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Sample records for l-type voltage-gated calcium

  1. L-type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Conditioned Fear: A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Sze, Wilson; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological approaches, others have suggested that L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) mediate both consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. In the absence of L-VGCC isoform-specific antagonists, we have begun to investigate the subtype-specific role of LVGCCs in consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear…

  2. Emerging Roles of L-Type Voltage-Gated and Other Calcium Channels in T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Badou, Abdallah; Jha, Mithilesh K.; Matza, Didi; Flavell, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    In T lymphocytes, calcium ion controls a variety of biological processes including development, survival, proliferation, and effector functions. These distinct and specific roles are regulated by different calcium signals, which are generated by various plasma membrane calcium channels. The repertoire of calcium-conducting proteins in T lymphocytes includes store-operated CRAC channels, transient receptor potential channels, P2X channels, and L-type voltage-gated calcium (Cav1) channels. In this paper, we will focus mainly on the role of the Cav1 channels found expressed by T lymphocytes, where these channels appear to operate in a T cell receptor stimulation-dependent and voltage sensor independent manner. We will review their expression profile at various differentiation stages of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. Then, we will present crucial genetic evidence in favor of a role of these Cav1 channels and related regulatory proteins in both CD4 and CD8 T cell functions such as proliferation, survival, cytokine production, and cytolysis. Finally, we will provide evidence and speculate on how these voltage-gated channels might function in the T lymphocyte, a non-excitable cell. PMID:24009608

  3. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca[subscript v]1.3 Mediates Consolidation, but Not Extinction, of Contextually Conditioned Fear in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Using pharmacological techniques, it has been demonstrated that both consolidation and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning are dependent to some extent upon L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs). Although these studies have successfully implicated LVGCCs in Pavlovian fear conditioning, they do not provide information about the…

  4. Like Extinction, Latent Inhibition of Conditioned Fear in Mice Is Blocked by Systemic Inhibition of L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Ashley M.; Cain, Chris K.; Barad, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Having recently shown that extinction of conditioned fear depends on L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs), we have been seeking other protocols that require this unusual induction mechanism. We tested latent inhibition (LI) of fear, because LI resembles extinction except that cue exposures precede, rather than follow, cue-shock pairing.…

  5. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  6. Localization and functional modification of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in equine spermatozoa from fresh and frozen semen.

    PubMed

    Albrizio, M; Moramarco, A M; Nicassio, M; Micera, E; Zarrilli, A; Lacalandra, G M

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that insemination of cryopreserved semen always results in lower fertility when compared with fresh semen, but there is an increased interest and demand for frozen equine semen by the major breeder associations because of the utility arising from semen already "on hand" at breeding time. In this article, we report that equine sperm cells express L-type voltage-gated calcium channels; their localization is restricted to sperm neck and to the principal piece of the tail in both fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa. We also studied the causes of cryoinjury at the membrane level focusing on the function of L-type calcium channels. We report that in cryopreserved spermatozoa the mean basal value of [Ca(2+)]i is higher than that of spermatozoa from fresh semen (447.130 vs. 288.3 nM; P < 0.001) and L-type channels function differently in response to their agonist and antagonist in relation to semen condition (fresh or frozen-thawed). We found that on addition of agonist to the culture medium, the increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) was greater in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 124.59 vs. 16.04 nM; P < 0.001), whereas after the addition of antagonist the decrease in [Ca(2+)]i was lower in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 32.5 vs. 82.5 nM; P < 0.001). In this article, we also discuss the impact of cryopreservation on sperm physiology. PMID:25459425

  7. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na+ and K+ channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca2+ ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca2+ elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca2+ concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca2+ imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca2+ entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca2+ may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:27313508

  8. Pulsed electromagnetic field enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression through L-type voltage-gated calcium channel- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways in neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Juanfang; Li, Ling; Hu, Xinghua; Sun, Honghui; Tian, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Although pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) exposure has been reported to promote neuronal differentiation, the mechanism is still unclear. Here, we aimed to examine the effects of PEMF exposure on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) mRNA expression and the correlation between the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and Bdnf mRNA expression in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Exposure to 50Hz and 1mT PEMF for 2h increased the level of [Ca(2+)]i and Bdnf mRNA expression, which was found to be mediated by increased [Ca(2+)]i from Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). However, calcium mobilization was not involved in the increased [Ca(2+)]i and BDNF expression, indicating that calcium influx was one of the key factors responding to PEMF exposure. Moreover, PD098059, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) inhibitor, strongly inhibited PEMF-dependant Erk1/2 activation and BDNF expression, indicating that Erk activation is required for PEMF-induced upregulation of BDNF expression. These findings indicated that PEMF exposure increased BDNF expression in DRGNs by activating Ca(2+)- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:24937769

  9. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  10. Redox Regulation of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons and are key regulators of cellular excitability and synaptic transmitter release. There is accumulating evidence that multiple subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels may be regulated by oxidation and reduction. However, the redox mechanisms involved in the regulation of channel function are not well understood. Recent Advances: Several studies have established that both T-type and high-voltage-activated subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel can be redox-regulated. This article reviews different mechanisms that can be involved in redox regulation of calcium channel function and their implication in neuronal function, particularly in pain pathways and thalamic oscillation. Critical Issues: A current critical issue in the field is to decipher precise mechanisms of calcium channel modulation via redox reactions. In this review we discuss covalent post-translational modification via oxidation of cysteine molecules and chelation of trace metals, and reactions involving nitric oxide-related molecules and free radicals. Improved understanding of the roles of redox-based reactions in regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels may lead to improved understanding of novel redox mechanisms in physiological and pathological processes. Future Directions: Identification of redox mechanisms and sites on voltage-gated calcium channel may allow development of novel and specific ion channel therapies for unmet medical needs. Thus, it may be possible to regulate the redox state of these channels in treatment of pathological process such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 880–891. PMID:24161125

  11. Characterization of L-type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel Expression and Function in Developing CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Norlin, Mackenzie S.; Vollmer, Cyndel C.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) play a major role during the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Ca2+ influx via VGCCs regulates axonal growth and neuronal migration as well as synaptic plasticity. Specifically, L-type VGCCs have been well characterized to be involved in the formation and refinement of the connections within the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The majority of the growth, formation, and refinement in the CNS occurs during the human third trimester. An equivalent developmental time period in rodents occurs during the first two weeks of post-natal life, and the expression pattern of L-type VGCCs during this time period has not been well characterized. In this study, we show that Cav1.2 channels are more highly expressed during this developmental period compared to adolescence (post-natal day 30) and that L-type VGCCs significantly contribute to the overall Ca2+ currents. These findings suggest that L-type VGCCs are functionally expressed during the crucial developmental period. PMID:23415785

  12. High-frequency stimulation-induced synaptic potentiation in dorsal and ventral CA1 hippocampal synapses: the involvement of NMDA receptors, mGluR5, and (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Kouvaros, Stylianos

    2016-09-01

    The ability of the ventral hippocampus (VH) for long-lasting long-term potentiation (LTP) and the mechanisms underlying its lower ability for short-lasting LTP compared with the dorsal hippocampus (DH) are unknown. Using recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from the CA1 field of adult rat hippocampal slices, we found that 200-Hz stimulation induced nondecremental LTP that was maintained for at least 7 h and was greater in the DH than in the VH. The interaction of NMDA receptors with L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels appeared to be more effective in the DH than in the VH. Furthermore, the LTP was significantly enhanced in the DH only, between 2 and 5 h post-tetanus. Furthermore, the mGluR5 contributed to the post-tetanic potentiation more in the VH than in the DH. PMID:27531836

  13. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels by fluoxetine in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Deák, F; Lasztóczi, B; Pacher, P; Petheö, G L; Valéria Kecskeméti; Spät, A

    2000-04-01

    Fluoxetine, an antidepressant which is used world-wide, is a prominent member of the class of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. Recently, inhibition of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels by fluoxetine has also been reported. We examined the effect of fluoxetine on voltage-gated calcium channels using the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. In hippocampal pyramidal cells, fluoxetine inhibited the low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium current with an IC(50) of 6.8 microM. Fluoxetine decreased the high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium current with an IC(50) between 1 and 2 microM. Nifedipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the HVA current by 24% and 43%, respectively. Fluoxetine (3 microM), applied in addition to nifedipine or omega-conotoxin, further reduced the current. When fluoxetine (3 microM) was applied first neither nifedipine nor omega-conotoxin attenuated the remaining component of the HVA current. This observation indicates that fluoxetine inhibits both L- and N-type currents. In addition, fluoxetine inhibited the HVA calcium current in carotid body type I chemoreceptor cells and pyramidal neurons prepared from prefrontal cortex. In hippocampal pyramidal cells high K(+)-induced seizure-like activity was inhibited by 1 microM fluoxetine; the mean burst duration was shortened by an average of 44%. These results provide evidence for inhibition of T-, N- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels by fluoxetine at therapeutically relevant concentrations. PMID:10727713

  14. Cardiac voltage-gated calcium channel macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20years, a new field of research, called channelopathies, investigating diseases caused by ion channel dysfunction has emerged. Cardiac ion channels play an essential role in the generation of the cardiac action potential. Investigators have largely determined the physiological roles of different cardiac ion channels, but little is known about the molecular determinants of their regulation. The voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.2 shapes the plateau phase of the cardiac action potential and allows the influx of calcium leading to cardiomyocyte contraction. Studies suggest that the regulation of Cav1.2 channels is not uniform in working cardiomyocytes. The notion of micro-domains containing Cav1.2 channels and different calcium channel interacting proteins, called macro-molecular complex, has been proposed to explain these observations. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently known information on the Cav1.2 macromolecular complexes in the cardiac cell and discuss their implication in cardiac function and disorder. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26707467

  15. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels by RGK Proteins.

    PubMed

    Buraei, Zafir; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Due to their essential biological roles, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are regulated by a myriad of molecules and mechanisms. Fifteen years ago, RGK proteins were discovered to bind the VGCC β subunit (Cavβ) and potently inhibit high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels. RGKs (Rad, Rem, Rem2 and Gem/Kir) are a family of monomeric small GTPases belonging to the superfamily of Ras GTPases. They exert dual inhibitory effects on VGCCs, decreasing surface expression and suppressing surface channels through immobilization of the voltage sensor or reduction of channel open probability. While Cavβ is required for all forms of RGK inhibition, not all inhibition is mediated by the RGK-Cavβ interaction. Some RGK proteins also interact directly with the pore-forming α1 subunit of some types of VGCCs (Cavα1). Importantly, RGK proteins tonically inhibit VGCCs in native cells, regulating cardiac and neural functions. This minireview summarizes the mechanisms, molecular determinants, and physiological impact of RGK inhibition of VGCCs. PMID:25966691

  16. Voltage-gated calcium channel autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McKasson, Marilyn; Clawson, Susan A.; Hill, Kenneth E.; Wood, Blair; Carlson, Noel; Bromberg, Mark; Greenlee, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe response to treatment in a patient with autoantibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) who presented with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration and subsequently developed Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), and to study the effect of the patient's autoantibodies on Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures. Methods: Case report and study of rat cerebellar slice cultures incubated with patient VGCC autoantibodies. Results: A 53-year-old man developed progressive incoordination with ataxic speech. Laboratory evaluation revealed VGCC autoantibodies without other antineuronal autoantibodies. Whole-body PET scans 6 and 12 months after presentation detected no malignancy. The patient improved significantly with IV immunoglobulin G (IgG), prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil, but worsened after IV IgG was halted secondary to aseptic meningitis. He subsequently developed weakness with electrodiagnostic evidence of LEMS. The patient's IgG bound to Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures, followed by neuronal death. Reactivity of the patient's autoantibodies with VGCCs was confirmed by blocking studies with defined VGCC antibodies. Conclusions: Autoimmune cerebellar degeneration associated with VGCC autoantibodies may precede onset of LEMS and may improve with immunosuppressive treatment. Binding of anti-VGCC antibodies to Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures may be followed by cell death. Patients with anti-VGCC autoantibodies may be at risk of irreversible neurologic injury over time, and treatment should be initiated early. PMID:27088118

  17. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels for neuropathic pain management

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Danielle; Luo, Z. David

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) play obligatory roles in diverse physiological functions. Pathological conditions leading to changes in their biophysical properties and expression levels may cause malfunctions of VGCC mediated activities, resulting in disease states. It is believed that changes in VGCC properties under pain-inducing conditions may play a causal role in the development of chronic pain, including nerve injury-induced pain, or neuropathic pain. Over the past decades, preclinical and clinical research in developing VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain management has been fruitful, leading to some US Food and Drug Administration approved drugs currently available for chronic pain management. However, their efficacy in pain relief is limited in some patients and their long-term use is limited by their side effect profiles. Certainly, there is room for improvement in developing more subtype specific VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain conditions. In this review, we summarized the most recent preclinical and clinical studies related to chronic pain medications acting on the VGCC. We also included clinical trials aiming to expand the application of approved VGCC drugs to different pain states derived from various pathological conditions, as well as drug combination therapies trying to improve the efficacies and side effect profiles of current pain medications. PMID:19789072

  18. The Physiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels and Their Future Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, Gerald W.; Striessnig, Joerg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are required for many key functions in the body. In this review, the different subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels are described and their physiologic roles and pharmacology are outlined. We describe the current uses of drugs interacting with the different calcium channel subtypes and subunits, as well as specific areas in which there is strong potential for future drug development. Current therapeutic agents include drugs targeting L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels, particularly 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. T-type (CaV3) channels are a target of ethosuximide, widely used in absence epilepsy. The auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 is the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are of value in certain epilepsies and chronic neuropathic pain. The limited use of intrathecal ziconotide, a peptide blocker of N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channels, as a treatment of intractable pain, gives an indication that these channels represent excellent drug targets for various pain conditions. We describe how selectivity for different subtypes of calcium channels (e.g., CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 L-type channels) may be achieved in the future by exploiting differences between channel isoforms in terms of sequence and biophysical properties, variation in splicing in different target tissues, and differences in the properties of the target tissues themselves in terms of membrane potential or firing frequency. Thus, use-dependent blockers of the different isoforms could selectively block calcium channels in particular pathologies, such as nociceptive neurons in pain states or in epileptic brain circuits. Of important future potential are selective CaV1.3 blockers for neuropsychiatric diseases, neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease, and resistant hypertension. In addition, selective or nonselective T-type channel blockers are considered potential therapeutic targets in epilepsy, pain, obesity, sleep, and

  19. The Physiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels and Their Future Therapeutic Potential.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, Gerald W; Striessnig, Joerg; Koschak, Alexandra; Dolphin, Annette C

    2015-10-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are required for many key functions in the body. In this review, the different subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels are described and their physiologic roles and pharmacology are outlined. We describe the current uses of drugs interacting with the different calcium channel subtypes and subunits, as well as specific areas in which there is strong potential for future drug development. Current therapeutic agents include drugs targeting L-type Ca(V)1.2 calcium channels, particularly 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. T-type (Ca(V)3) channels are a target of ethosuximide, widely used in absence epilepsy. The auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 is the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are of value in certain epilepsies and chronic neuropathic pain. The limited use of intrathecal ziconotide, a peptide blocker of N-type (Ca(V)2.2) calcium channels, as a treatment of intractable pain, gives an indication that these channels represent excellent drug targets for various pain conditions. We describe how selectivity for different subtypes of calcium channels (e.g., Ca(V)1.2 and Ca(V)1.3 L-type channels) may be achieved in the future by exploiting differences between channel isoforms in terms of sequence and biophysical properties, variation in splicing in different target tissues, and differences in the properties of the target tissues themselves in terms of membrane potential or firing frequency. Thus, use-dependent blockers of the different isoforms could selectively block calcium channels in particular pathologies, such as nociceptive neurons in pain states or in epileptic brain circuits. Of important future potential are selective Ca(V)1.3 blockers for neuropsychiatric diseases, neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease, and resistant hypertension. In addition, selective or nonselective T-type channel blockers are considered potential therapeutic targets in epilepsy, pain, obesity, sleep

  20. Structural Basis for Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Sodium and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Teresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate action potentials in nerve, muscle, and other electrically excitable cells. Voltage-gated calcium channels are activated by depolarization during action potentials, and calcium influx through them is the key second messenger of electrical signaling, initiating secretion, contraction, neurotransmission, gene transcription, and many other intracellular processes. Drugs that block sodium channels are used in local anesthesia and the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorder, chronic pain, and cardiac arrhythmia. Drugs that block calcium channels are used in the treatment of epilepsy, chronic pain, and cardiovascular disorders, including hypertension, angina pectoris, and cardiac arrhythmia. The principal pore-forming subunits of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are structurally related and likely to have evolved from ancestral voltage-gated sodium channels that are widely expressed in prokaryotes. Determination of the structure of a bacterial ancestor of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels at high resolution now provides a three-dimensional view of the binding sites for drugs acting on sodium and calcium channels. In this minireview, we outline the different classes of sodium and calcium channel drugs, review studies that have identified amino acid residues that are required for their binding and therapeutic actions, and illustrate how the analogs of those key amino acid residues may form drug-binding sites in three-dimensional models derived from bacterial channels. PMID:25848093

  1. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  2. LRRK2 Regulates Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Cade; Sears, Catherine; Perez-Carrion, Maria; Piccoli, Giovanni; Condliffe, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels enable Ca2+ influx in response to membrane depolarization. CaV2.1 channels are localized to the presynaptic membrane of many types of neurons where they are involved in triggering neurotransmitter release. Several signaling proteins have been identified as important CaV2.1 regulators including protein kinases, G-proteins and Ca2+ binding proteins. Recently, we discovered that leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a protein associated with inherited Parkinson’s disease, interacts with specific synaptic proteins and influences synaptic transmission. Since synaptic proteins functionally interact with CaV2.1 channels and synaptic transmission is triggered by Ca2+ entry via CaV2.1, we investigated whether LRRK2 could impact CaV2.1 channel function. CaV2.1 channel properties were measured using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology in HEK293 cells transfected with CaV2.1 subunits and various LRRK2 constructs. Our results demonstrate that both wild type (wt) LRRK2 and the G2019S LRRK2 mutant caused a significant increase in whole cell Ca2+ current density compared to cells expressing only the CaV2.1 channel complex. In addition, LRRK2 expression caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation while having no significant effect on inactivation properties. These functional changes in CaV2.1 activity are likely due to a direct action of LRRK2 as we detected a physical interaction between LRRK2 and the β3 CaV channel subunit via coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, effects on CaV2.1 channel function are dependent on LRRK2 kinase activity as these could be reversed via treatment with a LRRK2 inhibitor. Interestingly, LRRK2 also augmented endogenous voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in PC12 cells suggesting other CaV channels could also be regulated by LRRK2. Overall, our findings support a novel physiological role for LRRK2 in regulating CaV2.1 function that could have implications for how mutations in LRRK2

  3. Voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels mediate Sema3A retrograde signaling that regulates dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Naoya; Aoki, Reina; Chen, Sandy; Jitsuki-Takahashi, Aoi; Ohura, Shunsuke; Kamiya, Haruyuki; Goshima, Yoshio

    2016-01-15

    Growing axons rely on local signaling at the growth cone for guidance cues. Semaphorin3A (Sema3A), a secreted repulsive axon guidance molecule, regulates synapse maturation and dendritic branching. We previously showed that local Sema3A signaling in the growth cones elicits retrograde retrograde signaling via PlexinA4 (PlexA4), one component of the Sema3A receptor, thereby regulating dendritic localization of AMPA receptor GluA2 and proper dendritic development. In present study, we found that nimodipine (voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) and tetrodotoxin (TTX; voltage-gated Na(+) channel blocker) suppress Sema3A-induced dendritic localization of GluA2 and dendritic branch formation in cultured hippocampal neurons. The local application of nimodipine or TTX to distal axons suppresses retrograde transport of Venus-Sema3A that has been exogenously applied to the distal axons. Sema3A facilitates axonal transport of PlexA4, which is also suppressed in neurons treated with either TTX or nimodipine. These data suggest that voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels mediate Sema3A retrograde signaling that regulates dendritic GluA2 localization and branch formation. PMID:26638837

  4. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  5. Differential Effects of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Blockers on Calcium Channel Alpha-2-Delta-1 Subunit Protein Mediated Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Chang, E.; Chen, X.; Kim, M.; Gong, N.; Bhatia, S.; Luo, Z.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of the voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) alpha-2-delta1 subunit protein (Cavα2δ1) has been shown to cause pain states. However, whether VGCC are involved in pain states driven by abnormal Cavα2δ1 expression is not known. Methods Intrathecal injection of N-, P/Q-, and L-type VGCC blockers were tested in two models: a transgenic neuronal Cavα2δ1 overexpression (TG) model with behavioral hypersensitivity and a spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model with Cavα2δ1 overexpression in sensory pathways and neuropathy pain states. Results The nociceptive response to mechanical stimuli was significantly attenuated in both models with ω-conotoxin GVIA (an N-type VGCC blocker) and nifedipine (a L-type VGCC blocker), in which ω-conotoxin GVIA appeared more potent than nifedipine. Treatments with ω-agatoxin IVA (P-VGCC blocker), but not ω-conotoxin MVIIC (Q-VGCC blocker) had similar potency in the TG model as the N-type VGCC blocker, while both ω-agatoxin IVA and ω-conotoxin MVIIC had minimal effects in the SNL model compared to controls. Conclusion These findings suggest that, at the spinal level, N- and L-type VGCC are likely involved in behavioral hypersensitivity states driven by Cavα2δ1 overexpression. Q-type VGCC have minimal effects in both models. The anti-nociceptive effects of P-type VGCC blocker in the Cavα2δ1 TG mice, but minimally at the SNL model with presynaptic Cavα2δ1 upregulation, suggest that its potential action site(s) is at the post-synaptic and/or supraspinal level. These findings support that N-, L- and P/Q-type VGCC have differential contributions to behavioral hypersensitivity modulated by Cavα2δ1 dysregulation at the spinal cord level. PMID:25158907

  6. PKC independent inhibition of voltage gated calcium channels by volatile anesthetics in freshly isolated vascular myocytes from the aorta

    PubMed Central

    Fanchaouy, Mohammed; Cubano, Luis; Maldonado, Hector; Bychkov, Rostislav

    2013-01-01

    In this study we used barium currents through voltage gated L-type calcium channels (recorded in freshly isolated cells with a conventional patch-clamp technique) to elucidate the cellular action mechanism for volatile anesthetics. It was found that halothane and isoflurane inhibited (dose-dependently and voltage independently) Ba2+ currents through voltage gated Ca2+ channels. Half maximal inhibitions occurred at 0.64 ± 0.07 mM and 0.86 ± 0.1 mM. The Hill slope value was 2 for both volatile anesthetics, suggesting the presence of more than one interaction site. Current inhibition by volatile anesthetics was prominent over the whole voltage range without changes in the peak of the current voltage relationship. Intracellular infusion of the GDPßS (100 μM) together with staurosporine (200 nM) did not prevent the inhibitory effect of volatile anesthetics. Unlike pharmacological Ca2+ channel blockers, volatile anesthetics blocked Ca2+ channel currents at resting membrane potentials. In other words, halothane and isoflurane induced an `initial block'. After the first 4 to 7 control pulses, the cells were left unstimulated and anesthetics were applied. The first depolarization after the pause evoked a Ca2+ channel current whose amplitude was reduced to 41 ± 3.4% and to 57 ± 4.2% of control values. In an analysis of the steady-state inactivation curve for voltage dependence, volatile anesthetics induced a negative shift of the 50% inactivation of the calcium channels. By contrast, the steepness factor characterizing the voltage sensitivity of the channels was unaffected. Unitary L-type Ca2+ channels blockade occurred under cell-attached configuration, suggesting a possible action of volatile anesthetics from within the intracellular space or from the part of the channel inside the lipid bilayer. PMID:23948226

  7. Hyperactivation of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in Caenorhabditis elegans striated muscle can result from point mutations in the IS6 or the IIIS4 segment of the α1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Lainé, Viviane; Ségor, Jean Rony; Zhan, Hong; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Jospin, Maelle

    2014-11-01

    Several human diseases, including hypokalemic periodic paralysis and Timothy syndrome, are caused by mutations in voltage-gated calcium channels. The effects of these mutations are not always well understood, partially because of difficulties in expressing these channels in heterologous systems. The use of Caenorhabditis elegans could be an alternative approach to determine the effects of mutations on voltage-gated calcium channel function because all the main types of voltage-gated calcium channels are found in C. elegans, a large panel of mutations already exists and efficient genetic tools are available to engineer customized mutations in any gene. In this study, we characterize the effects of two gain-of-function mutations in egl-19, which encodes the L-type calcium channel α1 subunit. One of these mutations, ad695, leads to the replacement of a hydrophobic residue in the IIIS4 segment. The other mutation, n2368, changes a conserved glycine of IS6 segment; this mutation has been identified in patients with Timothy syndrome. We show that both egl-19 (gain-of-function) mutants have defects in locomotion and morphology that are linked to higher muscle tone. Using in situ electrophysiological approaches in striated muscle cells, we provide evidence that this high muscle tone is due to a shift of the voltage dependency towards negative potentials, associated with a decrease of the inactivation rate of the L-type Ca(2+) current. Moreover, we show that the maximal conductance of the Ca(2+) current is decreased in the strongest mutant egl-19(n2368), and that this decrease is correlated with a mislocalization of the channel. PMID:25214488

  8. The impact of splice isoforms on voltage-gated calcium channel α1 subunits

    PubMed Central

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Semi-conserved exon boundaries in members of the CACNA1 gene family result in recurring pre-mRNA splicing patterns. The resulting variations in the encoded pore-forming subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel affect functionally significant regions, such as the vicinity of the voltage-sensing S4 segments or the intracellular loops that are important for protein interaction. In addition to generating functional diversity, RNA splicing regulates the quantitative expression of other splice isoforms of the same gene by producing transcripts with premature stop codons which encode two-domain or three-domain channels. An overview of some of the known splice isoforms of the α1 calcium channel subunits and their significance is given. PMID:14645450

  9. The impact of splice isoforms on voltage-gated calcium channel alpha1 subunits.

    PubMed

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2004-02-01

    Semi-conserved exon boundaries in members of the CACNA1 gene family result in recurring pre-mRNA splicing patterns. The resulting variations in the encoded pore-forming subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel affect functionally significant regions, such as the vicinity of the voltage-sensing S4 segments or the intracellular loops that are important for protein interaction. In addition to generating functional diversity, RNA splicing regulates the quantitative expression of other splice isoforms of the same gene by producing transcripts with premature stop codons which encode two-domain or three-domain channels. An overview of some of the known splice isoforms of the alpha(1) calcium channel subunits and their significance is given. PMID:14645450

  10. Control of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Ion Channels From RNA to Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lipscombe, Diane; Allen, Summer E; Toro, Cecilia P.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (CaV) ion channels convert neuronal activity into rapid intracellular calcium signals to trigger a myriad of cellular responses. Their involvement in major neurological and psychiatric diseases, and importance as therapeutic targets, has propelled interest in subcellular-specific mechanisms that align CaV channel activity to specific tasks. Here we highlight recent studies that delineate mechanisms controlling the expression of CaV channels at the level of RNA and protein. We discuss the roles of RNA editing and alternative pre-mRNA splicing in generating CaV channel isoforms with activities specific to the demands of individual cells; the roles of ubiquitination and accessory proteins in regulating CaV channel expression; and the specific binding partners which contribute to both pre- and post- synaptic CaV channel function. PMID:23907011

  11. Control of neuronal voltage-gated calcium ion channels from RNA to protein.

    PubMed

    Lipscombe, Diane; Allen, Summer E; Toro, Cecilia P

    2013-10-01

    Voltage-gated calcium ion (CaV) channels convert neuronal activity into rapid intracellular calcium signals to trigger a myriad of cellular responses. Their involvement in major neurological and psychiatric diseases, and importance as therapeutic targets, has propelled interest in subcellular-specific mechanisms that align CaV channel activity to specific tasks. Here, we highlight recent studies that delineate mechanisms controlling the expression of CaV channels at the level of RNA and protein. We discuss the roles of RNA editing and alternative pre-mRNA splicing in generating CaV channel isoforms with activities specific to the demands of individual cells; the roles of ubiquitination and accessory proteins in regulating CaV channel expression; and the specific binding partners that contribute to both pre- and postsynaptic CaV channel function. PMID:23907011

  12. Progesterone Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels is a Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism against Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Luoma, Jessie I; Kelley, Brooke G; Mermelstein, Paul G

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic use of progesterone following traumatic brain injury has recently entered phase III clinical trials as a means of neuroprotection. Although it has been hypothesized that progesterone protects against calcium overload following excitotoxic shock, the exact mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of progesterone have yet to be determined. We found that therapeutic concentrations of progesterone to be neuroprotective against depolarization-induced excitotoxicity in cultured striatal neurons. Through use of calcium imaging, electrophysiology and the measurement of changes in activity-dependent gene expression, progesterone was found to block calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels, leading to alterations in the signaling of the activity-dependent transcription factors NFAT and CREB. The effects of progesterone were highly specific to this steroid hormone, although they did not appear to be receptor mediated. In addition, progesterone did not inhibit AMPA or NMDA receptor signaling. This analysis regarding the effect of progesterone on calcium signaling provides both a putative mechanism by which progesterone acts as a neuroprotectant, as well as affords a greater appreciation for its potential far-reaching effects on cellular function. PMID:21371490

  13. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah C; Finney, Brenda A; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5-16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to match

  14. Fetal Calcium Regulates Branching Morphogenesis in the Developing Human and Mouse Lung: Involvement of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Sarah C.; Finney, Brenda A.; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E.; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9–17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5–16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (∼1.7 in the fetus vs. ∼1.1–1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to

  15. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, C. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response—homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors. There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies—such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other disorders. PMID

  16. Alternative splicing: functional diversity among voltage-gated calcium channels and behavioral consequences.

    PubMed

    Lipscombe, Diane; Andrade, Arturo; Allen, Summer E

    2013-07-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels generate rapid, transient intracellular calcium signals in response to membrane depolarization. Neuronal Ca(V) channels regulate a range of cellular functions and are implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Each mammalian Cacna1 gene has the potential to generate tens to thousands of Ca(V) channels by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, a process that adds fine granulation to the pool of Ca(V) channel structures and functions. The precise composition of Ca(V) channel splice isoform mRNAs expressed in each cell are controlled by cell-specific splicing factors. The activity of splicing factors are in turn regulated by molecules that encode various cellular features, including cell-type, activity, metabolic states, developmental state, and other factors. The cellular and behavioral consequences of individual sites of Ca(V) splice isoforms are being elucidated, as are the cell-specific splicing factors that control splice isoform selection. Altered patterns of alternative splicing of Ca(V) pre-mRNAs can alter behavior in subtle but measurable ways, with the potential to influence drug efficacy and disease severity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. PMID:23022282

  17. Alternative splicing: Functional diversity among voltage-gated calcium channels and behavioral consequences☆

    PubMed Central

    Lipscombe, Diane; Andrade, Arturo; Allen, Summer E.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels generate rapid, transient intracellular calcium signals in response to membrane depolarization. Neuronal CaV channels regulate a range of cellular functions and are implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases including epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, chronic pain, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Each mammalian Cacna1 gene has the potential to generate tens to thousands of CaV channels by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, a process that adds fine granulation to the pool of CaV channel structures and functions. The precise composition of CaV channel splice isoform mRNAs expressed in each cell are controlled by cell-specific splicing factors. The activity of splicing factors are in turn regulated by molecules that encode various cellular features, including cell-type, activity, metabolic states, developmental state, and other factors. The cellular and behavioral consequences of individual sites of CaV splice isoforms are being elucidated, as are the cell-specific splicing factors that control splice isoform selection. Altered patterns of alternative splicing of CaV pre-mRNAs can alter behavior in subtle but measurable ways, with the potential to influence drug efficacy and disease severity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. PMID:23022282

  18. The L-Type Calcium Channel Blocker Nifedipine Impairs Extinction, but Not Reduced Contingency Effects, in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jami, Shekib; Barad, Mark; Cain, Christopher K.; Godsil, Bill P.

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported that fear extinction, a form of inhibitory learning, is selectively blocked by systemic administration of L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LVGCC) antagonists, including nifedipine, in mice. We here replicate this finding and examine three reduced contingency effects after vehicle or nifedipine (40 mg/kg) administration.…

  19. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Yang; Lai, Ming-Derg; Phan, Nam Nhut; Sun, Zhengda; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org), a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I) are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment. PMID:26147197

  20. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Yang; Lai, Ming-Derg; Phan, Nam Nhut; Sun, Zhengda; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org), a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I) are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment. PMID:26147197

  1. Apo-states of calmodulin and CaBP1 control CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channel function through direct competition for the IQ domain

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Felix; Rumpf, Christine; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, binding of calmodulin (CaM) or calcium-binding protein 1 (CaBP1) to the CaV1 (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channel IQ domain endows the channel with diametrically opposed properties. CaM causes calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and limits calcium entry, whereas CaBP1 blocks CDI and allows sustained calcium influx. Here, we combine isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) with cell-based functional measurements and mathematical modeling to show that these calcium sensors behave in a competitive manner that is explained quantitatively by their apo-state binding affinities for the IQ domain. This competition can be completely blocked by covalent tethering of CaM to the channel. Further, we show that Ca2+/CaM has a sub-picomolar affinity for the IQ domain that is achieved without drastic alteration of calcium binding properties. The observation that the apo-forms of CaM and CaBP1 compete with each other demonstrates a simple mechanism for direct modulation of CaV1 function and suggests a means by which excitable cells may dynamically tune CaV activity. PMID:23811053

  2. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  3. Peptide Neurotoxins that Affect Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: A Close-Up on ω-Agatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Pringos, Emilie; Vignes, Michel; Martinez, Jean; Rolland, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins found in animal venoms have gained great interest in the field of neurotransmission. As they are high affinity ligands for calcium, potassium and sodium channels, they have become useful tools for studying channel structure and activity. Peptide neurotoxins represent the clinical potential of ion-channel modulators across several therapeutic fields, especially in developing new strategies for treatment of ion channel-related diseases. The aim of this review is to overview the latest updates in the domain of peptide neurotoxins that affect voltage-gated calcium channels, with a special focus on ω-agatoxins. PMID:22069688

  4. Voltage-gated and calcium-gated calcium release during depolarization of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemond, V; Csernoch, L; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-01-01

    The role of elevated intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) in activating calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in skeletal muscle fibers microinjected with strong calcium buffers. After the injection of 3.8 +/- 0.5 mM (mean +/- S.E. of mean, n = 16) BAPTA (1,2-bis[o-aminophenoxy]ethane- N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) or 2.2-2.8 mM fura-2 the normal increase in [Ca2+] during a depolarizing pulse was virtually eliminated. Even though calcium was released from the SR the kinetics of this release were markedly altered: the extensive buffering selectively eliminated the early peak component of SR calcium release with no effect on the maintained steady level. Microinjections of similar volumes but with low concentrations of fura-2 had no significant effect on the release waveform. The calcium released by voltage-dependent activation during depolarization may thus be involved in activating further calcium release, that is, in a calcium-induced calcium release mechanism. PMID:1660317

  5. GABAA Increases Calcium in Subventricular Zone Astrocyte-Like Cells Through L- and T-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stephanie Z.; Platel, Jean-Claude; Nielsen, Jakob V.; Jensen, Niels A.; Bordey, Angélique

    2010-01-01

    In the adult neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ), the behavior of astrocyte-like cells and some of their functions depend on changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels and tonic GABAA receptor activation. However, it is unknown whether, and if so how, GABAA receptor activity regulates intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in SVZ astrocytes. To monitor Ca2+ activity selectively in astrocyte-like cells, we used two lines of transgenic mice expressing either GFP fused to a Gq-coupled receptor or DsRed under the human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP) promoter. GABAA receptor activation induced Ca2+ increases in 40–50% of SVZ astrocytes. GABAA-induced Ca2+ increases were prevented with nifedipine and mibefradil, blockers of L- and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). The L-type Ca2+ channel activator BayK 8644 increased the percentage of GABAA-responding astrocyte-like cells to 75%, suggesting that the majority of SVZ astrocytes express functional VGCCs. SVZ astrocytes also displayed spontaneous Ca2+ activity, the frequency of which was regulated by tonic GABAA receptor activation. These data support a role for ambient GABA in tonically regulating intracellular Ca2+ dynamics through GABAA receptors and VGCC in a subpopulation of astrocyte-like cells in the postnatal SVZ. PMID:20422045

  6. Blockade of voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.2 and α1-adrenoceptors increases vertebral artery blood flow induced by the antivertigo agent difenidol.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kohji; Inoue, Naoki; Fuchikami, Chiaki; Tajima, Koyuki; Hashino, Asami; Fukui, Hisashi; Noda, Kumiko; Oka, Michiko

    2012-08-15

    Difenidol (1,1-diphenyl-4-piperidino-1-butanol hydrochloride) is an effective drug for the treatment of vertigo and dizziness. This drug is known to improve the blood flow in vertebral arteries, though the precise mechanism underlying this action remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of difenidol on voltage-gated calcium channel Ca(v)1.2 and α(1)-adrenoceptor subtypes that regulate the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), as well as their possible involvement in the action of difenidol on vertebral artery relaxation and blood flow in dogs. In vitro binding assays demonstrated that difenidol at micromolar concentrations bound to the α(1A)-, α(1B)- and α(1D)-adrenoceptor subtypes. Difenidol inhibited the phenylephrine-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human α(1A)-, α(1B)- or α(1D)-adrenoceptor subtypes with similar IC(50) values in the low micromolar range. In an electrophysiological assay, difenidol inhibited L-type calcium channel (Ca(v)1.2 subunit). In dogs, i.v. difenidol preferentially enhanced vertebral over femoral arterial blood flow. Phenylephrine and potassium induced contraction of dog vertebral arterial rings, and difenidol inhibited this action. Inhibition of phenylephrine-induced contraction by difenidol was mimicked by the α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine, the α(1A)-adrenoceptor antagonist RS 17,053 (N-[2-(2-cyclopropylmethoxyphenoxy)ethyl]-5-chloro-α,α-dimethyl-1H-indole-3-ethanamine hydrochloride) and the α(1D)-adrenoceptor antagonist BMY 7378 (8-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-8-azaspiro[4,5]decane-7,9-dione dihydrochloride). In addition, the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine, like difenidol, attenuated the potassium-induced contraction. These findings suggest that the difenidol-induced increase in vertebral arterial blood flow may be due to vascular relaxation mediated by mixed blocking actions at α(1)-adrenoceptors and

  7. Donepezil is a strong antagonist of voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, Elena I; Bukanova, Julia V; Marchenko, Evgeny; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2007-01-01

    Donepezil is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in Alzheimer's disease therapy. The neuroprotective effect of donepezil has been demonstrated in a number of different models of neurodegeneration including beta-amyloid toxicity. Since the mechanisms of neurodegeneration involve the activation of both Ca(2+)- and K(+)-channels, the study of donepezil action on voltage-gated ionic currents looked advisable. In the present study, the action of donepezil on voltage-gated Ca(2+)- and K(+)-channels was investigated on isolated neurons of the edible snail (Helix pomatia) using the two-microelectrodes voltage-clamp technique. Donepezil rapidly and reversibly inhibited voltage activated Ca(2+)-current (I(Ca)) (IC(50)=7.9 microM) and three types of high threshold K(+)-current: Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-current (I(C)) (IC(50)=6.4 microM), delayed rectifier K(+)-current (I(DR)) (IC(50)=8.0 microM) and fast transient K(+)-current (I(Adepol)) (IC(50)=9.1 microM). The drug caused a dual effect on low-threshold fast transient K(+)-current (I(A)), potentiating it at low (5 microM) concentration, but inhibiting at higher (7 microM and above) concentration. Donepezil also caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-current relationship of I(Ca) (but not of any type of K(+)-current). Results suggest the possible contribution of the blocking effect of donepezil on the voltage-gated Ca(2+)- and K(+)-channels to the neuroprotective effect of the drug. PMID:17126610

  8. Effects of electromagnetic field exposure on conduction and concentration of voltage gated calcium channels: A Brownian dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Tekieh, Tahereh; Sasanpour, Pezhman; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional Brownian Dynamics (BD) in combination with electrostatic calculations is employed to specifically study the effects of radiation of high frequency electromagnetic fields on the conduction and concentration profile of calcium ions inside the voltage-gated calcium channels. The electrostatic calculations are performed using COMSOL Multiphysics by considering dielectric interfaces effectively. The simulations are performed for different frequencies and intensities. The simulation results show the variations of conductance, average number of ions and the concentration profiles of ions inside the channels in response to high frequency radiation. The ionic current inside the channel increases in response to high frequency electromagnetic field radiation, and the concentration profiles show that the residency of ions in the channel decreases accordingly. PMID:27346366

  9. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Pentacycloundecylamines and Triquinylamines as Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Blockers.

