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Sample records for l-alanine difracao multipla

  1. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  2. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; et al

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  3. Expression of an L-alanine dehydrogenase gene in Zymomonas mobilis and excretion of L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlenbusch, I.; Sahm, H.; Sprenger, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Gene alaD for L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus was cloned and introduced into Z. mobilis. Under the control of the strong promoter of the pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) gene, the enzyme was expressed up to a specific activity of nearly 1 {mu}mol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg of protein{sup {minus}1} in recombinant cells. As a result of this high L-alanine dehydrogenase activity, growing cells excreted up to 10 mmol of alanine per 280 mmol of glucose utilized into a mineral salts medium. By the addition of 85 mM NH{sub 4}{sup +} to the medium, growth of the recombinant cells stopped, and up to 41 mmol of alanine was secreted. As alanine dehydrogenase competed with pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) for the same substrate (pyruvate), PDC activity was reduced by starvation for the essential PDC cofactor thiamine PP{sub i}. A thiamine auxotrophy mutant of Z. mobilis which carried the alaD gene was starved for 40 h in glucose-supplemented mineral salts medium and then shifted to mineral salts medium with 85 mM NH {sub 4}{sup +} and 280 mmol of glucose. The recombinants excreted up to 84 mmol of alanine over 25 h. Alanine excretion proceeded at an initial velocity of 238 nmol {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mg(dry weight){sup {minus}1}. Despite this high activity, the excretion rate seemed to be a limiting factor, as the intracellular concentration of alanine was as high as 260 mM at the beginning of the excretion phase and decreased to 80 to 90 mM over 24 h.

  4. Catalytic properties of Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Mureşan, L; Vancea, D; Presecan, E; Porumb, H; Lascu, I; Oargă, M; Matinca, D; Abrudan, I; Bârzu, O

    1983-02-15

    (1) L-Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus was purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure involving Cibacron-Blue 3G-A Sepharose 4B-CL, and Sepharose 6B-CL, and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. (2) Following immobilization via two of the six subunits, L-alanine dehydrogenase retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. The affinity of the immobilized enzyme for NH4+, pyruvate and L-alanine, was not different to that of the soluble form. The Km of the Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase for pyridine coenzymes was 6-8-times higher than in the soluble case. (3) The stability of L-alanine dehydrogenase towards urea or thermal denaturation was increased by immobilization. (4) The incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h of the immobilized L-alanine dehydrogenase with 3 M NH4Cl/NH4OH buffer (pH 9) released 70% of the enzyme. The specific activity and the affinity of the 'solubilized' L-alanine dehydrogenase for the pyridine coenzymes was the same as that obtained with the original, soluble L-alanine dehydrogenase. PMID:6404304

  5. Initiation of Spore Germination in Bacillus subtilis: Relationship to Inhibition of l-Alanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Chandan

    1974-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of anthranilic acid esters (methyl anthranilate and N-methyl anthranilate) on the l-alanine-induced initiation of spore germination was examined in Bacillus subtilis 168. Methyl anthranilate irreversibly inhibited alanine initiation by a competitive mechanism. In its presence, the inhibition could be reversed only by the combined addition of d-glucose, d-fructose, and K+. Both l-alanine dehydrogenase and l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase, enzymes which catalyze the first reaction in l-alanine metabolism, were competitively inhibited by methyl anthranilate. The Ki values for germination initiation (0.053 mM) and of l-glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (0.068 mM) were similar, whereas that for l-alanine dehydrogenase (0.4 mM) was six to seven times higher. Since a mutant lacking l-alanine dehydrogenase activity germinated normally in l-alanine alone, it is speculated that the major pathway of l-alanine metabolism during initiation may be via transmination reaction. PMID:4212093

  6. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production. PMID:26453031

  7. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [3H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [3H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [3H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  8. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed. PMID:26073055

  9. Sodium dependency of L-alanine absorption in canine Thiry-Vella loops.

    PubMed

    Fleshler, B; Nelson, R A

    1970-03-01

    The effect of sodium on the absorption of L-alanine in vivo was tested by measuring the absorption of L-alanine from Thiry-Vella loops in dogs. Solutions containing L-alanine (10 or 50 mM) sodium at concentrations of 0, 74, or 145 m-equiv/1 and mannitol, as needed to maintain isotonicity were instilled into the loops for 10 minutes. Similar studies were done with L-alanine 50 mM and either 0 or 145 m-equiv/1 of sodium for five minutes. Under all conditions absorption of alanine was significantly less from the solution initially free of sodium. Although these differences were statistically significant, the physiological significance was not great since the actual differences in amounts of L-alanine absorbed were small. Insorption of sodium was low from the fluid which initially had no sodium, but exsorption proceeded rapidly and was unaffected by the luminal sodium concentration. This resulted in a rapid rise of intraluminal sodium concentration when no sodium was initially present. This persistent exsorption of sodium was, therefore, adequate to provide sodium in the lumen to activate the sodium-dependent carrier, postulated on the basis of studies in vitro. These data in vivo are consistent with the view that sodium at the intraluminal surface is important in accelerating amino acid transport, but indicate that in the absence of added intraluminal sodium the gut mucosa itself, under normal circumstances, provides the sodium needed for L-alanine absorption. PMID:5423904

  10. Exchange interactions and magnetic dimension in Cu(L-alanine)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, R.; Passeggi, M. C. G.; Novak, M. A.; Symko, O. G.; Oseroff, S. B.; Nascimento, O. R.; Terrile, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the magnetic properties of the copper (II) complex of the amino acid l-alanine [Cu(l-alanine)2] is reported. The susceptibility of a powder sample has been measured between 0.013 and 240 K. A linear-spin-chain model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J=-0.52 K fits well the susceptibility data above 0.3 K. Room-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of single crystals of Cu(l-alanine)2 at 9 and 35 GHz show a single, exchange-narrowed resonance. The g tensor, with principal values g1=2.0554+/-0.0005, g2=2.1064+/-0.0005, and g3=2.2056+/-0.0005, reflects the crystal structure of Cu(l-alanine)2 and the electronic properties of the copper ions. The observed angular variation of the linewidth is attributed to the magnetic interactions, narrowed by the exchange coupling between copper ions, and shows a contribution characteristic of the dipole-dipole interaction in a spin system with a predominant two-dimensional spin dynamics. Considering the exchange-collapsed resonance corresponding to the two lattice sites for copper in Cu(l-alanine)2, we evaluate an exchange constant ||J(AB1)||=0.47 K between nonequivalent copper neighbors in a spin chain, similar to the value obtained from the susceptibility data. The one-dimensional magnetic behavior suggested by the susceptibility data in Cu(l-alanine)2, where the metal ions are distributed in layers, is explained by proposing that carboxylate bridges provide electronic paths for superexchange interactions between coppers. Considering the characteristics of the molecular structure of Cu(l-alanine)2, the layers seem to be magnetically split off into one-dimensional zigzag ribbons. The apparent disagreement between the one-dimensional behavior suggested by the susceptibility data and the two-dimensional behavior of the spin dynamics suggested by the EPR linewidth is analyzed.

  11. Inducible l-Alanine Exporter Encoded by the Novel Gene ygaW (alaE) in Escherichia coli ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hatsuhiro; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Tobe, Ryuta; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Katsumata, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    We previously isolated a mutant hypersensitive to l-alanyl-l-alanine from a non-l-alanine-metabolizing Escherichia coli strain and found that it lacked an inducible l-alanine export system. Consequently, this mutant showed a significant accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and a reduction in the l-alanine export rate compared to the parent strain. When the mutant was used as a host to clone a gene(s) that complements the dipeptide-hypersensitive phenotype, two uncharacterized genes, ygaW and ytfF, and two characterized genes, yddG and yeaS, were identified. Overexpression of each gene in the mutant resulted in a decrease in the intracellular l-alanine level and enhancement of the l-alanine export rate in the presence of the dipeptide, suggesting that their products function as exporters of l-alanine. Since ygaW exhibited the most striking impact on both the intra- and the extracellular l-alanine levels among the four genes identified, we disrupted the ygaW gene in the non-l-alanine-metabolizing strain. The resulting isogenic mutant showed the same intra- and extracellular l-alanine levels as observed in the dipeptide-hypersensitive mutant obtained by chemical mutagenesis. When each gene was overexpressed in the wild-type strain, which does not intrinsically excrete alanine, only the ygaW gene conferred on the cells the ability to excrete alanine. In addition, expression of the ygaW gene was induced in the presence of the dipeptide. On the basis of these results, we concluded that YgaW is likely to be the physiologically most relevant exporter for l-alanine in E. coli and proposed that the gene be redesignated alaE for alanine export. PMID:21531828

  12. Growth and characterization of pure and semiorganic nonlinear optical Lithium Sulphate admixtured l-alanine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, T.; Selvarajan, P.; Freeda, T. H.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2013-04-01

    Lithium sulphate admixtured l-alanine (LSLA) salt was synthesized and the solubility of the commercially available l-alanine and the synthesized LSLA sample was determined in de-ionized water at various temperatures. In accordance with the solubility data, the saturated aqueous solutions of l-alanine and lithium admixtured l-alanine were prepared separately and the single crystals of the samples were grown by the solution method with a slow evaporation technique. Studying single x-ray diffraction shows that pure and LSLA crystal belong to the orthorhombic system with a non-centrosymmetric space group P212121. Using the powder x-ray diffraction study, the crystallinity of the grown crystals is confirmed and the diffraction peaks are indexed. The various functional groups present in the pure and LSLA crystal are elucidated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study. UV-visible transmittance is recorded to study the optical transmittance range for the grown crystals. The powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical property of the grown crystals. From the microhardness test, the hardness of the grown crystals is estimated. The dielectric behaviour, such as the dielectric constant and the loss of the sample, are measured as a function of temperature and frequency. The ac conductivity of the grown crystals is also studied and the activation energy is calculated.

  13. L-alanine in a droplet of water: a density-functional molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Degtyarenko, Ivan M; Jalkanen, Karl J; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Nieminen, Risto M

    2007-04-26

    We report the results of a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study on an L-alanine amino acid in neutral aqueous solution. The whole system, the L-alanine zwitterion and 50 water molecules, was treated quantum mechanically. We found that the hydrophobic side chain (R = CH3) defines the trajectory path of the molecule. Initially fully hydrated in an isolated droplet of water, the amino acid moves to the droplet's surface, exposing its hydrophobic methyl group and alpha-hydrogen out of the water. The structure of an L-alanine with the methyl group exposed to the water surface was found to be energetically favorable compared to a fully hydrated molecule. The dynamic behavior of the system suggests that the first hydration shell of the amino acid is localized around carboxylate (CO2-) and ammonium (NH3+) functional groups; it is highly ordered and quite rigid. In contrast, the hydration shell around the side chain is much less structured, suggesting a modest influence of the methyl group on the structure of water. The number of water molecules in the first hydration shell of an alanine molecule is constantly changing; the average number was found to equal 7. The molecular dynamics results show that L-alanine in water does not have a preferred conformation, as all three of the molecule's functional sites (i.e., CH3, NH3+, CO2-) perform rotational movements around the C(alpha)-site bond. PMID:17407339

  14. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    SciTech Connect

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for ..cap alpha..-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10/sup 6/ to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: ..gamma..-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K/sup +/-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of /sup 14/C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 ..mu..M L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na/sup +/.

  15. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with uracil, guanine, thymine and L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, D.; Iyakutti, K.; Vasu, V.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental investigation of functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (OSWCNTs) with three nucleic acid bases such as uracil, guanine, thymine and one amino acid, L-alanine is carried out. Initially, the SWCNTs are oxidized by acid treatment. Further, the oxidized SWCNTs are effectively functionalized with aforementioned biological compounds by ultrasonication. The diameter of OSWCNTs has increased after the adsorption of biological compounds. The cumulative Π-Π stacking, hydrogen bond and polar interaction are the key factors to realize the adsorption. The amount of adsorption of each biological compound is estimated. The adsorption of guanine is more among all the four biological compounds.

  16. Rapid Crystallization of L-Alanine on Engineered Surfaces using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Alabanza, Anginelle M; Pozharski, Edwin; Aslan, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates the application of metal-assisted and microwave-accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique to rapid crystallization of L-alanine on surface engineered silver nanostructures. In this regard, silver island films (SIFs) were modified with hexamethylenediamine (HMA), 1-undecanethiol (UDET), and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA), which introduced -NH(2), -CH(3) and -COOH functional groups to SIFs, respectively. L-Alanine was crystallized on these engineered surfaces and blank SIFs at room temperature and using MA-MAEC technique. Significant improvements in crystal size, shape, and quality were observed on HMA-, MUDA- and UDET-modified SIFs at room temperature (crystallization time = 144, 40 and 147 min, respectively) as compared to those crystals grown on blank SIFs. Using the MA-MAEC technique, the crystallization time of L-alanine on engineered surfaces were reduced to 17 sec for microwave power level 10 (i.e., duty cycle 100%) and 7 min for microwave power level 1 (duty cycle 10%). Raman spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showed that L-Alanine crystals grown on engineered surfaces using MA-MAEC technique had identical characteristic peaks of L-alanine crystals grown using traditional evaporative crystallization. PMID:22267957

  17. Growth, Structural And Optical Studies On Bis L-alanine Lithium Chloride (BLALC) Single Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, A. S. J. Lucia; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-10-01

    Bis L-alanine Lithium Chloride (BLALC) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 15 x 9 x 4 mm3 have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colourless and transparent. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that BLALC belongs to orthorhombic system with a non-centro-symmetric space group P212121. The crystallinity of BLALC crystal was confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. The functional groups of the grown crystals have been identified by FTIR studies. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of BLALC crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  18. Experimental and DFT computational studies of L-alanine cadmium chloride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, I. Cicili; Dheivamalar, S.; Kirubavathi, K.; Selvaraju, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report the combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational spectra of nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium chloride (LACC). The single X-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic system C2 space group with cell parameters a = 16.270, b = 7.358, c = 7.887 and Z = 4. FTIR and Raman spectra of the nonlinear optical materials LACC have been recorded and analyzed. The optimized geometric bond length and bond angles are obtained with the help of density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP) calculation. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using DFT show good agreement with the experimental data. Using the natural bond orbital analysis the electronic effect and hydrogen bonding were confirmed. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap and the first order hyperpolarizability were calculated and it supports the nonlinear optical activity of LACC crystal.

  19. Gliotoxicity of the cyanotoxin, β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA)

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Alexander S.; Gehringer, Michelle M.; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Welch, Jeffrey H.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid variant β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) has long been associated with the increased incidence and progression of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). Previous studies have indicated that BMAA damages neurons via excitotoxic mechanisms. We have challenged rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with exogenous BMAA and found it to be cytotoxic. BMAA also induces a significant increase in Ca2+ influx, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupts mitochondrial activity in OECs. This is the first study investigating BMAA toxicity using pure glial cells. These findings align BMAA with the three proposed mechanisms of degeneration in ALS, those being non-cell autonomous death, excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23508043

  20. Linking β-methylamino-L-alanine exposure to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Annapolis, MD.

    PubMed

    Field, Nicholas C; Metcalf, James S; Caller, Tracie A; Banack, Sandra A; Cox, Paul A; Stommel, Elijah W

    2013-08-01

    Most amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases occur sporadically. Some environmental triggers have been implicated, including beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a cyanobacteria produced neurotoxin. This study aimed to identify environmental risk factors common to three sporadic ALS patients who lived in Annapolis, Maryland, USA and developed the disease within a relatively short time and within close proximity to each other. A questionnaire was used to identify potential risk factors for ALS among the cohort of patients. One common factor among the ALS patients was the frequent consumption of blue crab. Samples of blue crab from the patients' local fish market were tested for BMAA using LC-MS/MS. BMAA was identified in these Chesapeake Bay blue crabs. We conclude that the presence of BMAA in the Chesapeake Bay food web and the lifetime consumption of blue crab contaminated with BMAA may be a common risk factor for sporadic ALS in all three patients. PMID:23660330

  1. The fate of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in freshwater mussels.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Downing, Timothy Grant

    2014-03-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suggested as a causative agent for certain neurodegenerative diseases. This cyanotoxin bioaccumulates in an array of aquatic organisms, in which it occurs as both a free amino acid and in a protein-associated form. This study was intended to investigate the environmental fate of BMAA by examining the metabolism of isotopically labeled BMAA in four freshwater mussel species. All species showed substantial uptake of BMAA from the culture media. Data showed no significant evidence for BMAA catabolism in any of the animals but did suggest metabolism via the reversible covalent modification of BMAA in freshwater mussels, a process that appears to be variable in different species. PMID:24507126

  2. Controlled radical polymerization of an acrylamide containing L-alanine moiety via ATRP.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Homopolymerization of an optically active acrylamide having an amino acid moiety in the side chain, N-acryloyl-L-alanine (AAla) was carried out via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at room temperature using 2-hydroxyethyl-2'-methyl-2'-bromopropionate (HMB) or sodium-4-(bromomethyl)benzoate (SBB) as initiator in pure water, methanol/water mixture and pure methanol solvents. The polymerization reaction resulted in the optically active biocompatible amino acid-based homopolymer in good yield with narrow molecular weight distribution. The number average molecular weight increased with conversion and polydispersity was low. The structure and molecular weight of synthesized polymer were characterized by (1)H NMR, FT-IR spectroscopic techniques and size-exclusion chromatography. PMID:26385362

  3. Gliotoxicity of the cyanotoxin, β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Gehringer, Michelle M; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J; Welch, Jeffrey H; Neilan, Brett A

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid variant β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) has long been associated with the increased incidence and progression of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). Previous studies have indicated that BMAA damages neurons via excitotoxic mechanisms. We have challenged rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with exogenous BMAA and found it to be cytotoxic. BMAA also induces a significant increase in Ca2+ influx, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupts mitochondrial activity in OECs. This is the first study investigating BMAA toxicity using pure glial cells. These findings align BMAA with the three proposed mechanisms of degeneration in ALS, those being non-cell autonomous death, excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23508043

  4. Discovery of an L-alanine ester prodrug of the Hsp90 inhibitor, MPC-3100.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ho; Tangallapally, Rajendra; Kim, In Chul; Trovato, Richard; Parker, Daniel; Patton, J Scott; Reeves, Leslie; Bradford, Chad; Wettstein, Daniel; Baichwal, Vijay; Papac, Damon; Bajji, Ashok; Carlson, Robert; Yager, Kraig M

    2015-11-15

    Various types of Hsp90 inhibitors have been and continue to undergo clinical investigation. One development candidate is the purine-based, synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor 1 (MPC-3100), which successfully completed a phase I clinical study. However, further clinical development of 1 was hindered by poor solubility and consequent formulation issues and promoted development of a more water soluble prodrug. Towards this end, numerous pro-moieties were explored in vitro and in vivo. These studies resulted in identification of L-alanine ester mesylate, 2i (MPC-0767), which exhibited improved aqueous solubility, adequate chemical stability, and rapid bioconversion without the need for solubilizing excipients. Based on improved physical characteristics and favorable PK and PD profiles, 2i mesylate was selected for further development. A convergent, scalable, chromatography-free synthesis for 2i mesylate was developed to support further clinical evaluation. PMID:26483201

  5. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations. PMID:26119066

  6. Fibrous biodegradable l-alanine-based scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Srinath, Deepta; Lin, Shigang; Knight, Darryl K; Rizkalla, Amin S; Mequanint, Kibret

    2014-07-01

    In vascular tissue engineering, three-dimensional (3D) biodegradable scaffolds play an important role in guiding seeded cells to produce matrix components by providing both mechanical and biological cues. The objective of this work was to fabricate fibrous biodegradable scaffolds from novel poly(ester amide)s (PEAs) derived from l-alanine by electrospinning, and to study the degradation profiles and its suitability for vascular tissue-engineering applications. In view of this, l-alanine-derived PEAs (dissolved in chloroform) were electrospun together with 18-30% w/w polycaprolactone (PCL) to improve spinnability. A minimum of 18% was required to effectively electrospin the solution while the upper value was set in order to limit the influence of PCL on the electrospun PEA fibres. Electrospun fibre mats with average fibre diameters of ~0.4 µm were obtained. Both fibre diameter and porosity increased with increasing PEA content and solution concentration. The degradation of a PEA fibre mat over a period of 28 days indicated that mass loss kinetics was linear, and no change in molecular weight was found, suggesting a surface erosion mechanism. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) cultured for 7 days on the fibre mats showed significantly higher viability (p < 0.0001), suggesting that PEA scaffolds provided a better microenvironment for seeded cells compared with control PCL fibre mats of similar fibre diameter and porosity. Furthermore, elastin expression on the PEA fibre mats was significantly higher than the pure PEA discs and pure PCL fibre mat controls (p < 0.0001). These novel biodegradable PEA fibrous scaffolds could be strong candidates for vascular tissue-engineering applications. PMID:22899439

  7. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaignac, A. L. O.; Lima, R. J. C.; Façanha Filho, P. F.; Moreno, A. J. D.; Freire, P. T. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  8. Determination of β-Cyano-L-alanine, γ-Glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, and Common Free Amino Acids in Vicia sativa (Fabaceae) Seeds by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Megías, Cristina; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A method for determination of β-cyano-L-alanine, γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine and other free amino acids in Vicia sativa is presented. Seed extracts were derivatized by reaction with diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate and analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Calibration curves showed very good linearity of the response. The limit of detection and quantification was 0.15 and 0.50 μM, respectively. The method has high intra- (RSD = 0.28–0.31%) and interrepeatability (RSD = 2.76–3.08%) and remarkable accuracy with a 99% recovery in spiked samples. The method is very easy to carry out and allows for ready analysis of large number of samples using very basic HPLC equipment because the derivatized samples are very stable and have very good chromatographic properties. The method has been applied to the determination of γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, β-cyano-L-alanine, and common free amino acids in eight wild populations of V. sativa from southwestern Spain. PMID:25587488

  9. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L.

    2014-11-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments.

  10. Biotransfer of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in a eutrophicated freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-03-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA. PMID:25738330

  11. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) metabolism in the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Grant Downing, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) bioaccumulates and biomagnifies within the environment. However, most reports on the environmental presence of BMAA focus on the presence of BMAA in animals rather than in plants. Various laboratory studies have reported that this neurotoxin, implicated in neurodegenerative disease, is rapidly taken up by various aquatic and terrestrial plants, including crop plants. In this study the metabolism of BMAA in the aquatic macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum, was investigated using stable isotopically labelled BMAA. Data show that the toxin is rapidly removed from the environment by the plant. However, during depuration cellular BMAA concentrations decrease considerably, without excretion of the toxin back into the environment and without catabolism of BMAA, evidenced by the absence of label transfer to other amino acids. This strongly suggests that BMAA is metabolised via covalent modification and sequestered inside the plant as a BMAA-derivative. This modification may be reversed in humans following consumption of BMAA-containing plant material. These data therefore impact on the assessment of the risk of human exposure to this neurotoxin. PMID:26036420

  12. Bacteria do not incorporate β-N-methylamino-L-alanine into their proteins.

    PubMed

    van Onselen, Rianita; Cook, Niall A; Phelan, Richard R; Downing, Tim G

    2015-08-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), is commonly found in both a free and proteinassociated form in various organisms exposed to the toxin. The long latency of development of neurodegeneration attributed to BMAA, is hypothesized to be the result of excitotoxicity following slow release of the toxin from protein reservoirs. It was recently suggested that these BMAA-protein associations may reflect misincorporation of BMAA in place of serine, as occurs, for example, when canavanine misincorporates in place of arginine. We therefore compared BMAA and canavanine toxicty in various bacterial species, and misincorporation of these amino acids into proteins in a bacterial protein expression system. None of the bacterial species showed any physiological stress responses to BMAA in contrast to the growth reduction observed when cultures were incubated in media containing canavanine. LC-MS analysis confirmed uptake of BMAA from growth media. However, after immobilized metal affinity chromatography and SDS-PAGE purification of proteins produced in an E scherichia coli expression system, no BMAA was detected by either LC-MS or LC-MS/MS analysis using two derivatization methods, or by orbitrap MS of trypsin digests of the protein. We therefore conclude that BMAA is not misincorporated into proteins in bacteria and that the observed BMAA-protein association in bacteria is superficial. PMID:26051985

  13. Acute β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine Toxicity in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Rogers, Douglas G; Hoagland, Kyle D

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is considered to be an "excitotoxin," and its suggested mechanism of action is killing neurons. Long-term exposure to L-BMAA is believed to lead to neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). Objectives of this study were to determine the presumptive median lethal dose (LD50), the Lowest-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level (LOAEL), and histopathologic lesions caused by the naturally occurring BMAA isomer, L-BMAA, in mice. Seventy NIH Swiss Outbred mice (35 male and 35 female) were used. Treatment group mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.03, 0.3, 1, 2, and 3 mg/g body weight L-BMAA, respectively, and control mice were sham-injected. The presumptive LD50 of L-BMAA was 3 mg/g BW and the LOAEL was 2 mg/g BW. There were no histopathologic lesions in brain, liver, heart, kidney, lung, or spleen in any of the mice during the 14-day study. L-BMAA was detected in brains and livers in all of treated mice but not in control mice. Males injected with 0.03 mg/g BW, 0.3 mg/g BW, and 3.0 mg/g BW L-BMAA showed consistently higher concentrations (P < 0.01) in brain and liver samples as compared to females in those respective groups. PMID:26604922

  14. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L

    2014-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments. PMID:25373604

  15. Growth and characterization of L-alanine cadmium bromide a semiorganic nonlinear optical crystals.

    PubMed

    Ilayabarathi, P; Chandrasekaran, J

    2012-10-01

    A new semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal, l-alanine cadmium bromide (LACB) was grown from aqueous solution by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. As grown crystals were characterized for its spectral, thermal, linear and second order nonlinear optical properties. LACB crystallizes in orthorhombic system and unit cell parameters a=5.771(2)Å, b=6.014(4)Å, c=12.298(2)Å, α=β=γ=90° and volume=426.8(3)Å(3). The mode of vibrations of different molecular groups present in the crystal was identified by FTIR study. The grown crystals were found to be transparent in the entire visible region. The thermal strength and the decomposition of the grown crystals were studied using TG/DTA and DSC analysis. Dielectric measurement revealed that the crystals had very low dielectric constant at higher frequency in room temperature. The mechanical behavior was studied by Vicker's microhardness tester. The grown crystal has negative photoconductivity nature. The fluorescence spectrum of the crystal was recorded and its optical band gap is about 3.356 eV. The NLO property of crystal using modified Kurtz-Perry powder technique with Nd:YAG laser light of wavelength 1064nm indicated that their second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was half that of pure KDP. PMID:22885081

  16. Biotransfer of β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in a Eutrophicated Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA. PMID:25738330

  17. Transcription and genetic analyses of a putative N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase in Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Li, Chunhao

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a putative N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase gene (bb0666) was identified in the genome of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. This protein shares c. 30% identity with its counterparts from other bacteria. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that bb0666 along with two other genes (bb0665 and bb0667) are cotranscribed with the motility and chemotaxis genes. This newly identified operon is termed as pami. Sequence and primer extension analyses showed that pami was regulated by a σ70-like promoter, which is designated as Pami. Transcriptional analysis using a gene encoding green fluorescence protein as a reporter demonstrated that Pami functions in both Escherichia coli and B. burgdorferi. Genetic studies showed that the Δbb0666 mutant grows in long chains of unseparated cells, whose phenotype is similar to its counterparts in E. coli. Taken together, these results demonstrate that bb0666 is a homolog of MurNac-LAAs that contributes to the cell division of B. burgdorferi. PMID:19025570

  18. Moments and distribution functions for polypeptide chains. Poly-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Conrad, J C; Flory, P J

    1976-01-01

    Statistical mechanical averages of vectors and tensors characterizing the configurations of polypeptides have been calculated for poly-L-alanines (PLA) of xu = 2-400 peptide units. These quantities are expressed in the reference frame of the first peptide unit, the X axis being situated along the virtual bond, the Y axis in the plane of the peptide unit. The persistence vector a identical to (r) converges rapidly with chain length to its limit a infinity which lies virtually in the XZ plane. Configurational averages of Cartesian tensors up to the sixth rank formed from the displacement vector p = r-a have been computed. For xu greater than 50 the even moments of fourth and sixth rank formed from the reduced vector p for the real chain are well repreented by the freely jointed chain with 21.7 virtual bonds equivalent to one of the model. The moments of p display assymmetry for xu less than 50. Density distribution functions Wa(p), evaluated from the three-dimensional Hermite series truncated at the term in the polynomial involving the tensors of p of sixth rank, display no obvious symmetry for xu less than 50. Approximate spherical symmetry of the distribution of p about a is observed only for xu greater than or equal to 100. PMID:1249990

  19. Uptake of a cyanotoxin, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, by wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Schwanemann, Torsten; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    In order to study the uptake of the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) into the crop plant Triticum aestivum during germination and primary growth imbibed grains and 7-day-old seedlings were irrigated with 100 and 1000µg l(-1) BMAA for 4 days and 100µg l(-1) BMAA for 28 days. Content of derivatized free and protein-associated BMAA in seedlings, root and shoot tissue, respectively, were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Free BMAA was only detected in seedlings exposed to 1000µg l(-1) BMAA, whereas protein-associated BMAA was found at both exposure concentrations. Irrigation with 100µgl(-1) BMAA led to an uptake of the neurotoxin into roots and shoots and to immediate protein-association. In roots, protein-associated BMAA was detectable after 5 days with peaking amounts after 14 days. Longer exposure did not cause further accumulation in roots. In contrast, protein-associated BMAA was detected in shoot samples after only 1 day. In shoots the highest amounts of protein-associated BMAA were found after 28 days. In turn, in both plant compartments free BMAA was below the measurable concentration. PMID:24675440

  20. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in Shark Fins

    PubMed Central

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A.; Mash, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA. PMID:22412816

  1. Cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in shark fins.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A; Mash, Deborah C

    2012-02-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA. PMID:22412816

  2. In vivo dose evaluation during gynaecological radiotherapy using L-alanine/ESR dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Rech, Amanda Burg; Barbi, Gustavo Lazzaro; Ventura, Luiz Henrique Almeida; Guimarães, Flavio Silva; Oliveira, Harley Francisco; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2014-06-01

    The dose delivered by in vivo 3-D external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was verified with L-alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry for patients diagnosed with gynaecological cancer. Measurements were performed with an X-band ESR spectrometer. Dosemeters were positioned inside the vaginal cavity with the assistance of an apparatus specially designed for this study. Previous phantom studies were performed using the same conditions as in the in vivo treatment. Four patients participated in this study during 20-irradiation sessions, giving 220 dosemeters to be analysed. The doses were determined with the treatment planning system, providing dose confirmation. The phantom study resulted in a deviation between -2.5 and 2.1 %, and for the in vivo study a deviation between -9.2 and 14.2 % was observed. In all cases, the use of alanine with ESR was effective for dose assessment, yielding results consistent with the values set forth in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) reports. PMID:24751984

  3. Acute β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine Toxicity in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Rogers, Douglas G.; Hoagland, Kyle D.

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is considered to be an “excitotoxin,” and its suggested mechanism of action is killing neurons. Long-term exposure to L-BMAA is believed to lead to neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). Objectives of this study were to determine the presumptive median lethal dose (LD50), the Lowest-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level (LOAEL), and histopathologic lesions caused by the naturally occurring BMAA isomer, L-BMAA, in mice. Seventy NIH Swiss Outbred mice (35 male and 35 female) were used. Treatment group mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.03, 0.3, 1, 2, and 3 mg/g body weight L-BMAA, respectively, and control mice were sham-injected. The presumptive LD50 of L-BMAA was 3 mg/g BW and the LOAEL was 2 mg/g BW. There were no histopathologic lesions in brain, liver, heart, kidney, lung, or spleen in any of the mice during the 14-day study. L-BMAA was detected in brains and livers in all of treated mice but not in control mice. Males injected with 0.03 mg/g BW, 0.3 mg/g BW, and 3.0 mg/g BW L-BMAA showed consistently higher concentrations (P < 0.01) in brain and liver samples as compared to females in those respective groups. PMID:26604922

  4. Cerebral uptake and protein incorporation of cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaobin; Basile, Margaret; Mash, Deborah C

    2013-10-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a nonprotein amino acid produced by diverse species of free-living cyanobacteria found in terrestrial and aquatic environments worldwide. BMAA has been detected as a soluble (free) and insoluble protein-bound (bound) amino acid in brains of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex patients. A toxic reservoir of BMAA in the brain may be excitotoxic to neurons or serve to disrupt cerebral protein homeostasis. Here, we report tracer uptake kinetics and a time course for protein incorporation of [C]-L-BMAA into the brain of C57/BL6 mice. BMAA pharmacokinetic parameters measured in plasma show a rapid distribution phase and a terminal elimination half-life of 1.7 days following bolus intravenous administration. Total [C]-L-BMAA uptake to the brain reached a maximum at 1.5 h. Ex-vivo autoradiography of [C]-labeled BMAA showed dense labeling within the ventricles, choroid plexus, and whole-brain gray matter structures. Radioactivity measured in soluble and trichloroacetic acid precipitates was compared to determine the incorporation of [C]-L-BMAA into total brain protein. The maximal concentration of [C]-L-BMAA was measured in protein-bound fractions of brain at 4 h, followed by a corresponding decrease in the free pool of this nonprotein amino acid. The time-dependent association of [C]-L-BMAA in the protein-bound fraction suggests that BMAA may be trapped in new proteins by protein synthesis-dependent processes. BMAA may accumulate into growing polypeptide chains and recycle to the free pool with protein turnover. PMID:23979257

  5. Solvated states of poly-L-alanine α-helix explored by Raman optical activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Furukawa, Tatsuya; Bouř, Petr; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-05-22

    Raman optical activity (ROA) reveals surprising details of the secondary structure of polypeptides and proteins in solution phase. Yet specific spectral features, such as in the extended amide III region of hydrated α-helix, did not seem explicable by the generally accepted sensitivity of ROA to the local conformation. This is reconciled in the present study by simulations of ROA spectra for model α-helical structures. Two positive ROA peaks often observed at around 1340 and 1300 cm(-1) for polypeptides and proteins have been assigned to two types of solvated α-helices; one is stable in hydrophilic environment where amide groups make hydrogen bonds to solvent molecules or polar side chains (∼1340 cm(-1)), and the other is supported by a hydrophobic environment without the possibility of external hydrogen bonds (∼1300 cm(-1)). For poly-L-alanine (PLA), regarded as a good model of α-helical structure, the experimentally observed relative intensity ratio of the two ROA bands has been explained by a conformational equilibrium depending on the solvent polarity. The intensities of the bands reflect solvated and unsolvated α-helical geometries, with peptide backbone torsional angles (ϕi+1, ψi) of (-66°, -41°) and (-59°, -44°), respectively. Quantum-mechanical simulations of the ROA spectra utilizing the normal mode optimization and Cartesian tensor transfer methods indicate, however, that the change in dielectric constant of the solvent is the main factor for the spectral intensity change, whereas the influence of the conformational change is minor. PMID:24758541

  6. Environmental neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and mercury in shark cartilage dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Broc Glover, W; Murch, Susan J; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C

    2014-08-01

    Shark cartilage products are marketed as dietary supplements with claimed health benefits for animal and human use. Shark fin and cartilage products sold as extracts, dry powders and in capsules are marketed based on traditional Chinese medicine claims that it nourishes the blood, enhances appetite, and energizes multiple internal organs. Shark cartilage contains a mixture of chondroitin and glucosamine, a popular nutritional supplement ingested to improve cartilage function. Sharks are long-lived apex predators, that bioaccumulate environmental marine toxins and methylmercury from dietary exposures. We recently reported detection of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in the fins of seven different species of sharks from South Florida coastal waters. Since BMAA has been linked to degenerative brain diseases, the consumption of shark products may pose a human risk for BMAA exposures. In this report, we tested sixteen commercial shark cartilage supplements for BMAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-FD) with fluorescence detection and ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Total mercury (Hg) levels were measured in the same shark cartilage products by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). We report here that BMAA was detected in fifteen out of sixteen products with concentrations ranging from 86 to 265μg/g (dry weight). All of the shark fin products contained low concentrations of Hg. While Hg contamination is a known risk, the results of the present study demonstrate that shark cartilage products also may contain the neurotoxin BMAA. Although the neurotoxic potential of dietary exposure to BMAA is currently unknown, the results demonstrate that shark cartilage products may contain two environmental neurotoxins that have synergistic toxicities. PMID:24755394

  7. An Anhydro-N-Acetylmuramyl-l-Alanine Amidase with Broad Specificity Tethered to the Outer Membrane of Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Park, James T.

    2007-01-01

    From its amino acid sequence homology with AmpD, we recognized YbjR, now renamed AmiD, as a possible second 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid (anhMurNAc)-l-alanine amidase in Escherichia coli. We have now confirmed that AmiD is an anhMurNAc-l-Ala amidase and demonstrated that AmpD and AmiD are the only enzymes present in E. coli that are able to cleave the anhMurNAc-l-Ala bond. The activity was present only in the outer membrane fraction obtained from an ampD mutant. In contrast to AmpD, which is specific for the anhMurNAc-l-alanine bond, AmiD also cleaved the bond between MurNAc and l-alanine in both muropeptides and murein sacculi. Unlike the periplasmic murein amidases, AmiD did not participate in cell separation. ampG mutants, which are unable to import GlcNAc-anhMurNAc-peptides into the cytoplasm, released mainly peptides into the medium due to AmiD activity, whereas an ampG amiD double mutant released a large amount of intact GlcNAc-anhMurNAc-peptides into the medium. PMID:17526703

  8. Synthesis, growth and optical properties of an efficient nonlinear optical single crystal: L-alanine DL-malic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubagaran, R.; Madhavan, J.

    2015-02-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine DL-malic acid (LADLMA) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow-cooling technique. Powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the structure of the crystal to be orthorhombic. The nonlinear optical conversion efficiency test was carried out for the grown crystals using the Kurtz powder technique. The third order nonlinear refractive index and the nonlinear absorption coefficient where evaluated by Z-scan measurements. As the material have a negative refractive index it could be used in the protection of optical sensors such as night vision devices.

  9. Novel NMDA receptor-specific desensitization/inactivation produced by ingestion of the neurotoxins, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) or β-N-oxalylamino-L-alanine (BOAA/β-ODAP).

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jane H; Goto, Joy J; Ikeda, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    The environmental neurotoxins BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) and BOAA (β-N-oxalylamino-L-alanine) are implicated as possible causative agents for the neurodegenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/ParkinsonismDementia complex (ALS/PDC) and neurolathyrism, respectively. Both are structural analogs of the neurotransmitter, glutamate, and bind postsynaptic glutamate receptors. In this study, the effect of ingestion of these toxins on the response of a singly-innervated, identified, glutamatergic postsynaptic cell in a living, undissected Drosophila is observed by intracellular recording. Previously we have reported that ingested BMAA behaves as an NMDA agonist that produces an abnormal NMDA response in the postsynaptic cell. It is shown here that BOAA also behaves as an NMDA agonist, and produces an effect very similar to that of BMAA on the postsynaptic response. In response to a single stimulus, the amplitude of the NMDA component is decreased, while the time to peak and duration of the NMDA component are greatly increased. No discernable effect on the AMPA component of the response was observed. Furthermore, both BMAA and BOAA cause an NMDAR-specific desensitization in response to repetitive stimulation at the physiological frequency for the postsynaptic cell (5 Hz). The possibility that this phenomenon may represent a response to excessive Ca(2+) entry through NMDAR channels is discussed. This desensitization phenomenon, as well as the abnormal NMDAR gating characteristics induced by BMAA, appears to be rescued during higher frequency stimulation (e.g. 10, 20 Hz). PMID:25193276

  10. Growth and characterization of nonlinear optical active L-alanine formate crystal by modified Sankaranarayanan Ramasamy (SR) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justin Raj, C.; Jerome Das, S.

    2007-06-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine formate ( L-AlFo) have been grown from aqueous solution by using the novel uniaxial crystal growth method of Sankaranarayanan and Ramasamy (SR) with a due modification in the growth assembly. A vertical bottom-seed ampoule was rotated by 90°/s using a stepper motor and was used for the growth of single crystal and ring heater was replaced by alternating 40 W filament lamps for maintaining the evaporation rate. L-alanine formate crystals of 10 mm diameter and 50 mm length have been grown with a growth rate 5 mm per day. The grown crystal was subjected to single-crystal X-ray analysis, which confirms that the crystal belongs to orthorhombic structure with space group P 212121. The presence of formate functional groups in L-AlFo and the protanation of ions were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared transmission (FTIR) analysis. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz powder test. The DRS UV-vis spectrum of the crystal shows that the crystal has UV cut-off at 205 nm. TGA/DTA studies revealed that the crystal was thermally stable up to 234 °C.

  11. Domain Motions and Functionally-Key Residues of L-Alanine Dehydrogenase Revealed by an Elastic Network Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Chao; Zhu, Yan-Ying; Su, Ji-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (L-MtAlaDH) plays an important role in catalyzing L-alanine to ammonia and pyruvate, which has been considered to be a potential target for tuberculosis treatment. In the present work, the functional domain motions encoded in the structure of L-MtAlaDH were investigated by using the Gaussian network model (GNM) and the anisotropy network model (ANM). The slowest modes for the open-apo and closed-holo structures of the enzyme show that the domain motions have a common hinge axis centered in residues Met133 and Met301. Accompanying the conformational transition, both the 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-binding domain (NBD) and the substrate-binding domain (SBD) move in a highly coupled way. The first three slowest modes of ANM exhibit the open-closed, rotation and twist motions of L-MtAlaDH, respectively. The calculation of the fast modes reveals the residues responsible for the stability of the protein, and some of them are involved in the interaction with the ligand. Then, the functionally-important residues relevant to the binding of the ligand were identified by using a thermodynamic method. Our computational results are consistent with the experimental data, which will help us to understand the physical mechanism for the function of L-MtAlaDH. PMID:26690143

  12. Response of L-alanine and 2-methylalanine minidosimeters for K-Band (24 GHz) EPR dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Graeff, C. F. O.; Baffa, O.

    2007-11-01

    Minidosimeters of L-alanine and 2-methylalanine (2MA) were prepared and tested as potential candidates for small radiation field dosimetry. To quantify the free radicals created by radiation a K-Band (24 GHz) EPR spectrometer was used. X-rays provided by a 6 MV clinical linear accelerator were used to irradiate the minidosimeters in the dose range of 0.5-30 Gy. The dose-response curves for both radiation sensitive materials displayed a good linear behavior in the dose range indicated with 2MA being more radiation sensitive than L-alanine. Moreover, 2MA showed a smaller LLD (lower limit detection) value. The proposed system minidosimeter/K-Band spectrometer was able to detect 10 Gy EPR spectra with good signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). The overall uncertainty indicates that this system shows a good performance for the detection of dose values of 20 Gy and above, which are dose values typically used in radiosurgery treatments.

  13. Crystal Engineering of l-Alanine with l-Leucine Additive using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that the change in the morphology of l-alanine crystals can be controlled with the addition of l-leucine using the metal-assisted and microwave accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique. Crystallization experiments, where an increasing stoichiometric amount of l-leucine is added to initial l-alanine solutions, were carried out on circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) disks modified with a 21-well capacity silicon isolator and silver nanoparticle films using microwave heating (MA-MAEC) and at room temperature (control experiments). The use of the MA-MAEC technique afforded for the growth of l-alanine crystals with different morphologies up to ∼10-fold faster than those grown at room temperature. In addition, the length of l-alanine crystals was systematically increased from ∼380 to ∼2000 μm using the MA-MAEC technique. Optical microscope images revealed that the shape of l-alanine crystals was changed from tetragonal shape (without l-leucine additive) to more elongated and wire-like structures with the addition of the l-leucine additive. Further characterization of l-alanine crystals was undertaken by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements. In order to elucidate the growth mechanism of l-alanine crystals, theoretical simulations of l-alanine’s morphology with and without l-leucine additive were carried out using Materials Studio software in conjunction with our experimental data. Theoretical simulations revealed that the growth of l-alanine’s {011} and {120} crystal faces were inhibited due to the incorporation of l-leucine into these crystal faces in selected positions. PMID:24839404

  14. A study of conformational stability of poly(L-alanine), poly(L-valine), and poly(L-alanine)/poly(L-valine) blends in the solid state by (13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Murata, Katsuyoshi; Kuroki, Shigeki; Kimura, Hideaki; Ando, Isao

    2002-06-01

    13C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR and (1)H T(1rho) experiments of poly(L-alanine) (PLA), poly(L-valine) (PLV), and PLA/PLV blends have been carried out in order to elucidate the conformational stability of the polypeptides in the solid state. These were prepared by adding a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) solution of the polymer with a 2.0 wt/wt % of sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) to alkaline water. From these experimental results, it is clarified that the conformations of PLA and PLV in their blends are strongly influenced by intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions that cause their miscibility at the molecular level. PMID:11948439

  15. An Optical Overview of Poly[μ2-L-alanine-μ3-nitrato-sodium(I)] Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos-Loya, E.; Orrantia-Borunda, E.; Duarte-Moller, A.

    2012-01-01

    Single crystals of the semiorganic materials, L-alanine sodium nitrate (LASN) and D-alanine sodium nitrate (DASN), were grown from an aqueous solution by slow-evaporation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried for the doped grown crystals. The absorption of these grown crystals was analyzed using UV-Vis-NIR studies, and it was found that these crystals possess minimum absorption from 200 to 1100 nm. An infrared (FTIR) spectrum of single crystal has been measured in the 4000–400 cm−1 range. The assignment of the observed vibrational modes to corresponding symmetry type has been performed. A thermogravimetric study was carried out to determine the thermal properties of the grown crystal. The efficiency of second harmonic generation was obtained by a variant of the Kurtz-Perry method. PMID:22566774

  16. Vibrational spectral characterization, NLO studies and charge transfer analysis of the organometallic material L-Alanine cadmium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun Sasi, B. S.; Bright, K. C.; James, C.

    2016-01-01

    An organometallic nonlinear crystal, L-Alanine Cadmium Chloride (LACC) was synthesized by slow evaporation technique. The effects of hydrogen bonding on the structure, binding of ligand to metal ion, natural orbital occupancies, and vibrational frequencies were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) with the combined B3LYP and LANL2DZ basis set. Vibrational assignments were made on the basis of calculated potential energy distribution values from MOLVIB program. The topological analysis of electron localization function (ELF) provides basin population N (integrated density over the attractor basin), standard deviation (σ), and their relative fluctuation, defined as λ = σ2/N, which are sensitive criteria of delocalization. The molecular stability, electronic exchange interaction, and bond strength of the molecule were studied by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was determined using Kurtz and Perry method. Natural bond orbital analysis was carried out to study various intramolecular interactions that are responsible for the stabilization of the molecule.

  17. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine induces changes in both GSK3 and TDP-43 in human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Saez, Emma; de Munck, Estefanía; Arahuetes, Rosa M; Solas, M Teresa; Martínez, Ana M; Miguel, Begoña G

    2013-01-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid produced by most cyanobacteria, which are extensively distributed in different environments all over the world. L-BMAA has been linked to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. This work aims to analyze the toxicological action of L-BMAA related to alterations observed in different neurodegenerative illness as Alzheimer disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our results demonstrate that neuroblastoma cells treated with L-BMAA show an increase in glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSk3β) and induce accumulation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) truncated forms (C-terminal fragments), phosphorylated  and high molecular weight forms of TDP-43, that appears frequently in some neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23665941

  18. Environmental modulation of microcystin and β-N-methylamino-L-alanine as a function of nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Scott, L L; Downing, S; Phelan, R R; Downing, T G

    2014-09-01

    The most significant modulators of the cyanotoxins microcystin and β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in laboratory cyanobacterial cultures are the concentration of growth-medium combined nitrogen and nitrogen uptake rate. The lack of field studies that support these observations led us to investigate the cellular content of these cyanotoxins in cyanobacterial bloom material isolated from a freshwater impoundment and to compare these to the combined nitrogen availability. We established that these toxins typically occur in an inverse relationship in nature and that their presence is mainly dependent on the environmental combined nitrogen concentration, with cellular microcystin present at exogenous combined nitrogen concentrations of 29 μM and higher and cellular BMAA correlating negatively with exogenous nitrogen at concentrations below 40 μM. Furthermore, opposing nutrient and light gradients that form in dense cyanobacterial blooms may result in both microcystin and BMAA being present at a single sampling site. PMID:24878376

  19. Self-Assembly, Supramolecular Organization, and Phase Behavior of L-Alanine Alkyl Esters (n = 9-18) and Characterization of Equimolar L-Alanine Lauryl Ester/Lauryl Sulfate Catanionic Complex.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishna, D; Swamy, Musti J

    2015-09-01

    A homologous series of l-alanine alkyl ester hydrochlorides (AEs) bearing 9-18 C atoms in the alkyl chain have been synthesized and characterized with respect to self-assembly, supramolecular structure, and phase transitions. The CMCs of AEs bearing 11-18 C atoms were found to range between 0.1 and 10 mM. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies showed that the transition temperatures (Tt), enthalpies (ΔHt) and entropies (ΔSt) of AEs in the dry state exhibit odd-even alternation, with the odd-chain-length compounds having higher Tt values, but the even-chain-length homologues showing higher values of ΔHt and ΔSt. In DSC measurements on hydrated samples, carried out at pH 5.0 and pH 10.0 (where they exist in cationic and neutral forms, respectively), compounds with 13-18 C atoms in the alkyl chain showed sharp gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transitions, and odd-even alternation was not seen in the thermodynamic parameters. The molecular structure, packing properties, and intermolecular interactions of AEs with 9 and 10 C atoms in the alkyl chain were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, which showed that the alkyl chains are packed in a tilted interdigitated bilayer format. d-Spacings obtained from powder X-ray diffraction studies exhibited a linear dependence on the alkyl chain length, suggesting that the other AEs also adopt an interdigitated bilayer structure. Turbidimetric, fluorescence spectroscopic, and isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) studies established that in aqueous dispersions l-alanine lauryl ester hydrochloride (ALE·HCl) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) form an equimolar complex. Transmission electron microscopic and DSC studies indicate that the complex exists as unilamellar liposomes, which exhibit a sharp phase transition at ∼39 °C. The aggregates were disrupted at high pH, suggesting that the catanionic complex would be useful to develop a base-labile drug delivery system. ITC studies indicated that ALE·HCl forms

  20. Relative output factor and beam profile measurements of small radiation fields with an L-alanine/K-Band EPR minidosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Abrego, Felipe; Calcina, Carmen Sandra Guzman; Almeida, Adelaide de; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2007-05-15

    The performance of an L-alanine dosimeter with millimeter dimensions was evaluated for dosimetry in small radiation fields. Relative output factor (ROF) measurements were made for 0.5x0.5, 1x1, 3x3, 5x5, 10x10 cm{sup 2} square fields and for 5-, 10-, 20-, 40-mm-diam circular fields. In beam profile (BP) measurements, only 1x1, 3x3, 5x5 cm{sup 2} square fields and 10-, 20-, 40-mm-diam circular fields were used. For square and circular field irradiations, Varian/Clinac 2100, and a Siemens/Mevatron 6 MV linear accelerators were used, respectively. For a batch of 800 L-alanine minidosimeters (miniALAs) the average mass was 4.3{+-}0.5 (1{sigma}) mg, the diameter was 1.22{+-}0.07 (1{sigma}) mm, and the length was 3.5{+-}0.2 (1{sigma}) mm. A K-Band (24 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer was used for recording the spectrum of irradiated and nonirradiated miniALAs. To evaluate the performance of the miniALAs, their ROF and BP results were compared with those of other types of detectors, such as an ionization chamber (PTW 0.125 cc), a miniTLD (LiF: Mg,Cu,P), and Kodak/X-Omat V radiographic film. Compared to other dosimeters, the ROF results for miniALA show differences of up to 3% for the smallest fields and 7% for the largest ones. These differences were within the miniALA experimental uncertainty ({approx}5-6% at 1{sigma}). For BP measurements, the maximum penumbra width difference observed between miniALA and film (10%-90% width) was less than 1 mm for square fields and within 1-2 mm for circular fields. These penumbra width results indicate that the spatial resolution of the miniALA is comparable to that of radiographic film and its dimensions are adequate for the field sizes used in this experiment. The K-Band EPR spectrometer provided adequate sensitivity for assessment of miniALAs with doses of the order of tens of Grays, making this dosimetry system (K-Band/miniALA) a potential candidate for use in radiosurgery dosimetry.

  1. Heterogeneity of L-alanine transport systems in brush-border membrane vesicles from rat placenta during late gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Torre, S R; Serrano, M A; Medina, J M; Alvarado, F

    1992-01-01

    The placental uptake of L-alanine was studied by using purified brush-border membrane vesicles from rat trophoblasts. Saturation curves were carried out at 37 degrees C in buffers containing 100 mM (zero-trans)-NaSCN, -NaCl, -KSCN, -KCl, or -N-methyl-D-glucamine gluconate. The uncorrected uptake results were fitted by non-linear regression analysis to an equation involving one diffusional component either one or two saturable Michaelian transport terms. In the presence of NaCl, two distinct L-alanine transport systems were distinguished, named respectively System 1 (S-1; Vm1 about 760 pmol/s per mg of protein; KT1 = 0.5 mM) and System 2 (S-2; Vm2 about 1700 pmol/s per mg; KT2 = 9 mM). In contrast, in the presence of K+ (KCl = KSCN) or in the absence of any alkali-metal ions (N-methyl-D-glucamine gluconate), only one saturable system was apparent, which we identify as S-2. When Na+ is present, S-1, but not S-2, appears to be rheogenic, since its maximal transport capacity significantly increases in the presence of an inside-negative membrane potential, created either by replacing Cl- with the permeant anion thiocyanate (NaSCN > NaCl) or by applying an appropriate K+ gradient and valinomycin. alpha-(Methylamino)isobutyrate (methyl-AIB) appears to be a substrate of S-1, but not of S-2. For reasons that remain to be explained, however, methyl-AIB inhibits S-2. We conclude that S-1 represents a truly Na(+)-dependent mechanism, where Na+ behaves as an obligatory activator, whereas S-2 cannot discriminate between Na+ and K+, although its activity is higher in the presence of alkali-metal ions than in their absence (Na+ = K+ > N-methyl-D-glucammonium ion). S-2 appears to be fully developed 2 days before birth, whereas S-1 undergoes a capacity-type activation between days 19.5 and 21.5 of gestation, i.e. its apparent Vmax. nearly doubles, whereas its KT remains constant. PMID:1445280

  2. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  3. Effect of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine on oxidative stress of liver and kidney in rat.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Antonio, María Teresa; Pineda, Javier; Herrera, Amparo; Miguel, Begoña G; Arahuetes, Rosa María

    2013-03-01

    β-N-methylamino-(L)-alanine (L)-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid, found in the majority of cyanbacterial genera tested. Evidence for implication of (L)-BMAA in neurodegenerative disorders, like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), relies on bioaccumulation and biomagnification from symbiotic cyanobacteria. The involvement of (L)-BMAA in oxidative stress was demonstrated in several studies in the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the effect of (L)-BMAA on the oxidative stress responses of liver and kidney in rats treated by intraperitoneal administration with this amino acid. Oxidative stress was demonstrated by the quantification of lipid peroxidation, the measurement of both catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities, as well as the quantification of glutathione (GSH) levels and the total antioxidant capacity. It was observed that (L)-BMAA caused a significant increase in the degree of lipid peroxidation and catalase activity in both organs. A significant increase in glutathione peroxidase activity was obtained only in liver, whereas glutathione levels were also increased in both organs. The total antioxidant capacity decreased in liver and increased in kidney. These results suggest that the oxidative stress was higher in liver than in kidney, and might be crucial for (L)-BMAA toxicological action. PMID:23328118

  4. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) induces neuronal and behavioral changes in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Okle, Oliver; Rath, Lisa; Galizia, C Giovanni; Dietrich, Daniel R

    2013-07-01

    The cyanobacterially produced neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is thought to induce amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC)-like symptoms. However, its mechanism of action and its pathway of intoxication are yet unknown. In vivo animal models suitable for investigating the neurotoxic effect of BMAA with applicability to the human are scarce. Hence, we used the honeybee (Apis mellifera) since its nervous system is relatively simple, yet having cognitive capabilities. Bees fed with BMAA-spiked sugar water had an increased mortality rate and a reduced ability to learn odors in a classical conditioning paradigm. Using (14)C-BMAA we demonstrated that BMAA is biologically available to the bee, and is found in the head, thorax and abdomen with little to no excretion. BMAA is also transferred from one bee to the next via trophallaxis resulting in an exposure of the whole beehive. BMAA bath application directly onto the brain leads to an altered Ca(2+) homeostasis and to generation of reactive oxygen species. These behavioral and physiological observations suggest that BMAA may have effects on bee brains similar to those assumed to occur in humans. Therefore the bee could serve as a surrogate model system for investigating the neurological effects of BMAA. PMID:23591064

  5. The physiological effect of ingested β-N-methylamino-L-alanine on a glutamatergic synapse in an in vivo preparation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Joy J; Koenig, Jane H; Ikeda, Kazuo

    2012-11-01

    The neurotoxin, BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine), may be a risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's (PD) and Alzheimer's (AD) disease. In vivo experiments have demonstrated that BMAA can cause a number of motor dysfunctions if ingested or injected, and in vitro experiments show that this toxin binds to glutamate receptors with deleterious results. Also, BMAA exists in the human food chain worldwide, and has been detected in the brains of ALS and AD patients. This paper offers the first demonstration by intracellular recording of the effect of ingested BMAA on the postsynaptic response of an identified glutamatergic cell in a living, undissected organism (Drosophila melanogaster), and correlates these observations with the specific motor dysfunctions that result from ingestion. The results suggest that BMAA acts as a glutamate agonist, causing NMDA receptor channels to remain open for prolonged periods of time, thereby damaging the cell by excitotoxicity. The effect on the postsynaptic response became apparent days before the function of the postsynaptic cell (wing beat) became affected. Severely depolarized cells were able to fully recover with the removal of BMAA from the food source, suggesting that blocking BMAA binding in the brain might be a good treatment strategy. PMID:22841708

  6. The use of L-serine to prevent β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA)-induced proteotoxic stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Main, Brendan J; Dunlop, Rachael A; Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid synthesised by cyanobacteria, has been linked to a complex neurological disorder on Guam and more recently to other cases of sporadic ALS (sALS), however the mechanisms of BMAA toxicity are not completely understood. We have previously demonstrated that BMAA is misincorporated into newly synthesised proteins by human neuroblastoma cells and fibroblasts, resulting in the formation of autofluorescent material and the induction of apoptotic cell death. In the present study we show that BMAA at low levels does not cause an acute toxicity in neuroblastoma cells but increases the expression of the ER stress marker, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and increases the activity of the pro-apoptotic enzyme caspase-3. We also observed an increase in the activity of the lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B and L, characteristic of the accumulation of proteins in the lysosomal system. We were able to prevent these proteotoxic effects in neuroblastoma cells through co-treatment with l-serine suggesting that they resulted from incorporation of BMAA into proteins. Misincorporation provides a possible mechanism whereby BMAA could initiate misfolding, and the accumulation of aggregate-prone proteins in neurons. This build-up of misfolded proteins could explain the long latency period of the disease previously reported on Guam. PMID:26559613

  7. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) uptake by the animal model, Daphnia magna and subsequent oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Wiegand, Claudia; Downing, Tim G

    2015-06-15

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), produced by cyanobacteria, is a neurotoxin implicated in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria are lower than those thought to be necessary to result in neurological damage thus bioaccumulation or biomagnification is required to achieve concentrations able to cause neurodegeneration. Many cyanobacteria produce BMAA and uptake routes into the food web require examination. In this study we investigate the uptake of BMAA by adult phytoplanktivorus Daphnia magna via exposure to dissolved pure BMAA and BMAA containing cyanobacteria, as well as the subsequent oxidative stress response in the daphnia. Free BMAA and protein-associated BMAA were quantified by LC-MS/MS. Dissolved BMAA was taken up and was found as free BMAA in D. magna. No protein-associated BMAA was detected in D. magna after a 24-h exposure period. No BMAA was detectable in D. magna after exposure to BMAA containing cyanobacteria. BMAA inhibited the oxidative stress defence and biotransformation enzymes within 24-h exposure in the tested Daphnia and could therefore impair the oxidant status and the capability of detoxifying other substances in D. magna. PMID:25841344

  8. The cyanobacterial amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine perturbs the intermediary metabolism in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Engskog, Mikael K R; Karlsson, Oskar; Haglöf, Jakob; Elmsjö, Albert; Brittebo, Eva; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt

    2013-10-01

    The neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is produced by most cyanobacteria. BMAA is considered as a potential health threat because of its putative role in neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously observed cognitive disturbances and morphological brain changes in adult rodents exposed to BMAA during the development. The aim of this study was to characterize changes of major intermediary metabolites in serum following neonatal exposure to BMAA using a non-targeted metabolomic approach. NMR spectroscopy was used to obtain serum metabolic profiles from neonatal rats exposed to BMAA (40, 150, 460mg/kg) or vehicle on postnatal days 9-10. Multivariate data analysis of binned NMR data indicated metabolic pattern differences between the different treatment groups. In particular five metabolites, d-glucose, lactate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, creatine and acetate, were changed in serum of BMAA-treated neonatal rats. These metabolites are associated with changes in energy metabolism and amino acid metabolism. Further statistical analysis disclosed that all the identified serum metabolites in the lowest dose group were significantly (p<0.05) decreased. The neonatal rat model used in this study is so far the only animal model that displays significant biochemical and behavioral effects after a low short-term dose of BMAA. The demonstrated perturbation of intermediary metabolism may contribute to BMAA-induced developmental changes that result in long-term effects on adult brain function. PMID:23886855

  9. Is there a role for naturally occurring cyanobacterial toxins in neurodegeneration? The beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) paradigm.

    PubMed

    Papapetropoulos, Spiridon

    2007-06-01

    The naturally occurring, non-essential amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been recently found in high concentrations in brain tissues of patients with tauopathies such as the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) in the South Pacific island of Guam and in a small number of Caucasian, North American patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease. BMAA is produced by cyanobacteria that are present in all conceivable aquatic and/or terrestrial ecosystems and may be accumulated in living tissues in free and protein-bound forms through the process of biomagnification. Although its role in human degenerative disease is highly debated, there is mounting evidence in support of the neurotoxic properties of BMAA that may be mediated via mechanisms involving among others the regulation of glutamate. Glutamate-related excitotoxicity is among the most prominent factors in the etiopathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the wide geographical distribution of cyanobacteria and the possible implications of BMAA neurotoxic properties in public health more research towards this direction is warranted. PMID:17296249

  10. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA)

    PubMed Central

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  11. Assessment of the mutagenic and genotoxic activity of cyanobacterial toxin beta-N-methyl-amino-L-alanine in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Novak, Matjaž; Hercog, Klara; Žegura, Bojana

    2016-08-01

    A neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) is a non-protein amino acid produced by most cyanobacteria ubiquitously present in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Due to its global presence in surface waters, a widespread human exposure is possible and therefore this toxin represents a health risk for humans and animals. L-BMAA has been linked to the development of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Its neurotoxic activity has been extensively studied, while nothing is known on its genotoxic properties. In the present study we evaluated for the first time L-BMAA mutagenic potential using Ames assay on several Salmonella typhimurium strains (TA97a, TA98, TA100, TA102 and TA1535). The results showed that the toxin (up to 0.9 mg/plate) did not induce mutations without or with S9 metabolic activation. Its genotoxic activity was further studied with the SOS/umuC assay on S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 and the results showed that it was not cytotoxic nor genotoxic for bacteria. The present study represents the first evidence that L-BMAA is not mutagenic nor genotoxic for bacteria even at concentrations much higher than those typically found in the environment. However, as most of the cyanobacterial toxins are not bacterial mutagens it is very important to further elucidate its genotoxic activity in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27137670

  12. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  13. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  14. Autolytic system of Staphylococcus simulans 22: influence of cationic peptides on activity of N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase.

