollution exposure adversely affects the survival of AMI patients. Citation: Chen H, Burnett RT, Copes R, Kwong JC, Villeneuve PJ, Goldberg MS, Brook RD, van Donkelaar A, Jerrett M, Martin RV, Brook JR, Kopp A, Tu JV. 2016. Ambient fine

  13. Equation of State for thermodynamic equilibrium of gas mixtures and brines to allow simulation of the effects of impurities in CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziabakhshganji, Z.; Kooi, H.

    2012-04-01

    Comprehensive understanding and prediction of chemical, reactive processes during and following injection of CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs and saline aquifers is important for the assessment of the performance and impacts of planned and existing Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects. Over the last decade significant improvements have been made in numerical modelling of the complex, coupled processes involved. Among the many remaining issues where progress is still called for, is the consistent simulation of impacts of gas mixtures. In particular the presence of 'impurities' or 'co-contaminants' in the injected CO2 stream that are retained from the original flue-gases, such as H2S, SO2, have the potential, upon dissolution in the pore water, to alter aqueous and water-mineral reactions. Moreover, presence of these and other injected or in-situ (CH4) gases affect CO2 solubility and thermodynamic properties of the fluid and gas phases, which, in turn, impact transport processes. To be able to evaluate the impact of gas mixtures on these processes, a new non-iterative Equation of State (EOS) has been developed which allows accurate and efficient modelling of thermodynamic equilibrium of gas mixtures and brines over a large range of pressure, temperature and salinity conditions. Presently the model includes CO2, SO2, H2S, CH4 and N2. This model is based on equating the chemical potentials in the system, using the modified Redlich-Kwong EOS to calculate the fugacity of the gas phase. Preliminary analysis shows, for instance, that CO2 solubility is most sensitive to CH4 admixture and least sensitive to the presence of SO2 in the injected gas mixture. The model design/approach will be outlined. Furthermore, the model performance will be illustrated with respect to experimental data from literature and other EOS's. In further work we aim to use this EOS in coupled flow and chemical reactive-transport simulations to investigate the impact of gas mixtures for CO2 storage.

  14. Short-time dynamics of correlated quantum Coulomb systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Strong correlations in dense Coulomb systems are attracting increasing interest in many fields ranging from dense astrophysical plasmas, dusty plasmas and semiconductors to metal clusters and ultracold trapped ions [1]. Examples are bound states in dense plasmas (atoms, molecules, clusters) and semiconductors (excitons, trions, biexcitons) and many-particle correlations such as Coulomb and Yukawa liquids and crystals. Of particular current interest is the response of these systems to short excitations generated e.g. by femtosecond laser pulses and giving rise to ultrafast relaxation processes and build up of binary correlations. The proper theoretical tool are non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations [1,2] which can be derived from Nonequilibrium Green's Functions (NEGF) and are now successfully solved numerically for dense plasmas and semiconductors [3], correlated electrons [4] and other many-body systems with moderate correlations [5]. This method is well suited to compute the nonlinear response to strong fields selfconsistently including many-body effects [6]. Finally, we discuss recent extensions of the NEGF-computations to the dynamics of strongly correlated Coulomb systems, such as single atoms and molecules [7] and electron and exciton Wigner crystals in quantum dots [8,9]. [1] H. Haug and A.-P. Jauho, Quantum Kinetics in Transport and Optics of Semiconductors, Springer 1996; M. Bonitz Quantum Kinetic Theory, Teubner, Stuttgart/Leipzig 1998; [2] Progress in Nonequilibrium Green's Functions III, M. Bonitz and A. Filinov (Eds.), J. Phys. Conf. Ser. vol. 35 (2006); [3] M. Bonitz et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 8, 6057 (1996); R. Binder, H.S. K"ohler, and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. B 55, 5110 (1997); [4] N.H. Kwong, and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1768 (2000); [5] Introduction to Computational Methods for Many-Body Systems, M. Bonitz and D. Semkat (eds.), Rinton Press, Princeton (2006); [6] H. Haberland, M. Bonitz, and D. Kremp, Phys. Rev. E 64

  15. Abstract: Magnetic solitons' contribution to the specific heat of (CH3)4NMnCl3 in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsa, F.

    1982-03-01

    It has been shown theoretically that linear magnetic systems with planar anisotropy should display nonlinear excitations, i.e., sine-Gordon solitons upon application of a magnetic field perpendicular to the chain axis. Experimental evidence for ID magnetic solitons has been presented for TMMC from neutron scattering and NMR measurements.1 The classical statistical mechanics of this system predict a soliton contribution to the free energy and thus to the specific heat.2 In order to test experimentally the thermodynamic relevance of magnetic solitons, I performed measurements of specific heat in single crystal TMMC in an external magnetic field up to 10 Tesla, applied both perpendicular and parallel to the chain. The measurements were performed with an adiabatic calorimeter in the temperature range 1.5-15 °K. The results show an extra contribution for H⊥c not present for H∥c. This contribution displays a broad maximum which scales approximately as H/T in agreement with the theory. The maximum occurs just above the peak in the specific heat which is observed in correspondence to the three-dimensional transition temperature, and it can be clearly resolved only for H⩾5.0 T. The soliton energy obtained by fitting the experiments to the classical theory is Es = 2.0 H for H = 5.39 T and Es = 1.8 H for H = 10 T to be compared with the theoretical value of Es = gμBHS = 3.35 H and with the value obtained by neutron scattering at H = 3.2 T, i.e., Es = 2.6 H. The discrepancy between theory and experiment is discussed in terms of renormalization corrections and of a possible soliton instability occurring for fields between 3 and 5 T. a)Permanent address: Institut di Fisica, Universita di Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy. 1J. P. Boucher, L. P. Regnault, J. Rossad Miguod, J. P. Renard, J. Bouillot, and W. G. Stirling, J. Appl. Phys. 52, 1956 (1981). 2K. M. Leung, D. Hone, D. L. Mills, P. S. Riseborough, and S. E. Trullinger, Phys. Rev. B 21, 4017 (1980).

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for point defects in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Richard

    2010-03-01

    ] [4] R. Vaidyanathan, M. Y. L. Jung, and E. G. Seebauer, Phys. Rev. B 75, 195209 (2007). [0pt] [5] P. G. Coleman and C. P. Burrows, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265502 (2007). [0pt] [6] W. K. Leung, R. J. Needs, G. Rajagopal, S. Itoh, and S. Ihara, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2351 (1999). [0pt] [7] P. Rinke, A. Janotti, M. Scheffler, and C. G. Van de Walle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 026402 (2009).

  17. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  18. Sequence analysis, expression, and binding activity of recombinant major outer sheath protein (Msp) of Treponema denticola.

    PubMed Central

    Fenno, J C; Müller, K H; McBride, B C

    1996-01-01

    The gene encoding the major outer sheath protein (Msp) of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Preliminary sequence analysis showed that the 5' end of the msp gene was not present on the 5.5-kb cloned fragment described in a recent study (M. Haapasalo, K. H. Müller, V. J. Uitto, W. K. Leung, and B. C. McBride, Infect. Immun. 60:2058-2065,1992). The 5' end of msp was obtained by PCR amplification from a T. denticola genomic library, and an open reading frame of 1,629 bp was identified as the coding region for Msp by combining overlapping sequences. The deduced peptide consisted of 543 amino acids and had a molecular mass of 58,233 Da. The peptide had a typical prokaryotic signal sequence with a potential cleavage site for signal peptidase 1. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showing the msp transcript to be approximately 1.7 kb was consistent with the identification of a promoter consensus sequence located optimally upstream of msp and a transcription termination signal found downstream of the stop codon. The entire msp sequence was amplified from T. denticola genomic DNA and cloned in E. coli by using a tightly regulated T7 RNA polymerase vector system. Expression of Msp was toxic to E. coli when the entire msp gene was present. High levels of Msp were produced as inclusion bodies when the putative signal peptide sequence was deleted and replaced by a vector-encoded T7 peptide sequence. Recombinant Msp purified to homogeneity from a clone containing the full-length msp gene adhered to immobilized laminin and fibronectin but not to bovine serum albumin. Attachment of recombinant Msp was decreased in the presence of soluble substrate. Attachment of T. denticola to immobilized laminin and fibronectin was increased by pretreatment of the substrate with recombinant Msp. These studies lend further support to the hypothesis that Msp mediates the extracellular matrix binding activity of T. denticola. PMID