    PubMed

    Young, Lois-May; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Domingo, Olwen C; Malan, Sarel F; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical studies for neurodegenerative diseases have shown a multi-targeted approach to be successful in the treatment of these complex disorders with several pathoetiological pathways. Polycyclic compounds, such as NGP1-01 (7a), have demonstrated the ability to target multiple mechanisms of the complex etiology and are referred to as multifunctional compounds. These compounds have served as scaffolds with the ability to attenuate Ca(2+) overload and excitotoxicity through several pathways. In this study, our focus was on mitigating Ca(2+) overload through the L-type calcium channels (LTCC). Here, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of several novel polycyclic compounds. We determined the IC50 values for both the pentacycloundecylamines and the triquinylamines by means of a high-throughput fluorescence calcium flux assay utilizing Fura-2/AM. The potential of these compounds to offer protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death was also evaluated. Overall, 8-benzylamino-8,11-oxapentacyclo[5.4.0.0(2,6) .0(3,10) .0(5,9) ]undecane (NGP1-01, 7a) had the most favorable pharmacological profile with an IC50 value of 86 µM for LTCC inhibition and significant reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. In general, the triquinylamines were more active as LTCC blockers than the oxa-pentacycloundecylamines. The aza-pentacycloundecylamines were potent LTCC inhibitors, with 8-hydroxy-N-phenylethyl-8,11-azapentacyclo[5.4.0.0(2,6) .0(3,10) .0(5,9) ]undecane (8b) also able to offer significant protection in the cell viability assays. PMID:26892182

  10. Towards a unified theory of calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+ channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca2+ and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms. PMID:25966688

  11. Voltage-gated calcium currents in cultured embryonic Xenopus spinal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Barish, M E

    1991-01-01

    1. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were studied in cultured embryonic Xenopus spinal neurones using whole-cell gigaohm seal techniques. Cultures of neural plate cells were established from stage 15-17 embryos (see Methods), and were studied for up to 80 h in vitro. During this period neural precursor cells morphologically differentiate and commence expression of multiple types of voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels. 2. Embryonic Xenopus neurones studied during the first 20-40 h in culture display Ca2+ currents that correspond to the low-voltage-activated (T-type) and high-voltage-activated forms described in other neurones and excitable cells. These Ca2+ current types could be separated based on voltage dependencies and pharmacological sensitivities. 3. T-type Ca2+ current was activated at voltages positive to -50 mV, and was selectively blocked by 200 microM-Ni2+. Curves describing the voltage dependencies of activation and steady-state inactivation overlapped in a region centred on -40 mV. A small sustained Ca2+ current could be recorded within this voltage region. 4. High-voltage-activated (HVA) Ca2+ currents were observed at voltages positive to -10 mV, and could be separated into relaxing and sustained components (denoted as HVA-relaxing and HVA-sustained). HVA-relaxing current was selectively reduced by Met-enkephalin (17.5 microM). Both components of HVA current were sensitive to verapamil (100 microM), were almost completely blocked by omega-conotoxin (3 microM) and were insensitive to nifedipine (20 microM). 5. The data indicate that T-type Ca2+ current is present in the membrane during the initial period of channel and receptor expression, process outgrowth, and synaptogenesis, and is the dominant influence on voltage-gated Ca2+ influx during subthreshold voltage excursions. Further, at more positive voltages, T-type Ca2+ current contributes to inward Ca2+ current during the first 5-10 ms after depolarizing voltage steps, and thus to inward Ca2+ current

  12. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction. PMID:27262167

  13. The role of voltage-gated calcium channels in neurotransmitter phenotype specification: Coexpression and functional analysis in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brittany B; Miller, Lauren E; Herbst, Wendy A; Saha, Margaret S

    2014-01-01

    Calcium activity has been implicated in many neurodevelopmental events, including the specification of neurotransmitter phenotypes. Higher levels of calcium activity lead to an increased number of inhibitory neural phenotypes, whereas lower levels of calcium activity lead to excitatory neural phenotypes. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) allow for rapid calcium entry and are expressed during early neural stages, making them likely regulators of activity-dependent neurotransmitter phenotype specification. To test this hypothesis, multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to characterize the coexpression of eight VGCC α1 subunits with the excitatory and inhibitory neural markers xVGlut1 and xVIAAT in Xenopus laevis embryos. VGCC coexpression was higher with xVGlut1 than xVIAAT, especially in the hindbrain, spinal cord, and cranial nerves. Calcium activity was also analyzed on a single-cell level, and spike frequency was correlated with the expression of VGCC α1 subunits in cell culture. Cells expressing Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 displayed increased calcium spiking compared with cells not expressing this marker. The VGCC antagonist diltiazem and agonist (−)BayK 8644 were used to manipulate calcium activity. Diltiazem exposure increased the number of glutamatergic cells and decreased the number of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic cells, whereas (−)BayK 8644 exposure decreased the number of glutamatergic cells without having an effect on the number of GABAergic cells. Given that the expression and functional manipulation of VGCCs are correlated with neurotransmitter phenotype in some, but not all, experiments, VGCCs likely act in combination with a variety of other signaling factors to determine neuronal phenotype specification. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2518–2531, 2014. PMID:24477801

  14. Progress in the structural understanding of voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) function and modulation.

    PubMed

    Minor, Daniel L; Findeisen, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (CaVs) are large, transmembrane multiprotein complexes that couple membrane depolarization to cellular calcium entry. These channels are central to cardiac action potential propagation, neurotransmitter and hormone release, muscle contraction, and calcium-dependent gene transcription. Over the past six years, the advent of high-resolution structural studies of CaV components from different isoforms and CaV modulators has begun to reveal the architecture that underlies the exceptionally rich feedback modulation that controls CaV action. These descriptions of CaV molecular anatomy have provided new, structure-based insights into the mechanisms by which particular channel elements affect voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), calcium‑dependent inactivation (CDI), and calcium‑dependent facilitation (CDF). The initial successes have been achieved through structural studies of soluble channel domains and modulator proteins and have proven most powerful when paired with biochemical and functional studies that validate ideas inspired by the structures. Here, we review the progress in this growing area and highlight some key open challenges for future efforts. PMID:21139419

  15. A homology model of the pore domain of a voltage-gated calcium channel is consistent with available SCAM data.

    PubMed

    Bruhova, Iva; Zhorov, Boris S

    2010-03-01

    In the absence of x-ray structures of calcium channels, their homology models are used to rationalize experimental data and design new experiments. The modeling relies on sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels. Zhen et al. (2005. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.200509292) used the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to identify pore-lining residues in the Ca(v)2.1 channel and concluded that their data are inconsistent with the symmetric architecture of the pore domain and published sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels. Here, we have built K(v)1.2-based models of the Ca(v)2.1 channel with 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSET)-modified engineered cysteines and used Monte Carlo energy minimizations to predict their energetically optimal orientations. We found that depending on the position of an engineered cysteine in S6 and S5 helices, the ammonium group in the long flexible MTSET-modified side chain can orient into the inner pore, an interface between domains (repeats), or an interface between S5 and S6 helices. Different local environments of equivalent positions in the four repeats can lead to different SCAM results. The reported current inhibition by MTSET generally decreases with the predicted distances between the ammonium nitrogen and the pore axis. A possible explanation for outliers of this correlation is suggested. Our calculations rationalize the SCAM data, validate one of several published sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels, and suggest similar spatial dispositions of S5 and S6 helices in voltage-gated potassium and calcium channels. PMID:20176854

  16. Role of calcium and calpain in the downregulation of voltage-gated sodium channel expression by the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Magby, Jason P; Richardson, Jason R

    2015-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) are essential for initiation and propagation of action potentials. Previous in vitro studies reported that exposure to the Na(v) toxins veratridine and α scorpion toxin cause persistent downregulation of Na(v) mRNA in vitro. However the mechanism of this downregulation is not well characterized. Here, we report that the type-II pyrethroid deltamethrin, which has a similar mechanism as these toxins, elicited an approximate 25% reduction in Na(v) 1.2 and Na(v) 1.3 mRNA in SK-N-AS cells. Deltamethrin-induced decreases of Na(v) mRNA were blocked with the Na(v) antagonist tetrodotoxin, demonstrating a primary role for interaction with Na(v). Pre-treatment with the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM and the calpain inhibitor PD-150606 also prevented these decreases, identifying a role for intracellular calcium and calpain activation. Because alterations in Na(v) expression and function can result in neurotoxicity, additional studies are warranted to determine whether or not such effects occur in vivo. PMID:25358543

  17. Genetic disruption of voltage-gated calcium channels in psychiatric and neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Samuel; Pratt, Wendy S.; Rees, Elliott; Dahimene, Shehrazade; Ferron, Laurent; Owen, Michael J.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarises genetic studies in which calcium channel genes have been connected to the spectrum of neuropsychiatric syndromes, from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia to autism spectrum disorders and intellectual impairment. Among many other genes, striking numbers of the calcium channel gene superfamily have been implicated in the aetiology of these diseases by various DNA analysis techniques. We will discuss how these relate to the known monogenic disorders associated with point mutations in calcium channels. We will then examine the functional evidence for a causative link between these mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms and the disease processes. A major challenge for the future will be to translate the expanding psychiatric genetic findings into altered physiological function, involvement in the wider pathology of the diseases, and what potential that provides for personalised and stratified treatment options for patients. PMID:26386135

  18. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels as Common Mode of Action for (Mixtures of) Distinct Classes of Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M.L.; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin; organophosphate: chlorpyrifos; organochlorine: endosulfan; neonicotinoid: imidacloprid) and mixtures thereof on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Effects of acute (20 min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i were studied in vitro with Fura-2-loaded PC12 cells and high resolution single-cell fluorescence microscopy. The data demonstrate that cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos concentration-dependently decreased depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i, with 50% (IC50) at 78nM, 239nM, 250nM, and 899nM, respectively. Additionally, acute exposure to chlorpyrifos or endosulfan (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca2+]i, amounting to 68 ± 8nM and 53 ± 8nM, respectively. Imidacloprid did not disturb basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i at 10μM. Following exposure to binary mixtures, effects on depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i were within the expected effect additivity range, whereas the effect of the tertiary mixture was less than this expected additivity effect range. These results demonstrate that different types of insecticides inhibit depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells by inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in vitro at concentrations comparable with human occupational exposure levels. Moreover, the effective concentrations in this study are below those for earlier described modes of action. Because inhibition of VGCCs appears to be a common and potentially additive mode of action of several classes of insecticides, this target should be considered in neurotoxicity risk assessment studies. PMID:24913802

  19. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels: developments in peptide and small-molecule inhibitors for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Vink, S; Alewood, P F

    2012-11-01

    Chronic pain affects approximately 20% of people worldwide and places a large economic and social burden on society. Despite the availability of a range of analgesics, this condition is inadequately treated, with complete alleviation of symptoms rarely occurring. In the past 30 years, the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) have been recognized as potential targets for analgesic development. Although the majority of the research has been focused on Ca(v) 2.2 in particular, other VGCC subtypes such as Ca(v) 3.2 have recently come to the forefront of analgesic research. Venom peptides from marine cone snails have been proven to be a valuable tool in neuroscience, playing a major role in the identification and characterization of VGCC subtypes and producing the first conotoxin-based drug on the market, the ω-conotoxin, ziconotide. This peptide potently and selectively inhibits Ca(v) 2.2, resulting in analgesia in chronic pain states. However, this drug is only available via intrathecal administration, and adverse effects and a narrow therapeutic window have limited its use in the clinic. Other Ca(v) 2.2 inhibitors are currently in development and offer the promise of an improved route of administration and safety profile. This review assesses the potential of targeting VGCCs for analgesic development, with a main focus on conotoxins that block Ca(v) 2.2 and the developments made to transform them into therapeutics. PMID:22725651

  20. A voltage-gated calcium channel regulates lysosomal fusion with endosomes and autophagosomes and is required for neuronal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xuejun; Gala, Upasana; Zhang, Yongping; Shang, Weina; Nagarkar Jaiswal, Sonal; di Ronza, Alberto; Jaiswal, Manish; Yamamoto, Shinya; Sandoval, Hector; Duraine, Lita; Sardiello, Marco; Sillitoe, Roy V; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Fan, Hengyu; Bellen, Hugo J; Tong, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy helps deliver sequestered intracellular cargo to lysosomes for proteolytic degradation and thereby maintains cellular homeostasis by preventing accumulation of toxic substances in cells. In a forward mosaic screen in Drosophila designed to identify genes required for neuronal function and maintenance, we identified multiple cacophony (cac) mutant alleles. They exhibit an age-dependent accumulation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in photoreceptor terminals and eventually a degeneration of the terminals and surrounding glia. cac encodes an α1 subunit of a Drosophila voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) that is required for synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane and neurotransmitter release. Here, we show that cac mutant photoreceptor terminals accumulate AV-lysosomal fusion intermediates, suggesting that Cac is necessary for the fusion of AVs with lysosomes, a poorly defined process. Loss of another subunit of the VGCC, α2δ or straightjacket (stj), causes phenotypes very similar to those caused by the loss of cac, indicating that the VGCC is required for AV-lysosomal fusion. The role of VGCC in AV-lysosomal fusion is evolutionarily conserved, as the loss of the mouse homologues, Cacna1a and Cacna2d2, also leads to autophagic defects in mice. Moreover, we find that CACNA1A is localized to the lysosomes and that loss of lysosomal Cacna1a in cerebellar cultured neurons leads to a failure of lysosomes to fuse with endosomes and autophagosomes. Finally, we show that the lysosomal CACNA1A but not the plasma-membrane resident CACNA1A is required for lysosomal fusion. In summary, we present a model in which the VGCC plays a role in autophagy by regulating the fusion of AVs with lysosomes through its calcium channel activity and hence functions in maintaining neuronal homeostasis. PMID:25811491

  1. A Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Regulates Lysosomal Fusion with Endosomes and Autophagosomes and Is Required for Neuronal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongping; Shang, Weina; Nagarkar Jaiswal, Sonal; di Ronza, Alberto; Jaiswal, Manish; Yamamoto, Shinya; Sandoval, Hector; Duraine, Lita; Sardiello, Marco; Sillitoe, Roy V.; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Fan, Hengyu; Bellen, Hugo J.; Tong, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy helps deliver sequestered intracellular cargo to lysosomes for proteolytic degradation and thereby maintains cellular homeostasis by preventing accumulation of toxic substances in cells. In a forward mosaic screen in Drosophila designed to identify genes required for neuronal function and maintenance, we identified multiple cacophony (cac) mutant alleles. They exhibit an age-dependent accumulation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in photoreceptor terminals and eventually a degeneration of the terminals and surrounding glia. cac encodes an α1 subunit of a Drosophila voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) that is required for synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane and neurotransmitter release. Here, we show that cac mutant photoreceptor terminals accumulate AV-lysosomal fusion intermediates, suggesting that Cac is necessary for the fusion of AVs with lysosomes, a poorly defined process. Loss of another subunit of the VGCC, α2δ or straightjacket (stj), causes phenotypes very similar to those caused by the loss of cac, indicating that the VGCC is required for AV-lysosomal fusion. The role of VGCC in AV-lysosomal fusion is evolutionarily conserved, as the loss of the mouse homologues, Cacna1a and Cacna2d2, also leads to autophagic defects in mice. Moreover, we find that CACNA1A is localized to the lysosomes and that loss of lysosomal Cacna1a in cerebellar cultured neurons leads to a failure of lysosomes to fuse with endosomes and autophagosomes. Finally, we show that the lysosomal CACNA1A but not the plasma-membrane resident CACNA1A is required for lysosomal fusion. In summary, we present a model in which the VGCC plays a role in autophagy by regulating the fusion of AVs with lysosomes through its calcium channel activity and hence functions in maintaining neuronal homeostasis. PMID:25811491

  2. Characterization of ST14A Cells for Studying Modulation of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Crowley, Mandy L.; Rittenhouse, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    In medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum, dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) specifically inhibit the Cav1.3 subtype of L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCs). MSNs are heterogeneous in their expression of dopamine receptors making the study of D2R pathways difficult in primary neurons. Here, we employed the ST14A cell line, derived from embryonic striatum and characterized to have properties of MSNs, to study Cav1.3 current and its modulation by neurotransmitters. Round, undifferentiated ST14A cells exhibited little to no endogenous Ca2+ current while differentiated ST14A cells expressed endogenous Ca2+ current. Transfection with LTC subunits produced functional Cav1.3 current from round cells, providing a homogeneous model system compared to native MSNs for studying D2R pathways. However, neither endogenous nor recombinant Cav1.3 current was modulated by the D2R agonist quinpirole. We confirmed D2R expression in ST14A cells and also detected D1Rs, D4Rs, D5Rs, Gq, calcineurin and phospholipase A2 using RT-PCR and/or Western blot analysis. Phospholipase C β-1 (PLCβ-1) expression was not detected by Western blot analysis which may account for the lack of LTC modulation by D2Rs. These findings raise caution about the assumption that the presence of G-protein coupled receptors in cell lines indicates the presence of complete signaling cascades. However, exogenous arachidonic acid inhibited recombinant Cav1.3 current indicating that channels expressed in ST14A cells are capable of modulation since they respond to a known signaling molecule downstream of D2Rs. Thus, ST14A cells provide a MSN-like cell line for studying channel modulation and signaling pathways that do not involve activation of PLCβ-1. PMID:26147123

  3. CNS Voltage-gated Calcium Channel Gene Variation And Prolonged Recovery Following Sport-related Concussion

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the association between concussion duration and two calcium channel, voltage-dependent, R type, alpha 1E subunit (CACNA1E) single nucleotide polymorphisms (i.e., rs35737760 and rs704326). A secondary purpose was to examine the association between CACNA1E single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and three acute concussion severity scores (i.e., vestibule-ocular reflex test, balance error scoring scale, and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing). Methods: Forty athletes with a diagnosed concussion from a hospital concussion program completed a standardized initial evaluation. Concussion injury characteristics, acute signs and symptoms followed by an objective screening (i.e., vestibular ocular assessments, balance error scoring system test, and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing exam) were assessed. Enrolled participants provided salivary samples for isolation of DNA. Two exon SNPs rs35737760 and rs704326 within CACNA1E were genotyped. Results: There was a significant difference found between acute balance deficits and prolonged recovery group (X2 = 5.66, p = 0.017). There was an association found between the dominant model GG genotype (X2 = 5.41, p = 0.027) within the rs704326 SNP and prolonged recovery group. Significant differences were identified for the rs704326 SNP within the dominant model GG genotype (p = 0.030) for VOR scores by recovery. A significant difference was found between the rs704326 SNP codominant model AA (p = 0.042) and visual memory. There was an association between acute balance deficits and prolonged recovery (X2 = 5.66, p = 0.017) for the rs35737760 SNP. No significant associations between concussion severity and genotype for rs35737760 SNP. Conclusion: Athletes carrying the CACNA1E rs704326 homozygous genotype GG are at a greater risk of a prolonged recovery. Athletes that reported balance deficits at the time of injury were more likely to have prolonged recovery. These

  4. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx through L-type channels contributes to sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) loading in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gaëlle; Allard, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Muscle contraction is triggered by Ca(2+) ions released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in response to depolarization of skeletal muscle fibres. Muscle activation is also associated with a voltage-activated trans-sarcolemmal Ca(2+) influx early identified as a current flowing through L-type Ca(2+) channels. Because removal of external Ca(2+) does not impede fibres from contracting, a negligible role was given to this voltage-activated Ca(2+) entry, although the decline of Ca(2+) release is more pronounced in the absence of Ca(2+) during long-lasting activation. Furthermore, it is not clearly established whether Ca(2+) exclusively flows through L-type channels or in addition through a parallel voltage-activated pathway distinct from L-type channels. Here, by monitoring the quenching of fura-2 fluorescence resulting from Mn(2+) influx in voltage-controlled mouse and zebrafish isolated muscle fibres, we show that the L-type current is the only contributor to Ca(2+) influx during long-lasting depolarizations in skeletal muscle. Calibration of the Mn(2+) quenching signal allowed us to estimate a mean Mn(2+) current of 0.31 ± 0.06 A F(-1) flowing through L-type channels during a train of action potentials. Measurements of SR Ca(2+) changes with fluo-5N in response to depolarization revealed that an elevated voltage-activated Ca(2+) current potentiated SR Ca(2+) loading and addition of external Mn(2+) produced quenching of fluo-5N in the SR, indicating that voltage-activated Ca(2+) /Mn(2+) influx contributes to SR Ca(2+) /Mn(2+) loading. PMID:26383921

  5. Design of a functional calcium channel protein: inferences about an ion channel-forming motif derived from the primary structure of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Grove, A.; Tomich, J. M.; Iwamoto, T.; Montal, M.

    1993-01-01

    To identify sequence-specific motifs associated with the formation of an ionic pore, we systematically evaluated the channel-forming activity of synthetic peptides with sequence of predicted transmembrane segments of the voltage-gated calcium channel. The amino acid sequence of voltage-gated, dihydropyridine (DHP)-sensitive calcium channels suggests the presence in each of four homologous repeats (I-IV) of six segments (S1-S6) predicted to form membrane-spanning, alpha-helical structures. Only peptides representing amphipathic segments S2 or S3 form channels in lipid bilayers. To generate a functional calcium channel based on a four-helix bundle motif, four-helix bundle proteins representing IVS2 (T4CaIVS2) or IVS3 (T4CaIVS3) were synthesized. Both proteins form cation-selective channels, but with distinct characteristics: the single-channel conductance in 50 mM BaCl2 is 3 pS and 10 pS. For T4CaIVS3, the conductance saturates with increasing concentration of divalent cation. The dissociation constants for Ba2+, Ca2+, and Sr2+ are 13.6 mM, 17.7 mM, and 15.0 mM, respectively. The conductance of T4CaIVS2 does not saturate up to 150 mM salt. Whereas T4CaIVS3 is blocked by microM Ca2+ and Cd2+, T4CaIVS2 is not blocked by divalent cations. Only T4CaIVS3 is modulated by enantiomers of the DHP derivative BayK 8644, demonstrating sequence requirement for specific drug action. Thus, only T4CaIVS3 exhibits pore properties characteristic also of authentic calcium channels. The designed functional calcium channel may provide insights into fundamental mechanisms of ionic permeation and drug action, information that may in turn further our understanding of molecular determinants underlying authentic pore structures. PMID:7505682

  6. Voltage-gated calcium channels are abnormal in cultured spinal motoneurons in the G93A-SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motoneurons. Hyperexcitability and excitotoxicity have been implicated in the early pathogenesis of ALS. Studies addressing excitotoxic motoneuron death and intracellular Ca(2+) overload have mostly focused on Ca(2+) influx through AMPA glutamate receptors. However, intrinsic excitability of motoneurons through voltage-gated ion channels may also have a role in the neurodegeneration. In this study we examined the function and localization of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in cultured spinal cord motoneurons from mice expressing a mutant form of human superoxide dismutase-1 with a Gly93→Ala substitution (G93A-SOD1). Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we showed that high voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) currents are increased in G93A-SOD1 motoneurons, but low voltage activated Ca(2+) currents are not affected. G93A-SOD1 motoneurons also have altered persistent Ca(2+) current mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Quantitative single-cell RT-PCR revealed higher levels of Ca1a, Ca1b, Ca1c, and Ca1e subunit mRNA expression in G93A-SOD1 motoneurons, indicating that the increase of HVA Ca(2+) currents may result from upregulation of Ca(2+) channel mRNA expression in motoneurons. The localizations of the Ca1B N-type and Ca1D L-type Ca(2+) channels in motoneurons were examined by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. G93A-SOD1 motoneurons had increased Ca1B channels on the plasma membrane of soma and dendrites. Ca1D channels are similar on the plasma membrane of soma and lower on the plasma membrane of dendrites of G93A-SOD1 motoneurons. Our study demonstrates that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels have aberrant functions and localizations in ALS mouse motoneurons. The increased HVA Ca(2+) currents and PCCa current could contribute to early pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27151771

  7. Role of calcium channels in cellular antituberculosis effects: Potential of voltage-gated calcium-channel blockers in tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Cui, Ruina; Yang, Yourong; Wu, Xueqiong

    2015-10-01

    The immunity of human immune cells and their ability to inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are key factors in the anti-MTB effect. However, MTB modulates the levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers, such as calcium, to evade protective immune responses. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting L-type calcium channel in immune cells using either antibodies or small interfering RNA increases calcium influx, upregulates the expression of proinflammation genes, and reduces MTB burden. First, we will review the key factors in calcium-signaling pathway that may affect the immunity of immune cells to MTB infection. Second, we will focus on the role of calcium channels in regulating cellular immunity to MTB. Finally, we will discuss the possibility of using calcium-channel blockers as anti-MTB chemotherapy drugs to enhance chemotherapy effects, shorten treatment period, and overcome drug resistance. PMID:25442874

  8. Ancient Origins of RGK Protein Function: Modulation of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Preceded the Protostome and Deuterostome Split

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Henry L.; Lu, Van B.; Won, Yu-Jin; Sasson, Yehezkel; Hirsch, Joel A.; Ono, Fumihito; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    RGK proteins, Gem, Rad, Rem1, and Rem2, are members of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins that interact with Ca2+ channel β subunits to modify voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function. In addition, RGK proteins affect several cellular processes such as cytoskeletal rearrangement, neuronal dendritic complexity, and synapse formation. To probe the phylogenetic origins of RGK protein–Ca2+ channel interactions, we identified potential RGK-like protein homologs in genomes for genetically diverse organisms from both the deuterostome and protostome animal superphyla. RGK-like protein homologs cloned from Danio rerio (zebrafish) and Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) expressed in mammalian sympathetic neurons decreased Ca2+ current density as reported for expression of mammalian RGK proteins. Sequence alignments from evolutionarily diverse organisms spanning the protostome/deuterostome divide revealed conservation of residues within the RGK G-domain involved in RGK protein – Cavβ subunit interaction. In addition, the C-terminal eleven residues were highly conserved and constituted a signature sequence unique to RGK proteins but of unknown function. Taken together, these data suggest that RGK proteins, and the ability to modify Ca2+ channel function, arose from an ancestor predating the protostomes split from deuterostomes approximately 550 million years ago. PMID:24992013

  9. EFFECTS OF SUBSCUTE EXPOSURE TO NANOMOLAR CONCENTRATIONS OF METHYLMERCURY ON VOLTAGE-GATES SODIUM AND CALCIUM CURRENTS IN PC12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg+) alters the function of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels in neuronal preparations following acute, in vitro, exposure. Because the developing nervous system is particularly sensitive to CH3Hg+ neurotoxicity, effects on voltage-gated Na+ (INa) and Ca2+ (IC...

  10. Calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channel activators in the 5β-cholanic acid-3α-ol analogue series with modifications in the lateral chain.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Patil, Shivaputra A; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D; Dopico, Alex M

    2012-10-01

    Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels regulate various physiological processes and represent an attractive target for drug discovery. Numerous BK channel activators are available. However, these agents usually interact with the ubiquitously distributed channel-forming subunit and thus cannot selectively target a particular tissue. We performed a structure-activity relationship study of lithocholic acid (LCA), a cholane that activates BK channels via the accessory BK β1 subunit. The latter protein is highly abundant in smooth muscle but scarce in most other tissues. Modifications to the LCA lateral chain length and functional group yielded two novel smooth muscle BK channel activators in which the substituent at C24 has a small volume and a net negative charge. Our data provide detailed structural information that will be useful to advance a pharmacophore in search of β1 subunit-selective BK channel activators. These compounds are expected to evoke smooth muscle relaxation, which would be beneficial in the pharmacotherapy of prevalent human disorders associated with increased smooth muscle contraction, such as systemic hypertension, cerebral or coronary vasospasm, bronchial asthma, bladder hyperactivity, and erectile dysfunction. PMID:22945504

  11. Cav1.4 L-Type Calcium Channels Contribute to Calpain Activation in Degenerating Photoreceptors of rd1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schön, Christian; Paquet-Durand, François; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited blinding disorder characterized by progressive degeneration and loss of photoreceptors. The exact mechanism of degeneration and cell death of photoreceptors is not known, but is thought to involve disturbed Ca2+—signaling. Ca2+ can enter the photoreceptor cell via outer segment cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels or synaptic Cav1.4 L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Previously, we have shown that genetic ablation of the Cngb1 gene encoding the B subunit of the rod CNG channel delays the fast progressing degeneration in the rd1 mutant mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. In this study, we crossbred rd1 mice with the Cacna1f-deficient mouse lacking the Cav1.4 α1 subunit of the L-type VGCC. Longitudinal in vivo examinations of photoreceptor layer thickness by optical coherence tomography revealed a significant, but not sustained delay of retinal degeneration in Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice compared to rd1 mice. This was accompanied by a reduction of TUNEL positive cells in the early phase of rod degeneration. Remarkably, Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice displayed a strong decrease in the activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain during photoreceptor loss. Our results show that genetic deletion of the synaptic Cav1.4 L-type VGCCs impairs calpain activation and leads to a short-term preservation of photoreceptors in the rd1 mouse. PMID:27270916

  12. Cav1.4 L-Type Calcium Channels Contribute to Calpain Activation in Degenerating Photoreceptors of rd1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Paquet-Durand, François; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited blinding disorder characterized by progressive degeneration and loss of photoreceptors. The exact mechanism of degeneration and cell death of photoreceptors is not known, but is thought to involve disturbed Ca2+-signaling. Ca2+ can enter the photoreceptor cell via outer segment cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels or synaptic Cav1.4 L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Previously, we have shown that genetic ablation of the Cngb1 gene encoding the B subunit of the rod CNG channel delays the fast progressing degeneration in the rd1 mutant mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. In this study, we crossbred rd1 mice with the Cacna1f-deficient mouse lacking the Cav1.4 α1 subunit of the L-type VGCC. Longitudinal in vivo examinations of photoreceptor layer thickness by optical coherence tomography revealed a significant, but not sustained delay of retinal degeneration in Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice compared to rd1 mice. This was accompanied by a reduction of TUNEL positive cells in the early phase of rod degeneration. Remarkably, Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice displayed a strong decrease in the activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain during photoreceptor loss. Our results show that genetic deletion of the synaptic Cav1.4 L-type VGCCs impairs calpain activation and leads to a short-term preservation of photoreceptors in the rd1 mouse. PMID:27270916

  13. Selectivity filters and cysteine-rich extracellular loops in voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and NALCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Robert F.; Guan, W.; Zhorov, Boris S.; Spafford, J. David

    2015-01-01

    How nature discriminates sodium from calcium ions in eukaryotic channels has been difficult to resolve because they contain four homologous, but markedly different repeat domains. We glean clues from analyzing the changing pore region in sodium, calcium and NALCN channels, from single-cell eukaryotes to mammals. Alternative splicing in invertebrate homologs provides insights into different structural features underlying calcium and sodium selectivity. NALCN generates alternative ion selectivity with splicing that changes the high field strength (HFS) site at the narrowest level of the hourglass shaped pore where the selectivity filter is located. Alternative splicing creates NALCN isoforms, in which the HFS site has a ring of glutamates contributed by all four repeat domains (EEEE), or three glutamates and a lysine residue in the third (EEKE) or second (EKEE) position. Alternative splicing provides sodium and/or calcium selectivity in T-type channels with extracellular loops between S5 and P-helices (S5P) of different lengths that contain three or five cysteines. All eukaryotic channels have a set of eight core cysteines in extracellular regions, but the T-type channels have an infusion of 4–12 extra cysteines in extracellular regions. The pattern of conservation suggests a possible pairing of long loops in Domains I and III, which are bridged with core cysteines in NALCN, Cav, and Nav channels, and pairing of shorter loops in Domains II and IV in T-type channel through disulfide bonds involving T-type specific cysteines. Extracellular turrets of increasing lengths in potassium channels (Kir2.2, hERG, and K2P1) contribute to a changing landscape above the pore selectivity filter that can limit drug access and serve as an ion pre-filter before ions reach the pore selectivity filter below. Pairing of extended loops likely contributes to the large extracellular appendage as seen in single particle electron cryo-microscopy images of the eel Nav1 channel. PMID

  14. A Polybasic Plasma Membrane Binding Motif in the I-II Linker Stabilizes Voltage-gated CaV1.2 Calcium Channel Function.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurjot; Pinggera, Alexandra; Ortner, Nadine J; Lieb, Andreas; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Obermair, Gerald J; Flucher, Bernhard E; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-08-21

    L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) regulate many physiological functions like muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression, and neuronal excitability. Their activity is strictly controlled by various molecular mechanisms. The pore-forming α1-subunit comprises four repeated domains (I-IV), each connected via an intracellular linker. Here we identified a polybasic plasma membrane binding motif, consisting of four arginines, within the I-II linker of all LTCCs. The primary structure of this motif is similar to polybasic clusters known to interact with polyphosphoinositides identified in other ion channels. We used de novo molecular modeling to predict the conformation of this polybasic motif, immunofluorescence microscopy and live cell imaging to investigate the interaction with the plasma membrane, and electrophysiology to study its role for Cav1.2 channel function. According to our models, this polybasic motif of the I-II linker forms a straight α-helix, with the positive charges facing the lipid phosphates of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Membrane binding of the I-II linker could be reversed after phospholipase C activation, causing polyphosphoinositide breakdown, and was accelerated by elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels. This indicates the involvement of negatively charged phospholipids in the plasma membrane targeting of the linker. Neutralization of four arginine residues eliminated plasma membrane binding. Patch clamp recordings revealed facilitated opening of Cav1.2 channels containing these mutations, weaker inhibition by phospholipase C activation, and reduced expression of channels (as quantified by ON-gating charge) at the plasma membrane. Our data provide new evidence for a membrane binding motif within the I-II linker of LTCC α1-subunits essential for stabilizing normal Ca(2+) channel function. PMID:26100638

  15. A Polybasic Plasma Membrane Binding Motif in the I-II Linker Stabilizes Voltage-gated CaV1.2 Calcium Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurjot; Pinggera, Alexandra; Ortner, Nadine J.; Lieb, Andreas; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Obermair, Gerald J.; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) regulate many physiological functions like muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression, and neuronal excitability. Their activity is strictly controlled by various molecular mechanisms. The pore-forming α1-subunit comprises four repeated domains (I–IV), each connected via an intracellular linker. Here we identified a polybasic plasma membrane binding motif, consisting of four arginines, within the I-II linker of all LTCCs. The primary structure of this motif is similar to polybasic clusters known to interact with polyphosphoinositides identified in other ion channels. We used de novo molecular modeling to predict the conformation of this polybasic motif, immunofluorescence microscopy and live cell imaging to investigate the interaction with the plasma membrane, and electrophysiology to study its role for Cav1.2 channel function. According to our models, this polybasic motif of the I-II linker forms a straight α-helix, with the positive charges facing the lipid phosphates of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Membrane binding of the I-II linker could be reversed after phospholipase C activation, causing polyphosphoinositide breakdown, and was accelerated by elevated intracellular Ca2+ levels. This indicates the involvement of negatively charged phospholipids in the plasma membrane targeting of the linker. Neutralization of four arginine residues eliminated plasma membrane binding. Patch clamp recordings revealed facilitated opening of Cav1.2 channels containing these mutations, weaker inhibition by phospholipase C activation, and reduced expression of channels (as quantified by ON-gating charge) at the plasma membrane. Our data provide new evidence for a membrane binding motif within the I-II linker of LTCC α1-subunits essential for stabilizing normal Ca2+ channel function. PMID:26100638