    PubMed Central

    Bierbaum, G; Sahl, H G

    1987-01-01

    Pep 5 and nisin are cationic peptide antibiotics which in addition to their membrane-disruptive action induce autolysis in staphylococci. To investigate the mechanism of lysis induction, the influence of the peptides on the activity of the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase of Staphylococcus simulans 22 was studied. In experiments with isolated cell walls at low ionic strength, the amidase activity was stimulated by the addition of Pep 5 and nisin, as well as by polylysine, streptomycin, and mono- and divalent cations. The concentrations necessary for activation depended on the nature of the cation and ranged from 5 microM for poly-L-lysine (n = 17) to 150 mM for Na+ at a cell wall concentration of 100 micrograms of cell walls per ml. No effect was observed if the cell walls were devoid of polyanionic constituents. Kinetic data suggested that the amidase bound to the teichoic and teichuronic acids of the cell wall and was thereby inhibited. Cationic molecules reversed this inhibition, most likely by displacing the enzyme from the polyanions. If the concentrations of the larger peptides were high in relation to cell wall concentration, the activation turned into inhibition, presumably by interfering with the access of the enzyme to its substrate. These experiments demonstrate that the activity of the amidase is modulated by basic peptides in vitro and help to explain how Pep 5 and nisin may cause lysis of treated cells. Images PMID:2890620

  15. Development of an analytical procedure for quantifying the underivatized neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Combes, Audrey; El Abdellaoui, Saïda; Vial, Jérome; Lagrange, Emmeline; Pichon, Valérie

    2014-07-01

    The cyanotoxin β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has received renewed attention as an environmental risk factor for sporadic cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (Nunn et al., Brain Res 410:375-379, 1987). The aim of the present study was to develop and to validate an analytical procedure that allows the quantification of native BMAA and of its natural isomer, 2,4 diaminobutyric acid (DAB), in brain tissues. An analytical procedure was previously reported by our group for the determination of underivatized BMAA in environmental samples. It included a step of sample clean-up by solid phase extraction (SPE) with a mixed-mode sorbent and the analyses were performed by LC/MS-MS using hydrophilic interaction chromatography and multiple reactions monitoring scan mode. As brain tissues have a higher lipid content, the crucial step of sample clean-up had been optimized by evaluating the efficiency of the addition of a liquid/liquid extraction step prior to the SPE procedure or alternatively, of washing steps to the SPE extraction procedure. The efficiency was checked by visualizing the complexity of the resulting chromatograms in LC/MS and their performance by using spiked brain samples. The optimized analytical procedure, including a washing step with cyclohexane to the SPE with a recovery yield close to 100%, was validated using the total error approach and allowed the quantification of BMAA in a concentration level ranging from 20 to 1,500 ng/g in brain samples. Finally, the feasibility of implementation of this procedure was verified in human brain samples from two patients who died of ALS. PMID:24858470

  16. Synthesis of a molecularly imprinted sorbent for selective solid-phase extraction of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Pavel; Combes, Audrey; Petit, Julia; Nováková, Lucie; Pichon, Valérie

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the work was to synthesize a molecularly imprinted material for the selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-2-amino-3-methylpropionic acid; BMAA) from cyanobacterial extracts. BMAA and its structural analogs that can be used as template are small, polar and hydrophilic molecules. These molecules are poorly soluble in organic solvents that are commonly used for the synthesis of acrylic-based polymers. Therefore, a sol gel approach was chosen to carry out the synthesis and the resulting sorbents were evaluated with different extraction procedures in order to determine their ability to selectively retain BMAA. The presence of imprinted cavities in the sorbent was demonstrated by comparing elution profiles obtained by using molecularly imprinted silica (MIS) and non-imprinted silica (NIS) as a control. The molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) procedure was first developed in a pure medium (acetonitrile) and further optimized for the treatment of cyanobacterial samples. It was characterized by high elution recoveries (89% and 77% respectively in pure and in real media).The repeatability of the extraction procedure in pure medium, in real medium and the reproducibility of MIS synthesis all expressed as RSD values of extraction recovery of BMAA were equal to 3%, 12% and 5%, respectively. A MIS capacity of 0.34 µmol/g was measured. The matrix effects, which affected the quantification of BMAA when employing a mixed mode sorbent, were completely removed by adding a clean-up step of the mixed-mode sorbent extract on the MIS. PMID:26452922

  17. Maternal transfer of the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) via milk to suckling offspring.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Bergström, Ulrika; Brittebo, Eva B; Brandt, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease and proposed to be biomagnified in terrestrial and aquatic food chains. We have previously shown that the neonatal period in rats, which in humans corresponds to the last trimester of pregnancy and the first few years of age, is a particularly sensitive period for exposure to BMAA. The present study aimed to examine the secretion of (14)C-labeled L- and D-BMAA into milk in lactating mice and the subsequent transfer of BMAA into the developing brain. The results suggest that secretion into milk is an important elimination pathway of BMAA in lactating mothers and an efficient exposure route predominantly for L-BMAA but also for D-BMAA in suckling mice. Following secretion of [(14)C]L-BMAA into milk, the levels of [(14)C]L-BMAA in the brains of the suckling neonatal mice significantly exceeded the levels in the maternal brains. In vitro studies using the mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cell line confirmed a more efficient influx and efflux of L-BMAA than of D-BMAA in cells, suggesting enantiomer-selective transport. Competition experiments with other amino acids and a low sodium dependency of the influx suggests that the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are involved in the transport of L-BMAA into milk. Given the persistent neurodevelopmental toxicity following injection of L-BMAA to neonatal rodent pups, the current results highlight the need to determine whether BMAA is enriched mother's and cow's milk. PMID:24194910

  18. Reactivity of β-methylamino-L-alanine in complex sample matrixes complicating detection and quantification by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Liberto, Caitlyn M; McNeil, W Stephen; Banack, Sandra Anne; Shipley, Paul R; Murch, Susan J

    2012-09-18

    β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a naturally occurring nonprotein amino acid originally discovered in cycad seeds and traditional foods of the Chamorro people of Guam. Recent research has implicated BMAA as a potential factor in neurodegenerative disease and described the production of BMAA in cyanobacteria, but conflicting results have complicated the interpretation of data. We hypothesized that the reactivity of BMAA with metal ions in the sample matrix and the formation of metal adducts in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) analysis confound results. Dilute solutions of TCA, MgCl(2), NaCl, CuCl(2), ZnCl(2) (0.01 M), or artificial ocean water (Instant Ocean, 3.5 g/L) reduced the signal attributable to the BMAA M + H(+) peak by 78-99.7%. The degree of adduct formation was significantly affected by MS settings such as induction voltage. A number of the detected ion peaks in BMAA standards were consistent with the formation of metal-BMAA complexes in addition to the adduct formation. A standard of Zn(BMAA)(2) was synthesized, and the effects of sample preparation, derivatization, column chromatography, pH, and interactions with serine were determined. Together, these data demonstrate that sample matrix, formation of adducts, and mass spectrometry settings complicate analysis of BMAA, that analysis by detection of the parent ion and daughter ion fragmentation patterns are highly susceptible to false negative findings, and that failure to detect BMAA cannot be considered proof of absence of the compound. PMID:22905767

  19. Maternal Transfer of the Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) via Milk to Suckling Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Bergström, Ulrika; Brittebo, Eva B.; Brandt, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease and proposed to be biomagnified in terrestrial and aquatic food chains. We have previously shown that the neonatal period in rats, which in humans corresponds to the last trimester of pregnancy and the first few years of age, is a particularly sensitive period for exposure to BMAA. The present study aimed to examine the secretion of 14C-labeled L- and D-BMAA into milk in lactating mice and the subsequent transfer of BMAA into the developing brain. The results suggest that secretion into milk is an important elimination pathway of BMAA in lactating mothers and an efficient exposure route predominantly for L-BMAA but also for D-BMAA in suckling mice. Following secretion of [14C]L-BMAA into milk, the levels of [14C]L-BMAA in the brains of the suckling neonatal mice significantly exceeded the levels in the maternal brains. In vitro studies using the mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cell line confirmed a more efficient influx and efflux of L-BMAA than of D-BMAA in cells, suggesting enantiomer-selective transport. Competition experiments with other amino acids and a low sodium dependency of the influx suggests that the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are involved in the transport of L-BMAA into milk. Given the persistent neurodevelopmental toxicity following injection of L-BMAA to neonatal rodent pups, the current results highlight the need to determine whether BMAA is enriched mother's and cow's milk. PMID:24194910

  20. The natural non-protein amino acid N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is incorporated into protein during synthesis.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Mash, Deborah C; Murch, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and accumulated through trophic levels in the environment and natural food webs. Human exposure to BMAA has been linked to progressive neurodegenerative diseases, potentially due to incorporation of BMAA into protein. The insertion of BMAA and other non-protein amino acids into proteins may trigger protein misfunction, misfolding and/or aggregation. However, the specific mechanism by which BMAA is associated with proteins remained unidentified. Such studies are challenging because of the complexity of biological systems and samples. A cell-free in vitro protein synthesis system offers an excellent approach for investigation of changing amino acid composition in protein. In this study, we report that BMAA incorporates into protein as an error in synthesis when a template DNA sequence is used. Bicinchoninic acid assay of total protein synthesis determined that BMAA effectively substituted for alanine and serine in protein product. LC-MS/MS confirmed that BMAA was selectively inserted into proteins in place of other amino acids, but isomers N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) did not share this characteristic. Incorporation of BMAA into proteins was significantly higher when genomic DNA from post-mortem brain was the template. About half of BMAA in the synthetic proteins was released with denaturation with sodium dodecylsulfonate and dithiothreitol, but the remaining BMAA could only be released by acid hydrolysis. Together these data demonstrate that BMAA is incorporated into the amino acid backbone of proteins during synthesis and also associated with proteins through non-covalent bonding. PMID:25096519

  1. Evaluation of a thiodipeptide, L-phenylalanyl-Ψ[CS-N]-L-alanine, as a novel probe for peptide transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Saito, Sachi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2014-01-01

    L-Phenylalanyl-Ψ[CS-N]-l-alanine (Phe-Ψ-Ala), a thiourea dipeptide, was evaluated as a probe for peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1). Uptake of Phe-Ψ-Ala in PEPT1-overexpressing HeLa cells was significantly higher than that in vector-transfected HeLa cells and the Km value was 275 ± 32 µM. The uptake was pH-dependent, being highest at pH 6.0, and was significantly decreased in the presence of PEPT1 inhibitors [glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar), cephalexin, valaciclovir, glycylglycine, and glycylproline]. In metabolism assay using rat intestinal mucosa, rat hepatic microsomes, and human hepatocytes, the amount of Phe-Ψ-Ala was unchanged, whereas phenylalanylalanine was extensively decomposed. The clearance, distribution volume, and half-life of intravenously administered Phe-Ψ-Ala in rats were 0.151 ± 0.008 L/h/kg, 0.235 ± 0.012 L/kg, and 1.14 ± 0.07 h, respectively. The maximum plasma concentration of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala (2.31 ± 0.60 µg/mL) in the presence of Gly-Sar was significantly decreased compared with that in the absence of glycylsarcosine (3.74 ± 0.44 µg/mL), suggesting that the intestinal absorption of Phe-Ψ-Ala is mediated by intestinal PEPT1. In conclusion, our results indicate that Phe-Ψ-Ala is a high-affinity, metabolically stable, non-radioactive probe for PEPT1, and it should prove useful in studies of PEPT1, e.g., for predicting drug-drug interactions mediated by PEPT1 in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25008848

  2. Global cellular responses to β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) by olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OEC).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Braidy, Nady; Marçal, Helder; Welch, Jeffrey H; Gehringer, Michelle M; Guillemin, Gilles J; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-06-01

    This study utilised a proteomics approach to identify any differential protein expression in a glial cell line, rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), treated with the cyanotoxin β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA). Five proteins of interest were identified, namely Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (RhoGDP1), Nck-associated protein 1 (NCKAP1), voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1), 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type-2 (3hCoAdh2), and ubiquilin-4 (UBQLN4). Four of these candidates, nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (Nur77), cyclophilin A (CyPA), RhoGDP1 and VDAC1, have been reported to be involved in cell growth. A microarray identified UBQLN4, palladin and CyPA, which have been implicated to have roles in excitotoxicity. Moreover, the NCKAP1, UBQLN4, CyPA and 3hCoAdh2 genes have been associated with abnormal protein aggregation. Differential expression of genes involved in mitochondrial activity, Nur77, 3hCoAdh2, VDAC1 and UBQLN4, were also identified. Confirmatory reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of transcripts generated from the genes of interest corroborated the differential expression trends identified in the global protein analysis. BMAA induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase of OEC and apoptosis after 48 h at concentrations of 250 μM and 500 μM. Collectively, this work advances our understanding of the mechanism of BMAA-mediated glial-toxicity in vitro. PMID:25797319

  3. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) induces neuronal and behavioral changes in honeybees

    SciTech Connect

    Okle, Oliver; Rath, Lisa; Galizia, C. Giovanni; Dietrich, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    The cyanobacterially produced neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is thought to induce amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC)-like symptoms. However, its mechanism of action and its pathway of intoxication are yet unknown. In vivo animal models suitable for investigating the neurotoxic effect of BMAA with applicability to the human are scarce. Hence, we used the honeybee (Apis mellifera) since its nervous system is relatively simple, yet having cognitive capabilities. Bees fed with BMAA-spiked sugar water had an increased mortality rate and a reduced ability to learn odors in a classical conditioning paradigm. Using {sup 14}C-BMAA we demonstrated that BMAA is biologically available to the bee, and is found in the head, thorax and abdomen with little to no excretion. BMAA is also transferred from one bee to the next via trophallaxis resulting in an exposure of the whole beehive. BMAA bath application directly onto the brain leads to an altered Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis and to generation of reactive oxygen species. These behavioral and physiological observations suggest that BMAA may have effects on bee brains similar to those assumed to occur in humans. Therefore the bee could serve as a surrogate model system for investigating the neurological effects of BMAA. - Highlights: • Investigating of neurotoxic effects of BMAA in honeybees • BMAA impairs ALS markers (ROS, Ca{sup 2+}, learning, memory, odor) in bees. • A method for the observation of ROS development in living bees brain was established. • Honeybees are a suitable model to explore neurodegenerative processes. • Neurotoxic BMAA can be spread in bee populations by trophallaxis.

  4. Amino acids (L-arginine and L-alanine) passivated CdS nanoparticles: Synthesis of spherical hierarchical structure and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Gambhire, A. B.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) passivated with amino acids (L-alanine and L-arginine) having spherical hierarchical morphology were synthesized by room temperature wet chemical method. Synthesized NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to study the variation of band gaps with concentration of surface modifying agents. Increase in band gap has been observed with the increase in concentration of surface modifying agents and was found more prominent for CdS NPs passivated with L-alanine. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were carried out for the study of crystal structure and morphology of CdS NPs. The average particle size of CdS NPs calculated from Debye-Scherer formula was found to less than 5 nm and agrees well with those determined from UV-vis spectra and TEM data. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to know the functional groups of the grown NPs. Peaks in FT-IR spectra indicate the formation of CdS NPs and capping with L-alanine and L-arginine. Photoluminescence spectra of these NPs were also studied. Finally, colloidal solution of CdS-PVAc was subjected to Z-scan experiment under low power cw laser illumination to characterize them for third order nonlinear optical properties. CdS-PVAc colloidal solution shows enhanced nonlinear absorption due to RSA and weak FCA on account of two photon absorption processes triggered by thermal effect.

  5. A study of L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-alanine transport in the perfused rat mammary gland: possible involvement of LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Shennan, D B; Calvert, D T; Travers, M T; Kudo, Y; Boyd, C A R

    2002-08-19

    The transport of L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-alanine by the perfused lactating rat mammary gland has been examined using a rapid, paired-tracer dilution technique. The clearances of all three amino acids by the mammary gland consisted of a rising phase followed by a rapid fall-off, respectively, reflecting influx and efflux of the radiotracers. The peak clearance of L-leucine was inhibited by BCH (65%) and D-leucine (58%) but not by L-proline. The inhibition of L-leucine clearance by BCH and D-leucine was not additive. L-leucine inhibited the peak clearance of radiolabelled L-leucine by 78%. BCH also inhibited the peak clearance of L-phenylalanine (66%) and L-alanine (33%) by the perfused mammary gland. Lactating rat mammary tissue was found to express both LAT1 and LAT2 mRNA. The results suggest that system L is situated in the basolateral aspect of the lactating rat mammary epithelium and thus probably plays a central role in neutral amino acid uptake from blood. The finding that L-alanine uptake by the gland was inhibited by BCH suggests that LAT2 may make a significant contribution to neutral amino acid uptake by the mammary epithelium. PMID:12101005

  6. Betaine: New Oxidant in the Stickland Reaction and Methanogenesis from Betaine and l-Alanine by a Clostridium sporogenes-Methanosarcina barkeri Coculture

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Evelyn; Hippe, Hans; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    1983-01-01

    Growing and nongrowing cells of Clostridium sporogenes fermented betaine with l-alanine, l-valine, l-leucine, and l-isoleucine as electron donors in a coupled oxidation-reduction reaction (Stickland reaction). For the substrate combinations betaine and l-alanine and betaine and l-valine balance studies were performed; the results were in agreement with the following fermentation equation: 1 R- CH(NH2)-COOH + 2 betaine + 2 H2O → 1 R-COOH + 1 CO2 + 1 NH3 + 2 trimethylamine + 2 acetate. Growth and production of trimethylamine were strictly dependent on the presence of selenite in the medium. With cell suspensions it was shown that C. sporogenes was unable to catabolize betaine as a single substrate. Betaine, however, was reduced to trimethylamine and acetate under an atmosphere of molecular hydrogen. For the reduction of betaine by cell extracts of C. sporogenes, dimercaptans such as 1,4-dithiothreitol could serve as electron donors. No betaine reductase activity was detected in cells grown in a complex medium without betaine. The pH optimum of betaine reductase was at pH 7.3. When C. sporogenes was cocultured with Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro on betaine together with l-alanine, an almost complete conversion of the two substrates to CH4, NH3, and presumably CO2 was observed. PMID:16346196

  7. Altered hepatic gluconeogenesis during L-alanine infusion in weight-losing lung cancer patients as observed by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and turnover measurements.

    PubMed

    Leij-Halfwerk, S; van den Berg, J W; Sijens, P E; Wilson, J H; Oudkerk, M; Dagnelie, P C

    2000-02-01

    Profound alterations in host metabolism in lung cancer patients with weight loss have been reported, including elevated phosphomonoesters (PMEs) as detected by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In healthy subjects, infusion of L-alanine induced significant increases in hepatic PMEs and phosphodiesters (PDEs) due to rising concentrations of 3-phosphoglycerate and phosphoenolpyruvate, respectively. The aim of the present study was to monitor these changes in the tumor-free liver of lung cancer patients during L-alanine infusion by means of simultaneous 31P MRS and turnover measurements. Twenty-one lung cancer patients without liver metastases with (CaWL) or without weight loss (CaWS), and 12 healthy control subjects were studied during an i.v. L-alanine challenge of 1.4-2.8 mmol/kg followed by 2.8 mmol/kg/h for 90 min. Plasma L-alanine concentrations increased during alanine infusion, from 0.35-0.37 mM at baseline to 5.37 +/- 0.14 mM in the CaWL patients, 6.67 +/- 0.51 mM in the CaWS patients, and 8.47 +/- 0.88 mM in the controls (difference from baseline and between groups during alanine infusion, all P < 0.001). Glucose turnover and liver PME levels at baseline were significantly elevated in the CaWL patients. Alanine infusion increased whole-body glucose turnover by 8 +/- 3% in the CaWS patients (P = 0.03), whereas no significant change occurred in the CaWL and controls. PME levels increased by 50 +/- 16% in controls (area under the curve, P < 0.01) and by 87 +/- 31% in the CaWS patients (P < 0.05) after 45-90 min. In contrast, no significant changes in PME levels were observed in the CaWL patients. Plasma insulin concentrations increased during L-alanine infusion in all groups to levels that were lower in the CaWL patients than in the CaWS patients and controls (P < 0.05). In lung cancer patients, but not in controls, changes in PME and PDE levels during alanine infusion were inversely correlated with their respective baseline levels (r = -0.82 and -0

  8. Identification and Partial Characterization of a Novel UDP-N-Acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine Reductase/UDP-N-Acetylmuramate:l-Alanine Ligase Fusion Enzyme from Verrucomicrobium spinosum DSM 4136T

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Kubra F.; Patin, Delphine; Wheatley, Matthew S.; Savka, Michael A.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Gan, Han Ming; Barreteau, Hélène; Blanot, Didier; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Hudson, André O.

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes involved in synthesizing the bacterial cell wall are attractive targets for the design of antibacterial compounds, since this pathway is essential for bacteria and is absent in animals, particularly humans. A survey of the genome of a bacterium that belongs to the phylum Verrucomicrobia, the closest free-living relative to bacteria from the Chlamydiales phylum, shows genetic evidence that Verrucomicrobium spinosum possesses a novel fusion open reading frame (ORF) annotated by the locus tag (VspiD_010100018130). The ORF, which is predicted to encode the enzymes UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine reductase (MurB) and UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanine ligase (MurC) that are involved in the cytoplasmic steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, was cloned. In vivo analyses using functional complementation showed that the fusion gene was able to complement Escherichia coli murB and murC temperature sensitive mutants. The purified recombinant fusion enzyme (MurB/CVs) was shown to be endowed with UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanine ligase activity. In vitro analyses demonstrated that the latter enzyme had a pH optimum of 9.0, a magnesium optimum of 10 mM and a temperature optimum of 44–46°C. Its apparent Km values for ATP, UDP-MurNAc, and l-alanine were 470, 90, and 25 μM, respectively. However, all attempts to demonstrate an in vitro UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine reductase (MurB) activity were unsuccessful. Lastly, Hidden Markov Model-based similarity search and phylogenetic analysis revealed that this fusion enzyme could only be identified in specific lineages within the Verrucomicrobia phylum. PMID:27047475

  9. Determination of the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of l-glutamine and l-alanine, or dipeptide, supplementation in rats submitted to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Raizel, Raquel; Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Coqueiro, Audrey Yule; Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of chronic oral supplementation with l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form or as the dipeptide l-alanyl-l-glutamine (DIP) on muscle damage, inflammation and cytoprotection, in rats submitted to progressive resistance exercise (RE). Wistar rats (n 8/group) were submitted to 8-week RE, which consisted of climbing a ladder with progressive loads. In the final 21 d before euthanasia, supplements were delivered in a 4 % solution in drinking water. Glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), TNF-α, specific IL (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated in plasma. The concentrations of glutamine, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, as well as NF-κB activation, were determined in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) skeletal muscle. HSP70 level was assayed in EDL and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). RE reduced glutamine concentration in plasma and EDL (P<0·05 v. sedentary group). However, l-glutamine supplements (l-alanine plus l-glutamine (GLN+ALA) and DIP groups) restored glutamine levels in plasma (by 40 and 58 %, respectively) and muscle (by 93 and 105 %, respectively). GLN+ALA and DIP groups also exhibited increased level of HSP70 in EDL and PBMC, consistent with the reduction of NF-κB p65 activation and cytokines in EDL. Muscle protection was also indicated by attenuation in plasma levels of CK, LDH, TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as an increase in IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1. Our study demonstrates that chronic oral l-glutamine treatment (given with l-alanine or as dipeptide) following progressive RE induces cyprotective effects mediated by HSP70-associated responses to muscle damage and inflammation. PMID:27215379

  10. Effective production of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA) with Erwinia herbicola cells carrying a mutant transcriptional regulator TyrR.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Takashi; Katayama, Takane; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nakazawa, Hidetsugu; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2005-02-01

    The enzymatic production of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA) using Erwinia herbicola cells involves the action of tyrosine phenol-lyase (Tpl, EC 4.1.99.2). Since Tpl is only synthesized under L-tyrosine-induced conditions, the addition of L-tyrosine to the medium is unavoidable when preparing cells (the enzyme source), but severely impedes the pure preparation of the final product L-DOPA. We circumvented this problem by using recombinant E. herbicola cells carrying a mutant transcriptional regulator TyrR, which is capable of activating the tpl promoter in the absence of L-tyrosine. PMID:15639092

  11. Hyperproduction of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-Dopa) using Erwinia herbicola cells carrying a mutant transcriptional regulator TyrR.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Takashi; Katayama, Takane; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Onishi, Akiko; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2009-05-01

    In the last few decades, enzymatic production of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-dopa) using tyrosine phenol-lyase (Tpl) has been industrialized. This method has an intrinsic problem of tyrosine contamination because Tpl is synthesized under tyrosine-induced conditions. Herein, we constructed a hyper-L-dopa-producing strain by exploiting a mutant TyrR, an activator of tpl. The highest productivity was obtained for the strain grown under non-induced conditions. It was 30-fold higher than that obtained for tyrosine-induced wild-type cells. PMID:19420686

  12. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic and DFT studies of anti-cancer active molecule N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-Alanine - Glycine ethyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, T. S.; Kenny, Peter T. M.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert

    2015-06-01

    FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-alanine - glycine ethyl ester were recorded in solid phase. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and the Raman scattering intensities were calculated by using density functional method(B3LYP) with 6-31G(d, p) basis set. Vibrational assignment of the molecule was done by using potential energy distribution analysis. Natural bond orbital analysis, Mulliken charge analysis and HOMO-LUMO energy were used to elucidate the reasons for intra molecular charge transfer. Docking studies were conducted to predict its anticancer activity.

  13. Cyanobacterial Blooms and the Occurrence of the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in South Florida Aquatic Food Webs.

    PubMed

    Brand, Larry E; Pablo, John; Compton, Angela; Hammerschlag, Neil; Mash, Deborah C

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that most cyanobacteria produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and that it can biomagnify in at least one terrestrial food chain. BMAA has been implicated as a significant environmental risk in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). We examined several blooms of cyanobacteria in South Florida, and the BMAA content of resident animals, including species used as human food. A wide range of BMAA concentrations were found, ranging from below assay detection limits to approximately 7000 μg/g, a concentration associated with a potential long-term human health hazard. PMID:21057660

  14. Temperature-sensitive mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 with low activities of the L-alanine adding enzyme and the D-alanyl-D-alanine adding enzyme.

    PubMed

    Lugtenberg, E J; v Schijndel-van Dam, A

    1972-04-01

    A number of properties of temperature-sensitive mutants in murein synthesis are described. The mutants grow at 30 C but lyse at 42 C. One mutant possesses a temperature-sensitive d-alanyl-d-alanine adding enzyme, has an impaired rate of murein synthesis in vivo at both 30 and 42 C, and contains elevated levels of uridine diphosphate-N-acetyl-muramyl-tripeptide (UDP-MurNAc-l-Ala-d-Glu-m-diaminopimelic acid) at 42 C. The other mutant possesses an l-alanine adding enzyme with a very low in vitro activity at both 30 and 42 C. Its in vivo rate of murein synthesis is almost normal at 30 C but is much less at 42 C. When the murein precursors were isolated after incubation of the cells in the presence of (14)C-l-alanine, they contained only a fraction of the radioactivity that could be obtained from a wild-type strain. A genetic nomenclature for genes concerned with murein synthesis is proposed. PMID:4552998

  15. The metabolism of the non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Downing, Timothy Grant

    2016-06-01

    The neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is produced by cyanobacteria under nitrogen starvation conditions and its metabolism is closely associated with cellular nitrogen control. Very little is known regarding the metabolism or biosynthesis of this amino acid in the producing organisms and current knowledge is limited to the spontaneous formation of carbamate adducts in the presence of aqueous carbon dioxide, the rapid removal of free cellular BMAA upon the addition of ammonia to nitrogen-starved cyanobacterial cultures, and the link between cellular nitrogen status and BMAA synthesis. Data presented here show that exogenous BMAA is readily metabolised by cyanobacteria during which, the primary amino group is rapidly transferred to other cellular amino acids. Furthermore, data suggest that BMAA is metabolised in cyanobacteria via a reversible transamination reaction. This study presents novel data on BMAA metabolism in cyanobacteria and provides the first proposed biosynthetic precursor to BMAA biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. PMID:26948425

  16. Studies on optical, mechanical and transport properties of NLO active L-alanine formate single crystal grown by modified Sankaranarayanan Ramasamy (SR) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justin Raj, C.; Dinakaran, S.; Krishnan, S.; Milton Boaz, B.; Robert, R.; Jerome Das, S.

    2008-04-01

    Bulk single crystals of L-alanine formate of 10 mm diameter and 50 mm length have been grown with an aid of modified Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) uniaxial crystal growth method within a period of ten days. The optical properties of the grown crystal were calculated from UV transmission spectral analysis. The second harmonic generation efficiency of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz powder test. In order to determine the mechanical strength of the crystal, Vicker's microhardness test was carried along the growth plane (0 0 1). Dielectric studies reveal that both dielectric constant and dielectric loss decreases with increase in frequency. Photoconductivity study confirms the negative photoconducting nature of the crystal.

  17. Cyanobacterial Blooms and the Occurrence of the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in South Florida Aquatic Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Larry E.; Pablo, John; Compton, Angela; Hammerschlag, Neil; Mash, Deborah C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that most cyanobacteria produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and that it can biomagnify in at least one terrestrial food chain. BMAA has been implicated as a significant environmental risk in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). We examined several blooms of cyanobacteria in South Florida, and the BMAA content of resident animals, including species used as human food. A wide range of BMAA concentrations were found, ranging from below assay detection limits to approximately 7000 μg/g, a concentration associated with a potential long-term human health hazard. PMID:21057660

  18. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for the analysis of N-β-methylamino-L-alanine with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Cohen, Steven A; Murch, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies in the past decade have identified N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) as a putative environmental neurotoxin. Produced by cyanobacteria and accumulated at different levels of the trophic system, BMAA has been detected in the brain tissue of human patients that died from progressive neurodegenerative disease. Research into the mechanism of neurotoxicity has been hampered by conflicting results and disagreement in the literature over analytical methods used for quantification and detection. While several research approaches have been tested, the use of the derivatizing reagent 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate is presented here as an effective and selective means for the analysis of BMAA and two co-occurring biological isomers, DAB and AEG, by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:25323521

  19. Tetra­kis-μ-l-alanine-κ8 O:O′-bis­[tetra­aqua­terbium(III)] hexa­perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Musa E.; Chopra, Deepak; Venugopal, K. N.; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Maguire, Glenn E. M.

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Tb2(C3H7NO2)4(H2O)8](ClO4)6, contains a dinuclear cation and six perchlorate anions, one of which is disordered. In the cation, the four l-alanine mol­ecules are present in their zwitterionic form and bridge two Tb3+ ions through their carboxyl­ate O atoms. Each Tb atom is also coordinated by four water mol­ecules in a square-anti­prismatic geometry. In the crystal structure, the cations and anions are held together via inter­molecular O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:21579659

  20. Kinetic Studies and Mechanism of Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic Decomposition by Cu(II) Complexes with Polyelectrolytes Derived from L-Alanine and Glycylglycine

    PubMed Central

    Skounas, Spyridon; Methenitis, Constantinos; Pneumatikakis, George; Morcellet, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by Cu(II) complexes with polymers bearing L-alanine (PAla) and glycylglycine (PGlygly) in their side chain was studied in alkaline aqueous media. The reactions were of pseudo-first order with respect to [H2O2] and [L-Cu(II)] (L stands for PAla or PGlygly) and the reaction rate was increased with pH increase. The energies of activation for the reactions were determined at pH 8.8, in a temperature range of 293–308 K. A suitable mechanism is proposed to account for the kinetic data, which involves the Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox pair, as has been demonstrated by ESR spectroscopy. The trend in catalytic efficiency is in the order PGlygly>PAla, due to differences in modes of complexation and in the conformation of the macromolecular ligands. PMID:20721280

  1. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated uc(l)-Alanine Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of uc(l)-alanine peptides (uc(l)-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) and homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the uc(l)-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+(uc(l)-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of uc(d)-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+(uc(d)-Trp). uc(l)-Ala peptides recognize uc(d)-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+(uc(d)-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas uc(l)-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of uc(l)-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  2. Transfer of developmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) via milk to nursed offspring: Studies by mass spectrometry and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Banack, Sandra Anne; Brandt, Ingvar

    2016-09-01

    The cyanobacterial non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is proposed to be involved in the etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex. When administered as single doses to neonatal rats, BMAA gives rise to cognitive and neurodegenerative impairments in the adult animal. Here, we employed mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and autoradiographic imaging to examine the mother-to-pup transfer of BMAA in rats. The results show that unchanged BMAA was secreted into the milk and distributed to the suckling pups. The concentration of BMAA in pup stomach milk and the neonatal liver peaked after 8h, while the concentration in the pup brain increased throughout the study period. About 1 and 6% of the BMAA recovered from adult liver and brain were released following hydrolysis, suggesting that this fraction was associated with protein. No association to milk protein was observed. Injection of rat pups with [methyl-(14)C]-l-BMAA or [carboxyl-(14)C]-l-BMAA resulted in highly similar distribution patterns, indicating no or low metabolic elimination of the methylamino- or carboxyl groups. In conclusion, BMAA is transported as a free amino acid to rat milk and suckling pups. The results strengthen the proposal that mothers' milk could be a source of exposure for BMAA in human infants. PMID:27320960

  3. Immobilization by Polyurethane of Pseudomonas dacunhae Cells Containing l-Aspartate β-Decarboxylase Activity and Application to l-Alanine Production

    PubMed Central

    Fusee, Murray C.; Weber, Jennifer E.

    1984-01-01

    Whole cells of Pseudomonas dacunhae containing l-aspartate β-decarboxylase activity were immobilized by mixing a cell suspension with a liquid isocyanate-capped polyurethane prepolymer (Hypol; W. R. Grace & Co., Lexington, Mass.). The immobilized cell preparation was used to convert l-aspartic acid to l-alanine. Properties of the immobilized P. dacunhae cells containing aspartate β-decarboxylase activity were investigated with batch reactors. Retention of enzyme activity was observed to be as much as 100% when cell lysis was allowed to occur before immobilization. The pH and temperature optima were determined to be 5.5 and 45°C, respectively. Immobilized P. dacunhael-aspartate β-decarboxylase activity was stabilized by the addition of 0.1 mM pyridoxal-5-phosphate and 0.1 mM α-ketoglutaric acid to a 1.7 M ammonium aspartate (pH 5.5) substrate solution. Under conditions of semicontinuous use in a batch reactor, a 2.5% loss in immobilized l-aspartate β-decarboxylase activity was observed over a 31-day period. PMID:16346636

  4. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and isomers: Distribution in different food web compartments of Thau lagoon, French Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Masseret, Estelle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2015-09-01

    The neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-l-alanine) and its isomer DAB (2,4-diaminobutyric acid) have been detected in seafood worldwide, including in Thau lagoon (French Mediterranean Sea). A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease associated with BMAA, has also been observed in this region. Mussels, periphyton (i.e. biofilms attached to mussels) and plankton were sampled between July 2013 and October 2014, and analyzed using HILIC-MS/MS. BMAA, DAB and AEG (N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine) were found in almost all the samples of the lagoon. BMAA and DAB were present at 0.58 and 0.83, 2.6 and 3.3, 4.0 and 7.2 μg g(-1) dry weight in plankton collected with nets, periphyton and mussels, respectively. Synechococcus sp., Ostreococcus tauri, Alexandrium catenella and eight species of diatoms were cultured and screened for BMAA and analogs. While Synechococcus sp., O. tauri and A. catenella did not produce BMAA under our culture conditions, four diatoms species contained both BMAA and DAB. Hence, diatoms may be a source of BMAA for mussels. Unlike other toxins produced by microalgae, BMAA and DAB were detected in significant amounts in tissues other than digestive glands in mussels. PMID:26254582

  5. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA. PMID:26498001

  6. Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine: LC-MS/MS optimization, screening of cyanobacterial strains and occurrence in shellfish from Thau, a French Mediterranean lagoon.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Brient, Luc; Savar, Véronique; Bardouil, Michèle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2014-11-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid suggested to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases. It was reported to be produced by cyanobacteria, but also found in edible aquatic organisms, thus raising concern of a widespread human exposure. However, the chemical analysis of BMAA and its isomers are controversial, mainly due to the lack of selectivity of the analytical methods. Using factorial design, we have optimized the chromatographic separation of underivatized analogues by a hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) method. A combination of an effective solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up, appropriate chromatographic resolution and the use of specific mass spectral transitions allowed for the development of a highly selective and sensitive analytical procedure to identify and quantify BMAA and its isomers (in both free and total form) in cyanobacteria and mollusk matrices (LOQ of 0.225 and 0.15 µg/g dry weight, respectively). Ten species of cyanobacteria (six are reported to be BMAA producers) were screened with this method, and neither free nor bound BMAA could be found, while both free and bound DAB were present in almost all samples. Mussels and oysters collected in 2009 in the Thau Lagoon, France, were also screened, and bound BMAA and its two isomers, DAB and AEG, were observed in all samples (from 0.6 to 14.4 µg/g DW), while only several samples contained quantifiable free BMAA. PMID:25405857

  7. Detection of cyanotoxins, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine and microcystins, from a lake surrounded by cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie; Henegan, Patricia; Haney, James; Murby, Amanda; Metcalf, James S; Powell, James; Cox, Paul Alan; Stommel, Elijah

    2015-02-01

    A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously described to border Lake Mascoma in Enfield, NH, with an incidence of ALS approximating 25 times expected. We hypothesize a possible association with cyanobacterial blooms that can produce β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid implicated as a possible cause of ALS/PDC in Guam. Muscle, liver, and brain tissue samples from a Lake Mascoma carp, as well as filtered aerosol samples, were analyzed for microcystins (MC), free and protein-bound BMAA, and the BMAA isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG). In carp brain, BMAA and DAB concentrations were 0.043 μg/g ± 0.02 SD and 0.01 μg/g ± 0.002 SD respectively. In carp liver and muscle, the BMAA concentrations were 1.28 μg/g and 1.27 μg/g respectively, and DAB was not detected. BMAA was detected in the air filters, as were the isomers DAB and AEG. These results demonstrate that a putative cause for ALS, BMAA, exists in an environment that has a documented cluster of ALS. Although cause and effect have not been demonstrated, our observations and measurements strengthen the association. PMID:25643180

  8. Detection of cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine within shellfish in the diet of an ALS patient in Florida.

    PubMed

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Metcalf, James S; Bradley, Walter G; Cox, Paul Alan

    2014-11-01

    Cyanobacteria produce the neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), which in contaminated marine waters has been found to accumulate in shellfish. Exposure to BMAA has been associated with an increased risk of neurodegenerative disease. Analysis of blinded samples found BMAA to be present in neuroproteins of individuals who died from ALS and ALS/PDC, but generally not in the brains of patients who died of causes unrelated to neurodegeneration or Huntington's disease, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. We here report support for a link between a patient with ALS and chronic exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA via shellfish consumption. The patient had frequently eaten lobsters collected in Florida Bay for approximately 30 years. LC-MS/MS analysis of two lobsters which this ALS patient had placed in his freezer revealed BMAA at concentrations of 27 and 4 μg/g, respectively, as well as the presence of 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB), a BMAA isomer. Two additional lobsters recently collected from Florida Bay also contained the neurotoxins BMAA and DAB. These data suggest that invertebrates collected in water where cyanobacterial blooms are present, if consumed, may result in direct human exposure to these neurotoxic amino acids. The data support the assertion that prolonged exposure to BMAA may have played a role in the etiology of ALS in this patient. PMID:25123936

  9. Protein association of the neurotoxin and non-protein amino acid BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in the liver and brain following neonatal administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Andersson, Marie; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2014-04-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not an amino acid that is normally found in proteins. Our previous autoradiographic study of (3)H-labeled BMAA in adult mice unexpectedly revealed a tissue distribution similar to that of protein amino acids. The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution of free and protein-bound BMAA in neonatal rat tissues following a short exposure using autoradiographic imaging and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The autoradiographic imaging of (14)C-L-BMAA demonstrated a distinct uptake of radioactivity that was retained following acid extraction in tissues with a high rate of cell turnover and/or protein synthesis. The UHPLC-MS/MS analysis conclusively demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat tissues. The level of protein-associated BMAA in the liver was more than 10 times higher than that in brain regions not fully protected by the blood-brain barrier which may be due to the higher rate of protein synthesis in the liver. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BMAA was associated with rat proteins suggesting that BMAA may be misincorporated into proteins. However, protein-associated BMAA seemed to be cleared over time, as none of the samples from adult rats had any detectable free or protein-associated BMAA. PMID:24472610

  10. Carbon-Nanotube-Mediated Electrochemical Transition in a Redox-Active Supramolecular Hydrogel Derived from Viologen and an l-Alanine-Based Amphiphile.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sougata; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2016-05-23

    A two-component hydrogelator (16-A)2 -V(2+) , comprising an l-alanine-based amphiphile (16-A) and a redox-active viologen based partner (V(2+) ), is reported. The formation the hydrogel depended, not only on the acid-to-amine stoichiometric ratio, but on the choice of the l-amino acid group and also on the hydrocarbon chain length of the amphiphilic component. The redox responsive property and the electrochemical behavior of this two-component system were further examined by step-wise chemical and electrochemical reduction of the viologen nucleus (V(2+) /V(+) and V(+) /V(0) ). The half-wave reduction potentials (E1/2 ) associated with the viologen ring shifted to more negative values with increasing amine component. This indicates that higher extent of salt formation hinders reduction of the viologen moiety. Interestingly, the incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the electrochemically irreversible hydrogel (16-A)2 -V(2+) transformed it into a quasi-reversible electrochemical system. PMID:27059107

  11. Pore Diameter Dependence and Segmental Dynamics of Poly-Z-L-lysine and Poly-L-alanine Confined in 1D Nanocylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncel, Eylul; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Iossifidis, Agathaggelos; Steinhart, Martin; Butt, Hans-Jurgen; Floudas, George; Duran, Hatice

    Structure formation, thermodynamic stability, phase and dynamic behaviors of polypeptides are strongly affected by confinement. Since understanding the changes in these behaviors will allow their rational design as functional devices with tunable properties, herein we investigated Poly-Z-L-lysine (PZLL) and Poly-L-alanine (PAla) homopolypeptides confined in nanoporous alumina containing aligned cylindrical nanopores as a function of pore size by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Solid-state NMR, X-ray diffraction, Dielectric spectroscopy(DS). Bulk PZLL exhibits a glass transition temperature (Tg) at about 301K while PZLL nanorods showed slightly lower Tg (294K). The dynamic investigation by DS also revealed a decrease (4K) in Tg between bulk and PZLL nanorods. DS is a very sensitive probe of the local and global secondary structure relaxation through the large dipole to study effect of confinement. The results revealed that the local segmental dynamics, associated with broken hydrogen bonds, and segmental dynamics speed-up on confinement.

  12. Structural, vibrational spectroscopic studies and quantum chemical calculations of n-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-alanine methyl ester by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarasu, K.; Kavitha, E.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the vibrational wavenumbers of N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-alanine methyl ester (abbreviated as Dnp-ala-ome) were obtained from ab initio studies based on the density functional theory approach with B3LYP and M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The optimized geometry and structural features of the most potential nonlinear optical crystal Dnp-ala-ome and the vibrational spectral investigations have been thoroughly described with the FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra supported by the DFT computations. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-50 cm-1) in the solid phase and the UV-Vis spectra that dissolved in ethanol were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The Natural population analysis and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis have also been carried out to analyze the effects of intramolecular charge transfer, intramolecular and hyperconjugative interactions on the geometries. The effects of frontier orbitals, HOMO and LUMO, transition of electron density transfer have also been discussed. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) and related properties (β, α0 and Δα) of Dnp-ala-ome were calculated. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was investigated using theoretical calculations. The chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of at different temperature are calculated.

  13. Beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine: LC-MS/MS Optimization, Screening of Cyanobacterial Strains and Occurrence in Shellfish from Thau, a French Mediterranean Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Brient, Luc; Savar, Véronique; Bardouil, Michèle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2014-01-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid suggested to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases. It was reported to be produced by cyanobacteria, but also found in edible aquatic organisms, thus raising concern of a widespread human exposure. However, the chemical analysis of BMAA and its isomers are controversial, mainly due to the lack of selectivity of the analytical methods. Using factorial design, we have optimized the chromatographic separation of underivatized analogues by a hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) method. A combination of an effective solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up, appropriate chromatographic resolution and the use of specific mass spectral transitions allowed for the development of a highly selective and sensitive analytical procedure to identify and quantify BMAA and its isomers (in both free and total form) in cyanobacteria and mollusk matrices (LOQ of 0.225 and 0.15 µg/g dry weight, respectively). Ten species of cyanobacteria (six are reported to be BMAA producers) were screened with this method, and neither free nor bound BMAA could be found, while both free and bound DAB were present in almost all samples. Mussels and oysters collected in 2009 in the Thau Lagoon, France, were also screened, and bound BMAA and its two isomers, DAB and AEG, were observed in all samples (from 0.6 to 14.4 µg/g DW), while only several samples contained quantifiable free BMAA. PMID:25405857

  14. Detection of Cyanotoxins, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine and Microcystins, from a Lake Surrounded by Cases of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie; Henegan, Patricia; Haney, James; Murby, Amanda; Metcalf, James S.; Powell, James; Cox, Paul Alan; Stommel, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously described to border Lake Mascoma in Enfield, NH, with an incidence of ALS approximating 25 times expected. We hypothesize a possible association with cyanobacterial blooms that can produce β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid implicated as a possible cause of ALS/PDC in Guam. Muscle, liver, and brain tissue samples from a Lake Mascoma carp, as well as filtered aerosol samples, were analyzed for microcystins (MC), free and protein-bound BMAA, and the BMAA isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG). In carp brain, BMAA and DAB concentrations were 0.043 μg/g ± 0.02 SD and 0.01 μg/g ± 0.002 SD respectively. In carp liver and muscle, the BMAA concentrations were 1.28 μg/g and 1.27 μg/g respectively, and DAB was not detected. BMAA was detected in the air filters, as were the isomers DAB and AEG. These results demonstrate that a putative cause for ALS, BMAA, exists in an environment that has a documented cluster of ALS. Although cause and effect have not been demonstrated, our observations and measurements strengthen the association. PMID:25643180

  15. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L.; Brittebo, Eva B.

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA. PMID:26498001

  16. Model Studies on the Antioxidative Effect of Polyphenols in Thermally Treated D-Glucose/L-Alanine Solutions with Added Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Wilker, Daniel; Heinrich, Anna B; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-12-30

    The influence of different polyphenolic compounds (PPs) on the Maillard reaction in a d-glucose/l-alanine model system with or without metal ions was studied under various reaction conditions. At temperatures up to 100 °C the PPs showed pro-oxidative effects due to their reducing effects on metal ions. This can be explained by a combined redox cycling mechanism of metals and PPs that promotes oxidation in the Maillard reaction. The antioxidative capacities of the PPs were measured with three different assays and correlated directly with their pro-oxidative effects on d-glucosone formation. The degree of the pro-oxidative effect depended not only on the PPs' reducing potential and their antioxidative ability but also on their concentration, the temperature, and the pH value of the model system. At low pH values and temperatures, the PPs were more stable and therefore showed an increased pro-oxidative tendency. In contrast, some of the used PPs were almost completely degraded at temperatures of 130 °C, and the formed polymers were able to complex metal ions. In the absence of these catalyzing ions, the oxidation ratio of d-glucose to d-glucosone was decreased. PMID:26634406

  17. Combined use of l-alanine tert butyl ester lactate and trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin for the enantiomeric separations of 2-arylpropionic acids nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Mavroudi, Maria C; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a new CE method, employing a binary system of trimethyl-β-CD (TM-β-CD) and a chiral amino acid ester-based ionic liquid (AAIL), was developed for the chiral separation of seven 2-arylpropionic acid nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In particular, the enantioseparation of ibuprofen, ketoprofen, carprofen, indoprofen, flurbiprofen, naproxen, and fenoprofen was improved significantly by supporting the BGE with the chiral AAIL l-alanine tert butyl ester lactate (l-AlaC4 Lac). Parameters, such as concentrations of TM-β-CD and l-AlaC4 Lac, and buffer pH, were systematically examined in order to optimize the chiral separation of each NSAID. It was observed that the addition of the AAIL into the BGE improved both resolution and efficiency significantly. After optimization of separation conditions, baseline separation (Rs >1.5) of five of the analytes was achieved in less than 11 min, while the resolution of ibuprofen and flurbiprofen was approximately 1.2. The optimized enantioseparation conditions for all analytes involve a BGE of 5 mM sodium acetate/acetic acid (pH 5.0), an applied voltage of 30 kV, and a temperature of 20°C. In addition, the results obtained by computing the %-RSD values of the EOF and the two enantiomer peaks, demonstrated excellent run-to-run, batch-to-batch, and day-to-day reproducibilities. PMID:26080944

  18. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine causes neurological and pathological phenotypes mimicking Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): the first step towards an experimental model for sporadic ALS.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Miguel, Begoña G; Solas, M Teresa; Ojeda, Irene; Martínez, Ana; Gil, Carmen; Arahuetes, Rosa Ma

    2013-09-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (L-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid that has been related to various neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this work was to analyze the biotoxicity produced by L-BMAA in vivo in rats, trying to elucidate its physiopathological mechanisms and to search for analogies between the found effects and pathologies like Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Our data demonstrated that the neurotoxic effects in vivo were dosage-dependent. For evaluating the state of the animals, a neurological evaluation scale was developed as well as a set of functional tests. Ultrastructural cell analysis of spinal motoneurons has revealed alterations both in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Since GSK3β could play a role in some neuropathological processes, we analyzed the alterations occurring in GSK3β levels in L-BMAA treated rats, we have observed an increase in the active form of GSK3β levels in lumbar spinal cord and motor cerebral cortex. On the other hand, (TAR)-DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) increased in L-BMAA treated animals. Our results indicated that N-acetylaspartate (NAA) declined in animals treated with L-BMAA, and the ratio of N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho), N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and N-acetylaspartate/choline+creatine (NAA/Cho+Cr) tended to decrease in lumbar spinal cord and motor cortex. This project offers some encouraging results that could help establishing the progress in the development of an animal model of sporadic ALS and L-BMAA could be a useful tool for this purpose. PMID:23688553

  19. β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine exposure alters defense against oxidative stress in aquatic plants Lomariopsis lineata, Fontinalis antipyretica, Riccia fluitans and Taxiphyllum barbieri.

    PubMed

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Funke, Marc Sebastian; Peuthert, Anja; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    Four different aquatic plants, the Pteridophyte Lomariopsis lineata and the Bryophytes Fontinalis antipyretica, Riccia fluitans and Taxiphyllum barbieri, were tested for their capacity to absorb the neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) from water and thus their possible applicability in a "Green Liver System". After exposure to 10 and 100 μg L(-1) BMAA for 1, 3, 7 and 14 days exposure concentration of medium and tissue were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The amount removed by the plants within only 1 day was equal to the biological degradation of 14 days. Comparing the "BMAA-removal" capacity of the 4 tested aquatic plants R. fluitans, L. lineata and T. barbieri turned out to be most effective in cleaning the water from this cyanobacterial toxin by up to 97% within 14 days. Activity of the antioxidant enzymes peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT), as well as biotransformation enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) was compared between exposed and control plants to determine possible harmful effects induced by BMAA. Whereas the Bryophytes displayed increased POD activity and subsequent adaptation when exposed to the lower concentration, as well as partly inhibited antioxidant response at the higher applied BMAA concentration, the Pteridophyte L. lineata reacted with increased POD activity during the whole experiment and increased GST activity after longer exposure for 14 days. To give a recommendation of the suitability of an aquatic plant to be used for sustainable phytoremediation of contaminated water, testing of removal capacity of specific contaminants as well as studying general physiological parameters giving hint on survivability in such environments has to be combined. PMID:23177931

  20. Remarkable regioisomer control in the hydrogel formation from a two-component mixture of pyridine-end oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s and N-decanoyl-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Subham; Datta, Sougata; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-12-01

    N-Decanoyl-L-alanine (DA) was mixed with either colorless 4,4'-bipyridine (BP) or various derivatives such as chromogenic oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (OPV) functionalized with isomeric pyridine termini in specific molar ratios. This mixtures form salt-type gels in a water/ethanol (2:1, v/v) mixture. The gelation properties of these two-component mixtures could be modulated by variation of the position of the ''N'' atom of the end pyridyl groups in OPVs. The presence of acid-base interactions in the self-assembly of these two-component systems leading to gelation was probed in detail by using stoichiometry-dependent UV/Vis and FTIR spectroscopy. Furthermore, temperature-dependent UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy clearly demonstrated a J-type aggregation mode of these gelator molecules during the sol-to-gel transition process. Morphological features and the arrangement of the molecules in the gels were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Calculation of the length of each molecular system by energy minimization in its extended conformation and comparison with the XRD patterns revealed that this class of gelator molecules adopts lamellar organizations. Rheological properties of these two-component systems provided clear evidence that the flow behavior could be modulated by varying the acid/amine ratio. Polarized optical microscopy (POM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and XRD results revealed that the solid-phase behavior of such two-component mixtures (acid/base=2:1) varied significantly upon changing the proton-acceptor part from BP to OPV. Interestingly, the XRD pattern of these acid/base mixtures after annealing at their associated isotropic temperature was significantly different from that of their xerogels. PMID:24194380

  1. Analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in spirulina-containing supplements by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has come under intense scrutiny. International laboratory and epidemiological research continues to support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to BMAA (e.g., through dietary practices, water supply) can promote the risk of various neurodegenerative diseases. A wide variety of cyanobacteria spp. have previously been reported to produce BMAA, with production levels dependent upon species, strain and environmental conditions. Since spirulina (Arthrospira spp.) is a member of the cyanobacteria phylum frequently consumed via dietary supplements, the presence of BMAA in such products may have public health implications. In the current work, we have analyzed ten spirulina-containing samples for the presence of BMAA; six pure spirulina samples from two separate raw materials suppliers, and four commercially-available multi-ingredient products containing 1.45 g of spirulina per 8.5 g serving. Because of controversy surrounding the measurement of BMAA, we have used two complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods: one based on reversed phase LC (RPLC) with derivatization and the other based on hydrophilic interaction LC (HILIC). Potential matrix effects were corrected for by internal standardization using a stable isotope labeled BMAA standard. BMAA was not detected at low limits of detection (80 ng/g dry weight) in any of these product samples. Although these results are reassuring, BMAA analyses should be conducted on a wider sample selection and, perhaps, as part of ongoing spirulina production quality control testing and specifications. PMID:25120905

  2. Systematic detection of BMAA (β-N-methylamino-l-alanine) and DAB (2,4-diaminobutyric acid) in mollusks collected in shellfish production areas along the French coasts.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Séchet, Véronique; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2016-02-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is naturally present in some microalgal species in the marine environment. The accumulation of BMAA has widely been observed in filter-feeding bivalves that are known to consume primary producers constituting the base of complex aquatic food webs. This study was performed to assess the occurrence of BMAA and isomers in mollusks collected from nine representative shellfish production areas located on the three French coasts (Channel, Atlantic and Mediterranean sites). The use of a highly selective and sensitive HILIC-MS/MS method, with D5DAB as internal standard, revealed the systematic detection of BMAA and DAB, in concentrations ranging from 0.20 to 6.7 μg g(-1) dry weight of digestive gland tissues of mollusks. While we detected BMAA in four strains of diatoms in a previous study, here BMAA was only detected in one diatom species previously not investigated out of the 23 microalgal species examined (belonging to seven classes). The concentrations of BMAA and DAB in mussels and oysters were similar at different sampling locations and despite the high diversity of phytoplankton populations that mollusks feed on at these locations. Only small variations of BMAA and DAB levels were observed and these were not correlated to any of the phytoplankton species reported. Therefore, extensive research should be performed on both origin and metabolism of BMAA in shellfish. The levels observed in this study are similar to those found in other studies in France or elsewhere. A previous study had related such levels to a cluster of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in the South of France; hence the widespread occurrence of BMAA in shellfish from all coasts in France found in this study suggests the need for further epidemiological and toxicological studies to establish the levels that are relevant for a link between the consumption of BMAA-containing foodstuffs and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26615827

  3. Analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in spirulina-containing supplements by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Pearse; Logan, Alan C; Giddings, Sabrina D; Quilliam, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has come under intense scrutiny. International laboratory and epidemiological research continues to support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to BMAA (e.g., through dietary practices, water supply) can promote the risk of various neurodegenerative diseases. A wide variety of cyanobacteria spp. have previously been reported to produce BMAA, with production levels dependent upon species, strain and environmental conditions. Since spirulina (Arthrospira spp.) is a member of the cyanobacteria phylum frequently consumed via dietary supplements, the presence of BMAA in such products may have public health implications. In the current work, we have analyzed ten spirulina-containing samples for the presence of BMAA; six pure spirulina samples from two separate raw materials suppliers, and four commercially-available multi-ingredient products containing 1.45 g of spirulina per 8.5 g serving. Because of controversy surrounding the measurement of BMAA, we have used two complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods: one based on reversed phase LC (RPLC) with derivatization and the other based on hydrophilic interaction LC (HILIC). Potential matrix effects were corrected for by internal standardization using a stable isotope labeled BMAA standard. BMAA was not detected at low limits of detection (80 ng/g dry weight) in any of these product samples. Although these results are reassuring, BMAA analyses should be conducted on a wider sample selection and, perhaps, as part of ongoing spirulina production quality control testing and specifications. PMID:25120905

  4. ALS-linked SOD1 in glial cells enhances ß-N-Methylamino L-Alanine (BMAA)-induced toxicity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Rafique; Zhang, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Environmental factors have been implicated in the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the role of environmental agents in ALS remains poorly understood. To this end, we used transgenic fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) to explore the interaction between mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and chemicals such as ß-N-methylamino L-alanine (BMAA), the herbicide agent paraquat, and superoxide species. We expressed ALS-linked human SOD1 (hSOD1A4V, and hSOD1G85R), hSOD1wt as well as the Drosophila native SOD1 (dSOD1) in motoneurons (MNs) or in glial cells alone and simultaneously in both types of cells. We then examined the effect of BMAA (3 mM), paraquat (20 mM), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1%) on the lifespan of SOD1-expressing flies. Our data show that glial expression of mutant and wild type hSOD1s reduces the ability of flies to climb. Further, we show that while all three chemicals significantly shorten the lifespan of flies, mutant SOD1 does not have a significant additional effect on the lifespan of flies fed on paraquat, but further shortens the lifespan of flies fed on H2O2. Finally, we show that BMAA shows a dramatic cell-type specific effect with mutant SOD1. Flies with expression of mutant hSOD1 in MNs survived longer on BMAA compared to control flies. In contrast, BMAA significantly shortened the lifespan of flies expressing mutant hSOD1 in glia. Consistent with a neuronal protection role, flies expressing these mutant hSOD1s in both MNs and glia also lived longer. Hence, our studies reveal a synergistic effect of mutant SOD1 with H2O2 and novel roles for mutant hSOD1s in neurons to reduce BMAA toxicity and in glia to enhance the toxicity of BMAA in flies. PMID:24627764

  5. Antiferromagnetic spin chain behavior and a transition to 3D magnetic order in Cu(D,L-alanine)2: Roles of H-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Rafael; Sartoris, Rosana P.; Calvo, Hernán L.; Chagas, Edson F.; Rapp, Raul E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the spin chain behavior, a transition to 3D magnetic order and the magnitudes of the exchange interactions for the metal-amino acid complex Cu(D,L-alanine)2•H2O, a model compound to investigate exchange couplings supported by chemical paths characteristic of biomolecules. Thermal and magnetic data were obtained as a function of temperature (T) and magnetic field (B0). The magnetic contribution to the specific heat, measured between 0.48 and 30 K, displays above 1.8 K a 1D spin-chain behavior that can be fitted with an intrachain antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.12±0.08) cm-1 (defined as ℋex(i,i+1) = -2J0SiṡSi+1), between neighbor coppers at 4.49 Å along chains connected by non-covalent and H-bonds. We also observe a narrow specific heat peak at 0.89 K indicating a phase transition to a 3D magnetically ordered phase. Magnetization curves at fixed T = 2, 4 and 7 K with B0 between 0 and 9 T, and at T between 2 and 300 K with several fixed values of B0 were globally fitted by an intrachain AFM exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.27±0.02) cm-1 and g = 2.091±0.005. Interchain interactions J1 between coppers in neighbor chains connected through long chemical paths with total length of 9.51 Å cannot be estimated from magnetization curves. However, observation of the phase transition in the specific heat data allows estimating the range 0.1≤|2J1|≤0.4 cm-1, covering the predictions of various approximations. We analyze the magnitudes of 2J0 and 2J1 in terms of the structure of the corresponding chemical paths. The main contribution in supporting the intrachain interaction is assigned to H-bonds while the interchain interactions are supported by paths containing H-bonds and carboxylate bridges, with the role of the H-bonds being predominant. We compare the obtained intrachain coupling with studies of compounds showing similar behavior and discuss the validity of the approximations allowing to calculate the interchain

  6. Dietary protein reduction in sheep and goats: different effects on L-alanine and L-leucine transport across the brush-border membrane of jejunal enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Schröder, B; Schöneberger, M; Rodehutscord, M; Pfeffer, E; Breves, G

    2003-08-01

    It was the aim of this study to examine the potential regulatory effects of a long-term low dietary protein supply on the transport capacity of the jejunal brush-border membrane for amino acids. For this purpose, we used the neutral amino acids L-alanine (representative for nonessential amino acids) and L-leucine (representative for essential amino acids) as model substances. Ten sheep lambs, 8 weeks of age and 19-27 kg body weight, were allotted to two dietary regimes with either adequate or reduced protein supply which was achieved by 17.9% and 9.7% of crude protein in the concentrated feed, respectively. The feeding periods were 4-6 weeks in length. Similarly, eight goat kids of 5-7 weeks of age and 8-14 kg body weight were allotted to either adequate (crude protein 20.1%, feeding period 9-12 weeks) or reduced protein supply (10.1%, feeding period 17-18 weeks). Dietary protein reduction in lambs caused a significant body weight loss of 0.6 +/- 0.7 kg, whereas the body weight in control animals increased by 1.9 +/- 0.7 kg (P<0.05). Plasma urea concentrations decreased significantly by 60% (low protein 2.3 +/- 0.1 versus control 5.7 +/- 0.2 mmol l(-1), P<0.001). In kids, reduction of dietary protein intake led to significant decreases of the daily weight gain by 48% from 181 +/- 8 g to 94 +/- 3 g (P<0.001) and daily dry matter intake by 27% from 568 +/- 13 g to 417 +/- 6 g (P<0.01). Respective urea concentrations in plasma were reduced by 77% from 5.2 +/- 0.4 to 1.2 +/- 0.2 mmol l(-1) (P<0.01). Kinetic analyses of the initial rates of alanine uptake into isolated jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles from sheep and goats as affected by low dietary protein supply yielded that the apparent Km was neither significantly different between the species nor significantly affected by the feeding regime thus ranging between 0.12 and 0.16 mmol.l(-1). Reduction of dietary protein, however, resulted in significantly decreased Vmax values of the transport system by 25

  7. Quantum yields of decomposition and homo-dimerization of solid L-alanine induced by 7.2 eV Vacuum ultraviolet light irradiation: an estimate of the half-life of L-alanine on the surface of space objects.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yudai; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2011-08-01

    One of the leading hypotheses regarding the origin of prebiotic molecules on primitive Earth is that they formed from inorganic molecules in extraterrestrial environments and were delivered by meteorites, space dust and comets. To evaluate the availability of extraterrestrial amino acids, it is necessary to examine their decomposition and oligomerization rates as induced by extraterrestrial energy sources, such as vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray photons and high energy particles. This paper reports the quantum yields of decomposition ((8.2 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) photon(-1)) and homo-dimerization ((1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-3) photon(-1)) and decomposition of the dimer (0.24 ± 0.06 photon(-1)) of solid L-alanine (Ala) induced by VUV light with an energy of 7.2 eV. Using these quantum yields, the half-life of L-Ala on the surface of a space object in the present earth orbit was estimated to be about 52 days, even when only photons with an energy of 7.2 eV emitted from the present Sun were considered. The actual half-life of solid L-Ala on the surface of a space object orbit around the present day Earth would certainly be much shorter than our estimate, because of the added effect of photons and particles of other energies. Thus, we propose that L-Ala needs to be shielded from solar VUV in protected environments, such as the interior of a meteorite, within a time scale of days after synthesis to ensure its arrival on the primitive Earth. PMID:21461647

  8. Energetics of the molecular interactions of L-alanine and L-serine with xylitol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhevoi, I. N.; Badelin, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    Integral enthalpies of dissolution Δsol H m of L-alanine and L-serine are measured via the calorimetry of dissolution in aqueous solutions of xylitol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol. Standard enthalpies of dissolution (Δsol H ○) and the transfer (Δtr H ○) of amino acids from water to binary solvent are calculated from the experimental data. Using the McMillan-Mayer theory, enthalpy coefficients of pairwise interactions h xy of amino acids with molecules of polyols are calculated that are negative. The obtained results are discussed within the theory of the prevalence of different types of interactions in mixed solutions and the effect of the structural features of interacting biomolecules on the thermochemical parameters of dissolution of amino acids.

  9. Improved detection of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine using N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of N-butylnicotinic acid for the localization of BMAA in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Andrýs, Rudolf; Zurita, Javier; Zguna, Nadezda; Verschueren, Klaas; De Borggraeve, Wim M; Ilag, Leopold L

    2015-05-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an important non-protein amino acid linked to neurodegenerative diseases, specifically amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Because it can be transferred and bioaccumulated higher up the food chain, it poses significant public health concerns; thus, improved detection methods are of prime importance for the identification and management of these toxins. Here, we report the successful use of N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of N-butylnicotinic acid (C4-NA-NHS) for the efficient separation of BMAA from its isomers and higher sensitivity in detecting BMAA compared to the current method of choice using 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) derivatization. Implementation of this efficient method allowed localization of BMAA in the non-visceral tissues of blue mussels, suggesting that more efficient depuration may be required to remove this toxin prior to consumption. This is a crucial method in establishing the absence or presence of the neurotoxic amino acid BMAA in food, environmental or biomedical samples. PMID:25821115

  10. Occurrence and transfer of a cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-methylamino-L-alanine within the aquatic food webs of Gonghu Bay (Lake Taihu, China) to evaluate the potential human health risk.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yiying; Chen, Qiankun; Chen, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liao, Xuewei; Jiang, Lijuan; Wu, Jun; Yang, Liuyan

    2014-01-15

    To evaluate the health risk of cyanobacterial blooms, the levels of the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), was investigated in the freshwater ecosystem of Gonghu Bay in Lake Taihu. Lake Taihu is a large shallow lake contaminated by the excessive growth of Microcystis. Since BMAA has been measured in diverse cyanobacteria in different ecosystems all over the world, BMAA might also occur in Gonghu Bay. A long term monitoring of BMAA was done by HPLC-MS/MS method in cyanobacteria, mollusks, crustaceans and various fish species at different trophic levels of ecosystems in Gonghu Bay, some of which were popularly consumed by humans. Over the entire sampling period, the total average BMAA content in cyanobacteria, mollusks, crustaceans and various fish species were 4.12, 3.21, 3.76, and 6.05μgBMAA/g dry weight, respectively. Thus, BMAA could be biosynthesized by the blooming cyanobacteria in which Microcystis dominates. This toxin can be transferred through ascending trophic levels of the aquatic ecosystem in Gonghu Bay. The bioaccumulation of BMAA was observed in aquatic animals, especially in some fish species during the bloom-outbreak and bloom-decline phases. The discovery of the chronic neurotoxin BMAA in a large limnic ecosystem together with possible pathways of accumulation within major food webs deserves serious consideration due to its potential long-term risk to human health. PMID:24055662

  11. Effect of L-tryptophan injection in rats on some enzymes of amino acid metabolism in liver. I. In vitro studies of the effect of L-tryptophan and its metabolites on the extramitochondrial L-alanine: 2-ketoglutaric aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Katsos, A; Philippidis, H; Palaiologos, G

    1981-02-01

    Fed and fasted rats were injected with L-tryptophan (12.5 mg/100 g body weight) and the specific activities of L-glutamic: NAD oxidoreductase (deaminating) (EC 1.4.1.2) (GDH), L-aspartic-2-ketoglutaric aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1) (GOT) and L-alanine-2-ketoglutaric aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.2) (GPT) from hepatic mitochondria and cytosol were compared. L-tryptophan results in a decrease of mitochondrial GDH activity by 22% and of cytosolic GPT and GOT by 42% and 38% respectively in the liver of fasted rats. Xanthurenate is a potent inhibitor of purified extramitochondrial GPT, whereas anthranilate and quinolinate are less potent inhibitors. L-tryptophan, 5-OH-tryptophan and indole exert a slight inhibition. Kynurenine, 5-OH-tryptamine, tryptamine, picolinic acid, nicotinic acid and indoloacetic acid do not show any inhibition of GPT. It is suggested that L-tryptophan injection inhibits extramitochondrial GPT by its transformation to xanthurenate and anthranilate. PMID:7227974

  12. Quality measures of imaging mass spectrometry aids in revealing long-term striatal protein changes induced by neonatal exposure to the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Bergquist, Jonas; Andersson, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Many pathological processes are not directly correlated to dramatic alterations in protein levels. The changes in local concentrations of important proteins in a subset of cells or at specific loci are likely to play a significant role in disease etiologies, but the precise location might be unknown, or the concentration might be too small to be adequately sampled for traditional proteomic techniques. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a unique analytical method that combines analysis of multiple molecular species and of their distribution in a single platform. As reproducibility is essential for successful biomarker discovery, it is important to systematically assess data quality in biologically relevant MALDI IMS experiments. In the present study, we applied four simple tools to study the reproducibility for individual sections, within-group variation, and between-group variation of data acquired from brain sections of 21 animals divided into three treatment groups. We also characterized protein changes in distinct regions of the striatum from six-month-old rats treated neonatally (postnatal days 9-10) with the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), which has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. The results showed that optimized experimental settings can yield high-quality MALDI IMS data with relatively low variation (14% to 15% coefficient of variance) that allow the characterization of subtle changes in protein expression in various subregions of the brain. This was further exemplified by the dose-dependent reduction of myelin basic protein in the caudate putamen and the nucleus accumbens of adult rats neonatally treated with BMAA (150 and 460 mg/kg). The reduction in myelin basic protein was confirmed through immunohistochemistry and indicates that developmental exposure to BMAA may induce structural effects on axonal growth and/or directly on the proliferation of oligodendrocytes

  13. Quality Measures of Imaging Mass Spectrometry Aids in Revealing Long-term Striatal Protein Changes Induced by Neonatal Exposure to the Cyanobacterial Toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA)*

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Oskar; Bergquist, Jonas; Andersson, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Many pathological processes are not directly correlated to dramatic alterations in protein levels. The changes in local concentrations of important proteins in a subset of cells or at specific loci are likely to play a significant role in disease etiologies, but the precise location might be unknown, or the concentration might be too small to be adequately sampled for traditional proteomic techniques. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a unique analytical method that combines analysis of multiple molecular species and of their distribution in a single platform. As reproducibility is essential for successful biomarker discovery, it is important to systematically assess data quality in biologically relevant MALDI IMS experiments. In the present study, we applied four simple tools to study the reproducibility for individual sections, within-group variation, and between-group variation of data acquired from brain sections of 21 animals divided into three treatment groups. We also characterized protein changes in distinct regions of the striatum from six-month-old rats treated neonatally (postnatal days 9–10) with the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), which has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. The results showed that optimized experimental settings can yield high-quality MALDI IMS data with relatively low variation (14% to 15% coefficient of variance) that allow the characterization of subtle changes in protein expression in various subregions of the brain. This was further exemplified by the dose-dependent reduction of myelin basic protein in the caudate putamen and the nucleus accumbens of adult rats neonatally treated with BMAA (150 and 460 mg/kg). The reduction in myelin basic protein was confirmed through immunohistochemistry and indicates that developmental exposure to BMAA may induce structural effects on axonal growth and/or directly on the proliferation of oligodendrocytes

  14. Determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine, and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid in Food Products Containing Cyanobacteria by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Single-Laboratory Validation.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Baker, Teesha C; Murch, Susan J; Brown, Paula N

    2015-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was completed for the determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG), and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in bulk natural health product supplements purchased from a health food store in Canada. BMAA and its isomers were extracted with acid hydrolysis to free analytes from protein association. Acid was removed with the residue evaporated to dryness and reconstituted with derivatization using 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AccQ-Fluor). Chromatographic separation and detection were achieved using RP ultra-performance LC coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Data from biological samples were evaluated for precision and accuracy across different days to ensure repeatability. Accuracy was assessed by spike recovery of biological samples using varying amino acid concentrations, with an average recovery across all samples of 108.6%. The analytical range was found to be 764-0.746 ng/mL prior to derivatization, thereby providing a linear range compatible with potentially widely varying analyte concentrations in commercial health food products. Both the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U. S. Pharmacopeia definitions were evaluated for determining method limits, with the FDA approach found to be most suitable having an LOD of 0.187 ng/mL and LLOQ of 0.746 ng/mL. BMAA in the collected specimens was detected at concentrations lower than 1 μg/g, while AEG and DAB were found at concentrations as high as 100 μg/g. Finding these analytes, even at low concentrations, has potential public health significance and suggests a need to screen such products prior to distribution. The method described provides a rapid, accurate, and precise method to facilitate that screening process. PMID:26651568

  15. Transfer Partial Molar Isentropic Compressibilities of ( l-Alanine/ l-Glutamine/Glycylglycine) from Water to 0.512 {mol} \\cdot {kg}^{-1} Aqueous {KNO}3/0.512 {mol} \\cdot {kg}^{-1} Aqueous {K}2{SO}4 Solutions Between 298.15 K and 323.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyazuddeen; Gazal, Umaima

    2013-03-01

    Speeds of sound of ( l-alanine/ l-glutamine/glycylglycine + 0.512 {mol}\\cdot {kg}^{-1} aqueous {KNO}3/0.512 {mol}\\cdot {kg}^{-1} aqueous {K}2{SO}4) systems have been measured for several molal concentrations of amino acid/peptide at different temperatures: T = (298.15 to 323.15) K. Using the speed-of-sound and density data, the parameters, partial molar isentropic compressibilities φ _{kappa }0 and transfer partial molar isentropic compressibilities Δ _{tr} φ _{kappa }0, have been computed. The trends of variation of φ _{kappa }0 and Δ _{tr} φ _{kappa }0 with changes in molal concentration of the solute and temperature have been discussed in terms of zwitterion-ion, zwitterion-water dipole, ion-water dipole, and ion-ion interactions operative in the systems.