  19. Bovine herpesvirus 1 U(s) open reading frame 4 encodes a glycoproteoglycan.

    PubMed Central

    Keil, G M; Engelhardt, T; Karger, A; Enz, M

    1996-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the short unique (Us) segment of the bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) genome predicted that the Us open reading frame (ORF) 4 encodes a protein with homology to glycoprotein G (gG) of other alpha-herpesviruses (P. Leung-Tack, J.-C. Audonnet, and M. Riviere, Virology 199:409-421, 1994). RNA analysis showed that the Us ORF4 is contained within two transcripts of 3.5 and 1.8 kb. The 3.5 kb RNA represents a structurally bicistronic RNA which encompasses the Us ORF3 and Us ORF4, whereas the 1.8-kb RNA constitutes the monocistronic Us ORF4 mRNA. To identify the predicted BHV-I gG, recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the Us ORF4 was used to raise specific antibodies in rabbits. The antiserum recognized a 65-kDa polypeptide and a very diffusely migrating species of proteins with an apparent molecular mass of between 90 and greater than 240 kDa in supernatants of BHV-1-infected cells which was also precipitated together with 61- and 70-kDa polypeptides from cell-associated proteins. The specificity of the reaction was demonstrated by the absence of these proteins from the supernatant of cells infected with the Us ORF4 deletion mutant BHV-l/gp1-8. Treatment of the immunoprecipitated proteins with glycosidases and chondroitinase AC showed that the 65-kDa protein constitutes gG, which contains both N- and O-linked carbohydrates, and that the high-molecular-mass proteins contain glycosaminoglycans linked to a 65-kDa glycoprotein that is antigenically related to gG. These molecules were therefore named glycoproteoglycan C (gpgG). Pulse chase experiments indicated that gG and gpgG were processed from a common precursor molecule with an apparent molecular mass of 61 kDa via a 70-kDa intermediate. Both gG and gpgG could not be found associated with purified virions. In summary, our results identify the BHV-I gG protein and demonstrate the presence of a form of posttranslational modification, glycosamino-glycosylation, that has not yet been described for a

  20. Is It Time to Change Our Reference Curve for Femur Length? Using the Z-Score to Select the Best Chart in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huixia; Wei, Yumei; Su, Rina; Wang, Chen; Meng, Wenying; Wang, Yongqing; Shang, Lixin; Cai, Zhenyu; Ji, Liping; Wang, Yunfeng; Sun, Ying; Liu, Jiaxiu; Wei, Li; Sun, Yufeng; Zhang, Xueying; Luo, Tianxia; Chen, Haixia; Yu, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To use Z-scores to compare different charts of femur length (FL) applied to our population with the aim of identifying the most appropriate chart. Methods A retrospective study was conducted in Beijing. Fifteen hospitals in Beijing were chosen as clusters using a systemic cluster sampling method, in which 15,194 pregnant women delivered from June 20th to November 30th, 2013. The measurements of FL in the second and third trimester were recorded, as well as the last measurement obtained before delivery. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, we identified FL measurements from 19996 ultrasounds from 7194 patients between 11 and 42 weeks gestation. The FL data were then transformed into Z-scores that were calculated using three series of reference equations obtained from three reports: Leung TN, Pang MW et al (2008); Chitty LS, Altman DG et al (1994); and Papageorghiou AT et al (2014). Each Z-score distribution was presented as the mean and standard deviation (SD). Skewness and kurtosis and were compared with the standard normal distribution using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The histogram of their distributions was superimposed on the non-skewed standard normal curve (mean = 0, SD = 1) to provide a direct visual impression. Finally, the sensitivity and specificity of each reference chart for identifying fetuses <5th or >95th percentile (based on the observed distribution of Z-scores) were calculated. The Youden index was also listed. A scatter diagram with the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile curves calculated from and superimposed on each reference chart was presented to provide a visual impression. Results The three Z-score distribution curves appeared to be normal, but none of them matched the expected standard normal distribution. In our study, the Papageorghiou reference curve provided the best results, with a sensitivity of 100% for identifying fetuses with measurements < 5th and > 95th percentile, and specificities of 99.9% and 81

  1. SU-E-I-59: Image Quality and Dose Measurement for Partial Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abouei, E; Ford, N

    2014-06-01

    Dentistry S. Wah Leung Endowment Fund.

  2. Assessing recreation impacts to cliffs in Shenandoah National Park: Integrating visitor observation with trail and recreation site measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, K.T.; Lawson, S.R.; Marion, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The rock outcrops and cliffs of Shenandoah National Park provide habitat for several rare and endangered plant and animal species, including the federally endangered Shenandoah Salamander (Plethodon shenandoah; Ludwig et al., 1993). The location of the well-known park tour road, Skyline Drive, along the ridgeline provides exceptional access to many outcrops and cliffs throughout the park for a large number of the park?s 1.2 million annual visitors. Consequently, visitor use of cliff areas has led to natural resource impacts, including marked decreases in size and vigor of known rare plant populations. Despite the clear ecological value and potential threats to the natural resources at cliff areas, managers possess little information on visitor use of cliff sites and presently have no formal planning document to guide management. Thus, a park wide study of cliff sites was initiated during the 2005 visitor use season. As part of this research effort, our study used an integrative approach to study recreational use and visitor-caused resource impacts at one of the more heavily visited cliff sites in the park: Little Stony Man Cliffs (LSMC). In particular, this study integrated data from resource impact measurements and visitor use observation to help assess the effects of recreational use on the natural resources of LSMC. Procedures derived from campsite and trail impact studies were used to measure and characterize the amount of visitor-caused resource impacts on LSMC (Marion & Leung, 2001; Marion, 1995). Visitor use observations were conducted on top of LSMC to document and characterize the type and amount of recreational use the cliffs receive and the behaviors of recreationists that may contribute to cliff-top resource impacts. Resource impact measurement data show trampling disturbance present at LSMC, characterized by vegetation loss, exposed soil, and root exposure. Documentation of informal trails, soil erosion, tree damage, and tree stumps provide further

  3. Differential regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 enhancer in monocytes at various stages of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hilfinger, J M; Clark, N; Smith, M; Robinson, K; Markovitz, D M

    1993-07-01

    We have demonstrated that stimulation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) enhancer in T cells is dependent upon at least four cis-acting elements, including two purine-rich binding sites, PuB1 and PuB2, which are capable of binding members of the ets family of proto-oncogenes, the pets (peri-ets) site, which lies just upstream of the PuB2 site, and a single kappa B site (D. M. Markovitz, M. Smith, J. M. Hilfinger, M. C. Hannibal, B. Petryniak, and G. J. Nabel, J. Virol. 66:5479-5484, 1992). In this study, we examined the regulation of the HIV-2 enhancer in cells of monocytic lineage. We found that in immature monocytic cell lines, the HIV-2 enhancer is markedly induced by phorbol esters and that all four cis-acting elements are required for activation. In mature monocytic cells, constitutive activity is high, with only modest stimulation following phorbol ester treatment. Mutation of any of the four cis-acting elements resulted in greatly reduced basal expression in mature monocytes. This is in contrast to HIV-1, in which developmentally controlled expression of the enhancer in monocytes is mediated largely through the kappa B sites alone [G. E. Griffin, K. Leung, T. M. Folks, S. Kunkel, and G. J. Nabel, Nature (London) 339:70-73, 1989]. Further, we demonstrated that although both Elf-1, an ets family member with significant similarity to the drosophila developmental regulatory protein E74, and Pu.1, a monocyte- and B-cell-specific member of the ets family, bind the purine-rich enhancer region, Elf-1 is the protein which binds predominantly in vivo. A nuclear factor(s) which binds the pets site, an element which has been described only in HIV-2, was detected in extracts of all of the monocytic cells tested. These findings indicate that the mechanism by which cellular factors regulate HIV-2 enhancer function in monocytic cells differs significantly from that of HIV-1 and may offer a partial explanation for the differences in the biological and

  4. Structure of the Soot Growth Region of Laminar Premixer Methane/Oxygen Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot is a dominant feature of hydrocarbon/air flames, affecting their reaction mechanisms and structure. As a result, soot processes affect capabilities for computational combustion as well as predictions of flame radiation and pollution emissions. Motivated by these observations, the present investigation extended past work on soot growth in laminar premixed flames, seeking to evaluate model predictions of flame structure. Xu et al. report direct measurements of soot residence times, soot concentrations, soot structure, gas temperatures and gas compositions for premixed flames similar to those studied by Harris and Weiner and Ramer et al. respectively. It was found that predictions of major stable gas species concentrations based on mechanisms of Leung and Lindstedt and Frenklach and coworkers, were in good agreement with the measurements. The results were also used to evaluate the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms of Frenklach and coworkers and Colket and Hall. It was found that these mechanisms were effective using quite reasonable correlations for the steric factors appearing in the theories. The successful evaluation of the HACA mechanism of soot growth in Refs. 1 and 2 is encouraging but one aspect of this evaluation is a concern. In particular, H-atom concentrations play a crucial role in the HACA mechanism and it was necessary to estimate these concentrations because they were not measured directly. These estimates were made assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium between H, and H based on measured temperatures and H2 concentrations and the equilibrium constant data of Kee et al.. This approach was justified by the flame structure predictions; nevertheless, direct evaluation of equilibrium estimates of H-atom concentrations in the soot growth regions of laminar premixed flames is needed to provide more convincing proof of this behavior. Thus, the objective of the present investigation was to complete new measurements of the