  16. L-type Calcium Channel Auto-Regulation of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Jonathan; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Crump, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    L-type calcium channels (LTCC) impact the function of nearly all excitable cells. The classical LTCC function is to mediate trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ flux. This review focuses on the contribution of a mobile segment of the LTCC that regulates ion channel function, and also serves as a regulator of transcription in the nucleus. Specifically we highlight recent work demonstrating an auto-feedback regulatory pathway whereby the LTCC transcription factor regulates the LTCC. Also discussed is acute and long-term regulation of function by the LTCC-transcription regulator. PMID:21295347

  17. L-type calcium channels in adrenal chromaffin cells: role in pace-making and secretion.

    PubMed

    Marcantoni, A; Baldelli, P; Hernandez-Guijo, J M; Comunanza, V; Carabelli, V; Carbone, E

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated L-type (Cav1.2 and Cav1.3) channels are widely expressed in cardiovascular tissues and represent the critical drug-target for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases. The two isoforms are also abundantly expressed in neuronal and neuroendocrine tissues. In the brain, Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channels control synaptic plasticity, somatic activity, neuronal differentiation and brain aging. In neuroendocrine cells, they are involved in the genesis of action potential generation, bursting activity and hormone secretion. Recent studies have shown that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are also expressed in chromaffin cells but their functional role has not yet been identified despite that L-type channels possess interesting characteristics, which confer them an important role in the control of catecholamine secretion during action potentials stimulation. In intact rat adrenal glands L-type channels are responsible for adrenaline and noradrenaline release following splanchnic nerve stimulation or nicotinic receptor activation. L-type channels can be either up- or down-modulated by membrane autoreceptors following distinct second messenger pathways. L-type channels are tightly coupled to BK channels and activate at relatively low-voltages. In this way they contribute to the action potential hyperpolarization and to the pace-maker current controlling action potential firings. L-type channels are shown also to regulate the fast secretion of the immediate readily releasable pool of vesicles with the same Ca(2+)-efficiency of other voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In mouse adrenal slices, repeated action potential-like stimulations drive L-type channels to a state of enhanced stimulus-secretion efficiency regulated by beta-adrenergic receptors. Here we will review all these novel findings and discuss the possible implication for a specific role of L-type channels in the control of chromaffin cells activity. PMID:17561252

  18. The effects of piracetam and its novel peptide analogue GVS-111 on neuronal voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, E I; Bukanova, J V; Ostrovskaya, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Voronina, T A; Skrebitsky, V G

    1997-07-01

    1. With the use of the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method, three types of voltage-activated ionic currents were examined in isolated neurons of the snail Helix pomatia: high-threshold Ca2+ current (ICa), high-threshold Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)) and high-threshold K+ current independent of Ca2+ (IK(V)). 2. The effect of bath application of the nootropics piracetam and a novel piracetam peptide analog, ethyl ester of N-phenyl-acetyl-L-prolyl-glycine (GVS-111), on these three types of voltage-activated ionic currents was studied. 3. In more than half of the tested cells, ICa was resistant to both piracetam and GVS-111. In the rest of the cells, ICa decreased 19 +/- 7% with 2 mM of piracetam and 39 +/- 14% with 2 microM of GVS-111. 4. IK(V) in almost all cells tested was resistant to piracetam at concentrations up to 2 mM. However, IK(V) in two-thirds of the cells was sensitive to GVS-111, being suppressed 49 +/- 18% with 1 microM GVS-111. 5. IK(Ca) appeared to be the most sensitive current of those studied to both piracetam and GVS-111. Piracetam at 1 mM and GVS-111 at 0.1 microM decreased the amplitude of IK(Ca) in most of the cells examined by 49 +/- 19% and 69 +/- 24%, respectively. 6. The results suggest that piracetam and GVS-111 suppression of voltage-activated calcium and potassium currents of the neuronal membrane may regulate (both up and down) Ca2+ influx into neurons. PMID:9195198

  19. Calcium-Activated SK Channels Influence Voltage-Gated Ion Channels to Determine the Precision of Firing in Globus Pallidus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Deister, Christopher A.; Chan, C. Savio; Surmeier, D. James; Wilson, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Globus pallidus (GP) neurons fire rhythmically in the absence of synaptic input, suggesting that they may encode their inputs as changes in the phase of their rhythmic firing. Action potential afterhyperpolarization (AHP) enhances precision of firing by ensuring that the ion channels recover from inactivation by the same amount on each cycle. Voltage-clamp experiments in slices showed that the longest component of the GP neuron’s AHP is blocked by apamin, a selective antagonist of calcium-activated SK channels. Application of 100 nm apamin also disrupted the precision of firing in perforated-patch and cell-attached recordings. SK channel blockade caused a small depolarization in spike threshold and made it more variable, but there was no reduction in the maximal rate of rise during an action potential. Thus, the firing irregularity was not caused solely by a reduction in voltage-gated Na+ channel availability. Subthreshold voltage ramps triggered a large outward current that was sensitive to the initial holding potential and had properties similar to the A-type K+ current in GP neurons. In numerical simulations, the availability of both Na+ and A-type K+ channels during autonomous firing were reduced when SK channels were removed, and a nearly equal reduction in Na+ and K+ subthreshold-activated ion channel availability produced a large decrease in the neuron’s slope conductance near threshold. This change made the neuron more sensitive to intrinsically generated noise. In vivo, this change would also enhance the sensitivity of GP neurons to small synaptic inputs. PMID:19571136

  20. Ca2+ controls gating of voltage-gated calcium channels by releasing the β2e subunit from the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Il; Kweon, Hae-Jin; Park, Yongsoo; Jang, Deok-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels, which are regulated by membrane potential, cytosolic Ca(2+), phosphorylation, and membrane phospholipids, govern Ca(2+) entry into excitable cells. Cav channels contain a pore-forming α1 subunit, an auxiliary α2δ subunit, and a regulatory β subunit, each encoded by several genes in mammals. In addition to a domain that interacts with the α1 subunit, β2e and β2a also interact with the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane through an electrostatic interaction for β2e and posttranslational acylation for β2a. We found that an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) promoted the release of β2e from the membrane without requiring substantial depletion of the anionic phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) from the plasma membrane. Experiments with liposomes indicated that Ca(2+) disrupted the interaction of the β2e amino-terminal peptide with membranes containing PIP2 Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin (CaM) leads to CaM-mediated inactivation of Cav currents. Although Cav2.2 coexpressed with β2a required Ca(2+)-dependent activation of CaM for Ca(2+)-mediated reduction in channel activity, Cav2.2 coexpressed with β2e exhibited Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of the channel even in the presence of Ca(2+)-insensitive CaM. Inducible depletion of PIP2 reduced Cav2.2 currents, and in cells coexpressing β2e, but not a form that lacks the polybasic region, increased intracellular Ca(2+) further reduced Cav2.2 currents. Many hormone- or neurotransmitter-activated receptors stimulate PIP2 hydrolysis and increase cytosolic Ca(2+); thus, our findings suggest that β2e may integrate such receptor-mediated signals to limit Cav activity. PMID:27382026

  1. Spinal blockage of P/Q- or N-type voltage-gated calcium channels modulates functional and symptomatic changes related to haemorrhagic cystitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R B M; Sperotto, N D M; Andrade, E L; Pereira, T C B; Leite, C E; de Souza, A H; Bogo, M R; Morrone, F B; Gomez, M V; Campos, M M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spinal voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are pivotal regulators of painful and inflammatory alterations, representing attractive therapeutic targets. We examined the effects of epidural administration of the P/Q- and N-type VGCC blockers Tx3-3 and Phα1β, respectively, isolated from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer, on symptomatic, inflammatory and functional changes allied to mouse cyclophosphamide (CPA)-induced haemorrhagic cystitis (HC). The effects of P. nigriventer-derived toxins were compared with those displayed by MVIIC and MVIIA, extracted from the cone snail Conus magus. Experimental Approach HC was induced by a single i.p. injection of CPA (300 mg·kg–1). Dose- and time-related effects of spinally administered P/Q and N-type VGCC blockers were assessed on nociceptive behaviour and macroscopic inflammation elicited by CPA. The effects of toxins were also evaluated on cell migration, cytokine production, oxidative stress, functional cystometry alterations and TRPV1, TRPA1 and NK1 receptor mRNA expression. Key Results The spinal blockage of P/Q-type VGCC by Tx3-3 and MVIIC or N-type VGCC by Phα1β attenuated nociceptive and inflammatory events associated with HC, including bladder oxidative stress and cytokine production. CPA produced a slight increase in bladder TRPV1 and TRPA1 mRNA expression, which was reversed by all the toxins tested. Noteworthy, Phα1β strongly prevented bladder neutrophil migration, besides HC-related functional alterations, and its effects were potentiated by co-injecting the selective NK1 receptor antagonist CP-96345. Conclusions and Implications Our results shed new light on the role of spinal P/Q and N-type VGCC in bladder dysfunctions, pointing out Phα1β as a promising alternative for treating complications associated with CPA-induced HC. PMID:25298144

  2. Electrophysiological evidence for voltage-gated calcium channel 2 (Cav2) modulation of mechano- and thermosensitive spinal neuronal responses in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, W; Patel, R; Dickenson, A H

    2015-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) remains one of the greatest healthcare burdens in western society, with chronic debilitating pain-dominating clinical presentation yet therapeutic strategies are inadequate in many patients. Development of better analgesics is contingent on improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating OA pain. Voltage-gated calcium channels 2.2 (Cav2.2) play a critical role in spinal nociceptive transmission, therefore blocking Cav2.2 activity represents an attractive opportunity for OA pain treatment, but the only available licensed Cav2.2 antagonist ziconitide (PrilatTM) is of limited use. TROX-1 is an orally available, use dependent and state-selective Cav2 antagonist, exerting its analgesic effect primarily via Cav2.2 blockade, with an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconitide. Using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), 2 mg, induced OA we used in vivo electrophysiology to assess the effects of spinal or systemic administration of TROX-1 on the evoked activity of wide dynamic range spinal dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical, natural mechanical (dynamic brush and von Frey 2, 8, 26 and 6 g) and thermal (40, 45 and 45 °C) stimuli applied to the peripheral receptive field. MIA injection into the knee joint resulted in mechanical hypersensitivity of the ipsilateral hind paw and weight-bearing asymmetry. Spinal administration of TROX-1 (0.1 and 1 μg/50 μl) produced a significant dose-related inhibition of dynamic brush, mechanical (von Frey filament (vF) 8, 26 and 60 g) and noxious thermal-(45 and 48 °C) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats only. Systemic administration of TROX-1 produced a significant inhibition of the mechanical-(vF 8, 26 and 60 g) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats. TROX-1 did not produce any significant effect on any neuronal measure in Sham controls. Our in vivo electrophysiological results demonstrate a pathological state-dependent effect of TROX-1, which suggests an increased functional

  3. Electrophysiological evidence for voltage-gated calcium channel 2 (Cav2) modulation of mechano- and thermosensitive spinal neuronal responses in a rat model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, W.; Patel, R.; Dickenson, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) remains one of the greatest healthcare burdens in western society, with chronic debilitating pain-dominating clinical presentation yet therapeutic strategies are inadequate in many patients. Development of better analgesics is contingent on improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating OA pain. Voltage-gated calcium channels 2.2 (Cav2.2) play a critical role in spinal nociceptive transmission, therefore blocking Cav2.2 activity represents an attractive opportunity for OA pain treatment, but the only available licensed Cav2.2 antagonist ziconitide (PrilatTM) is of limited use. TROX-1 is an orally available, use dependent and state-selective Cav2 antagonist, exerting its analgesic effect primarily via Cav2.2 blockade, with an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconitide. Using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), 2 mg, induced OA we used in vivo electrophysiology to assess the effects of spinal or systemic administration of TROX-1 on the evoked activity of wide dynamic range spinal dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical, natural mechanical (dynamic brush and von Frey 2, 8, 26 and 6 g) and thermal (40, 45 and 45 °C) stimuli applied to the peripheral receptive field. MIA injection into the knee joint resulted in mechanical hypersensitivity of the ipsilateral hind paw and weight-bearing asymmetry. Spinal administration of TROX-1 (0.1 and 1 μg/50 μl) produced a significant dose-related inhibition of dynamic brush, mechanical (von Frey filament (vF) 8, 26 and 60 g) and noxious thermal-(45 and 48 °C) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats only. Systemic administration of TROX-1 produced a significant inhibition of the mechanical-(vF 8, 26 and 60 g) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats. TROX-1 did not produce any significant effect on any neuronal measure in Sham controls. Our in vivo electrophysiological results demonstrate a pathological state-dependent effect of TROX-1, which suggests an increased

  4. Aging Reduces L-Type Calcium Channel Current and the Vasodilatory Response of Small Mesenteric Arteries to Calcium Channel Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Albarwani, Sulayma A.; Mansour, Fathi; Khan, Abdul Aleem; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Al-Kaabi, Abdulla; Al-Busaidi, Al-Manar; Al-Hadhrami, Safa; Al-Husseini, Isehaq; Al-Siyabi, Sultan; Tanira, Musbah O.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease (CVD) including hypertension. As aging is an independent risk factor for CVD, the use of CCBs increases with increasing age. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of aging on the sensitivity of small mesenteric arteries to L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LTCC) blockers and also to investigate whether there was a concomitant change in calcium current density. Third order mesenteric arteries from male F344 rats, aged 2.5–3 months (young) and 22–26 months (old) were mounted on wire myograph to measure the tension during isometric contraction. Arteries were contracted with 100 mM KCl and were then relaxed in a cumulative concentration-response dependent manner with nifedipine (0.1 nM–1 μM), verapamil (0.1 nM–10 μM), or diltiazem (0.1 nM–10 μM). Relaxation-concentration response curves produced by cumulative concentrations of three different CCBs in arteries of old rats were shifted to the right with statistically significant IC50s. pIC50 ± s.e.m: (8.37 ± 0.06 vs. 8.04 ± 0.05, 7.40 ± 0.07 vs. 6.81 ± 0.04, and 6.58 ± 0.07 vs. 6.34 ± 0.06) in young vs. old. It was observed that the maximal contractions induced by phenylephrine and reversed by sodium nitroprusside were not different between young and old groups. However, Bay K 8644 (1 μM) increased resting tension by 23 ± 4.8% in young arteries and 4.7 ± 1.6% in old arteries. LTCC current density were also significantly lower in old arteries (−2.77 ± 0.45 pA/pF) compared to young arteries (−4.5 ± 0.40 pA/pF); with similar steady-state activation and inactivation curves. Parallel to this reduction, the expression of Cav1.2 protein was reduced by 57 ± 5% in arteries from old rats compared to those from young rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that aging reduces the response of small mesenteric arteries to the vasodilatory effect of the CCBs and this may be due to, at least in part, reduced

  5. Conditional forebrain deletion of the L-type calcium channel Ca V 1.2 disrupts remote spatial memories in mice.

    PubMed

    White, Jessica A; McKinney, Brandon C; John, Manorama C; Powers, Patricia A; Kamp, Timothy J; Murphy, Geoffrey G

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are required for remote memory consolidation, we generated conditional knockout mice in which the L-VGCC isoform Ca(V)1.2 was postnatally deleted in the hippocampus and cortex. In the Morris water maze, both Ca(V)1.2 conditional knockout mice (Ca(V)1.2(cKO)) and control littermates displayed a marked decrease in escape latencies and performed equally well on probe trials administered during training. In distinct contrast to their performance during training, Ca(V)1.2(cKO) mice exhibited significant impairments in spatial memory when examined 30 d after training, suggesting that Ca(V)1.2 plays a critical role in consolidation of remote spatial memories. PMID:18174367

  6. Dopamine midbrain neurons in health and Parkinson's disease: emerging roles of voltage-gated calcium channels and ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, E; Schiemann, J; Liss, B

    2015-01-22

    Dopamine (DA) releasing midbrain neurons are essential for multiple brain functions, such as voluntary movement, working memory, emotion and cognition. DA midbrain neurons within the substantia nigra (SN) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) exhibit a variety of distinct axonal projections and cellular properties, and are differentially affected in diseases like schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Parkinson's disease (PD). Apart from having diverse functions in health and disease states, DA midbrain neurons display distinct electrical activity patterns, crucial for DA release. These activity patterns are generated and modulated by specific sets of ion channels. Recently, two ion channels have been identified, not only contributing to these activity patterns and to functional properties of DA midbrain neurons, but also seem to render SN DA neurons particularly vulnerable to degeneration in PD and its animal models: L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATPs). In this review, we focus on the emerging physiological and pathophysiological roles of these two ion channels (and their complex interplay with other ion channels), particularly in highly vulnerable SN DA neurons, as selective degeneration of these neurons causes the major motor symptoms of PD. PMID:25450964

  7. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of pyrimidobenzothiazole-3-carboxylate derivatives as selective L-type calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Chikhale, Rupesh; Thorat, Sonali; Pant, Amit; Jadhav, Ankush; Thatipamula, Krishna Chary; Bansode, Ratnadeep; Bhargavi, G; Karodia, Nazira; Rajasekharan, M V; Paradkar, Anant; Khedekar, Pramod

    2015-10-15

    L-type voltage gated calcium channels play essential role in contraction of various skeletal and vascular smooth muscles, thereby plays important role in regulating blood pressure. Dihydropyridine receptors have been targeted for development of newer antihypertensive agents, one of the structurally analogs nucleus dihydropyrimidines have been reported earlier by us as a potential agent toward development of calcium channel modulator. A pre-synthetic QSAR was run and on the basis of structure activity relationship a series of twenty three molecules was synthesized and studied by myosin light chain kinase assay (MLCK), Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) colorimetric assay, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) and invasive blood pressure (IBP) methods. Molecules with significant efficacy were studied for their single crystal X-ray diffraction, molecular docking, molecular dynamics and post-synthetic QSAR. The NIBP and IBP methods screened molecules with better percentage inhibition versus time compared to standard drug Nifedipine. The lead compound ethyl 2-methyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-4H-pyrimido [2,1-b] [1,3] benzothiazole-3-carboxylate (26) presented a triclinic structure with polymeric chain packing in lattice. 26 exhibited IC50 on MLCK assay of 2.1±1.7 μM with selectivity of L-type calcium channels and comparative to Nifedipine. It offered satisfactory physicochemical properties with partition coefficient of (ClogP) 4.64. Its pharmacokinetic profile is also good with Cmax at 0.40 μg/ml by oral route with Tmax reaching in 0.5 h which means in 30 min. 26 also exhibits superior t1/2 of 5.4 h and oral bioavailability of (F) 56.75% with an AUC0-∞ of 0.84 μg h/ml. Molecular docking studies indicates toward the interaction of lead compound via hydrogen bonds with Lys144, Glu181 and Asp183, it forms the Van der Walls interactions with Ser18, Asp20, Asn187, Pro185, Glu180, Glu181 and Arg10 with Glide score and Glide energy to be -3.602 and -47.098, respectively. Post

  8. TMEM16A is associated with voltage-gated calcium channels in mouse retina and its function is disrupted upon mutation of the auxiliary α2δ4 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Antonella; Piano, Ilaria; Demontis, Gian Carlo; Bacchi, Niccolò; Casarosa, Simona; Santina, Luca Della; Gargini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors rely upon highly specialized synapses to efficiently transmit signals to multiple postsynaptic targets. Calcium influx in the presynaptic terminal is mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). This event triggers neurotransmitter release, but also gates calcium-activated chloride channels (TMEM), which in turn regulate VGCC activity. In order to investigate the relationship between VGCC and TMEM channels, we analyzed the retina of wild type (WT) and Cacna2d4 mutant mice, in which the VGCC auxiliary α2δ4 subunit carries a nonsense mutation, disrupting the normal channel function. Synaptic terminals of mutant photoreceptors are disarranged and synaptic proteins as well as TMEM16A channels lose their characteristic localization. In parallel, calcium-activated chloride currents are impaired in rods, despite unaltered TMEM16A protein levels. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed the interaction between VGCC and TMEM16A channels in the retina. Heterologous expression of these channels in tsA-201 cells showed that TMEM16A associates with the CaV1.4 subunit, and the association persists upon expression of the mutant α2δ4 subunit. Collectively, our experiments show association between TMEM16A and the α1 subunit of VGCC. Close proximity of these channels allows optimal function of the photoreceptor synaptic terminal under physiological conditions, but also makes TMEM16A channels susceptible to changes occurring to calcium channels. PMID:26557056

  9. CACNA1D De Novo Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorders Activate Cav1.3 L-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Pinggera, Alexandra; Lieb, Andreas; Benedetti, Bruno; Lampert, Michaela; Monteleone, Stefania; Liedl, Klaus R.; Tuluc, Petronel; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Background Cav1.3 voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) are part of postsynaptic neuronal signaling networks. They play a key role in brain function, including fear memory and emotional and drug-taking behaviors. A whole-exome sequencing study identified a de novo mutation, p.A749G, in Cav1.3 α1-subunits (CACNA1D), the second main LTCC in the brain, as 1 of 62 high risk–conferring mutations in a cohort of patients with autism and intellectual disability. We screened all published genetic information available from whole-exome sequencing studies and identified a second de novo CACNA1D mutation, p.G407R. Both mutations are present only in the probands and not in their unaffected parents or siblings. Methods We functionally expressed both mutations in tsA-201 cells to study their functional consequences using whole-cell patch-clamp. Results The mutations p.A749G and p.G407R caused dramatic changes in channel gating by shifting (~15 mV) the voltage dependence for steady-state activation and inactivation to more negative voltages (p.A749G) or by pronounced slowing of current inactivation during depolarizing stimuli (p.G407R). In both cases, these changes are compatible with a gain-of-function phenotype. Conclusions Our data, together with the discovery that Cav1.3 gain-of-function causes primary aldosteronism with seizures, neurologic abnormalities, and intellectual disability, suggest that Cav1.3 gain-of-function mutations confer a major part of the risk for autism in the two probands and may even cause the disease. Our findings have immediate clinical relevance because blockers of LTCCs are available for therapeutic attempts in affected individuals. Patients should also be explored for other symptoms likely resulting from Cav1.3 hyperactivity, in particular, primary aldosteronism. PMID:25620733

  10. Stimulation of Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis by the Mental Disease Gene DISC1 is Mediated by N-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Willcyn; Thevathasan, Jervis Vermal; Lin, Qingshu; Lim, Kim Buay; Kuroda, Keisuke; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Bilger, Marcel; Soong, Tuck Wah; Fivaz, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lesions and mutations of the DISC1 (Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1) gene have been linked to major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism, but the influence of DISC1 on synaptic transmission remains poorly understood. Using two independent genetic approaches—RNAi and a DISC1 KO mouse—we examined the impact of DISC1 on the synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle by population imaging of the synaptic tracer vGpH in hippocampal neurons. DISC1 loss-of-function resulted in a marked decrease in SV exocytic rates during neuronal stimulation and was associated with reduced Ca2+ transients at nerve terminals. Impaired SV release was efficiently rescued by elevation of extracellular Ca2+, hinting at a link between DISC1 and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Accordingly, blockade of N-type Cav2.2 channels mimics and occludes the effect of DISC1 inactivation on SV exocytosis, and overexpression of DISC1 in a heterologous system increases Cav2.2 currents. Collectively, these results show that DISC1-dependent enhancement of SV exocytosis is mediated by Cav2.2 and point to aberrant glutamate release as a probable endophenotype of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:27378904

  11. Syntaxin-3 Binds and Regulates Both R- and L-Type Calcium Channels in Insulin-Secreting INS-1 832/13 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li; Dolai, Subhankar; Kang, Youhou; Liang, Tao; Xie, Huanli; Qin, Tairan; Yang, Lu; Chen, Liangyi; Gaisano, Herbert Y.

    2016-01-01

    Syntaxin (Syn)-1A mediates exocytosis of predocked insulin-containing secretory granules (SGs) during first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in part via its interaction with plasma membrane (PM)-bound L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav). In contrast, Syn-3 mediates exocytosis of newcomer SGs that accounts for second-phase GSIS. We now hypothesize that the newcomer SG Syn-3 preferentially binds and modulates R-type Cav opening, which was postulated to mediate second-phase GSIS. Indeed, glucose-stimulation of pancreatic islet β-cell line INS-1 induced a predominant increase in interaction between Syn-3 and Cavα1 pore-forming subunits of R-type Cav2.3 and to lesser extent L-type Cavs, while confirming the preferential interactions between Syn-1A with L-type (Cav1.2, Cav1.3) Cavs. Consistently, direct binding studies employing heterologous HEK cells confirmed that Syn-3 preferentially binds Cav2.3, whereas Syn-1A prefers L-type Cavs. We then used siRNA knockdown (KD) of Syn-3 in INS-1 to study the endogenous modulatory actions of Syn-3 on Cav channels. Syn-3 KD enhanced Ca2+ currents by 46% attributed mostly to R- and L-type Cavs. Interestingly, while the transmembrane domain of Syn-1A is the putative functional domain modulating Cav activity, it is the cytoplasmic domain of Syn-3 that appears to modulate Cav activity. We conclude that Syn-3 may mimic Syn-1A in the ability to bind and modulate Cavs, but preferring Cav2.3 to perhaps participate in triggering fusion of newcomer insulin SGs during second-phase GSIS. PMID:26848587

  12. Complex regulation of voltage-dependent activation and inactivation properties of retinal voltage-gated Cav1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels by Ca2+-binding protein 4 (CaBP4).

    PubMed

    Shaltiel, Lior; Paparizos, Christos; Fenske, Stefanie; Hassan, Sami; Gruner, Christian; Rötzer, Katrin; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A

    2012-10-19

    Cav1.4 L-type Ca(2+) channels are crucial for synaptic transmission in retinal photoreceptors and bipolar neurons. Recent studies suggest that the activity of this channel is regulated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein 4 (CaBP4). In the present study, we explored this issue by examining functional effects of CaBP4 on heterologously expressed Cav1.4. We show that CaBP4 dramatically increases Cav1.4 channel availability. This effect crucially depends on the presence of the C-terminal ICDI (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation) domain of Cav1.4 and is absent in a Cav1.4 mutant lacking the ICDI. Using FRET experiments, we demonstrate that CaBP4 interacts with the IQ motif of Cav1.4 and that it interferes with the binding of the ICDI domain. Based on these findings, we suggest that CaBP4 increases Cav1.4 channel availability by relieving the inhibitory effects of the ICDI domain on voltage-dependent Cav1.4 channel gating. We also functionally characterized two CaBP4 mutants that are associated with a congenital variant of human night blindness and other closely related nonstationary retinal diseases. Although both mutants interact with Cav1.4 channels, the functional effects of CaBP4 mutants are only partially preserved, leading to a reduction of Cav1.4 channel availability and loss of function. In conclusion, our study sheds new light on the functional interaction between CaBP4 and Cav1.4. Moreover, it provides insights into the mechanism by which CaBP4 mutants lead to loss of Cav1.4 function and to retinal disease. PMID:22936811

  13. Effect of dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) on L-type calcium channel current and its pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Ying; Cai, Zheng-Xu; Li, Ping; Cai, Chun-Yu; Qu, Cheng-Long; Guo, Hui-Shu

    2010-09-24

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), a newly-described natriuretic peptide, relaxes gastrointestinal smooth muscle. L-type calcium channel currents play an important role in regulating smooth muscle contraction. The effect of DNP on L-type calcium channel currents in gastrointestinal tract is still unclear. This study was designed to investigate the effect of DNP on barium current (I(Ba)) through the L-type calcium channel in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs and cGMP-pathway mechanism. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record L-type calcium channel currents. The content of cGMP in guinea pig gastric antral smooth muscle and perfusion solution was measured using radioimmunoassay. DNP markedly enhanced cGMP levels in gastric antral smooth muscle tissue and in perfusion medium. DNP concentration-dependently inhibited I(Ba) in freshly isolated guinea pig gastric antral circular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of guinea pigs. DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was partially blocked by LY83583, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase. KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor, almost completely blocked DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba). However, DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was potentiated by zaprinast, an inhibitor of cGMP-sensitive phosphodiesterase. Taken together, DNP inhibits L-type calcium channel currents via pGC-cGMP-PKG-dependent signal pathway in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs. PMID:20594955

  14. AKAP-Anchored PKA Maintains Neuronal L-type Calcium Channel Activity and NFAT Transcriptional Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jonathan G.; Sanderson, Jennifer L.; Gorski, Jessica A.; Scott, John D.; Catterall, William A.; Sather, William A.; Dell’Acqua, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In neurons, Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (LTCC) couples electrical activity to changes in transcription. LTCC activity is elevated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and depressed by the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), with both enzymes localized to the channel by A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79/150. AKAP79/150 anchoring of CaN also promotes LTCC activation of transcription through dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT). We report here that genetic disruption of PKA anchoring to AKAP79/150 also interferes with LTCC activation of CaN-NFAT signaling in neurons. Disruption of AKAP-PKA anchoring promoted redistribution of the kinase out of dendritic spines, profound decreases in LTCC phosphorylation and Ca2+ influx, and impaired NFAT movement to the nucleus and activation of transcription. Our findings support a model wherein basal activity of AKAP79/150-anchored PKA opposes CaN to preserve LTCC phosphorylation, thereby sustaining LTCC activation of CaN-NFAT signaling to the neuronal nucleus. PMID:24835999

  15. Voltage-Gated Hydrophobic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a fundamental property that is responsible for numerous physical and biophysical aspects of molecular interactions in water. Peculiar behavior is expected for water in the vicinity of hydrophobic structures, such as nanopores. Indeed, hydrophobic nanopores can be found in two distinct states, dry and wet, even though the latter is thermodynamically unstable. Transitions between these two states are kinetically hindered in long pores but can be much faster in shorter pores. As it is demonstrated for the first time in this paper, these transitions can be induced by applying a voltage across a membrane with a single hydrophobic nanopore. Such voltage-induced gating in single nanopores can be realized in a reversible manner through electrowetting of inner walls of the nanopores. The resulting I-V curves of such artificial hydrophobic nanopores mimic biological voltage-gated channels.

  16. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  17. A Blocker of N- and T-type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Intoxication, Place Preference, Self-Administration, and Reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Philip M.; Zeng, Lily; Wang, Victoria; Connolly, Jacklyn; Wallace, Melisa J.; Kim, Chanki; Shin, Hee-Sup; Belardetti, Francesco; Snutch, Terrance P.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    There is a clear need for new therapeutics to treat alcoholism. Here, we test our hypothesis that selective inhibitors of neuronal calcium channels will reduce ethanol consumption and intoxication, based on our previous studies using knock-out mice and cell culture systems. We demonstrate that pretreatment with the novel mixed N-type and T-type calcium channel antagonist 1-(6,6-bis(4-fluorophenyl)hexyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)piperazine (NP078585) reduced ethanol intoxication. NP078585 also attenuated the reinforcing and rewarding properties of ethanol, measured by operant self-administration and the expression of an ethanol conditioned place preference, and abolished stress-induced reinstatement of ethanol seeking. NP078585 did not affect alcohol responses in mice lacking N-type calcium channels. These results suggest that selective calcium channel inhibitors may be useful in reducing acute ethanol intoxication and alcohol consumption by human alcoholics. PMID:18987207

  18. L-type calcium channel β subunit modulates angiotensin II responses in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Moreno, Cristian; Itfinca, Mircea; Altier, Christophe; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andres; Zamponi, Gerald W; Varela, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II regulation of L-type calcium currents in cardiac muscle is controversial and the underlying signaling events are not completely understood. Moreover, the possible role of auxiliary subunit composition of the channels in Angiotensin II modulation of L-type calcium channels has not yet been explored. In this work we study the role of Ca(v)β subunits and the intracellular signaling responsible for L-type calcium current modulation by Angiotensin II. In cardiomyocytes, Angiotensin II exposure induces rapid inhibition of L-type current with a magnitude that is correlated with the rate of current inactivation. Semi-quantitative PCR of cardiomyocytes at different days of culture reveals changes in the Ca(v)β subunits expression pattern that are correlated with the rate of current inactivation and with Angiotensin II effect. Over-expression of individual b subunits in heterologous systems reveals that the magnitude of Angiotensin II inhibition is dependent on the Ca(v)β subunit isoform, with Ca(v)β(1b) containing channels being more strongly regulated. Ca(v)β(2a) containing channels were insensitive to modulation and this effect was partially due to the N-terminal palmitoylation sites of this subunit. Moreover, PLC or diacylglycerol lipase inhibition prevents the Angiotensin II effect on L-type calcium channels, while PKC inhibition with chelerythrine does not, suggesting a role of arachidonic acid in this process. Finally, we show that in intact cardiomyocytes the magnitude of calcium transients on spontaneous beating cells is modulated by Angiotensin II in a Ca(v)β subunit-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that Ca(v)β subunits alter the magnitude of inhibition of L-type current by Angiotensin II. PMID:21525790

  19. Post-transcriptional modifications and “Calmodulation” of voltage-gated calcium channel function: Reflections by two collaborators of David T Yue

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Tuck Wah; Mori, Masayuki X

    2016-01-01

    This review article is written to specially pay tribute to David T. Yue who was an outstanding human being and an excellent scientist who exuded passion and creativity. He exemplified an inter-disciplinary scientist who was able to cross scientific boundaries effortlessly in order to provide amazing understanding on how calcium channels work. This article provides a glimpse of some of the research the authors have the privilege to collaborate with David and it attempts to provide the thinking behind some of the research done. In a wider context, we highlight that calcium channel function could be exquisitely modulated by interaction with a tethered calmodulin. Post-transcriptional modifications such as alternative splicing and RNA editing further influence the Ca2+-CaM mediated processes such as calcium dependent inhibition and/or facilitation. Besides modifications of electrophysiological and pharmacological properties, protein interactions with the channels could also be influenced in a splice-variant dependent manner. PMID:26054929

  20. Post-transcriptional modifications and "Calmodulation" of voltage-gated calcium channel function: Reflections by two collaborators of David T Yue.

    PubMed

    Soong, Tuck Wah; Mori, Masayuki X

    2016-01-01

    This review article is written to specially pay tribute to David T. Yue who was an outstanding human being and an excellent scientist who exuded passion and creativity. He exemplified an inter-disciplinary scientist who was able to cross scientific boundaries effortlessly in order to provide amazing understanding on how calcium channels work. This article provides a glimpse of some of the research the authors have the privilege to collaborate with David and it attempts to provide the thinking behind some of the research done. In a wider context, we highlight that calcium channel function could be exquisitely modulated by interaction with a tethered calmodulin. Post-transcriptional modifications such as alternative splicing and RNA editing further influence the Ca(2+)-CaM mediated processes such as calcium dependent inhibition and/or facilitation. Besides modifications of electrophysiological and pharmacological properties, protein interactions with the channels could also be influenced in a splice-variant dependent manner. PMID:26054929

  1. [Discovering L-type calcium channels inhibitors of antihypertensive drugs based on drug repositioning].