  16. Ruthenium-nitrosyl complexes with glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, L-proline, D-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, and L-tyrosine: synthesis, X-ray diffraction structures, spectroscopic and electrochemical properties, and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Rathgeb, Anna; Böhm, Andreas; Novak, Maria S; Gavriluta, Anatolie; Dömötör, Orsolya; Tommasino, Jean Bernard; Enyedy, Eva A; Shova, Sergiu; Meier, Samuel; Jakupec, Michael A; Luneau, Dominique; Arion, Vladimir B

    2014-03-01

    The reactions of [Ru(NO)Cl5](2-) with glycine (Gly), L-alanine (L-Ala), L-valine (L-Val), L-proline (L-Pro), D-proline (D-Pro), L-serine (L-Ser), L-threonine (L-Thr), and L-tyrosine (L-Tyr) in n-butanol or n-propanol afforded eight new complexes (1-8) of the general formula [RuCl3(AA-H)(NO)](-), where AA = Gly, L-Ala, L-Val, L-Pro, D-Pro, L-Ser, L-Thr, and L-Tyr, respectively. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), (1)H NMR, UV-visible and ATR IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. X-ray crystallography studies have revealed that in all cases the same isomer type (from three theoretically possible) was isolated, namely mer(Cl),trans(NO,O)-[RuCl3(AA-H)(NO)], as was also recently reported for osmium analogues with Gly, L-Pro, and D-Pro (see Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. 2013, 639, 1590-1597). Compounds 1, 4, 5, and 8 were investigated by ESI-MS with regard to their stability in aqueous solution and reactivity toward sodium ascorbate. In addition, cell culture experiments in three human cancer cell lines, namely, A549 (nonsmall cell lung carcinoma), CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), and SW480 (colon carcinoma), were performed, and the results are discussed in conjunction with the lipophilicity of compounds. PMID:24555845

  17. Ruthenium-Nitrosyl Complexes with Glycine, l-Alanine, l-Valine, l-Proline, d-Proline, l-Serine, l-Threonine, and l-Tyrosine: Synthesis, X-ray Diffraction Structures, Spectroscopic and Electrochemical Properties, and Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The reactions of [Ru(NO)Cl5]2– with glycine (Gly), l-alanine (l-Ala), l-valine (l-Val), l-proline (l-Pro), d-proline (d-Pro), l-serine (l-Ser), l-threonine (l-Thr), and l-tyrosine (l-Tyr) in n-butanol or n-propanol afforded eight new complexes (1–8) of the general formula [RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)]−, where AA = Gly, l-Ala, l-Val, l-Pro, d-Pro, l-Ser, l-Thr, and l-Tyr, respectively. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), 1H NMR, UV–visible and ATR IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. X-ray crystallography studies have revealed that in all cases the same isomer type (from three theoretically possible) was isolated, namely mer(Cl),trans(NO,O)-[RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)], as was also recently reported for osmium analogues with Gly, l-Pro, and d-Pro (see Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem.2013, 639, 1590–1597). Compounds 1, 4, 5, and 8 were investigated by ESI-MS with regard to their stability in aqueous solution and reactivity toward sodium ascorbate. In addition, cell culture experiments in three human cancer cell lines, namely, A549 (nonsmall cell lung carcinoma), CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), and SW480 (colon carcinoma), were performed, and the results are discussed in conjunction with the lipophilicity of compounds. PMID:24555845

  18. Structural and catalytic properties of L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Porumb, H; Vancea, D; Mureşan, L; Presecan, E; Lascu, I; Petrescu, I; Porumb, T; Pop, R; Bârzu, O

    1987-04-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus, a non-allosteric enzyme composed of six identical subunits, was purified to homogeneity by chromatography on blue-Sepharose and Sepharose 6B-CL. Like other pyridine-linked dehydrogenases, alanine dehydrogenase is inhibited by Cibacron blue, competitively with respect to NADH and noncompetitively with respect to pyruvate. The enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M glycine/HCl (pH 2) and reactivated by 0.1 M phosphate (pH 8) supplemented with NAD+ or NADH. The reactivation was characterized by sigmoidal kinetics indicating a complex mechanism involving rate-limiting folding and association steps. Cibacron blue interfered with renaturation, presumably by competition with NADH. Chromatography on Sepharose 6B-CL of the partially renatured alanine dehydrogenase led to the separation of several intermediates, but only the hexamer was characterized by enzymatic activity. By immobilization on Sepharose 4B, alanine dehydrogenase from B. cereus retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. After denaturation of immobilized alanine dehydrogenase with 7 M urea, 37% of the initial protein was still bound to Sepharose, indicating that on the average the hexamer was attached to the matrix via, at most, two subunits. The ability of the denatured, immobilized subunits to pick up subunits from solution shows their capacity to fold back to the native conformation after urea treatment. The formation of "hybrids" between subunits of enzyme from B. cereus and Bacillus subtilis demonstrates the close resemblance of the tertiary and quaternary structures of alanine dehydrogenases from these species. PMID:3104322

  19. Analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) neurotoxicity in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; de Munck García, Estefanía; Arahuetes Portero, Rosa Ma; Martínez, Ana; Solas Alados, Ma Teresa; Miguel, Begoña Gómez

    2015-05-01

    Due to its structural similarity to glutamate, L-BMAA could be a trigger for neurodegenerative disorders caused by changes in the intracellular medium, such as increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired synthesis and protein degradation and the imbalance of some enzymes. It is also important to note that according to some published studies, L-BMAA will be incorporated into proteins, causing the alteration of protein homeostasis. Neuronal cells are particularly prone to suffer damage in protein folding and protein accumulation because they have not performed cellular division. In this work, we will analyse the cerebellum impairment triggered by L-BMAA in treated rats. The cerebellum is one of the most important subcortical motor centres and ensures that movements are performed with spatial and temporal precision. Cerebellum damage caused by L-BMAA can contribute to motor impairment. To characterize this neurodegenerative pathology, we first carried out ultrastructure analysis in Purkinje cells showing altered mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and Golgi apparatus (GA). We then performed biochemical assays of GSK3 and TDP-43 in cerebellum, obtaining an increase of both biomarkers with L-BMAA treatment and, finally, performed autophagy studies that revealed a higher level of these processes after treatment. This work provides evidence of cerebellar damage in rats after treatment with L-BMAA. Three months after treatment, affected rats cannot restore the normal functions of the cerebellum regarding motor coordination and postural control. PMID:25898785

  20. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (d, l)-alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T.; Johnston, Roy L.

    2015-10-01

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(l-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(d-Ala-l-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(l-Ala)3-(d-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  1. Excitotoxic potential of the cyanotoxin β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) in primary human neurons.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Gehringer, Michelle M; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J; Welch, Jeffrey H; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-11-01

    The toxicity of the cyanobacterial modified amino acid, BMAA, has been described in rat, mouse and leech neurons. Particular emphasis has been placed on the potential ability of BMAA to induce neuronal damage via excitotoxic mechanisms. Here we present data indicating that the effects observed on lower organisms are also evident in a human model. Our data indicates that BMAA induces increased intracellular Ca²⁺ influx, DNA damage, mitochondrial activity, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amelioration of LDH release in the presence of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK801 indicates that the neurotoxic effects of BMAA are mediated via NMDA receptor activation. Additionally, we have shown that BMAA induces the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and caspase-3 indicating that it can stimulate apoptosis in human neurons, presumably via activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:22885173

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 mediates the electrophysiological and toxic actions of the cycad derivative beta-N-Methylamino-L-alanine on substantia nigra pars compacta DAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cucchiaroni, Maria Letizia; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bernardi, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Guatteo, Ezia; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2010-04-14

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-Parkinson dementia complex (ALS-PDC) is a neurodegenerative disease with ALS, parkinsonism, and Alzheimer's symptoms that is prevalent in the Guam population. beta-N-Methylamino alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as the toxic agent damaging several neuronal types in ALS-PDC, including substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic (SNpc DAergic) neurons. BMAA is a mixed glutamate receptor agonist, but the specific pathways activated in DAergic neurons are not yet known. We combined electrophysiology, microfluorometry, and confocal microscopy analysis to monitor membrane potential/current, cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) changes, cytochrome-c (cyt-c) immunoreactivity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by BMAA. Rapid toxin applications caused reversible membrane depolarization/inward current and increase of firing rate and [Ca(2+)](i) in DAergic neurons. The inward current (I(BMAA)) was mainly mediated by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1), coupled to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and to a lesser extent, AMPA receptors. Indeed, mGluR1 (CPCCOEt) and TRP channels (SKF 96365; Ruthenium Red) antagonists reduced I(BMAA), and a small component of I(BMAA) was reduced by the AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX. Calcium accumulation was mediated by mGluR1 but not by AMPA receptors. Application of a low concentration of NMDA potentiated the BMAA-mediated calcium increase. Prolonged exposure to BMAA caused significant modifications of membrane properties, calcium overload, cell shrinkage, massive cyt-c release into the cytosol and ROS production. In SNpc GABAergic neurons, BMAA activated only AMPA receptors. Our study identifies the mGluR1-activated mechanism induced by BMAA that may cause the neuronal degeneration and parkinsonian symptoms seen in ALS-PDC. Moreover, environmental exposure to BMAA might possibly also contribute to idiopathic PD. PMID:20392940

  3. Validation of the analytical procedure for the determination of the neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in complex environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Combes, Audrey; El Abdellaoui, Saïda; Sarazin, Cédric; Vial, Jérome; Mejean, Annick; Ploux, Olivier; Pichon, Valérie

    2013-04-10

    The neurotoxic l-2-amino-3-methylaminopropionic acid (BMAA) was hypothesized to be involved in sporadic cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Studies highlighting a possible implication of environmental factors in the incidence of sporadic ALS have become more numerous over recent years. Over the past years, the most widely used method for quantifying BMAA was based on the derivatization of this polar and basic molecule with a fluorescent compound (6-aminoquinolonyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl, 6-AQC). This derivatization allows the retention of the conjugate by reversed-phase liquid chromatography and its detection by fluorescence. Nevertheless, recent findings have shown that this method applied to complex samples may cause false positive responses. We therefore developed an analytical procedure for the determination of underivatized BMAA at trace level in complex environmental matrices (river water, cyanobacteria and biofilm) using solid-phase extraction (SPE) based on mixed mode sorbent to concentrate and clean up real samples. Analyzes were performed by hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled to electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry used in multiple reaction monitoring scan mode. Analytical procedures were validated for the different natural samples using the total error approach. BMAA can be quantified by these reliable and highly selective analytical methods in a range of only a few ng mL(-1) in river water and a few ng mg(-1) dry weight in cyanobacteria and biofilm matrices. PMID:23522111

  4. UDP-N-Acetylmuramic Acid l-Alanine Ligase (MurC) Inhibition in a tolC Mutant Escherichia coli Strain Leads to Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Humnabadkar, Vaishali; Prabhakar, K. R.; Narayan, Ashwini; Sharma, Sreevalli; Guptha, Supreeth; Manjrekar, Praveena; Chinnapattu, Murugan; Ramachandran, Vasanthi; Hameed, Shahul P.; Ravishankar, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The Mur ligases play an essential role in the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and hence are attractive antibacterial targets. A screen of the AstraZeneca compound library led to the identification of compound A, a pyrazolopyrimidine, as a potent inhibitor of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa MurC. However, cellular activity against E. coli or P. aeruginosa was not observed. Compound A was active against efflux pump mutants of both strains. Experiments using an E. coli tolC mutant revealed accumulation of the MurC substrate and a decrease in the level of product upon treatment with compound A, indicating inhibition of MurC enzyme in these cells. Such a modulation was not observed in the E. coli wild-type cells. Further, overexpression of MurC in the E. coli tolC mutant led to an increase in the compound A MIC by ≥16-fold, establishing a correlation between MurC inhibition and cellular activity. In addition, estimation of the intracellular compound A level showed an accumulation of the compound over time in the tolC mutant strain. A significant compound A level was not detected in the wild-type E. coli strain even upon treatment with high concentrations of the compound. Therefore, the lack of MIC and absence of MurC inhibition in wild-type E. coli were possibly due to suboptimal compound concentration as a consequence of a high efflux level and/or poor permeativity of compound A. PMID:25114134

  5. Modified triglycine sulphate (TGS) single crystals for pyroelectric infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banan, M.; Lal, R. B.; Batra, Ashok

    1992-01-01

    Effects of caesium and cerium, L-alanine, and caesium plus L-alanine impurities on ferroelectric and pyroelectric properties of TGS crystals are investigated. Dielectric constant and loss, pyroelectric coefficient, spontaneous polarization, and coercive field measurements of these modified crystals, as a function of temperature, are reported. Caesium and cerium did not affect the electrical properties of TGS crystals significantly, whereas L-alanine- and, especially, Cs + L-alanine-doped TGS crystals exhibited promising improvements in pyroelectric properties, up to 48 C, as compared to pure TGS crystals.

  6. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  7. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  8. Functional differentiation of human jejunum and ileum: A comparison of the handling of glucose, peptides, and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D. B. A.; Webb, Joan P. W.; Lane, Annette E.; Clark, M. L.; Dawson, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of glucose, glycine, L-alanine, and glycyl-L-alanine absorption from the jejunum and ileum have been compared in normal human subjects. A perfusion technique has been used, and correct positioning of the perfusion tube has been confirmed by measuring the differential jejunal and ileal handling of bicarbonate. Glucose and glycine were absorbed faster from the jejunum than from the ileum of all subjects studied, and L-alanine was absorbed faster from the jejunum than from the ileum in five out of six subjects studied. In contrast, the dipeptide glycyl-L-alanine was absorbed at comparable rates from the jejunum and ileum. Higher concentrations of free amino acids were detected in the luminal contents aspirated during the ileal dipeptide perfusions. These results emphasize the importance of oligopeptide transport in the absorption of protein digestion products, especially in the human ileum, and the practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:4852103

  9. Mathematical Model of Metabolism and Electrophysiology of Amino Acid and Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion: In Vitro Validation Using a β-Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Salvucci, Manuela; Neufeld, Zoltan; Newsholme, Philip

    2013-01-01

    We integrated biological experimental data with mathematical modelling to gain insights into the role played by L-alanine in amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion (AASIS) and in D-glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), details important to the understanding of complex β-cell metabolic coupling relationships. We present an ordinary differential equations (ODEs) based simplified kinetic model of core metabolic processes leading to ATP production (glycolysis, TCA cycle, L-alanine-specific reactions, respiratory chain, ATPase and proton leak) and Ca2+ handling (essential channels and pumps in the plasma membrane) in pancreatic β-cells and relate these to insulin secretion. Experimental work was performed using a clonal rat insulin-secreting cell line (BRIN-BD11) to measure the consumption or production of a range of important biochemical parameters (D-glucose, L-alanine, ATP, insulin secretion) and Ca2+ levels. These measurements were then used to validate the theoretical model and fine-tune the parameters. Mathematical modelling was used to predict L-lactate and L-glutamate concentrations following D-glucose and/or L-alanine challenge and Ca2+ levels upon stimulation with a non metabolizable L-alanine analogue. Experimental data and mathematical model simulations combined suggest that L-alanine produces a potent insulinotropic effect via both a stimulatory impact on β-cell metabolism and as a direct result of the membrane depolarization due to Ca2+ influx triggered by L-alanine/Na+ co-transport. Our simulations indicate that both high intracellular ATP and Ca2+ concentrations are required in order to develop full insulin secretory responses. The model confirmed that K+ATP channel independent mechanisms of stimulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels, via generation of mitochondrial coupling messengers, are essential for promotion of the full and sustained insulin secretion response in β-cells. PMID:23520444

  10. Functional characterization of a melittin analog containing a non-natural tryptophan analog.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Zachary; Picciano, Angela L; Gosavi, Pallavi M; Moroz, Yurii S; Angevine, Christopher E; Chavis, Amy E; Reiner, Joseph E; Korendovych, Ivan V; Caputo, Gregory A

    2015-07-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) is a naturally occurring amino acid, which exhibits fluorescence emission properties that are dependent on the polarity of the local environment around the Trp side chain. However, this sensitivity also complicates interpretation of fluorescence emission data. A non-natural analogue of tryptophan, β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine, exhibits fluorescence insensitive to local solvent polarity and does not impact the structure or characteristics of several peptides examined. In this study, we investigated the effect of replacing Trp with β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine in the well-known bee-venom peptide melittin. This peptide provides a model framework for investigating the impact of replacing Trp with β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine in a functional peptide system that undergoes significant shifts in Trp fluorescence emission upon binding to lipid bilayers. Microbiological methods including assessment of the antimicrobial activity by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays and bacterial membrane permeability assays indicated little difference between the Trp and the β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine-substituted versions of melittin. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed both that peptides adopted the expected α-helical structures when bound to phospholipid bilayers and electrophysiological analysis indicated that both created membrane disruptions leading to significant conductance increases across model membranes. Both peptides exhibited a marked protection of the respective fluorophores when bound to bilayers indicating a similar membrane-bound topology. As expected, while fluorescence quenching and CD indicate the peptides are stably bound to lipid vesicles, the peptide containing β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine exhibited no fluorescence emission shift upon binding while the natural Trp exhibited >10 nm shift in emission spectrum barycenter. Taken together, the β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine can serve as a solvent insensitive alternative to Trp that does not have significant

  11. Functional Characterization of a Melittin Analog Containing a Non-natural Tryptophan Analog

    PubMed Central

    Gosavi, Pallavi M.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Angevine, Christopher E.; Chavis, Amy E.; Reiner, Joseph E.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Caputo, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) is a naturally occurring amino acid, which exhibits fluorescence emission properties that are dependent on the polarity of the local environment around the Trp side chain. However, this sensitivity also complicates interpretation of fluorescence emission data. A non-natural analogue of tryptophan, β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine, exhibits fluorescence insensitive to local solvent polarity and does not impact the structure or characteristics of several peptides examined. In this study we investigated the effect of replacing Trp with β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine in the well-known bee-venom peptide melittin. This peptide provides a model framework for investigating the impact of replacing Trp with β-(1-azulenyl)-L- alanine in a functional peptide system that undergoes significant shifts in Trp fluorescence emission upon binding to lipid bilayers. Microbiological methods including assessment of the antimicrobial activity by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays and bacterial membrane permeability assays indicated little difference between the Trp and the β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine-substituted versions of melittin. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed both that peptides adopted the expected α-helical structures when bound to phospholipid bilayers and electrophysiological analysis indicated that both created membrane disruptions leading to significant conductance increases across model membranes. Both peptides exhibited a marked protection of the respective fluorophores when bound to bilayers indicating a similar membrane-bound topology. As expected, while fluorescence quenching and CD indicate the peptides are stably bound to lipid vesicles, the peptide containing β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine exhibited no fluorescence emission shift upon binding while the natural Trp exhibited >10 nm shift in emission spectrum barycenter. Taken together, the β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine can serve as a solvent insensitive alternative to Trp that does not have significant

  12. XPS investigation on the structure of two dipeptides studied as models of self-assembling oligopeptides: comparison between experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, C.; Iucci, G.; Dettin, M.; Monti, S.; Carravetta, V.; Polzonetti, G.

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption on TiO2 surface of two dipeptides AE (L-alanine-L-glutamic acid) and AK (L-alanine-L-lysine), that are 'building blocks' of the more complex self-complementary amphiphilic oligopeptides and are therefore a good model in the interpretation of the complex peptide spectra, has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The chemical structure and composition of thin films of both dipeptides on TiO2 were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Theoretical ab-initio calculations (ΔSCF) were also performed to simulate the spectra allowing a direct comparison between experiment and theory.

  13. The total synthesis of pantocin B.

    PubMed

    Sutton, A E; Clardy, J

    2000-02-10

    [reaction: see text] Pantocin B, an unusual antibiotic produced by Erwinia herbicola, effectively controls E. amylovora, the pathogen causing the plant disease fire blight. A total synthesis of pantocin B from L-alanine, glycine, and L-malic acid is reported. PMID:10814312

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and biocompatible properties of alanine-grafted chitosan copolymers.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu Han; Kang, Min-Sil; Knowles, Jonathan C; Gong, Myoung-Seon

    2016-04-01

    In order to overcome major problems regarding the lack of affinity to solvents and limited reactivity of the free amines of chitosan, introduction of appropriate spacer arms having terminal amine function is considered of interest.L-Alanine-N-carboxyanhydride was grafted onto chitosan via anionic ring-opening polymerization. The chemical and structural characterizations ofL-alanine-grafted chitosan (Ala-g-Cts) were confirmed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR). In addition, the viscoelastic properties ofAla-g-Cts were examined by means of a rotational viscometer, and thermal analysis was carried out with a thermogravimetric analyzer and differential scanning calorimetry. Morphological changes in the chitosanL-alanine moiety were determined by x-ray diffraction. To determine the feasibility of using these films as biomedical materials, we investigated the effects of theirL-alanine content on physical and mechanical properties. The biodegradation results of crosslinkedAla-g-Cts films were evaluated in phosphate-buffered solution containing lysozyme at 37℃. Proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on crosslinkedAla-g-Cts films was also investigated with use of the CCK-8 assay. PMID:26767393

  15. Combination of amino acids reduces pigmentation in B16F0 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masago; Kawase, Ichiro; Ishii, Fumio

    2007-04-01

    Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, play significant roles in numerous physiological events in mammals. As the effects of amino acids on melanogenesis have yet to be demonstrated, the present study was conducted to identify whether amino acids, in particular alanine, glycine, isoleucine and leucine, influence melanogenesis in B16F0 melanoma cells. Glycine and L-isoleucine, but not D-isoleucine, reduced melanogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner without any morphological changes in B16F0 melanoma cells. L-Alanine and L-leucine, but not D-alanine and D-leucine, also reduced melanogenesis without any morphological changes in B16F0 melanoma cells. However these amino acids did not show a concentration-dependency. Combination of L-alanine and the other amino acids, particularly 4 amino acids combination, had an additive effect on the inhibition of melanogenesis compared with single treatment of L-alanine. None of the amino acids affected the activity of tyrosinase, a key enzyme in melanogenesis. These results suggest that L-alanine, glycine, L-isoleucine and L-leucine, but not the D-form amino acids, have a hypopigmenting effect in B16F0 melanoma cells, and that these effects are not due to the inhibition of tyrosinase activity. Combination of these 4 amino acids had the additive effect on hypopigmentation that was as similar as that of kojic acid. PMID:17409501

  16. Chemosensory tracking of scent trails by the planktonic shrimp Acetes sibogae australis.

    PubMed

    Hamner, P; Hamner, W M

    1977-03-01

    In the laboratory, planktonic shrimps (Acetes sibogae) precisely follow scent trails of food or paper soaked in meat extract, L-alanine, L-leucine, and L-methionine. In the ocean, Acetes may be able to follow scent trails as far as 20 meters to catch falling food. This demonstrates precise trail-following by pelagic animals. PMID:841313

  17. Unusual substrate specificity of the peptidoglycan MurE ligase from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    Patin, Delphine; Turk, Samo; Barreteau, Hélène; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Arthur, Michel; Gobec, Stanislav; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier

    2016-02-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacterium pathogenic to many species of birds and mammals, including humans. The main feature of its peptidoglycan is the presence of l-alanine at position 3 of the peptide stem. In the present work, we cloned the murE gene from E. rhusiopathiae and purified the corresponding protein as His6-tagged form. Enzymatic assays showed that E. rhusiopathiae MurE was indeed an l-alanine-adding enzyme. Surprisingly, it was also able, although to a lesser extent, to add meso-diaminopimelic acid, the amino acid found at position 3 in many Gram-negative bacteria, Bacilli and Mycobacteria. Sequence alignment of MurE enzymes from E. rhusiopathiae and Escherichia coli revealed that the DNPR motif that is characteristic of meso-diaminopimelate-adding enzymes was replaced by HDNR. The role of the latter motif in the interaction with l-alanine and meso-diaminopimelic acid was demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments and the construction of a homology model. The overexpression of the E. rhusiopathiae murE gene in E. coli resulted in the incorporation of l-alanine at position 3 of the peptide part of peptidoglycan. PMID:26700151

  18. Effect of Phenol on Bacillus subtilis Spores at Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Russell, A. D.; Loosemore, Muriel

    1964-01-01

    The nature of the recovery medium is shown to influence the number of Bacillus subtilis spores which, after exposure to 2.5 or 5% phenol at high temperatures, can produce a visible colony. Higher survivor counts were obtained in nutrient agar containing L-alanine and D-glucose than in plain nutrient agar. PMID:14215968

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMINOPEPTIDASE IN THE FREE-LIVING NEMATODE PANAGRELLUS REDIVIVUS: SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION AND POSSIBLE ROLE IN NEUROPEPTIDE METABOLISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminopeptidase was detected in homogenates of the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus with the aminoacyl substrate L-alanine-4-nitroanilide (Ala-4-NA). Subcellular distribution of the enzyme was unequal, with approximately 80 percent of total aminopeptidase in the soluble fraction and the rem...

  20. Differential localization of putative amino acid receptors in taste buds of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Finger, T E; Bryant, B P; Kalinoski, D L; Teeter, J H; Böttger, B; Grosvenor, W; Cagan, R H; Brand, J G

    1996-09-01

    The taste system of catfish, having distinct taste receptor sites for L-alanine and L-arginine, is highly sensitive to amino acids. A previously described monoclonal antibody (G-10), which inhibits L-alanine binding to a partial membrane fraction (P2) derived from catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) taste epithelium, was found in Western blots to recognize a single band, at apparent MW of 113,000 D. This MW differs from the apparent MW for the presumed arginine receptor identified previously by PHA-E lectin affinity. In order to test whether PHA-E lectin actually reacts with the arginine-receptor, reconstituted membrane proteins partially purified by PHA-E affinity were used in artificial lipid bilayers. These reconstituted channels exhibited L-arginine-activated activity similar to that found in taste cell membranes. Accordingly, we utilized the PHA-E lectin and G-10 antibody as probes to differentially localize the L-alanine and L-arginine binding sites on the apical surface of catfish taste buds. Each probe labels numerous, small (0.5-1.0 micron) patches within the taste pore of each taste bud. This observation suggests that each bud is not tuned to a single taste substance, but contains putative receptor sites for both L-arginine and L-alanine. Further, analysis of double-labeled tissue reveals that the PHA-E and G-10 sites tend to be separate within each taste pore. These findings imply that in catfish, individual taste cells preferentially express receptors to either L-arginine or L-alanine. In addition, PHA-E binds to the apices of solitary chemoreceptor cells in the epithelium, indicating that this independent chemoreceptor system may utilize some receptor sites similar to those in taste buds. PMID:8876468

  1. Stereospecificity of reactions catalyzed by bacterial D-amino acid transaminase.

    PubMed

    Martínez del Pozo, A; Merola, M; Ueno, H; Manning, J M; Tanizawa, K; Nishimura, K; Soda, K; Ringe, D

    1989-10-25

    The spectral shift from 420 to 338 nm when pure bacterial D-amino acid transaminase binds D-amino acid substrates is also exhibited in part by high concentrations of L-amino acids (L-alanine and L-glutamate) but not by simple dicarboxylic acids or monoamines. Slow processing of L-alanine to D-alanine was observed both by coupled enzymatic assays using D-amino acid oxidase and by high pressure liquid chromatography analysis employing an optically active chromophore (Marfey's reagent). When the acceptor for L-alanine was alpha-ketoglutarate, D-glutamate was also formed. This minor activity of the transaminase involved both homologous (L-alanine and D-alanine) and heterologous (L-alanine and D-glutamate) substrate pairs and was a function of the nature of the keto acid acceptor. In the presence of alpha-ketoisovalerate, DL-alanine was almost completely processed to D-valine; within the limits of the assay no L-valine was detected. With alpha-ketoisocaproate, 90% of the DL-alanine was converted to D-leucine. In the mechanism of this transaminase reaction, there may be more stereoselective constraints for the protonation of the quinonoid intermediate during the second half-reaction of the transamination reaction, i.e. the donation of the amino group from the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate coenzyme to a second keto acid acceptor, than during removal of the alpha proton in the initial steps of the reaction pathway. Thus, with this D-amino acid transaminase, the discrete steps of transamination ensure fidelity of the stereospecificity of reaction pathway. PMID:2808352

  2. Use of vibrational spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and binding of biomolecules: A combined theoretical and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalkanen, K. J.; Jürgensen, V. Würtz; Claussen, A.; Rahim, A.; Jensen, G. M.; Wade, R. C.; Nardi, F.; Jung, C.; Degtyarenko, I. M.; Nieminen, R. M.; Herrmann, F.; Knapp-Mohammady, M.; Niehaus, T. A.; Frimand, K.; Suhai, S.

    We report on our work with vibrational absorption, vibrational circular dichroism, Raman scattering, Raman optical activity, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and the binding of ligands, drugs, pesticides, or herbicides via a combined theoretical and experimental approach. The systems we have studied systematically are the amino acids (L-alanine, L-tryptophan, and L-histidine), peptides (N-4271 acetyl L-alanine N?-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-tryptophan N?-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-histidine N?-methyl amide, L-alanyl L-alanine, tri-L-serine, N-acetyl L-alanine L-proline L-tyrosine N?-methyl amide, Leu-enkephalin, cyclo-(gly-L-pro)3, N-acetyl (L-alanine)n N?-methyl amide), 3-methyl indole, and a variety of small molecules (dichlobenil and 2,6-dochlorobenzamide) of relevance to the protein systems under study. We have used molecular mechanics, the SCC-DFTB, SCC-DFTB+disp, RHF, MP2, and DFT methodologies for the modeling studies with the goal of interpreting the experimentally measured vibrational spectra for these molecules to the greatest extent possible and to use this combined approach to understand the structure, function, and electronic properties of these molecules in their various environments. The application of these spectroscopies to biophysical and environmental assays is expanding, and therefore a thorough understanding of the phenomenon from a rigorous theoretical basis is required. In addition, we give some exciting and new preliminary results which allow us to extend our methods to even larger and more complex systems. The work presented here is the current state of the art to this ever and fast changing field of theoretical spectroscopic interpretation and use of VA, VCD, Raman, ROA, EA, and ECD spectroscopies.

  3. Role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the kinetics of low-affinity high-capacity Na{sup +}-dependent alanine transport in SHR proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria Joao; Jose, Pedro A.; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only. {yields} It is suggested that Na{sup +} binding in renal ASCT2 may be regulated by ROS in SHR PTE cells. -- Abstract: The presence of high and low sodium affinity states for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in immortalized renal proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells was previously reported (Am. J. Physiol. 293 (2007) R538-R547). This study evaluated the role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake of ASCT2 in immortalized renal PTE cells from Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Na{sup +} dependence of [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake was investigated replacing NaCl with an equimolar concentration of choline chloride in vehicle- and apocynin-treated cells. Na{sup +} removal from the uptake solution abolished transport activity in both WKY and SHR PTE cells. Decreases in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels in the extracellular medium significantly reduced Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of the low-affinity high-capacity component in SHR PTE cells, with no effect on the high-affinity low-capacity state of the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake. After removal of apocynin from the culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels returned to basal values within 1 to 3 h in both WKY and SHR PTE cells and these were found stable for the next 24 h. Under these experimental conditions, the Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} of the high-affinity low-capacity state were unaffected and the low-affinity high-capacity component remained significantly decreased 1 day but not 4 days after apocynin removal. In conclusion, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only

  4. Addition of amino acids and dipeptides to fullerene C{sub 60} giving rise to monoadducts

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, V.S.; Tsyryapkin, V.A.; Vol`pin, M.E.

    1994-12-01

    The authors have developed a general method for the direct addition of amino acids and dipeptides of various structures to fullerene C{sub 60}. In all cases the addition involves the amino group. The reaction proceeds when the solutions of fullerene and an amino acid (or dipeptide) are mixed at 50-100 {degrees}C. The fullerene derivatives of the following amino acids and dipeptides have been obtained: glycine, p-aminobenzoic acid, {omega}-aminocaproic acid, L-proline, L-alanine, L-alanyl-Lalanine, D,L-alanyl-D,L-alanine, glycyl-L-valine. The adduct of methyl L-ananinate with C{sub 60} was also prepared.

  5. R76 in transmembrane domain 3 of the aspartate:alanine transporter AspT is involved in substrate transport.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satomi; Nanatani, Kei; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-01-01

    The L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus (AspT) possesses an arginine residue (R76) within the GxxxG motif in the central part of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3)-a residue that has been estimated to transport function. In this study, we carried out amino acid substitutions of R76 and used proteoliposome reconstitution for analyzing the transport function of each substitution. Both l-aspartate and l-alanine transport assays showed that R76K has higher activity than the AspT-WT (R76), whereas R76D and R76E have lower activity than the AspT-WT. These results suggest that R76 is involved in AspT substrate transport. PMID:26849958

  6. Electrophysiological responses of Xenopus oocytes to amino acids: criteria for expression of injected mRNA coding chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Etoh, M; Yoshii, K

    1994-10-01

    Responses of endogenous transporters/receptors of Xenopus oocytes to L-alanine, L-arginine, L-leucine and L-serine were investigated under voltage clamp conditions. (a) Concentration-response relations for the amino acids followed Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. (b) The neutral amino acids required Na+ to elicit the responses, whereas L-arginine did not. (c) The responses to L-alanine decreased with decreasing pH and became undetectable at pH 5.5. The present experiments supply criteria to judge if the oocytes translate exogenous mRNA coding taste or olfactory receptor proteins for the amino acids, the best characterized stimuli, especially in fishes. PMID:7956120

  7. Electrophysiological evidence for the broad distribution of specific odorant receptor molecules across the olfactory organ of the channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Chang, Q; Caprio, J

    1996-10-01

    To determine if there is a spatial segregation of responsiveness to odorants within the olfactory epithelium, microelectrode recordings were obtained from small populations of olfactory receptor neurons located across different lamellar sensory regions of the olfactory organ of the channel catfish, lctalurus punctatus. Stimuli included L-alanine, L-methionine, L-arginine hydrochloride, L-glutamic acid, ATP and a mixture of bile salts-odorants previously reported to stimulate independent receptor sites in aquatic species. The peak integrated olfactory receptor responses at each recording site were standardized to the response to L-alanine. The relative stimulatory effectiveness of the stimuli was preserved across the 10 olfactory lamellae recording sites. These data support previous molecular biological results of a broad distribution of receptor neurons that express specific receptor genes across the olfactory organ of the channel catfish. PMID:8902281

  8. Modification of olfactory-related behavior in juvenile Atlantic salmon by changes in pH.

    PubMed

    Royce-Malmgren, C H; Watson, W H

    1987-03-01

    The hypothesis that low pH modifies the response of salmonids to certain olfactory stimuli was tested. An interactive video-computer system was used to monitor the behavior of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). At a pH of 7.6, animals were attracted to glycine and avoidedL-alanine. These effects were dose-dependent, with a threshold of 10(-7) M. The response of the fish to both amino acids changed when the pH of the test chamber was gradually lowered from 7.6 to 5.1; they became attracted toL-alanine and indifferent to glycine. These effects were reversible with a return to pH 7.6. Our findings suggest that acid rain may contribute to reductions in salmonid populations in acidified rivers by impairing the recognition of olfactory cues by salmon during their spawning migration. PMID:24301892

  9. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  10. Monitoring the kinetics of Bacillus subtilis endospore germination via surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Jacquitta K; Caldwell, Thomas P; Christensen, Kenneth A; Chumanov, George

    2006-03-01

    Mirror sandwich SERS substrates (M3S) were used to monitor the kinetics of Bacillus subtilis endospore germination. The sandwich configuration of the substrates allows real-time observation of germination in samples that contained only several hundred endospores. The enhancement provided by the substrates is attributed to the enhanced local electromagnetic field that originates from coupling between the Ag nanoparticles and the underlying metal film as well as from coupling between the Ag nanoparticles themselves. The germination kinetics at varying concentrations of l-alanine and different temperatures were studied by monitoring the intensity and growth of the Raman peak at 1010 cm(-1), which is characteristic of dipicolinic acid. A total of four concentrations (50, 75, 100, and 150 mM) of l-alanine and three different temperatures (30, 37, and 55 degrees C) were investigated. PMID:16503629

  11. Structure and function of a 40,000-molecular-weight protein antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, A B; Andersen, P; Ljungqvist, L

    1992-01-01

    A gene encoding a protein antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with a molecular weight of 40,000 has been sequenced. On the basis of sequence homology and functional analyses, we demonstrated that the protein is an L-alanine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.1). The enzyme was demonstrated in M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium marinum but not in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The enzyme may play a role in cell wall synthesis because L-alanine is an important constituent of the peptidoglycan layer. Although no consensus signal sequence was identified, we found evidence which suggests that the enzyme is secreted across the cell membrane. The enzyme was characterized and purified by chromatography, thus enabling further studies of its role in virulence and interaction with the immune system of M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. Images PMID:1587598

  12. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors. PMID:26362681

  13. Asymmetric adsorption by quartz - A model for the prebiotic origin of optical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. M.; Kavasmaneck, P. R.; Martin, F. S.; Flores, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    One mechanism previously proposed for the abiotic accumulation of molecules of one chirality in nature is asymmetric adsorption on the chiral surfaces of optically active quartz crystals. Earlier literature in this field is reviewed, with the conclusion that previous investigations of this phenomenon, using optical rotation criteria, have afforded ambiguous results. We now have studied the adsorption of radioactive D- and L-alanine on powdered d- and l-quartz, using change in radioactivity level as a criterion for both gross and differential adsorption, d-Quartz preferentially adsorbed D-alanine from anhydrous dimethyl-formamide solution, and l-quartz L-alanine. The differential adsorption varied between 1.0 and 1.8%. The implications of these observations are discussed from the viewpoint of early chemical evolution and the origin of optically active organic compounds in nature.

  14. Elastic and inelastic light scattering from single bacterial spores in an optical trap allows the monitoring of spore germination dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lixin; Chen, De; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2009-01-01

    Raman scattering spectroscopy and elastic light scattering intensity (ESLI) were used to simultaneously measure levels of Ca-dipicolinic acid (CaDPA) and changes in spore morphology and refractive index during germination of individual B. subtilis spores with and without the two redundant enzymes (CLEs), CwlJ and SleB, that degrade spores’ peptidoglycan cortex. Conclusions from these measurements include: 1) CaDPA release from individual wild-type germinating spores was biphasic; in a first heterogeneous slow phase, Tlag, CaDPA levels decreased ∼15% and in the second phase ending at Trelease, remaining CaDPA was released rapidly; 2) in L-alanine germination of wild-type spores and spores lacking SleB: a) the ESLI rose ∼2-fold shortly before Tlag at T1; b) following Tlag, the ESLI again rose ∼2-fold at T2 when CaDPA levels had decreased ∼50%; and c) the ESLI reached its maximum value at ∼Trelease and then decreased; 3) in CaDPA germination of wild-type spores: a) Tlag increased and the first increase in ESLI occurred well before Tlag, consistent with different pathways for CaDPA and L-alanine germination; b) at Trelease the ESLI again reached its maximum value; 4) in L-alanine germination of spores lacking both CLEs and unable to degrade their cortex, the time ΔTrelease (Trelease–Tlag) for excretion of ≥75% of CaDPA was ∼15-fold higher than that for wild-type or sleB spores; and 5) spores lacking only CwlJ exhibited a similar, but not identical ESLI pattern during L-alanine germination to that seen with cwlJ sleB spores, and the high value for ΔTrelease. PMID:19374431

  15. The Aspergillus nidulans proline permease as a model for understanding the factors determining substrate binding and specificity of fungal amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Gournas, Christos; Evangelidis, Thomas; Athanasopoulos, Alexandros; Mikros, Emmanuel; Sophianopoulou, Vicky

    2015-03-01

    Amino acid uptake in fungi is mediated by general and specialized members of the yeast amino acid transporter (YAT) family, a branch of the amino acid polyamine organocation (APC) transporter superfamily. PrnB, a highly specific l-proline transporter, only weakly recognizes other Put4p substrates, its Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologue. Taking advantage of the high sequence similarity between the two transporters, we combined molecular modeling, induced fit docking, genetic, and biochemical approaches to investigate the molecular basis of this difference and identify residues governing substrate binding and specificity. We demonstrate that l-proline is recognized by PrnB via interactions with residues within TMS1 (Gly(56), Thr(57)), TMS3 (Glu(138)), and TMS6 (Phe(248)), which are evolutionary conserved in YATs, whereas specificity is achieved by subtle amino acid substitutions in variable residues. Put4p-mimicking substitutions in TMS3 (S130C), TMS6 (F252L, S253G), TMS8 (W351F), and TMS10 (T414S) broadened the specificity of PrnB, enabling it to recognize more efficiently l-alanine, l-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, and glycine without significantly affecting the apparent Km for l-proline. S253G and W351F could transport l-alanine, whereas T414S, despite displaying reduced proline uptake, could transport l-alanine and glycine, a phenotype suppressed by the S130C mutation. A combination of all five Put4p-ressembling substitutions resulted in a functional allele that could also transport l-alanine and glycine, displaying a specificity profile impressively similar to that of Put4p. Our results support a model where residues in these positions determine specificity by interacting with the substrates, acting as gating elements, altering the flexibility of the substrate binding core, or affecting conformational changes of the transport cycle. PMID:25572393

  16. Functional Characterization of Alanine Racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a Eucaryotic Counterpart to Bacterial Alanine Racemase

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Yoshimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Naotaka; Takegawa, Kaoru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe has an open reading frame, which we named alr1+, encoding a putative protein similar to bacterial alanine racemase. We cloned the alr1+ gene in Escherichia coli and purified the gene product (Alr1p), with an Mr of 41,590, to homogeneity. Alr1p contains pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme and catalyzes the racemization of alanine with apparent Km and Vmax values as follows: for l-alanine, 5.0 mM and 670 μmol/min/mg, respectively, and for d-alanine, 2.4 mM and 350 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme is almost specific to alanine, but l-serine and l-2-aminobutyrate are racemized slowly at rates 3.7 and 0.37% of that of l-alanine, respectively. S. pombe uses d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source, but deletion of the alr1+ gene resulted in retarded growth on the same medium. This indicates that S. pombe has catabolic pathways for both enantiomers of alanine and that the pathway for l-alanine coupled with racemization plays a major role in the catabolism of d-alanine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs markedly from S. pombe: S. cerevisiae uses l-alanine but not d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Moreover, d-alanine is toxic to S. cerevisiae. However, heterologous expression of the alr1+ gene enabled S. cerevisiae to grow efficiently on d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. The recombinant yeast was relieved from the toxicity of d-alanine. PMID:11244061

  17. Purification and characterization of alanine dehydrogenase from a cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Tani, M; Murata, K; Shibata, H; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free extracts of a non-N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 240 kDa, and SDS-PAGE revealed a minimum molecular mass of 41 kDa, suggesting a six-subunit structure. The NH2 terminal amino acid residues of the purified AlaDH revealed marked similarity with that of other AlaDHs. The enzyme was highly specific for L-alanine and NAD+, but showed relatively low amino-acceptor specificity. The pH optimum was 8.4 for reductive amination of pyruvate and 9.2 for oxidative deamination of L-alanine. The Km values were 5.0 mM for L-alanine and 0.04 mM for NAD+, 0.33 mM for pyruvate, 60.6 mM for NH4+ (pH 8.7), and 0.02 mM for NADH. Various L-amino acids including alanine, serine, threonine, and aromatic amino acids, inhibited the aminating reaction. The enzyme was inactivated upon incubation with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The copresence of NADH and pyruvate largely protected the enzyme against the inactivation by PLP. PMID:7896761

  18. Biological activities of indoleacetylamino acids and their use as auxins in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Hangarter, R.P.; Peterson, M.D.; Good, N.E.

    1980-05-01

    The auxin activities of a number of indoleacetylamino acid conjugates have been determined in three test systems: growth of tomato hypocotyl explants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Marglobe); growth of tobacco callus cultures (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38); and ethylene production from pea stems (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska). The activities of the conjugates differ greatly depending on the amino acid moiety. Indoleacetyl-L-alanine supports rapid callus growth from the tomato hypocotyls while inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetlyglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetylglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting shoot formation. The other amino acid conjugates tested (valine, leucine, aspartic acid, threonine, methionine, phenylalanine, and proline) support shoot formation without supporting root formation or much callus growth. The tobacco callus system, which forms abundant shoots in the presence or absence of free indoleacetic acid, produces only rapid undifferentiated growth in the presence of indoleacetyl-L-alanine and indoleacetylglycine. The other conjugates inhibit shoot formatin weakly if at all. Most of the conjugates induce sustained ethylene production from the pea stems but at rates well below the initial rates observed with free indoleacetic acid. Many, but not all of the effects of conjugates such as indoleacetyl-L-alanine can be mimicked by frequent renewals of the supply of free indoleacetic acid.

  19. Investigation of gamma radiation effect on chemical properties and surface morphology of some nonlinear optical (NLO) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlam, M. A.; Ravishankar, M. N.; Vijayan, N.; Govindaraj, G.; Siddaramaiah; Gnana Prakash, A. P.

    2012-05-01

    The effect of Co-60 gamma irradiation on L-alanine cadmium chloride (LACC), L-alanine doped potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KDP) and L-arginine doped KDP nonlinear optical (NLO) single crystals were studied in doses ranging from 100 krad to 6 Mrad. The crystals were grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The effects of gamma irradiation on the chemical, surface morphology, DC electrical conductivity, thermal and mechanical properties of the grown crystals have been studied. The functional groups of unirradiated and irradiated crystals have been identified and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of irradiated crystals shows some morphological changes in the crystals. The dc conductivity of LACC and L-alanine doped KDP crystals were found to increase with increase in radiation dose whereas in case of L-arginine doped KDP crystals, the dc conductivity was found to decrease with increase in radiation dose. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms reveals that there is no significant change in the melting point of the crystals after irradiation and the crystals does not decompose as a result of irradiation. The mechanical behavior of both unirradiated and irradiated crystals is explained with the indentation effects using Vicker's microhardness tester. The Vicker's hardness number HV and Mayer's index 'n' has been estimated and confirms that LACC belong to the hard materials.

  20. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues. PMID:26025417

  1. Biochemical studies of olfaction: binding specificity of radioactively labeled stimuli to an isolated olfactory preparation from rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Cagan, R H; Zeiger, W N

    1978-10-01

    The extent of binding of 10 radioactively labeled odorant amino acids to a sedimentable fraction (fraction P2) derived from the olfactory rosettes of the rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri corresponded closely with their reported relative stimulatory effectiveness measured electrophysiologically. L isomers were bound to a greater extent than their respective D isomers. Binding of L-alanine was strongly and irreversibly inhibited by mercurials but was not affected by sulfhydryl-blocking reagents. Binding was saturable and reversible. Scatchard analyses gave evidence of two types of binding sites for most of the amino acids studied. The Kd values of the higher-affinity binding sites were similar among the amino acids, being in the range of 10(-6) M; differences occurred in the relative numbers of sites, n. These results, coupled with those from competition experiments, lead to the postulate that a multiplicity of types of olfactory binding sites exist in the trout: site TSA, which binds L-threonine, L-serine, and L-alanine; site L, which binds L-lysine; and site AB which binds beta-alanine. Tentative assignments are: site V, which binds L-valine; site H, which binds L-histidine; and site AD, which binds D-alanine. Site AD may be a lower affinity site for L-alanine. Binding of olfactory stimulus molecules appears to be an initial discrimination step in olfaction. PMID:283385

  2. Consummatory feeding behavior to amino acids in intact and anosmic channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Valentincic, T; Caprio, J

    1994-05-01

    The entire sequence of feeding behavior patterns exhibited by intact and anosmic channel catfish to food extracts was also released by single amino acids. L-arginine (> 10(-6) M), L-alanine (> 10(-6) M), and L-proline (> 10(-4) M) were each highly effective at releasing consummatory behavior patterns, such as turning, increasing pumping of water across the gill arches, and biting-snapping. Swallowing required solid objects, whereas rhythmic movement of the hyoid was released by > 10(-2) M L-arginine alone. For the biting-snapping behavior, the number of bites depended upon both the number of eddies containing the amino acid above the behavioral threshold concentration and the amino acid applied. Multiple eddies of > 10(-3) M L-proline and L-alanine provoked up to 25 bites per test; however, the most effective stimulus for releasing biting-snapping behavior at low concentrations was L-arginine (behavioral threshold 3 x 10(-7) M). In comparison to 10(-4) M L-alanine and L-arginine, other amino acids were less effective stimuli. PMID:8022905

  3. Purification and characterization of selenocysteine beta-lyase from Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed Central

    Chocat, P; Esaki, N; Tanizawa, K; Nakamura, K; Tanaka, H; Soda, K

    1985-01-01

    The purification and characterization of bacterial selenocysteine beta-lyase, an enzyme which specifically catalyzes the cleavage of L-selenocysteine to L-alanine and Se0, are presented. The enzyme, purified to near homogeneity from Citrobacter freundii, is monomeric with a molecular weight of ca. 64,000 and contains 1 mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor per mol of enzyme. L-Selenocysteine is the sole substrate (Km, 0.95 mM). L-Cysteine is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme (Ki, 0.65 mM). The enzyme also catalyzes the alpha, beta elimination of beta-chloro-L-alanine to form NH3, pyruvate, and Cl- and is irreversibly inactivated during the reaction. The physicochemical properties, e.g., amino acid composition and subunit structure, of the bacterial enzyme are fairly different from those of the pig liver enzyme (Esaki et al., J. Biol. Chem. 257:4386-4391, 1982). However, the catalytic properties of both enzymes, e.g., substrate specificity and inactivation by the substrate or a mechanism-based inactivator, beta-chloro-L-alanine, are very similar. PMID:2991201

  4. Purification and characterization of selenocysteine beta-lyase from Citrobacter freundii

    SciTech Connect

    Chocat, P.; Esaki, N.; Tanizawa, K.; Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1985-08-01

    The purification and characterization of bacterial selenocysteine beta-lyase, an enzyme which specifically catalyzes the cleavage of L-selenocysteine to L-alanine and Se0, are presented. The enzyme, purified to near homogeneity from Citrobacter freundii, is monomeric with a molecular weight of ca. 64,000 and contains 1 mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor per mol of enzyme. L-Selenocysteine is the sole substrate. L-Cysteine is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The enzyme also catalyzes the alpha, beta elimination of beta-chloro-L-alanine to form NH3, pyruvate, and Cl- and is irreversibly inactivated during the reaction. The physicochemical properties, e.g., amino acid composition and subunit structure, of the bacterial enzyme are fairly different from those of the pig liver enzyme. However, the catalytic properties of both enzymes, e.g., substrate specificity and inactivation by the substrate or a mechanism-based inactivator, beta-chloro-L-alanine, are very similar.

  5. Amino acid and peptide absorption in patients with coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D. B. A.; Kumar, Parveen J.; Perrett, D.; Clark, M. L.; Dawson, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    A double-lumen perfusion technique has been used to study amino acid and peptide absorption in eight normal control subjects, 13 patients with untreated adult coeliac disease, and 16 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis who had varying morphological abnormalities of the small bowel. All subjects were perfused with isotonic solutions containing 10 mM glycyl-L-alanine and 10 mM glycine + 10 mM L-alanine. Patients with adult coeliac disease had impaired absorption of glycine (p < 0·01) and L-alanine (p < 0·05) from the amino acid solution compared with the control subjects. Amino acid uptake from the dipeptide solution was not significantly impaired, although four individual patients had impaired uptake of both amino acids. In contrast to these findings, very few patients with dermatitis herpetiformis had impaired amino acid absorption from either solution. Sodium absorption was impaired from both solutions when the groups of patients with adult coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis with subtotal villous atrophy and partial villous atrophy were studied, and there were patients in each group who secreted sodium and water. The results suggest that malabsorption of dietary protein is unlikely to occur in dermatitis herpetiformis but may occur and contribute to protein deficiency seen in some severe cases of adult coeliac disease. The impairment of sodium and water absorption provides evidence that there may be functional impairment of the jejunal mucosa in dermatitis herpetiformis as well as in adult coeliac disease. PMID:4820629

  6. D-cycloserine transport in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells: mediation by a H(+)-coupled amino acid transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, D. T.; Armstrong, G.; Hirst, B. H.; Simmons, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    1. The ability of D-cycloserine to act as a substrate for H+/amino acid symport has been tested in epithelial layers of Caco-2 human intestinal cells. 2. In Na(+)-free media with the apical bathing media held at pH 6.0, D-cycloserine (20 mM) is an effective inhibitor of net transepithelial transport (Jnet) of L-alanine (100 microM) and its accumulation (across the apical membrane) in a similar manner to amino acid substrates (L-alanine, beta-alanine, L-proline and glycine). In contrast L-valine was ineffective as an inhibitor for H+/amino acid symport. Both inhibition of L-alanine Jnet and its accumulation by D-cycloserine were dose-dependent, maximal inhibition being achieved by 5-10 mM. 3. Both D-cycloserine and known substrates for H+/amino acid symport stimulated an inward short circuit current (Isc) when voltage-clamped monolayers of Caco-2 epithelia, mounted in Ussing chambers, were exposed to apical substrate in Na(+)-free media, with apical pH held at 6.0. The D-cycloserine dependent increase in Isc was dose-dependent with an apparent Km = 15.8 +/- 2.0 (mean +/- s.e. mean) mM, and Vmax = 373 +/- 21 nmol cm-2h-1. 4. D-Cycloserine (20 mM) induced a prompt acidification of Caco-2 cell cytosol when superfused at the apical surface in both Na+ and Na(+)-free conditions. Cytosolic acidification in response to D-cycloserine was dependent upon superfusate pH, being attenuated at pH 8 and enhanced in acidic media. 5. The increment in Isc with 20 mM D-cycloserine was non-additive with other amino acid substrates for H+/amino acid symport. PMID:8548174

  7. Mechanistic deductions from multiple kinetic and solvent deuterium isotope effects and pH studies of pyridoxal phosphate dependent carbon-carbon lyases: escherichia coli tryptophan indole-lyase

    SciTech Connect

    Kiick, D.M.; Phillips, R.S.

    1988-09-20

    Analysis of the pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and competitive inhibitor Ki values for tryptophan indole-lyase suggests two enzymic groups must be unprotonated in order to facilitate binding and catalysis of tryptophan. The V/K for tryptophan and the pKi for oxindolyl-L-alanine, a putative transition state analogue and competitive inhibitor, decrease below two pK values of 7.6 and 6.0, while the Ki for L-alanine, also a competitive inhibitor, is 3300-fold larger (20 mM) than that for oxindolyl-L-alanine and increases below a single pK of 7.6. A single pK of 7.6 is also observed in the V/K profile for the alternate substrate, S-methyl-L-cysteine. Therefore, the enzymic group with a pK of 7.6 is responsible for proton abstraction at the 2-position of tryptophan, while the enzymic group with a pK of 6.0 interacts with the indole portion of tryptophan and probably catalyzes formation of the indolenine tautomer of tryptophan (in concert with proton transfer to C-3 of indole from the group with pK 7.6) to facilitate carbon-carbon bond cleavage and elimination of indole. The pH variation of the primary deuterium isotope effects for proton abstraction at the 2-position of tryptophan (DV = 2.5 and D(V/Ktrp) = 2.8) are pH independent, while the Vmax for tryptophan or S-methyl-L-cysteine is the same and also pH independent. Thus, substrates bind only to the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. Further, tryptophan is not sticky, and the pK values observed in both V/K profiles are the correct ones.

  8. Probing the cruzain S2 recognition subsite: a kinetic and binding energy calculation study.

    PubMed

    Polticelli, Fabio; Zaini, Germano; Bolli, Alessandro; Antonini, Giovanni; Gradoni, Luigi; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2005-03-01

    Cysteine proteases are relevant to several aspects of the parasite life cycle and the parasite-host relationship. Moreover, they appear as promising targets for antiparasite chemotherapy. Here, a quantitative investigation on the catalytic properties of cruzain, the papain-like cysteine protease from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, is reported. The results indicate that kinetics for the cruzain catalyzed hydrolysis of N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-l-arginyl-l-alanine-(7-amino-4-methylcoumarin), N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-l-phenylalanyl-l-alanine-(7-amino-4-methylcoumarin), and N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-l-tyrosyl-l-alanine-(7-amino-4-methylcoumarin) can be consistently fitted to the minimum three-step mechanism of cysteine proteases involving the acyl.enzyme intermediate E.P; the deacylation step is rate-limiting in enzyme catalysis. Remarkably, these substrates show identical catalytic parameters. This reflects the ability of the cruzain Glu205 residue, located at the bottom of the S(2) subsite, to neutralize the substrate/inhibitor polar P(2) residues (e.g., Arg or Tyr) and to be solvent-exposed when substrate/inhibitor nonpolar P(2) residues (e.g., Phe) fit the S(2) subsite. More complex catalytic mechanisms are also discussed. Binding free-energy calculation provides a quantitative framework for the interpretation of these results; in particular, direct evidence for the compensatory effect between Coulomb interaction(s) and solvation effect(s) is reported. These results appear of general significance for a deeper understanding of (macro)molecular recognition and for the rational design of novel inhibitors of parasitic cysteine proteases. PMID:15723522

  9. Characterization of an Arginine:Pyruvate Transaminase in Arginine Catabolism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2007-01-01

    The arginine transaminase (ATA) pathway represents one of the multiple pathways for l-arginine catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The AruH protein was proposed to catalyze the first step in the ATA pathway, converting the substrates l-arginine and pyruvate into 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine. Here we report the initial biochemical characterization of this enzyme. The aruH gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified to homogeneity. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses were employed to detect the presence of the transamination products 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine, thus demonstrating the proposed biochemical reaction catalyzed by AruH. The enzymatic properties and kinetic parameters of dimeric recombinant AruH were determined by a coupled reaction with NAD+ and l-alanine dehydrogenase. The optimal activity of AruH was found at pH 9.0, and it has a novel substrate specificity with an order of preference of Arg > Lys > Met > Leu > Orn > Gln. With l-arginine and pyruvate as the substrates, Lineweaver-Burk plots of the data revealed a series of parallel lines characteristic of a ping-pong kinetic mechanism with calculated Vmax and kcat values of 54.6 ± 2.5 μmol/min/mg and 38.6 ± 1.8 s−1. The apparent Km and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) were 1.6 ± 0.1 mM and 24.1 mM−1 s−1 for pyruvate and 13.9 ± 0.8 mM and 2.8 mM−1 s−1 for l-arginine. When l-lysine was used as the substrate, MS analysis suggested Δ1-piperideine-2-carboxylate as its transamination product. These results implied that AruH may have a broader physiological function in amino acid catabolism. PMID:17416668

  10. Metabolic Effects of Insulin and IGFs on Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Montserrat, Núria; Capilla, Encarnación; Navarro, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of gilthead sea bream myocytes were performed in order to examine the relative metabolic function of insulin compared with IGF-I and IGF-II (insulin-like growth factors, IGFs) at different stages in the cell culture. In these cells, the in vitro effects of insulin and IGFs on 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and l-alanine uptake were studied in both myocytes (day 4) and small myotubes (day 9). 2-DG uptake in gilthead sea bream muscle cells was increased in the presence of insulin and IGFs in a time dependent manner and along with muscle cell differentiation. On the contrary, l-alanine uptake was also stimulated by insulin and IGFs but showed an inverse pattern, being the uptake higher in small myocytes than in large myotubes. The results of preincubation with inhibitors (PD-98059, wortmannin, and cytochalasin B) on 2-DG uptake indicated that insulin and IGFs stimulate glucose uptake through the same mechanisms, and evidenced that mitogenesis activator protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K–Akt transduction pathways mediate the metabolic function of these peptides. In the same way, we observed that GLUT4 protein synthesis was stimulated in the presence of insulin and IGFs in gilthead sea bream muscle cells in a different manner at days 4 or 9 of the culture. In summary we describe here, for the first time, the effects of insulin and IGFs on 2-DG and l-alanine uptake in primary culture of gilthead sea bream muscle cells. We show that both MAPK and PI3K–Akt transduction pathways are needed in order to control insulin and IGFs actions in these cells. Moreover, changes in glucose uptake can be explained by the action of the GLUT4 transporter, which is stimulated in the presence of insulin and IGFs throughout the cell culture. PMID:22654873

  11. Analysis of the Effects of a gerP Mutation on the Germination of Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Butzin, Xuan Yi; Troiano, Anthony J.; Coleman, William H.; Griffiths, Keren K.; Doona, Christopher J.; Feeherry, Florence E.; Wang, Guiwen; Li, Yong-qing

    2012-01-01

    As previously reported, gerP Bacillus subtilis spores were defective in nutrient germination triggered via various germinant receptors (GRs), and the defect was eliminated by severe spore coat defects. The gerP spores' GR-dependent germination had a longer lag time between addition of germinants and initiation of rapid release of spores' dipicolinic acid (DPA), but times for release of >90% of DPA from individual spores were identical for wild-type and gerP spores. The gerP spores were also defective in GR-independent germination by DPA with its associated Ca2+ divalent cation (CaDPA) but germinated better than wild-type spores with the GR-independent germinant dodecylamine. The gerP spores exhibited no increased sensitivity to hypochlorite, suggesting that these spores have no significant coat defect. Overexpression of GRs in gerP spores did lead to faster germination via the overexpressed GR, but this was still slower than germination of comparable gerP+ spores. Unlike wild-type spores, for which maximal nutrient germinant concentrations were between 500 μM and 2 mM for l-alanine and ≤10 mM for l-valine, rates of gerP spore germination increased up to between 200 mM and 1 M l-alanine and 100 mM l-valine, and at 1 M l-alanine, the rates of germination of wild-type and gerP spores with or without all alanine racemases were almost identical. A high pressure of 150 MPa that triggers spore germination by activating GRs also triggered germination of wild-type and gerP spores identically. All these results support the suggestion that GerP proteins facilitate access of nutrient germinants to their cognate GRs in spores' inner membrane. PMID:22904285

  12. Structure-Activity Relationships of Somatostatin Analogs in the Rabbit Ileum and the Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Linda E.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Rivier, Jean; Vale, Wylie; Brown, Marvin; Dharmsathaphorn, Kiertisin

    1983-01-01

    Somatostatin increases absorption of electrolytes and inhibits diarrhea in patients with endocrine tumors and short bowel syndrome. In an attempt to develop a gut-specific somatostatin analog, each amino acid in the somatostatin molecule was replaced with L-alanine, deleted, or substituted with its D-isomer. The potency of each analog to stimulate ion transport in the rabbit ileum was then determined using the modified Ussing chamber technique. The results were compared to the ability of each analog to inhibit the stimulated release of growth hormone from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells and to inhibit the arginine-stimulated release of insulin and glucagon in the rat in vivo. Analogs that showed gut selectivity were then tested for their ion transport properties in the rat colon. Results: (a) Substitution with L-alanine or deletion of the amino acid at position 6, 7, 8, or 9 and deletion of Threonine10-produced analogs with significantly reduced ion transport properties to <4% of somatostatin's action. The substitution also markedly reduced the ability of the compounds to inhibit the release of growth hormone, insulin, and glucagon. (b) Selectivity of intestinal ion transport was achieved by any one of the following alterations: L-alanine substitution at Phenylalanine11, deletion of Phenylalanine11, substitution with D-lysine at Lysine4, or substitution with L-alanine at Lysine4. These compounds had intestinal ion transport properties of 52, 34, 139, and 94%, respectively, while demonstrating little or no inhibition of growth hormone, insulin or glucagon release. Conclusions: (a) Phenylalanine6, Phenylalanine7, Tryptophan8, and Lysine9 are required for the ion transport and other biologic actions of somatostatin, whereas Threonine10 serves as an essential spacer. (b) Alteration at Phenylalanine11 or Lysine4 yields analogs that are selective for ion transport in the rabbit ileum and rat colon. These findings should be taken into consideration when developing a

  13. Growth and study of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals in low-G for infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Wilcox, W. R.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments on growth of TGS crystals using (010) and (001) oriented disc shape seeds in the low gravity environment aboard Spacelab-3 are presented. The holographic interferograms reconstructed on the ground demonstrated diffusion limited growth. The morphology of the crystals grown was similar to that of crystals grown on earth, except the faces were not fully developed and planar. The device quality of these crytals is considered to be comparable with the best crystals grown on earth. Better infrared detector characteristics were obtained by doping TGS with Cs and L-alanine simultaneously on the ground. Crystals grown on (010) poled seeds show improved morphology and pyroelectric properties.