  5. Weathering Rinds and Soil Development on Basaltic Andesite, Guadeloupe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, P. B.; Murphy, M.; Ma, L.; Engel, J.; Pereyra, Y.; Gaillardet, J.; Brantley, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    An oriented clast of basaltic andesite collected from the B horizon of a soil developed in a late Quaternary volcanoclastic debris flow on the eastern, windward side of Basse Terre Island, Guadeloupe exhibits weathering patterns like that observed in many clasts from tropical settings. The sample consists of unweathered core material overlain by a ~19 mm thick weathering rind and a narrow ≤ 2mm thick indurated horizon separating the outer portion of the rind from the overlying >10mm of soil matrix material. Elemental variations are constrained by a seven point bulk ICP-AES vertical transect extending from the core, across the rind and ~15 mm into the overlying soil matix and six parallel electron microprobe transections. The porous-hydrated fraction increases from the core to the rind to the surrounding soil from 7±4% to 45±18% to 60±15%, respectively. Like the well-studied clast from the nearby Bras David watershed (Sak et al., 2010) the isovolumetric transformation from core to rind material is marked by a narrow (< 1500 mm) reaction front and elemental depletion. The hierarchy of elemental loss across the core-rind boundary as characterized by open system mass balances varies in order Ca≈Na>Ba>K≈Mn>Mg>Si>Al≈P>Fe»Ti, consistent with the relative reactivity of phases in the clast from plagioclasepyroxeneglass>apatite>ilmenite. Unlike previously studied clasts, the preservation of the rind-soil interface permits characterization of weathering reactions between the weathering clast and surrounding soil matrix. The abrupt (<1000 μm wide) reaction front at the rind-soil interface is marked by the enrichment of Mn, Ba, Al, Mg and K. The enrichment trends may result from soil waters percolating through atmospherically depositioned dust within the upper few meters of the soil profile, as documented in a deep soil profile in the Bras David watershed. The lack of an enrichment signal within the weathering rind suggests that weathering processes active within

  6. Validating the regional hydrogeological models with stable isotope data in precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvāns, Andis; Babre, Alise; Popovs, Konārds; Timuhins, Andrejs; Spalviņš, Aivars

    2016-04-01

    Modelling and Simulations (I.RE.MO.S.), Praise Worthy Prize, Naples, Italy, 8, pp. 266-276. Terzer, S., Wassenaar, L. I., Araguás-Araguás, L. J., Aggarwal, P. K., 2013. Global Isoscapes for δ18O and δ2H in Precipitation: Improved Prediction Using Regionalized Climatic Regression Models. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 17, pp. 4713-4728 Virbulis, J., Bethers U., Saks T., Sennikovs, J., Timuhins, A., 2013. Hydrogeological Model of the Baltic Artesian Basin. Hydrogeology Journal, 21, pp. 845-862

  7. Healthcare- and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Fatal Pneumonia with Pediatric Deaths in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia: Unique MRSA's Multiple Virulence Factors, Genome, and Stepwise Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Olga E.; Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yachenko, Svetlana V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Kamshilova, Vera V.; Kotlovsky, Yuri V.; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan V.; Sidorenko, Sergey V.; Peryanova, Olga V.; Reva, Galina V.; Teng, Lee-Jene; Salmina, Alla B.; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen. We herein discussed MRSA and its infections in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia between 2007 and 2011. The incidence of MRSA in 3,662 subjects was 22.0% and 2.9% for healthcare- and community-associated MRSA (HA- and CA-MRSA), respectively. The 15-day mortality rates for MRSA hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia (HAP and CAP) were 6.5% and 50%, respectively. MRSA CAP cases included pediatric deaths; of the MRSA pneumonia episodes available, ≥27.3% were associated with bacteremia. Most cases of HA-MRSA examined exhibited ST239/spa3(t037)/SCCmecIII.1.1.2 (designated as ST239Kras), while all CA-MRSA cases examined were ST8/spa1(t008)/SCCmecIV.3.1.1(IVc) (designated as ST8Kras). ST239Kras and ST8Kras strongly expressed cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin α, PSMα; and δ-hemolysin, Hld) genes, similar to CA-MRSA. ST239Kras pneumonia may have been attributed to a unique set of multiple virulence factors (MVFs): toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), elevated PSMα/Hld expression, α-hemolysin, the staphylococcal enterotoxin SEK/SEQ, the immune evasion factor SCIN/SAK, and collagen adhesin. Regarding ST8Kras, SEA was included in MVFs, some of which were common to ST239Kras. The ST239Kras (strain OC3) genome contained: a completely unique phage, φSa7-like (W), with no att repetition; S. aureus pathogenicity island SaPI2R, the first TSST-1 gene-positive (tst+) SaPI in the ST239 lineage; and a super copy of IS256 (≥22 copies/genome). ST239Kras carried the Brazilian SCCmecIII.1.1.2 and United Kingdom-type tst. ST239Kras and ST8Kras were MDR, with the same levofloxacin resistance mutations; small, but transmissible chloramphenicol resistance plasmids spread widely enough to not be ignored. These results suggest that novel MDR and MVF+ HA- and CA-MRSA (ST239Kras and ST8Kras) emerged in Siberian Russia (Krasnoyarsk) associated with fatal pneumonia, and also with ST

  8. North Central Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This radar image shows the dramatic landscape in the Phang Hoei Range of north central Thailand, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of the city of Lom Sak. The plateau, shown in green to the left of center, is the area of Phu Kradung National Park. This plateau is a remnant of a once larger plateau, another portion of which is seen along the right side of the image. The plateaus have been dissected by water erosion over thousands of years. Forest areas appear green on the image; agricultural areas and settlements appear as red and blue. North is toward the lower right. The area shown is 38 by 50 kilometers (24 by 31 miles) and is centered at 16.96 degrees north latitude, 101.67 degrees east longitude. Colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted and horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar on October 3, 1994, when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR is a joint mission of the U.S./German and Italian space agencies.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by

  9. Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nosocomial infections in a tertiary-care facility: emergence of new clonal complexes in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Senok, A; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S; Al-Saedan, R; Somily, A

    2016-11-01

    Changes in the molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continue to be reported. This study was carried out to characterize MRSA isolates in Saudi Arabia. MRSA isolates causing nosocomial infections (n = 117) obtained from 2009-2015 at a tertiary-care facility in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were studied. Molecular characterization of isolates was carried out using the StaphyType DNA microarray (Alere Technologies, Jena, Germany). Fourteen clonal complexes (CC) were identified, with the most common being CC80 (n = 35), CC6 (n = 15), CC5 (n = 13) and CC22 (n = 12). With the exception of nine ST239 MRSA-III isolates, all others were of community-associated MRSA lineages. The following strains are identified for the first time in Saudi Arabia: ST8-MRSA-IV [PVL(+)/ACME(+)], USA300 (n = 1); ST72-MRSA-IV USA700 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-IV, [PVL(+)/edinA(+)], WA MRSA-121 (n = 1); CC5-MRSA-V+SCCfus, WA MRSA-14/109 (n = 2), CC97-MRSA-IV, WA MRSA-54/63; CC2250/2277-MRSA-IV and WA MRSA-114. CC15-MRSA (n = 3) was identified for the first time in clinical infection in Saudi Arabia. None of the isolates harboured vancomycin resistance genes, while genes for resistance to mupirocin and quaternary ammonium compounds were found in one and nine isolates respectively. Fifty-seven isolates (48.7%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. While the staphylokinase (sak) and staphylococcal complement inhibitor (scn) genes were present in over 95% of the isolates, only 37.6% had the chemotaxis-inhibiting protein (chp) gene. Increasing occurrence of community-acquired MRSA lineages plus emergence of pandemic and rare MRSA strains is occurring in our setting. Strict infection control practices are important to limit the dissemination of these MRSA strains. PMID:27621823

  10. Healthcare- and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Fatal Pneumonia with Pediatric Deaths in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia: Unique MRSA's Multiple Virulence Factors, Genome, and Stepwise Evolution.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Olga E; Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yachenko, Svetlana V; Teplyakova, Olga V; Kamshilova, Vera V; Kotlovsky, Yuri V; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan V; Sidorenko, Sergey V; Peryanova, Olga V; Reva, Galina V; Teng, Lee-Jene; Salmina, Alla B; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen. We herein discussed MRSA and its infections in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia between 2007 and 2011. The incidence of MRSA in 3,662 subjects was 22.0% and 2.9% for healthcare- and community-associated MRSA (HA- and CA-MRSA), respectively. The 15-day mortality rates for MRSA hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia (HAP and CAP) were 6.5% and 50%, respectively. MRSA CAP cases included pediatric deaths; of the MRSA pneumonia episodes available, ≥27.3% were associated with bacteremia. Most cases of HA-MRSA examined exhibited ST239/spa3(t037)/SCCmecIII.1.1.2 (designated as ST239Kras), while all CA-MRSA cases examined were ST8/spa1(t008)/SCCmecIV.3.1.1(IVc) (designated as ST8Kras). ST239Kras and ST8Kras strongly expressed cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin α, PSMα; and δ-hemolysin, Hld) genes, similar to CA-MRSA. ST239Kras pneumonia may have been attributed to a unique set of multiple virulence factors (MVFs): toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), elevated PSMα/Hld expression, α-hemolysin, the staphylococcal enterotoxin SEK/SEQ, the immune evasion factor SCIN/SAK, and collagen adhesin. Regarding ST8Kras, SEA was included in MVFs, some of which were common to ST239Kras. The ST239Kras (strain OC3) genome contained: a completely unique phage, φSa7-like (W), with no att repetition; S. aureus pathogenicity island SaPI2R, the first TSST-1 gene-positive (tst+) SaPI in the ST239 lineage; and a super copy of IS256 (≥22 copies/genome). ST239Kras carried the Brazilian SCCmecIII.1.1.2 and United Kingdom-type tst. ST239Kras and ST8Kras were MDR, with the same levofloxacin resistance mutations; small, but transmissible chloramphenicol resistance plasmids spread widely enough to not be ignored. These results suggest that novel MDR and MVF+ HA- and CA-MRSA (ST239Kras and ST8Kras) emerged in Siberian Russia (Krasnoyarsk) associated with fatal pneumonia, and also with ST