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying-xi; He, Yu-su; Jiang, Lu-di; Yue, Qiao-xin; Cui, Shuai; Bin, Li; Ye, Xiao-tong; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Zhang, Yang-ling

    2015-09-01

    This study was amid to construct the pharmacophore model of L-type calcium channel antagonist in the application of screening Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs resulting from virtual screening and discusses the relocation-based drug discovery methods, screening antihypertensive drugs with L-type calcium channel function from TCMD. Qualitative hypotheses wre generated by HipHop separately on the basis of 12 compounds with antagonistic action on L-type calcium channel expressed in rabbit cardiac muscle. Datebase searching method was used to evaluate the generated hypotheses. The optimum hypothesis was used to search Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs and evaluates the antihypertensive effect of the chemical constituent of traditional Chinese medicine resulting from virtual screening by the matching score and literature. The results showed that optimum qualitative hypothesis is with six features, which were two hydrogen-bond acceptors, four hydrophobic groups, and the CAI value of 2.78. Screening Drugbank achieves 93 approved drugs. Screening TCMD achieves 285 chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine. It was concluded that the hypothesis is reliable and can be used to screen datebase. The approved drugs resulting from virtual screening, such as pravastatin, are potentially L-type calcium channels inhibitors. The chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine, such as Arctigenin III and Arctigenin are potentially antihypertensive drugs. It indicates that Drug Repositioning based on hypothesis is possible. PMID:26983215

  2. Isoforms of alpha1E voltage-gated calcium channels in rat cerebellar granule cells--detection of major calcium channel alpha1-transcripts by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schramm, M; Vajna, R; Pereverzev, A; Tottene, A; Klöckner, U; Pietrobon, D; Hescheler, J; Schneider, T

    1999-01-01

    In primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells, transcripts of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels have been amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and identified by sequencing of subcloned polymerase chain reaction products. In these neurons cultured for six to eight days in vitro, fragments of the three major transcripts alpha1C, alpha1A, and alpha1E are detected using degenerated oligonucleotide primer pairs under highly stringent conditions. Whole-cell Ca2+ current recordings from six to eight days in vitro granule cells show that most of the current is due to L-type (25%), P-type (33%) and R-type (30%) Ca2+ channels. These data support the correlation between alpha1A and P-type Ca2+ channels (G1) and between alpha1E and R-type channels (G2 and G3). By including specific primer pairs for alpha1E the complimentary DNA fragments of indicative regions of alpha1E isoforms are amplified corresponding to the three most variable regions of alpha1E, the 5'-end, the II/III-loop, and the central part of the 3'-end. Although the complementary DNA fragments of the 5'-end of rat alpha1E yield a uniform reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction product, its structure is unusual in the sense that it is longer than in the cloned rat alpha1E complementary DNA. It corresponds to the alpha1E isoform reported for mouse and human brain and is also expressed in cerebellum and cerebrum of rat brain as the major or maybe even the only variant of alpha1E. While fragments of a new rat alpha1E isoform are amplified from the 5'-end, three known fragments of the II/III-loop and two known isoforms homologue to the 3'-coding region are detected, which in the last case are discriminated by a 129 base pair insertion. The shift of the alpha1E expression from a pattern seen in cerebellum (alpha1Ee) to a pattern identified in other regions of the brain (alpha1E-3) is discussed. These data show that: (i) alpha1E is expressed in rat brain as a structural homologue to the

  3. Altered expression of the voltage-gated calcium channel subunit α2δ-1: A comparison between two experimental models of epilepsy and a sensory nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Rostro, M.; Sandhu, G.; Bauer, C.S.; Jiruska, P.; Jefferys, J.G.R.; Dolphin, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The auxiliary α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels is up-regulated in dorsal root ganglion neurons following peripheral somatosensory nerve damage, in several animal models of neuropathic pain. The α2δ-1 protein has a mainly presynaptic localization, where it is associated with the calcium channels involved in neurotransmitter release. Relevant to the present study, α2δ-1 has been shown to be the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs in their alleviation of neuropathic pain. These drugs are also used in the treatment of certain epilepsies. In this study we therefore examined whether the level or distribution of α2δ-1 was altered in the hippocampus following experimental induction of epileptic seizures in rats, using both the kainic acid model of human temporal lobe epilepsy, in which status epilepticus is induced, and the tetanus toxin model in which status epilepticus is not involved. The main finding of this study is that we did not identify somatic overexpression of α2δ-1 in hippocampal neurons in either of the epilepsy models, unlike the upregulation of α2δ-1 that occurs following peripheral nerve damage to both somatosensory and motor neurons. However, we did observe local reorganization of α2δ-1 immunostaining in the hippocampus only in the kainic acid model, where it was associated with areas of neuronal cell loss, as indicated by absence of NeuN immunostaining, dendritic loss, as identified by areas where microtubule-associated protein-2 immunostaining was missing, and reactive gliosis, determined by regions of strong OX42 staining. PMID:24641886

  4. The Fabry disease-associated lipid Lyso-Gb3 enhances voltage-gated calcium currents in sensory neurons and causes pain.

    PubMed

    Choi, L; Vernon, J; Kopach, O; Minett, M S; Mills, K; Clayton, P T; Meert, T; Wood, J N

    2015-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder characterised by accumulation of glycosphingolipids, and accompanied by clinical manifestations, such as cardiac disorders, renal failure, pain and peripheral neuropathy. Globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3), a deacylated form of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), has emerged as a marker of Fabry disease. We investigated the link between Gb3, lyso-Gb3 and pain. Plantar administration of lyso-Gb3 or Gb3 caused mechanical allodynia in healthy mice. In vitro application of 100nM lyso-Gb3 caused uptake of extracellular calcium in 10% of sensory neurons expressing nociceptor markers, rising to 40% of neurons at 1μM, a concentration that may occur in Fabry disease patients. Peak current densities of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels were substantially enhanced by application of 1μM lyso-Gb3. These studies suggest a direct role for lyso-Gb3 in the sensitisation of peripheral nociceptive neurons that may provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Fabry disease-associated pain. PMID:25697597

  5. CaMKII associates with CaV1.2 L-type calcium channels via selected β subunits to enhance regulatory phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Abiria, Sunday A.; Colbran, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) facilitates L-type Calcium Channel (LTCC) activity physiologically, but may exacerbate LTCC-dependent pathophysiology. We previously showed that CaMKII forms stable complexes with voltage-gated calcium channel β1b or β2a subunits, but not with the β3 or β4 subunits (Grueter et al 2008, Biochemistry, 47:1760–1767). CaMKII-dependent facilitation of CaV1.2 LTCCs requires Thr498 phosphorylation in the β2a subunit (Grueter et al, 2006, Mol Cell, 23:641–650), but the relationship of this modulation to CaMKII interactions with LTCC subunits is unknown. Here we show that CaMKII co-immunoprecipitates with forebrain LTCCs that contain CaV1.2α1 and β1 or β2 subunits, but is not detected in LTCC complexes containing β4 subunits.4 CaMKIIα can be specifically tethered to the I/II linker of CaV1.2α1 subunits in vitro by the β1b or β2a subunits. Efficient targeting of CaMKIIα to the full-length CaV1.2α1 subunit in transfected HEK293 cells requires CaMKII binding to the β2a subunit. Moreover, disruption of CaMKII binding substantially reduced phosphorylation of β2a at Thr498 within the LTCC complex, without altering overall phosphorylation of Cav1.2α1 and β subunits. These findings demonstrate a biochemical mechanism underlying LTCC facilitation by CaMKII. PMID:19840220

  6. Cytoplasmic location of α1A voltage-gated calcium channel C-terminal fragment (Cav2.1-CTF) aggregate is sufficient to cause cell death.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Obayashi, Masato; Ishiguro, Taro; Sato, Nozomu; Niimi, Yusuke; Ozaki, Kokoro; Mogushi, Kaoru; Mahmut, Yasen; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Dolmetsch, Ricardo; Yamada, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takeo; Mori, Osamu; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Ishikawa, Kinya

    2013-01-01

    The human α1A voltage-dependent calcium channel (Cav2.1) is a pore-forming essential subunit embedded in the plasma membrane. Its cytoplasmic carboxyl(C)-tail contains a small poly-glutamine (Q) tract, whose length is normally 4∼19 Q, but when expanded up to 20∼33Q, the tract causes an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). A recent study has shown that a 75-kDa C-terminal fragment (CTF) containing the polyQ tract remains soluble in normal brains, but becomes insoluble mainly in the cytoplasm with additional localization to the nuclei of human SCA6 Purkinje cells. However, the mechanism by which the CTF aggregation leads to neurodegeneration is completely elusive, particularly whether the CTF exerts more toxicity in the nucleus or in the cytoplasm. We tagged recombinant (r)CTF with either nuclear-localization or nuclear-export signal, created doxycyclin-inducible rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell lines, and found that the CTF is more toxic in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus, the observations being more obvious with Q28 (disease range) than with Q13 (normal-length). Surprisingly, the CTF aggregates co-localized both with cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the cytoplasm, and Western blot analysis showed that the quantity of CREB and p-CREB were both decreased in the nucleus when the rCTF formed aggregates in the cytoplasm. In human brains, polyQ aggregates also co-localized with CREB in the cytoplasm of SCA6 Purkinje cells, but not in other conditions. Collectively, the cytoplasmic Cav2.1-CTF aggregates are sufficient to cause cell death, and one of the pathogenic mechanisms may be abnormal CREB trafficking in the cytoplasm and reduced CREB and p-CREB levels in the nuclei. PMID:23505410

  7. Spinal morphine but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia is affected by alternative splicing of voltage-gated calcium channel CaV2.2 pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Andrade, Arturo; Lipscombe, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic voltage-gated calcium Ca(V)2.2 channels play a privileged role in spinal level sensitization following peripheral nerve injury. Direct and indirect inhibitors of Ca(V)2.2 channel activity in spinal dorsal horn are analgesic in chronic pain states. Ca(V)2.2 channels represent a family of splice isoforms that are expressed in different combinations according to cell-type. A pair of mutually exclusive exons in the Ca(V)2.2 encoding Cacna1b gene, e37a and e37b, differentially influence morphine analgesia. In mice that lack exon e37a, which is enriched in nociceptors, the analgesic efficacy of intrathecal morphine against noxious thermal stimuli is reduced. Here we ask if sequences unique to e37a influence: the development of abnormal thermal and mechanical sensitivity associated with peripheral nerve injury; and the actions of two other classes of analgesics that owe part or all of their efficacy to Ca(V)2.2 channel inhibition. We find that: i) the analgesic efficacy of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, is reduced in mice lacking e37a, ii) the induction and maintenance of behaviors associated with sensitization that accompany peripheral nerve injury, do not require e37a-specific sequence, iii) intrathecal morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia to thermal stimuli is significantly lower in wild-type mice after peripheral nerve injury, iv) the analgesic efficacy of ziconotide and gabapentin to mechanical stimuli is reduced following nerve injury, and iv) intrathecal morphine analgesia to thermal stimuli in mice lacking e37a is not further reduced by peripheral nerve injury. Our findings show that the analgesic action of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, to thermal stimuli is linked to which Cacna1b exon, e37a or e37b, is selected during alternative pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24369063

  8. Functional heterogeneity of the four voltage sensors of a human L-type calcium channel

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Antonios; Savalli, Nicoletta; Sigg, Daniel; Neely, Alan; Olcese, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Excitation-evoked Ca2+ influx is the fastest and most ubiquitous chemical trigger for cellular processes, including neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, and gene expression. The voltage dependence and timing of Ca2+ entry are thought to be functions of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels composed of a central pore regulated by four nonidentical voltage-sensing domains (VSDs I–IV). Currently, the individual voltage dependence and the contribution to pore opening of each VSD remain largely unknown. Using an optical approach (voltage-clamp fluorometry) to track the movement of the individual voltage sensors, we discovered that the four VSDs of CaV1.2 channels undergo voltage-evoked conformational rearrangements, each exhibiting distinct voltage- and time-dependent properties over a wide range of potentials and kinetics. The voltage dependence and fast kinetic components in the activation of VSDs II and III were compatible with the ionic current properties, suggesting that these voltage sensors are involved in CaV1.2 activation. This view is supported by an obligatory model, in which activation of VSDs II and III is necessary to open the pore. When these data were interpreted in view of an allosteric model, where pore opening is intrinsically independent but biased by VSD activation, VSDs II and III were each found to supply ∼50 meV (∼2 kT), amounting to ∼85% of the total energy, toward stabilizing the open state, with a smaller contribution from VSD I (∼16 meV). VSD IV did not appear to participate in channel opening. PMID:25489110

  9. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E.; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  10. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  11. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  12. Expression of L-type calcium channels associated with postnatal development of skeletal muscle function in mouse.

    PubMed

    Mänttäri, S; Pyörnilä, A; Harjula, R; Järvilehto, M

    2001-01-01

    Several factors have an influence on the improvement of muscle activity and motor co-ordination of mammals during post-natal development. One of them is voltage sensitive L-type calcium channel function. In striated muscles of adult mammals these channels are located in T-tubule membranes thus linking the on-coming action potential to the molecular process of muscle contraction. The postnatal development of L-type calcium channels is therefore critical not only for contraction but also for all subsequent motor learning. We used high affinity enantiomer of dihydropyridine labelled with a fluorophore in order to show the relative amount of L-type calcium channels by histofluorescence in tissue. We found by qualitative microscopical analysis that the amount of L-type calcium channels increased during the postnatal development in the mouse skeletal muscle (m. rectus femoris and m. gastrocnemius). We also noted variation between different fibre types in the increase of the amount of L-type calcium channels, as judged by the intensity of histofluorescence. We showed by histochemical staining and statistical analysis that the high density of L-type calcium channels in adult muscles is correlated with fast oxidative glycolytic fibre type of striated muscles rather than slow oxidative or fast glycolytic fibres. Based on this finding we propose that the development of L-type calcium channels can be considered as one of the factors determining the different physiological properties of fibre types. PMID:11563550

  13. Sex-dependent modulation of age-related cognitive decline by the L-type calcium channel gene Cacna1c (Cav 1.2).

    PubMed

    Zanos, Panos; Bhat, Shambhu; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Smith, Robert J; Tonelli, Leonardo H; Gould, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Increased calcium influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels has been implicated in the neuronal dysfunction underlying age-related memory declines. The present study aimed to test the specific role of Cacna1c (which encodes Cav 1.2) in modulating age-related memory dysfunction. Short-term, spatial and contextual/emotional memory was evaluated in young and aged, wild-type as well as mice with one functional copy of Cacna1c (haploinsufficient), using the novel object recognition, Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks, respectively. Hippocampal expression of Cacna1c mRNA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Ageing was associated with object recognition and contextual/emotional memory deficits, and a significant increase in hippocampal Cacna1c mRNA expression. Cacna1c haploinsufficiency was associated with decreased Cacna1c mRNA expression in both young and old animals. However, haploinsufficient mice did not manifest an age-related increase in expression of this gene. Behaviourally, Cacna1c haploinsufficiency prevented object recognition deficits during ageing in both male and female mice. A significant correlation between higher Cacna1c levels and decreased object recognition performance was observed in both sexes. Also, a sex-dependent protective role of decreased Cacna1c levels in contextual/emotional memory loss has been observed, specifically in male mice. These data provide evidence for an association between increased hippocampal Cacna1c expression and age-related cognitive decline. Additionally, they indicate an interaction between the Cacna1c gene and sex in the modulation of age-related contextual memory declines. PMID:25989111

  14. Voltage-Gated R-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition via Human μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid Receptors Is Voltage-Independently Mediated by Gβγ Protein Subunits.

    PubMed

    Berecki, Géza; Motin, Leonid; Adams, David J

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms that modulate calcium channels via opioid receptor activation is fundamental to our understanding of both pain perception and how opioids modulate pain. Neuronal voltage-gated N-type calcium channels (Cav2.2) are inhibited by activation of G protein-coupled opioid receptors (ORs). However, inhibition of R-type (Cav2.3) channels by μ- or κ-ORs is poorly defined and has not been reported for δ-ORs. To investigate such interactions, we coexpressed human μ-, δ-, or κ-ORs with human Cav2.3 or Cav2.2 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and measured depolarization-activated Ba(2+) currents (IBa). Selective agonists of μ-, δ-, and κ-ORs inhibited IBa through Cav2.3 channels by 35%. Cav2.2 channels were inhibited to a similar extent by κ-ORs, but more potently (60%) via μ- and δ-ORs. Antagonists of δ- and κ-ORs potentiated IBa amplitude mediated by Cav2.3 and Cav2.2 channels. Consistent with G protein βγ (Gβγ) interaction, modulation of Cav2.2 was primarily voltage-dependent and transiently relieved by depolarizing prepulses. In contrast, Cav2.3 modulation was voltage-independent and unaffected by depolarizing prepulses. However, Cav2.3 inhibition was sensitive to pertussis toxin and to intracellular application of guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt and guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate tetralithium salt. Coexpression of Gβγ-specific scavengers-namely, the carboxyl terminus of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 or membrane-targeted myristoylated-phosducin-attenuated or abolished Cav2.3 modulation. Our study reveals the diversity of OR-mediated signaling at Cav2 channels and identifies neuronal Cav2.3 channels as potential targets for opioid analgesics. Their novel modulation is dependent on pre-existing OR activity and mediated by membrane-delimited Gβγ subunits in a voltage-independent manner. PMID:26490245

  15. Injury-specific functional alteration of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in synaptic transmission of primary afferent C-fibers in the rat spinal superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Keiko; Ogawa, Koichi; Minami, Kazuhisa; Shinohara, Shunji; Kato, Akira

    2016-02-01

    We investigated functional alterations of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in excitatory synaptic transmission from primary afferent A- and C-fibers after peripheral nerve injury. Patch-clamp recordings were performed on substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of spinal cord slices with an attached dorsal root, prepared from L5 spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) rats. The effects of neuronal VGCC blockers, ω-conotoxin GVIA (ω-CgTX) for N-type channels and ω-agatoxin IVA (ω-AgaIVA) for P/Q-type channels, on evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) by stimulation of A- or C-fibers were studied. Besides, electrophysiological assay using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and immunohistochemistry were done. In naïve rats, ω-CgTX (0.1-1μM) reduced more effectively A-fiber eEPSCs than C-fiber ones. After nerve injury, ω-CgTX produced great inhibition of C-fiber eEPSCs in slices with the injured L5 dorsal root of SNL model rats, as compared to sham-operated rats. By contrast, in slices with the non-injured L4 one, inhibitory effects of ω-CgTX were not changed. This occurred concurrently with increased expression of N-type VGCCs in L5 spinal dorsal horn and with enhanced Ca(2+) currents through N-type VGCCs in small-sized (C-type) L5 DRG. In terms of A-fiber eEPSCs, ω-CgTX elicited similar inhibition in nerve-injured and sham-operated rats. ω-AgaIVA (0.1μM) had less effect on A- or C-fiber eEPSCs. These results indicate that N-type, but not P/Q-type, VGCCs mainly contribute to excitatory synaptic transmission from A- and C-fibers in the spinal dorsal horn. More importantly, following nerve injury, the functional contribution of N-type VGCCs to nociceptive transmission is increased in the pre-synaptic terminals of injured C-fibers. PMID:26708163

  16. Attenuated response of L-type calcium current to nitric oxide in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Rozmaritsa, Nadiia; Christ, Torsten; Van Wagoner, David R.; Haase, Hannelore; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Matschke, Klaus; Ravens, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Aim Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by cardiomyocytes plays an important role in the regulation of cardiac function. Here, we studied the impact of NO signalling on calcium influx in human right atrial myocytes and its relation to atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods and results Right atrial appendages (RAAs) were obtained from patients in sinus rhythm (SR) and AF. The biotin-switch technique was used to evaluate endogenous S-nitrosylation of the α1C subunit of L-type calcium channels. Comparing SR to AF, S-nitrosylation of Ca2+ channels was similar. Direct effects of the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) on L-type calcium current (ICa,L) were studied in cardiomyocytes with standard voltage-clamp techniques. In SR, ICa,L increased with SNAP (100 µM) by 48%, n/N = 117/56, P < 0.001. The SNAP effect on ICa,L involved activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and protein kinase A. Specific inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE)3 with cilostamide (1 µM) enhanced ICa,L to a similar extent as SNAP. However, when cAMP was elevated by PDE3 inhibition or β-adrenoceptor stimulation, SNAP reduced ICa,L, pointing to cGMP–cAMP cross-regulation. In AF, the stimulatory effect of SNAP on ICa,L was attenuated, while its inhibitory effect on isoprenaline- or cilostamide-stimulated current was preserved. cGMP elevation with SNAP was comparable between the SR and AF group. Moreover, the expression of PDE3 and soluble guanylate cyclase was not reduced in AF. Conclusion NO exerts dual effects on ICa,L in SR with an increase of basal and inhibition of cAMP-stimulated current, and in AF NO inhibits only stimulated ICa,L. We conclude that in AF, cGMP regulation of PDE2 is preserved, but regulation of PDE3 is lost. PMID:24336332

  17. Mechanism of Electromechanical Coupling in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Blunck, Rikard; Batulan, Zarah

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels play a central role in the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. They are selective for one type of ion – sodium, calcium, or potassium. Voltage-gated ion channels are composed of a central pore that allows ions to pass through the membrane and four peripheral voltage sensing domains that respond to changes in the membrane potential. Upon depolarization, voltage sensors in voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) undergo conformational changes driven by positive charges in the S4 segment and aided by pairwise electrostatic interactions with the surrounding voltage sensor. Structure-function relations of Kv channels have been investigated in detail, and the resulting models on the movement of the voltage sensors now converge to a consensus; the S4 segment undergoes a combined movement of rotation, tilt, and vertical displacement in order to bring 3–4e+ each through the electric field focused in this region. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the voltage sensor movement leads to pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, is still not fully understood. Thus, recently, electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels has been investigated with a multitude of techniques including electrophysiology, 3D crystal structures, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Evidently, the S4–S5 linker, the covalent link between the voltage sensor and pore, plays a crucial role. The linker transfers the energy from the voltage sensor movement to the pore domain via an interaction with the S6 C-termini, which are pulled open during gating. In addition, other contact regions have been proposed. This review aims to provide (i) an in-depth comparison of the molecular mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels; (ii) insight as to how the voltage sensor and pore domain influence one another; and (iii) theoretical predictions on the movement of the cytosolic face of the Kv channels during

  18. Forskolin Regulates L-Type Calcium Channel through Interaction between Actinin 4 and β3 Subunit in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lin; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Peng, Wen; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels that permit cellular calcium influx are essential in calcium-mediated modulation of cellular signaling. Although the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels is linked to many factors including cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity and actin cytoskeleton, little is known about the detailed mechanisms underlying the regulation in osteoblasts. Our present study investigated the modulation of L-type calcium channel activities through the effects of forskolin on actin reorganization and on its functional interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4. The results showed that forskolin did not significantly affect the trafficking of pore forming α1c subunit and its interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4, whereas it significantly increased the expression of β3 subunit and its interaction with actinin 4 in osteoblast cells as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down assay, and immunostaining. Further mapping showed that the ABD and EF domains of actinin 4 were interaction sites. This interaction is independent of PKA phosphorylation. Knockdown of actinin 4 significantly decreased the activities of L-type calcium channels. Our study revealed a new aspect of the mechanisms by which the forskolin activation of adenylyl cyclase - cAMP cascade regulates the L-type calcium channel in osteoblast cells, besides the PKA mediated phosphorylation of the channel subunits. These data provide insight into the important role of interconnection among adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, PKA, the actin cytoskeleton, and the channel proteins in the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in osteoblast cells. PMID:25902045

  19. The action of calcium channel blockers on recombinant L-type calcium channel α1-subunits

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Nicole; Buryi, Vitali; Feron, Olivier; Gomez, Jean-Pierre; Christen, Marie-Odile; Godfraind, Théophile

    1998-01-01

    CHO cells expressing the α1C-a subunit (cardiac isoform) and the α1C-b subunit (vascular isoform) of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel were used to investigate whether tissue selectivity of Ca2+ channel blockers could be related to different affinities for α1C isoforms.Inward current evoked by the transfected α1 subunit was recorded by the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration.Neutral dihydropyridines (nifedipine, nisoldipine, (+)-PN200-110) were more potent inhibitors of α1C-b-subunit than of α1C-a-subunit. This difference was more marked at a holding potential of −100 mV than at −50 mV. SDZ 207-180 (an ionized dihydropyridine) exhibited the same potency on the two isoforms.Pinaverium (ionized non-dihydropyridine derivative) was 2 and 4 fold more potent on α1C-a than on α1C-b subunit at Vh of −100 mV and −50 mV, respectively. Effects of verapamil were identical on the two isoforms at both voltages.[3H]-(+)-PN 200-110 binding experiments showed that neutral dihydropyridines had a higher affinity for the α1C-b than for the α1C-a subunit. SDZ 207-180 had the same affinity for the two isoforms and pinaverium had a higher affinity for the α1C-a subunit than for the α1C-b subunit.These results indicate marked differences among Ca2+ channel blockers in their selectivity for the α1C-a and α1C-b subunits of the Ca2+ channel. PMID:9846638

  20. The action of calcium channel blockers on recombinant L-type calcium channel alpha1-subunits.

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Buryi, V; Feron, O; Gomez, J P; Christen, M O; Godfraind, T

    1998-11-01

    1. CHO cells expressing the alpha(1C-a) subunit (cardiac isoform) and the alpha(1C-b) subunit (vascular isoform) of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel were used to investigate whether tissue selectivity of Ca2+ channel blockers could be related to different affinities for alpha1C isoforms. 2. Inward current evoked by the transfected alpha1 subunit was recorded by the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. 3. Neutral dihydropyridines (nifedipine, nisoldipine, (+)-PN200-110) were more potent inhibitors of alpha(1C-)b-subunit than of alpha(1C-a)-subunit. This difference was more marked at a holding potential of -100 mV than at -50 mV. SDZ 207-180 (an ionized dihydropyridine) exhibited the same potency on the two isoforms. 4. Pinaverium (ionized non-dihydropyridine derivative) was 2 and 4 fold more potent on alpha(1C-a) than on alpha(1C-b) subunit at Vh of -100 mV and -50 mV, respectively. Effects of verapamil were identical on the two isoforms at both voltages. 5. [3H]-(+)-PN 200-110 binding experiments showed that neutral dihydropyridines had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-b) than for the alpha(1C-a) subunit. SDZ 207-180 had the same affinity for the two isoforms and pinaverium had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-a) subunit than for the alpha(1C-b) subunit. 6. These results indicate marked differences among Ca2+ channel blockers in their selectivity for the alpha(1C-a) and alpha(1C-b) subunits of the Ca2+ channel. PMID:9846638

  1. L-type calcium channel blockers, morphine and pain: Newer insights

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mehra, RD; Ray, S Basu

    2010-01-01

    Earlier, we had reported that co-administration of opioids and L-type calcium channel blockers (L-CCBs) like diltiazem could prove useful in the treatment of cancer pain. Much of this report was based upon earlier published work involving animal models of pain exposed to brief periods of noxious radiant heat without any tissue injury. However, pain in clinical situations usually result from tissue injury. Thus, the aim of the current investigation was to study the analgesic effect of this combination of drugs in the rat formalin test which is associated with actual tissue injury. Wistar rats (n=60) received either L-CCB (nifedipine/nimodipine/verapamil/diltiazem i.p.) or morphine (s.c.) or both drugs. The formalin test was done 30 min after morphine or placebo injection. The naloxone reversal test was also done. Administration of L-CCBs alone, particularly diltiazem, increased pain in the formalin test. In contrast, co-administration of these L-CCBs with morphine led to decreased pain response, though statistically significant decrease was noted only with nimodipine + morphine. Naloxone reversed this analgesic effect, indicating that it was primarily an opioid-mediated effect. The results show that administration of L-CCBs alone may prove counterproductive in the therapeutic management of pain (anti-analgesic effect). However, co-administration of both drugs (morphine and nimodipine) in quick succession could lead to adequate pain relief. PMID:20661350

  2. Characterization of L-type calcium channel activity in atrioventricular nodal myocytes from rats with streptozotocin-induced Diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yuill, Kathryn H; Al Kury, Lina T; Howarth, Frank Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are common in patients with Diabetes mellitus (DM). In addition to changes in cardiac muscle inotropy, electrical abnormalities are also commonly observed in these patients. We have previously shown that spontaneous cellular electrical activity is altered in atrioventricular nodal (AVN) myocytes, isolated from the streptozotocin (STZ) rat model of type-1 DM. In this study, utilizing the same model, we have characterized the changes in L-type calcium channel activity in single AVN myocytes. Ionic currents were recorded from AVN myocytes isolated from the hearts of control rats and from those with STZ-induced diabetes. Patch-clamp recordings were used to assess the changes in cellular electrical activity in individual myocytes. Type-1 DM significantly altered the cellular characteristics of L-type calcium current. A reduction in peak ICaL density was observed, with no corresponding changes in the activation parameters of the current. L-type calcium channel current also exhibited faster time-dependent inactivation in AVN myocytes from diabetic rats. A negative shift in the voltage dependence of inactivation was also evident, and a slowing of restitution parameters. These findings demonstrate that experimentally induced type-1 DM significantly alters AVN L-type calcium channel cellular electrophysiology. These changes in ion channel activity may contribute to the abnormalities in cardiac electrical function that are associated with high mortality levels in patients with DM. PMID:26603460

  3. Voltage-gated proton channels: what' next?

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    This review is an attempt to identify and place in context some of the many questions about voltage-gated proton channels that remain unsolved. As the gene was identified only 2 years ago, the situation is very different than in fields where the gene has been known for decades. For the proton channel, most of the obvious and less obvious structure–function questions are still wide open. Remarkably, the proton channel protein strongly resembles the voltage-sensing domain of many voltage-gated ion channels, and thus offers a novel approach to study gating mechanisms. Another surprise is that the proton channel appears to function as a dimer, with two separate conduction pathways. A number of significant biological questions remain in dispute, unanswered, or in some cases, not yet asked. This latter deficit is ascribable to the intrinsic difficulty in evaluating the importance of one component in a complex system, and in addition, to the lack, until recently, of a means of performing an unambiguous lesion experiment, that is, of selectively eliminating the molecule in question. We still lack a potent, selective pharmacological inhibitor, but the identification of the gene has allowed the development of powerful new tools including proton channel antibodies, siRNA and knockout mice. PMID:18801839

  4. Pinaverium acts as L-type calcium channel blocker on smooth muscle of colon.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Farraway, L A; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1997-08-01

    The effect of pinaverium was electrophysiologically characterized and compared with the established L-type calcium channel blockers diltiazem, D600, and nitrendipine on canine colonic circular smooth muscle. Effects were studied on the electrical activity of the smooth muscle cells, in particular the spontaneously occurring slow wave. In addition, effects were examined on spontaneous contraction patterns and contractile activities generated by stimulation of cholinergic nerves or directly by stimulating muscarinic receptors. Effects were also examined on excitation of NO-releasing intrinsic nerves. Pinaverium bromide affected the slow wave by selectively inhibiting the plateau potential that is associated with generation of contractile activity. Pinaverium, similar to diltiazem and D600, produced reductions in cholinergic responses as well as spontaneous contractions. The IC50 values for inhibition of cholinergic responses for pinaverium, diltiazem, and D600 were 1.0 x 10(-6), 4.1 x 10(-7), and 5.3 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The IC50 values for inhibition of spontaneous contractile activity for pinaverium, diltiazem, and D600 were 3.8 x 10(-6), 9.7 x 10(-7), and 8.0 x 10(-7) M, respectively. Increases in contractility by carbachol were abolished by pretreatment with either pinaverium or D600. In addition, neither pinaverium nor D600 had any effects on the inhibitory NO-mediated relaxations. These data provide a rationale for the use of pinaverium in the treatment of colonic motor disorders where excessive contraction has to be suppressed. PMID:9360010

  5. Voltage-gated divalent currents in descending vasa recta pericytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong; Lin, Hai; Cao, Chunhua; Khurana, Sandeep; Pallone, Thomas L

    2010-10-01

    Multiple voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (Ca(V)) subtypes have been reported to participate in control of the juxtamedullary glomerular arterioles of the kidney. Using the patch-clamp technique, we examined whole cell Ca(V) currents of pericytes that contract descending vasa recta (DVR). The dihydropyridine Ca(V) agonist FPL64176 (FPL) stimulated inward Ca(2+) and Ba(2+) currents that activated with threshold depolarizations to -40 mV and maximized between -20 and -10 mV. These currents were blocked by nifedipine (1 μM) and Ni(2+) (100 and 1,000 μM), exhibited slow inactivation, and conducted Ba(2+) > Ca(2+) at a ratio of 2.3:1, consistent with "long-lasting" L-type Ca(V). In FPL, with 1 mM Ca(2+) as charge carrier, Boltzmann fits yielded half-maximal activation potential (V(1/2)) and slope factors of -57.9 mV and 11.0 for inactivation and -33.3 mV and 4.4 for activation. In the absence of FPL stimulation, higher concentrations of divalent charge carriers were needed to measure basal currents. In 10 mM Ba(2+), pericyte Ca(V) currents activated with threshold depolarizations to -30 mV, were blocked by nifedipine, exhibited voltage-dependent block by diltiazem (10 μM), and conducted Ba(2+) > Ca(2+) at a ratio of ∼2:1. In Ca(2+), Boltzmann fits to the data yielded V(1/2) and slope factors of -39.6 mV and 10.0 for inactivation and 2.8 mV and 7.7 for activation. In Ba(2+), V(1/2) and slope factors were -29.2 mV and 9.2 for inactivation and -5.6 mV and 6.1 for activation. Neither calciseptine (10 nM), mibefradil (1 μM), nor ω-agatoxin IVA (20 and 100 nM) blocked basal Ba(2+) currents. Calciseptine (10 nM) and mibefradil (1 μM) also failed to reverse ANG II-induced DVR vasoconstriction, although raising mibefradil concentration to 10 μM was partially effective. We conclude that DVR pericytes predominantly express voltage-gated divalent currents that are carried by L-type channels. PMID:20630935

  6. Salt Pumping by Voltage-Gated Nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Szleifer, Igal

    2015-09-17

    This Letter investigates voltage-gated nanochannels, where both the potential applied to the conductive membrane containing the channel (membrane potential) and the potential difference between the solutions at both sides of the membrane (transmembrane potential) are independently controlled. The predicted conductance characteristics of these fixed-potential channels dramatically differ from those of the widely studied fixed-charge nanochannels, in which the membrane is insulating and has a fixed surface charge density. The difference arises because the transmembrane potential induces an inhomogeneous charge distribution on the surface of fixed-potential nanochannels. This behavior, related to bipolar electrochemistry, has some interesting and unexpected consequences for ion transport. For example, continuously oscillating the transmembrane potential, while holding the membrane potential at the potential for which it has zero charge in equilibrium, creates fluxes of neutral salt (fluxes of anions and cations in the same direction and number) through the channel, which is an interesting phenomenon for desalination applications. PMID:26722719

  7. Philosophy of voltage-gated proton channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Hosler, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In this review, voltage-gated proton channels are considered from a mainly teleological perspective. Why do proton channels exist? What good are they? Why did they go to such lengths to develop several unique hallmark properties such as extreme selectivity and ΔpH-dependent gating? Why is their current so minuscule? How do they manage to be so selective? What is the basis for our belief that they conduct H+ and not OH–? Why do they exist in many species as dimers when the monomeric form seems to work quite well? It is hoped that pondering these questions will provide an introduction to these channels and a way to logically organize their peculiar properties as well as to understand how they are able to carry out some of their better-established biological functions. PMID:24352668

  8. Generation of slow wave type action potentials in the mouse small intestine involves a non-L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Richardson, D; Farraway, L; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1995-10-01

    Intrinsic electrical activities in various isolated segments of the mouse small intestine were recorded (i) to characterize action potential generation and (ii) to obtain a profile on the ion channels involved in initiating the slow wave type action potentials (slow waves). Gradients in slow wave frequency, resting membrane potential, and occurrence of spiking activity were found, with the proximal intestine exhibiting the highest frequency, the most hyperpolarized cell membrane, and the greatest occurrence of spikes. The slow waves were only partially sensitive to L-type calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine, verapamil, and pinaverium bromide abolished spikes that occurred on the plateau phase of the slow waves in all tissues. The activity that remained in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers, the upstroke potential, retained a similar amplitude to the original slow wave and was of identical frequency. The upstroke potential was not sensitive to a reduction in extracellular chloride or to the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin and mexiletine. Abolishment of the Na+ gradient by removal of 120 mM extracellular Na+ reduced the upstroke potential frequency by 13 - 18% and its amplitude by 50 - 70% in the ileum. The amplitude was similarly reduced by Ni2+ (up to 5 mM), and by flufenamic acid (100 mu M), a nonspecific cation and chloride channel blocker. Gadolinium, a nonspecific blocker of cation and stretch-activated channels, had no effect. Throughout these pharmacological manipulations, a robust oscillation remained at 5 - 10 mV. This oscillation likely reflects pacemaker activity. It was rapidly abolished by removal of extracellular calcium but not affected by L-type calcium channel blockers. In summary, the mouse small intestine has been established as a model for research into slow wave generation and electrical pacemaker activity. The upstroke part of the slow wave has two components, the pacemaker component involves a non-L-type calcium channel

  9. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  10. CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through upregulating L-type calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    A specialized culture medium termed ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) allows investigators to assess the peripheral effects of CNTF-induced activated astrocytes upon cultured neurons. CNTF-ACM has been shown to upregulate neuronal L-type calcium channel current activity, which has been previously linked to changes in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons. Cortical neurons, CNTF-ACM, and untreated control astrocyte-conditioned medium (UC-ACM) were prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cortical tissue. Neurons were cultured in either CNTF-ACM or UC-ACM for a 48-h period. Changes in the following parameters before and after treatment with the L-type calcium channel blocker isradipine were assessed: (i) intracellular calcium levels, (ii) mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), (iii) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation, (iv) intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, (v) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and (vi) susceptibility to the mitochondrial complex I toxin rotenone. CNTF-ACM neurons displayed the following significant changes relative to UC-ACM neurons: (i) increased intracellular calcium levels (p < 0.05), (ii) elevation in ΔΨm (p < 0.05), (iii) increased OCR and ATP formation (p < 0.05), (iv) increased intracellular NO levels (p < 0.05), (v) increased mitochondrial ROS production (p < 0.05), and (vi) increased susceptibility to rotenone (p < 0.05). Treatment with isradipine was able to partially rescue these negative effects of CNTF-ACM (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through elevating L-type calcium channel activity. PMID:27514537

  11. Molecular and functional characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Francisco M; Ravina, Cristina G; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Gallardo-Castro, Manuel; Cejudo-Román, Antonio; Candenas, Luz

    2009-01-01

    Background We have investigated the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in human spermatozoa and characterized their role in sperm motility. Methods Freshly ejaculated semen was collected from thirty normozoospermic human donors, with each donor supplying 2 different samples. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence techniques were used to detect the mRNAs and proteins of interest. Sperm motility was measured by a computer-assisted sperm analysis system (CASA). Cytosolic free calcium was determined by fluorimetry in cells loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator Fura-2. Results The mRNAs that encode the different Nav alpha subunits (Nav1.1-1.9) were all expressed in capacitated human spermatozoa. The mRNAs of the auxiliary subunits beta1, beta3 and beta4 were also present. Immunofluorescence studies showed that, with the exception of Nav1.1 and Nav1.3, the Nav channel proteins were present in sperm cells and show specific and different sites of localization. Veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, caused time- and concentration-dependent increases in progressive sperm motility. In sperm suspensions loaded with Fura-2, veratridine did not modify intracellular free calcium levels. Conclusion This research shows the presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm and supports a role for these channels in the regulation of mature sperm function. PMID:19607678

  12. L-type voltage-operated calcium channels contribute to astrocyte activation In vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheli, Veronica T; Santiago González, Diara A; Smith, Jessica; Spreuer, Vilma; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Paez, Pablo M