  14. Synthesis of homopolypeptides by aminolysis mediated by proteases encapsulated in silica nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Baker, Peter J; Patwardhan, Siddharth V; Numata, Keiji

    2014-11-01

    We report the encapsulation of three different proteases in bioinspired silica. Silica particles were formed under mild reaction conditions using cationic amine-rich ethyleneamines as initiators, which resulted in aggregations of nanoscale spheres. Following encapsulation, the proteases were characterized for their hydrolytic and aminolytic activities. The encapsulation resulted in an increase in the thermal stability of the proteases for both hydrolysis and aminolysis reactions. The enhanced thermal stability of the encapsulated proteases increased the production of poly-L-leucine by aminolysis. Furthermore, the encapsulation of papain resulted in an increase in the production of poly-L-alanine and poly-L-valine at 50 °C. PMID:25154484

  15. The Effects of the Toxic Cyanobacterium Limnothrix (Strain AC0243) on Bufo marinus Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Olivia; Fabbro, Larelle; Makiela, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Limnothrix (strain AC0243) is a cyanobacterium, which has only recently been identified as toxin producing. Under laboratory conditions, Bufo marinus larvae were exposed to 100,000 cells mL−1 of Limnothrix (strain AC0243) live cultures for seven days. Histological examinations were conducted post mortem and revealed damage to the notochord, eyes, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. The histopathological results highlight the toxicological impact of this strain, particularly during developmental stages. Toxicological similarities to β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine are discussed. PMID:24662524

  16. Antimicrobial Activity of Metal & Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Interfaced With Ligand Complexes Of 8-Hydroxyquinoline And α-Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanjana, Gaurav; Kumar, Neeraj; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Kumar, Sandeep

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial nanotechnology is a recent addition to the fight against disease causing organisms, replacing heavy metals and toxins. In the present work, mixed ligand complexes of metals like zinc, silver etc. and metal oxide have been synthesized using 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) as a primary ligand and N-and/O-donor amino acids such as L-serine, L-alanine, glycine, cysteine and histidine as secondary ligands. These complexes were characterized using different spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were tested for antifungal and antibacterial activity by using agar well diffusion bioassay.

  17. Slow-binding and competitive inhibition of 8-amino-7-oxopelargonate synthase, a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme involved in biotin biosynthesis, by substrate and intermediate analogs. Kinetic and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Ploux, O; Breyne, O; Carillon, S; Marquet, A

    1999-01-01

    8-Amino-7-oxopelargonate synthase catalyzes the first committed step of biotin biosynthesis in micro-organisms and plants. Because inhibitors of this pathway might lead to antibacterials or herbicides, we have undertaken an inhibition study on 8-amino-7-oxopelargonate synthase using six different compounds. d-Alanine, the enantiomer of the substrate of this pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme was found to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to l-alanine with a Ki of 0.59 mm. The fact that this inhibition constant was four times lower than the Km for l-alanine was interpreted as the consequence of the inversion-retention stereochemistry of the catalyzed reaction. Schiff base formation between l or d-alanine and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, in the active site of the enzyme, was studied using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. It was found that l and d-alanine form an external aldimine with equilibrium constants K = 4.1 mm and K = 37.8 mm, respectively. However, the equilibrium constant for d-alanine aldimine formation dramatically decreased to 1.3 mm in the presence of saturating concentration of pimeloyl-CoA, the second substrate. This result strongly suggests that the binding of pimeloyl-CoA induces a conformational change in the active site, and we propose that this new topology is complementary to d-alanine and to the putative reaction intermediate since they both have the same configuration. (+/-)-8-Amino-7-oxo-8-phosphonononaoic acid (1), the phosphonate derivative of the intermediate formed during the reaction, was our most potent inhibitor with a Ki of 7 microm. This compound behaved as a reversible slow-binding inhibitor, competitive with respect to l-alanine. Kinetic investigation showed that this slow process was best described by a one-step mechanism (mechanism A) with the following rate constants: k1 = 0.27 x 103 m-1.s-1, k2 = 1.8 s-1 and half-life for dissociation t1/2 = 6.3 min. The binding of compound 1 to the enzyme was also studied using

  18. Alpha-helical hydrophobic polypeptides form proton-selective channels in lipid bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. E.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Proton translocation is important in membrane-mediated processes such as ATP-dependent proton pumps, ATP synthesis, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome oxidase function. The fundamental mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To test the theoretical possibility that bundles of hydrophobic alpha-helices could provide a low energy pathway for ion translocation through the lipid bilayer, polyamino acids were incorporated into extruded liposomes and planar lipid membranes, and proton translocation was measured. Liposomes with incorporated long-chain poly-L-alanine or poly-L-leucine were found to have proton permeability coefficients 5 to 7 times greater than control liposomes, whereas short-chain polyamino acids had relatively little effect. Potassium permeability was not increased markedly by any of the polyamino acids tested. Analytical thin layer chromatography measurements of lipid content and a fluorescamine assay for amino acids showed that there were approximately 135 polyleucine or 65 polyalanine molecules associated with each liposome. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that a major fraction of the long-chain hydrophobic peptides existed in an alpha-helical conformation. Single-channel recording in both 0.1 N HCl and 0.1 M KCl was also used to determine whether proton-conducting channels formed in planar lipid membranes (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine, 1:1). Poly-L-leucine and poly-L-alanine in HCl caused a 10- to 30-fold increase in frequency of conductive events compared to that seen in KCl or by the other polyamino acids in either solution. This finding correlates well with the liposome observations in which these two polyamino acids caused the largest increase in membrane proton permeability but had little effect on potassium permeability. Poly-L-leucine was considerably more conductive than poly-L-alanine due primarily to larger event amplitudes and, to a lesser extent, a higher event frequency. Poly-L-leucine caused two

  19. In Vitro Bactericidal and Bacteriolytic Activity of Ceragenin CSA-13 against Planktonic Cultures and Biofilms of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Other Pathogenic Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez, Margarita; García, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    Ceragenin CSA-13, a cationic steroid, is here reported to show a concentration-dependent bactericidal/bacteriolytic activity against pathogenic streptococci, including multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. The autolysis promoted by CSA-13 in pneumococcal cultures appears to be due to the triggering of the major S. pneumoniae autolysin LytA, an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase. CSA-13 also disintegrated pneumococcal biofilms in a very efficient manner, although at concentrations slightly higher than those required for bactericidal activity on planktonic bacteria. CSA-13 has little hemolytic activity which should allow testing its antibacterial efficacy in animal models. PMID:25006964

  20. Demonstration of murine pancreas elastase and its interstrain variation by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    von Deimling, O H; Gaa, A; Hameister, H

    1991-06-01

    Isoelectric focusing between pH 9 and 11 was used for separation of murine pancreas proteases. One of these proteases is characterized by its preference for N-acetyl-L-alanine-alpha-naphthylester as substrate and by its genetic linkage to bt, a coat color marker of chromosome 15. This protease was identified as elastase, and is probably elastase-1 (ELA-1). Because of the simple procedure and the excellent reproducibility of the focusing pattern, ELA-1 is recommended as a useful marker for mouse chromosome 15. PMID:1889396

  1. Polymerization of amino acids under primitive earth conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Small amounts of peptides were obtained when equal amounts of methane and ammonia were reacted with vaporized aqueous solutions of C14-labeled glycine, L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid and L-threonine in the presence of a continuous spark discharge in a 24-hr cyclic process. The experiment was designed to demonstrate the possibility of peptide synthesis under simulated primeval earth conditions. It is theorized that some dehydration-condensation processes may have taken place, with ammonium cyanide, the hydrogencyanide tetramer or aminonitriles as intermediate products, during the early chemical evolution of the earth.

  2. Biomagnification of cycad neurotoxins in flying foxes: implications for ALS-PDC in Guam.

    PubMed

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Cox, Paul Alan

    2003-08-12

    Beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) occurs in higher levels in museum specimens of the Guamanian flying fox than in the cycad seeds the flying foxes feed on, confirming the hypothesis that cycad neurotoxins are biomagnified within the Guam ecosystem. Consumption of a single flying fox may have resulted in an equivalent BMAA dose obtained from eating 174 to 1,014 kg of processed cycad flour. Traditional feasting on flying foxes may be related to the prevalence of neuropathologic disease in Guam. PMID:12913204

  3. REVERSAL OF d-CYCLOSERINE INHIBITION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH BY ALANINE

    PubMed Central

    Zygmunt, Walter A.

    1962-01-01

    Zygmunt, Walter A. (Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.). Reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition of bacterial growth by alanine. J. Bacteriol. 84:154–156. 1962.—Reversal of the antibacterial activity of d-4-amino-3-isoxazolidone by alanine in bacterial cultures actively growing on chemically defined media was compared in cultures requiring exogenous alanine and those capable of its synthesis. dl-Alanine was the most effective reversal agent in Pediococcus cerevisiae, an alanine-requiring organism, and d-alanine was effective in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, organisms synthesizing alanine. With all three cultures, l-alanine was the least effective reversal agent. PMID:16561951

  4. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  5. Digestion under duress: nutrient acquisition and metabolism during hypoxia in the Pacific hagfish.

    PubMed

    Bucking, Carol; Glover, Chris N; Wood, Chris M

    2011-01-01

    Hagfish feed by immersing themselves in the body cavities of decaying animals. This ensures a rich nutrient source for absorption via the gills, skin, and gut, but it may also subject hagfish to reduced levels of dissolved oxygen and elevated levels of the products of biological degradation. This study investigated the impacts of hypoxia and ammonia on the assimilation and metabolism of selected nutrients (glycine, l-alanine, and glucose) in Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii). Throughout exposure to hypoxia, plasma glucose levels increased. This was not accompanied by an increase in gut glucose transport, which suggests mobilization of glucose from body glycogen stores. Hypoxia preexposure enhanced glycine absorption across the gut and the gill, although l-alanine uptake was unchanged in these tissues. A 24-h period of exposure to hypoxia in hagfish concurrently exposed to waterborne radio-labeled glycine led to a large (5.7-fold) increase in brain glycine accumulation. Preexposure to high levels of waterborne ammonia (10 mM) for 24 h had no impact on gut or skin glycine uptake. These results indicate that hagfish are adapted to maintain nutrient assimilation despite environmental stressors and that tissue-specific absorption of key nutrients such as glycine can even be enhanced in order to sustain critical functions during hypoxia. PMID:22030853

  6. Purification, characterization, and cDNA cloning of opine dehydrogenases from the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea.

    PubMed

    Endo, Noriyuki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Nagahisa, Eizoh

    2007-06-01

    Alanopine dehydrogenase (AlDH) and three isoforms of strombine/alanopine dehydrogenase (St/AlDH) were purified from muscle tissue of the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea. The four enzymes, which can be distinguished by the isoelectric point, are monomeric 42 kDa proteins, possess similar pH-activity profiles, and display specificity for pyruvate and NAD(H). The three isoforms of St/AlDH show equivalent Km and Vmax for glycine and L-alanine and for D-strombine and meso-alanopine. Free amino acid levels in the muscle and D-strombine accumulation in vivo during muscle activity suggest that St/AlDHs function physiologically as StDH. AlDH shows specificity for L-alanine and meso-alanopine, but not for glycine or D-strombine. The amino acid sequences of AlDH and one of the St/AlDH isoforms were determined by a combination of amino acid sequence analysis and cDNA cloning. St/AlDH cDNA consisted of 1586 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,346.70 Da), and AlDH cDNA consisted of 1587 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,886.68 Da). The two amino acid sequences deduced from the cDNA displayed 67% amino acid identity, with greatest similarity to that of tauropine dehydrogenase from the polychaete Arabella iricolor. PMID:17350870

  7. Forced swimming and imipramine modify plasma and brain amino acid concentrations in mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuro; Yamane, Haruka; Tomonaga, Shozo; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between monoamine metabolism and forced swimming or antidepressants have been well studied, however information is lacking regarding amino acid metabolism under these conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of forced swimming and imipramine on amino acid concentrations in plasma, the cerebral cortex and the hypothalamus in mice. Forced swimming caused cerebral cortex concentrations of L-glutamine, L-alanine, and taurine to be increased, while imipramine treatment caused decreased concentrations of L-glutamate, L-alanine, L-tyrosine, L-methionine, and L-ornithine. In the hypothalamus, forced swimming decreased the concentration of L-serine while imipramine treatment caused increased concentration of beta-alanine. Forced swimming caused increased plasma concentration of taurine, while concentrations of L-serine, L-asparagine, L-glutamine and beta-alanine were decreased. Imipramine treatment caused increased plasma concentration of all amino acid, except for L-aspartate and taurine. In conclusion, forced swimming and imipramine treatment modify central and peripheral amino acid metabolism. These results may aid in the identification of amino acids that have antidepressant-like effects, or may help to refine the dosages of antidepressant drugs. PMID:19010319

  8. Enhancing (L)-isoleucine production by thrABC overexpression combined with alaT deletion in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wen, Bing; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Chen, Ning; Xie, Xixian

    2013-09-01

    L-isoleucine is synthesized from 2-ketobutyrate and pyruvate in Corynebacterium glutamicum, and the supplies of these two precursors are important for L-isoleucine synthesis. C. glutamicum YILWΔalaT with alaT gene deletion (encoding alanine aminotransferase, a principal enzyme for L-alanine synthesis) was constructed to increase intracellular pyruvate availability, and the thrABC genes from Escherichia coli (encoding bifunctional aspartate kinase I-homoserine dehydrogenase I, homoserine kinase, and threonine synthetase) were overexpressed in C. glutamicum YILW and YILWΔalaT to increase the supply of intracellular 2-ketobutyrate. In the fed-batch fermentation, YILWpXMJ19thrABC, YILWΔalaT, and YILWΔalaTpXMJ19thrABC exhibited 5.3, 17.6, and 8.4 % higher L-isoleucine production than the original strain, respectively. Both YILWpXMJ19thrABC and YILWΔalaT excreted lower concentrations of L-lysine, L-alanine, and L-valine. YILWΔalaTpXMJ19thrABC exhibited a cumulative reduction of these by-products excretion, which indicated that thrABC overexpression combined with alaT deletion resulted in the metabolic flux redistribution from 2-ketobutyrate and pyruvate to L-isoleucine synthesis, and decreased the fluxes to by-products synthesis accordingly. PMID:23813403

  9. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    SciTech Connect

    Monserrat, Bartomeu Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-07

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  10. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  11. Comparative genomics for mycobacterial peptidoglycan remodelling enzymes reveals extensive genetic multiplicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacteria comprise diverse species including non-pathogenic, environmental organisms, animal disease agents and human pathogens, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Considering that the mycobacterial cell wall constitutes a significant barrier to drug penetration, the aim of this study was to conduct a comparative genomics analysis of the repertoire of enzymes involved in peptidoglycan (PG) remodelling to determine the potential of exploiting this area of bacterial metabolism for the discovery of new drug targets. Results We conducted an in silico analysis of 19 mycobacterial species/clinical strains for the presence of genes encoding resuscitation promoting factors (Rpfs), penicillin binding proteins, endopeptidases, L,D-transpeptidases and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases. Our analysis reveals extensive genetic multiplicity, allowing for classification of mycobacterial species into three main categories, primarily based on their rpf gene complement. These include the M. tuberculosis Complex (MTBC), other pathogenic mycobacteria and environmental species. The complement of these genes within the MTBC and other mycobacterial pathogens is highly conserved. In contrast, environmental strains display significant genetic expansion in most of these gene families. Mycobacterium leprae retains more than one functional gene from each enzyme family, underscoring the importance of genetic multiplicity for PG remodelling. Notably, the highest degree of conservation is observed for N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases suggesting that these enzymes are essential for growth and survival. Conclusion PG remodelling enzymes in a range of mycobacterial species are associated with extensive genetic multiplicity, suggesting functional diversification within these families of enzymes to allow organisms to adapt. PMID:24661741

  12. Dual effects of [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) on pain perception and in vivo hyperalgesic activity of its analogues.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chunnan; Huang, Wenmin; Xing, Xiaoting; Dong, Shouliang

    2010-09-01

    [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) with a short effecting time of about 20 min is one of the most potent rMrgC receptor agonists. To possibly increase its potency and metabolic stability, a series of analogues were prepared by replacing the Tyr(6) residue with the non-canonical amino acids 3-(1-naphtyl)-L-alanine, 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine, 4-methoxy-L-phenylalanine and 3-nitro-L-tyrosine. Dose-dependent nociceptive assays performed in conscious rats by intrathecal injection of the MSH peptides showed [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) hyperalgesic effects at low doses (5-20 nmol) and analgesia at high doses (100-200 nmol). This analgesic activity is fully reversed by the kyotorphin receptor-specific antagonist Leu-Arg. For the two analogues containing in position 6, 4-fluoro-L-phenylalanine and 3-nitro-L-tyrosine, a hyperalgesic activity was not observed, while the 3-(1-naphtyl)-L-alanine analogue at 10 nmol dose was found to induce hyperalgesia at a potency very similar to gamma2-MSH(6-12), but with longer duration of the effect. Finally, the 4-methoxy-L-phenylalanine analogue (0.5 nmol) showed greatly improved hyperalgesic activity and prolonged effects compared to the parent [Tyr(6)]-gamma2-MSH(6-12) compound. PMID:20629198

  13. Contaminant-specific targeting of olfactory sensory neuron classes: connecting neuron class impairment with behavioural deficits.

    PubMed

    Dew, William A; Azizishirazi, Ali; Pyle, Greg G

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system of fish comprises several classes of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). The odourants L-alanine and taurocholic acid (TCA) specifically activate microvillous or ciliated OSNs, respectively, in fish. We recorded electro-olfactograms (EOG) in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; a laboratory-reared model species) and wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) whose olfactory chambers were perfused with either L-alanine or TCA to determine if OSN classes were differentially vulnerable to contaminants, in this case copper or nickel. Results were consistent in both species and demonstrated that nickel targeted and impaired microvillous OSN function, while copper targeted and impaired ciliated OSN function. This result suggests that contaminant-specific effects observed in model laboratory species extrapolate to wild fish populations. Moreover, fathead minnows exposed to copper failed to perceive a conspecific alarm cue in a choice maze, whereas those exposed to nickel could respond to the same conspecific cue. These results demonstrate that fathead minnows perceive conspecific, damage-released alarm cue by ciliated, but not microvillous, OSNs. Fish living in copper-contaminated environments may be more vulnerable to predation than those in clean lakes owing to targeted effects on ciliated OSNs. PMID:24630454

  14. Stimulation of olfactory receptors alters regulation of [Cai] in olfactory neurons of the catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    PubMed

    Restrepo, D; Boyle, A G

    1991-03-01

    Intracellular calcium was measured in single olfactory neurons from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura 2. In 5% of the cells, olfactory stimuli (amino acids) elicited an influx of calcium through the plasma membrane which led to a rapid transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration. Amino acids did not induce release of calcium from internal stores in these cells. Some cells responded specifically to one stimulus (L-alanine, L-arginine, L-norleucine and L-glutamate) while one cell responded to all stimuli. An increase in intracellular calcium could also be elicited in 50% of the cells by direct G-protein stimulation using aluminum fluoride. Because the fraction of cells which respond to direct G-protein stimulation is substantially larger than the fraction of cells responding to amino acids, we tested for possible damage of receptor proteins due to exposure of the olfactory neurons to papain during cell isolation. We find that pretreatment with papain does not alter specific binding of L-alanine and L-arginine to olfactory receptor sites in isolated olfactory cilia. The results are discussed in terms of their relevance to olfactory transduction. PMID:2051471

  15. Biochemical studies of olfaction: binding specificity of odorants to a cilia preparation from rainbow trout olfactory rosettes.

    PubMed

    Rhein, L D; Cagan, R H

    1983-08-01

    Cilia isolated from the olfactory epithelium (olfactory rosettes) of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) bind amino acids, which are odor stimuli to this species. We demonstrate that L-threonine, L-serine, and L-alanine bind to a common site, TSA, in the cilia preparation. All possible mixtures of two of the amino acids as competitors, with the third as the 3H-labeled ligand, were studied. The effect of two combined (unlabeled) competitors was always substantially less than additive compared with their actions singly. Along with additional inhibition studies using mixtures of inhibitors, the data show that the three odorants must interact with at least one common binding site, TSA. Binding of L-[3H]lysine to site L was unaffected by addition of L-threonine, L-serine, or L-alanine, establishing its independence from site TSA. L-Arginine inhibited binding of L-[3H]lysine, showing that both of these basic amino acids interact with site L. The data establish the presence, in trout olfactory cilia, of at least two separate and noninteracting populations of odorant binding sites, TSA and L. PMID:6409997

  16. Modulation of antimicrobial effects of beta-lactams by amino acids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Schumacher, M; Breuer-Werle, M

    1991-06-01

    Glycine as well as 11 and 10, respectively, out of a total of 12 D-amino-acids tested increased the antimicrobial efficacy of imipenem (IMI) and of ampicillin (AMP) using the serosensitive strain E. coli ATCC 8739. D-proline was ineffective in assays with IMI as well as D-proline and D-leucine in assays with AMP. - In contrast, L-amino-acids behaved differently: In assays with IMI, 9 out of 13 isomers were ineffective whereas 3 were antagonistic (L-phenylalanine, L-serine, L-tryptophan). In combination with AMP, however, 10 L-amino acids had an antagonistic effect and 2 (L-leucine, L-methionine) were ineffective. L-alanine was an exception and showed a synergism with both antibiotics which was assumed to have been due to a racemase activity of cells. - Seroresistance of E. coli apparently reduced the synergistic effect of glycine and beta-lactams. - Glycine, alanine and tryptophan lost their typical synergistic or antagonistic effect with AMP when tested as di- or tri-amino-acid compounds. This was not the case with di-L-alanine - It is supposed that the synergistic effect of glycine or of D-amino-acids with beta-lactams can be explained mainly by an inhibition of carboxypeptidases. PMID:1930574

  17. Development of an orexin-2 receptor selective agonist, [Ala(11), D-Leu(15)]orexin-B.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Shuichi; Egashira, Shin-Ichiro; Matsuda, Masao; Iwaasa, Hisashi; Kanatani, Akio; Ohkubo, Mitsuru; Ihara, Masaki; Morishima, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    Investigation of L-alanine and D-amino acid replacement of orexin-B revealed that three L-leucine residues at the positions of 11, 14, and 15 in orexin-B were important to show selectivity for the orexin-2 receptor (OX(2)) over the orexin-1 receptor (OX(1)). L-Alanine substitution at position 11 and D-leucine substitution at positions 14 and 15 maintained the potency of orexin-B to mobilize [Ca(2+)](i) in CHO cells expressing the OX(2), while their potency for the OX(1) was significantly reduced. In combined substitutions, we identified that [Ala(11), D-Leu(15)]orexin-B showed a 400-fold selectivity for the OX(2) (EC(50)=0.13nM) over OX(1) (EC(50)=52nM). [Ala(11), D-Leu(15)]orexin-B is a beneficial tool for addressing the functional roles of the OX(2). PMID:12467628

  18. Greater Superficial Petrosal Nerve Transection in Rats does not Change Unconditioned Licking Responses to Putatively Sweet Taste Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Enshe; Blonde, Ginger; Garcea, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    The greater superficial petrosal nerve (GSP), innervating taste buds in the palate, is known to be exceptionally responsive to sucrose, especially compared with the responsiveness of the chorda tympani nerve (CT). However, whereas transection of the CT (CTX) alone has little or no effect on unconditioned licking responses to many “sweet” stimuli, the impact of GSP transection (GSPX) alone is equivocal. To further examine the role of the GSP on licking responses to putatively sweet-tasting substances, brief-access taste tests were conducted in nondeprived rats before and after sham surgery (SHAM) or CTX or GSPX. A range of concentrations of sucrose, L-alanine, glycine, and L-serine, with and without 1.0 mM inosine monophosphate (IMP) added, were used. All groups showed significant concentration-dependent increases in licking to all stimuli presurgically and postsurgically. CTX decreased licking responses relative to SHAM rats in the first sucrose test. There was also a group × concentration interaction for L-alanine, but post hoc tests did not reveal its basis. Other than this, there were no significant differences among the surgical groups. Interestingly, rats with GSPX tended to initiate fewer trials than SHAM rats. Overall, after GSPX, the remaining gustatory nerves are apparently sufficient to maintain concentration-dependent licking responses to all stimuli tested here. The disparity between our results and others in the literature where GSPX reduced licking responses to sucrose is possibly related to differences in surgical technique or test trial duration. PMID:18635557

  19. X-ray diffraction study of nanocrystalline and amorphous structure within major and minor ampullate dragline spider silks

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sujatha; Isdebski, Thomas; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Ayon, Joel V.; Henning, Robert W.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Antipoa, Olga; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-07-25

    Synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction experiments were carried out on Nephila clavipes (NC) and Argiope aurantia (AA) major (MA) and minor ampullate (MiA) fibers that make up dragline spider silk. The diffraction patterns show a semi-crystalline structure with {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites embedded in a partially oriented amorphous matrix. A superlattice reflection 'S' diffraction ring is observed, which corresponds to a crystalline component larger in size and is poorly oriented, when compared to the {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites that are commonly observed in dragline spider silks. Crystallite size, crystallinity and orientation about the fiber axis have been determined from the wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns. In both NC and AA, the MiA silks are found to be more highly crystalline, when compared with the corresponding MA silks. Detailed analysis on the amorphous matrix shows considerable differences in the degree of order of the oriented amorphous component between the different silks studied and may play a crucial role in determining the mechanical properties of the silks.

  20. Behavioral and electrophysiological dose-response relationships in adult western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) for host pollen amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hollister, Benedict; Mullin, Christopher A.

    1998-05-01

    A strong correlation is shown between taste cell inputs and phagostimulatory outputs with predominant dietary pollen amino acids for western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. Behavioral and electrophysiological dose-response profiles in adult beetles are presented for five major free amino acids in host pollens. Differential responses were found with strongest phagostimulation and sensory response elicited by L-alanine and L-serine, followed in order by L-proline and beta-alanine. gamma-Aminobutyric acid gave the weakest and most sporadic response. ED(50) values for phagostimulation and chemosensory input were 28.3nmol/disk and 13mM, respectively, for L-alanine and 17nmol/disk and 11mM, respectively, for serine. Threshold values for the responses were approximately 1-2mM. These behavioral and chemosensory dose-response ranges correspond closely to levels of free amino acids present in host plant pollens. Use of these response values in development of a pollen chemosensory code for western corn rootworm feeding is discussed. PMID:12770166

  1. Synthesis of deuterium-labelled halogen derivatives of L-tryptophan catalysed by tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Winnicka, Elżbieta; Szymańska, Jolanta; Kańska, Marianna

    2016-06-01

    The isotopomers of halogen derivatives of l-tryptophan (l-Trp) (4'-F-, 7'-F-, 5'-Cl- and 7'-Br-l-Trp), specifically labelled with deuterium in α-position of the side chain, were obtained by enzymatic coupling of the corresponding halogenated derivatives of indole with S-methyl-l-cysteine in (2)H2O, catalysed by enzyme tryptophanase (EC 4.1.99.1). The positional deuterium enrichment of the resulting tryptophan derivatives was controlled using (1)H NMR. In accordance with the mechanism of the lyase reaction, a 100% deuterium labelling was observed in the α-position; the chemical yields were between 23 and 51%. Furthermore, β-F-l-alanine, synthesized from β-F-pyruvic acid by the l-alanine dehydrogenase reaction, has been tested as a coupling agent to obtain the halogenated deuterium-labelled derivatives of l-Trp. The chemical yield (∼30%) corresponded to that as observed with S-methyl-l-cysteine but the deuterium label was only 63%, probably due to the use of a not completely deuterated incubation medium. PMID:26586366

  2. Synthesis of nano-sized stereoselective imprinted polymer by copolymerization of (S)-2-(acrylamido) propanoic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of racemic propranolol and copper ion.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Taher; Bagherzadeh, Azam; Shamkhali, Amir Nasser

    2016-06-01

    A new chiral functional monomer of (S)-2-(acrylamido) propanoic acid was obtained by reaction of (l)-alanine with acryloyl chloride. The resulting monomer was characterized by FT-IR and HNMR and then utilized for the preparation of chiral imprinted polymer (CIP). This was carried out by copolymerization of (l)-alanine-derived chiral monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in the presence of racemic propranolol and copper nitrate, via precipitation polymerization technique, resulting in nano-sized networked polymer particles. The polymer obtained was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FT-IR. The non-imprinted polymer was also synthesized and used as blank polymer. Density functional theory (DFT) was also employed to optimize the structures of two diasterometric ternary complexes, suspected to be created in the pre-polymerization step, by reaction of optically active isomers of propranolol, copper ion and (S)-2-(acrylamido) propanoic acid. Relative energies and other characteristics of the described complexes, calculated by the DFT, predicted the higher stability of (S)-propranolol involved complex, compared to (R)-propranolol participated complex. Practical batch extraction test which employed CIP as solid phase adsorbent, indicated that the CIP recognized selectively (S)-propranolol in the racemic mixture of propranolol; whereas, the non-imprinted polymer (NIP) showed no differentiation capability between two optically active isomers of propranolol. PMID:27040217

  3. Chiral resolution of salbutamol in plasma sample by a new chiral ligand-exchange chromatography method after its extraction with nano-sized imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Taher; Shamkhali, Amir Naser

    2016-01-15

    A new chromatographic procedure, based upon chiral ligand-exchange principal, was developed for the resolution of salbutamol enantiomers. The separation was carried out on a C18 column. (l)-Alanine and Cu(2+) were applied as chiral resolving agent and complexing ion, respectively. The kind of copper salt had definitive effect on the enantioseparation. Density functional theory (DFT) was used to substantiate the effect of various anions, accompanying Cu(2+), on the formation of ternary complexes, assumed to be created during separation process. The DFT results showed that the anion kind had huge effect on the stability difference between two corresponding diastereomeric complexes and their chemical structures. It was shown that the extent of participation of the chiral selector in the ternary diastereomeric complexes formation was managed by the anion kind, affecting thus the enantioseparation efficiency of the developed method. Water/methanol (70:30) mixture containing (l)-alanine-Cu(2+) (4:1) was found to be the best mobile phase for salbutamol enantioseparation. In order to analyze sulbutamol enantiomers in plasma samples, racemic salbutamol was first extracted from the samples via nano-sized salbutamol-imprinted polymer and then enantioseparated by the developed method. PMID:26720698

  4. Observation of 1H-13C and 1H-1H proximities in a paramagnetic solid by NMR at high magnetic field under ultra-fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenhui; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Zhou, Lei; Shen, Ming; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The assignment of NMR signals in paramagnetic solids is often challenging since: (i) the large paramagnetic shifts often mask the diamagnetic shifts specific to the local chemical environment, and (ii) the hyperfine interactions with unpaired electrons broaden the NMR spectra and decrease the coherence lifetime, thus reducing the efficiency of usual homo- and hetero-nuclear NMR correlation experiments. Here we show that the assignment of (1)H and (13)C signals in isotopically unmodified paramagnetic compounds with moderate hyperfine interactions can be facilitated by the use of two two-dimensional (2D) experiments: (i) (1)H-(13)C correlations with (1)H detection and (ii) (1)H-(1)H double-quantum↔single-quantum correlations. These methods are experimentally demonstrated on isotopically unmodified copper (II) complex of l-alanine at high magnetic field (18.8 T) and ultra-fast Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) frequency of 62.5 kHz. Compared to (13)C detection, we show that (1)H detection leads to a 3-fold enhancement in sensitivity for (1)H-(13)C 2D correlation experiments. By combining (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(1)H 2D correlation experiments with the analysis of (13)C longitudinal relaxation times, we have been able to assign the (1)H and (13)C signals of each l-alanine ligand. PMID:25557861

  5. Efficient Enzymatic Preparation of (13) N-Labelled Amino Acids: Towards Multipurpose Synthetic Systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Eunice S; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Baz, Zuriñe; Llop, Jordi; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2016-09-12

    Nitrogen-13 can be efficiently produced in biomedical cyclotrons in different chemical forms, and its stable isotopes are present in the majority of biologically active molecules. Hence, it may constitute a convenient alternative to Fluorine-18 and Carbon-11 for the preparation of positron-emitter-labelled radiotracers; however, its short half-life demands for the development of simple, fast, and efficient synthetic processes. Herein, we report the one-pot, enzymatic and non-carrier-added synthesis of the (13) N-labelled amino acids l-[(13) N]alanine, [(13) N]glycine, and l-[(13) N]serine by using l-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis, an enzyme that catalyses the reductive amination of α-keto acids by using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) as the redox cofactor and ammonia as the amine source. The integration of both l-alanine dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii in the same reaction vessel to facilitate the in situ regeneration of NADH during the radiochemical synthesis of the amino acids allowed a 50-fold decrease in the concentration of the cofactor without compromising reaction yields. After optimization of the experimental conditions, radiochemical yields were sufficient to carry out in vivo imaging studies in small rodents. PMID:27515007

  6. Neurotoxic cyanobacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Molgó, Jordi; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole

    2010-10-01

    Worldwide development of cyanobacterial blooms has significantly increased in marine and continental waters in the last century due to water eutrophication. This phenomenon is favoured by the ability of planktonic cyanobacteria to synthesize gas vesicles that allow them to float in the water column. Besides, benthic cyanobacteria that proliferate at the bottom of lakes, rivers and costal waters form dense mats near the shore. Cyanobacterial massive proliferation is of public concern regarding the capacity of certain cyanobacterial strains to produce hepatotoxic and neurotoxic compounds that can affect public health, human activities and wild and stock animals. The cholinergic synapses and voltage-gated sodium channels constitute the targets of choice of cyanobacterial neurotoxins. Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Anatoxin-a(s) is an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase. Saxitoxin, kalkitoxin and jamaicamide are blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels, whereas antillatoxin is an activator of such channels. Moreover the neurotoxic amino acid l-beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine was shown to be produced by diverse cyanobacterial taxa. Although controversial, increasing in vivo and in vitro evidence suggest a link between the ingestion of l-beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine and the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism-dementia complex, a neurodegenerative disease. This paper reviews the occurrence of cyanobacterial neurotoxins, their chemical properties, mode of action and biosynthetic pathways. PMID:19660486

  7. Metabolic changes in rats after intragastric administration of MGCD0103 (Mocetinostat), a HDAC class I inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingwei; Wu, Haiya; Wen, Congcong; Sun, Fa; Yang, Xuezhi; Hu, Lufeng

    2015-01-01

    MGCD0103, an isotype-selective HDACi, has been clinically evaluated for the treatment of hematologic malignancies and advanced solid tumors, alone and in combination with standard-of-care agents. In this study, we developed a serum metabolomic method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to evaluate the effect of intragastric administration of MGCD0103 on rats. The MGCD0103 group rats were given 20, 40, 80 mg/kg of MGCD0103 by intragastric administration each day for 7 days. Pattern recognition analysis, including both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) revealed that intragastric administration of MGCD0103 induced metabolic perturbations. As compared to the control group, the levels of L-alanine, L-isoleucine, and L-leucine of MGCD0103 group decreased. The results indicate that metabolomic methods based on GC-MS may be useful to elucidate side effect of MGCD0103 through the exploration of biomarkers (L-alanine, L-isoleucine, and L-leucine). According to the pathological changes of liver at difference dosage, MGCD0103 is hepatotoxic and its toxity is dose-dependent. PMID:26464683

  8. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  9. -aminobutyric acid as a required germinant for mutant spores of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Foerster, H F

    1971-11-01

    Germinated spores of Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 were irradiated with ultraviolet light, and spore-forming survivors were screened for germination requirements. Spore strains which failed to germinate in a variety of defined solutions germinative for spores of the parent strain were obtained. Mutant spores germinated readily in solutions containing yeast extract or one of numerous complex preparations. gamma-Aminobutyric acid, obtained from yeast extract by column chromatography, was shown to be required for germination by the mutant spores. gamma-Aminobutyric acid and l-alanine at final concentrations of 1 mm each, in solutions of KI (40 mm), equaled the potency of yeast extract (1 mg/ml) in the germination of the mutant spores. One of several other amino acids could be substituted, though less effectively, for l-alanine. alpha-Aminobutyric acid, beta-aminobutyric acid, beta-alanine, and 5-aminovaleric acid were ineffective substitutes for gamma-aminobutyric acid in mutant spore germination. PMID:5001872

  10. D-Galacturonic Acid: A Highly Reactive Compound in Nonenzymatic Browning. 2. Formation of Amino-Specific Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Steffen; Bornik, Maria-Anna; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-07-22

    Thermal treatment of aqueous solutions of D-galacturonic acid and L-alanine at pH 3, 5, and 8 led to rapid and more intensive nonenzymatic browning reactions compared to similar solutions of other uronic acids and to Maillard reactions of reducing sugars. The hemiacetal ring structures of uronic acids had a high impact on browning behavior and reaction pathways. Besides reductic acid (1,2-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one), 4,5-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one (DHCP), furan-2-carboxaldehyde, and norfuraneol (4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone) could be detected as typical products of nonenzymatic uronic acid browning reactions. 2-(2-Formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-yl)propanoic acid (FPA) and 1-(1-carboxyethyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-1-ium (HPA) were identified as specific reaction products of uronic acids with amine participation like l-alanine. In contrast, the structurally related D-galacturonic acid methyl ester showed less browning activity and degradation under equal reaction conditions. Pectin-specific degradation products such as 5-formyl-2-furanoic acid and 2-furanoic acid were found but could not be verified for d-galacturonic acid monomers alone. PMID:26111613

  11. Exploring Solute-Solvent Interactions of -Amino Acids in Aqueous [] Arrangements by Volumetric, Viscometric, Refractometric, and Acoustic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Roy, Milan Chandra; Basak, Saptarshi

    2014-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in glycine, l-alanine, l-valine, and aqueous solution of ionic liquid (IL) [1-ethylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate (] have been investigated by thermophysical properties. The apparent molar volume (), viscosity -coefficient, molal refraction (), and adiabatic compressibility ( of glycine, l-alanine, and l-valine have been studied in 0.001 mol , 0.003 mol , and 0.005 mol aqueous 1-ethylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate [] solutions at 298.15 K from the values of densities , viscosities (), refractive index (, and speed of sound , respectively. The extent of interaction, i.e., the solute-solvent interaction is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume (, viscosity -coefficient, and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility (. The limiting apparent molar volumes (, experimental slopes ( derived from the Masson equation, and viscosity - and -coefficients using the Jones-Dole equation have been interpreted in terms of ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions, respectively. Molal refractions ( have been calculated with the help of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation. The role of the solvent (aqueous IL solution) and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes have also been analyzed through the derived properties.

  12. Effect alteration of methamphetamine by amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, H; Tadokoro, S

    1983-02-01

    Effect alterations of methamphetamine by pretreatment of amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice were investigated to confirm a fact that certain amino acids, particularly monosodium L-glutamate, are added to methamphetamine by the street users, and that the amino acids augment the effect of methamphetamine. The ambulatory activity of mouse was measured by a tilting-type round activity cage of 25 cm in diameter. The amino acids or their salts tested were monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate, gamma-amino-butyric acid, L-alanine, L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride. A single administration of each chemical at doses of 1 and 2 g/kg i.p. did not induce a marked change in the ambulatory activity in mice. Methamphetamine 2 mg/kg s.c. induced an increase in the ambulatory activity with a peak at 40 min after the administration, and the increased ambulatory activity persisted for 3 hr. The ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine was augmented by the pretreatment of monosodium L-glutamate and monosodium L-aspartate at 30 min before the methamphetamine administration, while attenuated by the pretreatment of L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride in a dose-dependent manner. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not affect the effect of methamphetamine. Similar augmentation and attenuation in the ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine were induced by the pretreatment of sodium bicarbonate 0.9 g/kg i.p. (urinary alkalizer) and ammonium chloride 0.07 g/kg i.p. (urinary acidifier), respectively. The urinary pH level was elevated by the administration of monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate and sodium bicarbonate, and decreased by L-lysine hydrochloride, L-arginine hydrochloride and ammonium chloride. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not elicit a marked change in the urinary pH level. The present experiment confirms the fact in human that monosodium L-glutamate augments the effect of

  13. Functional and molecular characteristics of system L in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shennan, D B; Thomson, J; Barber, M C; Travers, M T

    2003-04-01

    The functional and molecular properties of system L in human mammary cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) have been examined. All transport experiments were conducted under Na(+)-free conditions. alpha-Aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) uptake by MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells was almost abolished by BCH (2-amino-2-norbornane-carboxylic acid). AIB uptake by MDA-MB-231 cells was also inhibited by L-alanine (83.6%), L-lysine (75.6%) but not by L-proline. Similarly, L-lysine and L-alanine, respectively, reduced AIB influx into MCF-7 cells by 45.3% and 63.7%. The K(m) of AIB uptake into MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells was, respectively, 1.6 and 8.8 mM, whereas the V(max) was, respectively, 9.7 and 110.0 nmol/mg protein/10 min. AIB efflux from MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells was trans-stimulated by BCH, L-glutamine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-lysine and AIB (all at 2 mM). In contrast, L-glutamate, L-proline, L-arginine and MeAIB had no effect. The interaction between L-lysine and AIB efflux was one of low affinity. The fractional release of AIB from MDA-MB-231 cells was trans-accelerated by D-leucine and D-tryptophan but not by D-alanine. MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells expressed LAT1 and CD98 mRNA. MCF-7 cells also expressed LAT2 mRNA. The results suggest that AIB transport in mammary cancer cells under Na(+)-free conditions is predominantly via system L which acts as an exchange mechanism. The differences in the kinetics of AIB transport between MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells may be due to the differential expression of LAT2. PMID:12659948

  14. Repression and inhibition of transport systems for branched-chain amino acids in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kiritani, K; Ohnishi, K

    1977-02-01

    Kinetics of the transport systems common for entry of L-isoleucine, L-leucine, and L-valine in Salmonella typhimurium LT2 have been analyzed as a function of substrateconcentration in the range of 0.5 to 45 muM. The systems of transport mutants, KA203 (ilvT3) and KA204 (ilvT4), are composed of two components; apparent Km values for uptake of isoleucine, leucine, and valine by the low Km component are 2 muM, 2 to 3 muM, and 1 muM, respectively, and by the high Km component 30 muM, 20 to 40 muM, and 0.1 mM, respectively. The transport system(s) of the wild type has not been separated into components but rather displays single Km values of 9 muM for isoleucine, 10 muM for leucine, and 30 muM for valine. The transport activity of the wild type was repressed by L-leucine, alpha ketoisocaproate, glycyl-L-isoleucine, glycyl-L-leucine, and glycyl-L-methionine. That for the transport mutants was repressed by L-alanine, L-isoleucine, L-methionine, L-valine, alpha-ketoisovalerate, alpha-keto-beta-methylvalerate, glycyl-L-alanine, glycyl-L-threonine, and glycyl-L-valine, in addition to the compounds described above. Repression of the mutant transport systems resulted in disappearance of the low Km component for valine uptake, together with a decrease in Vmax of the high Km component; the kinetic analysis with isoleucine and leucine as substrates was not possible because of poor uptake. The maximum reduction of the transport activity for isoleucine was obtained after growing cells for two to three generations in a medium supplemented with repressor, and for the depression, protein synthesis was essential after removal of the repressor. The transport activity for labeled isoleucine in the transport mutant and wild-type strains was inhibited by unlabeled L-alanine, L-cysteine, L-isoleucine, L-leucine, L-methionine, L-threonine, and L-valine. D-Amino acids neither repressed nor inhibited the transport activity of cells for entry of isoleucine. PMID:320186

  15. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of dodecakis-(μ2-alaninato-1:2κ(2) O:N,O)cerium(III)hexa-nickel(II) aqua-tris-(hydroxido-κO)tris-(nitrato-κ(2) O,O')cerate(III).

    PubMed

    Bezzubov, Stanislav I; Doljenko, Vladimir D; Churakov, Andrei V; Zharinova, Irina S; Kiselev, Yuri M

    2015-10-01

    The chiral title compound, [CeNi6(C3H6NO2)12][Ce(NO3)3(OH)3(H2O)], comprises a complex heterometallic Ni/Ce cation and a homonuclear Ce anion. Both the cation and anion exhibit point group symmetry 3. with the Ce(III) atom situated on the threefold rotation axis. The cation metal core consists of six Ni(II) atoms coordinated in a slightly distorted octa-hedral N2O4 configuration by N and O atoms of 12 deprotonated l-alaninate ligands exhibiting both bridging and chelating modes. This metal-organic coordination motif encapsulates one Ce(III) atom that shows an icosa-hedral coordination by the O-donor atoms of the l-alaninate ligands, with Ce-O distances varying in the range 2.455 (5)-2.675 (3) Å. In the anion, the central Ce(III) ion is bound to three bidentate nitrate ligands, to three hydroxide ligands and to one water mol-ecule, with Ce-O distances in the range 2.6808 (19)-2.741 (2) Å. The H atoms of the coordinating water mol-ecule are disordered over three positions due to its location on a threefold rotation axis. Disorder is also observed in fragments of two l-alaninate ligands, with occupancy ratios of 0.608 (14):0.392 (14) and 0.669 (8):0.331 (8), respectively, for the two sets of sites. In the crystal, the complex cations and anions assemble through O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network with large voids of approximately 1020 Å(3). The contributions of highly disordered ethanol and water solvent mol-ecules to the diffraction data were removed with the SQUEEZE procedure [Spek (2015 ▸). Acta Cryst. C71, 9-18]. The given chemical formula and other crystal data do not take into account the unknown amount of these solvent mol-ecules. PMID:26594427

  16. Theoretical investigation of the optical and EPR parameters for VO 2+ion in some complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfaoğlu, Emel; Karabulut, Bünyamin

    2012-04-01

    The molecular orbital coefficients and the EPR parameters of trisodium citrate dihydrate, sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate, potassium d-gluconate monohydrate and L-Alanine vanadyl complexes are calculated theoretically. Two d-d transition spectra and EPR parameters for the VO2+ complex are calculated theoretically by using crystal-field theory. The calculated g and A paramaters have indicated that paramagnetic center is axially symmetric. Having the relations of g∥A⊥ for VO2+ ions, it can be concluded that VO2+ ions are located in distorted octahedral sites (C4v) elongated along the z-axis and the ground state of the paramagnetic electron is dxy.

  17. 1-Deoxysphingolipids Encountered Exogenously and Made de Novo: Dangerous Mysteries inside an Enigma*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jingjing; Merrill, Alfred H.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional backbones of mammalian sphingolipids are 2-amino, 1,3-diols made by serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). Many organisms additionally produce non-traditional, cytotoxic 1-deoxysphingoid bases and, surprisingly, mammalian SPT biosynthesizes some of them, too (e.g. 1-deoxysphinganine from l-alanine). These are rapidly N-acylated to 1-deoxy-“ceramides” with very uncommon biophysical properties. The functions of 1-deoxysphingolipids are not known, but they are certainly dangerous as contributors to sensory and autonomic neuropathies when elevated by inherited SPT mutations, and they are noticeable in diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, serine deficiencies, and other diseases. As components of food as well as endogenously produced, these substances are mysteries within an enigma. PMID:25947379

  18. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  19. Probing micro-solvation in "numbers": the case of neutral dipeptides in water.

    PubMed

    Takis, Panteleimon G; Papavasileiou, Konstantinos D; Peristeras, Loukas D; Melissas, Vasilios S; Troganis, Anastassios N

    2013-05-21

    How many solvent molecules and in what way do they interact directly with biomolecules? This is one of the most challenging questions regarding a deep understanding of biomolecular functionalism and solvation. We herein present a novel NMR spectroscopic study, achieving for the first time the quantification of the directly interacting water molecules with several neutral dipeptides. Our proposed method is supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, advanced analysis of which allowed the identification of the direct interactions between solute-solvent molecules in the zwitterionic L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide-water system. Beyond the quantification of dipeptide-water molecule direct interactions, this NMR technique could be useful for the determination and elucidation of small to moderate bio-organic molecular groups' direct interactions with various polar solvent molecules, shedding light on the biomolecular micro-solvation processes and behaviour in various solvents. PMID:23579285

  20. Transition-density-fragment interaction approach for exciton-coupled circular dichroism spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J.

    2010-09-01

    A transition-density-fragment interaction (TDFI) method for exciton-coupled circular dichroism (ECCD) spectra is proposed. The TDFI method was previously developed for excitation-energy transfer, which led to the successful estimation of the electronic coupling energy between donor and accepter molecules in xanthorhodopsin [K. J. Fujimoto and S. Hayashi, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 14152 (2009)]. In the present study, the TDFI scheme is extended to the ECCD spectral calculation based on the matrix method and is applied to a dimerized retinal (all-trans N-retinylidene-L-alanine Schiff base) chromophore. Compared with the dipole-dipole and transition charge from ESP methods, TDFI has a much improved description of the electronic coupling. In addition, the matrix method combined with TDFI can reduce the computational costs compared with the full quantum-mechanical calculation. These advantages of the present method make it possible to accurately evaluate the CD Cotton effects observed in experiment.

  1. Exploration of interactions between bioactive solutes and vitamin B9 in aqueous medium by physico-chemical contrivances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Roy, Mahendra; Chakraborti, Palash; Ekka, Deepak

    2014-09-01

    Molecular interaction prevailing in α-amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-valine) and aqueous solution of folic acid (FA) has been reported by physico-chemical properties as density (ρ), viscosity (η), refractive index (nD) and ultrasonic speed (u) at 298.15 K. The extent of interaction (solute-solvent interaction) is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume (φ0V), viscosity B-coefficient, molar refraction (RM) and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility (φ0K). The trends in transfer volumes, Δφ0V, have been interpreted in terms of solute-cosolute interactions on the basis of a co-sphere overlap model. The role of the cosolute (FA), and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes, has also been analysed through the derived properties.

  2. Acquisition of Raman spectra of amino acids using portable instruments: Outdoor measurements and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culka, A.; Jehlička, J.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectra of 13 amino acids: L-alanine, β-alanine, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, glycine, L-methionine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan and L-tyrosine were acquired outdoors using two portable Raman instruments from the Ahura and Delta Nu manufacturers, both with 785 nm laser excitation. Both instruments provide quality Raman spectra with nevertheless a variable dependence upon the prevailing experimental conditions. The data acquired in these experiments will inform the selection of suitable Raman spectrometers for the in-field detection of biomolecules of relevance to the search for life signatures spectroscopically in terrestrial extreme environments and in extraterrestrial exploration, especially of planetary surfaces and subsurfaces using robotic instrumentation.

  3. Growth and ferroelectric properties of L-, D-, and DL-methionine-doped triglycine sulfate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuta, Toshio; Yamazaki, Toshinari; Nakatani, Noriyuki

    2010-12-01

    Single crystals of triglycine sulfate (TGS) doped with L-, D-, and DL-methionine have been prepared. Doping effects on the crystal morphology, the ferroelectric domain structure, and the generation of internal bias field Eb were investigated. These effects were compared with each other and also compared with those of alanine-doped crystals. Though L-methionine-doped crystals show the asymmetric morphology analogous to L-alanine-doped crystals, these two crystals are distinct from each other in their domain structure and the generation of Eb. It was ascertained that the asymmetry caused by L- and D-methionine are mutually reversed in the b-axis. For the doping of racemic mixture DL-methionine, we could recognize the overlap of doping effects caused by the both enantiomers of methionine.

  4. The production and characterisation of dinitrocarbanilide antibodies raised using antigen mimics.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Lisa; Fodey, Terence L; Crooks, Steven R H; Delahaut, Philippe; Elliott, Christopher T

    2002-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies were produced to detect the coccidiostat nicarbazin. Due to structural constraints of the active component of nicarbazin, dinitrocarbanilide (DNC), three different compounds that shared a common substructure with DNC were used as antigen mimics. The compounds (N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine 4-nitroanilide (SAN), L-glutamic acid gamma-(p-nitroanilide) (GAN) and p-nitrosuccinanilic acid (NSA)) were conjugated to a carrier protein and used in the immunisation of rabbits. Five different polyclonal sera were produced and consequently characterised. The antibodies exhibited an IC(50) range of 2.3-7.6 ng/ml using a competitive ELISA procedure. Serum from one rabbit, R555, exhibited an IC(50) of 2.9 ng/ml for DNC and cross-reactivity studies showed that this serum was specific for DNC and did not cross-react with other coccidiostats such as halofuginone, toltrazuril or ronidazole. PMID:12191508

  5. Alahopcin, a new dipeptide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Higashide, E; Horii, S; Ono, H; Mizokami, N; Yamazaki, T; Shibata, M; Yoneda, M

    1985-03-01

    An actinomycete strain No. B-52653 was found to produce an antibiotic selectively active against the in vitro antibiotic resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus. Based on taxonomic studies, the name Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov. is proposed for the strain. The microorganism produced two kinds of antibiotics; one identical with gougerotin, the other an amphoteric water soluble dipeptide containing L-alanine. The latter has the molecular formula C9H15N3O6 and is named alahopcin. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum and a synergistic effect with some other antibiotics against some antibiotic resistant staphylococci. Alahopcin has a low toxicity and was effective against experimental infections in mice caused by Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:3839222

  6. Isosulfazecin, a new beta-lactam antibiotic, produced by an acidophilic pseudomonad. Fermentation, isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, K; Haibara, K; Asai, M; Imada, A

    1981-09-01

    A novel beta-lactam antibiotic, isosulfazecin (iSZ), was found to be produced by an acidophilic pseudomonad, Pseudomonas mesoacidophila sp. nov. iSZ was produced in parallel with bacterial growth in nutrient broth containing glycerol and sodium thiosulfate under aerated conditions. iSZ was isolated by chromatography on activated charcoal and anion-exchangers and crystallized from 70% aqueous methanol. The molecular formula was determined to be C12H20N4O9S from physiochemical data. The IR and NMR spectra suggested that iSZ has a beta-lactam ring, methoxyl and sulfonate groups. On acid hydrolysis, it gave L-alanine and D-glutamic acid. iSZ is an epimeric isomer of sulfazecin. iSZ was weakly active against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, and was strongly active against mutants hypersensitive to beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:7328050

  7. A density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method.

    PubMed

    Waller, Mark P; Kumbhar, Sadhana; Yang, Jack

    2014-10-20

    We present a density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (DBA-QM/MM) method, whereby molecules can switch layers from the QM to the MM region and vice versa. The adaptive partitioning of the molecular system ensures that the layer assignment can change during the optimization procedure, that is, on the fly. The switch from a QM molecule to a MM molecule is determined if there is an absence of noncovalent interactions to any atom of the QM core region. The presence/absence of noncovalent interactions is determined by analysis of the reduced density gradient. Therefore, the location of the QM/MM boundary is based on physical arguments, and this neatly removes some empiricism inherent in previous adaptive QM/MM partitioning schemes. The DBA-QM/MM method is validated by using a water-in-water setup and an explicitly solvated L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide. PMID:24954803

  8. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase. PMID:26024289

  9. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)--a novel olfactory stimulant in fish.

    PubMed

    Andersen, O; Døving, K B

    1991-08-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the putative role of the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH or LHRH) as an olfactory stimulant in fish. We report for the first time extreme sensitivity of the olfactory organ in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to GnRH. Recordings of the electroolfactogram (EOG) showed an electrophysiological response to 10(-16) M GnRH four times the amplitude of the response to a fresh water control stimulus. By stimulating the olfactory epithelium with several GnRH analogs and fragments of the decapeptide, the biologically active region of GnRH could be partly elucidated. The response profile of GnRH differed from that of the positive control odorant L-alanine, suggesting that separate receptors or receptor cells are involved. We propose that this potent odorant may act as a reproductive pheromone in fish. PMID:1912479

  10. REDOR with a relative full-echo reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Anil K.; Cegelski, Lynette; O'Connor, Robert D.; Schaefer, Jacob

    2003-07-01

    REDOR and REDOR-like 13C{ 19F} and 2H{ 19F} NMR experiments have been performed on lyophilized whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus. The bacteria were grown to maturity on media containing L-[ 13C3]alanine or L-[methyl- d3]alanine, and then complexed with the 4-fluorobiphenyl derivative of chloroeremomycin, an analogue of the widely used antibiotic, vancomycin. The position of the 19F of the drug bound in the bacterial cell wall was determined relative to L-alanine 13C and 2H labels in the peptidoglycan peptide stem that was closest to the fluorinated biphenyl moiety of the drug. These determinations were made by dipolar recoupling methods that do not require an absolute measurement of the REDOR full echo (the signal observed without rotor-synchronized dephasing pulses) of the labels in the peptide stem.

  11. A complex-polarization-propagator protocol for magneto-chiral axial dichroism and birefringence dispersion.

    PubMed

    Cukras, Janusz; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Rizzo, Antonio; Rikken, Geert L J A; Coriani, Sonia

    2016-05-21

    A computational protocol for magneto-chiral dichroism and magneto-chiral birefringence dispersion is presented within the framework of damped response theory, also known as complex polarization propagator theory, at the level of time-dependent Hartree-Fock and time-dependent density functional theory. Magneto-chiral dichroism and magneto-chiral birefringence spectra in the (resonant) frequency region below the first ionization threshold of R-methyloxirane and l-alanine are presented and compared with the corresponding results obtained for both the electronic circular dichroism and the magnetic circular dichroism. The additional information content yielded by the magneto-chiral phenomena, as well as their potential experimental detectability for the selected species, is discussed. PMID:27118603

  12. Protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis using inverse substrates: the influence of reaction conditions on the trypsin acyl transfer efficiency.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, V; Jakubke, H D; Zapevalova, N P; Mitin, Y V

    1991-06-01

    Benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanine p-guanidinophenyl ester behaves as a trypsin "inverse substrate," i.e., a cationic center is included in the leaving group instead of being in the acyl moiety. Using this substrate as an acyl donor, trypsin catalyzes the synthesis of peptide bonds that cannot be split by this enzyme. An optimal acyl transfer efficiency was achieved between pH 8 and 9 at 30 degrees C.The addition of as much as 50% cosolvent was shown to be of minor influence on the acyl transfer efficiency, whereas the reaction velocity decreases by more than one order of magnitude. The efficiency of H-Leu-NH(2) and H-Val-NH(2) in deacylation is almost the same for "inverse" and normal type substrates. PMID:18600704

  13. Biosynthesis of the ansamycin antibiotic ansatrienin (mycotrienin) by Streptomyces collinus.

    PubMed

    Wu, T S; Duncan, J; Tsao, S W; Chang, C J; Keller, P J; Floss, H G

    1987-01-01

    The biosynthesis of ansatrienin (mycotrienin) has been studied in radioactive and stable isotope feeding experiments with Streptomyces collinus Tü 1892. The m-C7N unit of the ansa ring is efficiently and specifically derived from 3-amino-5-hydroxybenzoic acid; shikimic acid is not incorporated into this part of the molecule but does label the cyclohexanecarboyxlic acid moiety, providing all seven of its carbon atoms. Incorporation of methionine confirms origin of the methoxy group by transmethylation. The D-alanine moiety is derived directly from D-alanine rather than L-alanine. The terminal steps in the conversion of shikimic acid into cyclohexanecarboyxlic acid seem to be sequential reduction of 2,5-dihydrobenzoic acid and cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid as evidenced by feeding experiments and the detection of a new ansatrienin containing a 1-cyclohexene instead of the cyclohexane moiety. PMID:3598593

  14. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms. PMID:23966039

  15. BMAA inhibits nitrogen fixation in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-08-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms. PMID:23966039

  16. Diatoms: a novel source for the neurotoxin BMAA in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Eriksson, Johan; Lage, Sandra; Jonasson, Sara; Shams, Shiva; Mehine, Martin; Ilag, Leopold L; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig's disease is a neurological disorder linked to environmental exposure to a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). The only organisms reported to be BMAA-producing, are cyanobacteria--prokaryotic organisms. In this study, we demonstrate that diatoms--eukaryotic organisms--also produce BMAA. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry revealed the occurrence of BMAA in six investigated axenic diatom cultures. BMAA was also detected in planktonic field samples collected on the Swedish west coast that display an overrepresentation of diatoms relative to cyanobacteria. Given the ubiquity of diatoms in aquatic environments and their central role as primary producers and the main food items of zooplankton, the use of filter and suspension feeders as livestock fodder dramatically increases the risk of human exposure to BMAA-contaminated food. PMID:24392143

  17. Crystal growth, structural and thermal studies of amino acids admixtured L-arginine phosphate monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, P.; Saravanan, T.; Parthipan, G.; Kumar, R. Mohan; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ravi, G.; Jayavel, R.

    2011-05-01

    To study the improved characteristics of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystals, amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been grown by slow cooling method. Amino acids like glycine, L-alanine, and L-valine have been selected for doping. Optical quality bulk crystals have been harvested after a typical growth period of about twenty days. The effect of amino acids in the crystal lattice and molecular vibrational frequencies of various functional groups in the crystals have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) analyses respectively. Thermal behavior of the amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been studied from the TG and DTG analyses. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies have been carried out to find the crystalline nature. Optical transmission studies have been carried out by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The cut off wavelength is below 240 nm for the grown crystals.

  18. Germination of Rhizopus oligosporus Sporangiospores

    PubMed Central

    Medwid, Richard D.; Grant, Dale W.

    1984-01-01

    The morphology of Rhizopus oligosporus (NRRL 2710) sporangiospores and their physiological requirements for germination were studied. Germination proceeded in two separable phases: phase I (swelling) and phase II (germ tube protrusion). The optimal conditions for germination were 42°C and pH 4.0. Sporangiospores contained insufficient endogenous carbon for swelling or germination to occur in distilled water. Initial swelling during phase I occurred only in the presence of a suitable carbohydrate. Subsequent production of germ tubes during phase II required exogenous sources of both carbon and nitrogen. Spores germinated most rapidly in mixtures of amino acids; l-proline and l-alanine were the most effective. These amino acids, at concentrations as low as 10−6 M, supported germination when combined with glucose and McIlvaine (citric acid-phosphate) buffer. d-Glucose, d-xylose, and d-mannose were the most effective carbohydrates tested for promotion of germination. Images PMID:16346671

  19. Anorexia nervosa with severe liver dysfunction and subsequent critical complications.

    PubMed

    Furuta, S; Ozawa, Y; Maejima, K; Tashiro, H; Kitahora, T; Hasegawa, K; Kuroda, S; Ikuta, N

    1999-07-01

    A twenty-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa (body mass index=11) suffered from severe liver dysfunction (aspartate aminotransferase 5,000 IU/l, alanine aminotransferase 3,980 IU/l, prothrombin time 32%), hypoglycemia (serum glucose 27 mg/dl), and pancreatic dysfunction (amylase 820 IU/l, lipase 558 IU/l). She fell into a depressive state with irritability, which was not improved by intravenous glucose. Despite treatment with plasmapheresis for the liver dysfunction, she subsequently developed pulmonary edema, acute renal failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Hemodialysis, mechanical ventilation and drug therapy including prednisolone, prostaglandin E1, and branched-chain amino acid, improved her critical condition. In this case, malnutrition may have been the cause for the liver dysfunction and subsequent complications. PMID:10435364

  20. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Bozzoni, V; Pansarasa, Orietta; Diamanti, L; Nosari, G; Cereda, C; Ceroni, M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that affects central and peripheral motor neuron cells. Its etiology is unknown, although a relationship between genetic background and environmental factors may play a major role in triggering the neurodegeneration. In this review, we analyze the role of environmental factors in ALS: heavy metals, electromagnetic fields and electric shocks, pesticides, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, physical activity and the controversial role of sports. The literature on the single issues is analyzed in an attempt to clarify, as clearly as possible, whether each risk factor significantly contributes to the disease pathogenesis. After summarizing conflicting observations and data, the authors provide a final synthetic statement. PMID:27027889

  1. Diatoms: A Novel Source for the Neurotoxin BMAA in Aquatic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Sandra; Jonasson, Sara; Shams, Shiva; Mehine, Martin; Ilag, Leopold L.; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease is a neurological disorder linked to environmental exposure to a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). The only organisms reported to be BMAA-producing, are cyanobacteria – prokaryotic organisms. In this study, we demonstrate that diatoms – eukaryotic organisms – also produce BMAA. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry revealed the occurrence of BMAA in six investigated axenic diatom cultures. BMAA was also detected in planktonic field samples collected on the Swedish west coast that display an overrepresentation of diatoms relative to cyanobacteria. Given the ubiquity of diatoms in aquatic environments and their central role as primary producers and the main food items of zooplankton, the use of filter and suspension feeders as livestock fodder dramatically increases the risk of human exposure to BMAA-contaminated food. PMID:24392143

  2. In Vitro Destruction of Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms with Bacterial and Phage Peptidoglycan Hydrolases▿

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Host- and phage-coded cell wall hydrolases have been used to fight Streptococcus pneumoniae growing as planktonic cells in vitro as well as in animal models. Until now, however, the usefulness of these enzymes in biofilm-grown pneumococci has gone untested. The antipneumococcal activity of different cell wall hydrolases produced by S. pneumoniae and a number of its phages was examined in an in vitro biofilm model. The major pneumococcal autolysin LytA, an N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase, showed the greatest efficiency in disintegrating S. pneumoniae biofilms. The phage-encoded lysozymes Cpl-1 and Cpl-7 were also very efficient. Biofilms formed by the close pneumococcal relatives Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae and Streptococcus oralis were also destroyed by the phage endolysins but not by the S. pneumoniae autolysin LytA. A cooperative effect of LytA and Cpl-1 in the disintegration of S. pneumoniae biofilms was recorded. PMID:21746941

  3. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  4. Circularly Polarized Luminescence of Chiral Perylene Diimide Based Enantiomers Triggered by Supramolecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Li, Yunzhi; Wei, Guo; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Shuhua; Cheng, Yixiang

    2016-08-26

    Two perylene diimide (PDI) enantiomers (d/l-PDI) incorporating the d/l-alanine moiety have been designed and synthesized. d/l-PDI in chloroform displays bright-yellow fluorescence that is redshifted to orange-red when the solvent contains a methanol fraction of 99 vol %. No circular dichroism (CD) or circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) signals were observed for d/l-PDI enantiomers in CHCl3 . Interestingly, the d/l-PDI enantiomers exhibit clear mirror-image Cotton effects and CPL emission in the aggregate state. The optical anisotropy factor (glum ) is as high as 0.02 at fm =99 %, which can be attributed to self-assembly through intermolecular π-π interactions in the aggregate state. PMID:27470269

  5. Morphometric and neurochemical alterations found in l-BMAA treated rats.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Miguel, Begoña G; Solas, M Teresa; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle paralysis that reflects the motoneurons' degeneration. Several studies support the relationship between β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (l-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and diatoms, and the sporadic occurrence of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the study of its neurotoxicity mechanisms has assumed great relevance in recent years. Recently, our research team has proposed a sporadic ALS animal model by l-BMAA administration in rats, which displays many pathophysiological features of human ALS. In this paper, we deepen the characterization of this model corroborating the occurrence of alterations present in ALS patients such as decreased muscle volume, thinning of the motor cortex, enlarged brain's lateral ventricles, and alteration of both bulbar nuclei and neurotransmitters' levels. Therefore, we conclude that l-BMAA treated rats could be a good model which mimics degenerative features that ALS causes in humans. PMID:26002186

  6. Neurotoxic flying foxes as dietary items for the Chamorro people, Marianas Islands.

    PubMed

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Murch, Susan J; Cox, Paul Alan

    2006-06-15

    Fanihi -- flying foxes (Pteropus mariannus mariannus, Pteropodidae) -- are a highly salient component of the traditional Chamorro diet. A neurotoxic, non-protein amino acid, beta-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) accumulates in flying foxes, which forage on the seeds of Cycas micronesica (Cycadaceae) in Guam's forests. BMAA occurs throughout flying fox tissues both as a free amino acid and in a protein-bound form. It is not destroyed by cooking. Protein-bound BMAA also remains in cycad flour which has been washed and prepared by the Chamorro people as tortillas, dumplings, and thickened soups. Other animals that forage on cycad seeds may also provide BMAA inputs into the traditional Chamorro diet. PMID:16457975

  7. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance: Efficient dipolar recovery in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, N. C.; Bildsøe, H.; Jakobsen, H. J.; Levitt, M. H.