  11. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  12. Gas geochemistry of the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: implications for gas hydrate exploration in the Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Collett, T.S.; Hunter, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Gases were analyzed from well cuttings, core, gas hydrate, and formation tests at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, drilled within the Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope. The well penetrated a portion of the Eileen gas hydrate deposit, which overlies the more deeply buried Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, West Sak, and Kuparuk River oil fields. Gas sources in the upper 200 m are predominantly from microbial sources (C1 isotopic compositions ranging from −86.4 to −80.6‰). The C1 isotopic composition becomes progressively enriched from 200 m to the top of the gas hydrate-bearing sands at 600 m. The tested gas hydrates occur in two primary intervals, units D and C, between 614.0 m and 664.7 m, containing a total of 29.3 m of gas hydrate-bearing sands. The hydrocarbon gases in cuttings and core samples from 604 to 914 m are composed of methane with very little ethane. The isotopic composition of the methane carbon ranges from −50.1 to −43.9‰ with several outliers, generally decreasing with depth. Gas samples collected by the Modular Formation Dynamics Testing (MDT) tool in the hydrate-bearing units were similarly composed mainly of methane, with up to 284 ppm ethane. The methane isotopic composition ranged from −48.2 to −48.0‰ in the C sand and from −48.4 to −46.6‰ in the D sand. Methane hydrogen isotopic composition ranged from −238 to −230‰, with slightly more depleted values in the deeper C sand. These results are consistent with the concept that the Eileen gas hydrates contain a mixture of deep-sourced, microbially biodegraded thermogenic gas, with lesser amounts of thermogenic oil-associated gas, and coal gas. Thermal gases are likely sourced from existing oil and gas accumulations that have migrated up-dip and/or up-fault and formed gas hydrate in response to climate cooling with permafrost formation.

  13. Response regulators SrrA and SskA are central components of a phosphorelay system involved in stress signal transduction and asexual sporulation in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Pérez, Itzel; Sánchez, Olivia; Kawasaki, Laura; Georgellis, Dimitris; Aguirre, Jesús

    2007-09-01

    Among eukaryotes, only slime molds, fungi, and plants contain signal transduction phosphorelay systems. In filamentous fungi, multiple sensor kinases appear to use a single histidine-containing phosphotransfer (HPt) protein to relay signals to two response regulators (RR). In Aspergillus nidulans, the RR SskA mediates activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase SakA in response to osmotic and oxidative stress, whereas the functions of the RR SrrA were unknown. We used a genetic approach to characterize the srrA gene as a new member of the skn7/prr1 family and to analyze the roles of SrrA in the phosphorelay system composed of the RR SskA, the HPt protein YpdA, and the sensor kinase NikA. While mutants lacking the HPt protein YpdA are unviable, mutants lacking SskA (DeltasskA), SrrA (DeltasrrA), or both RR (DeltasrrA DeltasskA) are viable and differentially affected in osmotic and oxidative stress responses. Both RR are involved in osmostress resistance, but DeltasskA mutants are more sensitive to this stress, and only SrrA is required for H(2)O(2) resistance and H(2)O(2)-mediated induction of catalase CatB. In contrast, both RR are individually required for fungicide sensitivity and calcofluor resistance and for normal sporulation and conidiospore viability. The DeltasrrA and DeltasskA sporulation defects appear to be related to decreased mRNA levels of the key sporulation gene brlA. In contrast, conidiospore viability defects do not correlate with the activity of the spore-specific catalase CatA. Our results support a model in which NikA acts upstream of SrrA and SskA to transmit fungicide signals and to regulate asexual sporulation and conidiospore viability. In contrast, NikA appears dispensable for osmotic and oxidative stress signaling. These results highlight important differences in stress signal transmission among fungi and define a phosphorelay system involved in oxidative and osmotic stress, cell wall maintenance, fungicide sensitivity, asexual

  14. Time Variation of Seismic Anisotropy, Stress and Cracks on Active Volcanoes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    We summarize measurements of seismic anisotropy and its relation to other geophysical measurements of stress and cracks on eleven active volcanoes; Unzen (Unz), Sakurajima (Sak), Aso, Asama (Asm) and Kirishima (Kir) in Japan; Okmok (Okm) in Alaska, Ruapehu (Rua) and Tongariro (Ton) in New Zealand, Soufriere Hills (Sou) in Montserrat, Kilauea (Kil) in Hawaii and Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) in La Reunion. We used the MFAST shear wave splitting computer code, an objective code that is fully automatic except for the S arrival pick. Fast polarization directions (phi) should be parallel to cracks and hence the maximum horizontal stress direction. Time delays (dt) increase with path length and percent anisotropy, usually related to crack density. Where possible we used S waves from deep earthquakes to ensure that the movement of the earthquakes was not correlated with the volcanic activity. At some volcanoes we used families of repeating events with similar waveforms and at most volcanoes we also computed splitting at earthquakes local to the volcano. We compared the phi and dt variation in time to eruption occurrences and to other available parameters including seismicity rate, b-values, focal mechanisms, isotropic velocity changes from noise cross-correlation, Vp/Vs ratios, Geodetic measurements such as GPS and tilt, and gas flux. All volcanoes had some stations with excellent shear wave arrivals that yielded measureable splitting. Individual measurements showed scatter in most areas, but at most of the volcanoes, moving averages of phi or dt (or both) yielded time variations that correlated with other measurements related to volcanic activity or to stress changes or changes in crack-filling material such as gas flux. The multiplet studies did not yield slowly varying splitting but instead showed distinct jumps in splitting parameters at various times, which appears to be caused in part by cycle skipping. Time resolution of changes depends on the seismicity available

  15. Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    amount of geographically diverse data, it is not possible to develop a comprehensive predictive model. Based on the comprehensive phase behavior analysis of Alaska North Slope crude oil, a reservoir simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of a gas injection enhanced oil recovery technique for the West Sak reservoir. It was found that a definite increase in viscous oil production can be obtained by selecting the proper injectant gas and by optimizing reservoir operating parameters. A comparative analysis is provided, which helps in the decision-making process.

  16. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ) and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ), indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC) or fungicidal (MFC) concentrations. Effective

  17. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    topics including growth and heteroepitaxy, bulk GaN substrates, theory and modelling, optical properties, laser diodes and LEDs as well as transport properties and electronics. Farrell et al review materials and growth issues for high-performance non- and semipolar light-emitting devices, and Scholz provides an overview of heteroepitaxial growth of semipolar GaN. Okada et al review growth mechanisms of non- and semipolar GaN layers on patterned sapphire substrates, and Vennéguès discusses defect reduction methods for heteroepitaxially grown non- and semipolar III-nitride films. Leung et al explain how kinetic Wulff plots can be used to design and control non-polar and semipolar GaN heteroepitaxy, and a contribution by Sawaki et al explores the impurity incorporation in (1-101) GaN grown on Si substrates. In the area of bulk crystal growth Kucharski et al review non- and semipolar GaN substrates by ammonothermal growth, and Chichibu et al discuss the challenges for epitaxial growth of InGaN on free-standing m-plane GaN substrates. Calculation of semipolar orientations for wurtzitic semiconductor heterostructures and their application to nitrides and oxides are reviewed by Bigenwald et al, and Ito et al present an ab initio approach to reconstruction, adsorption, and incorporation on GaN surfaces. Finally, the theoretical description of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductor quantum-well structures is presented by Ahn et al. In a discussion of the optical properties, Kisin et al discuss the effect of the quantum well population on the optical characteristics of polar, semipolar and non-polar III-nitride light emitters, and Jönen et al investigate the indium incorporation and optical properties of non- and semipolar GaInN QW structures. Wernicke et al explore the emission wavelength of polar, non-polar, and semipolar InGaN quantum wells and the incorporation of indium. In a contribution by Melo et al, the gain in polar and non-polar/semipolar gallium