    2016-08-01

    We have found a significant upregulation of L-type voltage-operated Ca(++) channels (VOCCs) in reactive astrocytes. To test if VOCCs are centrally involved in triggering astrocyte reactivity, we used in vitro models of astrocyte activation in combination with pharmacological inhibitors, siRNAs and the Cre/lox system to reduce the activity of L-type VOCCs in primary cortical astrocytes. The endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as high extracellular K(+) , glutamate, and ATP promote astrogliosis in vitro. L-type VOCC inhibitors drastically reduce the number of reactive cells, astrocyte hypertrophy, and cell proliferation after these treatments. Astrocytes transfected with siRNAs for the Cav1.2 subunit that conducts L-type Ca(++) currents as well as Cav1.2 knockout astrocytes showed reduce Ca(++) influx by ∼80% after plasma membrane depolarization. Importantly, Cav1.2 knock-down/out prevents astrocyte activation and proliferation induced by LPS. Similar results were found using the scratch wound assay. After injuring the astrocyte monolayer, cells extend processes toward the cell-free scratch region and subsequently migrate and populate the scratch. We found a significant increase in the activity of L-type VOCCs in reactive astrocytes located in the growing line in comparison to quiescent astrocytes situated away from the scratch. Moreover, the migration of astrocytes from the scratching line as well as the number of proliferating astrocytes was reduced in Cav1.2 knock-down/out cultures. In summary, our results suggest that Cav1.2 L-type VOCCs play a fundamental role in the induction and/or proliferation of reactive astrocytes, and indicate that the inhibition of these Ca(++) channels may be an effective way to prevent astrocyte activation. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1396-1415. PMID:27247164

  13. The L-type calcium channel Cav1.3 is required for proper hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Marschallinger, Julia; Sah, Anupam; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Unger, Michael; Rotheneichner, Peter; Kharitonova, Maria; Waclawiczek, Alexander; Gerner, Philipp; Jaksch-Bogensperger, Heidi; Berger, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Singewald, Nicolas; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig

    2015-12-01

    L-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) are widely expressed within different brain regions including the hippocampus. The isoforms Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 have been shown to be involved in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, cognitive functions that require proper hippocampal neurogenesis. In vitro, functional LTCCs are expressed on neuronal progenitor cells, where they promote neuronal differentiation. Expression of LTCCs on neural stem and progenitor cells within the neurogenic regions in the adult brain in vivo has not been examined so far, and a contribution of the individual isoforms Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 to adult neurogenesis remained to be clarified. To reveal the role of these channels we first evaluated the expression patterns of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) in adult (2- and 3-month old) and middle-aged (15-month old) mice on mRNA and protein levels. We performed immunohistological analysis of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult and middle-aged Cav1.3(-/-) mice and finally addressed the importance of Cav1.3 for hippocampal function by evaluating spatial memory and depression-like behavior in adult Cav1.3(-/-) mice. Our results showed Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 expression at different stages of neuronal differentiation. While Cav1.2 was primarily restricted to mature NeuN(+) granular neurons, Cav1.3 was expressed in Nestin(+) neural stem cells and in mature NeuN(+) granular neurons. Adult and middle-aged Cav1.3(-/-) mice showed severe impairments in dentate gyrus neurogenesis, with significantly smaller dentate gyrus volume, reduced survival of newly generated cells, and reduced neuronal differentiation. Further, Cav1.3(-/-) mice showed impairment in the hippocampus dependent object location memory test, implicating Cav1.3 as an essential element for hippocampus-associated cognitive functions. Thus, modulation of LTCC activities may have a crucial impact on neurogenic responses and cognition, which should be

  14. L-Type Calcium Channels Do Not Play a Critical Role in Chest Blow Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Commotio Cordis

    PubMed Central

    Madias, Christopher; Garlitski, Ann C.; Kalin, John; Link, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In a commotio cordis swine model, ventricular fibrillation (VF) can be induced by a ball blow to the chest believed secondary to activation of mechanosensitive ion channels. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate whether stretch induced activation of the L-type calcium channel may cause intracellular calcium overload and underlie the VF in commotio cordis. Method and Results. Anesthetized juvenile swine received 6 chest wall strikes with a 17.9 m/s lacrosse ball timed to the vulnerable period for VF induction. Animals were randomized to IV verapamil (n = 6) or placebo (n = 6). There was no difference in the observed frequency of VF between verapamil (19/26: 73%) and placebo (20/36: 56%) treated animals (p = 0.16). There was also no significant difference in the combined endpoint of VF or nonsustained VF (21/26: 81% in verapamil versus 24/36: 67% in controls, p = 0.22). Conclusions. In this experimental model of commotio cordis, verapamil did not prevent VF induction. Thus, in commotio cordis it is unlikely that stretch activation of the L-type calcium channel with resultant intracellular calcium overload plays a prominent role. PMID:26925288

  15. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Torrente, Angelo G.; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−) or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1−/−) channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias. PMID:25698974

  16. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutations W1684R and V1696I alter G protein-mediated regulation of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Garza-López, Edgar; Sandoval, Alejandro; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A; Van den Maagdenberg, Arn; De Waard, Michel; Felix, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is a monogenic form of migraine with aura that is characterized by recurrent attacks of a typical migraine headache with transient hemiparesis during the aura phase. In a subset of patients, additional symptoms such as epilepsy and cerebellar ataxia are part of the clinical phenotype. FHM-1 is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Although the functional effects of an increasing number of FHM-1 mutations have been characterized, knowledge on the influence of most of these mutations on G protein regulation of channel function is lacking. Here, we explored the effects of G protein-dependent modulation on mutations W1684R and V1696I which cause FHM-1 with and without cerebellar ataxia, respectively. Both mutations were introduced into the human Ca(V)2.1α(1) subunit and their functional consequences investigated after heterologous expression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells using patch-clamp recordings. When co-expressed along with the human μ-opioid receptor, application of the agonist [d-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) inhibited currents through both wild-type (WT) and mutant Ca(V)2.1 channels, which is consistent with the known modulation of these channels by G protein-coupled receptors. Prepulse facilitation, which is a way to characterize the relief of direct voltage-dependent G protein regulation, was reduced by both FHM-1 mutations. Moreover, the kinetic analysis of the onset and decay of facilitation showed that the W1684R and V1696I mutations affect the apparent dissociation and reassociation rates of the Gβγ dimer from the channel complex, suggesting that the G protein-Ca(2+) channel affinity may be altered by the mutations. These biophysical studies may shed new light on the pathophysiology underlying FHM-1. PMID:22549042

  17. Deletion of the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 but not CaV1.2 Results in a Diminished sAHP in Mouse CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamelli, Amy E.; McKinney, Brandon C.; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2009-01-01

    Trains of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons are followed by a prolonged calcium-dependent post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that serves to limit further firing to a sustained depolarizing input. A reduction in the AHP accompanies acquisition of several types of learning and increases in the AHP are correlated with age-related cognitive impairment. The AHP develops primarily as the result of activation of outward calcium-activated potassium currents; however the precise source of calcium for activation of the AHP remains unclear. There is substantial experimental evidence suggesting that calcium influx via voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (L-VGCCs) contributes to the generation of the AHP. Two L-VGCC subtypes are predominately expressed in the hippocampus, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, however it is not known which L-VGCC subtype is involved in generation of the AHP. This ambiguity is due in large part to the fact that at present there are no subunit-specific agonists or antagonists. Therefore, using mice in which the gene encoding CaV1.2 or CaV1.3 was deleted, we sought to determine the impact of alterations in levels of these two L-VCGG subtypes on neuronal excitability. No differences in any AHP measure were seen between neurons from CaV1.2 knockout mice and controls. However, the total area of the AHP was significantly smaller in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to neurons from wildtype controls. A significant reduction in the amplitude of the AHP was also seen at the 1 sec time point in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to those from controls. Reductions in both the area and 1 sec amplitude suggest the involvement of calcium influx via CaV1.3 in the slow AHP (sAHP). Thus, the results of our study demonstrate that deletion of CaV1.3, but not CaV1.2, significantly impacts the generation of the sAHP. PMID:20014384

  18. Photocontrol of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Azobenzene Trimethylammonium Bromide in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Frolova, Sheyda R; Gaiko, Olga; Tsvelaya, Valeriya A; Pimenov, Oleg Y; Agladze, Konstantin I

    2016-01-01

    The ability of azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB) to sensitize cardiac tissue excitability to light was recently reported. The dark, thermally relaxed trans- isomer of azoTAB suppressed spontaneous activity and excitation propagation speed, whereas the cis- isomer had no detectable effect on the electrical properties of cardiomyocyte monolayers. As the membrane potential of cardiac cells is mainly controlled by activity of voltage-gated ion channels, this study examined whether the sensitization effect of azoTAB was exerted primarily via the modulation of voltage-gated ion channel activity. The effects of trans- and cis- isomers of azoTAB on voltage-dependent sodium (INav), calcium (ICav), and potassium (IKv) currents in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The experiments showed that azoTAB modulated ion currents, causing suppression of sodium (Na+) and calcium (Ca2+) currents and potentiation of net potassium (K+) currents. This finding confirms that azoTAB-effect on cardiac tissue excitability do indeed result from modulation of voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential. PMID:27015602

  19. Photocontrol of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Azobenzene Trimethylammonium Bromide in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Frolova, Sheyda R.; Gaiko, Olga; Tsvelaya, Valeriya A.; Pimenov, Oleg Y.; Agladze, Konstantin I.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB) to sensitize cardiac tissue excitability to light was recently reported. The dark, thermally relaxed trans- isomer of azoTAB suppressed spontaneous activity and excitation propagation speed, whereas the cis- isomer had no detectable effect on the electrical properties of cardiomyocyte monolayers. As the membrane potential of cardiac cells is mainly controlled by activity of voltage-gated ion channels, this study examined whether the sensitization effect of azoTAB was exerted primarily via the modulation of voltage-gated ion channel activity. The effects of trans- and cis- isomers of azoTAB on voltage-dependent sodium (INav), calcium (ICav), and potassium (IKv) currents in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The experiments showed that azoTAB modulated ion currents, causing suppression of sodium (Na+) and calcium (Ca2+) currents and potentiation of net potassium (K+) currents. This finding confirms that azoTAB-effect on cardiac tissue excitability do indeed result from modulation of voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential. PMID:27015602

  20. L-type calcium channel mediates anticonvulsant effect of cannabinoids in acute and chronic murine models of seizure.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Nima; Ahmad-Molaei, Leila; Mazar-Atabaki, Ali; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz; Shirazi-zand, Zahra; Motiei-Langroudi, Seyed Mehrdad; Eslahkar, Somayeh

    2012-02-01

    The anticonvulsant activities of cannabinoid compounds have been shown in various models of seizure and epilepsy. At least, part of antiseizure effects of cannabinoid compounds is mediated through calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. The L-type Ca(2+) channels have been shown to be important in various epilepsy models. However, there is no data regarding the role of L-type Ca(2+) channels in protective action of cannabinoids on acute and chronic models of seizure. In this study, the effects of cannabinoid compounds and L-type Ca(2+) channels blockers, either alone or in combination were investigated using acute model of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure in mice and chronic model electrical kindling of amygdala in rats. Pretreatment of mice with both cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) and endocannabinoid degradating enzyme inhibitor cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-biphenyl-3-yl ester (URB597) produced a protective effect against PTZ-induced seizure. Administration of various doses of the two L-type Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem did not alter PTZ-induced seizure threshold. However, co-administration of verapamil and either ACEA or URB597 attenuated the protective effect of cannabinoid compounds against PTZ-induced seizure. Also, pretreatment of mice with diltiazem blocked the anticonvulsant activity of both ACEA and URB597. Moreover, (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl) methanone mesylate (WIN55,212-2), the non-selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist showed anticonvulsant effect in amygdala-kindled rats. However, co-administration of WIN55,212-2 and verapamil attenuated the protective properties of WIN55,212-2. Our results showed that the anticonvulsant activity of cannabinoid compounds is mediated, at least in part, by L-type Ca(2+) channels in these two models of convulsion and epilepsy. PMID:21928146

  1. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27488468

  2. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  3. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27488468

  4. Short-term exposure to L-type calcium channel blocker, verapamil, alters the expression pattern of calcium-binding proteins in the brain of goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Palande, Nikhil V; Bhoyar, Rahul C; Biswas, Saikat P; Jadhao, Arun G

    2015-01-01

    The influx of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) is responsible for various physiological events including neurotransmitter release and synaptic modulation. The L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (L-type VDCCs) transport Ca(2+) across the membrane. Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) bind free cytosolic Ca(2+) and prevent excitotoxicity caused by sudden increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+). The present study was aimed to understand the regulation of expression of neuronal CaBPs, namely, calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) following blockade of L-type VDCCs in the CNS of Carassius auratus. Verapamil (VRP), a potent L-type VDCC blocker, selectively blocks Ca(2+) entry at the plasma membrane level. VRP present in the aquatic environment at a very low residual concentration has shown ecotoxicological effects on aquatic animals. Following acute exposure for 96h, median lethal concentration (LC50) for VRP was found to be 1.22mg/L for goldfish. At various doses of VRP, the behavioral alterations were observed in the form of respiratory difficulty and loss of body balance confirming the cardiovascular toxicity caused by VRP at higher doses. In addition to affecting the cardiovascular system, VRP also showed effects on the nervous system in the form of altered expression of PV. When compared with controls, the pattern of CR expression did not show any variations, while PV expression showed significant alterations in few neuronal populations such as the pretectal nucleus, inferior lobes, and the rostral corpus cerebellum. Our result suggests possible regulatory effect of calcium channel blockers on the expression of PV. PMID:26215640

  5. Aging Decreases L-Type Calcium Channel Currents and Pacemaker Firing Fidelity in Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Sarah Y.; Sharma, Ramaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Substantia nigra dopamine neurons are involved in behavioral processes that include cognition, reward learning, and voluntary movement. Selective deterioration of these neurons is responsible for the motor deficits associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aging is the leading risk factor for PD, suggesting that adaptations occurring in dopamine neurons during normal aging may predispose individuals to the development of PD. Previous studies suggest that the unique set of ion conductances that drive spontaneous, rhythmic firing of action potentials could predispose substantia nigra dopamine neurons to selective neurodegeneration. Here we show, using patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings in brain slices, that substantia nigra dopamine neurons from mice 25–30 months of age (old) have comparable membrane capacitance and input resistance to neurons from mice 2–7 months of age (young). However, neurons from old mice exhibit slower firing rates, narrower spike widths, and more variable interspike intervals compared with neurons from young mice. Dopamine neurons from old mice also exhibit smaller L-type calcium channel currents, providing a plausible mechanism that likely contributes to the changes in impulse activity. Age-related decrements in the physiological function of dopamine neurons could contribute to the decrease in voluntary movement and other dopamine-mediated behaviors observed in aging populations. Furthermore, as pharmacological antagonism of L-type calcium channels has been proposed as a potential treatment for the early stages of PD, our results could point to a limited temporal window of opportunity for this therapeutic intervention. PMID:25009264

  6. Regulation of L-type calcium current by intracellular magnesium in rat cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Tashiro, Michiko; Berlin, Joshua R

    2004-01-01

    The effects of changing cytosolic [Mg2+] ([Mg2+]i) on l-type Ca2+ currents were investigated in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes voltage-clamped with patch pipettes containing salt solutions with defined [Mg2+] and [Ca2+]. To control [Mg2+]i and cytosolic [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i), the pipette solution included 30 mm citrate and 10 mm ATP along with 5 mm EGTA (slow Ca2+ buffer) or 15 mm EGTA plus 5 mm BAPTA (fast Ca2+ buffer). With pipette [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]p) set at 100 nm using a slow Ca2+ buffer and pipette [Mg2+] ([Mg2+]p) set at 0.2 mm, peak l-type Ca2+ current density (ICa) was 17.0 ± 2.2 pA pF−1. Under the same conditions, but with [Mg2+]p set to 1.8 mm, ICa was 5.6 ± 1.0 pA pF−1, a 64 ± 2.8% decrease in amplitude. This decrease in ICa was accompanied by an acceleration and a –8 mV shift in the voltage dependence of current inactivation. The [Mg2+]p-dependent decrease in ICa was not significantly different when myocytes were preincubated with 10 μm forskolin and 300 μm 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and voltage-clamped with pipettes containing 50 μm okadaic acid, to maximize Ca2+ channel phosphorylation. However, when myocytes were voltage-clamped with pipettes containing protein phosphatase 2A, to promote channel dephosphorylation, ICa decreased only 25 ± 3.4% on changing [Mg2+]p from 0.2 to 1.8 mm. In the presence of 0.2 mm[Mg2+]p, changing channel phosphorylation conditions altered ICa over a 4-fold range; however, with 1.8 mm[Mg2+]p, these same manoeuvres had a much smaller effect on ICa. These data suggest that [Mg2+]i can antagonize the effects of phosphorylation on channel gating kinetics. Setting [Ca2+]p to 1, 100 or 300 nm also showed that the [Mg2+]p-induced reduction of ICa was smaller at the lowest [Ca2+]p, irrespective of channel phosphorylation conditions. This interaction between [Ca2+]i and [Mg2+]i to modulate ICa was not significantly affected by ryanodine, fast Ca2+ buffers or inhibitors of calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent kinase and

  7. The influence of lipids on voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Gonen, Tamir

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are responsible for transmitting electrochemical signals in both excitable and non-excitable cells. Structural studies of voltage-gated potassium and sodium channels by X-ray crystallography have revealed atomic details on their voltage-sensor domains and pore domains, and were put in context of disparate mechanistic views on the voltage-driven conformational changes in these proteins. Functional investigation of voltage-gated channels in membranes, however, showcased a mechanism of lipid-dependent gating for voltage-gated channels, suggesting that the lipids play an indispensible and critical role in the proper gating of many of these channels. Structure determination of membrane-embedded voltage-gated ion channels appears to be the next frontier in fully addressing the mechanism by which the voltage sensor domains control channel opening. Currently electron crystallography is the only structural biology method in which a membrane protein of interest is crystallized within a complete lipid-bilayer mimicking the native environment of a biological membrane. At a sufficiently high resolution, an electron crystallographic structure could reveal lipids, the channel and their mutual interactions at the atomic level. Electron crystallography is therefore a promising avenue toward understanding how lipids modulate channel activation through close association with the voltage sensor domains. PMID:22483432

  8. Oxidative Modulation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Nirakar; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated K+ channels are a large family of K+-selective ion channel protein complexes that open on membrane depolarization. These K+ channels are expressed in diverse tissues and their function is vital for numerous physiological processes, in particular of neurons and muscle cells. Potentially reversible oxidative regulation of voltage-gated K+ channels by reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) represents a contributing mechanism of normal cellular plasticity and may play important roles in diverse pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases. Recent Advances: Studies using various protocols of oxidative modification, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural and kinetic modeling provide a broader phenomenology and emerging mechanistic insights. Critical Issues: Physicochemical mechanisms of the functional consequences of oxidative modifications of voltage-gated K+ channels are only beginning to be revealed. In vivo documentation of oxidative modifications of specific amino-acid residues of various voltage-gated K+ channel proteins, including the target specificity issue, is largely absent. Future Directions: High-resolution chemical and proteomic analysis of ion channel proteins with respect to oxidative modification combined with ongoing studies on channel structure and function will provide a better understanding of how the function of voltage-gated K+ channels is tuned by ROS and the corresponding reducing enzymes to meet cellular needs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 933–952. PMID:24040918

  9. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Iwasaki, Hirohide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2009-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  10. Lateral Mobility of Presynaptic L-Type Calcium Channels at Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Chen, Minghui; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2011-01-01

    At most synapses, presynaptic Ca2+ channels are positioned near vesicle release sites, and increasing this distance reduces synaptic strength. We examined the lateral membrane mobility of presynaptic L-type Ca2+ channels at photoreceptor ribbon synapses of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina. Movements of individual Ca2+ channels were tracked by coupling quantum dots to an antibody against the extracellular α2δ4 Ca2+ channel subunit. α2δ4 antibodies labeled photoreceptor terminals and co-localized with antibodies to synaptic vesicle protein SV2 and Ca2+ channel CaV1.4 α1 subunits. The results show that Ca2+ channels are dynamic and move within a confined region beneath the synaptic ribbon. The size of this confinement area is regulated by actin and membrane cholesterol. Fusion of nearby synaptic vesicles caused jumps in Ca2+ channel position, propelling them towards the outer edge of the confinement domain. Channels rebounded rapidly towards the center. Thus, although CaV channels are mobile, molecular scaffolds confine them beneath the ribbon to maintain neurotransmission even at high release rates. PMID:21430141

  11. Intracellular calcium store filling by an L-type calcium current in the basolateral amygdala at subthreshold membrane potentials

    PubMed Central

    Power, John M; Sah, Pankaj

    2005-01-01

    The long-term changes that underlie learning and memory are activated by rises in intracellular Ca2+ that activate a number of signalling pathways and trigger changes in gene transcription. Ca2+ rises due to influx via L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (L-VDCCs) and release from intracellular Ca2+ stores have been consistently implicated in the biochemical cascades that underlie the final changes in memory formation. Here, we show that pyramidal neurones in the basolateral amygdala express an L-VDCC that is active at resting membrane potentials. Subthreshold depolarization of neurones either by current injection or summating synaptic potentials led to a sustained rise in cytosolic Ca2+ that was blocked by the dihydropyridine nicardipine. Activation of metabotropic receptors released Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores. At hyperpolarized potentials, metabotropic-evoked store release ran down with repeated stimulation. Depolarization of cells to −50 mV, or maintaining them at the resting membrane potential, restored release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, an effect that was blocked by nicardipine. These results show that Ca2+ influx via a low-voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ current refills inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores, and maintains Ca2+ release and wave generation by metabotropic receptor activation. PMID:15550460

  12. Population Density and Moment-based Approaches to Modeling Domain Calcium-mediated Inactivation of L-type Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Hardcastle, Kiah; Weinberg, Seth H; Smith, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    We present a population density and moment-based description of the stochastic dynamics of domain [Formula: see text]-mediated inactivation of L-type [Formula: see text] channels. Our approach accounts for the effect of heterogeneity of local [Formula: see text] signals on whole cell [Formula: see text] currents; however, in contrast with prior work, e.g., Sherman et al. (Biophys J 58(4):985-995, 1990), we do not assume that [Formula: see text] domain formation and collapse are fast compared to channel gating. We demonstrate the population density and moment-based modeling approaches using a 12-state Markov chain model of an L-type [Formula: see text] channel introduced by Greenstein and Winslow (Biophys J 83(6):2918-2945, 2002). Simulated whole cell voltage clamp responses yield an inactivation function for the whole cell [Formula: see text] current that agrees with the traditional approach when domain dynamics are fast. We analyze the voltage-dependence of [Formula: see text] inactivation that may occur via slow heterogeneous domain [[Formula: see text

  13. Benzonatate inhibition of voltage-gated sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Evans, M Steven; Maglinger, G Benton; Fletcher, Anita M; Johnson, Stephen R

    2016-02-01

    Benzonatate was FDA-approved in 1958 as an antitussive. Its mechanism of action is thought to be anesthesia of vagal sensory nerve fibers that mediate cough. Vagal sensory neurons highly express the Nav1.7 subtype of voltage-gated sodium channels, and inhibition of this channel inhibits the cough reflex. Local anesthetics inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels, but there are no reports of whether benzonatate affects these channels. Our hypothesis is that benzonatate inhibits Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channels. We used whole cell voltage clamp recording to test the effects of benzonatate on voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) currents in two murine cell lines, catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells, which express primarily Nav1.7, and N1E-115, which express primarily Nav1.3. We found that, like local anesthetics, benzonatate strongly and reversibly inhibits voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Benzonatate causes both tonic and phasic inhibition. It has greater effects on channel inactivation than on activation, and its potency is much greater at depolarized potentials, indicating inactivated-state-specific effects. Na(+) currents in CAD cells and N1E-115 cells are similarly affected, indicating that benzonatate is not Na(+) channel subtype-specific. Benzonatate is a mixture of polyethoxy esters of 4-(butylamino) benzoic acid having varying degrees of hydrophobicity. We found that Na(+) currents are inhibited most potently by a benzonatate fraction containing the 9-ethoxy component. Detectable effects of benzonatate occur at concentrations as low as 0.3 μM, which has been reported in humans. We conclude that benzonatate has local anesthetic-like effects on voltage-gated sodium channels, including Nav1.7, which is a possible mechanism for cough suppression by the drug. PMID:26386152

  14. Voltage-gated sodium channels in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Mohamed; Chatelier, Aurélien; Babich, Olga; Krupp, Johannes J

    2008-04-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels play an essential biophysical role in many excitable cells such as neurons. They transmit electrical signals through action potential (AP) generation and propagation in the peripheral (PNS) and central nervous systems (CNS). Each sodium channel is formed by one alpha-subunit and one or more beta-subunits. There is growing evidence indicating that mutations, changes in expression, or inappropriate modulation of these channels can lead to electrical instability of the cell membrane and inappropriate spontaneous activity observed during pathological states. This review describes the biochemical, biophysical and pharmacological properties of neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) and their implication in several neurological disorders. PMID:18537643

  15. Voltage-gated sodium channels contribute to action potentials and spontaneous contractility in isolated human lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Telinius, Niklas; Majgaard, Jens; Kim, Sukhan; Katballe, Niels; Pahle, Einar; Nielsen, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Donna Briggs

    2015-07-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) play a key role for initiating action potentials (AP) in excitable cells. VGSC in human lymphatic vessels have not been investigated. In the present study, we report the electrical activity and APs of small human lymphatic collecting vessels, as well as mRNA expression and function of VGSC in small and large human lymphatic vessels. The VGSC blocker TTX inhibited spontaneous contractions in six of 10 spontaneously active vessels, whereas ranolazine, which has a narrower VGSC blocking profile, had no influence on spontaneous activity. TTX did not affect noradrenaline-induced contractions. The VGSC opener veratridine induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1-30 μm) eliciting a stable tonic contraction and membrane depolarization to -18 ± 0.6 mV. Veratridine-induced depolarizations and contractions were reversed ∼80% by TTX, and were dependent on Ca(2+) influx via L-type calcium channels and the sodium-calcium exchanger in reverse mode. Molecular analysis determined NaV 1.3 to be the predominantly expressed VGSC isoform. Electrophysiology of mesenteric lymphatics determined the resting membrane potential to be -45 ± 1.7 mV. Spontaneous APs were preceded by a slow depolarization of 5.3 ± 0.6 mV after which a spike was elicited that almost completely repolarized before immediately depolarizing again to plateau. Vessels transiently hyperpolarized prior to returning to the resting membrane potential. TTX application blocked APs. We have shown that VGSC are necessary for initiating and maintaining APs and spontaneous contractions in human lymphatic vessels and our data suggest the main contribution from comes NaV 1.3. We have also shown that activation of these channels augments the contractile activity of the vessels. PMID:25969124

  16. Immunohistological demonstration of CaV3.2 T-type voltage-gated calcium channel expression in soma of dorsal root ganglion neurons and peripheral axons of rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Rose, K E; Lunardi, N; Boscolo, A; Dong, X; Erisir, A; Jevtovic-Todorovic, V; Todorovic, S M

    2013-10-10

    Previous behavioral studies have revealed that CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels support peripheral nociceptive transmission and electrophysiological studies have established the presence of T-currents in putative nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG). To date, however, the localization pattern of this key nociceptive channel in the soma and peripheral axons of these cells has not been demonstrated due to lack of isoform-selective anti-CaV3.2 antibodies. In the present study a new polyclonal CaV3.2 antibody is used to localize CaV3.2 expression in rodent DRG neurons using different staining techniques including confocal and electron microscopy (EM). Confocal microscopy of both acutely dissociated cells and short-term cultures demonstrated strong immunofluorescence of anti-CaV3.2 antibody that was largely confined to smaller diameter DRG neurons where it co-localized with established immuno-markers of unmyelinated nociceptors, such as, CGRP, IB4 and peripherin. In contrast, a smaller proportion of these CaV3.2-labeled DRG cells also co-expressed neurofilament 200 (NF200), a marker of myelinated sensory neurons. In the rat sciatic nerve preparation, confocal microscopy demonstrated anti-CaV3.2 immunofluorescence which was co-localized with both peripherin and NF200. Further, EM revealed immuno-gold labeling of CaV3.2 preferentially in association with unmyelinated sensory fibers from mouse sciatic nerve. Finally, we demonstrated the expression of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nerve endings of mouse hindpaw skin as shown by co-localization with Mrgpd-GFP-positive fibers. The CaV3.2 expression within the soma and peripheral axons of nociceptive sensory neurons further demonstrates the importance of this channel in peripheral pain transmission. PMID:23867767

  17. Supramolecular Assemblies and Localized Regulation of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Hall, Duane D.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2009-01-01

    This review addresses the localized regulation of voltage-gated ion channels by phosphorylation. Comprehensive data on channel regulation by associated protein kinases, phosphatases, and related regulatory proteins are mainly available for voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which form the main focus of this review. Other voltage-gated ion channels and especially Kv7.1-3 (KCNQ1-3), the large- and small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels BK and SK2, and the inward-rectifying K+ channels Kir3 have also been studied to quite some extent and will be included. Regulation of the L-type Ca2+ channel Cav1.2 by PKA has been studied most thoroughly as it underlies the cardiac fight-or-flight response. A prototypical Cav1.2 signaling complex containing the β2 adrenergic receptor, the heterotrimeric G protein Gs, adenylyl cyclase, and PKA has been identified that supports highly localized via cAMP. The type 2 ryanodine receptor as well as AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors are in close proximity to Cav1.2 in cardiomyocytes and neurons, respectively, yet independently anchor PKA, CaMKII, and the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1, PP2A, and PP2B, as is discussed in detail. Descriptions of the structural and functional aspects of the interactions of PKA, PKC, CaMKII, Src, and various phosphatases with Cav1.2 will include comparisons with analogous interactions with other channels such as the ryanodine receptor or ionotropic glutamate receptors. Regulation of Na+ and K+ channel phosphorylation complexes will be discussed in separate papers. This review is thus intended for readers interested in ion channel regulation or in localization of kinases, phosphatases, and their upstream regulators. PMID:19342611

  18. Effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate on L-type calcium current and Ca(2+) transient in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel Eroume-A; Bae, James S H; Capel, Rebecca; Richards, Mark; Ke, Yunbo; Pharithi, Rebabonye B; Maher, Vincent; Kruzliak, Peter; Lei, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Modulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis in cardiac myocytes plays a major role in beat-to-beat regulation of heart function. Previous studies suggest that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a biologically active sphingomyelin metabolite, regulates Ca(2+) handling in cardiac myocytes, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that S1P-induced functional alteration of intracellular Ca(2+) handling includes the L-type calcium channel current (ICa,L) via a signalling pathway involving P21-activated kinase 1 (Pak1). Our results show that, in rat ventricular myocytes, S1P (100 nM) does not affect the basal activity of ICa,L but is able to partially reverse the effect of the β-adrenergic agonist Isoproterenol (ISO, 100 nM) on ICa,L. S1P (25 nM) also significantly prevents ISO (5 nM)-induced Ca(2+) waves and diastolic Ca(2+) release in these cells. Our further molecular characterisation demonstrates that Pak1 activity is increased in myocytes treated with S1P (25 nM) compared with those myocytes without treatment of S1P. By immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that Pak1 and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) are associated in ventricular tissue indicating their functional interaction. Thus the results indicate that S1P attenuates β-adrenergic stress-induced alteration of intracellular Ca(2+) release and L-type Ca(2+) channel current at least in part via Pak1-PP2A-mediated signalling. PMID:27372350

  19. Bradykinin induced a positive chronotropic effect via stimulation of T- and L-type calcium currents in heart cells.

    PubMed

    El-Bizri, Nesrine; Bkaily, Ghassan; Wang, Shimin; Jacques, Danielle; Regoli, Domenico; D'Orléans-Juste, Pedro; Sukarieh, Rami

    2003-03-01

    Using Fluo-3 calcium dye confocal microscopy and spontaneously contracting embryonic chick heart cells, bradykinin (10(-10) M) was found to induce positive chronotropic effects by increasing the frequency of the transient increase of cytosolic and nuclear free Ca2+. Pretreatment of the cells with either B1 or B2 receptor antagonists (R126 and R817, respectively) completely prevented bradykinin (BK) induced positive chronotropic effects on spontaneously contracting single heart cells. Using the whole-cell voltage clamp technique and ionic substitution to separate the different ionic current species, our results showed that BK (10(-6) M) had no effect on fast Na+ inward current and delayed outward potassium current. However, both L- and T-type Ca2+ currents were found to be increased by BK in a dose-dependent manner (10(-10)-10(-7) M). The effects of BK on T- and L-type Ca2+ currents were partially blocked by the B1 receptor antagonist [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK (R592) (10(-7) M) and completely reversed by the B2 receptor antagonist D-Arg[Hyp3,D-Phe7,Leu8]BK (R-588) (10(-7) M) or pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX). These results demonstrate that BK induced a positive chronotropic effect via stimulation of T- and L-type Ca2+ currents in heart cells mainly via stimulation of B2 receptor coupled to PTX-sensitive G-proteins. The increase of both types of Ca2+ current by BK in heart cells may explain the positive inotropic and chronotropic effects of this hormone. PMID:12733823

  20. Local postsynaptic voltage-gated sodium channel activation in dendritic spines of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    PubMed

    Bywalez, Wolfgang G; Patirniche, Dinu; Rupprecht, Vanessa; Stemmler, Martin; Herz, Andreas V M; Pálfi, Dénes; Rózsa, Balázs; Egger, Veronica

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal dendritic spines have been speculated to function as independent computational units, yet evidence for active electrical computation in spines is scarce. Here we show that strictly local voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) activation can occur during excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the spines of olfactory bulb granule cells, which we mimic and detect via combined two-photon uncaging of glutamate and calcium imaging in conjunction with whole-cell recordings. We find that local Nav activation boosts calcium entry into spines through high-voltage-activated calcium channels and accelerates postsynaptic somatic depolarization, without affecting NMDA receptor-mediated signaling. Hence, Nav-mediated boosting promotes rapid output from the reciprocal granule cell spine onto the lateral mitral cell dendrite and thus can speed up recurrent inhibition. This striking example of electrical compartmentalization both adds to the understanding of olfactory network processing and broadens the general view of spine function. PMID:25619656

  1. Amino acid substitutions in the FXYD motif enhance phospholemman-induced modulation of cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Xianming; Gao, Guofeng; Huang, Congxin; Elmslie, Keith S; Peterson, Blaise Z

    2010-11-01

    We have found that phospholemman (PLM) associates with and modulates the gating of cardiac L-type calcium channels (Wang et al., Biophys J 98: 1149-1159, 2010). The short 17 amino acid extracellular NH(2)-terminal domain of PLM contains a highly conserved PFTYD sequence that defines it as a member of the FXYD family of ion transport regulators. Although we have learned a great deal about PLM-dependent changes in calcium channel gating, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed changes. Therefore, we investigated the role of the PFTYD segment in the modulation of cardiac calcium channels by individually replacing Pro-8, Phe-9, Thr-10, Tyr-11, and Asp-12 with alanine (P8A, F9A, T10A, Y11A, D12A). In addition, Asp-12 was changed to lysine (D12K) and cysteine (D12C). As expected, wild-type PLM significantly slows channel activation and deactivation and enhances voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). We were surprised to find that amino acid substitutions at Thr-10 and Asp-12 significantly enhanced the ability of PLM to modulate Ca(V)1.2 gating. T10A exhibited a twofold enhancement of PLM-induced slowing of activation, whereas D12K and D12C dramatically enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. The PLM-induced slowing of channel closing was abrogated by D12A and D12C, whereas D12K and T10A failed to impact this effect. These studies demonstrate that the PFXYD motif is not necessary for the association of PLM with Ca(V)1.2. Instead, since altering the chemical and/or physical properties of the PFXYD segment alters the relative magnitudes of opposing PLM-induced effects on Ca(V)1.2 channel gating, PLM appears to play an important role in fine tuning the gating kinetics of cardiac calcium channels and likely plays an important role in shaping the cardiac action potential and regulating Ca(2+) dynamics in the heart. PMID:20720179

  2. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  3. Characterisation of marrubenol, a diterpene extracted from Marrubium vulgare, as an L-type calcium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    El-Bardai, Sanae; Wibo, Maurice; Hamaide, Marie-Christine; Lyoussi, Badiaa; Quetin-Leclercq, Joelle; Morel, Nicole

    2003-12-01

    1. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of marrubenol, a diterpenoid extracted from Marrubium vulgare. In rat aorta, marrubenol was a more potent inhibitor of the contraction evoked by 100 mM KCl (IC50: 11.8+/-0.3 microM, maximum relaxation: 93+/-0.6%) than of the contraction evoked by noradrenaline (maximum relaxation: 30+/-1.5%). 2. In fura-2-loaded aorta, marrubenol simultaneously inhibited the Ca2+ signal and the contraction evoked by 100 mM KCl, and decreased the quenching rate of fura-2 fluorescence by Mn2+. 3. Patch-clamp data obtained in aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) indicated that marrubenol inhibited Ba2+ inward current in a voltage-dependent manner (KD: 8+/-2 and 40+/-6 microM at holding potentials of -50 and -100 mV, respectively). 4. These results showed that marrubenol inhibits smooth muscle contraction by blocking L-type calcium channels. PMID:14597602

  4. CLOCK-BMAL1 regulate the cardiac L-type calcium channel subunit CACNA1C through PI3K-Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanhong; Zhu, Didi; Yuan, Jiamin; Han, Zhonglin; Wang, Yao; Qian, Zhiyong; Hou, Xiaofeng; Wu, Tingting; Zou, Jiangang