    1994-08-01

    We describe an efficient method for the recovery of homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions in magic-angle spinning NMR. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance (2Q-HORROR) is established by fulfilling the condition ωr=2ω1, where ωr is the sample rotation frequency and ω1 is the nutation frequency around an applied resonant radio frequency (rf) field. This resonance can be used for double-quantum filtering and measurement of homonuclear dipolar interactions in the presence of magic-angle spinning. The spin dynamics depend only weakly on crystallite orientation allowing good performance for powder samples. Chemical shift effects are suppressed to zeroth order. The method is demonstrated for singly and doubly 13C labeled L-alanine.

  8. Strecker degradation of amino acids promoted by a camphor-derived sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, M João; Knittel, Ana S O; Oliveira, Maria da Conceição; Costa Pessoa, João; Herrmann, Rudolf; Wagner, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Summary A camphor-derived sulfonimine with a conjugated carbonyl group, oxoimine 1 (O2SNC10H13O), reacts with amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-leucine) to form a compound O2SNC10H13NC10H14NSO2 (2) which was characterized by spectroscopic means (MS and NMR) and supported by DFT calculations. The product, a single diastereoisomer, contains two oxoimine units connected by a –N= bridge, and thus has a structural analogy to the colored product Ruhemann´s purple obtained by the ninhydrin reaction with amino acids. A plausible reaction mechanism that involves zwitterions, a Strecker degradation of an intermediate imine and water-catalyzed tautomerizations was developed by means of DFT calculations on potential transition states. PMID:27340465

  9. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis.

    PubMed

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-07-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  10. Synthesis, characterization of α-amino acid Schiff base derived Ru/Pt complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell via protein binding and ROS generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsalme, Ali; Laeeq, Sameen; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Mohd. Shahnawaz; Al Farhan, Khalid; Musarrat, Javed; Khan, Rais Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    We have synthesized two new complexes of platinum (1) and ruthenium (2) with α-amino acid, L-alanine, and 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde derived Schiff base (L). The ligand and both complexes were characterized by using elemental analysis and several other spectroscopic techniques viz; IR, 1H, 13C NMR, EPR, and ESI-MS. Furthermore, the protein-binding ability of synthesized complexes was monitored by UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques with a model protein, human serum albumin (HSA). Both the PtL2 and RuL2 complexes displayed significant binding towards HSA. Also, in vitro cytotoxicity assay for both complexes was carried out on human hepatocellular carcinoma cancer (HepG2) cell line. The results showed concentration-dependent inhibition of cell viability. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species was also evaluated, and results exhibited substantial role in cytotoxicity.

  11. Synthesis and anti-HIV evaluation of hybrid-type prodrugs conjugating HIV integrase inhibitors with d4t by self-cleavable spacers containing an amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Fossey, Christine; Huynh, Ngoc-Trinh; Vu, Anh-Hoang; Vidu, Anamaria; Zarafu, Irina; Laduree, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2007-10-01

    In an attempt to combine the anti-HIV inhibitory capacity of reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and integrase (IN) inhibitors (INIs), several heterodimer analogues of the previously reported [d4T]-PABC-[INI] and [d4T]-OABC-[INI] prototypes have been prepared. In these novel series, we wished to extend our results to conjugates which incorporated an enzymatically labile aminoacid unit (L-alanine) connected to d4T through a self-immolative para- or ortho-aminobenzyl carbonate (PABC or OABC) spacer. Among the novel heterodimers, several derivatives show a potent anti-HIV-1 activity, which proved comparable to that of the [L-708,906]-PABC-[d4T] Heterodimer A prototype. However, although the compounds proved inhibitory to HIV-1, they were less potent than the parent compounds from which they were derived. PMID:18035829

  12. Chirality Amplification in Tactoids of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate an effective chirality amplification based on the long-range forces, extending over the scales of tens of micrometers, much larger than the single molecule (nanometer) scale. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) that represent water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as amino acid L-alanine and limonene added to the droplets of LCLC lead to chiral amplification characterized by an increase of optical activity by a factor of 103 - 104. This effect allows one to discriminate and detect the absolute configuration of chiral molecules in an aqueous system, thus opening new possibilities in biosensing and other biological applications.

  13. The Transition from Stiff to Compliant Materials in Squid Beaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2008-03-01

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications.

  14. The Transition from Stiff to Compliant Materials in Squid Beaks

    PubMed Central

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications. PMID:18369144

  15. The transition from stiff to compliant materials in squid beaks.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W; Waite, J Herbert

    2008-03-28

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications. PMID:18369144

  16. Investigation of biomolecules trapped in fluid inclusions inside halite crystals by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Osterrothová, Kateřina; Jehlička, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy was tested for the identification of biomolecules (glycine, L-alanine, β-alanine, L-serine, and γ-aminobutyric acid) trapped in fluid inclusions inside halite model crystals. The investigated biomolecules represent important targets for future astrobiological missions. We know from terrestrial conditions that organic molecules and microorganisms can be sealed within fluid inclusions and can survive intact even for hundreds of millions of years. Raman spectroscopy is currently being miniaturized for future extraterrestrial planetary exploration (ExoMars 2018). Raman spectroscopy has shown the ability to detect investigated aminoacids nondestructively without any sample preparation, in short measurement times, and in relatively low concentrations. The number of registered Raman bands of investigated aminoacids and their intensity clearly correlate with the given concentration of biomolecules within fluid inclusions. PMID:21930419

  17. Cyanobacterial blooms and biomagnification of the neurotoxin BMAA in South Florida coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, L.; Mash, D.

    2008-12-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria have developed in Florida Bay, Biscayne Bay and other coastal waters of South Florida. It has recently been shown that virtually all cyanobacteria produce the potent neurotoxin, beta-N- methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Studies in Guam indicate that BMAA can biomagnify up the food chain from cyanobacteria to human food and humans. Recent studies in Guam and on human brains in North America suggest an association between BMAA and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). A variety of organisms from South Florida coastal waters are being analyzed for BMAA content to determine if BMAA is biomagnifying in these food chains and if it is a potential human health hazard. Some have extremely high concentrations of BMAA.

  18. Production and physicochemical assessment of new stevia amino acid sweeteners from the natural stevioside.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Sherine N; Massoud, Mona I; Jad, Yahya El-Sayed; Bekhit, Adnan A; El-Faham, Ayman

    2015-04-15

    New stevia amino acid sweeteners, stevia glycine ethyl ester (ST-GL) and stevia l-alanine methyl ester (ST-GL), were synthesised and characterised by IR, NMR ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) and elemental analysis. The purity of the new sweeteners was determined by HPLC and their sensory properties were evaluated relative to sucrose in an aqueous system. Furthermore, the stevia derivatives (ST-GL and ST-AL) were evaluated for their acute toxicity, melting point, solubility and heat stability. The novel sweeteners were stable in acidic, neutral or basic aqueous solutions maintained at 100 °C for 2 h. The sweetness intensity rate of the novel sweeteners was higher than sucrose. Stevia amino acid (ST-GL and ST-AL) solutions had a clean sweetness taste without bitterness when compared to stevioside. The novel sweeteners can be utilised as non-caloric sweeteners in the production of low-calorie food. PMID:25466115

  19. Measurements of 13C multiple-quantum coherences in amyloid fibrils under magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tsai, Tim W T; Cheng, Hsin-Mei; Chan, Jerry C C

    2012-06-21

    The excitation and detection of high-order multiple quantum coherences among (13)C nuclear spins are demonstrated in the samples of [1-(13)C]-L-alanine and (13)C labeled amyloid fibrils at a spinning frequency of 20 kHz. The technique is based on the double-quantum average Hamiltonian prepared by the DRAMA-XY4 pulse sequence. Empirically, we find that multiple supercycles are required to suppress the higher-order effects for real applications. Measurements for the fibril samples formed by the polypeptides of PrP(113-127) provide the first solid-state NMR evidence for the stacking of multiple β-sheet layers at the structural core of amyloid fibrils. PMID:22632418

  20. Acquisition of Raman spectra of amino acids using portable instruments: outdoor measurements and comparison.

    PubMed

    Culka, A; Jehlička, J; Edwards, H G M

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectra of 13 amino acids: L-alanine, β-alanine, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, glycine, L-methionine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan and L-tyrosine were acquired outdoors using two portable Raman instruments from the Ahura and Delta Nu manufacturers, both with 785 nm laser excitation. Both instruments provide quality Raman spectra with nevertheless a variable dependence upon the prevailing experimental conditions. The data acquired in these experiments will inform the selection of suitable Raman spectrometers for the in-field detection of biomolecules of relevance to the search for life signatures spectroscopically in terrestrial extreme environments and in extraterrestrial exploration, especially of planetary surfaces and subsurfaces using robotic instrumentation. PMID:20863748

  1. Synthesis, characterization of α-amino acid Schiff base derived Ru/Pt complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell via protein binding and ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Alsalme, Ali; Laeeq, Sameen; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Al Farhan, Khalid; Musarrat, Javed; Khan, Rais Ahmad

    2016-06-15

    We have synthesized two new complexes of platinum (1) and ruthenium (2) with α-amino acid, l-alanine, and 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde derived Schiff base (L). The ligand and both complexes were characterized by using elemental analysis and several other spectroscopic techniques viz; IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR, EPR, and ESI-MS. Furthermore, the protein-binding ability of synthesized complexes was monitored by UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques with a model protein, human serum albumin (HSA). Both the PtL2 and RuL2 complexes displayed significant binding towards HSA. Also, in vitro cytotoxicity assay for both complexes was carried out on human hepatocellular carcinoma cancer (HepG2) cell line. The results showed concentration-dependent inhibition of cell viability. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species was also evaluated, and results exhibited substantial role in cytotoxicity. PMID:27002605

  2. A Floquet description of phase alternated sequences for efficient homonuclear recoupling in solid perdeuterated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthi, Sundaresan; Akbey, Ümit; Uluca, Boran; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Vega, Shimon

    2013-09-01

    A Floquet description of a phase alternated homonuclear recoupling scheme for perdeuterated systems is presented. As a result, we demonstrate improvements in the recoupling efficiency of the DOuble Nucleus Enhanced Recoupling [DONER; J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131 (2009) 17054] technique by utilizing Phase Alternated Recoupling Irradiation Schemes [PARIS; Chem. Phys. Lett. 469 (2009) 342]. The effect of proton and deuterium radio frequency irradiation during recoupling has been systematically studied and theoretical observations have been verified experimentally using a deuterated model compound, L-Alanine, at 10 and 20 kHz magic angle spinning frequency. Experimental results are well in agreement with theoretical observations, thereby significantly increasing the recoupling efficiency of conventional DONER in perdeuterated systems.

  3. Copper(II) triflate catalyzed amination of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Ton, Thi My Uyen; Himawan, Fanny; Chang, Joyce Wei Wei; Chan, Philip Wai Hong

    2012-09-17

    A method to prepare α,α-acyl amino acid derivatives efficiently by Cu(OTf)(2)+1,10-phenanthroline (1,10-phen)-catalyzed amination of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with PhI=NSO(2) Ar is described. The mechanism is thought to initially involve aziridination of the enolic form of the substrate, formed in situ through coordination to the Lewis acidic metal catalyst, by the putative copper-nitrene/imido species generated from the reaction of the metal catalyst with the iminoiodane source. Subsequent ring opening of the resultant aziridinol adduct under the Lewis acidic conditions then provided the α-aminated product. The utility of this method was exemplified by the enantioselective synthesis of a precursor of 3-styryl-2-benzoyl-L-alanine. PMID:22890890

  4. Bimodular Peptide Synthetase SidE Produces Fumarylalanine in the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Steinchen, Wieland; Lackner, Gerald; Yasmin, Sabiha; Schrettl, Markus; Dahse, Hans-Martin

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous mold Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a potentially life-threatening infectious disease, in humans. The sidE gene encodes a bimodular peptide synthetase and was shown previously to be strongly upregulated during initiation of murine lung infection. In this study, we characterized the two adenylation domains of SidE with the ATP-[32P]pyrophosphate exchange assay in vitro, which identified fumarate and l-alanine, respectively, as the preferred substrates. Using full-length holo-SidE, fumarylalanine (FA) formation was observed in vitro. Furthermore, FA was identified in A. fumigatus culture supernatants under inducing conditions, unless sidE was genetically inactivated. As FA is structurally related to established pharmaceutical products exerting immunomodulatory activity, this work may contribute to our understanding of the virulence of A. fumigatus. PMID:23974138

  5. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    PubMed Central

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-01-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  6. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  7. Study of apoptosis in human lymphocytes by toxic substances implicated in toxic oil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, S; Cárdaba, B; del Pozo, V; de Andrés, B; Cortegano, I; Jurado, A; Tramón, P; Palomino, P; Lahoz, C

    1997-03-14

    Toxic Oil Syndrome is a multisystemic disease that occurred in epidemic proportions in Spain in 1981 caused by the ingestion of rapeseed oil denatured with aniline. Several data implicate T cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. We evaluated the mechanisms of cytotoxicity in human lymphocytes of TOS-related products: aniline, 3-(N-phenylamino)-1,2-propanediol and its mono- and di-oleyl esters and eosinophilia myalgia-related product such as 3-(phenylamino)-L-alanine, which is chemically similar to 3-(N-phenylamino)-1,2-propanediol, and has been found in manufactured L-tryptophan. Our results show that only di-oleyl ester of 3-(N-phenylamino)-1,2-propanediol induces apoptosis in human lymphocytes, in a concentration and time-dependent way, confirmed by morphology, expression of phosphatidylserine in membrane and analysis of DNA degradation. PMID:9074655

  8. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents. PMID:25976788

  9. Influence of alanine uptake on Staphylococcus aureus surface charge and its susceptibility to two cationic antibacterial agents, nisin and low molecular weight chitosan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Chen; Chiang, Wen-Dee; Chen, Wei-Chiuan; Chen, Hui-Huang; Huang, Yao-Wen; Chen, Wei-Jung; Lin, Shih-Bin

    2012-12-15

    Low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) and nisin, recognized as cationic antibacterial agents (CAAs), inhibit bacterial growth by interacting with the anionically charged cell wall. In this study, alanine uptake significantly reduced the anionic cell surface charge, as determined by the zeta potential (ZP) measurements, of Staphylococcus aureus, resulting from the incorporation of d-alanine into the cell wall. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests and growth inhibition curves revealed that LMWC and nisin possessed inverse antibacterial activity against three strains of S. aureus, depending on the strains' net charge. A twofold reduction in the MIC value of nisin was obtained against S. aureus, inoculated in a 1.0% d- or l-alanine-augmented trypticase soy broth medium. A flocculation test demonstrated that neutralizing the anionic surface charge using d-alanine reduced the adsorption of S. aureus onto LMWC. Furthermore, the reduced surface net charge could enhance the colonization capacity of S. aureus on glass. PMID:22980819

  10. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Activity on Human Cancer Cells of Novel Isoquinolinequinone-Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Jaime A; Delgado, Virginia; Sepúlveda, Sandra; Benites, Julio; Theoduloz, Cristina; Buc Calderon, Pedro; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2016-01-01

    A variety of aminoisoquinoline-5,8-quinones bearing α-amino acids moieties were synthesized from 3-methyl-4-methoxycarbonylisoquinoline-5,8-quinone and diverse l- and d-α-amino acid methyl esters. The members of the series were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against normal and cancer cell lines by using the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. From the current investigation, structure-activity relationships demonstrate that the location and structure of the amino acid fragment plays a significant role in the cytotoxic effects. Moderate to high cytotoxic activity was observed and four members, derived from l-alanine, l-leucine, l-phenylalanine, and d-phenylalanine, were selected as promising compounds by their IC50 ranging from 0.5 to 6.25 μM and also by their good selectivity indexes (≥2.24). PMID:27617997

  11. First-principles free-energy analysis of helix stability: the origin of the low entropy in pi helices.

    PubMed

    Ismer, Lars; Ireta, Joel; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2008-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the stability of infinite poly-L-alanine alpha, pi, and 310 helices with respect to the fully extended structure (FES) is calculated using density functional theory and the harmonic approximation. We find that the vibrational entropy strongly reduces the stability of the helical conformations with respect to the FES. By mapping the ab initio data on an approximate mechanical model, we show that this effect is exclusively due to the formation of hydrogen bonds, whereas changes in the backbone stiffness are practically negligible. We furthermore observe that the temperature dependence is largest for the pi helix and smallest for the 310 helix and demonstrate that these trends are a generic behavior related to the geometric peculiarities of the respective helical conformations and independent of the specific amino acid sequence. PMID:18327931

  12. Non-specific esterases and esterproteases in masticatory muscles from the muscular dystrophic mouse.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, S; Moe, D; Vilmann, H

    1989-03-01

    With the aid of histochemical and electrophoretic techniques activities for esterase and esterprotease were investigated in the digastric and masseter muscles from normal and dystrophic mice. The substrates used were alpha-naphthyl acetate and N-acetyl-L-alanine alpha-naphthyl ester. According to the microscopic observations of the dystrophic muscles the histopathological changes in the masseter muscle were much more pronounced than in the digastric muscle. The connective tissue surrounding the myofibers of the dystrophic masseter contained a large number of cells with pronounced enzyme activity. Among them were mast cells that were strongly stained for esterprotease. The connective tissue of the dystrophic digastricus was much less infiltrated with cellular elements reacting for esterprotease. In zymograms the normal digastricus, the dystrophic masseter and the dystrophic digastricus showed a strong activity for certain isoenzymes that were absent or weakly expressed in the normal masseter. PMID:2657470

  13. Kinetics of acid hydrolysis and reactivity of some antibacterial hydrophilic iron(II) imino-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ali Mohamed; Nassr, Lobna Abdel-Mohsen Ebaid; Adam, Mohamed Shaker Saied; Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed Abdelhalim

    2015-05-01

    Kinetic study of acid hydrolysis of some hydrophilic Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes with antibacterial properties was performed using spectrophotometry. The Schiff base ligands were derived from sodium 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde-5-sulfonate and glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, DL-methionine, DL-serine, or L-phenylalanine. The reaction was studied in aqueous media under conditions of pseudo-first order kinetics. Moreover, the acid hydrolysis was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The general rate equation was suggested as follows: rate = k obs [Complex], where k obs = k 2 [H+]. The evaluated rate constants and activation parameters are consistent with the hydrophilicity of the investigated complexes.

  14. Enzymatic profile of Legionella pneumophilia.

    PubMed

    Müller, H E

    1981-03-01

    The enzyme activities of four strains of Legionella pneumophilia were investigated by using the API ZYM system (API System S.A., F-38390 Montalieu Vercieu, France) and synthetic substrates. Aminopeptidases were detected specifically against L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, L-cystine, L-glutaminic acid, glycine, L-histidine, L-isoleucine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-methionine, L-phenylalanine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, and L-valine. Furthermore, the bacteria possesses esterase activity splitting propionate, butyrate, caproate, caprylate, and caprate, but not laurate, myristate, palmitate, and stearate, esters. The enzymes studies were inhibited partially by aprotinin. No inhibition of phosphatase (pH range, 5.4 to 8.5) or of phosphoamidase was observed. Activities of arylsulfatase, chymotrypsin, trypsin, and glycosidases could not be detected. PMID:6165735

  15. Use of 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate labeling and mass spectrometry to determine the site of action of the streptococcolytic peptidoglycan hydrolase zoocin A.

    PubMed

    Gargis, Shaw R; Heath, Harry E; Heath, Lucie S; Leblanc, Paul A; Simmonds, Robin S; Abbott, Brian D; Timkovich, Russell; Sloan, Gary L

    2009-01-01

    Zoocin A is a streptococcolytic peptidoglycan hydrolase with an unknown site of action that is produced by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus 4881. Zoocin A has now been determined to be a d-alanyl-l-alanine endopeptidase by digesting susceptible peptidoglycan with a combination of mutanolysin and zoocin A, separating the resulting muropeptides by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, and analyzing them by mass spectrometry (MS) in both the positive- and negative-ion modes to determine their compositions. In order to distinguish among possible structures for these muropeptides, they were N-terminally labeled with 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate (SPITC) and analyzed by tandem MS in the negative-ion mode. This novel application of SPITC labeling and MS/MS analysis can be used to analyze the structure of peptidoglycans and to determine the sites of action of other peptidoglycan hydrolases. PMID:18978086

  16. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  17. Desensitization of sulphonylurea- and nutrient-induced insulin secretion following prolonged treatment with glibenclamide.

    PubMed

    Ball, A J; Flatt, P R; McClenaghan, N H

    2000-11-24

    Functional effects of prolonged exposure to the sulphonylurea glibenclamide were examined in a popular clonal pancreatic beta-cell line, denoted as BRIN-BD11. In acute 20-min incubations, 200 microM of tolbutamide or glibenclamide stimulated insulin release from non-depolarized and depolarized cells, which was dramatically reduced following 18-h culture with 100 microM glibenclamide. Sulphonylurea desensitization in non-depolarized cells was reversed following 6-36-h subsequent culture in the absence of glibenclamide. However, desensitization of insulinotropic effects of sulphonylureas in depolarized cells following glibenclamide culture and associated decline in cellular insulin content was not fully reversible. Culture with 100 microM glibenclamide also markedly reduced the acute insulinotropic actions of glucose, L-alanine, L-arginine, 2-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) and KCl. These effects were almost completely reversed following 18-h culture in the absence of the sulphonylurea. PMID:11090651

  18. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Bozzoni, Virginia; Pansarasa, Orietta; Diamanti, Luca; Nosari, Guido; Cereda, Cristina; Ceroni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that affects central and peripheral motor neuron cells. Its etiology is unknown, although a relationship between genetic background and environmental factors may play a major role in triggering the neurodegeneration. In this review, we analyze the role of environmental factors in ALS: heavy metals, electromagnetic fields and electric shocks, pesticides, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, physical activity and the controversial role of sports. The literature on the single issues is analyzed in an attempt to clarify, as clearly as possible, whether each risk factor significantly contributes to the disease pathogenesis. After summarizing conflicting observations and data, the authors provide a final synthetic statement. PMID:27027889

  19. β-Amino acid and amino-alcohol conjugation of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) imparts hydrogelation displaying remarkable biostability, biocompatibility, and anti-inflammatory properties.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Joydeb; Das, Mahua Rani; Deb, Jolly; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2013-08-13

    A well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), namely, naproxen (Np), was conjugated with β-alanine and various combinations of amino alcohols and l-alanine. Quite a few bioconjugates, thus synthesized, were capable of gelling pure water, NaCl solution (0.9 wt %), and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (pH 7.4). The hydrogels were characterized by rheology and electron microscopy. Hydrogelation was probed by FT-IR and temperature-variable (1)H NMR studies. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) of a nonhydrogelator and a hydrogelator in the series established a useful structure-property (gelation) correlation. MTT assay of the hydrogelators in the mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line showed excellent biocompatibility. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) assay of the hydrogelators revealed their anti-inflammatory response, which was comparable to that of the parent NSAID naproxen sodium (Ns). PMID:23859562

  20. Chemical Synthesis of Proteins with Non-Strategically Placed Cysteines Using Selenazolidine and Selective Deselenization.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Post Sai; Dery, Shahar; Metanis, Norman

    2016-01-18

    Although native chemical ligation has enabled the synthesis of hundreds of proteins, not all proteins are accessible through typical ligation conditions. The challenging protein, 125-residue human phosphohistidine phosphatase 1 (PHPT1), has three cysteines near the C-terminus, which are not strategically placed for ligation. Herein, we report the first sequential native chemical ligation/deselenization reaction. PHPT1 was prepared from three unprotected peptide segments using two ligation reactions at cysteine and alanine junctions. Selenazolidine was utilized as a masked precursor for N-terminal selenocysteine in the middle segment, and, following ligation, deselenization provided the native alanine residue. This approach was used to synthesize both the wild-type PHPT1 and an analogue in which the active-site histidine was substituted with the unnatural and isosteric amino acid β-thienyl-l-alanine. The activity of both proteins was studied and compared, providing insights into the enzyme active site. PMID:26636774

  1. Strecker degradation of amino acids promoted by a camphor-derived sulfonamide.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M Fernanda N N; Ferreira, M João; Knittel, Ana S O; Oliveira, Maria da Conceição; Costa Pessoa, João; Herrmann, Rudolf; Wagner, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    A camphor-derived sulfonimine with a conjugated carbonyl group, oxoimine 1 (O2SNC10H13O), reacts with amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-leucine) to form a compound O2SNC10H13NC10H14NSO2 (2) which was characterized by spectroscopic means (MS and NMR) and supported by DFT calculations. The product, a single diastereoisomer, contains two oxoimine units connected by a -N= bridge, and thus has a structural analogy to the colored product Ruhemann´s purple obtained by the ninhydrin reaction with amino acids. A plausible reaction mechanism that involves zwitterions, a Strecker degradation of an intermediate imine and water-catalyzed tautomerizations was developed by means of DFT calculations on potential transition states. PMID:27340465

  2. /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids for in vivo assessment of local myocardial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, F.J.; Barrio, J.R.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.; MacDonald, N.S.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1981-06-01

    The hot cell synthesis of sterile, pyrogen-free /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids was accomplished by employing the appropriate immobilized enzymes on a CNBr-activated Sepharose support and using remote, semiautomated systems. The syntheses were completed 6-12 min after cyclotron production of (/sup 13/N)ammonia. Myocardial time-activity curves after intracoronary injection of /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids in dogs were triexponential in both normal and ischemic myocardium. Higher retention of /sup 13/N activity was observed in ischemic segments. Positron computed tomography imaging also showed increased uptake of /sup 13/N-labeled L-glutamate and L-alanine in ischemic segments compared with normal myocardium when blood flow corrections were made. Myocardial transaminases are primarily responsible for the observed retention fractions. It suggests the participation of the carbon skeletons of these amino acids in the Krebs cycle.

  3. Alkylamine-Dependent Amino-Acid Oxidation by Lysine Monooxygenase—Fragmented Substrate of Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shozo; Yamauchi, Takashi; Hayaishi, Osamu

    1972-01-01

    Lysine monooxygenase catalyzes the oxygenative decarboxylation of L-lysine and produces a corresponding acid amide. L-Alanine was inactive as substrate. However, when propylamine was present, oxidation, but not oxygenation, of alanine was demonstrated with the oxygenase. Alanine was converted to pyruvate, with the liberation of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide, but propylamine remained unchanged. Other α-monoamino acids were also oxidized in the presence of alkylamines with various carbon chain lengths. The highest oxidase activity was observed when the total chain length of both amino acid and amine was nearly identical with that of lysine. Available evidence indicates that the amine-dependent amino-acid oxidase activity is associated with the lysine oxygenase activity. PMID:4509334

  4. Metals and the Integrity of a Biological Coating

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Mates, Thomas E.; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Stucky, Galen D.; Zok, Frank W.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The cuticle of mussel byssal threads is a robust natural coating that combines high extensibility with high stiffness and hardness. In this study, fluorescence microscopy and elemental analysis were exploited to show that the 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (dopa) residues of mussel foot protein-1 colocalize with Fe and Ca distributions in the cuticle of Mytilus galloprovincialis mussel byssal threads. Chelated removal of Fe and Ca from the cuticle of intact threads resulted in a 50% reduction in cuticle hardness, and thin sections subjected to the same treatment showed a disruption of cuticle integrity. Dopa-metal complexes may provide significant interactions for the integrity of composite cuticles deformed under tension. PMID:18847291

  5. Studies on Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria after Anaerobic Fermentation of Starch by a Hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitate, Toshihiro; Fukatsu, Makoto; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Kohno, Hideki; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Jun; Asada, Yasuo

    In order to establish the sequential hydrogen production from waste starch using a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, basic studies were done. P. furiosus produced hydrogen and acetate by anaerobic fermentation at 90°C. A photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, was able to produce hydrogen from acetate under anaerobic and light conditions at 30°C. However, Rb. sphaeroides RV was not able to produce hydrogen from acetate in the presence of sodium chloride that was essential for the growth and hydrogen production of P. furiosus although it produced hydrogen from lactate at a reduced rate with 1% sodium chloride. A newly isolated strain, CST-8, from natural environment was, however, able to produce hydrogen from acetate, especially with 3 mM L-alanine and in the presence of 1% sodium chloride. The sequential hydrogen production with P. furiosus and salt-tolerant photosynthetic bacteria could be probable at least in the laboratory experiment scale.

  6. Characterization of Lactobacillus salivarius alanine racemase: short-chain carboxylate-activation and the role of A131.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Yukimoto, Jotaro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Ohmori, Taketo; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Many strains of lactic acid bacteria produce high concentrations of d-amino acids. Among them, Lactobacillus salivarius UCC 118 produces d-alanine at a relative concentration much greater than 50 % of the total d, l-alanine (100d/d, l-alanine). We characterized the L. salivarius alanine racemase (ALR) likely responsible for this d-alanine production and found that the enzyme was activated by carboxylates, which is an unique characteristic among ALRs. In addition, alignment of the amino acid sequences of several ALRs revealed that A131 of L. salivarius ALR is likely involved in the activation. To confirm that finding, an L. salivarius ALR variant with an A131K (ALR(A131K)) substitution was prepared, and its properties were compared with those of ALR. The activity of ALR(A131K) was about three times greater than that of ALR. In addition, whereas L. salivarius ALR was strongly activated by low concentrations (e.g., 1 mM) of short chain carboxylates, and was inhibited at higher concentrations (e.g., 10 mM), ALR(A131K) was clearly inhibited at all carboxylate concentrations tested (1-40 mM). Acetate also increased the stability of ALR such that maximum activity was observed at 35 °C and pH 8.0 without acetate, but at 50 °C in the presence of 1 mM acetate. On the other hand, maximum ALR(A131K) activity was observed at 45 °C and around pH 9.0 with or without acetate. It thus appears that A131 mediates the activation and stabilization of L. salivarius ALR by short chain carboxylates. PMID:26543773

  7. L-glutamine supplementations enhance liver glutamine-glutathione axis and heat shock factor-1 expression in endurance-exercise trained rats.

    PubMed

    Petry, Éder Ricardo; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Heck, Thiago Gomes; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo; Tirapegui, Julio

    2015-04-01

    Liver L-glutamine is an important vehicle for the transport of ammonia and intermediary metabolism of amino acids between tissues, particularly under catabolic situations, such as high-intensity exercise. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of oral supplementations with L-glutamine in its free or dipeptide forms (with L-alanine) on liver glutamine-glutathione (GSH) axis, and 70 kDa heat shock proteins (HSP70)/heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) expressions. Adult male Wistar rats were 8-week trained (60 min/day, 5 days/week) on a treadmill. During the last 21 days, the animals were daily supplemented with 1 g of L-glutamine/kg body weight per day in either l-alanyl-L-glutamine dipeptide (DIP) form or a solution containing L-glutamine and l-alanine in their free forms (GLN+ALA) or water (controls). Exercise training increased cytosolic and nuclear HSF1 and HSP70 expression, as compared with sedentary animals. However, both DIP and GLN+ALA supplements enhanced HSF1 expression (in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions) in relation to exercised controls. Interestingly, HSF1 rises were not followed by enhanced HSP70 expression. DIP and GLN+ALA supplements increased plasma glutamine concentrations (by 62% and 59%, respectively) and glutamine to glutamate plasma ratio in relation to trained controls. This was in parallel with a decrease in plasma ammonium levels. Supplementations increased liver GSH (by 90%), attenuating the glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to GSH ratio, suggesting a redox state protection. In conclusion, oral administration with DIP and GLN+ALA supplements in endurance-trained rats improve liver glutamine-GSH axis and modulate HSF1 pathway. PMID:25202991

  8. Injectable small molecule hydrogel as a potential nanocarrier for localized and sustained in vivo delivery of doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manish; Kundu, Somanath; Reddy M, Amarendar; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Motiani, Rajender K.; Sengupta, Sagar; Srivastava, Aasheesh; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-10-01

    The majority of the localized drug delivery systems are based on polymeric or polypeptide scaffolds, as weak intermolecular interactions of low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs, Mw <500 Da) are significantly perturbed in the presence of anticancer drugs. Here, we present l-alanine derived low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs) that remain injectable even after entrapping the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). These DOX containing nanoassemblies (DOX-Gel) showed promising anticancer activity in mice models. Subcutaneous injection of DOX-Gel near the tumor achieved a greater decrease in tumour load than by intravenous injection of DOX (DOX-IV), and local injection of DOX alone (DOX-Local) at the tumor site. We noticed that DOX-Gel nanocarriers are especially effective when injected during the early stage of tumor progression, and achieve a substantial decrease in tumor load in the long term.The majority of the localized drug delivery systems are based on polymeric or polypeptide scaffolds, as weak intermolecular interactions of low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs, Mw <500 Da) are significantly perturbed in the presence of anticancer drugs. Here, we present l-alanine derived low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs) that remain injectable even after entrapping the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). These DOX containing nanoassemblies (DOX-Gel) showed promising anticancer activity in mice models. Subcutaneous injection of DOX-Gel near the tumor achieved a greater decrease in tumour load than by intravenous injection of DOX (DOX-IV), and local injection of DOX alone (DOX-Local) at the tumor site. We noticed that DOX-Gel nanocarriers are especially effective when injected during the early stage of tumor progression, and achieve a substantial decrease in tumor load in the long term. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Scheme 1, Fig. S1-S6, synthesis of hydrogels; experimental section for gelation, rheology, MALDI, microscopy and

  9. Oral supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine do not change metabolic alterations induced by long-term high-fat diet in the B6.129F2/J mouse model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bock, Patricia Martins; Krause, Mauricio; Schroeder, Helena Trevisan; Hahn, Gabriela Fernandes; Takahashi, Hilton Kenji; Schöler, Cinthia Maria; Nicoletti, Graziella; Neto, Luiz Domingos Zavarize; Rodrigues, Maria Inês Lavina; Bruxel, Maciel Alencar; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine in the high-fat diet (HFD)-fed B6.129SF2/J mouse model over insulin sensitivity response and signaling, oxidative stress markers, metabolism and HSP70 expression. Mice were fed in a standard low-fat diet (STA) or a HFD for 20 weeks. In the 21th week, mice from the HFD group were allocated in five groups and supplemented for additional 8 weeks with different amino acids: HFD control group (HFD-Con), HFD + dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine group (HFD-Dip), HFD + L-alanine group (HFD-Ala), HFD + L-glutamine group (HFD-Gln), or the HFD + L-alanine + L-glutamine (in their free forms) group (HFD-Ala + Gln). HFD induced higher body weight, fat pad, fasted glucose, and total cholesterol in comparison with STA group. Amino acid supplementations did not induce any modifications in these parameters. Although insulin tolerance tests indicated insulin resistance in all HFD groups, amino acid supplementations did not improve insulin sensitivity in the present model. There were also no significant differences in the immunocontents of insulin receptor, Akt, and Toll-like receptor-4. Notably, total 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 + HSP73) contents in the liver was markedly increased in HFD-Con group as compared to STA group, which might suggest that insulin resistance is only in the beginning. Apparently, B6.129SF2/J mice are more resistant to the harmful effects of HFD through a mechanism that may include gut adaptation, reducing the absorption of nutrients, including amino acids, which may explain the lack of improvements in our intervention. PMID:26530165

  10. Invariant Gly Residue Is Important for α-Defensin Folding, Dimerization, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Le; Ericksen, Bryan; Wu, Xueji; Zhan, Changyou; Yuan, Weirong; Li, Xu; Pazgier, Marzena; Lu, Wuyuan

    2012-01-01

    The human α-defensins (HNP) are synthesized in vivo as inactive prodefensins, and contain a conserved glycine, Gly17, which is part of a β-bulge structure. It had previously been shown that the glycine main chain torsion angles are in a d-configuration, and that d-amino acids but not l-alanine could be substituted at that position to yield correctly folded peptides without the help of a prodomain. In this study, the glycine to l-alanine mutant defensin was synthesized in the form of a prodefensin using native chemical ligation. The ligation product folded correctly and yielded an active peptide upon CNBr cleavage. The l-Ala17-HNP1 crystal structure depicted a β-bulge identical to wild-type HNP1. However, dimerization was perturbed, causing one monomer to tilt with respect to the other in a dimerization model. Inhibitory activity against the anthrax lethal factor showed a 2-fold reduction relative to wild-type HNP1 as measured by the inhibitory concentration IC50. Self-association was slightly reduced, as detected by surface plasmon resonance measurements. According to the results of the virtual colony count assay, the antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus exhibited a less than 2-fold reduction in virtual lethal dose values. Prodefensins with two other l-amino acid substitutions, Arg and Phe, at the same position did not fold, indicating that only small side chains are tolerable. These results further elucidate the factors governing the region of the β-bulge structure that includes Gly17, illuminating why glycine is conserved in all mammalian α-defensins. PMID:22496447

  11. Gustatory responsiveness to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids in the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jenny; Maitz, Anna; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2014-03-29

    The gustatory responsiveness of four adult spider monkeys to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids was assessed in two-bottle preference tests of brief duration (1min). We found that Ateles geoffroyi responded with significant preferences for seven amino acids (glycine, l-proline, l-alanine, l-serine, l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-lysine) when presented at a concentration of 100mM and/or 200mM and tested against water. At the same concentrations, the animals significantly rejected five amino acids (l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, l-valine, l-cysteine, and l-isoleucine) and were indifferent to the remaining tastants. Further, the results show that the spider monkeys discriminated concentrations as low as 0.2mM l-lysine, 2mM l-glutamic acid, 10mM l-proline, 20mM l-valine, 40mM glycine, l-serine, and l-aspartic acid, and 80mM l-alanine from the alternative stimulus, with individual animals even scoring lower threshold values. A comparison between the taste qualities of the proteinogenic amino acids as described by humans and the preferences and aversions observed in the spider monkeys suggests a fairly high degree of agreement in the taste quality perception of these tastants between the two species. A comparison between the taste preference thresholds obtained with the spider monkeys and taste detection thresholds reported in human subjects suggests that the taste sensitivity of A. geoffroyi for the amino acids tested here might match that of Homo sapiens. The results support the assumption that the taste responses of spider monkeys to proteinogenic amino acids might reflect an evolutionary adaptation to their frugivorous and thus protein-poor diet. PMID:24480073

  12. Inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase in vitro and long-chain base biosynthesis in intact Chinese hamster ovary cells by. beta. -chloroalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Medlock, K.A.; Merrill, A.H. Jr.

    1988-09-06

    The effects of ..beta..-chloroalanine (..beta..-Cl-alanine) on the serine palmitoyltransferase activity and the de novo biosynthesis of sphinganine and sphingenine were investigated in vitro with rat liver microsomes and in vivo with intact Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The inhibition in vitro was rapid, irreversible, and concentration and time dependent and apparently involved the active site because inactivation only occurred with ..beta..-Cl-L-alanine and was blocked by L-serine. These are characteristics of mechanism-based (suicide) inhibition. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) was also inhibited when intact CHO cells were incubated with ..beta..-Cl-alanine and this treatment inhibited (/sup 14/C)serine incorporation into long-chain bases by intact cells. The concentration dependence of the loss of SPT activity and of long-chain base synthesis was identical. The effects of ..beta..-Cl-alanine appeared to occur with little perturbation of other cell functions: the cells exhibited no loss in cell viability, (/sup 14/C)serine uptake was not blocked, total lipid biosynthesis from (/sup 14/C)acetic acid was not decreased (nor was the appearance of radiolabel in cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine), and (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA was not affected. There appeared to be little effect on protein synthesis based on the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine, which was only decreased by 14%. Although ..beta..-Cl-L-alanine is known to inhibit other pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzymes, alanine and aspartate transaminases were not inhibited under these conditions. These results establish the close association between the activity of serine palmitoyltransferase and the cellular rate of long-chain base formation and indicate that ..beta..-Cl-alanine and other mechanism-based inhibitors might be useful to study alterations in cellular long-chain base synthesis.

  13. Elucidating the pH-Dependent Structural Transition of T7 Bacteriophage Endolysin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Kumar, Dinesh; Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2016-08-23

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth. Bacteriophage endolysins are unique peptidoglycan hydrolases and have huge potential as effective enzybiotics in various infectious models. T7 bacteriophage endolysin (T7L), also known as N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase or T7 lysozyme, is a 17 kDa protein that lyses a range of Gram-negative bacteria by hydrolyzing the amide bond between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and the l-alanine of the peptidoglycan layer. Although the activity profiles of several of the T7 family members have been known for many years, the molecular basis for their pH-dependent differential activity is not clear. In this study, we explored the pH-induced structural, stability, and activity characteristics of T7L by applying a variety of biophysical techniques and protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our studies established a reversible structural transition of T7L below pH 6 and the formation of a partially denatured conformation at pH 3. This low-pH conformation is thermally stable and exposed its hydrophobic pockets. Further, NMR relaxation measurements and structural analysis unraveled that T7L is highly dynamic in its native state and a network of His residues are responsible for the observed pH-dependent conformational dynamics and transitions. As bacteriophage chimeric and engineered endolysins are being developed as novel therapeutics against multiple drug resistance pathogens, we believe that our results are of great help in designing these entities as broadband antimicrobial and/or antibacterial agents. PMID:27513288

  14. Defining Multiple Characteristic Raman Bands of α-Amino Acids as Biomarkers for Planetary Missions Using a Statistical Method.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, S M; Patel, M R; Gilmour, I; Olsson-Francis, K; Ringrose, T J

    2016-06-01

    Biomarker molecules, such as amino acids, are key to discovering whether life exists elsewhere in the Solar System. Raman spectroscopy, a technique capable of detecting biomarkers, will be on board future planetary missions including the ExoMars rover. Generally, the position of the strongest band in the spectra of amino acids is reported as the identifying band. However, for an unknown sample, it is desirable to define multiple characteristic bands for molecules to avoid any ambiguous identification. To date, there has been no definition of multiple characteristic bands for amino acids of interest to astrobiology. This study examined L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-cysteine, L-glutamine and glycine and defined several Raman bands per molecule for reference as characteristic identifiers. Per amino acid, 240 spectra were recorded and compared using established statistical tests including ANOVA. The number of characteristic bands defined were 10, 12, 12, 14 and 19 for L-alanine (strongest intensity band: 832 cm(-1)), L-aspartic acid (938 cm(-1)), L-cysteine (679 cm(-1)), L-glutamine (1090 cm(-1)) and glycine (875 cm(-1)), respectively. The intensity of bands differed by up to six times when several points on the crystal sample were rotated through 360 °; to reduce this effect when defining characteristic bands for other molecules, we find that spectra should be recorded at a statistically significant number of points per sample to remove the effect of sample rotation. It is crucial that sets of characteristic Raman bands are defined for biomarkers that are targets for future planetary missions to ensure a positive identification can be made. PMID:26744263

  15. The Metabolic Responses to L-Glutamine of Livers from Rats with Diabetes Types 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Comar, Jurandir Fernando; de Oliveira, Denise Silva; Bracht, Livia; Kemmelmeier, Fumie Suzuki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-01-01

    There are several claims about the beneficial effects of supplementing L-glutamine to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of the present study was to provide detailed knowledge about the fate of this amino acid in the liver, the first organ that receives the compound when ingested orally. The study was done using the isolated perfused rat liver, an experimental system that preserves the microcirculation of the organ and that allows to measured several parameters during steady-state and pre steady-state conditions. L-Glutamine was infused in the portal vein (5 mM) and several parameters were monitored. Livers from type 1 diabetic rats showed an accelerated response to L-glutamine infusion. In consequence of this accelerated response livers from type 1 diabetic rats presented higher rates of ammonia, urea, glucose and lactate output during the first 25–30 minutes following L-glutamine infusion. As steady-state conditions approached, however, the difference between type 1 diabetes and control livers tended to disappear. Measurement of the glycogen content over a period of 100 minutes revealed that, excepting the initial phase of the L-glutamine infusion, the increased glucose output in livers from type 1 diabetic rats was mainly due to accelerated glycogenolysis. Livers from type 2 diabetic rats behaved similarly to control livers with no accelerated glucose output but with increased L-alanine production. L-Alanine is important for the pancreatic β-cells and from this point of view the oral intake of L-glutamine can be regarded as beneficial. Furthermore, the lack of increased glucose output in livers from type 2 diabetic rats is consistent with observations that even daily L-glutamine doses of 30 g do not increase the glycemic levels in well controlled type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:27490892

  16. Molecular sizes of amino acid transporters in the luminal membrane from the kidney cortex, estimated by the radiation-inactivation method.

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, R; Demeule, M; Jetté, M; Potier, M

    1990-01-01

    Renal brush-border membrane vesicles from rat kidney cortex were irradiated in frozen state with a gamma-radiation source. Initial rates of influx into these vesicles were estimated for substrates such as L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, L-proline and L-leucine to establish the molecular sizes of their carriers. Transport was measured in initial-rate conditions to avoid artifacts arising from a decrease in the driving force caused by a modification of membrane permeability. Initial rates of Na(+)-independent uptakes for those four substrates appeared unaffected in the dose range used (0-6 Mrad), indicating that the passive permeability of the membrane towards these substrates was unaffected. However, at higher doses of irradiation the Na+ influx and the intravesicular volume evaluated by the uptake of glucose at equilibrium were altered by radiation. Thus Na(+)-dependent influx values were corrected for volume changes, and the corrected values were used to compute radiation-inactivation sizes of the transport systems. Their respective values for L-glutamic acid, L-proline, L-leucine and L-alanine carriers were 250, 224, 293 and 274 kDa. The presence of the free-radicals scavenger benzoic acid in the frozen samples during irradiation did not affect the uptake of glucose, phosphate and alkaline phosphatase activity. These results indicate that freezing samples in a cryoprotective medium was enough to prevent secondary inactivation of transporters by free radicals. Uptakes of beta-alanine and L-lysine were much less affected by radiation. The radiation-inactivation size of the Na(+)-dependent beta-alanine carrier was 127 kDa and that of the L-lysine carrier was 90 kDa. PMID:1971509

  17. The Use of Germinants to Potentiate the Sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis Spores to Peracetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Ozgur; Buyuk, Fatih; Pottage, Tom; Crook, Ant; Hawkey, Suzanna; Cooper, Callum; Bennett, Allan; Sahin, Mitat; Baillie, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM) and inosine (5 mM) to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA) required to inactivate B. anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p = 0.0085) the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p = 0.0009). To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 104 spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed 1 h later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B. anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p < 0.0001) in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B. anthracis spores contaminated sites. PMID:26858699

  18. Chiral conducting surfaces via electrochemical oxidation of L-leucine-oligothiophenes.

    PubMed

    McTiernan, Christopher D; Omri, Karim; Chahma, M'hamed

    2010-09-17

    Polythiophenes bearing a specific chiral center such as L-leucine have been prepared via the electrochemical oxidation of a series of L-leucine functionalized oligothiophenes (monothiophenes and terthiophenes). These oligothiophenes have been prepared through the condensation of L-leucine methyl ester and the corresponding thiophene monomers in the presence of hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt) and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) followed by hydrolysis of the esters. The electroactive polymers are electrochemically stable and exhibit excellent adhesive properties on electrode surfaces (platinum, gold, and glassy carbon) as well as interesting optical properties in both doped and undoped states. Hydrogen bonds between a free amino acid (L-leucine, D-leucine, L-alanine, D-alanine, and D/L-alanine) and the L-leucine based polythiophenes (chiral conducting surface) were probed using cyclic voltammetry. Preliminary results show that the capacitive current of a modified L-leucine-polythiophene electrode decreases as a result of the formation of a hydrogen bond barrier on the surface of the chiral conducting surface accompanied with a shift of the oxidation potential. Cyclic voltammetry responses resulting from the interaction of the chiral conducting surface with L and Dfree amino acid isomers are similar. The formation of hydrogen bonds between the chiral conducting surfaces and the free amino acids was characterized by (1)H NMR. A chemical shift was observed for the N-H group in monomer 6 as a result of the hydrogen bond formation between the L-leucine methyl ester (D-leucine methyl ester, D/L-leucine methyl ester) and monomer 6. PMID:20718451

  19. Glycine restores the anabolic response to leucine in a mouse model of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ham, Daniel J; Caldow, Marissa K; Chhen, Victoria; Chee, Annabel; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G; Lynch, Gordon S; Koopman, René

    2016-06-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine, potently stimulate protein synthesis and reduce protein breakdown in healthy skeletal muscle and as a result have received considerable attention as potential treatments for muscle wasting. However, the normal anabolic response to amino acids is impaired during muscle-wasting conditions. Although the exact mechanisms of this anabolic resistance are unclear, inflammation and ROS are believed to play a central role. The nonessential amino acid glycine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and preserves muscle mass in calorie-restricted and tumor-bearing mice. We hypothesized that glycine would restore the normal muscle anabolic response to amino acids under inflammatory conditions. Relative rates of basal and leucine-stimulated protein synthesis were measured using SUnSET methodology 4 h after an injection of 1 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas leucine failed to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in LPS-treated mice pretreated with l-alanine (isonitrogenous control), leucine robustly stimulated protein synthesis (+51%) in mice pretreated with 1 g/kg glycine. The improvement in leucine-stimulated protein synthesis was accompanied by a higher phosphorylation status of mTOR, S6, and 4E-BP1 compared with l-alanine-treated controls. Despite its known anti-inflammatory action in inflammatory cells, glycine did not alter the skeletal muscle inflammatory response to LPS in vivo or in vitro but markedly reduced DHE staining intensity, a marker of oxidative stress, in muscle cross-sections and attenuated LPS-induced wasting in C2C12 myotubes. Our observations in male C57BL/6 mice suggest that glycine may represent a promising nutritional intervention for the attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting. PMID:27094036

  20. l-Cysteine enhances nutrient absorption via a cystathionine-β-synthase-derived H2 S pathway in rodent jejunum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ailin; Li, Jing; Liu, Tianjian; Liu, Zhuxi; Wei, Chuanfei; Xu, Xiaomeng; Li, Qin; Li, Jingxin

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2 S) is generated endogenously from l-cysteine (l-Cys) by the enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). In addition, l-Cys is commonly used as a precursor in the food and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of the present study is to determine whether l-Cys regulates intestinal nutrient transport. To that end, the presence of CBS and CSE in the jejunum epithelium was assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and the methylene blue assay. In addition, in vivo l-Cys (100 mg/kg, administered immediately after the glucose load) significantly increased blood glucose levels 30 min after the oral administration of glucose to mice. This effect of l-Cys was completely blocked by amino-oxyacetic acid (AOA; 50 mg/kg; administered at the same time as l-Cys) an inhibitor of CBS. Measurements of the short-circuit current (Isc ) in the rat jejunum epithelium revealed that l-Cys (1 mmol/L; 6 min before the administration of l-alanine) enhances Na(+) -coupled l-alanine or glucose transport, and that this effect is inhibited by AOA (1 mmol/L;10 min before the administration of l-Cys), but not d,l-propargylglycine (PAG;1 mmol/L; 10 min before the administration of l-Cys), a CSE inhibitor. Notably, l-Cys-evoked enhancement of nutrient transport was alleviated by glibenclamide (Gli;0.1 mmol/L; 10 min before the administration of l-Cys), a K(+) channel blocker. Together, the data indicate that l-Cys enhances jejunal nutrient transport, suggesting a new approach to future treatment of nutrition-related maladies, including a range of serious health consequences linked to undernutrition. PMID:26901099

  1. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) 14N spectra ( I = 1) via spy nuclei S = 1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T11IT11S and T21IT11S at the beginning of the evolution interval t1. The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t1 to ω1 may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S- S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected 14N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the 14N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of L-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for L-alanine the width of the 14N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide 14N in AAG peptide bonds.

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopic, mutagenic, and cytotoxicity studies of some mixed-ligand platinum(II) complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jain, N; Mital, R; Ray, K S; Srivastava, T S; Bhattacharya, R K

    1987-09-01

    Seven platinum(II) complexes of the type [Pt(bipy)(AA)]n+ (where n = 1 or 0 and AA is anion of L-valine, L-isoleucine, L-aspartic acid (dianion), L-glutamic acid (dianion), L-glutamine, L-proline, or S-methyl-L-cysteine) have been prepared and characterized. The modes of binding of amino acids in these complexes have been ascertained particularly by infrared and 1H NMR spectral studies. The L-glutamine complex shows a ID50 value (50% inhibitory dose) in the range of greater than 20 micrograms/ml to 100 micrograms/ml of the complex. However, the complexes of L-valine, L-isoleucine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-proline, and S-methyl-L-cysteine show ID50 values greater than 100 micrograms/ml of the complex. The above complexes also show inferior growth inhibition of P-388 cells than platinum(II) complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine with L-alanine, L-leucine, L-methionine, and L-aspargine as reported earlier. The platinum(II) complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine with glycine (Gly), L-alanine (Ala), L-leucine (leu), L-valine (Val), L-methionine (Met), L-phenylalanine (Phe), L-serine (Ser), L-tyrosine (Tyr) and L-tryptophan (Trp) have been tested for mutagenesis using TA 100 and TA 98 strains. They show nonmutagenicity. This is in contrast to the cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2] showing a base pair substitution mutagenesis. PMID:3320273

  3. Expression, purification, and characterization of alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Shi, Ya-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alanine racemase catalyzes the interconversion of D: - and L: -alanine and plays an important role in supplying D: -alanine, a component of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, to most bacteria. Alanine racemase exists mostly in prokaryotes and is generally absent in higher eukaryotes; this makes it an attractive target for the design of new antibacterial drugs. Here, we present the cloning and characterization of a new gene-encoding alanine racemase from Pseudomonas putida YZ-26. An open reading frame (ORF) of 1,230 bp, encoding a protein of 410 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 44,217.3 Da, was cloned into modified vector pET32M to form the recombinant plasmid pET-alr. After introduction into E.coli BL21, the strain pET-alr/E.coli BL21 expressed His(6)-tagged alanine racemase. The recombinant alanine racemase was efficiently purified to homogeneity using Ni(2+)-NTA and a gel filtration column, with 82.5% activity recovery. The amino acid sequence deduced from the alanine racemase gene revealed identity similarities of 97.0, 93, 23, and 22.0% with from P. putida F1, P. putida200, P. aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. The recombinant alanine racemase is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity with L: -alanine and L: -isoleucine, and showed higher specificity for the former compared with the latter. The enzyme was stable from pH 7.0-11.0; its optimum pH was at 9.0. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 37°C, and its activity was rapidly lost at temperatures above 40°C. Divalent metals, including Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) obviously enhanced enzymatic activity, while the Cu(2+) ion showed inhibitory effects. PMID:22806802

  4. Identification and functional characterization of a novel low affinity aromatic-preferring amino acid transporter (arpAT). One of the few proteins silenced during primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Esperanza; Torrents, David; Zorzano, Antonio; Palacín, Manuel; Chillarón, Josep

    2005-05-13

    We have identified in silico arpAT, a gene encoding a new member of the LSHAT family, and cloned it from kidney. Co-expression of arpAT with the heavy subunits rBAT or 4F2hc elicited a sodium-independent alanine transport activity in HeLa cells. L-tyrosine, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), L-glutamine, L-serine, L-cystine, and L-arginine were also transported. Kinetic and cis-inhibition studies showed a K(m) = 1.59 +/- 0.24 mM for L-alanine or IC50 in the millimolar range for most amino acids, except L-proline, glycine, anionic and D-amino acids, which were not inhibitory. L-DOPA and L-tyrosine were the most effective competitive inhibitors of L-alanine transport, with IC50 values of 272.2 +/- 57.1 and 716.3 +/- 112.4 microM, respectively. In the small intestine, arpAT mRNA was located at the enterocytes, in a decreasing gradient from the crypts to the tip of the villi. It was also expressed in neurons from different brain areas. Finally, we show that while the arpAT gene is conserved in rat, dog, and chicken, it has become silenced in humans and chimpanzee. Actually, it has been recently reported that it is one of the 33 recently inactivated genes in the human lineage. The evolutionary implications of the silencing process and the roles of arpAT in transport of L-DOPA in the brain and in aromatic amino acid absorption are discussed. PMID:15757906

  5. Defining Multiple Characteristic Raman Bands of α-Amino Acids as Biomarkers for Planetary Missions Using a Statistical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, S. M.; Patel, M. R.; Gilmour, I.; Olsson-Francis, K.; Ringrose, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Biomarker molecules, such as amino acids, are key to discovering whether life exists elsewhere in the Solar System. Raman spectroscopy, a technique capable of detecting biomarkers, will be on board future planetary missions including the ExoMars rover. Generally, the position of the strongest band in the spectra of amino acids is reported as the identifying band. However, for an unknown sample, it is desirable to define multiple characteristic bands for molecules to avoid any ambiguous identification. To date, there has been no definition of multiple characteristic bands for amino acids of interest to astrobiology. This study examined l-alanine, l-aspartic acid, l-cysteine, l-glutamine and glycine and defined several Raman bands per molecule for reference as characteristic identifiers. Per amino acid, 240 spectra were recorded and compared using established statistical tests including ANOVA. The number of characteristic bands defined were 10, 12, 12, 14 and 19 for l-alanine (strongest intensity band: 832 cm-1), l-aspartic acid (938 cm-1), l-cysteine (679 cm-1), l-glutamine (1090 cm-1) and glycine (875 cm-1), respectively. The intensity of bands differed by up to six times when several points on the crystal sample were rotated through 360 °; to reduce this effect when defining characteristic bands for other molecules, we find that spectra should be recorded at a statistically significant number of points per sample to remove the effect of sample rotation. It is crucial that sets of characteristic Raman bands are defined for biomarkers that are targets for future planetary missions to ensure a positive identification can be made.