  18. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    topics including growth and heteroepitaxy, bulk GaN substrates, theory and modelling, optical properties, laser diodes and LEDs as well as transport properties and electronics. Farrell et al review materials and growth issues for high-performance non- and semipolar light-emitting devices, and Scholz provides an overview of heteroepitaxial growth of semipolar GaN. Okada et al review growth mechanisms of non- and semipolar GaN layers on patterned sapphire substrates, and Vennéguès discusses defect reduction methods for heteroepitaxially grown non- and semipolar III-nitride films. Leung et al explain how kinetic Wulff plots can be used to design and control non-polar and semipolar GaN heteroepitaxy, and a contribution by Sawaki et al explores the impurity incorporation in (1-101) GaN grown on Si substrates. In the area of bulk crystal growth Kucharski et al review non- and semipolar GaN substrates by ammonothermal growth, and Chichibu et al discuss the challenges for epitaxial growth of InGaN on free-standing m-plane GaN substrates. Calculation of semipolar orientations for wurtzitic semiconductor heterostructures and their application to nitrides and oxides are reviewed by Bigenwald et al, and Ito et al present an ab initio approach to reconstruction, adsorption, and incorporation on GaN surfaces. Finally, the theoretical description of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductor quantum-well structures is presented by Ahn et al. In a discussion of the optical properties, Kisin et al discuss the effect of the quantum well population on the optical characteristics of polar, semipolar and non-polar III-nitride light emitters, and Jönen et al investigate the indium incorporation and optical properties of non- and semipolar GaInN QW structures. Wernicke et al explore the emission wavelength of polar, non-polar, and semipolar InGaN quantum wells and the incorporation of indium. In a contribution by Melo et al, the gain in polar and non-polar/semipolar gallium

  19. Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy-Oil Recovery Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford University; Department of Energy Resources Engineering Green Earth Sciences

    2007-09-30

    crude oil. A significant number of laboratory-scale tests were made to evaluate the solution gas drive potential of West Sak (AK) viscous oil. The West Sak sample has a low acid number, low asphaltene content, and does not appear foamy under laboratory conditions. Tests show primary recovery of about 22% of the original oil in place under a variety of conditions. The acid number of other Alaskan North Slope samples tests is greater, indicating a greater potential for recovery by heavy-oil solution gas drive. Effective cold production leads to reservoir pressure depletion that eases the implementation of thermal recovery processes. When viewed from a reservoir perspective, thermal recovery is the enhanced recovery method of choice for viscous and heavy oils because of the significant viscosity reduction that accompanies the heating of oil. One significant issue accompanying thermal recovery in cold environments is wellbore heat losses. Initial work on thermal recovery found that a technology base for delivering steam, other hot fluids, and electrical heat through cold subsurface environments, such as permafrost, was in place. No commercially available technologies are available, however. Nevertheless, the enabling technology of superinsulated wells appears to be realized. Thermal subtasks focused on a suite of enhanced recovery options tailored to various reservoir conditions. Generally, electrothermal, conventional steam-based, and thermal gravity drainage enhanced oil recovery techniques appear to be applicable to 'prime' Ugnu reservoir conditions to the extent that reservoir architecture and fluid conditions are modeled faithfully here. The extent of reservoir layering, vertical communication, and subsurface steam distribution are important factors affecting recovery. Distribution of steam throughout reservoir volume is a significant issue facing thermal recovery. Various activities addressed aspects of steam emplacement. Notably, hydraulic fracturing of horizontal

  20. EDITORIAL: The 24th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting The 24th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páll Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne; Uhrenfeldt, Christian

    2012-03-01

    AndersenAalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Pia BomholtAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Hafliði P GíslasonUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Haraldur Páll GunnlaugssonAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark John HansenAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Britta JohansenAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Volodymyr KhranovskyyLinköping University, Linköping, Sweden Arne Nylandsted LarsenAarhus University, Denmark Helge MalmbekkUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Erik Stensrud MarsteinInstitute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway Antonio MartiUniversidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain Torben MølholtUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Sveinn ÓlafssonUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Thomas PedersenTechnical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark Thomas Garm PedersenAalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Dirch Hjorth PetersenTechnical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark Vincent QuemenerUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Henry RadamsonKTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Sweden Bahman RaeissiUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Jonatan SlotteAalto University, Aalto, Finland Xin SongUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Einar Örn SveinbjörnssonUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Mikael SyväjärviLinköping University, Linköping, Sweden Chi Kwong TangUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Erik V ThomsenTechnical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark Christian UhrenfeldtAarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Hans Ulrik UlriksenAalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Muhammad UsmanKTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Sweden Lasse VinesUniversity of Oslo, Oslo, Norway Ulrich WahlUnidade de Física e Aceleradores, Sacavém, Portugal Helge WemanNTNU, Trondheim, Norway Gerd WeyerAarhus University, Denmark

  1. PREFACE: Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2012-03-01

    energy electron diffraction (LEED), He atom scattering (HAS) and STM, to investigate the organization of water on metal, namely Pd(111) and Pt(111). Direct measurements of hyperpolarizabilities for non-linear spectroscopy can be made through hyper-Rayleigh scattering experiments, which are presented here by the group of P F Brevet on gold and silver nanoparticles. From the point of view of molecular dynamics simulations of interfaces, complementary levels of calculations are presented in this special section. The groups of K Leung, M-P Gaigeot, M Sulpizi and M Sprik provide theoretical investigations with DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. Leung et al and Gaigeot et al address the hot topic issue of the reactivity of oxides surface sites and especially reliable methods to calculate pKas of these sites, with simulations taking into account both the solid and the liquid explicitly, and at the same first principles level of theory. Gaigeot, Sprik and Sulpizi furthermore combine the information on the structural organization of liquid water at the interface with quartz and alumina via pKa calculations and vibrational features (and their microscopic assignments). Mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics (QM/MM) simulations are presented by Ishiyama and Morita for the investigation of another topical interface, i.e. the liquid-air interface. They provide the theoretical VSFG spectrum of the water-vapor interface and some understanding at the microscopic level of the experimental vibrational features. Molecular dynamics simulations based on empirical force fields have been applied to investigate hydrophobic interfaces by the groups of B Space and P Carloni. Carloni et al address salt effects at water-hydrophobic interfaces, investigating how the salts affect the structural organization of water at these interfaces. Space et al provide theoretical approximations to VSFG calculations in the special case of the carbon tetrachloride-water interface and the assignments of

  2. I Situ Characterization Techniques for Droplets and Sprays Using Nonlinear Optics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindal, J. Christian

    . Serpenguzel, J. C. Swindal, R. K. Chang, W. P. Acker, "Two Dimensional Imaging of Sprays with Fluorescence, Lasing, and Stimulated Raman Scattering," Applied Optics, 31, 3543-3551 (1992). ^2J. C. Swindal, G. Chen, A. Serpenguzel, W. P. Acker, and R. K. Chang, "Spray Diagnostics with Lasing and Stimulated Raman Scattering," in Recent Advances in Spray Combustion, AIAA Progress Series, (submitted). ^3J. C. Swindal, D. H. Leach, R. K. Chang, and K. Young, "Precession of Morphology -Dependent Resonances in Nonspherical Droplets," Optics Letters, Vol. 18, 191-193 (1993). ^4J. C. Swindal, D. H. Leach, R. K. Chang, and K. Young, "Precession of Morphology-Dependent Resonances in Nonspherical Droplets," Optics Letters, Vol. 18, 191-193 (1993). ^5 F. H. Wirth, K. A. Juvan, D. H. Leach, J. C. Swindal, R. K. Chang, and P. T. Leung, "Phonon-Retention Effects on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering from Micrometer-Sized Droplets Illuminated with Multiple Short Laser Pulses," Optics Letters, Vol. 17, 1334-1336 (1992).