    2016-09-01

    The heterodimerized transcription factors CLOCK-BMAL1 regulate the cardiomyocyte circadian rhythms. The L-type calcium currents play important role in the cardiac electrogenesis and arrhythmogenesis. Whether and how the CLOCK-BMAL1 regulate the cardiac L-type calcium channels are yet to be determined. The functions of the L-type calcium channels were evaluated with patch clamping techniques. Recombinant adenoviruses of CLOCK and BMAL1 were used in the expression experiments. We reported that the expressions and functions of CACNA1C (the α-subunit of the L-type calcium channels) showed circadian rhythms, with the peak at zeitgeber time 3 (ZT3). The endocardial action potential durations 90 (APD90) were correspondingly longer at ZT3. The protein levels of the phosphorylated Akt at threonine 308 (pAkt T308) also showed circadian rhythms. Overexpressions of CLOCK-BMAL1 significantly reduced the levels of CACNA1C while increasing the levels of pAkt T308 and pik3r1. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of CLOCK-BMAL1 on CACNA1C could be abolished by the Akt inhibitor MK2206 or the PDK1 inhibitor GSK2334470. Collectively, our findings suggested that the expressions of the cardiac CACNA1C were under the CLOCK-BMAL1 regulation, probably through the PI3K-Akt signal pathway. PMID:27376484

  5. Involvement of PKC and PKA in the enhancement of L-type calcium current by GABAB receptor activation in neonatal hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Jennifer G.; Mynlieff, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In the early neonatal period activation of GABAB receptors attenuates calcium current through N-type calcium channels while enhancing current through L-type calcium channels in rat hippocampal neurons. The attenuation of N-type calcium current has been previously demonstrated to occur through direct interactions of the βγ subunits of Gi/o G-proteins, but the signal transduction pathway for the enhancement of L-type calcium channels in mammalian neurons remains unknown. In the present study, calcium currents were elicited in acute cultures from postnatal day 6–8 rat hippocampi in the presence of various modulators of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways. Overnight treatment with an inhibitor of Gi/o (pertussis toxin, 200 ng/ml) abolished the attenuation of calcium current by the GABAB agonist, baclofen (10 μM) with no effect on the enhancement of calcium current. These data indicate that while the attenuation of N-type calcium current is mediated by the Gi/o subtype of G-protein, the enhancement of L-type calcium current requires activation of a different G-protein. The enhancement of the sustained component of calcium current by baclofen was blocked by PKC inhibitors, GF-109203X (500 nM), chelerythrine chloride (5 μM), and PKC fragment 19–36 (2 μM) and mimicked by the PKC activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (1 μM). The enhancement of the sustained component of calcium current was blocked by PKA inhibitors H-89 (1 μM) and PKA fragment 6–22 (500 nM) but not Rp-cAMPS (30 μM) and it was not mimicked by the PKA activator, 8-Br-cAMP (500 μM – 1 mM). The data suggest that activation of PKC alone is sufficient to enhance L-type calcium current but that PKA may also be involved in the GABAB receptor mediated effect. PMID:21277353

  6. Clustered voltage-gated Na+ channels in Aplysia axons.

    PubMed

    Johnston, W L; Dyer, J R; Castellucci, V F; Dunn, R J

    1996-03-01

    Clustering of voltage-gated Na+ channels is critical for the fast saltatory conduction of action potentials in vertebrate myelinated axons. However, the mechanisms responsible for the generation and maintenance of Na+ channel clustering are not well understood. In this study we have raised an antibody against the cloned SCAP-1 voltage-gated Na+ channel of the marine invertebrate Aplysia californica and used it to examine Na+ channel localization in Aplysia ganglia and in cultured Aplysia sensory neurons. Our results show that there is a large cytoplasmic pool of Na+ channels in the soma of Aplysia neurons. Furthermore, we show that Na+ channels in Aplysia axons are not homogeneously distributed but, rather, are present in distinct clusters. Theoretical considerations indicate that Na+ channel clustering may enhance action potential conduction. We propose that clustered Na+ channels may be a fundamental property of many axons, and perhaps of many membranes that conduct Na(+)-dependent action potentials. PMID:8774441

  7. Combined chronic blockade of hyper-active L-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors ameliorates HIV-1 associated hyper-excitability of mPFC pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Khodr, Christina E; Chen, Lihua; Dave, Sonya; Al-Harthi, Lena; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2016-10-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection induces neurological and neuropsychological deficits, which are associated with dysregulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other vulnerable brain regions. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection in the mPFC and the therapeutic potential of targeting over-active voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (L-channel) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR), as modeled in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the membrane properties and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) potentials (Ca(2+) influx) in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Neurons from HIV-1 Tg rats displayed reduced rheobase, spike amplitude and inwardly-rectifying K(+) influx, increased numbers of action potentials, and a trend of aberrant firing compared to those from non-Tg control rats. Neuronal hyper-excitation was associated with abnormally-enhanced Ca(2+) influx (independent of NMDAR), which was eliminated by acute L-channel blockade. Combined chronic blockade of over-active L-channels and NMDARs with open-channel blockers abolished HIV effects on spiking, aberrant firing and Ca(2+) potential half-amplitude duration, though not the reduced inward rectification. In contrast, individual chronic blockade of over-active L-channels or NMDARs did not alleviate HIV-induced mPFC hyper-excitability. These studies demonstrate that HIV alters mPFC neuronal activity by dysregulating membrane excitability and Ca(2+) influx through the L-channels. This renders these neurons more susceptible and vulnerable to excitatory stimuli, and could contribute to HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. Combined targeting of over-active L-channels/NMDARs alleviates HIV-induced dysfunction of mPFC pyramidal neurons, emphasizing a potential novel therapeutic strategy that may effectively decrease HIV-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation in the mPFC. PMID:27326669

  8. Unusual Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents as Targets for Pain.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, C; Cummins, T R

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a serious health problem that impacts the lives of many individuals. Hyperexcitability of peripheral sensory neurons contributes to both acute and chronic pain syndromes. Because voltage-gated sodium currents are crucial to the transmission of electrical signals in peripheral sensory neurons, the channels that underlie these currents are attractive targets for pain therapeutics. Sodium currents and channels in peripheral sensory neurons are complex. Multiple-channel isoforms contribute to the macroscopic currents in nociceptive sensory neurons. These different isoforms exhibit substantial variations in their kinetics and pharmacology. Furthermore, sodium current complexity is enhanced by an array of interacting proteins that can substantially modify the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Resurgent sodium currents, atypical currents that can enhance recovery from inactivation and neuronal firing, are increasingly being recognized as playing potentially important roles in sensory neuron hyperexcitability and pain sensations. Here we discuss unusual sodium channels and currents that have been identified in nociceptive sensory neurons, describe what is known about the molecular determinants of the complex sodium currents in these neurons. Finally, we provide an overview of therapeutic strategies to target voltage-gated sodium currents in nociceptive neurons. PMID:27586296

  9. Voltage-sensing domain of voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 shares mechanism of block with pore domains

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Pathak, Medha M.; Kim, Iris H.; Ta, Dennis; Tombola, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels are made of a pore domain (PD) controlled by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The PD contains the ion permeation pathway and the activation gate located on the intracellular side of the membrane. A large number of small molecules are known to inhibit the PD by acting as open channel blockers. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is made of two VSDs and lacks the PD. The location of the activation gate in the VSD is unknown and open channel blockers for VSDs have not yet been identified. Here we describe a class of small molecules which act as open channel blockers on the Hv1 VSD and find that a highly conserved phenylalanine in the charge transfer center of the VSD plays a key role in blocker binding. We then use one of the blockers to show that Hv1 contains two intracellular and allosterically-coupled gates. PMID:23352164

  10. Voltage-gated proton (H(v)1) channels, a singular voltage sensing domain.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Contreras, Gustavo F; Morera, Francisco J; Neely, Alan; Latorre, Ramon; Gonzalez, Carlos

    2015-11-14

    The main role of voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is to extrude protons from the intracellular milieu when, mediated by different cellular processes, the H(+) concentration increases. Hv1 are exquisitely selective for protons and their structure is homologous to the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of other voltage-gated ion channels like sodium, potassium, and calcium channels. In clear contrast to the classical voltage-dependent channels, Hv1 lacks a pore domain and thus permeation necessarily occurs through the voltage sensing domain. Hv1 channels are activated by depolarizing voltages, and increases in internal proton concentration. It has been proposed that local conformational changes of the transmembrane segment S4, driven by depolarization, trigger the molecular rearrangements that open Hv1. However, it is still unclear how the electromechanical coupling is achieved between the VSD and the potential pore, allowing the proton flux from the intracellular to the extracellular side. Here we provide a revised view of voltage activation in Hv1 channels, offering a comparative scenario with other voltage sensing channels domains. PMID:26296320

  11. Fendiline inhibits L-type calcium channels in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes: a whole-cell patch-clamp study.

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, O.; Schreibmayer, W.; Tritthart, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. Fendiline, a diphenylalkylamine type of antianginal drug, was examined for its effects on L-type calcium channels in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. 2. Fendiline (0.3-100 microM) applied extracellularly inhibited the calcium channel current (ICa) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 of fendiline was 17.0 +/- 2.43 microM and the Hill slope was 1.39 +/- 0.23. 3. Inhibition of ICa by fendiline appeared with an onset of less than 3 s. 4. Fendiline inhibited ICa at all the membrane potentials tested and shifted the current-voltage curve upwards. The overall calcium channel conductance (gCa) of the cell was reduced and conductance-voltage curve was shifted to the left in the presence of fendiline. 5. Isoprenaline (0.5-1 microM), a beta-adrenoceptor agonist, partially reversed the inhibitory effect of fendiline on ICa. 6. It is suggested that fendiline applied extracellularly blocks L-type calcium channels and reduces calcium channel conductance of the cell. The calcium channels thus inhibited are, nevertheless, still available for beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. PMID:8485628

  12. An Improved Targeted cAMP Sensor to Study the Regulation of Adenylyl Cyclase 8 by Ca2+ Entry through Voltage-Gated Channels

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Katy L.; Cooper, Dermot M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe an improved sensor with reduced pH sensitivity tethered to adenylyl cyclase (AC) 8. The sensor was used to study cAMP dynamics in the AC8 microdomain of MIN6 cells, a pancreatic β-cell line. In these cells, AC8 was activated by Ca2+ entry through L-type voltage-gated channels following depolarisation. This activation could be reconstituted in HEK293 cells co-expressing AC8 and either the α1C or α1D subunit of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The development of this improved sensor opens the door to the study of cAMP microdomains in excitable cells that have previously been challenging due to the sensitivity of fluorescent proteins to pH changes. PMID:24086669

  13. Inorganic polyphosphate regulates neuronal excitability through modulation of voltage-gated channels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a highly charged polyanion capable of interacting with a number of molecular targets. This signaling molecule is released into the extracellular matrix by central astrocytes and by peripheral platelets during inflammation. While the release of polyP is associated with both induction of blood coagulation and astrocyte extracellular signaling, the role of secreted polyP in regulation of neuronal activity remains undefined. Here we test the hypothesis that polyP is an important participant in neuronal signaling. Specifically, we investigate the ability of neurons to release polyP and to induce neuronal firing, and clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms of this process by studying the action of polyP on voltage gated channels. Results Using patch clamp techniques, and primary hippocampal and dorsal root ganglion cell cultures, we demonstrate that polyP directly influences neuronal activity, inducing action potential generation in both PNS and CNS neurons. Mechanistically, this is accomplished by shifting the voltage sensitivity of NaV channel activation toward the neuronal resting membrane potential, the block KV channels, and the activation of CaV channels. Next, using calcium imaging we found that polyP stimulates an increase in neuronal network activity and induces calcium influx in glial cells. Using in situ DAPI localization and live imaging, we demonstrate that polyP is naturally present in synaptic regions and is released from the neurons upon depolarization. Finally, using a biochemical assay we demonstrate that polyP is present in synaptosomes and can be released upon their membrane depolarization by the addition of potassium chloride. Conclusions We conclude that polyP release leads to increased excitability of the neuronal membrane through the modulation of voltage gated ion channels. Together, our data establishes that polyP could function as excitatory neuromodulator in both the PNS and CNS. PMID:24886461

  14. Mechanism of voltage-gated channel formation in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Guidelli, Rolando; Becucci, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Although several molecular models for voltage-gated ion channels in lipid membranes have been proposed, a detailed mechanism accounting for the salient features of experimental data is lacking. A general treatment accounting for peptide dipole orientation in the electric field and their nucleation and growth kinetics with ion channel formation is provided. This is the first treatment that explains all the main features of the experimental current-voltage curves of peptides forming voltage-gated channels available in the literature. It predicts a regime of weakly voltage-dependent conductance, followed by one of strong voltage-dependent conductance at higher voltages. It also predicts values of the parameters expressing the exponential dependence of conductance upon voltage and peptide bulk concentration for both regimes, in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Most importantly, the only two adjustable parameters involved in the kinetics of nucleation and growth of ion channels can be varied over broad ranges without affecting the above predictions to a significant extent. Thus, the fitting of experimental current-voltage curves stems naturally from the treatment and depends only slightly upon the choice of the kinetic parameters. PMID:26768224

  15. Voltage-Gated Proton Channel in Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Silva, Luisa; Queiroz, Fernanda Oliveira; da Silva, Annielle Mendes Brito; Hirata, Aparecida Emiko; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel

    2016-07-20

    Solid tumors tend to have a more glycolytic metabolism leading to an accumulation of acidic metabolites in their cytosol, and consequently, their intracellular pH (pHi) turns critically lower if the cells do not handle the acid excess. Recently, it was proposed that the voltage gated proton channels (HV1) can regulate the pHi in several cancers. Here we report the functional expression of voltage gated proton channels in a human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell line, the most common and lethal brain tumor. T98G cells presented an outward, slow activating voltage-dependent proton current, which was also ΔpH-dependent and inhibited by ZnCl2, characterizing it as being conducted by HV1 channels. Furthermore, blocking HV1 channels with ZnCl2 significantly reduced the pHi, cell survival, and migration, indicating an important role for HV1 for tumor proliferation and progression in GBM. Overall, our results suggest that HV1 channels can be a new therapeutic target for GBM. PMID:27225904

  16. Biophysical properties of the voltage gated proton channel HV1

    PubMed Central

    Musset, Boris; DeCoursey, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the voltage gated proton channel (HV1) are the key elements of its physiological function. The voltage gated proton channel is a unique molecule that in contrast to all other ion channels is exclusively selective for protons. Alone among proton channels, it has voltage and time dependent gating like other “classical” ion channels. HV1 is furthermore a sensor for the pH in the cell and the surrounding media. Its voltage dependence is strictly coupled to the pH gradient across the membrane. This regulation restricts opening of the channel to specific voltages at any given pH gradient, therefore allowing HV1 to perform its physiological task in the tissue it is expressed in. For HV1 there is no known blocker. The most potent channel inhibitor is zinc (Zn2+) which prevents channel opening. An additional characteristic of HV1 is its strong temperature dependence of both gating and conductance. In contrast to single-file water filled pores like the gramicidin channel, HV1 exhibits pronounced deuterium effects and temperature effects on conduction, consistent with a different conduction mechanism than other ion channels. These properties may be explained by the recent identification of an aspartate in the pore of HV1 that is essential to its proton selectivity. PMID:23050239

  17. Novel Activation of Voltage-gated K+ Channels by Sevoflurane*

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Annika F.; Liang, Qiansheng; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are modulated by halogenated inhaled general anesthetics, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Alkanols and halogenated inhaled anesthetics such as halothane and isoflurane inhibit the archetypical voltage-gated Kv3 channel homolog K-Shaw2 by stabilizing the resting/closed states. By contrast, sevoflurane, a more heavily fluorinated ether commonly used in general anesthesia, specifically activates K-Shaw2 currents at relevant concentrations (0.05–1 mm) in a rapid and reversible manner. The concentration dependence of this modulation is consistent with the presence of high and low affinity interactions (KD = 0.06 and 4 mm, respectively). Sevoflurane (<1 mm) induces a negative shift in the conductance-voltage relation and increases the maximum conductance. Furthermore, suggesting possible roles in general anesthesia, mammalian Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 channels display similar changes. Quantitative description of the observations by an economical allosteric model indicates that sevoflurane binding favors activation gating and eliminates an unstable inactivated state outside the activation pathway. This study casts light on the mechanism of the novel sevoflurane-dependent activation of Kv channels, which helps explain how closely related inhaled anesthetics achieve specific actions and suggests strategies to develop novel Kv channel activators. PMID:23038249

  18. Contribution of phosphodiesterase isozymes to the regulation of the L-type calcium current in human cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Katsuya; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Hosoda, Saichi

    1997-01-01

    To determine the contribution of the various phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes to the regulation of the L-type calcium current (ICa(L)) in the human myocardium, we investigated the effect of selective and non-selective PDE inhibitors on ICa(L) in single human atrial cells by use of the whole-cell patch-clamp method. We repeated some experiments in rabbit atrial myocytes, to make a species comparison. In human atrial cells, 100 μM pimobendan increased ICa(L) (evoked by depolarization to +10 mV from a holding potential of −40 mV) by 250.4±45.0% (n=15), with the concentration for half-maximal stimulation (EC50) being 1.13 μM. ICa(L) was increased by 100 μM UD-CG 212 by 174.5±30.2% (n=10) with an EC50 value of 1.78 μM in human atrial cells. These two agents inhibit PDE III selectively. A selective PDE IV inhibitor, rolipram (1–100 μM), did not itself affect ICa(L) in human atrial cells. However, 100 μM rolipram significantly enhanced the effect of 100 μM UD-CG 212 on ICa(L) (increase with UD-CG 212 alone, 167.9±33.9, n=5; increase with the two agents together, 270.0±52.2%; n=5, P<0.05). Rolipram also enhanced isoprenaline (5 nM)-stimulated ICa(L) by 52.9±9.3% (n=5) in human atrial cells. In rabbit atrial cells, ICa(L) at +10 mV was increased by 22.1±9.0% by UD-CG 212 (n=10) and by 67.4±12.0% (n=10) by pimobendan (each at 100 μM). These values were significantly lower than those obtained in human atrial cells (P<0.0001). Rolipram (1–100 μM) did not itself affect ICa(L) in rabbit atrial cells. However, ICa(L) was increased by 215.7±65.2% (n=10) by the combination of 100 μM UD-CG 212 and 100 μM rolipram. This value was almost 10 times larger than that obtained for the effect of 100 μM UD-CG 212 alone. These results imply a species difference: in the human atrium, the PDE III isoform seems dominant, whereas PDE IV may be more important in the rabbit atrium for regulating ICa(L). However, PDE IV might contribute

  19. Inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels mediates uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingying; Zhong, Xiangqin; Ding, Yaqin; Bai, Tao; Wang, Hui; Wu, Hongbin; Liu, Yunfeng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is important to maintain glucose homeostasis and is regulated by electrical activities. Uncarboxylated osteocalcin, a bone-derived protein, has been reported to regulate glucose metabolism by increasing insulin secretion, stimulating β cell proliferation and improving insulin sensitivity. But the underlying mechanisms of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the relationship of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion and voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels, voltage-gated calcium channels in rat β cells. Insulin secretion was measured by radioimmunoassay. Channel currents and membrane action potentials were recorded using the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Calcium imaging system was used to analyze intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The data show that under 16.7mmol/l glucose conditions uncarboxylated osteocalcin alone increased insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i, but with no such effects on insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i in the presence of a KV channel blocker, tetraethylammonium chloride. In the patch-clamp experiments, uncarboxylated osteocalcin lengthened action potential duration and significantly inhibited KV currents, but had no influence on the characteristics of voltage-gated calcium channels. These results indicate that KV channels are involved in uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells. By inhibiting KV channels, uncarboxylated osteocalcin prolongs action potential duration, increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and finally promotes insulin secretion. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion. PMID:26927753

  20. Neurotoxins and their binding areas on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Marijke; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Therefore, genetic defects in sodium channel genes can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called "channelopathies." The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. These concepts still form the basis for understanding the function of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and consequently generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start to inactivate and currents decrease. In the inactivated state, channels stay refractory for new stimuli and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to a new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) also contributed largely to our today's understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and of VGSCs specifically. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable lead compounds in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt(®), Elan). The original peptide, ω-MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in pain fibers. This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the structure and function of

  1. Neurotoxins and Their Binding Areas on Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Marijke; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Therefore, genetic defects in sodium channel genes can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called “channelopathies.” The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. These concepts still form the basis for understanding the function of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and consequently generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start to inactivate and currents decrease. In the inactivated state, channels stay refractory for new stimuli and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to a new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) also contributed largely to our today’s understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and of VGSCs specifically. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable lead compounds in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt®, Elan). The original peptide, ω-MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in pain fibers. This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the structure and

  2. Golli myelin basic proteins regulate oligodendroglial progenitor cell migration through voltage-gated Ca++ influx

    PubMed Central

    Paez, Pablo M.; Fulton, Daniel J.; Spreuer, Vilma; Handley, Vance; Campagnoni, Celia W.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Colwell, Christopher; Campagnoni, Anthony T.

    2009-01-01

    Migration of OL progenitor cells (OPCs) from proliferative zones to their final location in the brain is an essential step in nervous system development. Golli proteins, products of the myelin basic protein gene, can modulate voltage-gated Ca++ uptake in OPCs during process extension and retraction. Given the importance of process extension/retraction on movement, the consequences of golli expression on OPC migration were examined in vivo and in vitro using time-lapse imaging of isolated OPCs and acute brain slice preparations from golli KO and golli overexpressing mice (JOE). The results indicated that golli stimulated migration, and this enhanced motility was associated with increases in the activity of voltage operated Ca++ channels (VOCCs). Activation of VOCCs by high K+ resulted in a significant increase in the migration speed of JOE OPCs vs control cells and golli-mediated modulation of OPC migration disappeared in the presence of VOCC antagonists. During migration, OPCs generated Ca++ oscillations that were dependent on voltage-calcium influx and both the amplitude and frequency of these Ca++ transients correlated positively with the rate of cell movement under a variety of pharmacological treatments. The Ca++ transient amplitude and the rate of cell movement were significantly lower in KO cells and significantly higher in JOE cells suggesting that the presence of golli promotes OPC migration by increasing the size of voltage-mediated Ca++ oscillations. These data define a new molecule that regulates Ca++ homeostasis in OPCs, and are the first to demonstrate that voltage-gated Ca++ channels can regulate an OPC function, such as migration. PMID:19458236

  3. Calciseptine, a peptide isolated from black mamba venom, is a specific blocker of the L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed Central

    de Weille, J R; Schweitz, H; Maes, P; Tartar, A; Lazdunski, M

    1991-01-01

    The venom of the black mamba contains a 60-amino acid peptide called calciseptine. The peptide has been fully sequenced. It is a smooth muscle relaxant and an inhibitor of cardiac contractions. Its physiological action resembles that of drugs, such as the 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are important in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Calciseptine, like the 1,4-dihydropyridines, selectively blocks L-type Ca2+ channels and is totally inactive on other voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels such as N-type and T-type channels. To our knowledge, it is the only natural polypeptide that has been shown to be a specific inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels. Images PMID:1848702

  4. Shellfish Toxins Targeting Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management. PMID:24287955

  5. Biophysical Adaptations of Prokaryotic Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Vien, T N; DeCaen, P G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptive features found in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These two families are distinct, having diverged early in evolutionary history but maintain a surprising degree of convergence in function. While prokaryotic NaVs are required for growth and motility, eukaryotic NaVs selectively conduct fast electrical currents for short- and long-range signaling across cell membranes in mammalian organs. Current interest in prokaryotic NaVs is stoked by their resolved high-resolution structures and functional features which are reminiscent of eukaryotic NaVs. In this chapter, comparisons between eukaryotic and prokaryotic NaVs are made to highlight the shared and unique aspects of ion selectivity, voltage sensitivity, and pharmacology. Examples of prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV convergent evolution will be discussed within the context of their structural features. PMID:27586280

  6. Molecular identity of dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Andrea; Nusser, Zoltan

    2010-05-14

    Active invasion of the dendritic tree by action potentials (APs) generated in the axon is essential for associative synaptic plasticity and neuronal ensemble formation. In cortical pyramidal cells (PCs), this AP back-propagation is supported by dendritic voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channels, whose molecular identity is unknown. Using a highly sensitive electron microscopic immunogold technique, we revealed the presence of the Nav1.6 subunit in hippocampal CA1 PC proximal and distal dendrites. Here, the subunit density is lower by a factor of 35 to 80 than that found in axon initial segments. A gradual decrease in Nav1.6 density along the proximodistal axis of the dendritic tree was also detected without any labeling in dendritic spines. Our results reveal the characteristic subcellular distribution of the Nav1.6 subunit, identifying this molecule as a key substrate enabling dendritic excitability. PMID:20466935

  7. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter. PMID:26646477

  8. Neurological perspectives on voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Linley, John E.; Baker, Mark D.; Minett, Michael S.; Cregg, Roman; Werdehausen, Robert; Rugiero, François

    2012-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels has long been linked to disorders of neuronal excitability such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Recent genetic studies have now expanded the role of sodium channels in health and disease, to include autism, migraine, multiple sclerosis, cancer as well as muscle and immune system disorders. Transgenic mouse models have proved useful in understanding the physiological role of individual sodium channels, and there has been significant progress in the development of subtype selective inhibitors of sodium channels. This review will outline the functions and roles of specific sodium channels in electrical signalling and disease, focusing on neurological aspects. We also discuss recent advances in the development of selective sodium channel inhibitors. PMID:22961543

  9. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by sumatriptan bioisosteres

    PubMed Central

    Carbonara, Roberta; Carocci, Alessia; Roussel, Julien; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Buonavoglia, Canio; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni; Camerino, Diana Conte; Desaphy, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to play a pivotal role in perception and transmission of pain sensations. Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the peripheral neuronal sodium channels, hNav1.7–1.9, cause human painful diseases. Thus while treatment of chronic pain remains an unmet clinical need, sodium channel blockers are considered as promising druggable targets. In a previous study, we evaluated the analgesic activity of sumatriptan, an agonist of serotonin 5HT1B/D receptors, and some new chiral bioisosteres, using the hot plate test in the mouse. Interestingly, we observed that the analgesic effectiveness was not necessarily correlated to serotonin agonism. In this study, we evaluated whether sumatriptan and its congeners may inhibit heterologously expressed hNav1.7 sodium channels using the patch-clamp method. We show that sumatriptan blocks hNav1.7 channels only at very high, supratherapeutic concentrations. In contrast, its three analogs, namely 20b, (R)-31b, and (S)-22b, exert a dose and use-dependent sodium channel block. At 0.1 and 10 Hz stimulation frequencies, the most potent compound, (S)-22b, was 4.4 and 1.7 fold more potent than the well-known sodium channel blocker mexiletine. The compound induces a negative shift of voltage dependence of fast inactivation, suggesting higher affinity to the inactivated channel. Accordingly, we show that (S)-22b likely binds the conserved local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels. Combining these results with the previous ones, we hypothesize that use-dependent sodium channel blockade contributes to the analgesic activity of (R)-31b and (S)-22b. These later compounds represent promising lead compounds for the development of efficient analgesics, the mechanism of action of which may include a dual action on sodium channels and 5HT1D receptors. PMID:26257653

  10. Voltage Sensor in Voltage-gated ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanilla, Francisco

    2006-03-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are intrinsic membrane proteins that play a fundamental role in the generation and propagation of the nerve impulse. Their salient characteristic is that the probability of the ion channel of being open depends steeply on the voltage across the membrane where those channels are inserted. Thus, in a membrane containing many channels, the ionic conductance is controlled by the membrane potential. The voltage exerts its control on the channel by reorienting intrinsic charges in the protein, generally arginine or lysine residues located in the 4th transmembrane segment of the channel protein, a region that has been called the voltage sensor. Upon changing the membrane potential, the charged groups reorient in the field generating a transient current (gating current). The properties of the gating current may be studied with a small number of channels to infer the operation of the sensor at the single molecule level by noise analysis or with a large number of channels to infer the details of the energy landscape the sensor traverses in opening the pore. This information is global in nature and cannot pinpoint the exact origin of the charge movement that generates the gating current. The movement of physical charges in the protein has been inferred with site-directed mutagenesis of the charged residues to histidine that allows the study of proton accessibility. The actual movement has been studied with fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The combined information of site-directed mutagenesis, gating currents, fluorescence studies and emerging crystal structures have started to delineate a physical representation of the conformational changes responsible for voltage sensing that lead to the opening of the conduction pore in voltage-gated ion channels.

  11. Modulation of intracellular Ca2+ via L-type calcium channels in heart cells by the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of the alpha1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Bkaily, Ghassan; El-Bizri, Nesrine; Bui, Michel; Sukarieh, Rami; Jacques, Danielle; Fu, Michael L X

    2003-03-01

    The effects of methoxamine, a selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor agonist, and the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of alpha1-adrenoceptors were studied on intracellular free Ca2+ levels using confocal microscopy and ionic currents using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in single cells of 10-day-old embryonic chick and 20-week-old fetal human hearts. We observed that like methoxamine, the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of alpha1-adrenoreceptors significantly increased the L-type calcium current (I(Ca(L))) but had no effect on the T-type calcium current (I(Ca(T))), the delayed outward potassium current, or the fast sodium current. This effect of the autoantibody was prevented by a prestimulation of the receptors with methoxamine and vice versa. Moreover, treating the cells with prazosin, a selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist blocked the methoxamine and the autoantibody-induced increase in I(Ca(L)), respectively. In absence of prazosin, both methoxamine and the autoantibody showed a substantial enhancement in the frequency of cell contraction and that of the concomitant cytosolic and nuclear free Ca2+ variations. The subsequent addition of nifedipine, a specific L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, reversed not only the methoxamine or the autoantibody-induced effect but also completely abolished cell contraction. These results demonstrated that functional alpha1-adrenoceptors exist in both 10-day-old embryonic chick and 20-week-old human fetal hearts and that the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of this type of receptors plays an important role in stimulating their activity via activation of L-type calcium channels. This loop seems to have a functional significance by being the target of alpha1-receptor agonists like methoxamine. PMID:12733822

  12. Voltage Gated Proton Channels Find Their Dream Job Managing the Respiratory Burst in Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The voltage gated proton channel bears surprising resemblance to the voltage-sensing domain (S1–S4) of other voltage gated ion channels, but is a dimer with two conduction pathways. The proton channel seems designed for efficient proton extrusion from cells. In phagocytes, it facilitates the production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase. PMID:20134026

  13. Dynamin Is Required for GnRH Signaling to L-Type Calcium Channels and Activation of ERK.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian S; Dang, An K; Murtazina, Dilyara A; Dozier, Melissa G; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Khan, Shaihla A; Cherrington, Brian D; Amberg, Gregory C; Clay, Colin M; Navratil, Amy M

    2016-02-01

    We have shown that GnRH-mediated engagement of the cytoskeleton induces cell movement and is necessary for ERK activation. It also has previously been established that a dominant negative form of the mechano-GTPase dynamin (K44A) attenuates GnRH activation of ERK. At present, it is not clear at what level these cellular events might be linked. To explore this, we used live cell imaging in the gonadotrope-derived αT3-1 cell line to determine that dynamin-green fluorescent protein accumulated in GnRH-induced lamellipodia and plasma membrane protrusions. Coincident with translocation of dynamin-green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane, we demonstrated that dynamin colocalizes with the actin cytoskeleton and the actin binding protein, cortactin at the leading edge of the plasma membrane. We next wanted to assess the physiological significance of these findings by inhibiting dynamin GTPase activity using dynasore. We find that dynasore suppresses activation of ERK, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase, after exposure to GnRH agonist. Furthermore, exposure of αT3-1 cells to dynasore inhibited GnRH-induced cyto-architectural rearrangements. Recently it has been discovered that GnRH induced Ca(2+) influx via the L-type Ca(2+) channels requires an intact cytoskeleton to mediate ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, not only does dynasore attenuate GnRH-mediated actin reorganization, it also suppresses Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels visualized in living cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Collectively, our data suggest that GnRH-induced membrane remodeling events are mediated in part by the association of dynamin and cortactin engaging the actin cytoskeleton, which then regulates Ca(2+) influx via L-type channels to facilitate ERK phosphorylation. PMID:26696122

  14. A novel dihydropyridine with 3-aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution blocks L-type calcium channels in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis-Pareja, David; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Hidalgo, Jorge; Ayala, Pedro; and others

    2014-08-15

    Rationale: Dihydropyridines are widely used for the treatment of several cardiac diseases due to their blocking activity on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels and their renowned antioxidant properties. Methods: We synthesized six novel dihydropyridine molecules and performed docking studies on the binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel. We used biochemical techniques on isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes to assess the efficacy of these molecules on their Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity and antioxidant properties. The Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity was evaluated by confocal microscopy on fluo-3AM loaded cardiomyocytes, as well as using patch clamp experiments. Antioxidant properties were evaluated by flow cytometry using the ROS sensitive dye 1,2,3 DHR. Results: Our docking studies show that a novel compound with 3-OH substitution inserts into the active binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel previously described for nitrendipine. In biochemical assays, the novel meta-OH group in the aryl in C4 showed a high blocking effect on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel as opposed to para-substituted compounds. In the tests we performed, none of the molecules showed antioxidant properties. Conclusions: Only substitutions in C2, C3 and C5 of the aryl ring render dihydropyridine compounds with the capacity of blocking LTCC. Based on our docking studies, we postulate that the antioxidant activity requires a larger group than the meta-OH substitution in C2, C3 or C5 of the dihydropyridine ring. - Highlights: • Dihydropyridine (DHP) molecules are widely used in cardiovascular disease. • DHPs block Ca{sup 2+} entry through LTCC—some DHPs have antioxidant activity as well. • We synthesized 6 new DHPs and tested their Ca{sup 2+} blocking and antioxidant activities. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution strongly increases their Ca{sup 2+} blocking activity. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution did not affect the antioxidant properties.