  6. L-Serine Deficiency Elicits Intracellular Accumulation of Cytotoxic Deoxysphingolipids and Lipid Body Formation.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Kayoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Sonoda, Chiaki; Akagi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-06-01

    L-serine is required to synthesize membrane lipids such as phosphatidylserine and sphingolipids. Nevertheless, it remains largely unknown how a diminished capacity to synthesize L-serine affects lipid homeostasis in cells and tissues. Here, we show that deprivation of external L-serine leads to the generation of 1-deoxysphingolipids (doxSLs), including 1-deoxysphinganine, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (KO-MEFs) lacking D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of L-serine. A novel mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach demonstrated that 1-deoxydihydroceramide was the most abundant species of doxSLs accumulated in L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs. Among normal sphingolipid species in KO-MEFs, levels of sphinganine, dihydroceramide, ceramide, and hexosylceramide were significantly reduced after deprivation of external L-serine, whereas those of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were retained. The synthesis of doxSLs was suppressed by supplementing the culture medium with L-serine but was potentiated by increasing the ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in the medium. Unlike with L-serine, depriving cells of external L-leucine did not promote the occurrence of doxSLs. Consistent with results obtained from KO-MEFs, brain-specific deletion of Phgdh in mice also resulted in accumulation of doxSLs in the brain. Furthermore, L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs exhibited increased formation of cytosolic lipid bodies containing doxSLs and other sphingolipids. These in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that doxSLs are generated in the presence of a high ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in cells and tissues lacking Phgdh, and de novo synthesis of L-serine is necessary to maintain normal sphingolipid homeostasis when the external supply of this amino acid is limited. PMID:25903138

  7. Active-site Arg --> Lys substitutions alter reaction and substrate specificity of aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Vacca, R A; Giannattasio, S; Graber, R; Sandmeier, E; Marra, E; Christen, P

    1997-08-29

    Arg386 and Arg292 of aspartate aminotransferase bind the alpha and the distal carboxylate group, respectively, of dicarboxylic substrates. Their substitution with lysine residues markedly decreased aminotransferase activity. The kcat values with L-aspartate and 2-oxoglutarate as substrates under steady-state conditions at 25 degrees C were 0.5, 2.0, and 0.03 s-1 for the R292K, R386K, and R292K/R386K mutations, respectively, kcat of the wild-type enzyme being 220 s-1. Longer dicarboxylic substrates did not compensate for the shorter side chain of the lysine residues. Consistent with the different roles of Arg292 and Arg386 in substrate binding, the effects of their substitution on the activity toward long chain monocarboxylic (norleucine/2-oxocaproic acid) and aromatic substrates diverged. Whereas the R292K mutation did not impair the aminotransferase activity toward these substrates, the effect of the R386K substitution was similar to that on the activity toward dicarboxylic substrates. All three mutant enzymes catalyzed as side reactions the beta-decarboxylation of L-aspartate and the racemization of amino acids at faster rates than the wild-type enzyme. The changes in reaction specificity were most pronounced in aspartate aminotransferase R292K, which decarboxylated L-aspartate to L-alanine 15 times faster (kcat = 0.002 s-1) than the wild-type enzyme. The rates of racemization of L-aspartate, L-glutamate, and L-alanine were 3, 5, and 2 times, respectively, faster than with the wild-type enzyme. Thus, Arg --> Lys substitutions in the active site of aspartate aminotransferase decrease aminotransferase activity but increase other pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent catalytic activities. Apparently, the reaction specificity of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes is not only achieved by accelerating the specific reaction but also by preventing potential side reactions of the coenzyme substrate adduct. PMID:9268327

  8. The Use of Germinants to Potentiate the Sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis Spores to Peracetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Ozgur; Buyuk, Fatih; Pottage, Tom; Crook, Ant; Hawkey, Suzanna; Cooper, Callum; Bennett, Allan; Sahin, Mitat; Baillie, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM) and inosine (5 mM) to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA) required to inactivate B. anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p = 0.0085) the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p = 0.0009). To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 10(4) spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed 1 h later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B. anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p < 0.0001) in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B. anthracis spores contaminated sites. PMID:26858699

  9. A multinuclear NMR relaxation study of the interaction of divalent metal ions with L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Khazaeli, S; Viola, R E

    1984-09-01

    Carbon-13 spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, have been measured for aqueous solutions of L-aspartic acid, L-alanine, O-phospho-L-serine, and 2-mercapto-L-succinic acid in the presence of the paramagnetic metal ions, Cu2+ and Mn2+, and Mg2+ as a diamagnetic control, at ambient temperature and neutral pH. Nitrogen-15, oxygen-17 and proton relaxation times were also obtained for L-aspartic acid and phosphorus-31 relaxation times for O-phospho-L-serine under similar conditions. The structures of these complexes in solution were determined from the various metal ion-nuclei distances calculated from the paramagnetically-induced relaxation. These results indicate that the Cu2+ interaction with L-aspartic acid is through alpha-amino and beta-carboxyl groups while Mn2+ coordinates most strongly through alpha- and beta-carboxyl groups, with the possibility of a weak interaction through the amino group. An examination of the coordination of these divalent metal ions to an analog of L-aspartic acid in which the beta-carboxyl group is replaced by a phosphate group (O-phospho-L-serine) indicated that Cu2+ coordination is now probably through the alpha-amino and phosphate groups, while this analog is a monodentate ligand for Mn2+ coordinating through the phosphate group. Removal of the beta-carboxyl group (L-alanine) also results in Cu2+ coordination through the alpha-carboxyl and alpha-amino groups, and the same ligand interactions are observed with Mn2+. Replacement of the alpha-amino group of L-aspartic acid with an -SH group (2-mercapto-L-succinate) is sufficient to eliminate any specific coordination with either Cu2+ or Mn2+. PMID:6491655

  10. The Metabolic Responses to L-Glutamine of Livers from Rats with Diabetes Types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Comar, Jurandir Fernando; de Oliveira, Denise Silva; Bracht, Livia; Kemmelmeier, Fumie Suzuki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-01-01

    There are several claims about the beneficial effects of supplementing L-glutamine to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of the present study was to provide detailed knowledge about the fate of this amino acid in the liver, the first organ that receives the compound when ingested orally. The study was done using the isolated perfused rat liver, an experimental system that preserves the microcirculation of the organ and that allows to measured several parameters during steady-state and pre steady-state conditions. L-Glutamine was infused in the portal vein (5 mM) and several parameters were monitored. Livers from type 1 diabetic rats showed an accelerated response to L-glutamine infusion. In consequence of this accelerated response livers from type 1 diabetic rats presented higher rates of ammonia, urea, glucose and lactate output during the first 25-30 minutes following L-glutamine infusion. As steady-state conditions approached, however, the difference between type 1 diabetes and control livers tended to disappear. Measurement of the glycogen content over a period of 100 minutes revealed that, excepting the initial phase of the L-glutamine infusion, the increased glucose output in livers from type 1 diabetic rats was mainly due to accelerated glycogenolysis. Livers from type 2 diabetic rats behaved similarly to control livers with no accelerated glucose output but with increased L-alanine production. L-Alanine is important for the pancreatic β-cells and from this point of view the oral intake of L-glutamine can be regarded as beneficial. Furthermore, the lack of increased glucose output in livers from type 2 diabetic rats is consistent with observations that even daily L-glutamine doses of 30 g do not increase the glycemic levels in well controlled type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:27490892

  11. Identification of oxidized protein hydrolase of human erythrocytes as acylpeptide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Fujino, T; Watanabe, K; Beppu, M; Kikugawa, K; Yasuda, H

    2000-03-16

    Partial amino acid sequence of 80 kDa oxidized protein hydrolase (OPH), a serine protease present in human erythrocyte cytosol (Fujino et al., J. Biochem. 124 (1998) 1077-1085) that is adherent to oxidized erythrocyte membranes and preferentially degrades oxidatively damaged proteins (Beppu et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1196 (1994) 81-87; Fujino et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1374 (1998) 47-55) was determined. The N-terminal amino acid of diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP)-labeled OPH was suggested to be masked. Six peptide fragments of OPH obtained by digestion of DFP-labeled OPH with lysyl endopeptidase were isolated by use of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and the sequence of more than eight amino acids from the N-terminal position of each peptide was determined. Results of homology search of amino acid sequence of each peptide strongly suggested that the protein was identical with human liver acylpeptide hydrolase (ACPH). OPH showed ACPH activity when N-acetyl-L-alanine p-nitroanilide and N-acetylmethionyl L-alanine were used as substrates. Glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged recombinant ACPH (rACPH) was prepared by use of baculovirus expression system as a 107-kDa protein from cDNA of human erythroleukemic cell line K-562. rACPH reacted with anti-OPH antiserum from rabbit. rACPH showed OPH activity when hydrogen peroxide-oxidized or glycated bovine serum albumin was used as substrates. As well as the enzyme activities of OPH, those of rACPH were inhibited by DFP. The results clearly demonstrate that ACPH, whose physiological function has not yet been well characterized, can play an important role as OPH in destroying oxidatively damaged proteins in living cells. PMID:10719179

  12. ArcD1 and ArcD2 Arginine/Ornithine Exchangers Encoded in the Arginine Deiminase Pathway Gene Cluster of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Noens, Elke E. E.; Kaczmarek, Michał B.; Żygo, Monika

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway gene cluster in Lactococcus lactis contains two copies of a gene encoding an l-arginine/l-ornithine exchanger, the arcD1 and arcD2 genes. The physiological function of ArcD1 and ArcD2 was studied by deleting the two genes. Deletion of arcD1 resulted in loss of the growth advantage observed in the presence of high l-arginine in different growth media. Uptake of l-arginine and l-ornithine by resting cells was reduced to the low level observed for an ArcD1/ArcD2 double deletion mutant. Deletion of the arcD2 gene did not affect the growth enhancement, and uptake activities were slightly reduced. Nevertheless, recombinant expression of ArcD2 in the ArcD1/ArcD2 double mutant did recover the growth advantage. Kinetic characterization of ArcD1 and ArcD2 showed high affinities for both l-arginine and l-ornithine (Km in the micromolar range). A difference between the two transporters was the significantly lower affinity of ArcD2 for the cationic amino acids l-ornithine, l-lysine, and l-histidine. In contrast, the affinity of ArcD2 was higher for the neutral amino acid l-alanine. Moreover, ArcD2 efficiently translocated l-alanine, while ArcD1 did not. Both transporters revealed affinities in the mM range for agmatine, cadaverine, histamine, and putrescine. These amines bind but are not translocated. It is concluded that ArcD1 is the main l-arginine/l-ornithine exchanger in the ADI pathway and that ArcD2 is not functionally expressed in the media used. ArcD2 is proposed to function together with the arcT gene that encodes a putative transaminase and is found adjacent to the arcD2 gene. IMPORTANCE The arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway gene cluster in Lactococcus lactis contains two copies of a gene encoding an l-arginine/l-ornithine exchanger, the arcD1 and arcD2 genes. The physiological function of ArcD1 and ArcD2 was studied by deleting the two genes. It is concluded that ArcD1 is the main l-arginine/l-ornithine exchanger in the

  13. Germination of Individual Bacillus subtilis Spores with Alterations in the GerD and SpoVA Proteins, Which Are Important in Spore Germination▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiwen; Yi, Xuan; Li, Yong-qing; Setlow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Release of Ca2+ with dipicolinic acid (CaDPA) was monitored by Raman spectroscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy during germination of individual spores of Bacillus subtilis strains with alterations in GerD and SpoVA proteins. Notable conclusions about germination after the addition of nutrient were as follows. (i) Following l-alanine addition, wild-type and gerD spores and spores with elevated SpoVA protein levels (↑SpoVA spores) slowly released ∼10% of their CaDPA during a variable (6- to 55-min) period ending at Tlag, the time when faster CaDPA release began. (ii) Tlag times were lower for ↑SpoVA spores than for wild-type spores and were higher for gerD spores. (iii) The long Tlag times of gerD spores were partially due to slow commitment to germinate. (iv) The intervals between the commitment to germinate and CaDPA release were similar for wild-type and ↑SpoVA spores but longer for gerD spores. (v) The times for rapid CaDPA release, ΔTrelease = Trelease − Tlag (with Trelease being the time at which CaDPA release was complete), were similar for wild-type, gerD, and ↑SpoVA spores. (vi) Spores with either one of two point mutations in the spoVA operon (spoVA1 and spoVA2 spores) exhibited a more rapid rate of CaDPA release beginning immediately after l-alanine addition leading to ∼65% CaDPA release prior to Tlag. (vii) Tlag times for spoVA1 and spoVA2 spores were longer than for wild-type spores. (viii) The intervals between spoVA1 and spoVA2 spores' commitment and CaDPA release were similar to those for wild-type spores, but commitment occurred later. In contrast to germination after the addition of nutrient, Tlag and ΔTrelease times were relatively similar during dodecylamine germination of spores of the five strains. These findings suggest the following. (i) GerD plays no role in CaDPA release during spore germination. (ii) SpoVA proteins are involved in CaDPA release during germination with nutrients, and probably with

  14. Effects of supplementation with free glutamine and the dipeptide alanyl-glutamine on parameters of muscle damage and inflammation in rats submitted to prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Tirapegui, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the supplementation with the dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine (DIP) and a solution containing L-glutamine and L-alanine on plasma levels markers of muscle damage and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and glutamine metabolism in rats submitted to prolonged exercise. Rats were submitted to sessions of swim training for 6 weeks. Twenty-one days prior to euthanasia, the animals were supplemented with DIP (n = 8) (1.5 g.kg(-1)), a solution of free L-glutamine (1 g.kg(-1)) and free L-alanine (0.61 g.kg(-1)) (G&A, n = 8) or water (control (CON), n = 8). Animals were killed at rest before (R), after prolonged exercise (PE-2 h of exercise). Plasma concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and activity of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and muscle concentrations of glutamine and glutamate were measured. The concentrations of plasma TNF-alpha, PGE2 and the activity of CK were lower in the G&A-R and DIP-R groups, compared to the CON-R. Glutamine in plasma (p < 0.04) and soleus muscle (p < 0.001) was higher in the DIP-R and G&A-R groups relative to the CON-R group. G&A-PE and DIP-PE groups exhibited lower concentrations of plasma PGE2 (p < 0.05) and TNF-alpha (p < 0.05), and higher concentrations of glutamine and glutamate in soleus (p < 0.001) and gastrocnemius muscles (p < 0.05) relative to the CON-PE group. We concluded that supplementation with free L-glutamine and the dipeptide LL-alanyl-LL-glutamine represents an effective source of glutamine, which may attenuate inflammation biomarkers after periods of training and plasma levels of CK and the inflammatory response induced by prolonged exercise. PMID:19885855

  15. Synthesis and characterization of responsive nanoporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelow, Alexis Elizabeth

    This thesis describes the synthesis and properties of polymer or oligonucleotide-modified nanoporous membranes and nanopores which exhibit a response to external stimuli, synthesized with the intention of mimicking biological protein channels. The responsiveness of these systems arises as a function of the polymer or oligonucleotide modifier, which exhibit a change in conformation with exposure to temperature, pH, introduction of a small molecule, or electric potential. First, the transport of ions through supported silica colloidal films modified with poly(L-alanine) on platinum electrodes was studied using cyclic voltammetry. By monitoring the flux of a redox species through the polymer-modified colloidal film it is demonstrated that the polymer expands and contracts when the temperature was increased and decreased, respectively. We also observed an expansion and contraction as the pH was increased and decreased, respectively. Transport of a neutral dye molecule through free-standing silica colloidal films modified with poly(L-alanine) was also studied. As noted previously, the polymer expands and contracts as the pH is increased and decreased, respectively. Next, the transport was monitored through both silica colloidal film-modified Pt microelectrodes and Pt single nanopore electrodes as an oligonucleotide-based binder, or aptamer, was attached. The aptamer is responsive to a small molecule, cocaine where, in the absence of cocaine, only one "arm" of the aptamer is folded in on itself, leaving the rest of the chain partially unfolded, blocking the nanopores. However, when the cocaine molecule is introduced into solution, the aptamer folds completely in on itself, forming a three-armed structure with the small molecule encapsulated in the middle. This change in conformation is monitored by observing the change in transport of a redox species through the pores as cocaine is introduced into the system. We observed an increase rate of transport as the aptamer bound

  16. Injectable Hydrogel: Amplifying the pH Sensitivity of a Triblock Copolypeptide by Conjugating the N-Termini via Dynamic Covalent Bonding.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Maria-Teodora; Liontos, George; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Voulgari, Efstathia; Avgoustakis, Konstantinos; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos

    2016-07-13

    We explore the self-assembly behavior of aqueous solutions of an amphiphilic, pH-sensitive poly(l-alanine)-b-poly(l-glutamic acid)-b-poly(l-alanine), (A5E11A5) triblock copolypeptide, end-capped by benzaldehyde through Schiff base reaction. At elevated concentrations and under physiological pH (7.4) and ionic strength (0.15M), the bare copolypeptide aqueous solutions underwent a sol-gel transition after heating and slow cooling thermal treatment, forming opaque stiff gels due to a hierarchical self-assembly that led to the formation of β-sheet-based twisted super fibers (Popescu et al. Soft Matter 2015, 11, 331-342). The conjugation of the N-termini with benzaldehyde (Bz) through a Schiff base reaction amplifies the copolypeptide pH-sensitivity within a narrow pH window relevant for in vivo applications. Specifically, the dynamic character of the imine bond allowed coupling/decoupling of the Bz upon switching pH. The presence of Bz conjugates to the N-termini of the copolypeptide resulted in enhanced packing of the elementary superfibers into thick and short piles, which inhibited the ability of the system for gelation. However, partial cleavage of Bz upon lowering pH to 6.5 prompted recovery of the hydrogel. The sol-gel transition triggered by pH was reversible, due to the coupling/decoupling of the benzoic-imine dynamic covalent bonding, endowing thus the gelling system with injectability. Undesirably, the gelation temperature window was significantly reduced, which however can be regulated at physiological temperatures by using a suitable mixture of the bare and the Bz-conjugated coplypeptide. This triblock copolypeptide gelator was investigated as a scaffold for the encapsulation of polymersome nanocarriers, loaded with a hydrophilic model drug, calcein. The polymersome/polypeptide complex system showed prolonged probe release in pH 6.5, which is relevant to extracellular tumor environment, rendering the system potentially useful for sustained delivery of

  17. Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Phillips, Jana Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in

  18. The Hypothesis that the Genetic Code Originated in Coupled Synthesis of Proteins and the Evolutionary Predecessors of Nucleic Acids in Primitive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Although analysis of the genetic code has allowed explanations for its evolution to be proposed, little evidence exists in biochemistry and molecular biology to offer an explanation for the origin of the genetic code. In particular, two features of biology make the origin of the genetic code difficult to understand. First, nucleic acids are highly complicated polymers requiring numerous enzymes for biosynthesis. Secondly, proteins have a simple backbone with a set of 20 different amino acid side chains synthesized by a highly complicated ribosomal process in which mRNA sequences are read in triplets. Apparently, both nucleic acid and protein syntheses have extensive evolutionary histories. Supporting these processes is a complex metabolism and at the hub of metabolism are the carboxylic acid cycles. This paper advances the hypothesis that the earliest predecessor of the nucleic acids was a β-linked polyester made from malic acid, a highly conserved metabolite in the carboxylic acid cycles. In the β-linked polyester, the side chains are carboxylic acid groups capable of forming interstrand double hydrogen bonds. Evolution of the nucleic acids involved changes to the backbone and side chain of poly(β-d-malic acid). Conversion of the side chain carboxylic acid into a carboxamide or a longer side chain bearing a carboxamide group, allowed information polymers to form amide pairs between polyester chains. Aminoacylation of the hydroxyl groups of malic acid and its derivatives with simple amino acids such as glycine and alanine allowed coupling of polyester synthesis and protein synthesis. Use of polypeptides containing glycine and l-alanine for activation of two different monomers with either glycine or l-alanine allowed simple coded autocatalytic synthesis of polyesters and polypeptides and established the first genetic code. A primitive cell capable of supporting electron transport, thioester synthesis, reduction reactions, and synthesis of polyesters and

  19. L-leucine transport in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231): kinetics, regulation by estrogen and molecular identity of the transporter.

    PubMed

    Shennan, D B; Thomson, J; Gow, I F; Travers, M T; Barber, M C

    2004-08-30

    The transport of L-leucine by two human breast cancer cell lines has been examined. L-leucine uptake by MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells was via a BCH-sensitive, Na+ -independent pathway. L-leucine uptake by both cell lines was inhibited by L-alanine, D-leucine and to a lesser extent by L-lysine but not by L-proline. Estrogen (17beta-estradiol) stimulated L-leucine uptake by MCF-7 but not by MDA-MB-231 cells. L-leucine efflux from MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells was trans-stimulated by BCH in a dose-dependent fashion. The effect of external BCH on L-leucine efflux from both cell types was almost abolished by reducing the temperature from 37 to 4 degrees C. There was, however, a significant efflux of L-leucine under zero-trans conditions which was also temperature-sensitive. L-glutamine, L-leucine, D-leucine, L-alanine, AIB and L-lysine all trans-stimulated L-leucine release from MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. In contrast, D-alanine and L-proline had little or no effect. The anti-cancer agent melphalan inhibited L-leucine uptake by MDA-MB-231 cells but had no effect on L-leucine efflux. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that LAT1 mRNA was approximately 200 times more abundant than LAT2 mRNA in MCF-7 cells and confirmed that MDA-MB-231 cells express LAT1 but not LAT2 mRNA. LAT1 mRNA levels were higher in MCF-7 cells than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, LAT1 mRNA was more abundant than CD98hc mRNA in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. The results suggest that system L is the major transporter for L-leucine in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. It is possible that LAT1 may be the major molecular correlate of system L in both cell types. However, not all of the properties of system L reflected those of LAT1/LAT2/CD98hc. PMID:15328053

  20. Structural analysis of Bacillus subtilis 168 endospore peptidoglycan and its role during differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Atrih, A; Zöllner, P; Allmaier, G; Foster, S J

    1996-01-01

    The structure of the endospore cell wall peptidoglycan of Bacillus subtilis has been examined. Spore peptidoglycan was produced by the development of a method based on chemical permeabilization of the spore coats and enzymatic hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan. The resulting muropeptides which were >97% pure were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, amino acid analysis, and mass spectrometry. This revealed that 49% of the muramic acid residues in the glycan backbone were present in the delta-lactam form which occurred predominantly every second muramic acid. The glycosidic bonds adjacent to the muramic acid delta-lactam residues were resistant to the action of muramidases. Of the muramic acid residues, 25.7 and 23.3% were substituted with a tetrapeptide and a single L-alanine, respectively. Only 2% of the muramic acids had tripeptide side chains and may constitute the primordial cell wall, the remainder of the peptidoglycan being spore cortex. The spore peptidoglycan is very loosely cross-linked at only 2.9% of the muramic acid residues, a figure approximately 11-fold less than that of the vegetative cell wall. The peptidoglycan from strain AA110 (dacB) had fivefold-greater cross-linking (14.4%) than the wild type and an altered ratio of muramic acid substituents having 37.0, 46.3, and 12.3% delta-lactam, tetrapeptide, and single L-alanine, respectively. This suggests a role for the DacB protein (penicillin-binding protein 5*) in cortex biosynthesis. The sporulation-specific putative peptidoglycan hydrolase CwlD plays a pivotal role in the establishment of the mature spore cortex structure since strain AA107 (cwlD) has spore peptidoglycan which is completely devoid of muramic acid delta-lactam residues. Despite this drastic change in peptidoglycan structure, the spores are still stable but are unable to germinate. The role of delta-lactam and other spore peptidoglycan structural features in the maintenance of dormancy, heat resistance

  1. Mode of Action of Glycine on the Biosynthesis of Peptidoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Kandler, O.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of glycine action in growth inhibition was studied on eight different species of bacteria of various genera representing the four most common peptidoglycan types. To inhibit the growth of the different organisms to 80%, glycine concentrations from 0.05 to 1.33 M had to be applied. The inhibited cells showed morphological aberrations. It has been demonstrated that glycine is incorporated into the nucleotide-activated peptidoglycan precursors. The amount of incorporated glycine was equivalent to the decrease in the amount of alanine. With one exception glycine is also incorporated into the peptidoglycan. Studies on the primary structure of both the peptidoglycan precursors and the corresponding peptidoglycan have revealed that glycine can replace l-alanine in position 1 and d-alanine residues in positions 4 and 5 of the peptide subunit. Replacement of l-alanine in position 1 of the peptide subunit together with an accumulation of uridine diphosphate-muramic acid (UDP-MurNAc), indicating an inhibition of the UDP-MurNAc:l-Ala ligase, has been found in three bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and L. plantarum). However, discrimination against precursors with glycine in position 1 in peptidoglycan synthesis has been observed only in S. aureus. Replacement of d-alanine residues was most common. It occurred in the peptidoglycan with one exception in all strains studied. In Corynebacterium sp., C. callunae, L. plantarum, and L. cellobiosus most of the d-alanine replacing glycine occurs C-terminal in position 4, and in C. insidiosum and S. aureus glycine is found C-terminal in position 5. It is suggested that the modified peptidoglycan precursors are accumulated by being poor substrates for some of the enzymes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Two mechanisms leading to a more loosely cross-linked peptidoglycan and to morphological changes of the cells are considered. First, the accumulation of glycine-containing precursors may lead to

  2. The Hypothesis that the Genetic Code Originated in Coupled Synthesis of Proteins and the Evolutionary Predecessors of Nucleic Acids in Primitive Cells.

    PubMed

    Francis, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Although analysis of the genetic code has allowed explanations for its evolution to be proposed, little evidence exists in biochemistry and molecular biology to offer an explanation for the origin of the genetic code. In particular, two features of biology make the origin of the genetic code difficult to understand. First, nucleic acids are highly complicated polymers requiring numerous enzymes for biosynthesis. Secondly, proteins have a simple backbone with a set of 20 different amino acid side chains synthesized by a highly complicated ribosomal process in which mRNA sequences are read in triplets. Apparently, both nucleic acid and protein syntheses have extensive evolutionary histories. Supporting these processes is a complex metabolism and at the hub of metabolism are the carboxylic acid cycles. This paper advances the hypothesis that the earliest predecessor of the nucleic acids was a β-linked polyester made from malic acid, a highly conserved metabolite in the carboxylic acid cycles. In the β-linked polyester, the side chains are carboxylic acid groups capable of forming interstrand double hydrogen bonds. Evolution of the nucleic acids involved changes to the backbone and side chain of poly(β-d-malic acid). Conversion of the side chain carboxylic acid into a carboxamide or a longer side chain bearing a carboxamide group, allowed information polymers to form amide pairs between polyester chains. Aminoacylation of the hydroxyl groups of malic acid and its derivatives with simple amino acids such as glycine and alanine allowed coupling of polyester synthesis and protein synthesis. Use of polypeptides containing glycine and l-alanine for activation of two different monomers with either glycine or l-alanine allowed simple coded autocatalytic synthesis of polyesters and polypeptides and established the first genetic code. A primitive cell capable of supporting electron transport, thioester synthesis, reduction reactions, and synthesis of polyesters and

  3. Substitution of apolar residues in the active site of aspartate aminotransferase by histidine. Effects on reaction and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Vacca, R A; Christen, P; Malashkevich, V N; Jansonius, J N; Sandmeier, E

    1995-01-15

    In an attempt to change the reaction and substrate specificity of aspartate aminotransferase, several apolar active-site residues were substituted in turn with a histidine residue. Aspartate aminotransferase W140H (of Escherichia coli) racemizes alanine seven times faster (Kcat' = 2.2 x 10(-4) s-1) than the wild-type enzyme, while the aminotransferase activity toward L-alanine was sixfold decreased. X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the structural changes brought about by the mutation are limited to the immediate environment of H140. In contrast to the tryptophan side chain in the wild-type structure, the imidazole ring of H140 does not form a stacking interaction with the coenzyme pyridine ring. The angle between the two ring planes is about 50 degrees. Pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate dissociates 50 times more rapidly from the W140H mutant than from the wild-type enzyme. A model of the structure of the quinonoid enzyme substrate intermediate indicates that H140 might assist in the reprotonation of C alpha of the amino acid substrate from the re side of the deprotonated coenzyme-substrate adduct in competition with si-side reprotonation by K258. In aspartate aminotransferase I17H (of chicken mitochondria), the substituted residue also lies on the re side of the coenzyme. This mutant enzyme slowly decarboxylates L-aspartate to L-alanine (Kcat' = 8 x 10(-5) s-1). No beta-decarboxylase activity is detectable in the wild-type enzyme. In aspartate aminotransferase V37H (of chicken mitochondria), the mutated residue lies besides the coenzyme in the plane of the pyridine ring; no change in reaction specificity was observed. All three mutations, i.e. W140-->H, I17-->H and V37--H, decreased the aminotransferase activity toward aromatic amino acids by 10-100-fold, while decreasing the activity toward dicarboxylic substrates only moderately to 20%, 20% and 60% of the activity of the wild-type enzymes, respectively. In all three mutant enzymes, the decrease in aspartate

  4. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, Kent R. Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  5. A Case of Primary Hypoparathyroidism Presenting with Acute Kidney Injury Secondary to Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Zeki; Gursu, Meltem; Uzun, Sami; Karadag, Serhat; Cebeci, Egemen; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is the most common cause of symmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. Herein, a case of primary hypoparathyroidism with severe tetany, rhabdomyolysis, and acute kidney injury is presented. A 26-year-old male was admitted to the emergency clinic with leg pain and cramps, nausea, vomiting, and decreased amount of urine. He had been treated for epilepsy for the last 10 years. He was admitted to the emergency department for leg pain, cramping in the hands and legs, and agitation multiple times within the last six months. He was prescribed antidepressant and antipsychotic medications. He had a blood pressure of 150/90 mmHg, diffuse abdominal tenderness, and abdominal muscle rigidity on physical examination. Pathological laboratory findings were as follows: creatinine, 7.5 mg/dL, calcium, 3.7 mg/dL, alanine transaminase, 4349 U/L, aspartate transaminase, 5237 U/L, creatine phosphokinase, 262.000 U/L, and parathyroid hormone, 0 pg/mL. There were bilateral symmetrical calcifications in basal ganglia and the cerebellum on computerized tomography. He was diagnosed as primary hypoparathyroidism and acute kidney injury secondary to severe rhabdomyolysis. Brain calcifications, although rare, should be considered in dealing with patients with neurological symptoms, symmetrical cranial calcifications, and calcium metabolism abnormalities. PMID:27034860

  6. Amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex innervating the maxillary barbel in the Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Caprio, John; Shimohara, Mami; Marui, Takayuki; Kohbara, Jun; Harada, Shuitsu; Kiyohara, Sadao

    2015-12-01

    The Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus, possesses taste and solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) located on the external body surface that detect specific water-soluble substances. Here, we identify two major fiber types of the facial/trigeminal complex that transmit amino acid information to the medulla. Both single and few fiber preparations respond to amino acid stimulation in the 0.1 μM to mM range. One fiber type responds best to glycine and l-alanine (i.e. Gly/Ala fibers) whereas the other fiber type is best stimulated by l-proline and glycine betaine (hereafter referred to only as betaine) (i.e. Pro/Bet fibers). We demonstrate that betaine, which does not alter the pH of the seawater and therefore does not activate the animals' highly sensitive pH sensors (Caprio et al., Science 344:1154-1156, 2014), is sufficient to elicit appetitive food search behavior. We further show that the amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex in P. japonicus is different from that in Ariopsis felis (Michel and Caprio, J. Neurophysiol. 66:247-260, 1991; Michel et al., J. Comp. Physiol. A. 172:129-138, 1993), a representative member of the only other family (Ariidae) of extant marine catfishes. PMID:26459116

  7. Enantiomeric pair of copper(II) polypyridyl-alanine complexes: Effect of chirality on their interaction with biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chew Hee; Chan, Cheang Wei; Lai, Jing Wei; Ooi, Ing Hong; Chong, Kok Vei; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Seng, Hoi Ling

    2016-07-01

    Like chiral organic drugs, the chemical and biological properties of metal complexes can be dependent on chirality. Two pairs of [Cu(phen)(ala)(H2O)]X·xH2O (phen=1.10-phenanthroline: X=NO3(-); ala: l-alanine (l-ala), 1 and d-alanine (d-ala) 2; and (X=Cl(-); ala: l-ala, 3 and d-ala, 4) complex salts (x=number of lattice water molecules) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of 3 has been determined. The same pair of enantiomeric species, viz. [Cu(phen)(l-ala)(H2O)](+) and [Cu(phen)(d-ala)(H2O)](+), have been identified to be present in the aqueous solutions of both 1 and 3, and in those of both 2 and 4 respectively. Both 3 and 4 bind more strongly to ds(AT)6 than ds(CG)6. There is no or insignificant effect of the chirality of 3 and 4 on the production of hydroxyl radicals, binding to deoxyribonucleic acid from calf thymus (CT-DNA), ds(CG)6, G-quadruplex and 17-base pair duplex, and inhibition of both topoisomerase I and proteasome. Among the three proteasome proteolytic sites, the trypsin-like site is inhibited most strongly by these complexes. However, the chirality of 3 and 4 does affect the number of restriction enzymes inhibited, and their binding constants towards ds(AT)6 and serum albumin. PMID:27105312

  8. The Structure-Property Relationship of Poly(amide-imide)/Organoclay Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, Khalil; Soleimani, Masoumeh; Shabanian, Meisam; Abootalebi, Ashraf Sadateh

    2011-06-01

    Surface treated montmorillonite (MMT) was used to prepare nanocomposites with poly(amide-imide) (PAI) 5 by solution intercalation technique with various percent of organoclay (5-15 mass %). Surface modification of the MMT was performed with Cloisite 20A for ample compatibilization with the PAI matrix. The PAI 5 chains were produced through polycondensation of 4,4-diamino diphenyl sulfone 4 with N-trimellitylimido-L-alanine 3 in a medium consisting of triphenyl phosphite, N-methyl-2-pyrolidone (NMP), pyridine and calcium chloride. The PAI-Nanocomposites morphology and clay dispersion were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of clay dispersion and the interaction between clay and PAI chains on the properties of PAI-Nanocomposites films were investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and water uptake measurements. Thermal stability of nanocomposites increased relative to the neat polyamide with increasing organoclay content but water uptake of these materials decreased as compared to the neat polyamide indicating reduced permeability.

  9. Assessing the effect of surface modification of polyamide RO membrane by l-DOPA on the short range physiochemical interactions with biopolymer fouling on the membrane.

    PubMed

    Azari, Sara; Zou, Linda; Cornelissen, Emile

    2014-08-01

    Theoretical predictions of interaction energies for membrane-biopolymer foulant pairs were used to compare the fouling tendencies of a virgin commercial polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membrane with a amino acid 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-l-alanine (l-DOPA) coated RO membrane. Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) and Lewis acid-base (AB) surface tension components of the membranes were determined based on contact angle results using the van Oss approach. From these values, the LW and AB components of the free energy of adhesion between membrane and foulants were calculated. Electrostatic (EL) double layer interaction energies between the membrane and foulants were also estimated using the measured surface charge data of the membranes and fouling agents. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and alginic acid sodium salt (alginate) were used as model biopolymers causing membrane fouling. Based on the calculated adhesion free energies, acid-base interactions were found to have the strongest impact on the adhesion of both BSA and alginate to the either membranes surfaces. It was found that l-DOPA modification has significantly lowered acid-base interaction affinity toward the adhesion of both foulants studied. On the basis of calculated free energies of adhesion, lower fouling tendency of the l-DOPA modified membrane was expected. The accelerated fouling tests indicated a lower flux decline rate for the modified membrane and confirmed the results obtained from theory. PMID:24916284

  10. Development and validation of a supercritical fluid chromatography method for the direct determination of enantiomeric purity of provitamin B5 in cosmetic formulations with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Khater, Syame; West, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and efficient chiral supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) method has been developed for the quantitative determination of panthenol enantiomers in cosmetic formulations (cream, lotion, wipe, and exfoliant). Indeed, the pharmacological effect only depends on the D form (Dexpanthenol) thus accurate measurement of its enantiomeric purity in formulated cosmetic products is of interest. The samples were prepared with liquid-liquid extraction followed by solid-phase extraction on Adsorbex amino cartridges. After testing several enantioselective columns in an attempt at reversing the elution order to have the minor enantiomer eluted first, the best separation of enantiomers and internal standard (N-acetyl-L-alanine) was achieved on a 3 μm-amylose-type immobilized polysaccharide chiral stationary phase (Chiralpak IA) in less than 6 min with a simple mobile phase comprising carbon dioxide and 11% methanol pumped at 2.3 mL/min, 25°C and 150 bar backpressure. Supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to both an optical diode-array detector and a user-friendly single-quadrupole mass spectrometer (Waters QDa) equipped with electrospray ionization source has been used. The on-line coupling ensures the technique to be more informative and improves detection sensitivity, as underivatized panthenol has a poor UV absorption. The limit of quantification (LOQ) achieved with single-ion recording was 0.5 μg/mL. The method was validated in terms of linearity, precision and accuracy and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:25459930

  11. C60-derived nanobaskets: stability, vibrational signatures, and molecular trapping.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, S G; Pires, M S; Lemos, V; Freire, V N; Caetano, E W S; Galvão, D S; Sato, F; Albuquerque, E L

    2009-09-30

    C(60)-derived nanobaskets, with chemical formulae (symmetry point group) C(40)H(10) (C(5v)), C(39)H(12) (C(3v)), C(46)H(12) (C(2v)), were investigated. Molecular dynamic simulations (MDSs) indicate that the molecules preserve their bonding frame for temperatures up to 300 K (simulation time 100 ps), and maintain atomic cohesion for at least 4 ps at temperatures up to 3500 K. The infrared spectra of the C(60)-derived nanobaskets were simulated through density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allowing for the attribution of infrared signatures specific to each carbon nanobasket. The possibility of using C(60)-derived nanobaskets as molecular containers is demonstrated by performing a DFT study of their bonding to hydrogen, water, and L-alanine. The carbon nanostructures presented here show a higher bonding energy (approximately 1.0 eV), suggesting that a family of nanostructures, C(n)-derived (n = 60,70,76,80, etc) nanobaskets, could work as molecular containers, paving the way for future developments such as tunable traps for complex molecular systems. PMID:19724106

  12. Effects of monocrotaline on energy metabolism in the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mingatto, Fábio Erminio; Maioli, Marcos Antonio; Bracht, Adelar; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza

    2008-11-10

    Monocrotaline (MCT) is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid present in the plants of the Crotalaria species that causes cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in animals and humans, and it is hepatically metabolized to the alkylating agent dehydromonocrotaline by cytochrome P-450. The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of MCT-induced tissue injury remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that dehydromonocrotaline, but not monocrotaline, inhibits the activity of NADH-dehydrogenase at micromolar concentrations in isolated liver mitochondria, an effect associated with significantly reduced ATP synthesis. Impairment of energy metabolism is expected to lead to several alterations in cell metabolism. In this work, the action of different concentrations of monocrotaline (250, 500, and 750microM) on energy metabolism-linked parameters was investigated in isolated perfused rat livers. In the fed state, monocrotaline increased glycogenolysis and glycolysis, whereas in the livers of fasted rats, it decreased gluconeogenesis and urea synthesis from l-alanine. These metabolic alterations were only found in livers of phenobarbital-treated rats, indicating that active metabolites including dehydromonocrotaline were responsible for the observed activity. Our findings indicate that hepatic metabolic changes may be implicated, partly at least, in the hepatotoxicity of monocrotaline in animals and humans. PMID:18835426

  13. Portable Fourier Transform Spectroscopy for Analysis of Surface Contamination and Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Progress has been made into adapting and enhancing a commercially available infrared spectrometer for the development of a handheld device for in-field measurements of the chemical composition of various samples of materials. The intent is to duplicate the functionality of a benchtop Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) within the compactness of a handheld instrument with significantly improved spectral responsivity. Existing commercial technology, like the deuterated L-alanine triglycine sulfide detectors (DLATGS), is capable of sensitive in-field chemical analysis. This proposed approach compares several subsystem elements of the FTIR inside of the commercial, non-benchtop system to the commercial benchtop systems. These subsystem elements are the detector, the preamplifier and associated electronics of the detector, the interferometer, associated readout parameters, and cooling. This effort will examine these different detector subsystem elements to look for limitations in each. These limitations will be explored collaboratively with the commercial provider, and will be prioritized to meet the deliverable objectives. The tool design will be that of a handheld gun containing the IR filament source and associated optics. It will operate in a point-and-shoot manner, pointing the source and optics at the sample under test and capturing the reflected response of the material in the same handheld gun. Data will be captured via the gun and ported to a laptop.

  14. The application of phosphoramidate ProTide technology to acyclovir confers anti-HIV inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Derudas, Marco; Carta, Davide; Brancale, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Lisco, Andrea; Margolis, Leonid; Balzarini, Jan; McGuigan, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that phosphorylated acyclovir (ACVa) inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase in a cell free system. To deliver phosphorylated ACV inside cells we designed ACV monophosphorylated derivatives using ProTide technology. We found that the L-alanine derivatived ProTides show anti-HIV activity at non-cytotoxic concentrations; ester and aryl variation was tolerated. ACV ProTides with other amino acids, other than L-phenylalanine, showed no detectable activity against HIV in cell culture. The inhibitory activity of the prodrugs against herpes simplex virus (HSV) type -1, -2 and thymidine kinase-deficient HSV-1 revealed different structure-activity relationships, but was again consistent with successful nucleoside kinase bypass. Enzymatic and molecular modelling studies have been performed in order to better understand the antiviral behaviour of these compounds. ProTides showing diminished carboxypeptidase lability translated to poor anti-HIV agents and vice versa, so the assay became predictive. PMID:19645484

  15. Testing nucleoside analogues as inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis spore germination in vitro and in macrophage cell culture.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Zadkiel; Lee, Kyungae; Abel-Santos, Ernesto

    2010-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, has a dormant stage in its life cycle known as the endospore. When conditions become favorable, spores germinate and transform into vegetative bacteria. In inhalational anthrax, the most fatal manifestation of the disease, spores enter the organism through the respiratory tract and germinate in phagosomes of alveolar macrophages. Germinated cells can then produce toxins and establish infection. Thus, germination is a crucial step for the initiation of pathogenesis. B. anthracis spore germination is activated by a wide variety of amino acids and purine nucleosides. Inosine and l-alanine are the two most potent nutrient germinants in vitro. Recent studies have shown that germination can be hindered by isomers or structural analogues of germinants. 6-Thioguanosine (6-TG), a guanosine analogue, is able to inhibit germination and prevent B. anthracis toxin-mediated necrosis in murine macrophages. In this study, we screened 46 different nucleoside analogues as activators or inhibitors of B. anthracis spore germination in vitro. These compounds were also tested for their ability to protect the macrophage cell line J774a.1 from B. anthracis cytotoxicity. Structure-activity relationship analysis of activators and inhibitors clarified the binding mechanisms of nucleosides to B. anthracis spores. In contrast, no structure-activity relationships were apparent for compounds that protected macrophages from B. anthracis-mediated killing. However, multiple inhibitors additively protected macrophages from B. anthracis. PMID:20921305

  16. Characterization of O-Acetylation of N-Acetylglucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Elvis; Rolain, Thomas; Courtin, Pascal; Guillot, Alain; Langella, Philippe; Hols, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) N-acetyl muramic acid (MurNAc) O-acetylation is widely spread in Gram-positive bacteria and is generally associated with resistance against lysozyme and endogenous autolysins. We report here the presence of O-acetylation on N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in Lactobacillus plantarum PG. This modification of glycan strands was never described in bacteria. Fine structural characterization of acetylated muropeptides released from L. plantarum PG demonstrated that both MurNAc and GlcNAc are O-acetylated in this species. These two PG post-modifications rely on two dedicated O-acetyltransferase encoding genes, named oatA and oatB, respectively. By analyzing the resistance to cell wall hydrolysis of mutant strains, we showed that GlcNAc O-acetylation inhibits N-acetylglucosaminidase Acm2, the major L. plantarum autolysin. In this bacterial species, inactivation of oatA, encoding MurNAc O-acetyltransferase, resulted in marked sensitivity to lysozyme. Moreover, MurNAc over-O-acetylation was shown to activate autolysis through the putative N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase LytH enzyme. Our data indicate that in L. plantarum, two different O-acetyltransferases play original and antagonistic roles in the modulation of the activity of endogenous autolysins. PMID:21586574

  17. Biconical tapered optical fiber biosensor for measuring refractive index of a-amino acids in aqueous D-glucose and sucrose solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Karami, M.; Gholami, M.; Hosseini, S. M.; Ghezelayagh, M. H.

    2010-04-01

    A single-mode biconical tapered optical fiber (BTOF) sensor was utilized for sensing the variation of refractive index (RI) with concentration of D-glucose in double distilled deionized water and measuring of RI of amino acids (AAs) in carbohydrate solutions. This method showed a rewarding ability in understanding the basis of biomolecular interactions in biological systems. The BTOF is fabricated by heat pulling method, utilizing a CO2 laser. The detection limit of the BTOF was 50 ppb for the D-glucose concentration ranging from 0 to 80 ppm, and RI detection limit corresponding to these concentrations in the range at 1.3333 to 1.3404 was 5.4×10-6 as a refractometer sensor. The response of the BTOF shows that the different kinds of interactions of various groups of AAs such as L-alanine, L-leucine, and L-cystein with D-glucose, sucrose and water molecules depend on functional groups in AAs such as OH, SH;CH2;NH3+ ,COO-. These results can be interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions and structure making/breaking ability of solutes in the given solution.

  18. Structure-Guided Functional Characterization of DUF1460 Reveals a New, Highly Specific NlpC/P60 Amidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Patin, Delphine; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-tetrapeptide is a major peptidoglycan degradation intermediate and a cytotoxin. It is generated by lytic transglycosylases and further degraded and recycled by various enzymes. We have identified and characterized a novel, highly specific N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiA) from Bacteroides uniformis, a member of the DUF1460 protein family, that hydrolyzes GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-peptide into disaccharide and stem peptide. The high-resolution apo-structure at 1.15 Å resolution shows that AmiA is related to NlpC/P60 γ-D-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid amidases and shares a common catalytic core and cysteine peptidase-like active site. AmiA has evolved structural adaptations that reconfigure the substrate recognition site. The preferred substrates for AmiA were predicted in silico based on structural and bioinformatics data, and were subsequently characterized experimentally. Further crystal structures of AmiA in complexes with GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc and GlcNAc have enabled us to elucidate substrate recognition and specificity. DUF1460 is highly conserved in structure and defines a new amidase family. PMID:25465128

  19. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  20. Purification and characterization of a protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase in an anoxia tolerant animal.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S P; Storey, K B

    1996-05-01

    A protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase (PK) in vitro was purified and characterized from the foot muscle of the anoxia tolerant gastropod mollusc Busycon canaliculatum. Purification involved three steps: negative chromatography through Blue Dextran and CM Sephadex, affinity chromatography on DEAE Sephadex and gel exclusion chromatography on Sephacryl S-400. Pyruvate kinase phosphatase (PK-Pase) activity was monitored by following changes in PK I50 values for L-alanine that had previously been linked to changes in the degree of PK phosphorylation. The purified PK-Pase gave a single band on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 41 +/- 1 kdaltons. Isoelectric focusing analysis showed that the PK-Pase had an isoelectric point of 4.2 +/- 0.1. Kinetic analysis showed that the enzyme was a Type 2C protein phosphatase with a pH optimum of 6.5. Maximal activity required the presence of magnesium ions (KM = 7.9 +/- 0.6 microM) although high concentrations of Mg2+ were inhibitory (I50 = 2.3 +/- 0.4 mM). The protein phosphatase activity was not affected by either spermine, cAMP, cGMP, potassium phosphate, tartrate, NaF, HgCl2, citrate or concentrations of CaCl2 less than 10 mM. The enzyme could also use ATP, ADP, and GTP as substrates. PMID:8739044

  1. Purification and characterization of a highly stable tyrosinase from Thermomicrobium roseum.

    PubMed

    Kong, K H; Hong, M P; Choi, S S; Kim, Y T; Cho, S H

    2000-04-01

    Tyrosinase, with an isoelectric point at pH 4.9, was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Thermomicrobium roseum. Gel filtration, N-terminal amino acid sequencing and SDS/PAGE analysis indicate that T. roseum tyrosinase is composed of two identical subunits, each with a molecular mass of 43000 Da. The enzyme exhibited high substrate specificity towards catechol, chlorogenic acid, L-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-L-alanine (L-DOPA) and pyrogallol. The K(m) value of the enzyme for L-DOPA was 0.18 mM. beta-Mercaptoethanol and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate notably inhibited the enzymic activity. The activity of the enzyme was optimal at pH 9.5 and 70 degrees C, and was increased by addition of 1 mM Mg(2+), K(+) or Cu(2+). The enzyme was highly stable against high temperature and guanidine hydrochloride. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme was determined to be Asp-Ile-Asn-Gly-Gly-Gly-Ala-Thr-Leu-Pro-Gln-Lys-Leu-Tyr. These facts indicate that T. roseum tyrosinase appears to be distinct from the tyrosinases so far purified from other sources. PMID:10744956

  2. Production, purification, and properties of serine carboxypeptidase from Paecilomyces carneus.

    PubMed

    Umetsu, H; Hishinuma, K; Wake, H; Ichishima, E

    1996-07-01

    Seventeen strains of the genus Paecilomyces were examined for their ability to produce serine carboxypeptidase. Paecilomyces carneus IFO 7012 exhibited the highest potency for serine carboxypeptidase production. A maximum yield of serine carboxypeptidase was obtained by koji culture of the strain at 22 degrees C for 7 days. The serine carboxypeptidase was purified to homogeneity from an extract of the koji culture. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 47,000 by HPLC. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was determined to be 4.0, and the optimum pH was 4.0 toward benzyloxycarbonyl-L-glutamyl-L-tyrosine (Z-Glu-Tyr) and benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanine (Z-Phe-Ala), respectively. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and p-chloromercurybenzoate. Relative hydrolysis rates of N-acylpeptides and kinetic studies indicated that the enzyme preferred substrates having bulky amino acids in the penultimate position from their carboxy-termini. PMID:8661688

  3. Effect of pore structure on surface characteristics of zirconium phosphate-modified silica.

    PubMed

    El Shafei, Gamal M S

    2002-06-15

    Three samples of silica of different pore structure-predominantly microporous, S1; mesoporous, S2; and nonporous, S3-were modified with zirconium phosphate and examined. Pore structure analysis showed that modification had taken place in wider pores of S1 leaving a totally microporous sample, and in large pores of S2 giving a mesoporous sample of narrower pore size distribution. The modification of the nonporous sample decreased the surface area and pore volume to a lower extent than in the other two samples, but resulted in a surface of lower energy toward N2. The different distribution of surface silanol groups on the surfaces of different porosity may result in variable pictures on the modified surfaces as reflected in the differences observed in Brønsted acidity of modified surfaces. The use of these modified silica samples for amino acid adsorption (L-glutamic acid and L-alanine) indicated that both the isoelectric point of the amino acid and the distribution of surface groups on modified solids are controlling the adsorption process. PMID:16290676

  4. Purification and characterization of an immunogenic aminopeptidase of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Rodriguez, Araceli; Ramirez-Zavala, Bernardo; Contreras, Andrea; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Lopez-Merino, Ahide

    2003-09-01

    An immunogenic aminopeptidase was purified from Brucella melitensis strain VTRM1. The purification procedure consisted of ammonium sulfate fractionation and three chromatographic steps. This procedure resulted in a yield of 29% and a 144-fold increase in specific activity. The aminopeptidase appeared to be a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 96 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.8. Its activity was optimal at pH 7.0 at 40 degrees C. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by EDTA, 1,10-phenathroline, and divalent cations (Zn(2+) and Hg(2+)), suggesting that this protein was a metalloaminopeptidase. The enzyme showed preference for alanine at the N termini of aminoacyl derivatives. The K(m) values for L-alanine-p-nitroanilide (Ala-pNA) and Lys-pNA were 0.35 and 0.18 mM, respectively. The N-terminal sequence of aminopeptidase was used for a homologous search in the genomes of B. melitensis 16M and Brucella suis 1330. The analysis revealed an exact match of the probe sequence (36 bp) with an open reading frame of 2,652 bp encoding a protein predicted to be alanyl aminopeptidase (aminopeptidase N). Collectively, these data suggest designation of the B. melitensis enzyme as an aminopeptidase N. The aminopeptidase was recognized by sera from patients with acute and chronic brucellosis, suggesting that the enzyme may have important diagnostic implications. PMID:12933870

  5. Supported absorption of CO2 by tetrabutylphosphonium amino acid ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, Suojiang; Dong, Kun; Zhang, Yanqiang; Shen, Youqing; Lv, Xingmei

    2006-05-15

    A new type of "task specific ionic liquid", tetrabutylphosphonium amino acid [P(C4)4][AA], was synthesized by the reaction of tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide [P(C4)4][OH] with amino acids, including glycine, L-alanine, L-beta-alanine, L-serine, and L-lysine. The liquids produced were characterized by NMR, IR spectroscopies, and elemental analysis, and their thermal decomposition temperature, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, density, and viscosity were recorded in detail. The [P(C4)4][AA] supported on porous silica gel effected fast and reversible CO2 absorption when compared with bubbling CO2 into the bulk of the ionic liquid. No changes in absorption capacity and kinetics were found after four cycles of absorption/desorption. The CO2 absorption capacity at equilibrium was 50 mol % of the ionic liquids. In the presence of water (1 wt %), the ionic liquids could absorb equimolar amounts of CO2. The CO2 absorption mechanisms of the ionic liquids with and without water were different. PMID:16528787

  6. Twisted and tubular silica structures by anionic surfactant fibers encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Chekini, Mahshid; Guénée, Laure; Marchionni, Valentina; Sharma, Manish; Bürgi, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Organic molecules imprinting can be used for introducing specific properties and functionalities such as chirality to mesoporous materials. Particularly organic self-assemblies can work as a scaffold for templating inorganic materials such as silica. During recent years chiral imprinting of anionic surfactant for fabrication of twisted rod-like silica structures assisted by co-structuring directing agent were thoroughly investigated. The organic self-assemblies of anionic surfactants can also be used for introducing other shapes in rod-like silica structures. Here we report the formation of amphiphilic N-miristoyl-l-alanine self-assemblies in aqueous solution upon stirring and at presence of l-arginine. These anionic surfactant self-assemblies form fibers that grow by increasing the stirring duration. The fibers were studied using transmission electron microscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and vibrational circular dichroism. Addition of silica precursor 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethylene and co-structuring directing agent N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride at different stages of fibers' growth leads to formation of different silica structures. By controlling stirring duration, we obtained twisted tubular silica structures as a result of fibers encapsulation. We decorated these structures with gold nanoparticles by different methods and measured their optical activity. PMID:27267039

  7. A Collaborative Evaluation of LC-MS/MS Based Methods for BMAA Analysis: Soluble Bound BMAA Found to Be an Important Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Faassen, Elisabeth J.; Antoniou, Maria G.; Beekman-Lukassen, Wendy; Blahova, Lucie; Chernova, Ekaterina; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Combes, Audrey; Edwards, Christine; Fastner, Jutta; Harmsen, Joop; Hiskia, Anastasia; Ilag, Leopold L.; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; Lopicic, Srdjan; Lürling, Miquel; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Meriluoto, Jussi; Porojan, Cristina; Viner-Mozzini, Yehudit; Zguna, Nadezda

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) might be linked to the incidence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Analytical chemistry plays a crucial role in determining human BMAA exposure and the associated health risk, but the performance of various analytical methods currently employed is rarely compared. A CYANOCOST initiated workshop was organized aimed at training scientists in BMAA analysis, creating mutual understanding and paving the way towards interlaboratory comparison exercises. During this workshop, we tested different methods (extraction followed by derivatization and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis, or directly followed by LC-MS/MS analysis) for trueness and intermediate precision. We adapted three workup methods for the underivatized analysis of animal, brain and cyanobacterial samples. Based on recovery of the internal standard D3BMAA, the underivatized methods were accurate (mean recovery 80%) and precise (mean relative standard deviation 10%), except for the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya. However, total BMAA concentrations in the positive controls (cycad seeds) showed higher variation (relative standard deviation 21%–32%), implying that D3BMAA was not a good indicator for the release of BMAA from bound forms. Significant losses occurred during workup for the derivatized method, resulting in low recovery (<10%). Most BMAA was found in a trichloroacetic acid soluble, bound form and we recommend including this fraction during analysis. PMID:26938542

  8. Metal Dyshomeostasis and Inflammation in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Possible Impact of Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, Oddvar; Utkilen, Hans; Duale, Nur; Brunborg, Gunnar; Hofer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    A dysregulated metal homeostasis is associated with both Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases; AD patients have decreased cortex and elevated serum copper levels along with extracellular amyloid-beta plaques containing copper, iron, and zinc. For AD, a putative hepcidin-mediated lowering of cortex copper mechanism is suggested. An age-related mild chronic inflammation and/or elevated intracellular iron can trigger hepcidin production followed by its binding to ferroportin which is the only neuronal iron exporter, thereby subjecting it to lysosomal degradation. Subsequently raised neuronal iron levels can induce translation of the ferroportin assisting and copper binding amyloid precursor protein (APP); constitutive APP transmembrane passage lowers the copper pool which is important for many enzymes. Using in silico gene expression analyses, we here show significantly decreased expression of copper-dependent enzymes in AD brain and metallothioneins were upregulated in both diseases. Although few AD exposure risk factors are known, AD-related tauopathies can result from cyanobacterial microcystin and β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) intake. Several environmental exposures may represent risk factors for PD; for this disease neurodegeneration is likely to involve mitochondrial dysfunction, microglial activation, and neuroinflammation. Administration of metal chelators and anti-inflammatory agents could affect disease outcomes. PMID:23710288

  9. Feeding response of subterranean termites Coptotermes curvignathus and Coptotermes gestroi (Blattodea: Rhinotermitidae) to baits supplemented with sugars, amino acids, and cassava.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Venite Pesigan; Sajap, Ahmad Said; Sahri, Mohd Hamami

    2013-08-01

    Feeding responses of subterranean termites Coptotermes curvignathus (Holmgren) and Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) (Blattodea: Rhinotermitidae) to bait matrices supplemented with various sugars, amino acids, and cassava were evaluated both in the laboratory and field. The results indicated that the two termite species consumed significantly different amount of filter papers that had been treated with various types and concentrations of sugars and amino acids. Based on consumption and survival data, filter papers with 3% glucose and 3% xylose were among the most consumed by C. curvignathus and C. gestroi, respectively. Both termite species consumed more of the filter papers treated with 3% casein than filter papers treated with L-alanine. Both species had a comparable survival rate compared with those in the controls. Results from laboratory and field trials on bait prototypes indicated that C. gestroi consumed more bait prototypes containing cellulose, 3% xylose, 3% casein, and cassava, whereas C curvignathus consumed more bait prototype containing cellulose, 3% glucose, and cassava, than on pure crystalline cellulose baits. Thus, with an improved and cost-effective bait formulation, a much wider control of subterranean termite colonies could be achieved. PMID:24020295

  10. PCR use in miliary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Riachy, Moussa Albert

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old pregnant woman admitted to the hospital for rapidly progressive dyspnoea, non-productive cough and altered general status evolving over 1-month period. Her vital signs showed a low blood pressure 90/60 mm Hg, pulse rate 100 beats/min, respiratory rate 32 breaths/min and oxygen saturation on room air of 88%. Laboratory findings showed haemoglobin 9.7 g/dl, white blood cells 15 000/mm3 (neutrophils 82%), C reactive protein 74 mg/l, alkaline phosphatase 320 U/l, alanine aminotransferase 62 IU/l, aspartate aminotransferase 120 IU/l, γ glutamyl transpeptidase 125 U/l; brain natriuretic peptide 25.4 pg/ml, procalcitonine >2, lactate dehydrogenase 1618 U/l. Chest radiographics showed diffuse bilateral micronodular pulmonary infiltrates and CT of the chest confirmed 1–3 mm diffuse bilateral micronodular infiltrates with ground glass opacities. Complete investigation including bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for any viral, bacteriologic, acid-fast bacilli and full serum antibodies panel were all negative. DNA amplification for mycobacterium using PCR on the BAL rapidly rectified the diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:22694890

  11. PCR use in miliary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riachy, Moussa Albert

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old pregnant woman admitted to the hospital for rapidly progressive dyspnoea, non-productive cough and altered general status evolving over 1-month period. Her vital signs showed a low blood pressure 90/60 mm Hg, pulse rate 100 beats/min, respiratory rate 32 breaths/min and oxygen saturation on room air of 88%. Laboratory findings showed haemoglobin 9.7 g/dl, white blood cells 15 000/mm(3) (neutrophils 82%), C reactive protein 74 mg/l, alkaline phosphatase 320 U/l, alanine aminotransferase 62 IU/l, aspartate aminotransferase 120 IU/l, γ glutamyl transpeptidase 125 U/l; brain natriuretic peptide 25.4 pg/ml, procalcitonine >2, lactate dehydrogenase 1618 U/l. Chest radiographics showed diffuse bilateral micronodular pulmonary infiltrates and CT of the chest confirmed 1-3 mm diffuse bilateral micronodular infiltrates with ground glass opacities. Complete investigation including bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for any viral, bacteriologic, acid-fast bacilli and full serum antibodies panel were all negative. DNA amplification for mycobacterium using PCR on the BAL rapidly rectified the diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:22694890

  12. Prodrug design, synthesis and pharmacokinetic evaluation of (3′ R, 4′ R)-3-hydroxymethyl-4-methyl-3′,4′-di-O-(S)-camphanoyl-(+)-cis-khellactone

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huanfang; Zhuang, Xiaomei; Qian, Keduo; Sun, Lianqi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Hua; Lee, Kuohsiung; Xie, Lan

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxymethyl-4-methyl-DCK (3, HMDCK) was discovered previously as a potent HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTIs) (EC50: 0.004 μM, TI: 6225) with a novel mechanism of action. It exerts anti-HIV activity by inhibiting the production of HIV-1 double-stranded viral DNA from a single-stranded DNA intermediate, rather than blocking the generation of single-stranded DNA from a RNA template, which is the mechanism of action of current HIV-1 RT inhibitors. However, the insufficient metabolic stability of 3 limits its further clinical development. In the current study, a series of ester prodrugs of 3 was designed and synthesized to explore the new drug candidates as NNRTIs. The l-alanine ester prodrug 10 exhibited desirable pharmacokinetic properties in vitro and in vivo and showed improved oral bioavailability of 26% in rat, and would be a potential clinical candidate as a new anti-AIDS drug. PMID:23687633

  13. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis. PMID:23956997

  14. Amide-conjugated indole-3-acetic acid and adventitious root formation in mung bean cuttings

    SciTech Connect

    Norcini, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate further the relationship between amide-conjugated auxin and adventitious root formation. Indoleacetylaspartic acid (IAA-aspartate) was positively identified as the predominant conjugate isolated from mung bean cuttings after the cuttings has been treated with 10/sup -3/ M IAA. In cuttings treated with (1-/sup 14/C)IAA immediately after excision (0 hr), the percent of extractable /sup 14/C in IAA-aspartate in the hypocotyl sharply increased until 36 hr, then steadily declined. (/sup 14/C)IAA was completely metabolized between 12 and 24 hr. The rooting activities of IAA-L-aspartate, IAA-L-alanine, and IAA-glycine were determined at various stages of root formation; some cuttings were pretreated with 10/sup -3/ M IAA at 0 hr. Pretreated cuttings that were treated with IAA-glycine at 12, 24, 36 hr exhibited the greatest consistency between replications, the greatest number of long roots, and the longest roots. The conjugates did not stimulate rooting as effectively as IAA, yet like IAA, generally enhanced rooting the greatest when applied before the first cell division (24 hr).

  15. Antigenic role of single residues within the main immunogenic region of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Papadouli, I; Potamianos, S; Hadjidakis, I; Bairaktari, E; Tsikaris, V; Sakarellos, C; Cung, M T; Marraud, M; Tzartos, S J

    1990-01-01

    The target of most of the autoantibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in myasthenic sera is the main immunogenic region (MIR) on the extracellular side of the AChR alpha-subunit. Binding of anti-MIR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has been recently localized between residues alpha 67 and alpha 76 of Torpedo californica electric organ (WNPADYGGIK) and human muscle (WNPDDYGGVK) AChR. In order to evaluate the contribution of each residue to the antigenicity of the MIR, we synthesized peptides corresponding to residues alpha 67-76 from Torpedo and human AChRs, together with 13 peptide analogues. Nine of these analogues had one residue of the Torpedo decapeptide replaced by L-alanine, three had a structure which was intermediate between those of the Torpedo and human alpha 67-76 decapeptides, and one had D-alanine in position 73. Binding studies employing six anti-MIR mAbs and all 15 peptides revealed that some residues (Asn68 and Asp71) are indispensable for binding by all mAbs tested, whereas others are important only for binding by some mAbs. Antibody binding was mainly restricted to residues alpha 68-74, the most critical sequence being alpha 68-71. Fish electric organ and human MIR form two distinct groups of strongly overlapping epitopes. Some peptide analogues enhanced mAb binding compared with Torpedo and human peptides, suggesting that the construction of a very antigenic MIR is feasible. PMID:1695844

  16. The Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas dacunhae Aspartate-[beta]-Decarboxylase Dodecamer Reveals an Unknown Oligomeric Assembly for a Pyridoxal-5′-Phosphate-Dependent Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Santiago; Sundararaju, Bakthavatsalam; Huang, Christina; Khristoforov, Roman; Momany, Cory; Phillips, Robert S.

    2010-09-01

    The Pseudomonas dacunhae L-aspartate-{beta}-decarboxylase (ABDC, aspartate 4-decarboxylase, aspartate 4-carboxylyase, E.C. 4.1.1.12) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the {beta}-decarboxylation of L-aspartate to produce L-alanine and CO{sub 2}. This catalytically versatile enzyme is known to form functional dodecamers at its optimal pH and is thought to work in conjunction with an L-Asp/L-Ala antiporter to establish a proton gradient across the membrane that can be used for ATP biosynthesis. We have solved the atomic structure of ABDC to 2.35 {angstrom} resolution using single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing. The structure reveals that ABDC oligomerizes as a homododecamer in an unknown mode among PLP-dependent enzymes and has highest structural homology with members of the PLP-dependent aspartate aminotransferase subfamily. The structure shows that the ABDC active site is very similar to that of aspartate aminotransferase. However, an additional arginine side chain (Arg37) was observed flanking the re-side of the PLP ring in the ABDC active site. The mutagenesis results show that although Arg37 is not required for activity, it appears to be involved in the ABDC catalytic cycle.

  17. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore. PMID:27161341

  18. Photo-crosslinking, bio-inspired terpolymer adhesives intended for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Tristan

    A bio-inspired, modular terpolymer adhesive has been synthesized containing three different functionalities: a photocrosslinking segment, wet adhesion segment, and a water soluble segment. Wet adhesion is brought on by an amino acid from mussel byssal plaques called 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl--L-alanine, which has been known to generate strong bonding under wet conditions. The photocrosslinking segment consists of an anthracene based monomer used for mechanical fortification of polymer chains. The water soluble segment consists of poly(acrylic acid), which has been known to increase water solubility of polymers and increase adhesion strength of adhesives. The terpolymer was designed to easily applicable using biologically friendly solvents including water and ethanol. Structural design was confirmed by NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Reversible cycloaddition reactions were executed using a handheld UV lamp along with a photoreactor. Molecular weight increases were seen from 4.120 x 104 Da to 7.429 x 104 Da. Lap shear strength testing showed effects of UV exposure through increases in adhesion energy above 450%. Multiple application variables were tested to determine optimal conditions, such as solvent, concentration, and substrate. Currently, optimal conditions show a 1:1 weight ratio of polymer:solvent in water for all surfaces.

  19. Nod2-Nodosome in a Cell-Free System: Implications in Pathogenesis and Drug Discovery for Blau Syndrome and Early-Onset Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Tomoyuki; Kaneko, Naoe; Ito, Yuki; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Heike, Toshio; Migita, Kiyoshi; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Kawakami, Atsushi; Morikawa, Shinnosuke; Mokuda, Sho; Kurata, Mie

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (Nod) 2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, which recognizes muramyl dipeptide (N-Acetylmuramyl-L-Alanyl-D-Isoglutamine: MDP), a bacterial peptidoglycan component, and makes a NF-κB-activating complex called nodosome with adaptor protein RICK (RIP2/RIPK2). Nod2 mutants are associated with the autoinflammatory diseases, Blau syndrome (BS)/early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS). For drug discovery of BS/EOS, we tried to develop Nod2-nodosome in a cell-free system. FLAG-tagged RICK, biotinylated-Nod2, and BS/EOS-associated Nod2 mutants were synthesized, and proximity signals between FLAG-tagged and biotinylated proteins were detected by amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (ALPHA). Upon incubation with MDP, the ALPHA signal of interaction between Nod2-WT and RICK was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The ALPHA signal of interaction between RICK and the BS/EOS-associated Nod2 mutants was more significantly increased than Nod2-WT. Notably, the ALPHA signal between Nod2-WT and RICK was increased upon incubation with MDP, but not when incubated with the same concentrations, L-alanine, D-isoglutamic acid, or the MDP-D-isoform. Thus, we successfully developed Nod2-nodosome in a cell-free system reflecting its function in vivo, and it can be useful for screening Nod2-nodosome-targeted therapeutic molecules for BS/EOS and granulomatous inflammatory diseases. PMID:27403452

  20. Transport of Extraterrestrial Biomolecules to the Earth: Problem of Thermal Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, V. A.; Douda, J.; Navarro-González, R.

    1999-01-01

    The idea of extraterrestrial delivery of organic matter to the early Earth is especially attractive at present and is strongly supported by the detection of a large variety of organic compounds, including amino acids and nucleobases, in carbonaceous chondrites. Whether these compounds can be delivered by other space bodies is unclear and depends primarily on capability of the biomolecules to survive high temperatures during atmospheric deceleration and impacts to the terrestrial surface. In the present study we estimated survivability of simple amino acids (α-aminoisobutyric acid, L-alanine, L-valine and L-leucine), purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (uracil and cytosine) under rapid heating to temperatures of 400 to 1000 °C under N2 or CO2 atmosphere. We have found that most of the compounds studied cannot survive the temperatures substantially higher than 700 °C however at 500-600 °C, the recovery can be at a per cent level (or even 10%-level for adenine, uracil, alanine, and valine). Implications of the data for extraterrestrial delivery of the biomolecules are discussed

  1. Endosymbiotic and Host Proteases in the Digestive Tract of the Invasive Snail Pomacea canaliculata: Diversity, Origin and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Martín S.; Castro-Vasquez, Alfredo; Vega, Israel A.

    2013-01-01

    Digestive proteases of the digestive tract of the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata were studied. Luminal protease activity was found in the crop, the style sac and the coiled gut and was significantly higher in the coiled gut. Several protease bands and their apparent molecular weights were identified in both tissue extracts and luminal contents by gel zymography: (1) a 125 kDa protease in salivary gland extracts and in the crop content; (2) a 30 kDa protease throughout all studied luminal contents and in extracts of the midgut gland and of the endosymbionts isolated from this gland; (3) two proteases of 145 and 198 kDa in the coiled gut content. All these proteases were inhibited by aprotinin, a serine-protease inhibitor, and showed maximum activity between 30°C and 35°C and pH between 8.5 and 9.5. Tissue L-alanine-N-aminopeptidase activity was determined in the wall of the crop, the style sac and the coiled gut and was significantly higher in the coiled gut. Our findings show that protein digestion in P. canaliculata is carried out through a battery of diverse proteases originated from the salivary glands and the endosymbionts lodged in the midgut gland and by proteases of uncertain origin that occur in the coiled gut lumen. PMID:23818959

  2. BMAA extraction of cyanobacteria samples: which method to choose?

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Burian, Alfred; Rasmussen, Ulla; Costa, Pedro Reis; Annadotter, Heléne; Godhe, Anna; Rydberg, Sara

    2016-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxin reportedly produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates, is proposed to be linked to the development of neurological diseases. BMAA has been found in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, both in its phytoplankton producers and in several invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that bioaccumulate it. LC-MS/MS is the most frequently used analytical technique in BMAA research due to its high selectivity, though consensus is lacking as to the best extraction method to apply. This study accordingly surveys the efficiency of three extraction methods regularly used in BMAA research to extract BMAA from cyanobacteria samples. The results obtained provide insights into possible reasons for the BMAA concentration discrepancies in previous publications. In addition and according to the method validation guidelines for analysing cyanotoxins, the TCA protein precipitation method, followed by AQC derivatization and LC-MS/MS analysis, is now validated for extracting protein-bound (after protein hydrolysis) and free BMAA from cyanobacteria matrix. BMAA biological variability was also tested through the extraction of diatom and cyanobacteria species, revealing a high variance in BMAA levels (0.0080-2.5797 μg g(-1) DW). PMID:26304815

  3. Autoradiographic study of /sup 3/H-methylated elastase in hamster lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.M.; Stone, P.J.; Snider, G.L.; Albright, J.T.; Franzblau, C.

    1983-05-01

    An emphysemalike condition can be induced in animal lungs by the instillation of a single dose of elastase. Autoradiography was used to determine the location of /sup 3/H-methylated porcine pancreatic elastase in hamster lungs at four time points. Six hours after instillation of radiolabeled enzyme the distribution of silver grains was very patchy, but in heavily labeled areas grains were concentrated over macrophages, connective tissue areas and over some fibroblasts. By 24 hr the labeling of connective tissue areas was no longer evident and almost all silver grains were associated with macrophages or with the edema fluid that filled many alveoli at this time. By 4 days only macrophages exhibited concentrations of silver grains. The labeling of macrophages was still evident at 7 days. Elastase inactivated by N-acetyl-(L-alanyl)3-L-alanine chloromethyl ketone showed a different distribution 6 hr after instillation. Silver grains were concentrated over macrophages and alveolar type II cells but showed no affinity for connective tissue areas or fibroblasts. By 24 hr almost all grains were located over heavily labeled macrophages.

  4. Mycobacterial Lipid II Is Composed of a Complex Mixture of Modified Muramyl and Peptide Moieties Linked to Decaprenyl Phosphate†

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Yagi, Tetsuya; Belisle, John T.; Espinosa, Benjamin J.; Hill, Preston J.; McNeil, Michael R.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Crick, Dean C.