  3. A review on regional convection permitting climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lipzig, Nicole; Prein, Andreas; Brisson, Erwan; Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Demuzere, Matthias; Saeed, Sajjad; Stengel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    of using CPMs to study climate change it is necessary that these deficiencies are addressed in future research. Coordinated modeling programs are crucially needed to advance parameterizations of unresolved physics and to assess the full potential of CPMs. Brisson, E., K. Van Weverberg, M. Demuzere, A. Devis, S. Saeed, M. Stengel, N.P.M. van Lipzig, 2016. How well can a convection-permitting climate model reproduce 1 decadal statistics of precipitation, temperature and cloud characteristics? Clim. Dyn. (minor revisions). Prein, Andreas F., Wolfgang Langhans, Giorgia Fosser, Andrew Ferrone, Nikolina Ban, Klaus Goergen, Michael Keller, Merja Tölle, Oliver Gutjahr, Frauke Feser, Erwan Brisson, Stefan Kollet, Juerg Schmidli, Nicole P. M. van Lipzig, Ruby Leung. (2015) A review on regional convection-permitting climate modeling: Demonstrations, prospects, and challenges. Reviews of Geophysics 53:10.1002/rog.v53.2, 323-361

  4. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    , Finland), Masahiro Yamamoto (University of Tokyo, Japan), Gunther Uhlmann (University of Washington) and Jun Zou (Chinese University of Hong Kong). IPIA is a recently formed organization that intends to promote the field of inverse problem at all levels. See http://www.inverse-problems.net/. IPIA awarded the first Calderón prize at the opening of the conference to Matti Lassas (see first article in the Proceedings). There was also a general meeting of IPIA during the workshop. This was probably the largest conference ever on IP with 350 registered participants. The program consisted of 18 invited speakers and the Calderón Prize Lecture given by Matti Lassas. Another integral part of the program was the more than 60 mini-symposia that covered a broad spectrum of the theory and applications of inverse problems, focusing on recent developments in medical imaging, seismic exploration, remote sensing, industrial applications, numerical and regularization methods in inverse problems. Another important related topic was image processing in particular the advances which have allowed for significant enhancement of widely used imaging techniques. For more details on the program see the web page: http://www.pims.math.ca/science/2007/07aip. These proceedings reflect the broad spectrum of topics covered in AIP 2007. The conference and these proceedings would not have happened without the contributions of many people. I thank all my fellow organizers, the invited speakers, the speakers and organizers of mini-symposia for making this an exciting and vibrant event. I also thank PIMS, NSF and MITACS for their generous financial support. I take this opportunity to thank the PIMS staff, particularly Ken Leung, for making the local arrangements. Also thanks are due to Stephen McDowall for his help in preparing the schedule of the conference and Xiaosheng Li for the help in preparing these proceedings. I also would like to thank the contributors of this volume and the referees. Finally

  5. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    , Finland), Masahiro Yamamoto (University of Tokyo, Japan), Gunther Uhlmann (University of Washington) and Jun Zou (Chinese University of Hong Kong). IPIA is a recently formed organization that intends to promote the field of inverse problem at all levels. See http://www.inverse-problems.net/. IPIA awarded the first Calderón prize at the opening of the conference to Matti Lassas (see first article in the Proceedings). There was also a general meeting of IPIA during the workshop. This was probably the largest conference ever on IP with 350 registered participants. The program consisted of 18 invited speakers and the Calderón Prize Lecture given by Matti Lassas. Another integral part of the program was the more than 60 mini-symposia that covered a broad spectrum of the theory and applications of inverse problems, focusing on recent developments in medical imaging, seismic exploration, remote sensing, industrial applications, numerical and regularization methods in inverse problems. Another important related topic was image processing in particular the advances which have allowed for significant enhancement of widely used imaging techniques. For more details on the program see the web page: http://www.pims.math.ca/science/2007/07aip. These proceedings reflect the broad spectrum of topics covered in AIP 2007. The conference and these proceedings would not have happened without the contributions of many people. I thank all my fellow organizers, the invited speakers, the speakers and organizers of mini-symposia for making this an exciting and vibrant event. I also thank PIMS, NSF and MITACS for their generous financial support. I take this opportunity to thank the PIMS staff, particularly Ken Leung, for making the local arrangements. Also thanks are due to Stephen McDowall for his help in preparing the schedule of the conference and Xiaosheng Li for the help in preparing these proceedings. I also would like to thank the contributors of this volume and the referees. Finally

  6. Cellular Expression of Smarca4 (Brg1)-regulated Genes in Zebrafish Retinas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a recent genomic study, Leung et al. used a factorial microarray analysis to identify Smarca4 (Brg1)-regulated genes in micro-dissected zebrafish retinas. Two hundred and fifty nine genes were grouped in three-way ANOVA models which carried the most specific retinal change. To validate the microarray results and to elucidate cellular expression patterns of the significant genes for further characterization, 32 known genes were randomly selected from this group. In situ hybridization of these genes was performed on the same types of samples (wild-type (WT) and smarca4a50/a50 (yng) mutant) at the same stages (36 and 52 hours post-fertilization (hpf)) as in the microarray study. Results Thirty out of 32 riboprobes showed a positive in situ staining signal. Twenty seven out of these 30 genes were originally further classified as Smarca4-regulated retinal genes, while the remaining three as retinal-specific expression independent of Smarca4 regulation. It was found that 90.32% of the significant microarray comparisons that were used to identify Smarca4-regulated retinal genes had a corresponding qualitative expression change in the in situ hybridization comparisons. This is highly concordant with the theoretical true discovery rate of 95%. Hierarchical clustering was used to investigate the similarity of the cellular expression patterns of 25 out of the 27 Smarca4-regulated retinal genes that had a sufficiently high expression signal for an unambiguous identification of retinal expression domains. Three broad groups of expression pattern were identified; including 1) photoreceptor layer/outer nuclear layer specific expression at 52 hpf, 2) ganglion cell layer (GCL) and/or inner nuclear layer (INL) specific expression at both 36 & 52 hpf, and 3) GCL and/or INL specific expression at 52 hpf only. Some of these genes have recently been demonstrated to play key roles in retinal cell-type specification, differentiation and lamination. For the remaining three

  7. The Spectral Signature of Accretion in Low-Mass Protostars: Observations and Non-LTE Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesemeyer, Helmut

    1997-06-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a study bringing together theoretical concepts of the earliest phase of low-mass star formation and its observational evidence. Thus, two aspects have been considered: Observational evidence: In order to detect protostellar collapse by virtue of kinematical features in spectral line profiles, both optically thick and optically thin tracers are needed. According to Leung & Brown (1977, ApJ 214, L73), a protostellar envelope undergoing collapse exhibits a red-shifted self-absorption in a molecular line transition if the excitation gradient is negative. Optically thin emission (e.g. from the corresponding isotopomere's line) corroborates the conclusions by ruling out the case of independent components filling the observing beam. The nearby (d~200 pc) globular filament L 1082 (no. 9 from a catalog assembled by Schneider & Elmegreen, 1979, ApJS 41, 87) provides at least three candidates showing unambigeous footprints of protostellar collapse. By means of millimeter-interferometry (with the iram and bima interferometers Asz well as single dish spectroscopy and continuum imaging (using the iram 30 m telescope), these candidates were identified and characterized. As moderately optically thick high-density tracers, the CS (2,1), (3,2) and (5,4) transitions have been observed. The optically thin (2,1) lines of C34S and C18O were measured to confirm the evidence for collapse. Preliminary results from observations with isophot and isocam were used to better constrain the luminosity of one of the collapse candidates, which subsequently has been classified as an extreme Class 0 protostar. Theoretical concepts: For reasons evidenced by the observed column density distributions and by systematic shifts of the molecular line emission across the sources, spherically-symmetric collapse has to be ruled out. Instead, scenarios such as core formation in sheet-like clouds (as proposed by Hartmann et al., 1994, ApJ 430, L49) and magnetic accretion

  8. DynaPop-X: A population dynamics model applied to spatio-temporal exposure assessment - Implementation aspects from the CRISMA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Christoph; Steinnocher, Klaus; Humer, Heinrich; Huber, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    .K., Hunter, G.J. (2007) A spatio-temporal population model to support risk assessment and damage analysis for decision-making. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 21(8), 935-953. Aubrecht, C., Fuchs, S., Neuhold, C. (2013a) Spatio-temporal aspects and dimensions in integrated disaster risk management. Natural Hazards, 68(3), 1205-1216. Aubrecht, C., Özceylan, D., Steinnocher, K., Freire, S. (2013b) Multi-level geospatial modeling of human exposure patterns and vulnerability indicators. Natural Hazards, 68(1), 147-163. Bhaduri, B. (2008) Population distribution during the day. In S. Shekhar & X. Hui, eds., Encyclopedia of GIS. Springer US, 880-885. Cockings, S., Martin, D. & Leung, S. (2010) Population 24/7: building space-time specific population surface models. In M. Haklay, J. Morley, & H. Rahemtulla, eds., Proceedings of the GIS Research UK 18th Annual conference. GISRUK 2010. London, UK, 41-47. Freire, S., Aubrecht, C. (2012) Integrating population dynamics into mapping human exposure to seismic hazard. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 12(11), 3533-3543.