  15. Spexin Enhances Bowel Movement through Activating L-type Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel via Galanin Receptor 2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-yuan; Zhang, Man; Huang, Tao; Yang, Li-ling; Fu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Ling; Zhong, Linda LD; Mu, Huai-xue; Shi, Xiao-ke; Leung, Christina FP; Fan, Bao-min; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-ping; Zhu, Li-xin; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel neuropeptide spexin was found to be broadly expressed in various endocrine and nervous tissues while little is known about its functions. This study investigated the role of spexin in bowel movement and the underlying mechanisms. In functional constipation (FC) patients, serum spexin levels were significantly decreased. Consistently, in starved mice, the mRNA of spexin was significantly decreased in intestine and colon. Spexin injection increased the velocity of carbon powder propulsion in small intestine and decreased the glass beads expulsion time in distal colon in mice. Further, spexin dose-dependently stimulated the intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction. Galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) antagonist M871, but not Galanin receptor 3 (GALR3) antagonist SNAP37899, effectively suppressed the stimulatory effects of spexin on intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction, which could be eliminated by extracellular [Ca2+] removal and L-type voltage-dependentCa2+ channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine. Besides, spexin dramatically increased the [Ca2+]i in isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that spexin can act on GALR2 receptor to regulate bowel motility by activating L-type VDCC. Our findings provide evidence for important physiological roles of spexin in GI functions. Selective action on spexin pathway might have therapeutic effects on GI diseases with motility disorders. PMID:26160593

  16. Pharmacological Inhibition of Voltage-gated Ca2+ Channels for Chronic Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungkyu

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is a major therapeutic problem as the current treatment options are unsatisfactory with low efficacy and deleterious side effects. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), which are multi-complex proteins consisting of α1, β, γ, and α2δ subunits, play an important role in pain signaling. These channels are involved in neurogenic inflammation, excitability, and neurotransmitter release in nociceptors. It has been previously shown that N-type VGCCs (Cav2.2) are a major pain target. U.S. FDA approval of three Cav2.2 antagonists, gabapentin, pregabalin, and ziconotide, for chronic pain underlies the importance of this channel subtype. Also, there has been increasing evidence that L-type (Cav1.2) or T-type (Cav3.2) VGCCs may be involved in pain signaling and chronic pain. In order to develop novel pain therapeutics and to understand the role of VGCC subtypes, discovering subtype selective VGCC inhibitors or methods that selectively target the inhibitor into nociceptors would be essential. This review describes the various VGCC subtype inhibitors and the potential of utilizing VGCC subtypes as targets of chronic pain. Development of VGCC subtype inhibitors and targeting them into nociceptors will contribute to a better understanding of the roles of VGCC subtypes in pain at a spinal level as well as development of a novel class of analgesics for chronic pain. PMID:24396337

  17. Pharmacological Inhibition of Voltage-gated Ca(2+) Channels for Chronic Pain Relief.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungkyu

    2013-12-01

    Chronic pain is a major therapeutic problem as the current treatment options are unsatisfactory with low efficacy and deleterious side effects. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), which are multi-complex proteins consisting of α1, β, γ, and α2δ subunits, play an important role in pain signaling. These channels are involved in neurogenic inflammation, excitability, and neurotransmitter release in nociceptors. It has been previously shown that N-type VGCCs (Cav2.2) are a major pain target. U.S. FDA approval of three Cav2.2 antagonists, gabapentin, pregabalin, and ziconotide, for chronic pain underlies the importance of this channel subtype. Also, there has been increasing evidence that L-type (Cav1.2) or T-type (Cav3.2) VGCCs may be involved in pain signaling and chronic pain. In order to develop novel pain therapeutics and to understand the role of VGCC subtypes, discovering subtype selective VGCC inhibitors or methods that selectively target the inhibitor into nociceptors would be essential. This review describes the various VGCC subtype inhibitors and the potential of utilizing VGCC subtypes as targets of chronic pain. Development of VGCC subtype inhibitors and targeting them into nociceptors will contribute to a better understanding of the roles of VGCC subtypes in pain at a spinal level as well as development of a novel class of analgesics for chronic pain. PMID:24396337

  18. Voltage gating and anions, especially phosphate: a model system.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Padmanava; Ghose, Ranajeet; Green, Michael E

    2005-11-30

    The voltage sensor of voltage gated sodium and potassium channels consists of four sets of transmembrane segments, of which one, called S4, contains at least four arginines; these are presumed to each carry positive charges. The channel opening is usually attributed to the outward (i.e., toward the extracellular side of the membrane) motion of S4. The evidence for this motion is based on certain experiments that appear to show differential access to parts of S4 from the intracellular and extracellular sides of the membrane in the open and closed states. A newly available structure [S.B. Long, E.B. Campbell and R. MacKinnon, Crystal structure of a mammalian voltage-dependent Shaker family K(+) channel. Science 309 (2005) 897-903; S.B. Long, E.B. Campbell, R. MacKinnon, Voltage sensor of Kv1.2: structural basis of electromechanical coupling. Science 309 (2005) 903-908][1,2] has now been used to argue for a large scale motion, although, as a static structure, it is not conclusive. In this paper, we consider the effect of anions in the surrounding medium. Phosphate is present in the intracellular as well as the extracellular fluid, apparently at hundreds of micromolar concentration, or more. There is evidence in the literature suggesting that phosphate-arginine complexes are rather strong. In a recent calculation one of us [M.E. Green, A possible role for phosphate in complexing the arginines of S4 in voltage gated channels J. Theor. Biol. 233 (2005) 337-341][3] has shown that a model peptide with a 2:1 arg:phosphate complex should have a favorable geometry. Here, we present NMR evidence of the existence of phosphate complexes of a model peptide with two arginines separated by two hydrophobic residues, the same spacing as in S4 segments. The complexes (there are different complexes for HPO(4)(2-) and for H(2)PO(4)(-) [3]) form with concentrations of peptide in the range of hundreds of micromolar, making it significant in the biological context. NMR spectra provide

  19. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of ω-TRTX-Cc1a, a novel tarantula venom peptide that selectively targets L-type Cav channels.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Berecki, Géza; Durek, Thomas; Mobli, Mehdi; Knapp, Oliver; King, Glenn F; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2014-05-15

    Spider venoms are replete with peptidic ion channel modulators, often with novel subtype selectivity, making them a rich source of pharmacological tools and drug leads. In a search for subtype-selective blockers of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels, we isolated and characterized a novel 39-residue peptide, ω-TRTX-Cc1a (Cc1a), from the venom of the tarantula Citharischius crawshayi (now Pelinobius muticus). Cc1a is 67% identical to the spider toxin ω-TRTX-Hg1a, an inhibitor of CaV2.3 channels. We assembled Cc1a using a combination of Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. Oxidative folding yielded two stable, slowly interconverting isomers. Cc1a preferentially inhibited Ba(2+) currents (IBa) mediated by L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3) CaV channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 825nM and 2.24μM, respectively. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Cc1a inhibited IBa mediated by high voltage-activated CaV channels but did not affect low voltage-activated T-type CaV channels. Cc1a exhibited weak activity at NaV1.5 and NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels stably expressed in mammalian HEK or CHO cells, respectively. Experiments with modified Cc1a peptides, truncated at the N-terminus (ΔG1-E5) or C-terminus (ΔW35-V39), demonstrated that the N- and C-termini are important for voltage-gated ion channel modulation. We conclude that Cc1a represents a novel pharmacological tool for probing the structure and function of L-type CaV channels. PMID:24561180

  20. Linalool suppresses voltage-gated currents in sensory neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Narusuye, K; Kawai, F; Matsuzaki, K; Miyachi, E

    2005-02-01

    Linalool is a major component of essential oils and possesses various biological effects in sensory or central nervous systems. To investigate the pharmacological and biophysical effects of linalool on voltage-gated currents in sensory neurons, we used the whole-cell patch clamp and the Ca(2+) imaging techniques. Under the voltage clamp, membrane depolarization generated time- and voltage-dependent current responses in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). Linalool significantly and reversibly suppressed the voltage-gated currents in ORCs. The dose-suppression relation of linalool for the voltage-gated Na(+) current could be fitted by the Hill equation with a half-blocking concentration of 0.56 mM and a Hill coefficient of 1.2. To test whether linalool suppresses voltage-gated currents in ORCs specifically or suppresses currents in other neurons generally, we next examined the effects of linalool on voltage-gated currents in newt retinal neurons and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. Linalool suppressed the voltage-gated currents not only in retinal horizontal cells and ganglion cells but also in Purkinje cells. Furthermore, bath application of linalool inhibited the KCl-induced [Ca(2+)](i) response of ORCs, suggesting that linalool suppresses Ca(2+) currents in ORCs. These results suggest that linalool non-selectively suppresses the voltage-gated currents in newt sensory neurons and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:15365786

  1. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; McArthur, Jeff; Ostroumov, Vitaly; French, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10–70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  2. Mechanism of Inactivation in Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channels.

    PubMed

    Gawali, V S; Todt, H

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) initiate action potentials thereby giving rise to rapid transmission of electrical signals along cell membranes and between cells. Depolarization of the cell membrane causes VGSCs to open but also gives rise to a nonconducting state termed inactivation. Inactivation of VGSCs serves a critical physiologic function as it determines the extent of excitability of neurons and of muscle cells. Depending on the time course of development and removal of inactivation both "fast-" and "slow"-inactivated states have been described. Evidence from mutagenesis studies suggests that fast inactivation is produced by a block of the internal vestibule by a tethered inactivation particle that has been mapped to the internal linker between domains III and IV. The motion of this linker may be regulated by parts of the internal C-terminus. The molecular mechanism of slow inactivation is less clear. However, aside from a high number of mutagenesis studies, the recent availability of 3D structures of crystallized prokaryotic VGSCs offers insights into the molecular motions associated with slow inactivation. One possible scenario is that slow movements of the voltage sensors are transmitted to the external vestibule giving rise to a conformational change of this region. This molecular rearrangement is transmitted to the S6 segments giving rise to collapse of the internal vestibule. PMID:27586291

  3. Resurgent current of voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H; Raman, Indira M

    2014-01-01

    Resurgent Na+ current results from a distinctive form of Na+ channel gating, originally identified in cerebellar Purkinje neurons. In these neurons, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels responsible for action potential firing have specialized mechanisms that reduce the likelihood that they accumulate in fast inactivated states, thereby shortening refractory periods and permitting rapid, repetitive, and/or burst firing. Under voltage clamp, step depolarizations evoke transient Na+ currents that rapidly activate and quickly decay, and step repolarizations elicit slower channel reopening, or a ‘resurgent’ current. The generation of resurgent current depends on a factor in the Na+ channel complex, probably a subunit such as NaVβ4 (Scn4b), which blocks open Na+ channels at positive voltages, competing with the fast inactivation gate, and unblocks at negative voltages, permitting recovery from an open channel block along with a flow of current. Following its initial discovery, resurgent Na+ current has been found in nearly 20 types of neurons. Emerging research suggests that resurgent current is preferentially increased in a variety of clinical conditions associated with altered cellular excitability. Here we review the biophysical, molecular and structural mechanisms of resurgent current and their relation to the normal functions of excitable cells as well as pathophysiology. PMID:25172941

  4. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Biophysics, Pharmacology, and Related Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H.; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named “channel partners” or “channel interacting proteins” (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium “channelopathies”.  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field. PMID:22798951

  5. Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels: Not Just for Conduction.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Larisa C; Isom, Lori L

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), composed of a pore-forming α subunit and up to two associated β subunits, are critical for the initiation of the action potential (AP) in excitable tissues. Building on the monumental discovery and description of sodium current in 1952, intrepid researchers described the voltage-dependent gating mechanism, selectivity of the channel, and general structure of the VGSC channel. Recently, crystal structures of bacterial VGSC α subunits have confirmed many of these studies and provided new insights into VGSC function. VGSC β subunits, first cloned in 1992, modulate sodium current but also have nonconducting roles as cell-adhesion molecules and function in neurite outgrowth and neuronal pathfinding. Mutations in VGSC α and β genes are associated with diseases caused by dysfunction of excitable tissues such as epilepsy. Because of the multigenic and drug-resistant nature of some of these diseases, induced pluripotent stem cells and other novel approaches are being used to screen for new drugs and further understand how mutations in VGSC genes contribute to pathophysiology. PMID:27252364

  6. Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vidhya R.; Perez-Neut, Mathew; Kaja, Simon; Gentile, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    Changes of the electrical charges across the surface cell membrane are absolutely necessary to maintain cellular homeostasis in physiological as well as in pathological conditions. The opening of ion channels alter the charge distribution across the surface membrane as they allow the diffusion of ions such as K+, Ca++, Cl−, Na+. Traditionally, voltage-gated ion channels (VGIC) are known to play fundamental roles in controlling rapid bioelectrical signaling including action potential and/or contraction. However, several investigations have revealed that these classes of proteins can also contribute significantly to cell mitotic biochemical signaling, cell cycle progression, as well as cell volume regulation. All these functions are critically important for cancer cell proliferation. Interestingly, a variety of distinct VGICs are expressed in different cancer cell types, including metastasis but not in the tissues from which these tumors were generated. Given the increasing evidence suggesting that VGIC play a major role in cancer cell biology, in this review we discuss the role of distinct VGIC in cancer cell proliferation and possible therapeutic potential of VIGC pharmacological manipulation. PMID:26010603

  7. Regulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Currents by Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II in Resting Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Hongwei; Sapunar, Damir; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is recognized as a key element in encoding depolarization activity of excitable cells into facilitated voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC) function. Less is known about the participation of CaMKII in regulating VGCCs in resting cells. We examined constitutive CaMKII control of Ca2+ currents in peripheral sensory neurons acutely isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of adult rats. The small molecule CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1.0μM) reduced depolarization-induced ICa by 16 – 30% in excess of the effects produced by the inactive homolog KN-92. The specificity of CaMKII inhibition on VGCC function was shown by efficacy of the selective CaMKII blocking peptide autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide in a membrane-permeable myristoylated form, which also reduced VGCC current in resting neurons. Loss of VGCC currents is primarily due to reduced N-type current, as application of mAIP selectively reduced N-type current by approximately 30%, and prior N-type current inhibition eliminated the effect of mAIP on VGCCs, while prior block of L-type channels did not reduce the effect of mAIP on total ICa. T-type currents were not affected by mAIP in resting DRG neurons. Transduction of sensory neurons in vivo by DRG injection of an adeno-associated virus expressing AIP also resulted in a loss of N-type currents. Together, these findings reveal a novel molecular adaptation whereby sensory neurons retain CaMKII support of VGCCs despite remaining quiescent. PMID:25064143

  8. Regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in resting sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Hongwei; Sapunar, Damir; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H

    2014-09-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is recognized as a key element in encoding depolarization activity of excitable cells into facilitated voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) function. Less is known about the participation of CaMKII in regulating VGCCs in resting cells. We examined constitutive CaMKII control of Ca(2+) currents in peripheral sensory neurons acutely isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of adult rats. The small molecule CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1.0μM) reduced depolarization-induced ICa by 16-30% in excess of the effects produced by the inactive homolog KN-92. The specificity of CaMKII inhibition on VGCC function was shown by the efficacy of the selective CaMKII blocking peptide autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide in a membrane-permeable myristoylated form, which also reduced VGCC current in resting neurons. Loss of VGCC currents is primarily due to reduced N-type current, as application of mAIP selectively reduced N-type current by approximately 30%, and prior N-type current inhibition eliminated the effect of mAIP on VGCCs, while prior block of L-type channels did not reduce the effect of mAIP on total ICa. T-type currents were not affected by mAIP in resting DRG neurons. Transduction of sensory neurons in vivo by DRG injection of an adeno-associated virus expressing AIP also resulted in a loss of N-type currents. Together, these findings reveal a novel molecular adaptation whereby sensory neurons retain CaMKII support of VGCCs despite remaining quiescent. PMID:25064143

  9. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao

    2015-01-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control. PMID:25681415

  10. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Evolutionary History and Distinctive Sequence Features.

    PubMed

    Kasimova, M A; Granata, D; Carnevale, V

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are responsible for the rising phase of the action potential. Their role in electrical signal transmission is so relevant that their emergence is believed to be one of the crucial factors enabling development of nervous system. The presence of voltage-gated sodium-selective channels in bacteria (BacNav) has raised questions concerning the evolutionary history of the ones in animals. Here we review some of the milestones in the field of Nav phylogenetic analysis and discuss some of the most important sequence features that distinguish these channels from voltage-gated potassium channels and transient receptor potential channels. PMID:27586287

  11. S-nitrosothiols dilate the mesenteric artery more potently than the femoral artery by a cGMP and L-type calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Zhang, Meijuan; Wilson, Sean M; Terry, Michael H; Longo, Lawrence D; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2016-08-31

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are metabolites of NO with potent vasodilatory activity. Our previous studies in sheep indicated that intra-arterially infused SNOs dilate the mesenteric vasculature more than the femoral vasculature. We hypothesized that the mesenteric artery is more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation, and investigated various steps along the NO/cGMP pathway to determine the mechanism for this difference. In anesthetized adult sheep, we monitored the conductance of mesenteric and femoral arteries during infusion of S-nitroso-l-cysteine (L-cysNO), and found mesenteric vascular conductance increased (137 ± 3%) significantly more than femoral conductance (26 ± 25%). Similar results were found in wire myography studies of isolated sheep mesenteric and femoral arteries. Vasodilation by SNOs was attenuated in both vessel types by the presence of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), and both YC-1 (sGC agonist) and 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog) mediated more potent relaxation in mesenteric arteries than femoral arteries. The vasodilatory difference between mesenteric and femoral arteries was eliminated by antagonists of either protein kinase G or L-type Ca(2+) channels. Western immunoblots showed a larger L-type Ca(2+)/sGC abundance ratio in mesenteric arteries than in femoral arteries. Fetal sheep mesenteric arteries were more responsive to SNOs than adult mesenteric arteries, and had a greater L-Ca(2+)/sGC ratio (p = 0.047 and r = -0.906 for correlation between Emax and L-Ca(2+)/sGC). These results suggest that mesenteric arteries, especially those in fetus, are more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation than femoral arteries due to a greater role of the L-type calcium channel in the NO/cGMP pathway. PMID:27235767

  12. Voltage-Gated Channel Mechanosensitivity: Fact or Friction?

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Catherine E.

    2011-01-01

    The heart is a continually active pulsatile fluid pump. It generates appropriate forces by precisely timed and spaced engagement of its contractile machinery. Largely, it makes its own control signals, the most crucial of which are precisely timed and spaced fluxes of ions across the sarcolemma, achieved by the timely opening and closing of diverse voltage-gated channels (VGC). VGCs have four voltage sensors around a central ion-selective pore that opens and closes under the influence of membrane voltage. Operation of any VGC is secondarily tuned by the mechanical state (i.e., structure) of the bilayer in which it is embedded. Rates of opening and closing, in other words, vary with bilayer structure. Thus, in the intensely mechanical environment of the myocardium and its vasculature, VGCs kinetics might be routinely modulated by reversible and irreversible nano-scale changes in bilayer structure. If subtle bilayer deformations are routine in the pumping heart, VGCs could be subtly transducing bilayer mechanical signals, thereby tuning cardiac rhythmicity, collectively contributing to mechano-electric feedback. Reversible bilayer deformations would be expected with changing shear flows and tissue distension, while irreversible bilayer restructuring occurs with ischemia, inflammation, membrane remodeling, etc. I suggest that tools now available could be deployed to help probe whether/how the inherent mechanosensitivity of VGCs – an attribute substantially reflecting the dependence of voltage sensor stability on bilayer structure – contributes to cardiac rhythmicity. Chief among these tools are voltage sensor toxins (whose inhibitory efficacy varies with the mechanical state of bilayer) and arrhythmia-inducing VGC mutants with distinctive mechano-phenotypes. PMID:21660289

  13. Ion permeation and glutamate residues linked by Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory in L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Nonner, W; Eisenberg, B

    1998-09-01

    L-type Ca channels contain a cluster of four charged glutamate residues (EEEE locus), which seem essential for high Ca specificity. To understand how this highly charged structure might produce the currents and selectivity observed in this channel, a theory is needed that relates charge to current. We use an extended Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP2) theory to compute (mean) Coulombic interactions and thus to examine the role of the mean field electrostatic interactions in producing current and selectivity. The pore was modeled as a central cylinder with tapered atria; the cylinder (i.e., "pore proper") contained a uniform volume density of fixed charge equivalent to that of one to four carboxyl groups. The pore proper was assigned ion-specific, but spatially uniform, diffusion coefficients and excess chemical potentials. Thus electrostatic selection by valency was computed self-consistently, and selection by other features was also allowed. The five external parameters needed for a system of four ionic species (Na, Ca, Cl, and H) were determined analytically from published measurements of thre limiting conductances and two critical ion concentrations, while treating the pore as a macroscopic ion-exchange system in equilibrium with a uniform bath solution. The extended PNP equations were solved with these parameters, and the predictions were compared to currents measured in a variety of solutions over a range of transmembrane voltages. The extended PNP theory accurately predicted current-voltage relations, anomalous mole fraction effects in the observed current, saturation effects of varied Ca and Na concentrations, and block by protons. Pore geometry, dielectric permittivity, and the number of carboxyl groups had only weak effects. The successful prediction of Ca fluxes in this paper demonstrates that ad hoc electrostatic parameters, multiple discrete binding sites, and logistic assumptions of single-file movement are all unnecessary for the prediction of permeation in

  14. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  15. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  16. L-Type Calcium Channels Play a Critical Role in Maintaining Lens Transparency by Regulating Phosphorylation of Aquaporin-0 and Myosin Light Chain and Expression of Connexins

    PubMed Central

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; de Ridder, Gustaaf G.; Schey, Kevin L.; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V) 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations reveal a crucial

  17. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1/VSOP inhibits neutrophil granule release.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Aratani, Yasuaki; Adissu, Hibret A; Miyawaki, Nana; Sasaki, Mari; Suzuki, Kazuo; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granule exocytosis is crucial for host defense and inflammation. Neutrophils contain 4 types of granules, the exocytotic release of which is differentially regulated. This exocytosis is known to be driven by diverse mediators, including calcium and nucleotides, but the precise molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We show in the present study that voltage-gated proton (Hv) channels are necessary for the proper release of azurophilic granules in neutrophils. On activation of NADPH oxidase by PMA and IgG, neutrophils derived from Hvcn1 gene knockout mouse exhibited greater secretion of MPO and elastase than WT cells. In contrast, release of LTF enriched in specific granules was not enhanced in these cells. The excess release of azurophilic granules in Hv1/VSOP-deficient neutrophils was suppressed by inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity and, in part, by valinomycin, a potassium ionophore. In addition, Hv1/VSOP-deficient mice exhibited more severe lung inflammation after intranasal Candida albicans infection than WT mice. These findings suggest that the Hv channel acts to specifically dampen the release of azurophilic granules through, in part, the suppression of increased positive charges at the plasma membrane accompanied by the activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils. PMID:25990245

  18. Cloning, chromosomal localization, and functional expression of the alpha 1 subunit of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel from normal human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, D; Mikala, G; Yatani, A; Engle, D B; Iles, D E; Segers, B; Sinke, R J; Weghuis, D O; Klöckner, U; Wakamori, M

    1993-01-01

    A unique structural variant of the cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha 1 subunit cDNA was isolated from libraries derived from normal human heart mRNA. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to other calcium channel alpha 1 subunits. However, differences from the rabbit heart alpha 1 include a shortened N-terminus, a unique C-terminal insertion, and both forms of an alternatively spliced motif IV S3 region. The shortened N-terminus provides optimal access to consensus sequences thought to facilitate translation. Northern blot analysis revealed a single hybridizing mRNA species of 9.4 kb. The gene for the human heart alpha 1 subunit was localized specifically to the distal region of chromosome 12p13. The cloned alpha 1 subunit was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and single-channel analyses revealed native-like pharmacology and channel properties. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8392192

  19. Voltage-gated sodium channels in the mammalian heart

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Thomas; Haufe, Volker; Blechschmidt, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian species express nine functional voltage-gated Na+ channels. Three of them, the cardiac-specific isoform Nav1.5 and the neuronal isoforms Nav1.8 and Nav1.9, are relatively resistant to the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin (TTX; IC50 ≥ 1 μM). The other six isoforms are highly sensitive to TTX with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. These isoforms are expressed in the central nervous system (Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.3, Nav1.6), in the skeletal muscle (Nav1.4), and in the peripheral nervous system (Nav1.6, Nav1.7). The isoform Nav1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is responsible for the upstroke of the action potential in the heart. Mutations in SCN5A are associated with a variety of life-threatening arrhythmias, like long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3), Brugada syndrome (BrS) or cardiac conduction disease (CCD). Previous immunohistochemical and electrophysiological assays demonstrated the cardiac expression of neuronal and skeletal muscle Na+ channels in the heart of various mammals, which led to far-reaching speculations on their function. However, when comparing the Na+ channel mRNA patterns in the heart of various mammalian species, only minute quantities of transcripts for TTX-sensitive Na+ channels were detectable in whole pig and human hearts, suggesting that these channels are not involved in cardiac excitation phenomena in higher mammals. This conclusion is strongly supported by the fact that mutations in TTX-sensitive Na+ channels were associated with epilepsy or skeletal muscle diseases, rather than with a pathological cardiac phenotype. Moreover, previous data from TTX-intoxicated animals and from cases of human tetrodotoxication showed that low TTX dosages caused at most little alterations of both the cardiac output and the electrocardiogram. Recently, genome-wide association studies identified SCN10A, the gene encoding Nav1.8, as a determinant of cardiac conduction parameters, and mutations in SCN10A have been associated with BrS. These novel findings opened a

  20. Perturbed atrial calcium handling in an ovine model of heart failure: potential roles for reductions in the L-type calcium current.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jessica D; Caldwell, Jessica L; Horn, Margaux A; Bode, Elizabeth F; Richards, Mark A; Hall, Mark C S; Graham, Helen K; Briston, Sarah J; Greensmith, David J; Eisner, David A; Dibb, Katharine M; Trafford, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is commonly associated with reduced cardiac output and an increased risk of atrial arrhythmias particularly during β-adrenergic stimulation. The aim of the present study was to determine how HF alters systolic Ca(2+) and the response to β-adrenergic (β-AR) stimulation in atrial myocytes. HF was induced in sheep by ventricular tachypacing and changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration studied in single left atrial myocytes under voltage and current clamp conditions. The following were all reduced in HF atrial myocytes; Ca(2+) transient amplitude (by 46% in current clamped and 28% in voltage clamped cells), SR dependent rate of Ca(2+) removal (kSR, by 32%), L-type Ca(2+) current density (by 36%) and action potential duration (APD90 by 22%). However, in HF SR Ca(2+) content was increased (by 19%) when measured under voltage-clamp stimulation. Inhibiting the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa-L) in control cells reproduced both the decrease in Ca(2+) transient amplitude and increase of SR Ca(2+) content observed in voltage-clamped HF cells. During β-AR stimulation Ca(2+) transient amplitude was the same in control and HF cells. However, ICa-L remained less in HF than control cells whilst SR Ca(2+) content was highest in HF cells during β-AR stimulation. The decrease in ICa-L that occurs in HF atrial myocytes appears to underpin the decreased Ca(2+) transient amplitude and increased SR Ca(2+) content observed in voltage-clamped cells. PMID:25463272

  1. L-type calcium channels and MAP kinase contribute to thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced depolarization in thalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    In rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) neurons, activation of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors enhances neuronal excitability via concurrent decrease in a G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K (GIRK)-like conductance and opening of a cannabinoid receptor-sensitive transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC)-like conductance. Here, we investigated the calcium (Ca2+) contribution to the components of this TRH-induced response. TRH-induced membrane depolarization was reduced in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, also in media containing nominally zero [Ca2+]o, suggesting a critical role for both intracellular Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx. TRH-induced inward current was unchanged by T-type Ca2+ channel blockade, but was decreased by blockade of high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (HVACCs). Both the pharmacologically isolated GIRK-like and the TRPC-like components of the TRH-induced response were decreased by nifedipine and increased by BayK8644, implying Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channels. Only the TRPC-like conductance was reduced by either thapsigargin or dantrolene, suggesting a role for ryanodine receptors and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in this component of the TRH-induced response. In pituitary and other cell lines, TRH stimulates MAPK. In PVT neurons, only the GIRK-like component of the TRH-induced current was selectively decreased in the presence of PD98059, a MAPK inhibitor. Collectively, the data imply that TRH-induced depolarization and inward current in PVT neurons involve both a dependency on extracellular Ca2+ influx via opening of L-type Ca2+ channels, a sensitivity of a TRPC-like component to intracellular Ca2+ release via ryanodine channels, and a modulation by MAPK of a GIRK-like conductance component. PMID:27009047

  2. Molecular Determinants of Cav1.2 Calcium Channel Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated L-type Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to transient increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration that initiates a number of essential cellular functions including cardiac and vascular muscle contraction, gene expression, neuronal plasticity, and exocytosis. Inactivation or spontaneous termination of the calcium current through Cav1.2 is a critical step in regulation of these processes. The pathophysiological significance of this process is manifested in hypertension, heart failure, arrhythmia, and a number of other diseases where acceleration of the calcium current decay should present a benefit function. The central issue of this paper is the inactivation of the Cav1.2 calcium channel mediated by multiple determinants.

  3. Use-dependent effects of the class III antiarrhythmic agent NE-10064 (azimilide) on cardiac repolarization: block of delayed rectifier potassium and L-type calcium currents.

    PubMed

    Fermini, B; Jurkiewicz, N K; Jow, B; Guinosso, P J; Baskin, E P; Lynch, J J; Salata, J J

    1995-08-01

    We studied the effects of NE-10064 (azimilide), a new antiarrhythmic agent reported to be a selective blocker of the slowly activating component of the delayed rectifier, IKs. In ferret papillary muscles, NE-10064 increased effective refractory period (ERP) and decreased isometric twitch tension in a concentration-dependent manner (0.3-30 microM). Increases in ERP showed reverse use-dependence, and were greater at 1 than at 3 Hz. In contrast, changes in tension were use dependent, with larger decreases observed at 3 than at 1 Hz. In guinea pig ventricular myocytes, NE-10064 (0.3-3 microM) significantly prolonged action potential duration (APD) at 1 Hz. At 3 Hz, NE-10064 (0.3-1 microM) increased APD only slightly, and at 10 microM decreased APD and the plateau potential. NE-10064 potently blocked the rapidly activating component of the delayed rectifier, IKr (IC50 0.4 microM), and inhibited IKs (IC50 3 microM) with nearly 10-fold less potency. NE-10064 (10 microM) did not block the inward rectifier potassium current (IKl). NE-10064 (10 microM) blocked the L-type calcium current (ICa) in a use-dependent manner; block was greater at 3 than at 1 Hz. We conclude that (a) NE-10064's block of potassium currents is relatively selective for IKr over IKs, (b) NE-10064 inhibits ICa in a use-dependent fashion, and (c) NE-10064's effects on ERP and tension in papillary muscle as well as APD and action potential plateau level in myocytes may be explained by its potassium and calcium channel blocking properties. PMID:7475051

  4. Differential neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of L-type voltage dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonists in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Sarah C; Royer, Sarah E; D'Angelo, Heather M; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Fisher, David A; Wenk, Gary L

    2015-03-01

    Neuroinflammation and degeneration of catecholaminergic brainstem nuclei occur early in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Neuroinflammation increases levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species which can alter neuronal calcium (Ca(+2)) homoeostasis via L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (L-VDCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Alterations in Ca(+2) channel activity in the SN and LC can lead to disruption of normal pacemaking activity in these areas, contributing to behavioral deficits. Here, we utilized an in vivo model of chronic neuroinflammation: rats were infused intraventricularly with a continuous small dose (0.25 μg/h) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) for 28 days. Rats were treated with either the L-VDCC antagonist nimodipine or the RyR antagonist dantrolene. LPS-infused rats had significant motor deficits in the accelerating rotarod task as well as abnormal behavioral agitation in the forced swim task and open field. Corresponding with these behavioral deficits, LPS-infused rats also had significant increases in microglia activation and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and locus coeruleus (LC). Treatment with nimodipine or dantrolene normalized LPS-induced abnormalities in the rotarod and forced swim, restored the number of TH-immunoreactive cells in the LC, and significantly reduced microglia activation in the SNpc. Only nimodipine significantly reduced microglia activation in the LC, and neither drug increased TH immunoreactivity in the SNpc. These findings demonstrate that the Ca(+2) dysregulation in the LC and SN brainstem nuclei is differentially altered by chronic neuroinflammation. Overall, targeting Ca + 2 dysregulation may be an important target for ameliorating neurodegeneration in the SNpc and LC. PMID:25318607

  5. Renal-protective effect of T-and L-type calcium channel blockers in hypertensive patients: an Amlodipine-to-Benidipine Changeover (ABC) study.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Mitsuru; Takagi, Takashi; Ito, Norihisa; Terai, Minako; Tatara, Yuji; Hayashi, Norihiro; Shiota, Atsushi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Ogihara, Toshio

    2007-09-01

    Both strict blood pressure control and efferent artery dilatation are critical in reducing proteinuria, which in turn helps to regulate blood pressure. Benidipine, an L- and T-type calcium channel blocker, has the potential for increased effectiveness compared with L-type-dominant calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine. Therefore, we evaluated blood pressure and proteinuria after changeover from amlodipine to benidipine in poorly controlled hypertensive patients. Fifty-eight hypertensive outpatients undergoing amlodipine treatment and unable to achieve optimal blood pressure as determined by Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertention (JSH 2004) were changed over to benidipine treatment. We measured blood pressure and pulse rate and assessed urinary protein excretion before and after changeover. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure dropped from 151/90 mmHg to 140/81 mmHg (p<0.0001). Mean blood pressure (p<0.0001) and pulse pressure (p=0.0069) were also reduced, but pulse rate increased from 75 bpm to 78 bpm (p=0.0047). Urinary protein excretion adjusted for urinary creatinine was reduced from 0.35 +/- 0.82 to 0.22 +/- 0.55 g/g creatinine (p=0.0119). The urinary protein reduction was observed only in patients with renin-angiotensin inhibition (p=0.0216). By switching from amlodipine to benidipine treatment, more than 80% of patients reduced their blood pressure, and more than 40% achieved optimal blood pressure. Higher urinary protein excretion (p<0.0001), lower glomerular filtration rate (p=0.0011) and presence of diabetes (p=0.0284) were correlated with reduction of urinary proteins during changeover. Taken together, our results suggest that benidipine may have greater efficacy than amlodipine in reducing blood pressure and proteinuria. PMID:18037772

  6. Effect of Charge Substitutions at Residue His-142 on Voltage Gating of Connexin43 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Junko; Gutiérrez, Cristina; González, Daniel; Kieken, Fabien; Seki, Akiko; Requena Carrión, Jesus; Sorgen, Paul L.; Taffet, Steven M.; Barrio, Luis C.; Delmar, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the carboxyl terminal of connexin43 (Cx43CT) is involved in fast transjunctional voltage gating. Separate studies support the notion of an intramolecular association between Cx43CT and a region of the cytoplasmic loop (amino acids 119–144; referred to as “L2”). Structural analysis of L2 shows two α-helical domains, each with a histidine residue in its sequence (H126 and H142). Here, we determined the effect of H142 replacement by lysine, alanine, and glutamate on the voltage gating of Cx43 channels. Mutation H142E led to a significant reduction in the frequency of occurrence of the residual state and a prolongation of dwell open time. Macroscopically, there was a large reduction in the fast component of voltage gating. These results resembled those observed for a mutant lacking the carboxyl terminal (CT) domain. NMR experiments showed that mutation H142E significantly decreased the Cx43CT-L2 interaction and disrupted the secondary structure of L2. Overall, our data support the hypothesis that fast voltage gating involves an intramolecular particle-receptor interaction between CT and L2. Some of the structural constrains of fast voltage gating may be shared with those involved in the chemical gating of Cx43. PMID:16963503

  7. A Novel Role of the L-Type Calcium Channel α1D Subunit as a Gatekeeper for Intracellular Zinc Signaling: Zinc Wave

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Satoru; Hasegawa, Aiko; Hojyo, Shintaro; Ohashi, Wakana; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Nishida, Keigo; Hirano, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that zinc ion (Zn) can behave as an intracellular signaling molecule. We previously demonstrated that mast cells stimulated through the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) rapidly release intracellular Zn from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and we named this phenomenon the “Zn wave”. However, the molecules responsible for releasing Zn and the roles of the Zn wave were elusive. Here we identified the pore-forming α1 subunit of the Cav1.3 (α1D) L-type calcium channel (LTCC) as the gatekeeper for the Zn wave. LTCC antagonists inhibited the Zn wave, and an agonist was sufficient to induce it. Notably, α1D was mainly localized to the ER rather than the plasma membrane in mast cells, and the Zn wave was impaired by α1D knockdown. We further found that the LTCC-mediated Zn wave positively controlled cytokine gene induction by enhancing the DNA-binding activity of NF- κB. Consistent with this finding, LTCC antagonists inhibited the cytokine-mediated delayed-type allergic reaction in mice without affecting the immediate-type allergic reaction. These findings indicated that the LTCC α1D subunit located on the ER membrane has a novel function as a gatekeeper for the Zn wave, which is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling and the delayed-type allergic reaction. PMID:22745805

  8. Impact of phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable mutations of phospholemman on L-type calcium channels gating in HEK 293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Yue-Peng; Zhou, Zhi-Wen; Jiang, Yi-Bo; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Meng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Phospholemman (PLM) is an important phosphorylation substrate for protein kinases A and C in the heart. Until now, the association between PLM phosphorylation status and L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) gating has not been fully understood. We investigated the kinetics of LTCCs in HEK 293T cells expressing phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable PLM mutants. Methods: The LTCCs gating was measured in HEK 293T cells transfected with LTCC and wild-type (WT) PLM, phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable PLM mutants: 6263AA, 6869AA, AAAA, 6263DD, 6869DD or DDDD. Results: WT PLM significantly slowed LTCCs activation and deactivation while enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). PLM mutants 6869DD and DDDD significantly increased the peak of the currents. 6263DD accelerated channel activation, while 6263AA slowed it more than WT PLM. 6869DD significantly enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. AAAA slowed the channel activation more than 6263AA, and DDDD accelerated the channel VDI more than 6869DD. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that phosphomimetic PLM could stimulate LTCCs and alter their dynamics, while PLM nonphosphorylatable mutant produced the opposite effects. PMID:25656605

  9. Simulated microgravity inhibits L-type calcium channel currents partially by the up-regulation of miR-103 in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongyang; Cao, Xinsheng; Zhang, Zhuo; Hu, Zebing; Zhang, Lianchang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Hua; Li, Dongtao; Zhang, Shu; Xie, Manjiang

    2015-01-01

    L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (LTCCs), particularly Cav1.2 LTCCs, play fundamental roles in cellular responses to mechanical stimuli in osteoblasts. Numerous studies have shown that mechanical loading promotes bone formation, whereas the removal of this stimulus under microgravity conditions results in a reduction in bone mass. However, whether microgravity exerts an influence on LTCCs in osteoblasts and whether this influence is a possible mechanism underlying the observed bone loss remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that simulated microgravity substantially inhibited LTCC currents and suppressed Cav1.2 at the protein level in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. In addition, reduced Cav1.2 protein levels decreased LTCC currents in MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, simulated microgravity increased miR-103 expression. Cav1.2 expression and LTCC current densities both significantly increased in cells that were transfected with a miR-103 inhibitor under mechanical unloading conditions. These results suggest that simulated microgravity substantially inhibits LTCC currents in osteoblasts by suppressing Cav1.2 expression. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Cav1.2 expression and the inhibition of LTCCs caused by mechanical unloading in osteoblasts are partially due to miR-103 up-regulation. Our study provides a novel mechanism for microgravity-induced detrimental effects on osteoblasts, offering a new avenue to further investigate the bone loss induced by microgravity. PMID:25627864

  10. Psychiatric presentation of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    PARTHASARATHI, U. D.; HARROWER, T.; TEMPEST, M.; HODGES, J. R.; WALSH, C.; McKENNA, P. J.; FLETCHER, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody encephalopathy, a rare cause of limbic encephalopathy, typically presents with memory impairment and seizures. Psychiatric symptoms have not been emphasised in the literature. Here we describe a 58-year-old man who presented with panic attacks and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and, later on, developed delusions and hallucinations and then confusion.He was found to have antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels.Treatment with immuno-modulatory therapy resulted in almost complete recovery. PMID:16880491

  11. An evolutionarily-unique heterodimeric voltage-gated cation channel found in aphids

    PubMed Central

    Amey, Joanna S.; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Burton, Mark J.; Puinean, Alin M.; Mellor, Ian R.; Duce, Ian R.; Field, Linda M.; Wallace, B.A.; Williamson, Martin S.; Davies, T.G. Emyr

    2015-01-01

    We describe the identification in aphids of a unique heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel which has an atypical ion selectivity filter and, unusually for insect channels, is highly insensitive to tetrodotoxin. We demonstrate that this channel has most likely arisen by adaptation (gene fission or duplication) of an invertebrate ancestral mono(hetero)meric channel. This is the only identifiable voltage-gated sodium channel homologue in the aphid genome(s), and the channel’s novel selectivity filter motif (DENS instead of the usual DEKA found in other eukaryotes) may result in a loss of sodium selectivity, as indicated experimentally in mutagenised Drosophila channels. PMID:25637326