    2005-01-01

    Structural analysis of compounds identified as lipid I and II from Mycobacterium smegmatis demonstrated that the lipid moiety is decaprenyl phosphate; thus, M. smegmatis is the first bacterium reported to utilize a prenyl phosphate other than undecaprenyl phosphate as the lipid carrier involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. In addition, mass spectrometry showed that the muropeptides from lipid I are predominantly N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine-d-glutamate-meso-diaminopimelic acid-d-alanyl-d-alanine, whereas those isolated from lipid II form an unexpectedly complex mixture in which the muramyl residue and the pentapeptide are modified singly and in combination. The muramyl residue is present as N-acetylmuramic acid, N-glycolylmuramic acid, and muramic acid. The carboxylic functions of the peptide side-chains of lipid II showed three types of modification, with the dominant one being amidation. The preferred site for amidation is the free carboxyl group of the meso-diaminopimelic acid residue. Diamidated species were also observed. The carboxylic function of the terminal d-alanine of some molecules is methylated, as are all three carboxylic acid functions of other molecules. This study represents the first structural analysis of mycobacterial lipid I and II and the first report of extensive modifications of these molecules. The observation that lipid I was unmodified strongly suggests that the lipid II intermediates of M. smegmatis are substrates for a variety of enzymes that introduce modifications to the sugar and amino acid residues prior to the synthesis of peptidoglycan. PMID:15805521

  5. Differential effects of mercurial compounds on the electroolfactogram (EOG) of salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Baatrup, E; Døving, K B; Winberg, S

    1990-12-01

    The effects on the salmon (Salmo salar L.) electroolfactogram (EOG) of the two mercurials, mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and methylmercuric chloride (CH3HgCl), were studied. The EOG responses were evoked by stimulating the olfactory epithelium with 340 microM L-alanine for 10 sec every second minute during a 1-hr period. Each EOG response consisted of an initial peak component followed by a sustained component with an amplitude about 40% below the peak value. Three experimental series, each comprising six fish, were carried out. In the first series, the rosette was irrigated solely with artificial "fresh water." In the two other series, a 5-min exposure to mercury (HgCl2 or CH3HgCl, at 10(-5) M) was included after 10 min and a 15-min exposure after 45 min. The mercuric ion (Hg2+) eliminated the peak response within 2 min and suppressed the sustained response to about 35%. During the subsequent irrigation with mercury-free fresh water, both EOG components regained about 50% of their initial amplitudes. In contrast, methylmercury induced a steady and parallel decline of both the peak and the sustained responses, which were not reversed by rinsing the epithelium with fresh water. The results of this study demonstrate the vulnerability of the olfactory receptor function in fish to mercury exposure. Also, they show the very different effects of inorganic and organic mercurials upon the EOG. PMID:2090442

  6. Spectral characterization of novel ternary zinc(II) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline and Schiff bases derived from amino acids and salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghaei, Davar M.; Gharagozlou, Mehrnaz

    2007-07-01

    A series of new ternary zinc(II) complexes [Zn(L 1-10)(phen)], where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and H 2L 1-10 = tridentate Schiff base ligands derived from the condensation of amino acids (glycine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-alanine, and L-leucine) and salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonates (sodium salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonate and sodium 3-methoxy-salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonate), have been synthesized. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectra. The IR spectra of the complexes showed large differences between νas(COO) and νs(COO), Δ ν ( νas(COO) - νs(COO)) of 191-225 cm -1, indicating a monodentate coordination of the carboxylate group. Spectral data showed that in these ternary complexes the zinc atom is coordinated with the Schiff base ligand acts as a tridentate ONO moiety, coordinating to the metal through its phenolic oxygen, imine nitrogen, and carboxyl oxygen, and also with the neutral planar chelating ligand, 1,10-phenanthroline, coordinating through nitrogens.

  7. Transfer of a cyanobacterial neurotoxin within a temperate aquatic ecosystem suggests pathways for human exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, Sara; Eriksson, Johan; Berntzon, Lotta; Spáčil, Zdenĕk; Ilag, Leopold L.; Ronnevi, Lars-Olof; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic nonprotein amino acid produced by most cyanobacteria, has been proposed to be the causative agent of devastating neurodegenerative diseases on the island of Guam in the Pacific Ocean. Because cyanobacteria are widespread globally, we hypothesized that BMAA might occur and bioaccumulate in other ecosystems. Here we demonstrate, based on a recently developed extraction and HPLC-MS/MS method and long-term monitoring of BMAA in cyanobacterial populations of a temperate aquatic ecosystem (Baltic Sea, 2007–2008), that BMAA is biosynthesized by cyanobacterial genera dominating the massive surface blooms of this water body. BMAA also was found at higher concentrations in organisms of higher trophic levels that directly or indirectly feed on cyanobacteria, such as zooplankton and various vertebrates (fish) and invertebrates (mussels, oysters). Pelagic and benthic fish species used for human consumption were included. The highest BMAA levels were detected in the muscle and brain of bottom-dwelling fishes. The discovery of regular biosynthesis of the neurotoxin BMAA in a large temperate aquatic ecosystem combined with its possible transfer and bioaccumulation within major food webs, some ending in human consumption, is alarming and requires attention. PMID:20439734

  8. The major autolysin of Staphylococcus lugdunensis, AtlL, is involved in cell separation, stress-induced autolysis and contributes to bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Laure; Didi, Jennifer; Marlinghaus, Lennart; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Legris, Stéphanie; Szabados, Florian; Pons, Jean-Louis; Pestel-Caron, Martine

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a human skin commensal organism, but it is considered as a virulent Staphylococcus species. In a previous study, we described the first S. lugdunensis autolysin, AtlL. This enzyme displays two enzymatic domains and generates two peptidoglycan hydrolases, an N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase and an N-acetylglucosaminidase. In this study, to further investigate the functions of this autolysin, a ΔatlL mutant was constructed. The microscopic examination of the mutant showed cell aggregates and revealed a rough outer cell surface demonstrating, respectively, the roles of AtlL in cell separation and peptidoglycan turnover. This ΔatlL mutant exhibited a lower susceptibility to Triton X-100-induced autolysis assays and appears to be more resistant to cell wall antibiotic-induced lysis and death compared with its parental strain. The atlL mutation affected the biofilm formation capacity of S. lugdunensis. Furthermore, the ΔatlL mutant showed trends toward reduced virulence using the Caenorhabditis elegans model. Overall, AtlL appears as a major cell wall autolysin of S. lugdunensis implicated in cell separation, in stress-induced autolysis and in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24393327

  9. Redox Capacity of an Extracellular Matrix Protein Associated with Adhesion in Mytilus californianus.

    PubMed

    Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Spahn, Jamie E; Zhou, Hongjun; Gruian, Cristina M; Waite, J Herbert

    2016-04-01

    Adhesive mussel foot proteins (Mfps) rely in part on DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine) side chains to mediate attachment to mineral surfaces underwater. Oxidation of DOPA to Dopaquinone (Q) effectively abolishes the adsorption of Mfps to these surfaces. The thiol-rich mussel foot protein-6 (Mfp-6) rescues adhesion compromised by adventitious DOPA oxidation by reducing Q back to DOPA. The redox chemistry and kinetics of foot-extracted Mfp-6 were investigated by using a nonspecific chromogenic probe to equilibrate with the redox pool. Foot-extracted Mfp-6 has a reducing capacity of ~17 e(-) per protein; half of this comes from the cysteine residues, whereas the other half comes from other constituents, probably a cohort of four or five nonadhesive, redox-active DOPA residues in Mfp-6 with an anodic peak potential ~500 mV lower than that for oxidation of cysteine to cystine. At higher pH, DOPA redox reversibility is lost possibly due to Q scavenging by Cys thiolates. Analysis by one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance identified a pronounced β-sheet structure with a hydrophobic core in foot-extracted Mfp-6 protein. The structure endows redox-active side chains in Mfp-6, i.e., cysteine and DOPA, with significant reducing power over a broad pH range, and this power is measurably diminished in recombinant Mfp-6. PMID:26998552

  10. Shock synthesis of amino acids from impacting cometary and icy planet surface analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita; Price, Mark C.; Goldman, Nir; Sephton, Mark A.; Burchell, Mark J.

    2013-12-01

    Comets are known to harbour simple ices and the organic precursors of the building blocks of proteins--amino acids--that are essential to life. Indeed, glycine, the simplest amino acid, was recently confirmed to be present on comet 81P/Wild-2 from samples returned by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. Impacts of icy bodies (such as comets) onto rocky surfaces, and, equally, impacts of rocky bodies onto icy surfaces (such as the jovian and saturnian satellites), could have been responsible for the manufacture of these complex organic molecules through a process of shock synthesis. Here we present laboratory experiments in which we shocked ice mixtures analogous to those found in a comet with a steel projectile fired at high velocities in a light gas gun to test whether amino acids could be produced. We found that the hypervelocity impact shock of a typical comet ice mixture produced several amino acids after hydrolysis. These include equal amounts of D- and L-alanine, and the non-protein amino acids α-aminoisobutyric acid and isovaline as well as their precursors. Our findings suggest a pathway for the synthetic production of the components of proteins within our Solar System, and thus a potential pathway towards life through icy impacts.

  11. Capture myopathy in an endangered sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Thomas, N.J.; Reeves, S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite precautions to protect cranes, a 3-year-old endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla) was found caught in a leghold trap in Gautier, Mississippi, on 11 November 1987. The bird could have been in the trap for up to 16 hr and was standing and struggling to escape when it was discovered. Serum chemistries of the crane on 12 November revealed elevated lactic dehydrogenase (2,880 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (152 IU/L), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (>1,000 IU/L) values. Following surgical amputation of a fractured toe, the bird never attempted to stand and was unable to stand even when manually supported. Radiographic and physical examination of both legs did not reveal any anatomical abnormalities. Despite medical care, including supportive therapy, no improvement was observed in the bird's ability to stand and to support itself, and the bird died on 19 November. Serum chemistries and the postmortem and histopathologic findings were compatible with capture myopathy described in other species. Because of the possible susceptibility of long-legged birds such as the Mississippi sandhill crane to capture myopathy, special care must be taken when trapping, handling, chemically immobilizing, and transporting these species. In addition, precautions must be taken when conducting a predator-control program to ensure that nontarget wildlife are unlikely to encounter traps. Capture myopathy has only rarely been observed in wild birds, and this case represents the first report in a Mississippi sandhill crane.

  12. Planar anchoring strength and pitch measurements in achiral and chiral chromonic liquid crystals using 90-degree twist cells.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Christine K; Laderman, Laura I; Zimmermann, Natalie; Kitzerow, Heinz-S; Collings, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    Chromonic liquid crystals are formed by molecules that spontaneously assemble into anisotropic structures in water. The ordering unit is therefore a molecular assembly instead of a molecule as in thermotropic liquid crystals. Although it has been known for a long time that certain dyes, drugs, and nucleic acids form chromonic liquid crystals, only recently has enough knowledge been gained on how to control their alignment so that studies of their fundamental liquid crystal properties can be performed. In this article, a simple method for producing planar alignment of the nematic phase in chromonic liquid crystals is described, and this in turn is used to create twisted nematic structures of both achiral and chiral chromonic liquid crystals. The optics of 90-degree twist cells allows the anchoring strength to be measured in achiral systems, which for this alignment technique is quite weak, about 3×10(-7) J/m(2) for both disodium cromoglycate and Sunset Yellow FCF. The addition of a chiral amino acid to the system causes the chiral nematic phase to form, and similar optical measurements in 90-degree twist cells produce a measurement of the intrinsic pitch of the chiral nematic phase. From these measurements, the helical twisting power for L-alanine is found to be (1.1±0.4)×10(-2) μm(-1) wt%(-1) for 15 wt% disodium cromoglycate. PMID:24483474

  13. ORAL DELIVERY OF L-ARGININE STIMULATES PROSTAGLANDIN-DEPENDENT SECRETORY DIARRHEA IN C. PARVUM INFECTED NEONATAL PIGLETS

    PubMed Central

    Gookin, Jody L.; Foster, Derek M.; Coccaro, Maria R.; Stauffer, Stephen H.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To determine if oral supplementation with L-arginine could augment nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and promote epithelial defense in neonatal piglets infected with C. parvum. Methods Neonatal piglets were fed a liquid milk replacer and on day 3 of age infected or not with 108 C. parvum oocysts and the milk replacer supplemented with L-arginine or L-alanine. Milk consumption, body weight, fecal consistency, and oocyst excretion were recorded daily. On day 3 post-infection, piglets were euthanized, and serum concentration of NO metabolites and histological severity of villous atrophy and epithelial infection were quantified. Sheets of ileal mucosa were mounted in Ussing chambers for measurement of barrier function (transepithelial resistance (TER) and permeability) and short-circuit current (Isc; an indirect measurement of Cl− secretion in this tissue). Results C. parvum infected piglets had large numbers of epithelial parasites, villous atrophy, decreased barrier function, severe watery diarrhea, and failure to gain weight. L-arginine promoted synthesis of NO by infected piglets which was unaccompanied by improvement in severity of infection but rather promoted epithelial chloride secretion and diarrhea. Epithelial secretion by infected mucosa from L-arginine supplemented piglets was fully inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, indicating that prostaglandin synthesis was responsible for this effect. Conclusions Results of these studies demonstrate that provision of additional NO substrate in the form of L-arginine incites prostaglandin-dependent secretory diarrhea and does not promote epithelial defense or barrier function of C. parvum infected neonatal ileum. PMID:18223372

  14. Microstructural homogeneity of support silk spun by Eriophora fuliginea (C.L. Koch) determined by scanning X-ray microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riekel, C.; Craig, C. L.; Burghammer, M.; Müller, M.

    2001-01-01

    Scanning X-ray microdiffraction (SXD) permits the 'imaging' in-situ of crystalline phases, crystallinity and texture in whole biopolymer samples on the micrometre scale. SXD complements transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, which reach sub-nanometre lateral resolution but require thin sections and a vacuum environment. This is demonstrated using a support thread from a web spun by the orb-weaving spider Eriophora fuliginea (C.L. Koch). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows a central thread composed of two fibres to which thinner fibres are loosely attached. SXD of a piece of support thread approximately 60 µm long shows in addition the presence of nanometre-sized crystallites with the β-poly(L-alanine) structure in all fibres. The crystallinity of the thin fibres appears to be higher than that of the central thread, which probably reflects a higher polyalanine content of the fibroins. The molecular axis of the polymer chains in the central thread is orientated parallel to the macroscopic fibre axis, but in the thin fibres the molecular axis is tilted by about 71° to the macroscopic fibre axis. A helical model is tentatively proposed to describe this morphology. The central thread has a homogeneous distribution of crystallinity along the macroscopic fibre axis.

  15. Water temperature and pH influence olfactory sensitivity to pre-ovulatory and post-ovulatory ovarian pheromones in male Barilius bendelisis.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, J P; Kandwal, J S; Nautiyal, R

    2002-06-01

    The attractive response and sexual activity elicited by pre-ovulatory steroid sulphate and post-ovulatory 15K-PGF pheromones are greater in wild caught tubercular males and immature males which express breeding tubercles on the snout (at 12-13 days post androgen implant) than in non-tubercular and non-androgen implanted males of freshwater fish Barilius bendelisis. This shows that circulatory androgens exert an activational effect on olfactory receptors of male fish. Wild caught tubercular males and androgen implanted juvenile males exhibit a high responsiveness to steroid sulphate at the water temperature and pH which fish experience during the pre-spawning phase. The male's sensitivity to 15K-PGF is almost equally high at the water temperature and pH which they experience in wild during the both pre-spawning and spawning periods. This suggests that the differential olfactory sensitivity to the two classes of pheromones in androgen implanted males is due to the varied temperature and pH of water, and that during the breeding season the male's olfactory sensitivity to PGF pheromone is more widespread than to the steroidal pheromone. An increased and decreased olfactory sensitivity in mature males to sex pheromones and L-alanine respectively during the breeding phase is in agreement with the hypothesis that pheromonal stimuli dominate over feeding stimuli to promote spawning success. PMID:12089476

  16. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  17. Nod2-Nodosome in a Cell-Free System: Implications in Pathogenesis and Drug Discovery for Blau Syndrome and Early-Onset Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tomoyuki; Kaneko, Naoe; Ito, Yuki; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Heike, Toshio; Migita, Kiyoshi; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Kawakami, Atsushi; Morikawa, Shinnosuke; Mokuda, Sho; Kurata, Mie; Masumoto, Junya

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (Nod) 2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, which recognizes muramyl dipeptide (N-Acetylmuramyl-L-Alanyl-D-Isoglutamine: MDP), a bacterial peptidoglycan component, and makes a NF-κB-activating complex called nodosome with adaptor protein RICK (RIP2/RIPK2). Nod2 mutants are associated with the autoinflammatory diseases, Blau syndrome (BS)/early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS). For drug discovery of BS/EOS, we tried to develop Nod2-nodosome in a cell-free system. FLAG-tagged RICK, biotinylated-Nod2, and BS/EOS-associated Nod2 mutants were synthesized, and proximity signals between FLAG-tagged and biotinylated proteins were detected by amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (ALPHA). Upon incubation with MDP, the ALPHA signal of interaction between Nod2-WT and RICK was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The ALPHA signal of interaction between RICK and the BS/EOS-associated Nod2 mutants was more significantly increased than Nod2-WT. Notably, the ALPHA signal between Nod2-WT and RICK was increased upon incubation with MDP, but not when incubated with the same concentrations, L-alanine, D-isoglutamic acid, or the MDP-D-isoform. Thus, we successfully developed Nod2-nodosome in a cell-free system reflecting its function in vivo, and it can be useful for screening Nod2-nodosome-targeted therapeutic molecules for BS/EOS and granulomatous inflammatory diseases. PMID:27403452

  18. Wresting the muscle from mussel beards: research and applications.

    PubMed

    Rzepecki, L M; Waite, J H

    1995-12-01

    Marine and zebra mussels secrete byssal beards to attach themselves opportunistically to hard surfaces in their environment. By doing this, they naturally earn a reputation as fouling pests. The protein precursors of byssus in mussels are being investigated in the hope not only of discovering specific measures against these marine foulers, but also to gain some insights into the technically challenging task of engineering adhesive bonds underwater. Although byssal proteins are all part of the bearded glue that bonds them to a surface, they can be subdivided into three types depending on the function that they serve in byssal threads: (1) fibrous proteins form the load-bearing cables in the core of the threads, (2) cuticular proteins form a protective coat around the cables, and (3) adhesive proteins connect the cables to a foreign surface. A flaw in any one of these will undermine a mussel's ability to attach. The fibrous proteins can be collagenous, silk-like, elastic, or any combination of these. Covering these are the cuticular proteins, which are distinguished by their surface coupling properties, tandemly repeated primary sequence, and their high content of lysine and the exotic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (DOPA). The adhesive proteins are of low molecular weight, contain DOPA, and assemble to form microcellular solids (foams). Several of these proteins are already attracting biotechnological attention as cell and tissue attachment factors, anticorrosives, and metal-sequestering reagents. PMID:8541982

  19. Disruption of aldA Influences the Developmental Process in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Mandy J.; Lew, Helen; Zusman, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Previously, we identified a gene (aldA) from Myxococcus xanthus, which we suggested encoded the enzyme alanine dehydrogenase on the basis of similarity to known Ald protein sequences (M. J. Ward, H. Lew, A. Treuner-Lange, and D. R. Zusman, J. Bacteriol. 180:5668–5675, 1998). In this study, we have confirmed that aldA does encode a functional alanine dehydrogenase, since it catalyzes the reversible conversion of alanine to pyruvate and ammonia. Whereas an aldA gene disruption mutation did not significantly influence the rate of growth or spreading on a rich medium, AldA was required for growth on a minimal medium containing l-alanine as the major source of carbon. Under developmental conditions, the aldA mutation caused delayed aggregation in both wild-type (DZ2) and FB (DZF1) strains. Poorly formed aggregates and reduced levels of spores were apparent in the DZ2 aldA mutant, even after prolonged development. PMID:10629210

  20. Biochemical comparison of proteolytic enzymes present in rough- and smooth-surfaced capnocytophagas isolated from the subgingival plaque of periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Söderling, E; Mäkinen, P L; Syed, S; Mäkinen, K K

    1991-01-01

    Four rough-surfaced (R) and three smooth-surfaced (S) clinical isolates of Capnocytophaga obtained from the subgingival plaque of periodontitis patients were studied for their peptidase and protease profiles. The results were compared with those obtained with C. gingivalis (which has a smooth morphology). All cell extracts obtained by ultrasonic treatment displayed high peptidase activity toward N-aminoacyl-2-naphthylamines, the best substrates being the arginyl, aspartyl, and leucyl derivatives. The R and S isolates did not differ in these enzyme activities. Also the protease profiles studies with 4-phenylazobenzyloxycarbonyl-L-prolyl-L-leucylglycyl-L-proly l-D-arginine (PZ-PLPGA) and casein were similar. All extracts also hydrolyzed furylacryloyl-L-leucylglycyl-L-prolyl-L-alanine (FALGPA), reconstituted type I [3H]-collagen, and gelatin. N alpha-Benzoyl-DL-rginyl-2-naphthylamine was hydrolyzed faster by the R than the S strains. Comparison between cell suspensions and cell extracts of C. gingivalis showed the suspensions to be enzymatically more active than the extracts. In general, peptidase substrates and PZ-PLGPA were hydrolyzed at a higher rate by suspensions than by extracts, while protease substrates (such as casein) were hydrolyzed faster by the extracts. Gelatin and FALGPA were hydrolyzed by cell extracts only. Fast protein liquid chromatography of peptidases on a gel column was found to be a suitable method to differentiate between R and S isolates in diagnostics, while the chromatographic profiles of proteases were not suitable for this purpose. PMID:1825330

  1. The role of the dorsal raphe nucleus in the development, expression, and treatment of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia in hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Eskow, Karen L; Dupre, Kristin B; Barnum, Christopher J; Dickinson, Sando O; Park, John Y; Bishop, Christopher

    2009-07-01

    Convergent evidence indicates that in later stages of Parkinson's disease raphestriatal serotonin neurons compensate for the loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons by converting and releasing dopamine derived from exogenous administration of the pharmacotherapeutic L-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-dopa). Because the serotonin system is not equipped with dopamine autoregulatory mechanisms, it has been postulated that raphe-mediated striatal dopamine release may fluctuate dramatically. These fluctuations may portend the development of abnormal involuntary movements called L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). As such, it has been hypothesized that reducing the activity of raphestriatal neurons could dampen supraphysiological stimulation of striatal dopamine receptors thereby alleviating LID. To directly address this, the current study employed the rodent model of LID to investigate the contribution of the rostral raphe nuclei (RRN) in the development, expression and treatment of LID. In the first study, dual serotonin/dopamine selective lesions of the RRN and medial forebrain bundle, respectively, verified that the RRN are essential for the development of LID. In a direct investigation into the neuroanatomical specificity of these effects, microinfusions of +/-8-OH-DPAT into the intact dorsal raphe nucleus dose-dependently attenuated the expression of LID without affecting the antiparkinsonian efficacy of L-dopa. These current findings reveal the integral contribution of the RRN in the development and expression of LID and implicate a prominent role for dorsal raphe 5-HT1AR in the efficacious properties of 5-HT1AR agonists. PMID:19309758

  2. Parkinson-dementia complex and development of a new stable isotope dilution assay for BMAA detection in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Laura R.; Cruz-Aguado, Reyniel; Sadilek, Martin; Galasko, Douglas; Shaw, Christopher A.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-10-15

    {beta}-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as a global contributor to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson-dementia complex (PDC) of Guam and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The literature on the effects of BMAA is conflicting with some but not all in vitro data supporting a neurotoxic action, and experimental animal data failing to replicate the pattern of neurodegeneration of these human diseases, even at very high exposures. Recently, BMAA has been reported in human brain from individuals afflicted with PDC or AD. Some of the BMAA in human tissue reportedly is freely extractable (free) while some is protein-associated and liberated by techniques that hydrolyze the peptide bond. The latter is especially intriguing since BMAA is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that has no known tRNA. We attempted to replicate these findings with techniques similar to those used by others; despite more than adequate sensitivity, we were unable to detect free BMAA. Recently, using a novel stable isotope dilution assay, we again were unable to detect free or protein-associated BMAA in human cerebrum. Here we review the development of our new assay for tissue detection of BMAA and show that we are able to detect free BMAA in liver but not cerebrum, nor do we detect any protein-associated BMAA in mice fed this amino acid. These studies demonstrate the importance of a sensitive and specific assay for tissue BMAA and seriously challenge the proposal that BMAA is accumulating in human brain.

  3. Effects of growth conditions on the production of neurotoxin 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in Microcystis aeruginosa and its universal presence in diverse cyanobacteria isolated from freshwater in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hua; Qiu, Jiangbing; Fan, Lin; Li, Aifeng

    2015-04-01

    Neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and its isomer 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) have been reported previously in diverse strains of cyanobacteria. In this study, BMAA and DAB were analyzed for two strains of Microcystis aeruginosa incubated with four different levels of phosphate, nitrate, illumination, and temperature, respectively, in order to explore the effects of growth factors on toxin-producing ability of cyanobacteria. Both toxins were also screened in 17 cyanobacterial strains cultured with BG-11 medium and conventional illumination and temperature conditions, and in three field phytoplankton samples collected from different lakes in China. All samples were analyzed using a liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system coupled with a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) column. Results showed that no BMAA was detected in any of the cyanobacterial strains grown under our laboratory culture conditions, or in any of the field samples. Production of DAB in M. aeruginosa was significantly enhanced by extreme concentrations of nutrient and physical factors. Various concentrations of DAB were also present in most cultured samples (13 of 17) of cyanobacteria and were not species specific. This is the first time to report the production of DAB in M. aeruginosa cultured under alterative conditions in laboratory. Occurrence of DAB in most of the strains examined here means that consideration should be given to the presence of this compound in freshwater environment in China. PMID:25354443

  4. Methods for simultaneous detection of the cyanotoxins BMAA, DABA, and anatoxin-a in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Hoagland, Kyle D; Snow, Daniel D; Cassada, David

    2013-12-15

    Blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria, can produce several different groups of toxins in the environment including hepatotoxins (microcystins), neurotoxic non-protein amino acids β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), and 2,4-diaminobutyric (DABA), as well as the bicyclic amine alkaloid anatoxin-a. Few studies have addressed the methods necessary for an accurate determination of cyanotoxins in environmental samples, and none have been published that can detect these cyanotoxins together in a single sample. Cyanotoxins occur in a wide range of environmental samples including water, fish, and aquatic plant samples. Using polymeric cation exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection (HPLC/FD), and liquid chromatography ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), these compounds can for the first time be simultaneously quantified in a variety of environmental sample types. The extraction method for biological samples can distinguish bound and free cyanotoxins. Detection limits for water ranged from 5 to 7 μg/L using HPLC/FD, while detection limits for and LC/MS were in the range of 0.8-3.2 μg/L. PMID:24140919

  5. Detection of BMAA in the human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Berntzon, L; Ronnevi, L O; Bergman, B; Eriksson, J

    2015-04-30

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an extremely devastating neurodegenerative disease with an obscure etiology. The amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) produced by globally widespread phytoplankton has been implicated in the etiology of human motor neuron diseases [corrected]. BMAA was recently proven to be present in Baltic Sea food webs, ranging from plankton to larger Baltic Sea organisms, some serving as important food items (fish) for humans. To test whether exposure to BMAA in a Baltic Sea setting is reflected in humans, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from individuals suffering from ALS were analyzed, together with sex- and age-matched individuals not inflicted with ALS. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), in conjunction with diagnostic transitions revealed BMAA in three (12%) of the totally 25 Swedish individuals tested, with no preference for those suffering from ALS. The three BMAA-positive samples were all retrieved from the CSF, while BMAA was not detected in the blood. The data show that BMAA, potentially originating from Baltic Sea phytoplankton, may reach the human central nervous system, but does not lend support to the notion that BMAA is resident specifically in ALS-patients. However, while dietary exposure to BMAA may be intermittent and, if so, difficult to detect, our data provide the first demonstration of BMAA in the central nervous system of human individuals ante mortem quantified with UHPLC-MS/MS, and therefore calls for extended research efforts. PMID:25725357

  6. Presence of the Neurotoxin BMAA in Aquatic Ecosystems: What Do We Really Know?

    PubMed Central

    Faassen, Elisabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. BMAA production by cyanobacteria has been reported and contact with cyanobacteria infested waters or consumption of aquatic organisms are possible pathways to human exposure. However, there is little consensus regarding whether BMAA is present in cyanobacteria or not, and if so, at what concentrations. The aim of this review is to indicate the current state of knowledge on the presence of BMAA in aquatic ecosystems. Some studies have convincingly shown that BMAA can be present in aquatic samples at the µg/g dry weight level, which is around the detection limit of some equally credible studies in which no BMAA was detected. However, for the majority of the reviewed articles, it was unclear whether BMAA was correctly identified, either because inadequate analytical methods were used, or because poor reporting of analyses made it impossible to verify the results. Poor analysis, reporting and prolific errors have shaken the foundations of BMAA research. First steps towards estimation of human BMAA exposure are to develop and use selective, inter-laboratory validated methods and to correctly report the analytical work. PMID:24662480

  7. Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins.

    PubMed

    Kisby, Glen E; Moore, Holly; Spencer, Peter S

    2013-12-01

    Cycads are long-lived tropical and subtropical plants that contain azoxyglycosides (e.g., cycasin, macrozamin) and neurotoxic amino acids (notably β-N-methylamino-l-alanine l-BMAA), toxins that have been implicated in the etiology of a disappearing neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex that has been present in high incidence among three genetically distinct populations in the western Pacific. The neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex includes features suggestive of brain maldevelopment, an experimentally proven property of cycasin attributable to the genotoxic action of its aglycone methylazoxymethanol (MAM). This property of MAM has been exploited by neurobiologists as a tool to study perturbations of brain development. Depending on the neurodevelopmental stage, MAM can induce features in laboratory animals that model certain characteristics of epilepsy, schizophrenia, or ataxia. Studies in DNA repair-deficient mice show that MAM perturbs brain development through a DNA damage-mediated mechanism. The brain DNA lesions produced by systemic MAM appear to modulate the expression of genes that regulate neurodevelopment and contribute to neurodegeneration. Epigenetic changes (histone lysine methylation) have also been detected in the underdeveloped brain after MAM administration. The DNA damage and epigenetic changes produced by MAM and, perhaps by chemically related substances (e.g., nitrosamines, nitrosoureas, hydrazines), might be an important mechanism by which early-life exposure to genotoxicants can induce long-term brain dysfunction. PMID:24339036

  8. Presence of the neurotoxin BMAA in aquatic ecosystems: what do we really know?

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J

    2014-03-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. BMAA production by cyanobacteria has been reported and contact with cyanobacteria infested waters or consumption of aquatic organisms are possible pathways to human exposure. However, there is little consensus regarding whether BMAA is present in cyanobacteria or not, and if so, at what concentrations. The aim of this review is to indicate the current state of knowledge on the presence of BMAA in aquatic ecosystems. Some studies have convincingly shown that BMAA can be present in aquatic samples at the µg/g dry weight level, which is around the detection limit of some equally credible studies in which no BMAA was detected. However, for the majority of the reviewed articles, it was unclear whether BMAA was correctly identified, either because inadequate analytical methods were used, or because poor reporting of analyses made it impossible to verify the results. Poor analysis, reporting and prolific errors have shaken the foundations of BMAA research. First steps towards estimation of human BMAA exposure are to develop and use selective, inter-laboratory validated methods and to correctly report the analytical work. PMID:24662480

  9. Animal Models of Brain Maldevelopment Induced by Cycad Plant Genotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Kisby, Glen E.; Moore, Holly; Spencer, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Cycads are long-lived tropical and subtropical plants that contain azoxyglycosides (e.g., cycasin, macrozamin) and neurotoxic amino acids (notably β-N-methylamino-L-alanine L-BMAA), toxins that have been implicated in the etiology of a disappearing neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex that has been present in high incidence among three genetically distinct populations in the western Pacific. The neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex includes features suggestive of brain maldevelopment, an experimentally proven property of cycasin attributable to the genotoxic action of its aglycone methylazoxymethanol (MAM). This property of MAM has been exploited by neurobiologists as a tool to study perturbations of brain development. Depending on the neurodevelopmental stage, MAM can induce features in laboratory animals that model certain characteristics of epilepsy, schizophrenia, or ataxia. Studies in DNA repair-deficient mice show that MAM perturbs brain development through a DNA damage-mediated mechanism. The brain DNA lesions produced by systemic MAM appear to modulate the expression of genes that regulate neurodevelopment and contribute to neurodegeneration. Epigenetic changes (histone lysine methylation) have also been detected in the underdeveloped brain after MAM administration. The DNA damage and epigenetic changes produced by MAM and, perhaps by chemically related substances (e.g., nitrosamines, nitrosoureas, hydrazines), might be an important mechanism by which early-life exposure to genotoxicants can induce long-term brain dysfunction. PMID:24339036

  10. Evaluation of a Commercial Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for the Determination of the Neurotoxin BMAA in Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Faassen, Elisabeth J.; Beekman, Wendy; Lürling, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Because BMAA seems to be produced by cyanobacteria, surface waters are screened for BMAA. However, reliable analysis of BMAA requires specialized and expensive equipment. In 2012, a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determination of BMAA in surface waters was released. This kit could enable fast and relatively cheap screening of surface waters for BMAA. The objective of this study was to determine whether the BMAA ELISA kit was suitable for the determination of BMAA concentrations in surface waters. We hypothesised that the recovery of spiked samples was close to 100% and that the results of unspiked sample analysis were comparable between ELISA and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. However, we found that recovery was higher than 100% in most spiked samples, highest determined recovery was over 400%. Furthermore, the ELISA gave a positive signal for nearly each tested sample while no BMAA could be detected by LC-MS/MS. We therefore conclude that in its current state, the kit is not suitable for screening surface waters for BMAA. PMID:23762331

  11. Metal dyshomeostasis and inflammation in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases: possible impact of environmental exposures.

    PubMed

    Myhre, Oddvar; Utkilen, Hans; Duale, Nur; Brunborg, Gunnar; Hofer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    A dysregulated metal homeostasis is associated with both Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases; AD patients have decreased cortex and elevated serum copper levels along with extracellular amyloid-beta plaques containing copper, iron, and zinc. For AD, a putative hepcidin-mediated lowering of cortex copper mechanism is suggested. An age-related mild chronic inflammation and/or elevated intracellular iron can trigger hepcidin production followed by its binding to ferroportin which is the only neuronal iron exporter, thereby subjecting it to lysosomal degradation. Subsequently raised neuronal iron levels can induce translation of the ferroportin assisting and copper binding amyloid precursor protein (APP); constitutive APP transmembrane passage lowers the copper pool which is important for many enzymes. Using in silico gene expression analyses, we here show significantly decreased expression of copper-dependent enzymes in AD brain and metallothioneins were upregulated in both diseases. Although few AD exposure risk factors are known, AD-related tauopathies can result from cyanobacterial microcystin and β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) intake. Several environmental exposures may represent risk factors for PD; for this disease neurodegeneration is likely to involve mitochondrial dysfunction, microglial activation, and neuroinflammation. Administration of metal chelators and anti-inflammatory agents could affect disease outcomes. PMID:23710288

  12. Current pathways for epidemiological research in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Factor-Litvak, Pam; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Ascherio, Alberto; Bradley, Walter; Chío, Adriano; Garruto, Ralph; Hardiman, Orla; Kamel, Freya; Kasarskis, Edward; McKee, Ann; Nakano, Imaharu; Nelson, Lorene M; Eisen, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease. The current status of the epidemiology, challenges to its study, and novel study design options are discussed in this paper. We focus on recent results from large-scale population based prospective studies, case-control studies and population based registries, risk factors, and neuropathologic findings in chronic traumatic encephalomyelopathy. We identify areas of interest for future research, including time-trends in the incidence and prevalence of ALS; the meaning of lifetime risk; the phenotypic description of ALS; the definition of familial versus sporadic ALS, syndromic aspects of ALS; specific risk factors such as military service, life style factors such as smoking, the use of statins, and the presence of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), an excitotoxic amino acid derivative possibly produced by cyanobacteria found in almost every terrestrial and aquatic habitat; the emergence and disappearance of an endemic ALS in areas of the Pacific; and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of ALS. To move the epidemiology forward, we suggest using well-characterized cohorts of newly diagnosed ALS patients to identify risk and prognostic factors; storing biological material for future studies; building on the National ALS Registry as a resource of future studies; working in multidisciplinary consortia; and addressing the possible early life etiology of ALS. PMID:23678878

  13. Amino acid neurotoxins in feathers of the Lesser Flamingo, Phoeniconaias minor.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, J S; Banack, S A; Kotut, K; Krienitz, L; Codd, G A

    2013-01-01

    The Lesser Flamingo (Phoeniconaias minor) is known to use cyanobacteria (primarily Arthrospira) as a major food source in the East African Rift Valley lakes. Periodically, mass mortalities have occurred, associated with the cyanobacterial toxins (cyanotoxins), microcystins and anatoxin-a. Deposition of these cyanotoxins into P. minor feathers has been shown to occur, consistent with the presence of cyanotoxins in the livers, stomach and faecal contents after dietary intake. As cyanobacteria have been shown to also produce the neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB), stored wing feathers, previously recovered from flamingos which had been exposed to microcystins and anatoxin-a and had subsequently died, were analysed for these neurotoxic amino acids. Trace amounts of BMAA were detected in extracts from Lake Nakuru flamingo feathers, with DAB also present at concentrations between 3.5 and 8.5 μg g(-1) dry weight in feathers from both lakes. Toxin recovery by solid-phase extraction of feather digests was tested with spiked deuterated BMAA and showed good recovery when analysed by LC-MS/MS (80-94%). This is the first report of these neurotoxic amino acids in birds. We discuss the origin and significance of DAB, alongside other cyanotoxins of dietary origin, in the feathers of the Lesser Flamingo. PMID:23123117

  14. Is exposure to cyanobacteria an environmental risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases?

    PubMed

    Bradley, Walter G; Borenstein, Amy R; Nelson, Lorene M; Codd, Geoffrey A; Rosen, Barry H; Stommel, Elijah W; Cox, Paul Alan

    2013-09-01

    There is a broad scientific consensus that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by gene-environment interactions. Mutations in genes underlying familial ALS (fALS) have been discovered in only 5-10% of the total population of ALS patients. Relatively little attention has been paid to environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger the cascade of motor neuron death leading to the syndrome of ALS, although exposure to chemicals including lead and pesticides, and to agricultural environments, smoking, certain sports, and trauma have all been identified with an increased risk of ALS. There is a need for research to quantify the relative roles of each of the identified risk factors for ALS. Recent evidence has strengthened the theory that chronic environmental exposure to the neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced by cyanobacteria may be an environmental risk factor for ALS. Here we describe methods that may be used to assess exposure to cyanobacteria, and hence potentially to BMAA, namely an epidemiologic questionnaire and direct and indirect methods for estimating the cyanobacterial load in ecosystems. Rigorous epidemiologic studies could determine the risks associated with exposure to cyanobacteria, and if combined with genetic analysis of ALS cases and controls could reveal etiologically important gene-environment interactions in genetically vulnerable individuals. PMID:23286757

  15. Evaluation of a commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of the neurotoxin BMAA in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J; Beekman, Wendy; Lürling, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Because BMAA seems to be produced by cyanobacteria, surface waters are screened for BMAA. However, reliable analysis of BMAA requires specialized and expensive equipment. In 2012, a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determination of BMAA in surface waters was released. This kit could enable fast and relatively cheap screening of surface waters for BMAA. The objective of this study was to determine whether the BMAA ELISA kit was suitable for the determination of BMAA concentrations in surface waters. We hypothesised that the recovery of spiked samples was close to 100% and that the results of unspiked sample analysis were comparable between ELISA and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. However, we found that recovery was higher than 100% in most spiked samples, highest determined recovery was over 400%. Furthermore, the ELISA gave a positive signal for nearly each tested sample while no BMAA could be detected by LC-MS/MS. We therefore conclude that in its current state, the kit is not suitable for screening surface waters for BMAA. PMID:23762331

  16. The non-protein amino acid BMAA is misincorporated into human proteins in place of L-serine causing protein misfolding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNA(Ala) with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of L-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by L-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS. PMID:24086518

  17. Dietary exposure to an environmental toxin triggers neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid deposits in the brain.

    PubMed

    Cox, Paul Alan; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C; Metcalf, James S; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2016-01-27

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and β-amyloid plaques are the neurological hallmarks of both Alzheimer's disease and an unusual paralytic illness suffered by Chamorro villagers on the Pacific island of Guam. Many Chamorros with the disease suffer dementia, and in some villages one-quarter of the adults perished from the disease. Like Alzheimer's, the causal factors of Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC) are poorly understood. In replicated experiments, we found that chronic dietary exposure to a cyanobacterial toxin present in the traditional Chamorro diet, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), triggers the formation of both NFT and β-amyloid deposits similar in structure and density to those found in brain tissues of Chamorros who died with ALS/PDC. Vervets (Chlorocebus sabaeus) fed for 140 days with BMAA-dosed fruit developed NFT and sparse β-amyloid deposits in the brain. Co-administration of the dietary amino acid l-serine with l-BMAA significantly reduced the density of NFT. These findings indicate that while chronic exposure to the environmental toxin BMAA can trigger neurodegeneration in vulnerable individuals, increasing the amount of l-serine in the diet can reduce the risk. PMID:26791617

  18. Aerosolization of cyanobacteria as a risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stommel, Elijah W; Field, Nicholas C; Caller, Tracie A

    2013-02-01

    Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with no known cause. There are many clues to suggest an environmental trigger for the disease, including reports of conjugal couples and co-localized employees that developed sALS. On the island of Guam,a very high incidence of sALS occurred among the Chamorro natives back in the 1940s and 1950s and has been linked to the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) that is produced by cyanobacteria that live symbiotically in the roots of the cycad plant, the seeds from which were a staple of the Chamorro diet. It has been shown that BMAA was biomagnified up the food chain from the cycad seeds to the now largely extinct, indigenous flying foxes, a former delicacy of the Chamorro natives. Recent evidence suggests that long term, chronic exposure to low levels of BMAA might cause ALS in genetically predisposed individuals. Many exposure routes to BMAA have been implicated thus far, including consumption of contaminated food and exposure to water harboring cyanobacterial blooms which have the capability of producing BMAA. Aerosolization is a well documented means for bacterial or toxin exposure causing subsequent illness, as in the case of brevetoxins and pulmonary disease and Legionnaire's disease. We hypothesize that some cases of ALS may be related to chronic exposure to the aerosolization of cyanobacteria derived BMAA from cooling towers and might explain the observation of conjugal ALS couples. PMID:23246360

  19. The Non-Protein Amino Acid BMAA Is Misincorporated into Human Proteins in Place of l-Serine Causing Protein Misfolding and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNAAla with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of l-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by l-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS. PMID:24086518

  20. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome and mechanism of inhibition by a peptidyl boronate

    SciTech Connect

    Hu,G.; Lin, G.; Wang, M.; Dick, L.; Xu, R.; Nathan, C.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has the remarkable ability to resist killing by human macrophages. The 750 kDa proteasome, not available in most eubacteria except Actinomycetes, appears to contribute to Mtb's resistance. The crystal structure of the Mtb proteasome at 3.0 Angstroms resolution reveals a substrate-binding pocket with composite features of the distinct {beta}1, {beta}2 and {beta}5 substrate binding sites of eukaryotic proteasomes, accounting for the broad specificity of the Mtb proteasome towards oligopeptides described in the companion article [Lin et al. (2006), Mol Microbiol doi:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2005.05035.x]. The substrate entrance at the end of the cylindrical proteasome appears open in the crystal structure due to partial disorder of the a-subunit N-terminal residues. However, cryo-electron microscopy of the core particle reveals a closed end, compatible with the density observed in negative-staining electron microscopy that depended on the presence of the N-terminal octapeptides of the a-subunits in the companion article, suggesting that the Mtb proteasome has a gated structure. We determine for the first time the proteasomal inhibition mechanism of the dipeptidyl boronate N-(4-morpholine)carbonyl-{beta}-(1-naphthyl)-l-alanine-l-leucine boronic acid (MLN-273), an analogue of the antimyeloma drug bortezomib. The structure improves prospects for designing Mtb-specific proteasomal inhibitors as a novel approach to chemotherapy of tuberculosis.

  1. Membrane topology of aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT from Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Takashi; Nanatani, Kei; Nishitani, Kei; Yagi, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Uchida, Takafumi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abea, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    We cloned the aspT gene encoding the L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter AspTCt in Comamonas testosteroni genomic DNA. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that C. testosteroni has an asp operon containing aspT upstream of the l-aspartate 4-decarboxylase gene, and that the gene order of the asp operon of C. testosteroni is the inverse of that of Tetragenococcus halophilus. We used proteoliposomes to confirm the transport processes of AspTCt. To elucidate the two-dimensional structure of AspTCt, we analysed its membrane topology by means of alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) and beta-lactamase (BlaM) fusion methods. The fusion analyses revealed that AspTCt has seven transmembrane segments (TMs), a large cytoplasmic loop containing approximately 200 amino acid residues between TM4 and TM5, a cytoplasmic N-terminus, and a periplasmic C-terminus. These results suggest that the orientation of the N-terminus of AspTCt differs from that of tetragenococcal AspT, even though these two AspT orthologues catalyse the same transport reactions. PMID:17158863

  2. Microsphere-Incorporated Hybrid Thermogel for Neuronal Differentiation of Tonsil Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Patel, Madhumita; Moon, Hyo Jung; Jung, Bo Kyung; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2015-07-15

    Neuronal differentiation of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (TMSCs) is investigated in a 3D hybrid system. The hybrid system is prepared by increasing the temperature of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-alanine) aqueous solution to 37 °C through the heat-induced sol-to-gel transition, in which TMSCs and growth factor releasing microspheres are suspended. The in situ formed gel exhibits a modulus of 800 Pa at 37 °C, similar to that of brain tissue, and it is robust enough to hold the microspheres and cells during the 3D culture of TMSCs. The neuronal growth factors are released over 12-18 d, and the TMSCs in a spherical shape initially undergo multipolar elongation during the 3D culture. Significantly higher expressions of the neuronal biomarkers such as nuclear receptor related protein (Nurr-1), neuron specific enolase, microtubule associated protein-2, neurofilament-M, and glial fibrillary acidic protein are observed in both mRNA level and protein level in the hybrid systems than in the control experiments. This study proves the significance of a controlled drug delivery concept in tissue engineering or regenerative medicine, and a 3D hybrid system with controlled release of growth factors from microspheres in a thermogel can be a very promising tool. PMID:26033880

  3. Overview on the biotechnological production of L-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoungseon; Park, Kyungmoon; Park, Don-Hee; Yoo, Young Je

    2015-01-01

    L-DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine) has been widely used as a drug for Parkinson's disease caused by deficiency of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Since Monsanto developed the commercial process for L-DOPA synthesis for the first time, most of currently supplied L-DOPA has been produced by the asymmetric method, especially asymmetric hydrogenation. However, the asymmetric synthesis shows critical limitations such as a poor conversion rate and a low enantioselectivity. Accordingly, alternative biotechnological approaches have been researched for overcoming the shortcomings: microbial fermentation using microorganisms with tyrosinase, tyrosine phenol-lyase, or p-hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase activity and enzymatic conversion by immobilized tyrosinase. Actually, Ajinomoto Co. Ltd commercialized Erwinia herbicola fermentation to produce L-DOPA from catechol. In addition, the electroenzymatic conversion system was recently introduced as a newly emerging scheme. In this review, we aim to not only overview the biotechnological L-DOPA production methods, but also to briefly compare and analyze their advantages and drawbacks. Furthermore, we suggest the future potential of biotechnological L-DOPA production as an industrial process. PMID:25432672

  4. Investigating the inclusion properties of aromatic amino acids complexing beta-cyclodextrins in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Caso, Jolanda Valentina; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Malgieri, Gaetano; Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Isernia, Carla; Iacovino, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are commonly used as complexing agents in biological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications since they have an effect on protein thermal and proteolytic stability, refolding yields, solubility, and taste masking. β-cyclodextrins (β-CD), because of their cavity size are a perfectly suited complexing agent for many common guest moieties. In the case of peptide-cyclodextrin and protein-cyclodextrin host-guest complexes the aromatic amino acids are reported to be the principal responsible of the interaction. For these reasons, we have investigated the inclusion properties of nine designed tripeptides, obtained permuting the position of two L-alanines (Ala, A) with that of one L-tryptophan (Trp, W), L-phenylalanine (Phe, F), or L-tyrosine (Tyr, Y), respectively. Interestingly, the position of the aromatic side-chain in the sequence appears to modulate the β-CD:peptide binding constants, determined via UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopy, which in turn assumes values higher than those reported for the single amino acid. The tripeptides containing a tyrosine showed the highest binding constants, with the central position in the Ac-AYA-NH2 peptide becoming the most favorite for the interaction. A combined NMR and Molecular Docking approach permitted to build detailed complex models, highlighting the stabilizing interactions of the neighboring amino acids backbone atoms with the upper rim of the β-CD. PMID:25985927

  5. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  6. Synthesis, physicochemical studies, embryos toxicity and DNA interaction of some new Iron(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.

    2013-05-01

    New Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, and conductance measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. The investigated Schiff bases exhibited tridentate coordination mode with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O for all amino acids except L-histidine. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their toxicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. The interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA cleavage activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. The thermodynamic Profile of the binding of nphali complex and CT-DNA was constructed by analyzing the experimental data of absorption titration and UV melting studies with the McGhee equation, van't Hoff's equation, and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  7. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome and mechanism of inhibition by a peptidyl boronate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guiqing; Lin, Gang; Wang, Ming; Dick, Lawrence; Xu, Rui-Ming; Nathan, Carl; Li, Huilin

    2006-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has the remarkable ability to resist killing by human macrophages. The 750 kDa proteasome, not available in most eubacteria except Actinomycetes, appears to contribute to Mtb's resistance. The crystal structure of the Mtb proteasome at 3.0 A resolution reveals a substrate-binding pocket with composite features of the distinct beta1, beta2 and beta5 substrate binding sites of eukaryotic proteasomes, accounting for the broad specificity of the Mtb proteasome towards oligopeptides described in the companion article [Lin et al. (2006), Mol Microbiol doi:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2005.05035.x]. The substrate entrance at the end of the cylindrical proteasome appears open in the crystal structure due to partial disorder of the alpha-subunit N-terminal residues. However, cryo-electron microscopy of the core particle reveals a closed end, compatible with the density observed in negative-staining electron microscopy that depended on the presence of the N-terminal octapetides of the alpha-subunits in the companion article, suggesting that the Mtb proteasome has a gated structure. We determine for the first time the proteasomal inhibition mechanism of the dipeptidyl boronate N-(4-morpholine)carbonyl-beta-(1-naphthyl)-L-alanine-L-leucine boronic acid (MLN-273), an analogue of the antimyeloma drug bortezomib. The structure improves prospects for designing Mtb-specific proteasomal inhibitors as a novel approach to chemotherapy of tuberculosis. PMID:16468986

  8. Dietary exposure to an environmental toxin triggers neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid deposits in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Paul Alan; Davis, David A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Metcalf, James S.; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and β-amyloid plaques are the neurological hallmarks of both Alzheimer's disease and an unusual paralytic illness suffered by Chamorro villagers on the Pacific island of Guam. Many Chamorros with the disease suffer dementia, and in some villages one-quarter of the adults perished from the disease. Like Alzheimer's, the causal factors of Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC) are poorly understood. In replicated experiments, we found that chronic dietary exposure to a cyanobacterial toxin present in the traditional Chamorro diet, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), triggers the formation of both NFT and β-amyloid deposits similar in structure and density to those found in brain tissues of Chamorros who died with ALS/PDC. Vervets (Chlorocebus sabaeus) fed for 140 days with BMAA-dosed fruit developed NFT and sparse β-amyloid deposits in the brain. Co-administration of the dietary amino acid l-serine with l-BMAA significantly reduced the density of NFT. These findings indicate that while chronic exposure to the environmental toxin BMAA can trigger neurodegeneration in vulnerable individuals, increasing the amount of l-serine in the diet can reduce the risk. PMID:26791617

  9. The DmpA aminopeptidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi LMG7991 is the prototype of a new terminal nucleophile hydrolase family.

    PubMed Central

    Fanuel, L; Goffin, C; Cheggour, A; Devreese, B; Van Driessche, G; Joris, B; Van Beeumen, J; Frère, J M

    1999-01-01

    The DmpA (d-aminopeptidase A) protein produced by Ochrobactrum anthropi hydrolyses p-nitroanilide derivatives of glycine and d-alanine more efficiently than that of l-alanine. When regular peptides are utilized as substrates, the enzyme behaves as an aminopeptidase with a preference for N-terminal residues in an l configuration, thus exemplifying an interesting case of stereospecificity reversal. The best-hydrolysed substrate is l-Ala-Gly-Gly, but tetra- and penta-peptides are also efficiently hydrolysed. The gene encodes a 375-residue precursor, but the active enzyme contains two polypeptides corresponding to residues 2-249 (alpha-subunit) and 250-375 (beta-subunit) of the precursor. Residues 249 and 250 are a Gly and a Ser respectively, and various substitutions performed by site-directed mutagenesis result in the production of an uncleaved and inactive protein. The N-terminal Ser residue of the beta-subunit is followed by a hydrophobic peptide, which is predicted to form a beta-strand structure. All these properties strongly suggest that DmpA is an N-terminal amidohydrolase. An exploration of the databases highlights the presence of a number of open reading frames encoding related proteins in various bacterial genomes. Thus DmpA is very probably the prototype of an original family of N-terminal hydrolases. PMID:10377256

  10. Enrichment of Non-Terrestrial L-Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Aqueous Alteration on the Tagish Lake Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography fluorescence detection time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approx. 43 to 59%) of the a-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha-hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D approx. L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and D- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the Lexcesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals.

  11. Total synthesis and configurational assignment of chondramide A.

    PubMed

    Schmauder, Anke; Sibley, L David; Maier, Martin E

    2010-04-12

    The first total synthesis of the cyclodepsipeptide chondramide A (2 b) is described. This depsipeptide is composed of four subunits, namely L-alanine, N-Me-D-tryptophan, 3-amino-2-methoxy-propionic acid (beta-tyrosine derivative), and a 7-hydroxy-alkenoic acid. While the configuration of the stereogenic centers in the 7-hydroxy-alkenoic acid were known, the configuration of the tyrosine derivative required clarification and turned out to be (2S,3R) or (2L,3L), respectively. The synthesis of the 3-amino-2-methoxy-3-arylpropanoic ester 20 b relied on an asymmetric dihydroxylation yielding diol ent-15 a followed by a regioselective Mitsunobu substitution leading to 3-azido-2-hydroxypropanoate 18 b. We could also show that the ester bond in the seco compound 26 b can be fashioned by a Mitsunobu esterification by using hydroxy ester (7S)-7 and the tripeptide acid 25 b. This synthesis should allow for the preparation of various analogues. PMID:20222097

  12. Glycosylated Hydroxytryptophan in a Mussel Adhesive Protein from Perna viridis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Sagert, Jason; Hwang, Dong Soo; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (Dopa)-containing proteins of mussel byssus play a critical role in wet adhesion and have inspired versatile new synthetic strategies for adhesives and coatings. Apparently, however, not all mussel adhesive proteins are beholden to Dopa chemistry. The cDNA-deduced sequence of Pvfp-1, a highly aromatic and redox active byssal coating protein in the green mussel Perna viridis, suggests that Dopa may be replaced by a post-translational modification of tryptophan. The N-terminal tryptophan-rich domain of Pvfp-1 contains 42 decapeptide repeats with the consensus sequences ATPKPW1TAW2K and APPPAW1TAW2K. A small collagen domain (18 Gly-X-Y repeats) is also present. Tandem mass spectrometry of isolated tryptic decapeptides has detected both C2-hexosylated tryptophan (W1) and C2-hexosylated hydroxytryptophan (W2), the latter of which is redox active. The UV absorbance spectrum of W2 is consistent with 7-hydroxytryptophan, which represents an intriguing new theme for bioinspired opportunistic wet adhesion. PMID:19584055

  13. Boronate Complex Formation with Dopa Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein Retards pH-Induced Oxidation and Enables Adhesion to Mica

    PubMed Central

    Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The biochemistry of mussel adhesion has inspired the design of surface primers, adhesives, coatings and gels for technological applications. These mussel-inspired systems often focus on incorporating the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa) or a catecholic analog into a polymer. Unfortunately, effective use of Dopa is compromised by its susceptibility to auto-oxidation at neutral pH. Oxidation can lead to loss of adhesive function and undesired covalent cross-linking. Mussel foot protein 5 (Mfp-5), which contains ∼30 mole % Dopa, is a superb adhesive under reducing conditions but becomes nonadhesive after pH-induced oxidation. Here we report that the bidentate complexation of borate by Dopa to form a catecholato-boronate can be exploited to retard oxidation. Although exposure of Mfp-5 to neutral pH typically oxidizes Dopa, resulting in a>95% decrease in adhesion, inclusion of borate retards oxidation at the same pH. Remarkably, this Dopa-boronate complex dissociates upon contact with mica to allow for a reversible Dopa-mediated adhesion. The borate protection strategy allows for Dopa redox stability and maintained adhesive function in an otherwise oxidizing environment. PMID:25303409

  14. Binary and ternary complexes of some inner transition metal ions with amino acids and acetyl acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Eittah, R. H.; Abdou, M. M.; Salem, M. B.

    1998-05-01

    The stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 (whenever possible) complexes formed between La3+, Ce3+, Th4+ and the amino acid anions L-alaninate, L-phenylalaninate and L-histidinate were determined by potentiometric titration in aqueous solution (25± 1 ^circC, I = 0.1 M KCl) and compared together with the constants previously determined. The various formation degree of the resulting M(L) and M(L)2 were determined. In order to relate the formation degree of M(L) and M(L)2 with the basicity of the amino acid anion (L^-), the acidity constants of the protonated amino acids, H2L^+, were also measured. The main results of this work prove that Th4+ ion forms the strongest complex with the studied amino acids. It is the only ion which forms a 1:2 complex. The heterocyclic ring of histidine plays a significant role in complexing with the studied metal ions as is clearly seen from the distribution of the degree of formation of the different complexes. The stability constants of the 1:1:1, 1:2:1 and 1:1:2 complexes formed between La3+, Ce3+, Th4+ and the anions L-alaninate, L-phenylalaninate and L-histidinate together with the acetyl acetonate ion were also determined following the same experimental set up used in the study of the simple complexes. The mixed-ligand complexes turned out to be very much stronger than the simple ligand complexes. Formation of a mixed ligand complex can be considered as a type of senergism. Les constantes de stabilité des complexes 1:1 et 2:2 (lorsque cela est possible) formés entre La3+, Ce3+, Th4+ et les anions aminoacides L-alaninate, L-phénylalaninate et L-histidinate ont été déterminées par dosage potentiométrique en solution aqueuse (25± 1 ^circC, I = 0,1 M KCl), et comparées à celles de la littérature. Les différents degrés de formation de M(L) et M(L)2 ont été quantifiés. Pour mettre en évidence la relation entre le degré de formation de M(L) et M(L)2 et la basicité des anions aminoacides (L^-), les constantes d

  15. Intramolecular interactions of L-phenylalanine: Valence ionization spectra and orbital momentum distributions of its fragment molecules.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Wang, Feng; Falzon, Chantal

    2011-02-01

    Intramolecular interactions between fragments of L-phenylalanine, i.e., phenyl and alaninyl, have been investigated using dual space analysis (DSA) quantum mechanically. Valence space photoelectron spectra (PES), orbital energy topology and correlation diagram, as well as orbital momentum distributions (MDs) of L-phenylalanine, benzene and L-alanine are studied using density functional theory methods. While fully resolved experimental PES of L-phenylalanine is not yet available, our simulated PES reproduces major features of the experimental measurement. For benzene, the simulated orbital MDs for 1e(1g) and 1a(2u) orbitals also agree well with those measured using electron momentum spectra. Our theoretical models are then applied to reveal intramolecular interactions of the species on an orbital base, using DSA. Valence orbitals of L-phenylalanine can be essentially deduced into contributions from its fragments such as phenyl and alaninyl as well as their interactions. The fragment orbitals inherit properties of their parent species in energy and shape (ie., MDs). Phenylalanine orbitals show strong bonding in the energy range of 14-20 eV, rather than outside of this region. This study presents a competent orbital based fragments-in-molecules picture in the valence space, which supports the fragment molecular orbital picture and building block principle in valence space. The optimized structures of the molecules are represented using the recently developed interactive 3D-PDF technique. PMID:20806261

  16. Evidence for functional asymmetry in the olfactory system of the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis).

    PubMed

    Velez, Zélia; Hubbard, Peter C; Barata, Eduardo N; Canário, Adelino V M

    2005-01-01

    The two olfactory epithelia of flatfish of the family Soleidae are essentially in contact with two distinct environments; the upper (right) side samples open water while the lower (left) side samples interstitial water. This study assessed whether there are differences in the responsiveness of the two epithelia by use of the electro-olfactogram in the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis). The upper epithelium was significantly more responsive to the basic amino acids (L-lysine and L-arginine), glycine, and L-threonine than the lower epithelium. The lower epithelium was significantly more responsive to aromatic amino acids (L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-DOPA, and L-phenylalanine), L-leucine, and L-asparagine than the upper. Both epithelia had similar responsiveness to the sulphur-containing amino acids (L-cysteine and L-methionine), L-alanine, L-serine, and L-glutamine. Neither side was responsive to the acidic amino acids (L-aspartate and L-glutamate) or the D-isomers of any amino acid tested. The upper olfactory organ was much more responsive to conspecific-derived stimuli (bile and intestinal fluid) than the lower organ. We suggest that these differences in responsiveness may be related to different functional roles of the upper and lower epithelia in feeding and chemical communication. PMID:16059846

  17. Olfactory conditioning in the zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Braubach, Oliver R; Wood, Heather-Dawn; Gadbois, Simon; Fine, Alan; Croll, Roger P

    2009-03-01

    The zebrafish olfactory system is an attractive model for studying neural processing of chemosensory information. Here we characterize zebrafish olfactory behaviors and their modification through learning, using an apparatus consisting of a circular flow-through tank that allows controlled administration of odorants. When exposed to the amino acids l-alanine and l-valine, naive zebrafish responded with appetitive swimming behavior, which we measured as the number of >90 degrees turns made during 30s observation periods. Such appetitive responses were not observed when naive zebrafish were exposed to an unnatural odorant, phenylethyl alcohol (PEA). Repeated pairing of amino acids or PEA (conditioned stimuli, CS) with food flakes (unconditioned stimuli; UCS) increased odorant-evoked appetitive swimming behavior in all fish tested. The zebrafish also learned to restrict this behavior to the vicinity of a feeding ring, through which UCS were administered. When both nares were temporarily occluded, conditioned fish failed to respond to odorants, confirming that these behaviors were mediated by olfaction. These results represent the first demonstration of a classically conditioned appetitive response to a behaviorally neutral odorant in fish. Furthermore, they complement recent demonstrations of conditional place preferences in fish. By virtue of its robustness and simplicity, this method will be a useful tool for future research into the biological basis of olfactory learning in zebrafish. PMID:19056431

  18. Biochemical studies of olfaction: isolation, characterization, and odorant binding activity of cilia from rainbow trout olfactory rosettes.