  9. Using Uranium-series isotopes to understand processes of rapid soil formation in tropical volcanic settings: an example from Basse-Terre, French Guadeloupe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Lin Ma1, Yvette Pereyra1, Peter B Sak2, Jerome Gaillardet3, Heather L Buss4 and Susan L Brantley5, (1) University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, United States, (2) Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA, United States, (3) Institute de Physique d Globe Paris, Paris, France, (4) University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom, (5) Pennsylvania State University Main Campus, University Park, PA, United States Uranium-series isotopes fractionate during chemical weathering and their activity ratios can be used to determine timescales and rates of soil formation. Such soil formation rates provide important information to understand processes related to rapid soil formation in tropical volcanic settings, especially with respect to their fertility and erosion. Recent studies also highlighted the use of U-series isotopes to trace and quantify atmospheric inputs to surface soils. Such a process is particularly important in providing mineral nutrients to ecosystems in highly depleted soil systems such as the tropical soils. Here, we report U-series isotope compositions in thick soil profiles (>10 m) developed on andesitic pyroclastic flows in Basse-Terre Island of French Guadeloupe. Field observations have shown heterogeneity in color and texture in these thick profiles. However, major element chemistry and mineralogy show some general depth trends. The main minerals present throughout the soil profile are halloysite and gibbsite. Chemically immobile elements such as Al, Fe, and Ti show a depletion profile relative to Th while elements such as K, Mn, and Si show a partial depletion profile at depth. Mobile elements such as Ca, Mg, and Sr have undergone intensive weathering at depths, and an addition profile near the surface, most likely related to atmospheric inputs. (238U/232Th) activity ratios in one soil profile from the Brad David watershed in this study ranged from 0.374 to 1.696, while the (230Th/232Th) ratios ranged from 0.367 to 1.701. A decrease of (238U/232Th) in the

  10. EDITORIAL Solar harvest Solar harvest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-12-01

    investigating organic solar cell technology. In spring 2011, Nanotechnology launches a new section wholly dedicated to the coverage of new and stimulating research into energy sources based on nanoscale science and technology. There is at present considerable concern over how to fuel the planet in a sustainable manner with the increasingly energy-thirsty human population. Yet the Earth receives more solar energy in one hour than the world population consumes in one year [8]. No wonder research into photovoltaics and ways of increasing the efficiency with which this energy can be harnessed continues to hold so much fascination. References [1] Levin I and White C E 1949 J. Chem. Phys. 18 417 [2] Chirvase D, Parisi J, Hummelen J C and Dyakonov V 2004 Nanotechnology 15 1317 [3] Kwong C Y, Choy W C H, Djurišić A B, Chui P C, Cheng K W and Chan W K 2004 Nanotechnology 15 1156 [4] Krebs F C, Thomann Y, Thomann R and Andreasen J W 2008 Nanotechnology 19 424013 [5] Zeng T-W, Lin Y-Y, Lo H-H, Chen C-W, Chen C-H, Liou S-C, Huang H-Y and Su W-F 2006 Nanotechnology 17 5387 [6] Dissanayake D M N M, Hatton R A, Lutz T, Curry R J and Silva S R P 2009 Nanotechnology 20 245202 [7] Nicholson P G and Castro F A 2010 Nanotechnology 21 492001 [8] http://www.solarenergyworld.org/solar-energy-facts/

  11. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Lettenmaier, Dennis

    2012-05-26

    We proposed to extend Maurer’s data sets through at least 2005 (to include extreme drought years in the Colorado basin). We updated and verified the forcings for tmin, tmax, and precipitation over the Colorado River basin at 1/8-deg spatial resolution through November 2008, with the potential to alter the resolution as needed (we subsequently extended the Maurer et al data set over the entire continental U.S. at 1/16 degree spatial resolution; see Livneh et al., 2013). We proposed to use either MODIS-based land cover data for recent years, or modification of the existing fixed seasonal cycle used in VIC (based on University of Maryland land cover data) to represent interannual variations in vegetation characteristics such as leaf area index (LAI) particularly in drought years. We assessed model performance with respect to evapotranspiration estimation through comparison of the model predictions with ground observations and in experiments that use time-varying and fixed seasonal LAI cycles (based on University of Maryland land cover data) in a test region of northwestern Mexico where the ground ET observations from eddy covariance tower sites are available for the period from 2001 to 2008 (Tang et al., 2011). We also proposed to implement statistical downscaling with an adjustment to constrain precipitation changes at the GCM level. These simulations were performed, using 20 IPCC AR4 GCMs over the Colorado River basin with two global emissions scenarios, and are reported in Vano et al., 2014. Task 2: Coupled model implementation We proposed to implement the “standard” climate version of WRF, as used by collaborator Ruby Leung in NARCCAP simulations (see Section 5.4), and perform tests to assure that model output for runs equivalent to NARCCAP Phase 1 (reanalysis boundary conditions) are consistent. We proposed do test sensitivity to higher spatial resolution. We made a run of 11 years’ length with the “standard” version of WRF, forced by NCEP/DOE with

  12. Observing a Severe Dust Storm Event over China using Multiple Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Xue, Yong; Guang, Jie; Mei, Linlu

    2013-04-01

    make use of all useful satellite data to observe one severe dust procedure, multi-sensor and multi-algorithm AOD data were combined. In this paper, the satellite instruments considered are MISR, MODIS, POLDER and CALIPSO. In addition, air pollution index (API) data were used to validate the satellite AOD data. We chose the study region with a longitude range from 76°N to 136°N and a latitude range from 15°E to 60°E. Index Terms—aerosol optical depth, dust, satellite REFERENCES Adhikary, B., Kulkarni, S., Dallura A., Tang, Y., Chai, T., Leung, L. R., Qian, Y., Chung, C. E., Ramanathan,V. and Carmichael, G. R., 2008, A regional scale chemical transport modeling of Asian aerosols with data assimilation of AOD observations using optimal interpolation technique, Atmospheric Environment, 42(37), 8600-8615. Carboni, E., Thomas, G. E., Sayer, A. M., Siddans, R., Poulsen, C. A., Grainger, R. G., Ahn, C., Antoine, D., Bevan, S., Braak, R., Brindley, H., DeSouza-Machado, S., Deuz'e, J. L., Diner, D., Ducos, F., Grey, W., Hsu, C., Kalashnikova, O. V., Kahn, R., North, P. R. J., Salustro, C., Smith, A., Tanr'e, D., Torres, O., and Veihelmann, B., 2012, Intercomparison of desert dust optical depth from satellite measurements, Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 5, 1973-2002. Deuze', J. L., Bre'on, F. M., Devaux, C., Goloub, Herman, M., Lafrance, B., Maignan, F., Marchand, A.,Nadal, F., Perry, G., and Tanre', D., 2001, Remote sensing of aerosols over land surfaces from POLDER-ADEOS-1 polarized measurements, Journal of Geophysical Research, 106(D5), 4913-4926. Ehlers, M., 1991, Multisensor image fusion techniques in remote sensing, ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, 46, 19-30. Han, X., Ge. C., Tao, J. H., Zhang, M. G., Zhang, R. J., 2012, Air Quality Modeling for a Strong Dust Event in East Asia in March 2010, Aerosol and Air Quality Research, 12: 615-628. Hsu, N. C., Tsay, S. C., King, M. D. and Herman, J. R., 2004, Aerosol Properties over Bright

  13. What makes Aspergillus fumigatus a successful pathogen? Genes and molecules involved in invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Abad, Ana; Fernández-Molina, Jimena Victoria; Bikandi, Joseba; Ramírez, Andoni; Margareto, Javier; Sendino, Javier; Hernando, Fernando Luis; Pontón, Jose; Garaizar, Javier; Rementeria, Aitor

    2010-01-01

    -C, fumitremorgin A-C, verruculogen, fumagillin, helvolic acid, aflatoxin B1 and G1, and laeA. Two sections cover genes and molecules related with nutrient uptake, signaling and metabolic regulations involved in virulence, including enzymes, such as serine proteases (alp/asp f 13, alp2, and asp f 18), metalloproteases (mep/asp f 5, mepB, and mep20), aspartic proteases (pep/asp f 10, pep2, and ctsD), dipeptidylpeptidases (dppIV and dppV), and phospholipases (plb1-3 and phospholipase C); siderophores and iron acquisition (sidA-G, sreA, ftrA, fetC, mirB-C, and amcA); zinc acquisition (zrfA-H, zafA, and pacC); amino acid biosynthesis, nitrogen uptake, and cross-pathways control (areA, rhbA, mcsA, lysF, cpcA/gcn4p, and cpcC/gcn2p); general biosynthetic pathway (pyrG, hcsA, and pabaA), trehalose biosynthesis (tpsA and tpsB), and other regulation pathways such as those of the MAP kinases (sakA/hogA, mpkA-C, ste7, pbs2, mkk2, steC/ste11, bck1, ssk2, and sho1), G-proteins (gpaA, sfaD, and cpgA), cAMP-PKA signaling (acyA, gpaB, pkaC1, and pkaR), His kinases (fos1 and tcsB), Ca(2+) signaling (calA/cnaA, crzA, gprC and gprD), and Ras family (rasA, rasB, and rhbA), and others (ace2, medA, and srbA). Finally, we also comment on the effect of A. fumigatus allergens (Asp f 1-Asp f 34) on IA. The data gathered generate a complex puzzle, the pieces representing virulence factors or the different activities of the fungus, and these need to be arranged to obtain a comprehensive vision of the virulence of A. fumigatus. The most recent gene expression studies using DNA-microarrays may be help us to understand this complex virulence, and to detect targets to develop rapid diagnostic methods and new antifungal agents. PMID:20974273