    PubMed

    Rhein, L D; Cagan, R H

    1980-08-01

    The role of cilia in recognition of olfactory stimuli has been controversial. Cilia from the intact olfactory rosettes of the rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri were isolated, characterized biochemically, and examined by electron microscopy. The markers studied are those associated with cilia in other organisms. Dynein arms contain Mg2+-AtPase; this enzyme was enriched in the isolated cilia preparation. Guanine nucleotides are associated with the outer microtubule doublets of cilia but adenine nucleotides are not; a substantial enrichment in guanine, relative to adenine, was found in the cilia preparation. Tubulin, the structural protein component of microtubules, occurs in large amounts in cilia. Disc gel electrophoresis indicated tubulin in the cilia preparation. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cilia in the isolated preparation. Rainbow trout have an acute sense of smell and many amino acids are odorants to this species. Functional activity of the cilia preparation relevant to odorant recognition was assessed by using binding of radioactively labeled odorant amino acids. L-Alanine, L-serine, L-threonine, L-lysine, and D-alanine bound to the cilia preparation. This study provides direct biochemical evidence that olfactory cilia bind odorant molecules and supports the hypothesis that odorant recognition sites are integral parts of the cilia. PMID:6449006

  19. Visual and chemical release of feeding behavior in adult rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Valentincic, T; Caprio, J

    1997-08-01

    Feeding behavior of adult rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is released by visual and/or chemical stimuli. Detection of either a conditioned visual or a conditioned chemical stimulus creates an excitatory feeding state within the central nervous system which turns on feeding behavior composed of swimming, turning and biting/snapping actions. Particular amino acids that are highly effective physiological taste stimuli that are also detected through olfaction (e.g. L-proline, L-alanine, L-leucine) release the initial sequence of food searching and biting/snapping behaviors; however, an effective olfactory, but poor gustatory, stimulus (e.g. L-arginine) is rarely effective behaviorally. After bilateral removal of the paired olfactory organs, visual stimuli alone release the entire set of feeding behavior patterns. Since amino acids that are highly potent physiological taste stimuli do not release either feeding behavior or reflex biting/snapping actions in adult anosmic rainbow trout, it is postulated that the olfactory system detects potent taste stimuli and provides the afferent input for arousal and the release of all feeding activity patterns. PMID:9279460

  20. Expression of a reflex biting/snapping response to amino acids prior to first exogenous feeding in salmonid alevins.

    PubMed

    Valentincic, T; Lamb, C F; Caprio, J

    1999-10-01

    Five days prior to first exogenous feeding, amino acid stimuli released reflexive biting/snapping behavior in alevins of both rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). The biting/snapping responses of salmonid larvae, which obtain nutrients solely from their yolk sacs, were videotaped during presentations of amino acids that are potent olfactory and taste stimuli to adult rainbow trout. The tested salmonid alevins possessed developed eyes and olfactory and taste organs several days prior to the start of spontaneous swimming and exogenous feeding. Five days prior to the first occurrence of complex feeding behavior, L-proline and L-alanine, which released swimming, turning, and biting/snapping (exaggerated biting) behaviors in adult rainbow trout, triggered reflexive biting/snapping behavior in the alevins of rainbow and brook trout, but did not induce swimming. In contrast, L-proline released vigorous swimming, but not biting/snapping activity in alevins of the European freshwater huchen (Hucho huncho), another salmonid species. Unlike in adult rainbow trout where visual and olfactory stimuli control all the successive behavior patterns of feeding behavior, taste stimuli released in alevins of rainbow and brook trout the early biting/snapping reflex independently from the complex feeding behavior. The independent biting/snapping reflex of rainbow and brook trout alevins ceased at the onset of spontaneous swimming activity several hours prior to the first exogenous feeding. PMID:10549895

  1. Animal model of acid-reflux esophagitis: pathogenic roles of acid/pepsin, prostaglandins, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koji; Nagahama, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Esophagitis was induced in rats within 3 h by ligating both the pylorus and transitional region between the forestomach and glandular portion under ether anesthesia. This esophageal injury was prevented by the administration of acid suppressants and antipepsin drug and aggravated by exogenous pepsin. Damage was also aggravated by pretreatment with indomethacin and the selective COX-1 but not COX-2 inhibitor, whereas PGE2 showed a biphasic effect depending on the dose; a protection at low doses, and an aggravation at high doses, with both being mediated by EP1 receptors. Various amino acids also affected this esophagitis in different ways; L-alanine and L-glutamine had a deleterious effect, while L-arginine and glycine were highly protective, both due to yet unidentified mechanisms. It is assumed that acid/pepsin plays a major pathogenic role in this model of esophagitis; PGs derived from COX-1 are involved in mucosal defense of the esophagus; and some amino acids are protective against esophagitis. These findings also suggest a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of esophagitis, in addition to acid suppressant therapy. The model introduced may be useful to test the protective effects of drugs on esophagitis and investigate the mucosal defense mechanism in the esophagus. PMID:24672789

  2. Expression and delivery of an endolysin to combat Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Teresa; Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dugo, Giacomo; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a cause for increasing concern due to its responsibility for severe infections both in humans and animals, especially poultry. To find new control strategies to treat C. perfringens infection, we investigated the activity and delivery of a bacteriophage endolysin. We identified a new endolysin, designated CP25L, which shows similarity to an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain and is distinct from other C. perfringens endolysins whose activity has been demonstrated in vitro. The cp25l gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product demonstrated lytic activity against all 25 C. perfringens strains tested. The probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 was engineered to deliver the endolysin to the gastrointestinal tract. The integration of the nisRK two-component regulatory system from the Lactococcus lactis nisin A biosynthesis operon into the chromosome of L. johnsonii allowed constitutive expression of the endolysin under the control of the nisA promoter (P nisA ), while the use of a signal peptide (SLPmod) led to successful secretion of the active endolysin to the surrounding media. The high specificity and activity of the endolysin suggest that it may be developed as an effective tool to enhance the control of C. perfringens by L. johnsonii in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23942878

  3. Saliva microbiota carry caries-specific functional gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Ning, Kang; Chang, Xingzhi; Yuan, Xiao; Tu, Qichao; Yuan, Tong; Deng, Ye; Hemme, Christopher L; Van Nostrand, Joy; Cui, Xinping; He, Zhili; Chen, Zhenggang; Guo, Dawei; Yu, Jiangbo; Zhang, Yue; Zhou, Jizhong; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva microbiota is phylogenetically divergent among host individuals yet their roles in health and disease are poorly appreciated. We employed a microbial functional gene microarray, HuMiChip 1.0, to reconstruct the global functional profiles of human saliva microbiota from ten healthy and ten caries-active adults. Saliva microbiota in the pilot population featured a vast diversity of functional genes. No significant distinction in gene number or diversity indices was observed between healthy and caries-active microbiota. However, co-presence network analysis of functional genes revealed that caries-active microbiota was more divergent in non-core genes than healthy microbiota, despite both groups exhibited a similar degree of conservation at their respective core genes. Furthermore, functional gene structure of saliva microbiota could potentially distinguish caries-active patients from healthy hosts. Microbial functions such as Diaminopimelate epimerase, Prephenate dehydrogenase, Pyruvate-formate lyase and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase were significantly linked to caries. Therefore, saliva microbiota carried disease-associated functional signatures, which could be potentially exploited for caries diagnosis. PMID:24533043

  4. Trypsin inhibition by macrocyclic and open-chain variants of the squash inhibitor MCoTI-II.

    PubMed

    Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Le Nguyen, Dung; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2005-12-01

    MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis are inhibitors of trypsin-like proteases and the only known members of the large family of squash inhibitors that are cyclic and contain an additional loop connecting the amino- and the carboxy-terminus. To investigate the contribution of macrocycle formation to biological activity, we synthesized a set of open-chain variants of MCoTI-II that lack the cyclization loop and contain various natural and non-natural amino acid substitutions in the reactive-site loop. Upon replacement of P1 lysine residue #10 within the open-chain variant of MCoTI-II by the non-natural isosteric nucleo amino acid AlaG [beta-(guanin-9-yl)-L-alanine], a conformationally restricted arginine mimetic, residual inhibitory activity was detected, albeit reduced by four orders of magnitude. While the cyclic inhibitors MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II were found to be very potent trypsin inhibitors, with picomolar inhibition constants, the open-chain variants displayed an approximately 10-fold lower affinity. These data suggest that the formation of a circular backbone in the MCoTI squash inhibitors results in enhanced affinity and therefore is a determinant of biological activity. PMID:16336125

  5. Effects of Methylation on Zebularine Studied by Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Lalitha; Vasilyev, Vladislav; Wang, Feng; Vasilyev, Vladislav

    2009-06-01

    1-(β -D-ribofuranosyl)-2-pyrimidone (zebularine or zeb) and 1-(β -D-ribofuranosyl)-5-methyl-2-pyrimidinone (d5) are effective inhibitors of cytidine deaminases (CDA). Methyl modification of zeb at the C(5) position in the base moiety produces d5. A density functional theory (DFT) study reveals the impact of the methyl group on the electronic structures and spectra of the nucleoside pair. It is found that the addition of methyl group has little effect on the geometry of the nucleosides as well as their sugar puckering, but affects anisotropic properties such as dihedral angles, condensed Fukui functions and charge distribution can be seen in their molecular electrostatic potentials (MEPs). Electron spectra serve as the fingerprint for the methyl group. The valence spectra clearly indicate that the molecular pair is related in the inner valence space of IP > 20 eV, whereas the outer valence space reveals the methyl associated electronic structural modifications of the molecular pair. In the present study, the molecular orbitals (MO) such as MO8, MO18 and MO37 (HOMO as MO1) are identified as the fingerprint MOs for methyl, whereas other MOs marked in the figure are secondary methyl related MOs. Chemical shift in the inner shell and their spectra are also calculated. It reveals the similarities and differences of methyl effect to large nucleosides and small amino acids such as L-alanine.

  6. Cryo-bioorganic chemistry: freezing effect on stereoselection of L- and DL-leucine cooligomerization in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Vajda, T; Hollósi, M

    2001-02-01

    The chirality of L-/DL-leucine (50-50%) cooligomerization was investigated in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions. Cooligomerization was carried out by carbonyldiimidazole activation without initiator at an ambient (+ 22 degrees C) and frozen (- 18 degrees C) temperature, respectively. The separated samples obtained after different time intervals of treatment were completely hydrolyzed (HCl) and the diastereomeric L- and D-leucine derivates of Marfey's reagent (1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl-5-L-alanine amide) were then traced and evaluated by RP-HPLC analysis. After 9 days of oligomerization, the L-Leu content was slightly enhanced in the liquid (57%) and somewhat more enhanced in the frozen (64%) samples. After 17 days, however, the L-Leu content had decreased in the liquid (53%) and frozen (56%) conditions. These L-enantiomer amplifications indicate that an L-antipode is preferentially incorporated into the alpha-helical turn of the oligomer in the earlier stage of cooligomerization, while, later, the D-antipode is also incorporated. The role of ice in the improved stereoselection is discussed. This is the first recorded example of the effect of freezing on stereoselection. PMID:11289315

  7. Identification of a new chromophoric substrate in the library of amino acid p-nitroanilides for continuous assay of VanX, a D,D-dipeptidase essential for vancomycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Lung; Tseng, Min-Jen; Tseng, Ming-Chung; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2006-07-01

    As one of key bacterial proteins involved in vancomycin resistance, VanX is a D,D-dipeptidase that impedes bacterial cell wall biosynthesis by hydrolyzing the essential D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptide. Based on a report by Crowder and co-workers that L-alanine-p-nitroanilide (L-Ala-pNA) was a useful substrate for continuous assay of VanX, we constructed a library of 35 L- and D-amino acid p-nitroanilides to provide the needed diversity to discover new substrates that are more specific than L-Ala-pNA. We report here that, among all compounds tested, D-leucine-p-nitroanilide (D-Leu-pNA) was found to be the best substrate for VanX enzyme (KM=8.9+/-1.2 mM, kcat=0.0102+/-0.0016 s(-1), kcat/KM=0.0012 mM(-1)s(-1)). Although it is catalytically inefficient, this new VanX substrate needs essentially no sophisticated synthetic chemistry for preparation and therefore offers a convenient means for routine analysis of enzyme catalysis and the screening of potential inhibitors. Moreover, because it is the uncommon leucine in its D form in D-Leu-pNA, enzymatic activities due to other contaminated species in Escherichia coli used for VanX overproduction should be greatly reduced. PMID:16701071

  8. The amidating enzyme in pituitary will accept a peptide with C-terminal D-alanine as substrate.

    PubMed

    Landymore-Lim, A E; Bradbury, A F; Smyth, D G

    1983-11-30

    A series of tripeptides which terminated in d-alanine, d-serine, d-leucine or l-alanine was synthesized and the peptides tested for their ability to act as substrates for an amidating enzyme present in porcine pituitary. The peptides were allowed to compete with a radiolabelled substrate 125I d-Tyr Phe Gly in the presence of a rate limiting concentration of amidating enzyme and the degree of conversion to 125I d-Tyr Phe amide was determined by ion exchange chromatography. An accelerated procedure was developed for investigating the rates of reaction. The results showed that d-Tyr Phe d-Ala has a significant affinity for the amidating enzyme; no affinity could be demonstrated with d-Tyr Phe 1-Ala, d-Tyr Phe d-Ser or d-Tyr Phe d-Leu. Direct evidence that d-Tyr Phe d-Ala can undergo amidation was obtained by incubating the 125I labelled tripeptide with the pituitary enzyme. Amidation took place readily with d-Tyr Phe d-Ala but not with the other tripeptides; thus, while the enzyme is unable to catalyse the conversion of a peptide terminating in 1-alanine, it can accept a peptide terminating in d-alanine. The results indicate that the amidating enzyme has a highly compact substrate binding site. PMID:6661225

  9. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropies in solid-state NMR under high-speed magic-angle spinning and in uniformly 13C-labeled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jerry C. C.; Tycko, Robert

    2003-05-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of recoupling chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) interactions in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) under high-speed magic-angle spinning (MAS) while retaining a static CSA powder pattern line shape and simultaneously attenuating homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. CSA recoupling is accomplished by a rotation-synchronized radio-frequency pulse sequence with symmetry properties that permit static CSA line shapes to be obtained. We suggest a specific recoupling sequence, which we call ROCSA, for which the scaling factors for CSA and homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions are 0.272 and approximately 0.05, respectively. This sequence is suitable for high-speed 13C MAS NMR experiments on uniformly 13C-labeled organic compounds, including biopolymers. We demonstrate the ROCSA sequence experimentally by measuring the 13C CSA patterns of the uniformly labeled, polycrystalline compounds L-alanine and N-acetyl-D,L-valine at MAS frequencies of 11 and 20 kHz. We also present experimental data for amyloid fibrils formed by a 15-residue fragment of the β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, in which four amino acid residues are uniformly labeled, demonstrating the applicability to biochemical systems of high molecular weight and significant complexity. Analysis of the CSA patterns in the amyloid fibril sample demonstrates the utility of ROCSA measurements as probes of peptide and protein conformation in noncrystalline solids.

  10. Nitrile and thiocyanate IR probes: Molecular dynamics simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kwang-Im; Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Han, Jae-Beom; Lee, Hochan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2008-04-01

    Nitrile- and thiocyanate-derivatized amino acids have been found to be useful IR probes for investigating their local electrostatic environments in proteins. To shed light on the CN stretch frequency shift and spectral lineshape change induced by interactions with hydrogen-bonding solvent molecules, we carried out both classical and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for MeCN and MeSCN in water. These QM/MM and conventional force field MD simulation results were found to be inconsistent with the experimental results as well as with the high-level ab initio calculation results of MeCN-water and MeSCN-water potential energies. Thus, a new set of atomic partial charges of MeCN and MeSCN is obtained. By using the MD simulation trajectories and the electrostatic potential model recently developed, the CN and SCN stretching mode frequency trajectories were obtained and used to simulate the IR spectra. The C N frequency blueshifts of MeCN and MeSCN in water are estimated to be 9.0 and 1.9cm-1, respectively, in comparison with those of gas phase values. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured IR spectra of MeCN, MeSCN, β-cyano-L-alanine, and cyanylated cysteine in water and other polar solvents.

  11. Sensomics-Assisted Elucidation of the Tastant Code of Cooked Crustaceans and Taste Reconstruction Experiments.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Stefanie; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-02-10

    Sensory-guided fractionation by means of ultrafiltration and cation-exchange chromatography, followed by MS/MS quantitation, and taste re-engineering experiments revealed the key taste molecules coining the characteristic taste profile of the cooked meat of king prawns. Furthermore, quantitative analysis demonstrated that the taste differences between crustaceans are due to quantitative differences in the combinatorial code of tastants, rather than to qualitative differences in the tastant composition. Besides the amino acids glycine, L-proline, and L-alanine, the characteristic seafood-like sweet profile was found to be due to the sweet modulatory action of quaternary ammonium compounds, among which betaine, homarine, stachydrin, and trimethylamine-N-oxide were found as the key contributors on the basis of dose-activity considerations. Knowledge of this combinatorial tastant code provides the foundation for the development of more sophisticated crustacean flavors that are lacking any heavy metal ions and allergenic proteins present when using crustacean extracts for food flavoring. PMID:26795370

  12. Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Enhances Cell Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Sekimoto, Teruki; Ogura, Ayaka; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter, is endogenously generated by certain H2S synthesizing enzymes, including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) from L-cysteine in the mammalian body. Several studies have shown that endogenous and exogenous H2S affects the proliferation of cancer cells, although the effects of H2S appear to vary with cell type, being either promotive or suppressive. In the present study, we determined whether endogenously formed H2S regulates proliferation in human gastric cancer AGS cells. CSE, but not CBS, was expressed in AGS cells. CSE inhibitors, DL-propargylglycine (PPG) and β-cyano-L-alanine (BCA), significantly suppressed the proliferation of AGS cells in a concentration-dependent manner. CSE inhibitors did not increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the same concentration range. The inhibitory effects of PPG and BCA on cell proliferation were reversed by repetitive application of NaHS, a donor of H2S. Interestingly, nuclear condensation and fragmentation were detected in AGS cells treated with PPG or BCA. These results suggest that endogenous H2S produced by CSE may contribute to the proliferation of gastric cancer AGS cells, most probably through anti-apoptotic actions. PMID:27150157

  13. Spectrophotometric readout for an alanine dosimeter for food irradiation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraheem, S.; Beshir, W. B.; Eid, S.; Sobhy, R.; Kovács, A.

    2003-06-01

    The alanine-electron spin resonance (EPR) readout system is well known as a reference and transfer dosimetry system for the evaluation of high doses in radiation processing. The high cost of an EPR/alanine dosimetry system is a serious handicap for large-scale routine application in irradiation facilities. In this study, the use of a complex produced by dissolving irradiated L-alanine in 1,4-phenyl diammonium dichloride solution was investigated for dosimetry purposes. This complex—having a purple colour—has an increasing absorbance with increasing dose in the range of 1-20 kGy. The applicability of spectrophotometric evaluation was studied by measuring the absorbance intensity of this complex at 360 and 505 nm, respectively. Fluorimetric evaluation was also investigated by measuring the emission of the complex at 435 nm as a function of dose. The present method is easy for routine application. The effect of the dye concentration as well as the suitable amount of irradiated alanine has been studied. With respect to routine application, the stability of the product complex after its formation was also investigated.

  14. Biosensor-driven adaptive laboratory evolution of l-valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; Gätgens, Cornelia; Gätgens, Jochem; Polen, Tino; Kalinowski, Jörn; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution has proven a valuable strategy for metabolic engineering. Here, we established an experimental evolution approach for improving microbial metabolite production by imposing an artificial selective pressure on the fluorescent output of a biosensor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Cells showing the highest fluorescent output were iteratively isolated and (re-)cultivated. The L-valine producer Corynebacterium glutamicum ΔaceE was equipped with an L-valine-responsive sensor based on the transcriptional regulator Lrp of C. glutamicum. Evolved strains featured a significantly higher growth rate, increased L-valine titers (~25%) and a 3-4-fold reduction of by-product formation. Genome sequencing resulted in the identification of a loss-of-function mutation (UreD-E188*) in the gene ureD (urease accessory protein), which was shown to increase L-valine production by up to 100%. Furthermore, decreased L-alanine formation was attributed to a mutation in the global regulator GlxR. These results emphasize biosensor-driven evolution as a straightforward approach to improve growth and productivity of microbial production strains. PMID:26453945

  15. Isolation and characterization of a novel phage lysin active against Paenibacillus larvae, a honeybee pathogen

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Lucy; Nezami, Sara; Yost, Diane; Tsourkas, Philippos; Amy, Penny S

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood (AFB) disease which affects early larval stages during honeybee development. Due to its virulence, transmissibility, capacity to develop antibiotic resistance, and the inherent resilience of its endospores, Paenibacillus larvae is extremely difficult to eradicate from infected hives which often must be burned. AFB contributes to the worldwide decline of honeybee populations, which are crucial for pollination and the food supply. We have isolated a novel bacteriophage lysin, PlyPalA, from the genome of a novel Paenibacillus larvae bacteriophage originally extracted from an environmental sample. PlyPalA has an N-terminal N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase catalytic domain and possesses lytic activity against infectious strains of Paenibacillus larvae without harming commensal bacteria known to compose the honeybee larval microbiota. A single dose of PlyPalA rescued 75% of larvae infected with endospores, showing that it represents a powerful tool for future treatment of AFB. This represents the first time that lysins have been tested for therapeutic use in invertebrates. PMID:26904379

  16. Chimeric phage-bacterial enzymes: a clue to the modular evolution of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, E; López, R; García, J L

    1990-01-01

    Pneumococcal peptidoglycan amidase (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, EC 3.5.1.28) and phage CPL1 lysozyme degrade a common substrate (choline-containing pneumococcal cell walls); the former hydrolyzes the bond between muramic acid and alanine, whereas the latter breaks down the linkage between muramic acid and glucosamine. The amino acid sequences of their C-terminal domains are homologous. Chimeric genes were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis: a unique SnaBI restriction site in the cpl1 gene, coding for the phage lysozyme, was introduced at a location equivalent to the SnaBI site present in the lytA gene, which codes for the pneumococcal amidase. The resulting genes expressed lytic activities at levels similar to those of the parental genes. The gene products, which have been purified to electrophoretical homogeneity, exhibited unusual combined biochemical properties--e.g., by exchange of protein domains, we have switched the regulatory properties of these enzymes without altering their catalytic activities. Chimeric gene construction in Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages is an excellent model to study the modular organization of genes and proteins and to help to establish evolutionary relationships between phage and bacteria. These constructions provide an experimental approach to the molecular processes involved in cassette recruitment during evolution and contribute support to the concept of bacteria as adaptable chimeras. Images PMID:1978320

  17. Striatal cholinergic cell ablation attenuates L-DOPA induced dyskinesia in Parkinsonian mice.

    PubMed

    Won, Lisa; Ding, Yunmin; Singh, Pardeep; Kang, Un Jung

    2014-02-19

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID) is a debilitating side effect of long-term dopamine replacement therapy in Parkinson's Disease. At present, there are few therapeutic options for treatment of LID and mechanisms contributing to the development and maintenance of these drug-induced motor complications are not well understood. We have previously shown that pharmacological reduction of cholinergic tone attenuates the expression of LID in parkinsonian mice with established dyskinesia after chronic L-DOPA treatment. The present study was undertaken to provide anatomically specific evidence for the role of striatal cholinergic interneurons by ablating them before initiation of L-DOPA treatment and determining whether it decreases LID. We used a novel approach to ablate striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) via Cre-dependent viral expression of the diphtheria toxin A subunit (DT-A) in hemiparkinsonian transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the choline acetyltransferase promoter. We show that Cre recombinase-mediated DT-A ablation selectively eliminated ChIs when injected into striatum. The depletion of ChIs markedly attenuated LID without compromising the therapeutic efficacy of L-DOPA. These results provide evidence that ChIs play a key and selective role in LID and that strategies to reduce striatal cholinergic tone may represent a promising approach to decreasing L-DOPA-induced motor complications in Parkinson's disease. PMID:24553948

  18. The effects of dose and radiation quality on the shape and power saturation of the EPR signal in alanine.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, B; Wielopolski, L

    1994-10-01

    Variations in the shape and the power saturation of EPR spectra of L-alanine irradiated with photons, electrons, neutrons and protons are reported. It is shown that the ratio of the intensities of the satellite lines attributable to "spin flips" and the central line depend on the EPR microwave power, and it is proposed as a quantitative measure of the signal saturation effect. Dependence of this ratio on the microwave power is affected by the radiation quality and for doses in excess of 10 kGy by the absorbed dose. At high doses of low-LET radiation these changes are attributed to a high local density of free radicals, while for low doses of high-LET radiation these are due to changes induced in the crystal lattice. Consequently, the conventional peak-to-peak amplitude measurement of the EPR signal intensity is inaccurate when used for high doses and for comparison between radiations with different beam quality. The possibility to determine radiation quality from an EPR measurement is discussed. PMID:7938443

  19. How significant to plant N nutrition is the direct consumption of soil microbes by roots?

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Paul W; Marsden, Karina A; Jones, Davey L

    2013-01-01

    Summary –The high degree to which plant roots compete with soil microbes for organic forms of nitrogen (N) is becoming increasingly apparent. This has culminated in the finding that plants may consume soil microbes as a source of N, but the functional significance of this process remains unknown. –We used 15N- and 14C-labelled cultures of soil bacteria to measure rates of acquisition of microbes by sterile wheat roots and plants growing in soil. We compared these rates with acquisition of 15N delivered as nitrate, amino acid monomer (l-alanine) and short peptide (l-tetraalanine), and the rate of decomposition of [14C] microbes by indigenous soil microbiota. –Acquisition of microbe 15N by both sterile roots and roots growing in soil was one to two orders of magnitude slower than acquisition of all other forms of 15N. Decomposition of microbes was fast enough to account for all 15N recovered, but approximately equal recovery of microbe 14C suggests that microbes entered roots intact. –Uptake of soil microbes by wheat (Triticum aestivum) roots appears to take place in soil. If wheat is typical, the importance of this process to terrestrial N cycling is probably minor in comparison with fluxes of other forms of soil inorganic and organic N. PMID:23718181

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Spatial-Temporal Correlations during Germination of Spores of Bacillus Species ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinqiao; Garner, Will; Setlow, Peter; Yu, Ji

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria of Bacillus species sporulate upon starvation, and the resultant dormant spores germinate when the environment appears likely to allow the resumption of vegetative growth. Normally, the rates of germination of individual spores in populations are very heterogeneous, and the current work has investigated whether spore-to-spore communication enhances the synchronicity of germination. In order to do this work, time-lapse optical images of thousands of individual spores were captured during germination, and an image analysis algorithm was developed to do the following: (i) measure the positions and germination rates of many thousands of individual spores and (ii) compute pairwise correlations of their germination. This analysis showed that an individual spore's germination rate was dependent on its distance from other spores, especially at short distances. Thus, spores that were within a few micrometers exhibited an increased synchronicity in germination, suggesting that there is a mechanism for short-range communication between such spores during germination. However, two molecules known to be germinants that are released during germination, l-alanine and the 1:1 chelate of Ca2+ and dipicolinic acid, did not mediate spore-to-spore communication during germination. PMID:21622756

  1. Preparation and properties of BSA-loaded microspheres based on multi-(amino acid) copolymer for protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingtao; Lv, Guoyu; Zhang, Jue; Tang, Songchao; Yan, Yonggang; Wu, Zhaoying; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A multi-(amino acid) copolymer (MAC) based on ω-aminocaproic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, L-alanine, L-lysine, L-glutamate, and hydroxyproline was synthetized, and MAC microspheres encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) were prepared by a double-emulsion solvent extraction method. The experimental results show that various preparation parameters including surfactant ratio of Tween 80 to Span 80, surfactant concentration, benzyl alcohol in the external water phase, and polymer concentration had obvious effects on the particle size, morphology, and encapsulation efficiency of the BSA-loaded microspheres. The sizes of BSA-loaded microspheres ranged from 60.2 μm to 79.7 μm, showing different degrees of porous structure. The encapsulation efficiency of BSA-loaded microspheres also ranged from 38.8% to 50.8%. BSA release from microspheres showed the classic biphasic profile, which was governed by diffusion and polymer erosion. The initial burst release of BSA from microspheres at the first week followed by constant slow release for the next 7 weeks were observed. BSA-loaded microspheres could degrade gradually in phosphate buffered saline buffer with pH value maintained at around 7.1 during 8 weeks incubation, suggesting that microsphere degradation did not cause a dramatic pH drop in phosphate buffered saline buffer because no acidic degradation products were released from the microspheres. Therefore, the MAC microspheres might have great potential as carriers for protein delivery. PMID:24855351

  2. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and {sup 13}C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 {angstrom}. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O{sub 2} and ultraviolet. A method for measuring {sup 14}N-{sup 1}H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in {sup 13}C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  3. Accessing structure and dynamics of mobile phase in organic solids by real-time T1C filter PISEMA NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Chen, Yuzhu; Chen, Tiehong; Sun, Pingchuan; Li, Baohui; Ding, Datong

    2012-01-26

    The structure and dynamic behavior of mobile components play a significant role in determining properties of solid materials. Herein, we propose a novel real-time spectrum-editing method to extract signals of mobile components in organic solids on the basis of the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle (PISEMA) pulse sequence and the difference in (13)C T(1) values of rigid and mobile components. From the dipolar splitting spectrum sliced along the heteronuclear dipolar coupling dimension of the 2D spectrum, the structural and dynamic information can be obtained, such as the distances between atoms, the dipolar coupling strength, the order parameter of the polymer backbone chain, and so on. Furthermore, our proposed method can be used to achieve the separation of overlapped NMR signals of mobile and rigid phases in the PISEMA experiment. The high efficacy of this 2D NMR method is demonstrated on organic solids, including crystalline L-alanine, semicrystalline polyamide-6, and the natural abundant silk fibroin. PMID:22185485

  4. [Single-handed helical framework material [{Cu(sala)}n] incorporated peramylated β-cyclodextrin for improving gas chromatography enantioseparation].

    PubMed

    Xie, Shengming; Liu, Hong; Yang, Jiangrong; Ai, Ping; Yuan, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as a new generation of functional molecular materials, have broad application prospects in enantioselective catalysis and chiral separation areas due to their unusual properties, such as high surface area, rich topologies, permanent microporous, availability of outer-surface modification and so on. A single-handed helical three-dimensional metal-organic framework material [{Cu(sala)}n] (H2sala=N-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-L-alanine) was incorporated with peramylated β-cyclodextrin for the preparation of novel capillary gas chromatography stationary phase. To investigate whether the use of a chiral MOF can enhance enantioseparation on peramylated β-cyclodextrin, three chiral columns were fabricated using different stationary phases for comparison, including column A ([{Cu (sala)}n]), column B (peramylated β-cyclodextrin) and column C ([{Cu(sala)}n]+peramylated β-cyclodextrin). The results of comparing the resolving abilities of the three columns for the same chiral compounds demonstrated that column C showed better enantioselectivity and higher resolution. The use of MOF [{Cu(sala)}n] can improve enantioseparation on peramylated β-cyclodextrin. PMID:27319175

  5. Twin-arginine translocation system (tat) mutants of Salmonella are attenuated due to envelope defects, not respiratory defects.

    PubMed

    Craig, Maureen; Sadik, Adam Y; Golubeva, Yekaterina A; Tidhar, Avital; Slauch, James M

    2013-09-01

    The twin-arginine translocation system (Tat) transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane and is critical to virulence in Salmonella and other pathogens. Experimental and bioinformatic data indicate that 30 proteins are exported via Tat in Salmonella Typhimurium. However, there are no data linking specific Tat substrates with virulence. We inactivated every Tat-exported protein and determined the virulence phenotype of mutant strains. Although a tat mutant is highly attenuated, no single Tat-exported substrate accounts for this virulence phenotype. Rather, the attenuation is due primarily to envelope defects caused by failure to translocate three Tat substrates, the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, AmiA and AmiC, and the cell division protein, SufI. Strikingly, neither the amiA amiC nor the sufI mutations alone conferred any virulence defect. Although AmiC and SufI have previously been localized to the divisome, the synthetic phenotypes observed are the first to suggest functional overlap. Many Tat substrates are involved in anaerobic respiration, but we show that a mutant completely deficient in anaerobic respiration retains full virulence in both the oral and systemic phases of infection. Similarly, an obligately aerobic mutant is fully virulent. These results suggest that in the classic mouse model of infection, S. Typhimurium is replicating only in aerobic environments. PMID:23822642

  6. Twin-arginine Translocation System (tat) Mutants of Salmonella are Attenuated Due to Envelope Defects, not Respiratory Defects

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Maureen; Sadik, Adam Y.; Golubeva, Yekaterina A.; Tidhar, Avital; Slauch, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The twin-arginine translocation system (Tat) transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane and is critical to virulence in Salmonella and other pathogens. Experimental and bioinformatic data indicate that 30 proteins are exported via Tat in Salmonella Typhimurium. However, there are no data linking specific Tat substrates with virulence. We inactivated every Tat-exported protein and determined the virulence phenotype of mutant strains. Though a tat mutant is highly attenuated, no single Tat-exported substrate accounts for this virulence phenotype. Rather, the attenuation is due primarily to envelope defects caused by failure to translocate three Tat substrates, the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases, AmiA and AmiC, and the cell division protein, SufI. Strikingly, neither the amiA amiC nor the sufI mutations alone conferred any virulence defect. Although AmiC and SufI have previously been localized to the divisome, the synthetic phenotypes observed are the first to suggest functional overlap. Many Tat substrates are involved in anaerobic respiration, but we show that a mutant completely deficient in anaerobic respiration retains full virulence in both the oral and systemic phases of infection. Similarly, an obligately aerobic mutant is fully virulent. These results suggest that in the classic mouse model of infection, S. Typhimurium is replicating only in aerobic environments. PMID:23822642

  7. Generation of C3- and C2-deuterated L-lactic acid by human erythrocytes exposed to D-[1-13C]glucose, D-[2-13C]glucose and D-[6-13C]glucose in the presence of D2O.

    PubMed

    Malaisse, W J; Biesemans, M; Willem, R

    1994-05-01

    1. The generation of C2- and C3-deuterated L-lactate was monitored by 13C NMR in human erythrocytes exposed to D-[1-13C]glucose, D-[2-13C]glucose or D-[6-13C]glucose and incubated in a medium prepared in D2O. 2. The results suggested that the deuteration of the C1 of D-fructose 6-phosphate in the phosphoglucoisomerase reaction, the deuteration of the C1 of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate in the sequence of reactions catalyzed by triose phosphate isomerase and aldolase and the deuteration of the C3 of pyruvate in the reaction catalyzed by pyruvate kinase were all lower than expected from equilibration with D2O. 3. Moreover, about 40% of the molecules of pyruvate generated by glycolysis apparently underwent deuteration on their C3 during interconversion of the 2-keto acid and L-alanine in the reaction catalyzed by glutamate-pyruvate transaminase. 4. The occurrence of the latter process was also documented in cells exposed to exogenous [3-13C]pyruvate. 5. This methodological approach is proposed to provide a new tool to assess in intact cells the extent of back-and-forth interconversion of selected metabolic intermediates. PMID:8005354

  8. 13C NMR study of the generation of C2- and C3-deuterated lactic acid by tumoral pancreatic islet cells exposed to D-[1-13C]-, D-[2-13C]- and D-[6-13C]-glucose in 2H2O.

    PubMed

    Willem, R; Biesemans, M; Kayser, F; Malaisse, W J

    1994-03-01

    Tumoral pancreatic islet cells of the RIN5mF line were incubated for 120 min in media prepared in 2H2O and containing D-[1-13C]glucose, D-[2-13C]glucose, and D-[6-13C]glucose. The generation of C2- and C3-deuterated lactic acid was assessed by 13C NMR. The interpretation of experimental results suggests that a) the efficiency of deuteration on the C1 of D-fructose 6-phosphate does not exceed about 47% and 4% in the phosphoglucoisomerase and phosphomannoisomerase reactions, respectively; b) approximately 38% of the molecules of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate generated from D-glucose escape deuteration in the sequence of reactions catalyzed by triose phosphate isomerase and aldolase; and c) about 41% of the molecules of pyruvate generated by glycolysis are immediately converted to lactate, the remaining 59% of pyruvate molecules undergoing first a single or double back-and-forth interconversion with L-alanine. It is proposed that this methodological approach, based on high resolution 13C NMR spectroscopy, may provide novel information on the regulation of back-and-forth interconversion of glycolytic intermediates in intact cells as modulated, for instance, by enzyme-to-enzyme tunneling. PMID:8057796

  9. Determination of normal values of some blood serum enzymes in Acipenser stellatus Pallas.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, D; Mohri, M; Gholipour Kanani, H

    2010-03-01

    Hematological studies on fishes have assumed greater significance due to the increasing emphasis on pisciculture and greater awareness of the pollution of natural water resources. Such studies have generally been used as an effective and sensitive index to monitor physiological and pathological changes in fishes, especially in the management of endangered species. This study was undertaken to establish a reference range for six important blood serum enzymes. Serum samples of 40 Acipenser stellatus (20 female and 20 male) were analyzed, and serum enzyme values were determined. The reference ranges for the total samples and also for each sex were determined. The activities of measured enzymes in serum were: aspartate aminotransferase (AST) 265.60 +/- 56.55 IU/l, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) 5.65 +/- 1.18 IU/l, acid phosphatase (ACP) 15.63 +/- 2.59 IU/l, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 2007.15 +/- 521.97 IU/l, creatine kinase (CK) 6,596.05 +/- 1,807.19 IU/l, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) 69.05 +/- 13.04 IU/l. There were significant differences between male and female fish in terms of AST and CK activity (P < 0.05). These may be related to the season of sampling and changing physiological cycles during spawning during which period the sexual hormones and stress are more obvious. However, there were no differences in the activity of ALP, ACP, LDH, and ALT between sexes. The correlations between measured enzymes were also determined. PMID:18982419

  10. The effects of additives on the crystal habit of monosodium L-glutamate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Chiaki; Nagashima, Nobuya; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Iitaka, Yoichi

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various amino acids and organic acids on the habit of MSG crystals have been investigated. The addition of L-alanine (L-Ala) and L-lysine (L-Lys) made the MSG crystals short and thick, but D-glutamic acid (D-Glu), γ-amino butylic acid (γ-ABA) and L-pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (L-PCA) made the crystals long and thin. HPLC analysis of the end and the side faces of the MSG crystals grown with the additives revealed that the concentrations of L-Lys and L-Ala were higher at the end faces than at the side faces; but those of D-Glu, γ-ABA and L-PCA were higher at the side faces than at the end faces. The facts indicate that habit modifications of the MSG crystals, brought about in the presence of these additives, are due to stereo-selective adsorption of the additives on the crystal faces. Finally, the cause leading to the differences in adsorption of the additives on the crystal faces of MSG is discussed in relation to the stacking density of L-Glu molecules and Na ions on each face using the results of the X-ray structure analysis.

  11. Ditetraalkylammonium amino acid ionic liquids as CO₂ absorbents of high capacity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing-Wen; Zhou, Zheng; Zhang, Feng; Fang, Cheng-Gang; Wu, You-Ting; Zhang, Zhi-Bing; Li, Ai-Min

    2011-12-15

    By grafting butyl or ethyl onto tetramethylethylenediamine, quaternary ammonium salts with two positive charge centers were formed at the first step. Metathesis with Ag(2)O followed. Through neutralization with glycine, l-alanine, or valine, a series of new ditetraalkylammonium amino acid ionic liquids (DILs) for CO(2) capture were generated. The structures of DILs, as shown in Figure 1, were verified by using (1)H NMR and EA. These DILs were found to be of quite high viscosity which militated against their industrial application in CO(2) removal. Drawing on the experience of mixed amines' aqueous solutions, these DILs were blended with water or N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) aqueous solutions to act as special absorbents of CO(2). Using a Double-Tank Absorption System, the absorption performance of these DIL solutions was investigated in detail. The experimental results indicated that among the three aqueous solutions of DILs (20%, 40%, and 80 wt %), the solution of 40% DIL had a higher absorption rate of CO(2) than the other two, demonstrating the different effects of concentration and viscosity on the absorption. The solution of 40% DIL or the 15% DIL + 15% MDEA had much higher capacity for CO(2) than the corresponding monocation tetraalkylammonium AAILs, due to the special structure of the dication which could influence the solubility of CO(2) in the aqueous solution. PMID:22066493

  12. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis, and characterization of a new cell wall hydrolase, CwlL, of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Nakayama, R; Kuroda, A; Sekiguchi, J

    1993-11-01

    We have cloned a DNA fragment containing the gene for a cell wall hydrolase from Bacillus licheniformis FD0120 into Escherichia coli. Sequencing of the fragment showed the presence of an open reading frame (ORF; designated as cwlL), which is different from the B. licheniformis cell wall hydrolase gene cwlM, and encodes a polypeptide of 360 amino acids with a molecular mass of 38,994. The enzyme purified from the E. coli clone is an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, which has a M(r) value of 41 kDa as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and is able to digest B. licheniformis, B. subtilis and Micrococcus luteus cell walls. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of cwlL are very similar to those of ORF3 in the putative operon xpaL1-xpaL2-ORF3 in B. licheniformis MC14. Moreover, the amino acid sequence homology of CwlL with the B. subtilis amidase CwlA indicates two evolutionarily distinguishable regions in CwlL. The sequence homology of CwlL with other cell wall hydrolases and the regulation of cwlL are discussed. PMID:7902527

  13. Hematologic and plasma biochemical reference intervals for Morelet's crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii) in the northern wetlands of Campeche, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Sergio E; Weber, Manuel; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2011-07-01

    Health surveys and hematologic and plasma biochemical analyses were conducted in 52 free-ranging and 51 captive Morelet's crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii) in Campeche, Mexico, March-September 2007. Blood samples from 92 crocodiles (45 free-ranging and 47 captive) were collected for hematologic and plasma biochemical analyses. Average values of erythrocytes of free-ranging crocodiles were 1,046,166 cells/μl, and total white cells were 1.03 × 10(4) cells/μl. Captive crocodiles had erythrocyte and leukocyte values of 1,100,416 cells/μl and 8.51 × 10(3) cells/μl, respectively. There were no significant differences in values of erythrocytes or in hematocrit between free-ranging and captive crocodiles, or between sexes, or among size classes. Counts of leukocytes in free-ranging crocodiles were significantly higher than in captive individuals. The mean values of plasma analytes were 69.55 mg/l (glucose), 250.14 mg/l (cholesterol), 3.04 mg/l (uric acid), 2.70 mg/l (creatinine), and 20.20 IU/l (alanine aminotransferase). There were significant differences in cholesterol between free-ranging and captive crocodiles and between sexes. PMID:21719816

  14. Effect of amino acid additives on the growth and physical properties of potassium acid phthalate (KAP) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, A. Elakkina; Kanchana, P.; Sekar, C.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of potassium acid phthalate (KAP) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique by adding L-alanine (LA), glycine (Gly) and L-tyrosine (LT) as additives. Powder X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the phase formation and amino acids doping into KAP crystals. The optical absorption studies reveal that the LA doped crystals possess less absorption of visible ray than the pristine, Gly and LT doped KAP crystals. Optical transmission is found to be low in LT doped KAP than in all the other crystals. TG-DTA studies show the decomposition temperatures to be 255 °C, 232 °C, 258 °C and 264 °C for pure, LA, Gly and LT doped KAP crystals respectively. SHG efficiency of LA doped KAP crystal was found to be 1.1 times (31 mV for KDP and 34 mV for LA doped KAP) that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal. This is much higher when compared to that of undoped KAP crystal (12 mV). The grown crystals were also subjected to FTIR, microhardness and dielectric studies.

  15. Structure-reactivity relationship of Amadori rearrangement products compared to related ketoses.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Martin; Meissner, Philipp M; Pelke, Daniel; Mügge, Clemens; Kroh, Lothar W

    2016-06-16

    Structure-reactivity relationships of Amadori rearrangement products compared to their related ketoses were derived from multiple NMR spectroscopic techniques. Besides structure elucidation of six Amadori rearrangement products derived from d-glucose and d-galactose with l-alanine, l-phenylalanine and l-proline, especially quantitative (13)C selective saturation transfer NMR spectroscopy was applied to deduce information on isomeric systems. It could be shown exemplarily that the Amadori compound N-(1-deoxy-d-fructos-1-yl)-l-proline exhibits much higher isomerisation rates than d-fructose, which can be explained by C-1 substituent mediated intramolecular catalysis. In combination with a reduced carbonyl activity of Amadori compounds compared to their related ketoses which results in an increased acyclic keto isomer concentration, the results on isomerisation dynamics lead to a highly significant increased reactivity of Amadori compounds. This can be clearly seen, comparing approximated carbohydrate milieu stability time constants (ACuSTiC) which is 1 s for N-(1-deoxy-d-fructos-1-yl)-l-proline and 10 s for d-fructose at pD 4.20 ± 0.05 at 350 K. In addition, first NMR spectroscopic data are provided, which prove that α-pyranose of (amino acid substituted) d-fructose adopts both, (2)C5 and (5)C2 conformation. PMID:27152632

  16. Surface chemistry of alanine on Cu{111}: Adsorption geometry and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldanza, Silvia; Cornish, Alix; Nicklin, Richard E. J.; Zheleva, Zhasmina V.; Held, Georg

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption of L-alanine on the Cu{111} single crystal surface was investigated as a model system for interactions between small chiral modifier molecules and close-packed metal surfaces. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy are used to determine the chemical state, bond coordination and out-of-plane orientation of the molecule on the surface. Alanine adsorbs in its anionic form at room temperature, whilst at low temperature the overlayer consists of anionic and zwitterionic molecules. NEXAFS spectra exhibit a strong angular dependence of the π* resonance associated with the carboxylate group, which allows determining the tilt angle of this group with respect to the surface plane (48° ± 2°) at room temperature. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) shows a p(2√{ 13} × 2√{ 13}) R 13 ° superstructure with only one domain, which breaks the mirror symmetry of the substrate and, thus, induces global chirality to the surface. Temperature-programmed XPS (TP-XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments indicate that the zwitterionic form converts into the anionic species (alaninate) at 293 K. The latter desorbs/decomposes between 435 K and 445 K.

  17. Parkinson’s-Dementia Complex and Development of a New Stable Isotope Dilution Assay for BMAA Detection in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Laura R.; Cruz-Aguado, Reyniel; Sadilek, Martin; Galasko, Douglas; Shaw, Christopher A.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as a global contributor to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson-dementia complex (PDC) of Guam and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The literature on the effects of BMAA is conflicting with some but not all in vitro data supporting a neurotoxic action, and experimental animal data failing to replicate the pattern of neurodegeneration of these human diseases, even at very high exposures. Recently, BMAA has been reported in human brain from individuals afflicted with PDC or AD. Some of the BMAA in human tissue reportedly is freely extractable (free) while some is protein-associated and liberated by techniques that hydrolyze the peptide bond. The latter is especially intriguing since BMAA is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that has no known tRNA. We attempted to replicate these findings with techniques similar to those used by others; despite more than adequate sensitivity, we were unable to detect free BMAA. Recently, using a novel stable isotope dilution assay we again were unable to detect free or protein-associated BMAA in human cerebrum. Here we review the development of our new assay for tissue detection of BMAA and show that we are able to detect free BMAA in liver but not cerebrum, nor do we detect any protein-associated BMAA in mice fed this amino acid. These studies demonstrate the importance of a sensitive and specific assay for tissue BMAA and seriously challenge the proposal that BMAA is accumulating in human brain. PMID:19716838

  18. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  19. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  20. Scalemic and racemic imprinting with a chiral crosslinker.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Britney; Meador, Danielle S; Spivak, David A

    2015-08-26

    The development of molecularly imprinted chiral stationary phases has traditionally been limited by the need for a chiral pure template. Paradoxically, availability of a chiral pure template largely defeats the purpose of developing a chiral stationary phase. To solve this paradox, imprinting of scalemic and racemic template mixtures was investigated using both chiral (N-α-bismethacryloyl-L-alanine) and achiral (N,O-bisacrylamide ethanolamine) crosslinkers. Imprinting of scalemic mixtures provided polymers capable of partial separation of Boc-tyrosine enantiomers with virtually the same results when using either the chiral or achiral crosslinker. However, the chiral crosslinker was required for chiral differentiation by the racemic imprinted polymers which were evaluated in both batch rebinding and chromatographic modes. Batch rebinding analysis revealed intersecting binding isotherms for the L- and D-Boc-tyrosine, indicating bias for the D or L enantiomer is concentration dependent. Partial chromatographic separation was achieved by the racemic imprinted polymers providing variable D or L bias in equal probability over multiple replicates of polymer synthesis. Correlation of enantiomer bias with the batch rebinding results and optimization of HPLC parameters are discussed. PMID:26347178

  1. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of phosphorodiamidate prodrugs of antiviral and anticancer nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Christopher; Bourdin, Claire; Derudas, Marco; Hamon, Nadège; Hinsinger, Karen; Kandil, Sahar; Madela, Karolina; Meneghesso, Silvia; Pertusati, Fabrizio; Serpi, Michaela; Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Chamberlain, Stanley; Kolykhalov, Alexander; Vernachio, John; Vanpouille, Christophe; Introini, Andrea; Margolis, Leonid; Balzarini, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the application of the phosphorodiamidate phosphate prodrug approach to a series of thirteen nucleoside analogs with antiviral or anticancer activity. Twenty-five symmetrical phosphorodiamidates were synthesized, bearing esterified l-Alanine (and in one case d-alanine) in the prodrug moiety, each as single stereoisomer. The presence of an achiral phosphorus represents a potential advantage over the phosphoramidate ProTide approach, where diastereoisomeric mixtures are routinely obtained, and different biological profiles may be expected from the diastereoisomers. Optimization of the synthetic pathway allowed us to identify two general methods depending on the particular nucleoside analogs. All the compounds were biologically evaluated in antiviral and anticancer assays and several showed improvement of activity compared to their parent nucleosides, as in the case of ddA, d4T, abacavir and acyclovir against HIV-1 and/or HIV-2. The biological results were supported by metabolism studies with carboxypeptidase Y monitored by 31P NMR to investigate their bioactivation. This work further validates the phosphorodiamidate approach as a monophosphate prodrug motif with broad application in the antiviral and anticancer fields. PMID:24177359

  2. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  3. The Uses of 2-Ethoxy-(4H)-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one in the Synthesis of Some Quinazolinone Derivatives of Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    El-Hashash, Maher A.; Darwish, Khalid M.; Rizk, Sameh A.; El-Bassiouny, Fakhry A.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of 2-ethoxy-(4H)-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one (1) towards nitrogen nucleophiles, e.g. ethanolamine, aromatic amines (namely: p-toluidine, p-anisidine, p-hydroxyaniline, o-hydroxyaniline, o-bromoaniline, o-phenylenediamine, p-phenylenediamine, o-tolidinediamine) p-aminobenzoic acid, glucosamine hydrochloride, 2-aminonicotinic acid, 1-naphthalenesulfonic acid hydrazide, n-decanoic acid hydrazide, benzoic acid hydrazide, semicarbazide, aminoacids (e.g. D,L-alanine, L-asparagine, L-arginine) and derivatives of 2-aminothiodiazole has been investigated. The behavior of the benzoxazinone towards a selected sulfur nucleophile, L-cysteine, has also been discussed. Formation of an amidine salt as a reaction intermediate has been assumed. The effect of solvent in some reactions has been elucidated. The structures of all the novel quinazoline and quinazolinone derivatives, obtained by heterocyclic ring opening and ring closure were inferred by the IR, MS as well as 1H-NMR spectral analysis. Moreover, the antimicrobial potential of some of the new synthesized derivatives has been evaluated.

  4. Hierarchical amplification of macromolecular helicity of dynamic helical poly(phenylacetylene)s composed of chiral and achiral phenylacetylenes in dilute solution, liquid crystal, and two-dimensional crystal.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Sousuke; Sakurai, Shin-ichiro; Nagai, Kanji; Banno, Motonori; Maeda, Katsuhiro; Kumaki, Jiro; Yashima, Eiji

    2011-01-12

    Optically active poly(phenylacetylene) copolymers consisting of optically active and achiral phenylacetylenes bearing L-alanine decyl esters (1L) and 2-aminoisobutylic acid decyl esters (Aib) as the pendant groups (poly(1L(m)-co-Aib(n))) with various compositions were synthesized by the copolymerization of the optically active 1L with achiral Aib using a rhodium catalyst, and their chiral amplification of the macromolecular helicity in a dilute solution, a lyotropic liquid crystalline (LC) state, and a two-dimensional (2D) crystal on the substrate was investigated by measuring the circular dichroism of the copolymers, mesoscopic cholesteric twist in the LC state (cholesteric helical pitch), and high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the self-assembled 2D helix-bundles of the copolymer chains. We found that the macromolecular helicity of poly(1L(m)-co-Aib(n))s could be hierarchically amplified in the order of the dilute solution, LC state, and 2D crystal. In sharp contrast, almost no chiral amplification of the macromolecular helicity was observed for the homopolymer mixtures of 1L and Aib in the LC state and 2D crystal on graphite. PMID:21141965

  5. Chirality amplification and detection by tactoids of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-10-01

    Detection of chiral molecules requires amplification of chirality to measurable levels. Typically, amplification mechanisms are considered at the microscopic scales of individual molecules and their aggregates. Here we demonstrate chirality amplification and visualization of structural handedness in water solutions of organic molecules that extends over the scale of many micrometers. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) formed in water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. The nematic LCLC coexists with its isotropic counterpart, forming elongated tactoids; the spatial confinement causes a structural twist even when the material is nonchiral. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as the amino acid l-alanine and limonene transform the racemic array of left- and right-twisted tactoids into a homochiral set. The left and right chiral enantiomers are readily distinguished from each other as the induced structural handedness is visualized through a simple polarizing microscope observation. The effect is important for developing our understanding of chirality amplification mechanisms; it also might open up new possibilities in biosensing. PMID:26238525

  6. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids.

  7. Nitrile-synthesizing enzyme: Screening, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Takuto; Suzuki, Takahisa; Shimizu, Sakayu; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-09-12

    Cyanide is known as a toxic compound for almost all living organisms. We have searched for cyanide-resistant bacteria from the soil and stock culture collection of our laboratory, and have found the existence of a lot of microorganisms grown on culture media containing 10 mM potassium cyanide. Almost all of these cyanide-resistant bacteria were found to show β-cyano-L-alanine (β-CNAla) synthetic activity. β-CNAla synthase is known to catalyze nitrile synthesis: the formation of β-CNAla from potassium cyanide and O-acetyl-L-serine or L-cysteine. We found that some microorganisms were able to detoxify cyanide using O-methyl-DL-serine, O-phospho-L-serine and β-chloro-DL-alanine. In addition, we purified β-CNAla synthase from Pseudomonas ovalis No. 111 in nine steps, and characterized the purified enzyme. This enzyme has a molecular mass of 60,000 and appears to consist of two identical subunits. The purified enzyme exhibits a maximum activity at pH 8.5-9.0 at an optimal temperature of 40-50°C. The enzyme is specific for O-acetyl-L-serine and β-chloro-DL-alanine. The Km value for O-acetyl-L-serine is 10.0 mM and Vmax value is 3.57 μmol/min/mg. PMID:27250663

  8. Effect of fipronil on energy metabolism in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Hyllana Catarine Dias; Constantin, Jorgete; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Mingatto, Fábio Erminio

    2015-07-01

    Fipronil is an insecticide used to control pests in animals and plants that can causes hepatotoxicity in animals and humans, and it is hepatically metabolized to fipronil sulfone by cytochrome P-450. The present study aimed to characterize the effects of fipronil (10-50μM) on energy metabolism in isolated perfused rat livers. In fed animals, there was increased glucose and lactate release from glycogen catabolism, indicating the stimulation of glycogenolysis and glycolysis. In the livers of fasted animals, fipronil inhibited glucose and urea production from exogenous l-alanine, whereas ammonia and lactate production were increased. In addition, fipronil at 50μM concentration inhibited the oxygen uptake and increased the cytosolic NADH/NAD⁺ ratio under glycolytic conditions. The metabolic alterations were found both in livers from normal or proadifen-pretreated rats revealing that fipronil and its reactive metabolites contributed for the observed activity. The effects on oxygen uptake indicated that the possible mechanism of toxicity of fipronil involves impairment on mitochondrial respiratory activity, and therefore, interference with energy metabolism. The inhibitory effects on oxygen uptake observed at the highest concentration of 50μM was abolished by pretreatment of the rats with proadifen indicating that the metabolites of fipronil, including fipronil sulfone, acted predominantly as inhibitors of respiratory chain. The hepatoxicity of both the parent compound and its reactive metabolites was corroborated by the increase in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in the effluent perfusate in livers from normal or proadifen-pretreated rats. PMID:25943759

  9. Characterization of some amino acid derivatives of benzoyl isothiocyanate: Crystal structures and theoretical prediction of their reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odame, Felix; Hosten, Eric C.; Betz, Richard; Lobb, Kevin; Tshentu, Zenixole R.

    2015-11-01

    The reaction of benzoyl isothiocyanate with L-serine, L-proline, D-methionine and L-alanine gave 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]-3-hydroxypropanoic acid (I), 1-(benzoylcarbamothioyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (II), 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]-4-(methylsulfanyl)butanoic acid (III) and 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]propanoic acid (IV), respectively. The compounds have been characterized by IR, NMR, microanalyses and mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of all the compounds have also been discussed. Compound II showed rotamers in solution. DFT calculations of the frontier orbitals of the compounds have been carried out to ascertain the groups that contribute to the HOMO and LUMO, and to study their contribution to the reactivity of these compounds. The calculations indicated that the carboxylic acid group in these compounds is unreactive hence making the conversion to benzimidazoles via cyclization on the carboxylic acids impractical. This has been further confirmed by the reaction of compounds I-IV, respectively, with o-phenylene diamine which was unsuccessful but gave compound V.

  10. Discovery and structure determination of a novel Maillard-derived sweetness enhancer by application of the comparative taste dilution analysis (cTDA).

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Harald; Soldo, Tomislav; Hofmann, Thomas

    2003-02-12

    Application of a novel screening procedure, the comparative taste dilution analysis (cTDA), on the non-solvent-extractable reaction products formed in a thermally processed aqueous solution of glucose and l-alanine led to the discovery of the presence of a sweetness-enhancing Maillard reaction product. Isolation, followed by LC-MS and 1D- and 2D-NMR measurements, and synthesis led to its unequivocal identification as N-(1-carboxyethyl)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pyridinium-3-ol inner salt. This so-called alapyridaine, although being tasteless itself, is the first nonvolatile, sweetness-enhancing Maillard reaction product reported in the literature. Depending on the pH value, the detection thresholds of sweet sugars, amino acids, and aspartame, respectively, were found to be significantly decreased when alapyridaine was present; for example, the threshold of glucose decreased by a factor of 16 in an equimolar mixture of glucose and alapyridaine. Studies on the influence of the stereochemistry on taste-enhancing activity revealed that the (+)-(S)-alapyridaine is the physiologically active enantiomer, whereas the (-)-(R)-enantiomer did not affect sweetness perception at all. Thermal processing of aqueous solutions of alapyridaine at 80 degrees C demonstrated a high thermal and hydrolytic stability of that sweetness enhancer; for example, more than 90 or 80% of alapyridaine was recovered when heated for 5 h at pH 7.0, 5.0, or 3.0, respectively. PMID:12568569

  11. Proteases and Peptidases of Castor Bean Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Raymond E.; Beevers, Harry

    1978-01-01

    The endosperm of castor bean seeds (Ricinus communis L.) contains two —SH-dependent aminopeptidases, one hydrolyzing l-leucine-β-naphthylamide optimally at pH 7.0, and the other hydrolyzing l-proline-β-naphthylamide optimally at pH 7.5. After germination the endosperm contains in addition an —SH-dependent hemoglobin protease, a serine-dependent carboxypeptidase, and at least two —SH-dependent enzymes hydrolyzing the model substrate α-N-benzoyl-dl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (BANA). The carboxypeptidase is active on a variety of N-carbobenzoxy dipeptides, especially N-carbobenzoxy-L-phenylalanine-l-alanine and N-carbobenzoxy-l-tyrosine-l-leucine. The pH optima for the protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase acivities are 3.5 to 4.0, 5.0 to 5.5, and 6 to 8, respectively. The two aminopeptidases increased about 4-fold in activity during the first 4 days of growth, concurrent with the period of rapid depletion of storage protein. Activities then declined as the endosperm senesced, but were still evident after 6 days. Senescence was complete by day 7 to 8. Hemoglobin protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase activities appeared in the endosperm at day 2 to 3, and reached peak activity at day 5 to 6. The data indicate that the aminopeptidases are involved in the early mobilization of endosperm storage protein, whereas protease, carboxypeptidase, and BANAase may take part in later turnover and/or senescence. PMID:16660598

  12. In-vitro bioactivity, biocompatibility and dissolution studies of diopside prepared from biowaste by using sol-gel combustion method.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Rajan; Vecstaudza, Jana; Krishnamurithy, G; Raghavendran, Hanumantha Rao Balaji; Murali, Malliga Raman; Kamarul, Tunku; Swamiappan, Sasikumar; Locs, Janis

    2016-11-01

    Diopside was synthesized from biowaste (Eggshell) by sol-gel combustion method at low calcination temperature and the influence of two different fuels (urea, l-alanine) on the phase formation temperature, physical and biological properties of the resultant diopside was studied. The synthesized materials were characterized by heating microscopy, FTIR, XRD, BET, SEM and EDAX techniques. BET analysis reveals particles were of submicron size with porosity in the nanometer range. Bone-like apatite deposition ability of diopside scaffolds was examined under static and circulation mode of SBF (Simulated Body Fluid). It was noticed that diopside has the capability to deposit HAP (hydroxyapatite) within the early stages of immersion. ICP-OES analysis indicates release of Ca, Mg, Si ions and removal of P ions from the SBF, but in different quantities from diopside scaffolds. Cytocompatability studies on human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) revealed good cellular attachment on the surface of diopside scaffolds and formation of extracellular matrix (ECM). This study suggests that the usage of eggshell biowaste as calcium source provides an effective substitute for synthetic starting materials to fabricate bioproducts for biomedical applications. PMID:27524000

  13. Purification and Partial Characterization of a Novel Bacteriocin Synthesized by Lactobacillus paracasei HD1-7 Isolated from Chinese Sauerkraut Juice

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jingping; Sun, Yanyang; Xin, Xing; Wang, Ying; Ping, Wenxiang

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriocins have antimicrobial activities against food-spoiling bacteria and food-borne pathogens. Paracin 1.7, a bacteriocin synthesized by Lactobacillus paracasei HD1-7 isolated from Chinese sauerkraut juice, was studied. Following partial purification with ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM Sepharose Fast Flow, and Sephadex G-10 chromatography, the molecular weight of Paracin 1.7 was about 10 kDa based on Tricine-SDS-PAGE results. A 2.87 fold purified bacteriocin was produced, reaching a final yield of 39.93% and the specific activity of 1.56 × 103 AU/mg. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of Paracin 1.7 was VSNTFFA, and the LC/LTQ results revealed that the N-terminal amino acid sequence was similar to that of ABC-type oligopeptide transport system protein and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase. Paracin 1.7 was sensitive to protease K, had antimicrobial activities at a broad pH range (3.0–8.0), and was heat resistant (121 °C for 20 min). Paracin 1.7 from Lactobacillus paracasei HD1-7 is a novel bacteriocin that has potential applications in food preservation. PMID:26763314

  14. Fast relief from migraine attacks using fast-disintegrating sublingual zolmitriptan tablets.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Azza A; Salah, Salwa

    2012-06-01

    Zolmitriptan is a potent molecule for treatment of migraine. Its current oral therapies present drawbacks such as slow onset of action, low bioavailability and large inter-subject variability. Fast disintegrating sublingual zolmitriptan tablet (FDST) using freeze-drying technique has been developed to enhance tablet disintegration and dissolution with the intention of speeding drug absorption and onset of effect, hence mitigating the effects on the gastrointestinal dysmotility that typically accompanies the migraine attack. The FDSTs were prepared using different concentrations of gelatin as binder and mannitol or L-alanine as matrix supporting/disintegration enhancing agents. The effect of formulation variables on the physicochemical and solid-state properties, as well as the dissolution behaviour of the tablets, was studied. The formulated FDSTs disintegrated within 30 s and showed significantly faster dissolution rate of zolmitriptan compared to the zolmitriptan oral tablet. Tablet containing 2% gelatin and mannitol showed acceptable weight variation, drug content and friability values. Furthermore, it had a low in-vitro and in-vivo disintegration time (11 s) and it reached 100% of drug release within 30 s. This sublingual formulation gave faster and higher zolmitriptan plasma concentration in rabbits compared to the oral zolmetriptan market product. Zolmitriptan FDST may therefore constitute an advance in the management of acute migraine attacks. PMID:22023340

  15. Effects of Lampricide on Olfaction and Behavior in Young-of-the-Year Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kathrine; Dew, William A; Hecnar, Stephen J; Pyle, Gregory G

    2016-04-01

    The lampricide, 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), is a primary component to sea lamprey control in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Though the lethal effects of TFM are well-known, the sublethal effects on fishes are virtually unknown. Here we studied the effects of TFM on the olfactory capabilities and behavior of young-of-the-year (YOY) lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens). At ecologically relevant concentrations of TFM there was reduced olfactory response to all three cues (l-alanine, taurocholic acid, food cue) tested, suggesting that TFM inhibits both olfactory sensory neurons tested. Sturgeon exposed to TFM also showed a reduced attraction to the scent of food and reduced consumption of food relative to unexposed fish. Exposed fish were more active than control fish, but with slower acceleration. Fish were able to detect the scent of TFM, but failed to avoid it in behavioral trials. The connection between neurophysiological and behavioral changes, and the commonality of habitats between sturgeon and lamprey ammocoetes, suggests that there may be effects at the ecosystem level in streams that undergo lamprey control treatments. PMID:27015540

  16. Resolution and isolation of enantiomers of (±)-isoxsuprine using thin silica gel layers impregnated with L-glutamic acid, comparison of separation of its diastereomers prepared with chiral derivatizing reagents having L-amino acids as chiral auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Ravi; Nagar, Hariom

    2015-03-01

    Thin silica gel layers impregnated with optically pure l-glutamic acid were used for direct resolution of enantiomers of (±)-isoxsuprine in their native form. Three chiral derivatizing reagents, based on DFDNB moiety, were synthesized having l-alanine, l-valine and S-benzyl-l-cysteine as chiral auxiliaries. These were used to prepare diastereomers under microwave irradiation and conventional heating. The diastereomers were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 column with detection at 340 nm using gradient elution with mobile phase containing aqueous trifluoroacetic acid and acetonitrile in different compositions and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) on reversed phase (RP) C18 plates. Diastereomers prepared with enantiomerically pure (+)-isoxsuprine were used as standards for the determination of the elution order of diastereomers of (±)-isoxsuprine. The elution order in the experimental study of RP-TLC and RP-HPLC supported the developed optimized structures of diastereomers based on density functional theory. The limit of detection was 0.1-0.09 µg/mL in TLC while it was in the range of 22-23 pg/mL in HPLC and 11-13 ng/mL in RP-TLC for each enantiomer. The conditions of derivatization and chromatographic separation were optimized. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, limit of detection and limit of quantification. PMID:25044026

  17. A Case of Primary Hypoparathyroidism Presenting with Acute Kidney Injury Secondary to Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Sumnu, Abdullah; Aydin, Zeki; Gursu, Meltem; Uzun, Sami; Karadag, Serhat; Cebeci, Egemen; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is the most common cause of symmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. Herein, a case of primary hypoparathyroidism with severe tetany, rhabdomyolysis, and acute kidney injury is presented. A 26-year-old male was admitted to the emergency clinic with leg pain and cramps, nausea, vomiting, and decreased amount of urine. He had been treated for epilepsy for the last 10 years. He was admitted to the emergency department for leg pain, cramping in the hands and legs, and agitation multiple times within the last six months. He was prescribed antidepressant and antipsychotic medications. He had a blood pressure of 150/90 mmHg, diffuse abdominal tenderness, and abdominal muscle rigidity on physical examination. Pathological laboratory findings were as follows: creatinine, 7.5 mg/dL, calcium, 3.7 mg/dL, alanine transaminase, 4349 U/L, aspartate transaminase, 5237 U/L, creatine phosphokinase, 262.000 U/L, and parathyroid hormone, 0 pg/mL. There were bilateral symmetrical calcifications in basal ganglia and the cerebellum on computerized tomography. He was diagnosed as primary hypoparathyroidism and acute kidney injury secondary to severe rhabdomyolysis. Brain calcifications, although rare, should be considered in dealing with patients with neurological symptoms, symmetrical cranial calcifications, and calcium metabolism abnormalities. PMID:27034860

  18. Is exposure to cyanobacteria an environmental risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Walter G.; Borenstein, Amy R.; Nelson, Lorene M.; Codd, Geoffrey A.; Rosen, Barry H.; Stommel, Elijah W.; Cox, Paul Alan

    2013-01-01

    There is a broad scientific consensus that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by gene-environment interactions. Mutations in genes underlying familial ALS (fALS) have been discovered in only 5–10% of the total population of ALS patients. Relatively little attention has been paid to environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger the cascade of motor neuron death leading to the syndrome of ALS, although exposure to chemicals including lead and pesticides, and to agricultural environments, smoking, certain sports, and trauma have all been identified with an increased risk of ALS. There is a need for research to quantify the relative roles of each of the identified risk factors for ALS. Recent evidence has strengthened the theory that chronic environmental exposure to the neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced by cyanobacteria may be an environmental risk factor for ALS. Here we describe methods that may be used to assess exposure to cyanobacteria, and hence potentially to BMAA, namely an epidemiologic questionnaire and direct and indirect methods for estimating the cyanobacterial load in ecosystems. Rigorous epidemiologic studies could determine the risks associated with exposure to cyanobacteria, and if combined with genetic analysis of ALS cases and controls could reveal etiologically important gene-environment interactions in genetically vulnerable individuals.

  19. A novel aceE mutation leading to a better growth profile and a higher L-serine production in a high-yield L-serine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen; Chen, Ziwei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Guoqiang; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Shi, Jinsong; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-09-01

    A comparative genomic analysis was performed to study the genetic variations between the L-serine-producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum SYPS-062 and the mutant strain SYPS-062-33a, which was derived from SYPS-062 by random mutagenesis with enhanced L-serine production. Some variant genes between the two strains were reversely mutated or deleted in the genome of SYPS-062-33a to verify the influences of the gene mutations introduced by random mutagenesis. It was found that a His-594 → Tyr mutation in aceE was responsible for the more accumulation of by-products, such as L-alanine and L-valine, in SYPS-062-33a. Furthermore, the influence of this point mutation on the L-serine production was investigated, and the results suggested that this point mutation led to a better growth profile and a higher L-serine production in the high-yield strain 33a∆SSAAI, which was derived from SYPS-062-33a by metabolic engineering with the highest L-serine production to date. PMID:27344574

  20. Determination of free L- and D-alanine in hydrolysed protein fertilisers by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cavani, Luciano; Ciavatta, Claudio; Gessa, Carlo

    2003-01-24

    of racemisation of hydrolysed protein fertilisers (HPFs) using an The objective of this study was to determine the degree inexpensive and easy to handle analytical method for qualitative control of the products. Using a polyacrylamide coated capillary and a run buffer containing 0.1 M Tris-borate+2.5 mM EDTA-Na2+0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate+10 mM beta-cyclodextrin a quantitative separation of D- and L-alanine (Ala) was made from an not treated HPF sample derivatised with dansyl chlorine by capillary electrophoresis. The D-Ala:[D-Ala+L-Ala] ratio, called degree of racemisation (RD), was calculated. The analysis of ten commercial HPFs has shown that more than 60% of HPFs have an RD > or = 40%. while only one product has shown an RD <5%. These results showed that most of the HPFs on the market are obtained with strong hydrolytic processes and high contents of D-amino acids are probably less effective as plant nutrients or even potentially dangerous to plants. PMID:12580515