  14. Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore Mohanty

    2012-03-31

    The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in Ugnu, West Sak and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir on top of Milne Point varies from 200 cp to 10,000 cp and the depth is about 3300 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west on the top of the Kuparuk River Unit and onto the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity increases towards the west. Currently, the operators are testing cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) in Ugnu, but oil recovery is expected to be low (< 10%). Improved oil recovery techniques must be developed for these reservoirs. The proximity to the permafrost is an issue for thermal methods; thus nonthermal methods must be considered. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methods for the Ugnu reservoir on the top of Milne Point. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) formulation was developed for a viscous oil (330 cp) where as an alkaline-surfactant formulation was developed for a heavy oil (10,000 cp). These formulations were tested in one-dimensional and quarter five-spot Ugnu sand packs. Micromodel studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of high viscosity ratio displacements. Laboratory displacements were modeled and transport parameters (such as relative permeability) were determined that can be used in reservoir simulations. Ugnu oil is suitable for chemical flooding because it is biodegraded and contains some organic acids. The acids react with injected alkali to produce soap. This soap helps in lowering interfacial tension between water and oil which in turn helps in the formation of macro and micro emulsions. A lower amount of synthetic surfactant is needed because of the presence of organic acids in the oil. Tertiary ASP flooding is very effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. This chemical formulation

  15. Transmission eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakoni, Fioralba; Haddar, Houssem

    2013-10-01

    associated transmission eigenfunctions. The three papers by respectively Robbiano [11], Blasten and Päivärinta [12], and Lakshtanov and Vainberg [13] provide new complementary results on the existence of transmission eigenvalues for the scalar problem under weak assumptions on the (possibly complex valued) refractive index that mainly stipulates that the contrast does not change sign on the boundary. It is interesting here to see three different new methods to obtain these results. On the other hand, the paper by Bonnet-Ben Dhia and Chesnel [14] addresses the Fredholm properties of the interior transmission problem when the contrast changes sign on the boundary, exhibiting cases where this property fails. Using more standard approaches, the existence and structure of transmission eigenvalues are analyzed in the paper by Delbary [15] for the case of frequency dependent materials in the context of Maxwell's equations, whereas the paper by Vesalainen [16] initiates the study of the transmission eigenvalue problem in unbounded domains by considering the transmission eigenvalues for Schrödinger equation with non-compactly supported potential. The paper by Monk and Selgas [17] addresses the case where the dielectric is mounted on a perfect conductor and provides some numerical examples of the localization of associated eigenvalues using the linear sampling method. A series of papers then addresses the question of localization of transmission eigenvalues and the associated inverse spectral problem for spherically stratified media. More specifically, the paper by Colton and Leung [18] provides new results on complex transmission eigenvalues and a new proof for uniqueness of a solution to the inverse spectral problem, whereas the paper by Sylvester [19] provides sharp results on how to locate all the transmission eigenvalues associated with angular independent eigenfunctions when the index of refraction is constant. The paper by Gintides and Pallikarakis [20] investigates an

  16. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    panel on the lifecycles of galaxies began with a talk by Ben Cook (astrobites author) on how we can infer whether a galaxy experienced large mergers. Cook used the Illustris simulation to study how stars are left in so-called stellar halos far outside galaxies after they have large collisions. Yicheng Guo then showed evidence that lower-mass galaxies tend to form their stars in a few large bursts, rather than long, steady formation like in more massive galaxies. Ali Khostavan measured the strengths of particular emission lines, which are found to increase further back in time, telling us that galaxies were forming many more stars early on in the universe than they are now.Artists impression of the heart of an active galaxy, known as an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab]Irene Shivael presented a new measurement of the relationship between the star-formation rate of a galaxy and the mass of its stars (i.e., its stellar mass). This relation has been measured to have very different values by a large number of different studies! Gene Leung look at the spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and found that many of them are blowing out large blobs of gas into the space around their host galaxies. This process is an important part of how we think galaxies shut off their star formation: the AGN blow the gas far away, so it cannot collapse and form new stars.Rui Xue studied large glowing halos of Lyman-alpha emission that are seen around high-redshift galaxies. This emission is lighting up the gas around each galaxy and can be used to measure the circum-galactic medium, the stuff around galaxies extremely far away. SungWon Kwak ran new simulations to study how small (dwarf) galaxies can form central bars or spiral arms when they fall into clusters or collide with other galaxies. Dusan Keres closed out the session by talking about a new, very powerful simulation called FIRE, which uses very complicated star-formation models and

  17. What influences climate and glacier change in southwestern China?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.

    2011-12-01

    , Song L, Zhang W, Norm C, Cao W, Wilfred H T, Liu H, Wang S, Du J, Xin H and Chang Li 2011 Climate and glacier change in southwestern China during the past several decades Environ. Res. Lett. 6 045404 Qian Y, Flanner M G, Leung L R and Wang W 2011 Sensitivity studies on the impacts of Tibetan Plateau snowpack pollution on the Asian hydrological cycle and monsoon climate Atmos. Chem. Phys. 11 1929-48 Ramanathan V, Li F, Ramana M V, Praveen P S, Kim D, Corrigan C E, Nguyen H, Stone E A, Schauer J J, Carmichael G R, Adhikary B and Yoon S C 2007 Atmospheric brown clouds: Hemispherical and regional variations in long-range transport, absorption, and radiative forcing J. Geophys. Res. 112 D22S21 Sakai A, Nakawo M and Fujita K 1998 Melt rate of ice cliffs on the Lirung Glacier, Nepal Himalayas, 1996 Bull. Glaciol. Res. 16 57-66 Sakai A, Nishimura K, Kadota T and Takeuchi N 2009 Onset of calving at supraglacial lakes on debris covered glaciers of the Nepal Himalayas J. Glaciol. 55 909-17 Scherler D, Bookhagen B and Strecker M R 2011 Spatially variable response of Himalayan glaciers to climate change affected by debris cover Nature Geosci. 4 156-9 Takeuchi N, Kohshima S and Seko K 2001 Structure, formation, darkening process of albedo reducing material (cryoconite) on a Himalayan glacier: a granular algal mat growing on the glacier Arct. Antarct. Alp. Res. 33 115-22 Warren S G and Wiscombe W J 1980 A model for the spectral albedo of snow. II: Snow containing atmospheric aerosols J. Atmos. Sci. 37 2734-45 Wiscombe W J and Warren S G 1980 A model for the spectral albedo of snow. I: Pure snow J. Atmos. Sci. 37 2712-3 Yao T D, Wang Y, Liu S, Pu J, Shen Y and Lu A 2004 Recent glacial retreat in high Asia in China and its impact on water resource in Northwest China Sci. China Ser. D 47 1065-75 Yasunari T J, Bonasoni P, Laj P, Fujita K, Vuillermoz E, Marinoni A, Cristofanelli P, Duchi R, Tartari G and Lau K M 2010 Estimated impact of black carbon deposition during pre-monsoon season

  18. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    products of dissimilatory iron reduction. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 74:574-583. 10. Karpinets, T.V., A.Y Obraztsova, Y. Wang, D.D. Schmoyer, G.H. Kora, B.H. Park, M.H. Serres, M.F. Ropmine, M.L. Land, T.B. Kothe, J.K. Fredrickson, K.H. Nealson, and E.C. Uberbacher 2010. Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species? cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes. Funct. Integr. Genomics 10: 97 ? 110. (DOI 10.1007/s10143-009-0142-y) 11. Bretschger, O., A.C.M. Cheung, F. Mansfeld, and K.H. Nealson. 2010. Comparative microbial fuel cell evaluations of Shewanella spp. Electroanalysis 22: 883-894. 12. McLean, J.S., G. Wanger, Y.A. Gorby, M. Wainstein, J. McQuaid, Shun?ichi Ishii, O. Bretschger, H. Beyanal, K.H. Nealson. 2010. Quantification of electron transfer rates to a solid phase electron acceptor through the stages of biofilm formation from single cells to multicellular communities. Env. Sci. Technol. 44:2721-2717. 13. El-Naggar, M., G. Wanger, K.M. Leung, T.D. Yuzvinsky, G. Southam, J. Yang, W.M. Lau, K.H. Nealson, and Y.A. Gorby. 2010. Electrical Transport Along Bacterial Nanowires from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 107:18127-18131. 14. Biffinger, J.C., L.A. Fitzgerald, R. Ray, B.J. Little, S.E. Lizewski, E.R. Petersen, B.R. Ringeisen, W.C. Sanders, P.E. Sheehan, J.J. Pietron, J.W. Baldwin, L.J. Nadeau, G.R. Johnson, M. Ribbens, S.E. Finkel, K.H. Nealson. 2010. The utility of Shewanella japonica for microbial fuel cells. Bioresource Technol. 102:290-297. 15. Rodionov, D. , C. Yang, X. Li, I. Rodionova, Y. Wang, A.Y. Obraztsova, O. P. Zagnitko, R. Overbeek, M. F. Romine, S. Reed, J.K. Fredrickson, K.H. Nealson, A.L. Osterman. 2010. Genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization pathways in the Shewanella genus. BMC Genomics 2010, 11:494 16. Kan, J., L. Hsu, A.C.M. Cheung, M. Pirbazari, and K.H. Nealson. 2011. Current production by bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells enriched from wastewater sludge