  12. Compensatory T-type Ca2+ channel activity alters D2-autoreceptor responses of Substantia nigra dopamine neurons from Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channel KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Poetschke, Christina; Dragicevic, Elena; Duda, Johanna; Benkert, Julia; Dougalis, Antonios; DeZio, Roberta; Snutch, Terrance P.; Striessnig, Joerg; Liss, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The preferential degeneration of Substantia nigra dopamine midbrain neurons (SN DA) causes the motor-symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), especially the Cav1.3-subtype, generate an activity-related oscillatory Ca2+ burden in SN DA neurons, contributing to their degeneration and PD. While LTCC-blockers are already in clinical trials as PD-therapy, age-dependent functional roles of Cav1.3 LTCCs in SN DA neurons remain unclear. Thus, we analysed juvenile and adult Cav1.3-deficient mice with electrophysiological and molecular techniques. To unmask compensatory effects, we compared Cav1.3 KO mice with pharmacological LTCC-inhibition. LTCC-function was not necessary for SN DA pacemaker-activity at either age, but rather contributed to their pacemaker-precision. Moreover, juvenile Cav1.3 KO but not WT mice displayed adult wildtype-like, sensitised inhibitory dopamine-D2-autoreceptor (D2-AR) responses that depended upon both, interaction of the neuronal calcium sensor NCS-1 with D2-ARs, and on voltage-gated T-type calcium channel (TTCC) activity. This functional KO-phenotype was accompanied by cell-specific up-regulation of NCS-1 and Cav3.1-TTCC mRNA. Furthermore, in wildtype we identified an age-dependent switch of TTCC-function from contributing to SN DA pacemaker-precision in juveniles to pacemaker-frequency in adults. This novel interplay of Cav1.3 L-type and Cav3.1 T-type channels, and their modulation of SN DA activity-pattern and D2-AR-sensitisation, provide new insights into flexible age- and calcium-dependent activity-control of SN DA neurons and its pharmacological modulation. PMID:26381090

  13. L-type calcium channel blockers and substance P induce angiogenesis of cortical vessels associated with beta-amyloid plaques in an Alzheimer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Daschil, Nina; Kniewallner, Kathrin M.; Obermair, Gerald J.; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Windisch, Manfred; Marksteiner, Josef; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) are expressed in astroglia. However, their functional role is still speculative, especially under pathologic conditions. We recently showed that the α1 subunit-like immunoreactivity of the CaV1.2 channel is strongly expressed in reactive astrocytes around beta-amyloid plaques in 11-month-old Alzheimer transgenic (tg) mice with the amyloid precursor protein London and Swedish mutations. The aim of the present study was to examine the cellular expression of all LTCC subunits around beta-amyloid plaques by in situ hybridization using 35S-labeled oligonucleotides. Our data show that messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of the LTCC CaV1.2 α1 subunit as well as all auxiliary β and α2δ subunits, except α2δ-4, were expressed in the hippocampus of age-matched wild-type mice. It was unexpected to see, that cells directly located in the plaque core in the cortex expressed mRNAs for CaV1.2 α1, β2, β4, and α2δ-1, whereas no expression was detected in the halo. Furthermore, cells in the plaque core also expressed preprotachykinin-A mRNA, the precursor for substance P. By means of confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that collagen-IV-stained brain vessels in the cortex were associated with the plaque core and were immunoreactive for substance P. In cortical organotypic brain slices of adult Alzheimer mice, we could demonstrate that LTCC blockers increased angiogenesis, which was further potentiated by substance P. In conclusion, our data show that brain vessels associated with beta-amyloid plaques express substance P and an LTCC and may play a role in angiogenesis. PMID:25619662

  14. Direct Evidence for Microdomain-Specific Localization and Remodeling of Functional L-Type Calcium Channels in Rat and Human Atrial Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Glukhov, Alexey V.; Balycheva, Marina; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L.; Ilkan, Zeki; Alvarez-Laviada, Anita; Bhogal, Navneet; Diakonov, Ivan; Schobesberger, Sophie; Sikkel, Markus B.; Bhargava, Anamika; Faggian, Giuseppe; Punjabi, Prakash P.; Houser, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background— Distinct subpopulations of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) with different functional properties exist in cardiomyocytes. Disruption of cellular structure may affect LTCC in a microdomain-specific manner and contribute to the pathophysiology of cardiac diseases, especially in cells lacking organized transverse tubules (T-tubules) such as atrial myocytes (AMs). Methods and Results— Isolated rat and human AMs were characterized by scanning ion conductance, confocal, and electron microscopy. Half of AMs possessed T-tubules and structured topography, proportional to cell width. A bigger proportion of myocytes in the left atrium had organized T-tubules and topography than in the right atrium. Super-resolution scanning patch clamp showed that LTCCs distribute equally in T-tubules and crest areas of the sarcolemma, whereas, in ventricular myocytes, LTCCs primarily cluster in T-tubules. Rat, but not human, T-tubule LTCCs had open probability similar to crest LTCCs, but exhibited ≈40% greater current. Optical mapping of Ca2+ transients revealed that rat AMs presented ≈3-fold as many spontaneous Ca2+ release events as ventricular myocytes. Occurrence of crest LTCCs and spontaneous Ca2+ transients were eliminated by either a caveolae-targeted LTCC antagonist or disrupting caveolae with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, with an associated ≈30% whole-cell ICa,L reduction. Heart failure (16 weeks post–myocardial infarction) in rats resulted in a T-tubule degradation (by ≈40%) and significant elevation of spontaneous Ca2+ release events. Although heart failure did not affect LTCC occurrence, it led to ≈25% decrease in T-tubule LTCC amplitude. Conclusions— We provide the first direct evidence for the existence of 2 distinct subpopulations of functional LTCCs in rat and human AMs, with their biophysical properties modulated in heart failure in a microdomain-specific manner. PMID:26450916

  15. Genotype phenotype associations across the voltage-gated sodium channel family.

    PubMed

    Brunklaus, Andreas; Ellis, Rachael; Reavey, Eleanor; Semsarian, Christopher; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2014-10-01

    Mutations in genes encoding voltage-gated sodium channels have emerged as the most clinically relevant genes associated with epilepsy, cardiac conduction defects, skeletal muscle channelopathies and peripheral pain disorders. Geneticists in partnership with neurologists and cardiologists are often asked to comment on the clinical significance of specific mutations. We have reviewed the evidence relating to genotype phenotype associations among the best known voltage-gated sodium channel related disorders. Comparing over 1300 sodium channel mutations in central and peripheral nervous system, heart and muscle, we have identified many similarities in the genetic and clinical characteristics across the voltage-gated sodium channel family. There is evidence, that the level of impairment a specific mutation causes can be anticipated by the underlying physico-chemical property change of that mutation. Across missense mutations those with higher Grantham scores are associated with more severe phenotypes and truncating mutations underlie the most severe phenotypes. Missense mutations are clustered in specific areas and are associated with distinct phenotypes according to their position in the protein. Inherited mutations tend to be less severe than de novo mutations which are usually associated with greater physico-chemical difference. These findings should lead to a better understanding of the clinical significance of specific voltage-gated sodium channel mutations, aiding geneticists and physicians in the interpretation of genetic variants and counselling individuals and their families. PMID:25163687

  16. Mechanisms of closed-state inactivation in voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Bähring, Robert; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Inactivation of voltage-gated ion channels is an intrinsic auto-regulatory process necessary to govern the occurrence and shape of action potentials and establish firing patterns in excitable tissues. Inactivation may occur from the open state (open-state inactivation, OSI) at strongly depolarized membrane potentials, or from pre-open closed states (closed-state inactivation, CSI) at hyperpolarized and modestly depolarized membrane potentials. Voltage-gated Na+, K+, Ca2+ and non-selective cationic channels utilize both OSI and CSI. Whereas there are detailed mechanistic descriptions of OSI, much less is known about the molecular basis of CSI. Here, we review evidence for CSI in voltage-gated cationic channels (VGCCs) and recent findings that shed light on the molecular mechanisms of CSI in voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels. Particularly, complementary observations suggest that the S4 voltage sensor, the S4S5 linker and the main S6 activation gate are instrumental in the installment of CSI in Kv4 channels. According to this hypothesis, the voltage sensor may adopt a distinct conformation to drive CSI and, depending on the stability of the interactions between the voltage sensor and the pore domain, a closed-inactivated state results from rearrangements in the selectivity filter or failure of the activation gate to open. Kv4 channel CSI may efficiently exploit the dynamics of the subthreshold membrane potential to regulate spiking properties in excitable tissues. PMID:21098008

  17. Lipid-dependent gating of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Liu, Weiran; Anderson, Lingyan Y.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies hypothesized that phospholipids stabilize two voltage-sensing arginine residues of certain voltage-gated potassium channels in activated conformations. It remains unclear how lipids directly affect these channels. Here, by examining the conformations of the KvAP in different lipids, we showed that without voltage change, the voltage-sensor domains switched from the activated to the resting state when their surrounding lipids were changed from phospholipids to nonphospholipids. Such lipid-determined conformational change was coupled to the ion-conducting pore, suggesting that parallel to voltage gating, the channel is gated by its annular lipids. Our measurements recognized that the energetic cost of lipid-dependent gating approaches that of voltage gating, but kinetically it appears much slower. Our data support that a channel and its surrounding lipids together constitute a functional unit, and natural nonphospholipids such as cholesterol should exert strong effects on voltage-gated channels. Our first observation of lipid-dependent gating may have general implications to other membrane proteins. PMID:21427721

  18. Surface dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Heine, Martin; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna; Voigt, Andreas; Heck, Jennifer; Bikbaev, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    Neurons encode information in fast changes of the membrane potential, and thus electrical membrane properties are critically important for the integration and processing of synaptic inputs by a neuron. These electrical properties are largely determined by ion channels embedded in the membrane. The distribution of most ion channels in the membrane is not spatially uniform: they undergo activity-driven changes in the range of minutes to days. Even in the range of milliseconds, the composition and topology of ion channels are not static but engage in highly dynamic processes including stochastic or activity-dependent transient association of the pore-forming and auxiliary subunits, lateral diffusion, as well as clustering of different channels. In this review we briefly discuss the potential impact of mobile sodium, calcium and potassium ion channels and the functional significance of this for individual neurons and neuronal networks. PMID:26891382

  19. Anaesthetic tricaine acts preferentially on neural voltage-gated sodium channels and fails to block directly evoked muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Attili, Seetharamaiah; Hughes, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    Movements in animals arise through concerted action of neurons and skeletal muscle. General anaesthetics prevent movement and cause loss of consciousness by blocking neural function. Anaesthetics of the amino amide-class are thought to act by blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels. In fish, the commonly used anaesthetic tricaine methanesulphonate, also known as 3-aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester, metacaine or MS-222, causes loss of consciousness. However, its role in blocking action potentials in distinct excitable cells is unclear, raising the possibility that tricaine could act as a neuromuscular blocking agent directly causing paralysis. Here we use evoked electrical stimulation to show that tricaine efficiently blocks neural action potentials, but does not prevent directly evoked muscle contraction. Nifedipine-sensitive L-type Cav channels affecting movement are also primarily neural, suggesting that muscle Nav channels are relatively insensitive to tricaine. These findings show that tricaine used at standard concentrations in zebrafish larvae does not paralyse muscle, thereby diminishing concern that a direct action on muscle could mask a lack of general anaesthesia. PMID:25090007

  20. Measuring Ca2+-Dependent Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels in HEK-293T Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica R; Lee, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Cav) channels regulate a variety of biological processes, such as muscle contraction, gene expression, and neurotransmitter release. Cav channels are subject to diverse forms of regulation, including those involving the Ca(2+) ions that permeate the pore. High voltage-activated Cav channels undergo Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) and facilitation (CDF), which can regulate processes such as cardiac rhythm and synaptic plasticity. CDI and CDF differ slightly between Cav1 (L-type) and Cav2 (P/Q-, N-, and R-type) channels. Human embryonic kidney cells transformed with SV40 large T-antigen (HEK-293T) are advantageous for studying CDI and CDF of a particular type of Cav channel. HEK-293T cells do not express endogenous Cav channels, but Cav channels can be expressed exogenously at high levels in these cells by transient transfection. This protocol describes how to characterize and analyze Ca(2+)-dependent modulation of recombinant Cav channels in HEK-293T cells. PMID:27587775

  1. Anaesthetic Tricaine Acts Preferentially on Neural Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels and Fails to Block Directly Evoked Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Seetharamaiah; Hughes, Simon M.

    2014-01-01

    Movements in animals arise through concerted action of neurons and skeletal muscle. General anaesthetics prevent movement and cause loss of consciousness by blocking neural function. Anaesthetics of the amino amide-class are thought to act by blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels. In fish, the commonly used anaesthetic tricaine methanesulphonate, also known as 3-aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester, metacaine or MS-222, causes loss of consciousness. However, its role in blocking action potentials in distinct excitable cells is unclear, raising the possibility that tricaine could act as a neuromuscular blocking agent directly causing paralysis. Here we use evoked electrical stimulation to show that tricaine efficiently blocks neural action potentials, but does not prevent directly evoked muscle contraction. Nifedipine-sensitive L-type Cav channels affecting movement are also primarily neural, suggesting that muscle Nav channels are relatively insensitive to tricaine. These findings show that tricaine used at standard concentrations in zebrafish larvae does not paralyse muscle, thereby diminishing concern that a direct action on muscle could mask a lack of general anaesthesia. PMID:25090007

  2. L-type calcium channels play a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Li; Wang, Yu; Wang, Huan; Kong, Lingmin; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Xin; Ding, Yin

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect the functional Ca{sup 2+} currents and mRNA expression of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blockage of VDCC{sub L} exert antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting VDCC{sub L} can suppress the ability of rMSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}1C of VDCC{sub L} may be a primary functional subunit in VDCC{sub L}-regulating rMSCs. -- Abstract: L-type voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channels (VDCC{sub L}) play an important role in the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and influence multiple cellular processes. They have been confirmed to contribute to the functional activities of osteoblasts. Recently, VDCC{sub L} expression was reported in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but the role of VDCC{sub L} in MSCs is still undetermined. The aim of this study was to determine whether VDCC{sub L} may be regarded as a new regulator in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat MSC (rMSCs). In this study, we examined functional Ca{sup 2+} currents (I{sub Ca}) and mRNA expression of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs, and then suppressed VDCC{sub L} using nifedipine (Nif), a VDCC{sub L} blocker, to investigate its role in rMSCs. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were analyzed by MTT, flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin Red S staining, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR assays. We found that Nif exerts antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. ALP activity and mineralized nodules were significantly decreased after Nif treatment. Moreover, the mRNA levels of the osteogenic markers, osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), were also down-regulated. In addition, we transfected {alpha}1C-siRNA into the cells to further confirm the role of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs, and a similar effect on osteogenesis was found. These

  3. The role of voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of mouse uterine contractility

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan C; McClure, Marisa C; Smith, Margaret A; Abel, Peter W; Bradley, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    Background Uterine smooth muscle cells exhibit ionic currents that appear to be important in the control of uterine contractility, but how these currents might produce the changes in contractile activity seen in pregnant myometrium has not been established. There are conflicting reports concerning the role of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels and large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels in the regulation of uterine contractility. In this study we provide molecular and functional evidence for a role for Kv channels in the regulation of spontaneous contractile activity in mouse myometrium, and also demonstrate a change in Kv channel regulation of contractility in pregnant mouse myometrium. Methods Functional assays which evaluated the effects of channel blockers and various contractile agonists were accomplished by quantifying contractility of isolated uterine smooth muscle obtained from nonpregnant mice as well as mice at various stages of pregnancy. Expression of Kv channel proteins in isolated uterine smooth muscle was evaluated by Western blots. Results The Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) caused contractions in nonpregnant mouse myometrium (EC50 = 54 micromolar, maximal effect at 300 micromolar) but this effect disappeared in pregnant mice; similarly, the Kv4.2/Kv4.3 blocker phrixotoxin-2 caused contractions in nonpregnant, but not pregnant, myometrium. Contractile responses to 4-AP were not dependent upon nerves, as neither tetrodotoxin nor storage of tissues at room temperature significantly altered these responses, nor were responses dependent upon the presence of the endometrium. Spontaneous contractions and contractions in response to 4-AP did not appear to be mediated by BK, as the BK channel-selective blockers iberiotoxin, verruculogen, or tetraethylammonium failed to affect either spontaneous contractions or 4-AP-elicited responses. A number of different Kv channel alpha subunit proteins were found in isolated myometrium

  4. CaBP1 regulates voltage-dependent inactivation and activation of Ca(V)1.2 (L-type) calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Oz, Shimrit; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Christel, Carl J; Lee, Amy; Dascal, Nathan

    2011-04-22

    CaBP1 is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that regulates the gating of voltage-gated (Ca(V)) Ca(2+) channels. In the Ca(V)1.2 channel α(1)-subunit (α(1C)), CaBP1 interacts with cytosolic N- and C-terminal domains and blunts Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. To clarify the role of the α(1C) N-terminal domain in CaBP1 regulation, we compared the effects of CaBP1 on two alternatively spliced variants of α(1C) containing a long or short N-terminal domain. In both isoforms, CaBP1 inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation but also caused a depolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation and enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). In binding assays, CaBP1 interacted with the distal third of the N-terminal domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This segment is distinct from the previously identified calmodulin-binding site in the N terminus. However, deletion of a segment in the proximal N-terminal domain of both α(1C) isoforms, which spared the CaBP1-binding site, inhibited the effect of CaBP1 on VDI. This result suggests a modular organization of the α(1C) N-terminal domain, with separate determinants for CaBP1 binding and transduction of the effect on VDI. Our findings expand the diversity and mechanisms of Ca(V) channel regulation by CaBP1 and define a novel modulatory function for the initial segment of the N terminus of α(1C). PMID:21383011

  5. Cellular defibrillation: interaction of micro-scale electric fields with voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kargol, Armin; Malkinski, Leszek; Eskandari, Rahmatollah; Carter, Maya; Livingston, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    We study the effect of micro-scale electric fields on voltage-gated ion channels in mammalian cell membranes. Such micro- and nano-scale electric fields mimic the effects of multiferroic nanoparticles that were recently proposed [1] as a novel way of controlling the function of voltage-sensing biomolecules such as ion channels. This article describes experimental procedures and initial results that reveal the effect of the electric field, in close proximity of cells, on the ion transport through voltage-gated ion channels. We present two configurations of the whole-cell patch-clamping apparatus that were used to detect the effect of external stimulation on ionic currents and discuss preliminary results that indicate modulation of the ionic currents consistent with the applied stimulus. PMID:26067055

  6. Trafficking Mechanisms Underlying Neuronal Voltage-gated Ion Channel Localization at the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Vacher, Helene; Trimmer, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Voltage-gated ion channels are diverse and fundamental determinants of neuronal intrinsic excitability. Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) and Na+ (Nav) channels play complex yet fundamentally important roles in determining intrinsic excitability. The Kv and Nav channels located at the axon initial segment (AIS) play a unique and especially important role in generating neuronal output in the form of anterograde axonal and backpropagating action potentials, Aberrant intrinsic excitability in individual neurons within networks contributes to synchronous neuronal activity leading to seizures. Mutations in ion channel genes gives rise to a variety of seizure-related “Channelopathies”, and many of the ion channel subunits associated with epilepsy mutations are localized at the AIS, making this a hotspot for epileptogenesis. Here we review the cellular mechanisms that underlie the trafficking of Kv and Nav channels found at the AIS, and how Kv and Nav channel mutations associated with epilepsy can alter these processes. PMID:23216576

  7. Strategies for Investigating G-Protein Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Van B; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor modulation of voltage-gated ion channels is a common means of fine-tuning the response of channels to changes in membrane potential. Such modulation impacts physiological processes such as synaptic transmission, and hence therapeutic strategies often directly or indirectly target these pathways. As an exemplar of channel modulation, we examine strategies for investigating G-protein modulation of CaV2.2 or N-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. We focus on biochemical and genetic tools for defining the molecular mechanisms underlying the various forms of CaV2.2 channel modulation initiated following ligand binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:27140924

  8. Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: A Structural Examination of Selectivity and Gating.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dorothy M; Nimigean, Crina M

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels play a fundamental role in the generation and propagation of the action potential. The discovery of these channels began with predictions made by early pioneers, and has culminated in their extensive functional and structural characterization by electrophysiological, spectroscopic, and crystallographic studies. With the aid of a variety of crystal structures of these channels, a highly detailed picture emerges of how the voltage-sensing domain reports changes in the membrane electric field and couples this to conformational changes in the activation gate. In addition, high-resolution structural and functional studies of K(+) channel pores, such as KcsA and MthK, offer a comprehensive picture on how selectivity is achieved in K(+) channels. Here, we illustrate the remarkable features of voltage-gated potassium channels and explain the mechanisms used by these machines with experimental data. PMID:27141052

  9. Suppression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and neuronal excitability by imperatorin.

    PubMed

    Wu, King-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Hung; Cheng, Ka-Shun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yang, Chin-Tsang; Wong, Kar-Lok; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Chan, Paul; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2013-12-01

    Imperatorin is a naturally occurring furocoumarin compound isolated from plants such as Angelica archangelica and Cnidium monnieri. It has multiple pharmacological effects including anticonvulsant effects. Here we determined the effects of imperatorin on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) using whole-cell patch clamp techniques in differentiated neuronal NG108-15 cells. We showed that imperatorin inhibited VGSC; such inhibition did not show state-dependence. Imperatorin caused a left shift in the steady-state inactivation curve without affecting activation gating. The inhibition of VGSC by imperatorin displayed a mild frequency-dependence. Imperatorin was also shown to inhibit VGSC and action potential amplitude without affecting voltage-gated K(+) channels in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that imperatorin dampens neuronal excitability by inhibiting VGSC. PMID:24113522

  10. Dehydration of Ions in Voltage-Gated Carbon Nanopores Observed by in Situ NMR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Xing, Yun-Zhao; Liu, Shubin; Ling, Yan-Chun; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Wu, Yue

    2015-12-17

    Ion transport through nanochannels is of fundamental importance in voltage-gated protein ion channels and energy storage devices. Direct microscopic observations are critical for understanding the intricacy of ionic processes in nanoconfinement. Here we report an in situ nuclear magnetic resonance study of ion hydration in voltage-gated carbon nanopores. Nucleus-independent chemical shift was employed to monitor the ionic processes of NaF aqueous electrolyte in nanopores of carbon supercapacitors. The state of ion hydration was revealed by the chemical shift, which is sensitive to the hydration number. A large energy barrier was observed for ions to enter nanopores smaller than the hydrated ion size. Increasing the gating voltage above 0.4 V overcomes this barrier and brings F(-) into the nanopores without dehydration. Partial dehydration of F(-) occurs only at gating voltage above 0.7 V. No dehydration was observed for Na(+) cations, in agreement with their strong ion hydration. PMID:26629712

  11. Gαi2- and Gαi3-Specific Regulation of Voltage-Dependent L-Type Calcium Channels in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dizayee, Sara; Kaestner, Sonja; Kuck, Fabian; Hein, Peter; Klein, Christoph; Piekorz, Roland P.; Meszaros, Janos; Matthes, Jan; Nürnberg, Bernd; Herzig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background Two pertussis toxin sensitive Gi proteins, Gi2 and Gi3, are expressed in cardiomyocytes and upregulated in heart failure. It has been proposed that the highly homologous Gi isoforms are functionally distinct. To test for isoform-specific functions of Gi proteins, we examined their role in the regulation of cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC). Methods Ventricular tissues and isolated myocytes were obtained from mice with targeted deletion of either Gαi2 (Gαi2−/−) or Gαi3 (Gαi3−/−). mRNA levels of Gαi/o isoforms and L-VDCC subunits were quantified by real-time PCR. Gαi and Cavα1 protein levels as well as protein kinase B/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation levels were assessed by immunoblot analysis. L-VDCC function was assessed by whole-cell and single-channel current recordings. Results In cardiac tissue from Gαi2−/− mice, Gαi3 mRNA and protein expression was upregulated to 187±21% and 567±59%, respectively. In Gαi3−/− mouse hearts, Gαi2 mRNA (127±5%) and protein (131±10%) levels were slightly enhanced. Interestingly, L-VDCC current density in cardiomyocytes from Gαi2−/− mice was lowered (−7.9±0.6 pA/pF, n = 11, p<0.05) compared to wild-type cells (−10.7±0.5 pA/pF, n = 22), whereas it was increased in myocytes from Gαi3−/− mice (−14.3±0.8 pA/pF, n = 14, p<0.05). Steady-state inactivation was shifted to negative potentials, and recovery kinetics slowed in the absence of Gαi2 (but not of Gαi3) and following treatment with pertussis toxin in Gαi3−/−. The pore forming Cavα1 protein level was unchanged in all mouse models analyzed, similar to mRNA levels of Cavα1 and Cavβ2 subunits. Interestingly, at the cellular signalling level, phosphorylation assays revealed abolished carbachol-triggered activation of ERK1/2 in mice lacking Gαi2. Conclusion Our data provide novel evidence for an isoform-specific modulation of L-VDCC by G

  12. Magnetic skyrmion transistor: skyrmion motion in a voltage-gated nanotrack

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko; Zhao, G. P.; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized and topologically protected spin configurations, which are of both fundamental and applied interests for future electronics. In this work, we propose a voltage-gated skyrmion transistor within the well-established framework of micromagnetics. Its operating conditions and processes have been theoretically investigated and demonstrated, in which the gate voltage can be used to switch on/off a circuit. Our results provide the first time guidelines for practical realization of hybrid skyrmionic-electronic devices. PMID:26087287

  13. Maxi-K(Ca), a Unique Member of the Voltage-Gated K Channel Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Toro, L.; Wallner, M.; Meera, P.; Tanaka, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Large-conductance, voltage-, and Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) (maxi-K(Ca)) channels regulate neuronal and smooth muscle excitability. Their pore-forming alpha-subunit shows similarities with voltage-gated channels and indeed can open in the practical absence of Ca(2+). The NH(2) terminus is unique, with a seventh transmembrane segment involved in beta-subunit modulation. The long COOH terminus is implied in Ca(2+) modulation. PMID:11390773

  14. Outward Rectification of Voltage-Gated K+ Channels Evolved at Least Twice in Life History.

    PubMed

    Riedelsberger, Janin; Dreyer, Ingo; Gonzalez, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels are present in all living systems. Despite high structural similarities in the transmembrane domains (TMD), this K+ channel type segregates into at least two main functional categories-hyperpolarization-activated, inward-rectifying (Kin) and depolarization-activated, outward-rectifying (Kout) channels. Voltage-gated K+ channels sense the membrane voltage via a voltage-sensing domain that is connected to the conduction pathway of the channel. It has been shown that the voltage-sensing mechanism is the same in Kin and Kout channels, but its performance results in opposite pore conformations. It is not known how the different coupling of voltage-sensor and pore is implemented. Here, we studied sequence and structural data of voltage-gated K+ channels from animals and plants with emphasis on the property of opposite rectification. We identified structural hotspots that alone allow already the distinction between Kin and Kout channels. Among them is a loop between TMD S5 and the pore that is very short in animal Kout, longer in plant and animal Kin and the longest in plant Kout channels. In combination with further structural and phylogenetic analyses this finding suggests that outward-rectification evolved twice and independently in the animal and plant kingdom. PMID:26356684

  15. Outward Rectification of Voltage-Gated K+ Channels Evolved at Least Twice in Life History

    PubMed Central

    Riedelsberger, Janin; Dreyer, Ingo; Gonzalez, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels are present in all living systems. Despite high structural similarities in the transmembrane domains (TMD), this K+ channel type segregates into at least two main functional categories—hyperpolarization-activated, inward-rectifying (Kin) and depolarization-activated, outward-rectifying (Kout) channels. Voltage-gated K+ channels sense the membrane voltage via a voltage-sensing domain that is connected to the conduction pathway of the channel. It has been shown that the voltage-sensing mechanism is the same in Kin and Kout channels, but its performance results in opposite pore conformations. It is not known how the different coupling of voltage-sensor and pore is implemented. Here, we studied sequence and structural data of voltage-gated K+ channels from animals and plants with emphasis on the property of opposite rectification. We identified structural hotspots that alone allow already the distinction between Kin and Kout channels. Among them is a loop between TMD S5 and the pore that is very short in animal Kout, longer in plant and animal Kin and the longest in plant Kout channels. In combination with further structural and phylogenetic analyses this finding suggests that outward-rectification evolved twice and independently in the animal and plant kingdom. PMID:26356684

  16. Molecular basis of functional voltage-gated K+ channel diversity in the mammalian myocardium.

    PubMed

    Nerbonne, J M

    2000-06-01

    In the mammalian heart, Ca2+-independent, depolarization-activated potassium (K+) currents contribute importantly to shaping the waveforms of action potentials, and several distinct types of voltage-gated K+ currents that subserve this role have been characterized. In most cardiac cells, transient outward currents, Ito,f and/or Ito,s, and several components of delayed reactivation, including IKr, IKs, IKur and IK,slow, are expressed. Nevertheless, there are species, as well as cell-type and regional, differences in the expression patterns of these currents, and these differences are manifested as variations in action potential waveforms. A large number of voltage-gated K+ channel pore-forming (alpha) and accessory (beta, minK, MiRP) subunits have been cloned from or shown to be expressed in heart, and a variety of experimental approaches are being exploited in vitro and in vivo to define the relationship(s) between these subunits and functional voltage-gated cardiac K+ channels. Considerable progress has been made in defining these relationships recently, and it is now clear that distinct molecular entities underlie the various electrophysiologically distinct repolarizing K+ currents (i.e. Ito,f, Ito,s, IKr, IKs, IKur, IK,slow, etc.) in myocyardial cells. PMID:10835033

  17. Simulation Studies of Ion Permeation and Selectivity in Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ing, C; Pomès, R

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in electrically excitable cells. Molecular dynamics simulations have become a useful tool to study the molecular basis of ion transport in atomistic models of voltage-gated ion channels. The elucidation of several three-dimensional structures of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) in 2011 and 2012 opened the way to detailed computational investigations of this important class of membrane proteins. Here we review the numerous simulation studies of Na(+) permeation and selectivity in bacterial Nav channels published in the past 5years. These studies use a variety of simulation methodologies differing in force field parameters, molecular models, sampling algorithms, and simulation times. Although results disagree on the details of ion permeation mechanisms, they concur in the presence of two primary Na(+) binding sites in the selectivity filter and support a loosely coupled knock-on mechanism of Na(+) permeation. Comparative studies of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) permeation reveal sites within Nav channels that are Na(+) selective, yet a consensus model of selectivity has not been established. We discuss the agreement between simulation and experimental results and propose strategies that may be used to resolve discrepancies between simulation studies in order to improve future computational studies of permeation and selectivity in ion channels. PMID:27586286

  18. Loss of caveolin-3 induced by the dystrophy-associated P104L mutation impairs L-type calcium channel function in mouse skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Couchoux, Harold; Allard, Bruno; Legrand, Claude; Jacquemond, Vincent; Berthier, Christine

    2007-05-01

    Caveolins are membrane scaffolding proteins that associate with and regulate a variety of signalling proteins, including ion channels. A deficiency in caveolin-3 (Cav-3), the major striated muscle isoform, is responsible for skeletal muscle disorders, such as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C (LGMD 1C). The molecular mechanisms leading to the muscle wasting that characterizes this pathology are poorly understood. Here we show that a loss of Cav-3 induced by the expression of the LGMD 1C-associated mutant P104L (Cav-3(P104L)) provokes a reduction by half of the maximal conductance of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel in mouse primary cultured myotubes and fetal skeletal muscle fibres. Confocal immunomiscrocopy indicated a colocalization of Cav-3 and Ca(v)1.1, the pore-forming subunit of the L-type Ca(2+) channel, at the surface membrane and in the developing T-tubule network in control myotubes and fetal fibres. In myotubes expressing Cav-3(P104L), the loss of Cav-3 was accompanied by a 66% reduction in Ca(v)1.1 mean labelling intensity. Our results suggest that Cav-3 is involved in L-type Ca(2+) channel membrane function and localization in skeletal muscle cells and that an alteration of L-type Ca(2+) channels could be involved in the physiopathological mechanisms of caveolinopathies. PMID:17317753

  19. Loss of caveolin-3 induced by the dystrophy-associated P104L mutation impairs L-type calcium channel function in mouse skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Couchoux, Harold; Allard, Bruno; Legrand, Claude; Jacquemond, Vincent; Berthier, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Caveolins are membrane scaffolding proteins that associate with and regulate a variety of signalling proteins, including ion channels. A deficiency in caveolin-3 (Cav-3), the major striated muscle isoform, is responsible for skeletal muscle disorders, such as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C (LGMD 1C). The molecular mechanisms leading to the muscle wasting that characterizes this pathology are poorly understood. Here we show that a loss of Cav-3 induced by the expression of the LGMD 1C-associated mutant P104L (Cav-3P104L) provokes a reduction by half of the maximal conductance of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel in mouse primary cultured myotubes and fetal skeletal muscle fibres. Confocal immunomiscrocopy indicated a colocalization of Cav-3 and Cav1.1, the pore-forming subunit of the L-type Ca2+ channel, at the surface membrane and in the developing T-tubule network in control myotubes and fetal fibres. In myotubes expressing Cav-3P104L, the loss of Cav-3 was accompanied by a 66% reduction in Cav1.1 mean labelling intensity. Our results suggest that Cav-3 is involved in L-type Ca2+ channel membrane function and localization in skeletal muscle cells and that an alteration of L-type Ca2+ channels could be involved in the physiopathological mechanisms of caveolinopathies. PMID:17317753

  20. An in vivo tethered toxin approach for the cell-autonomous inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channel currents in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Stürzebecher, Annika S; Hu, Jing; Smith, Ewan St John; Frahm, Silke; Santos-Torres, Julio; Kampfrath, Branka; Auer, Sebastian; Lewin, Gary R; Ibañez-Tallon, Inés

    2010-01-01

    Understanding information flow in sensory pathways requires cell-selective approaches to manipulate the activity of defined neurones. Primary afferent nociceptors, which detect painful stimuli, are enriched in specific voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) subtypes. Toxins derived from venomous animals can be used to dissect the contributions of particular ion currents to cell physiology. Here we have used a transgenic approach to target a membrane-tethered isoform of the conotoxin MrVIa (t-MrVIa) only to nociceptive neurones in mice. T-MrVIa transgenic mice show a 44 ± 7% reduction of tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) VGSC current densities. This inhibition is permanent, reversible and does not result in functional upregulation of TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) VGSCs, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels present in nociceptive neurones. As a consequence of the reduction of TTX-R VGSC currents, t-MrVIa transgenic mice display decreased inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity, cold pain insensitivity and reduced firing of cutaneous C-fibres sensitive to noxious cold temperatures. These data validate the use of genetically encoded t-toxins as a powerful tool to manipulate VGSCs in specific cell types within the mammalian nervous system. This novel genetic methodology can be used for circuit mapping and has the key advantage that it enables the dissection of the contribution of specific ionic currents to neuronal function and to behaviour. PMID:20308253

  1. Visual Stimuli Evoked Action Potentials Trigger Rapidly Propagating Dendritic Calcium Transients in the Frog Optic Tectum Layer 6 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Svirskis, Gytis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskiene, Natasa; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus in mammals or the optic tectum in amphibians is a major visual information processing center responsible for generation of orientating responses such as saccades in monkeys or prey catching avoidance behavior in frogs. The conserved structure function of the superior colliculus the optic tectum across distant species such as frogs, birds monkeys permits to draw rather general conclusions after studying a single species. We chose the frog optic tectum because we are able to perform whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings fluorescence imaging of tectal neurons while they respond to a visual stimulus. In the optic tectum of amphibians most visual information is processed by pear-shaped neurons possessing long dendritic branches, which receive the majority of synapses originating from the retinal ganglion cells. Since the first step of the retinal input integration is performed on these dendrites, it is important to know whether this integration is enhanced by active dendritic properties. We demonstrate that rapid calcium transients coinciding with the visual stimulus evoked action potentials in the somatic recordings can be readily detected up to the fine branches of these dendrites. These transients were blocked by calcium channel blockers nifedipine CdCl2 indicating that calcium entered dendrites via voltage-activated L-type calcium channels. The high speed of calcium transient propagation, >300 μm in <10 ms, is consistent with the notion that action potentials, actively propagating along dendrites, open voltage-gated L-type calcium channels causing rapid calcium concentration transients in the dendrites. We conclude that such activation by somatic action potentials of the dendritic voltage gated calcium channels in the close vicinity to the synapses formed by axons of the retinal ganglion cells may facilitate visual information processing in the principal neurons of the frog optic tectum. PMID:26414356

  2. Visual Stimuli Evoked Action Potentials Trigger Rapidly Propagating Dendritic Calcium Transients in the Frog Optic Tectum Layer 6 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Svirskis, Gytis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskiene, Natasa; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus in mammals or the optic tectum in amphibians is a major visual information processing center responsible for generation of orientating responses such as saccades in monkeys or prey catching avoidance behavior in frogs. The conserved structure function of the superior colliculus the optic tectum across distant species such as frogs, birds monkeys permits to draw rather general conclusions after studying a single species. We chose the frog optic tectum because we are able to perform whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings fluorescence imaging of tectal neurons while they respond to a visual stimulus. In the optic tectum of amphibians most visual information is processed by pear-shaped neurons possessing long dendritic branches, which receive the majority of synapses originating from the retinal ganglion cells. Since the first step of the retinal input integration is performed on these dendrites, it is important to know whether this integration is enhanced by active dendritic properties. We demonstrate that rapid calcium transients coinciding with the visual stimulus evoked action potentials in the somatic recordings can be readily detected up to the fine branches of these dendrites. These transients were blocked by calcium channel blockers nifedipine CdCl2 indicating that calcium entered dendrites via voltage-activated L-type calcium channels. The high speed of calcium transient propagation, >300 μm in <10 ms, is consistent with the notion that action potentials, actively propagating along dendrites, open voltage-gated L-type calcium channels causing rapid calcium concentration transients in the dendrites. We conclude that such activation by somatic action potentials of the dendritic voltage gated calcium channels in the close vicinity to the synapses formed by axons of the retinal ganglion cells may facilitate visual information processing in the principal neurons of the frog optic tectum. PMID:26414356

  3. Targeting of protein phosphatases PP2A and PP2B to the C-terminus of the L-type calcium channel Ca v1.2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Ginsburg, Kenneth S; Hall, Duane D; Zimmermann, Maike; Stein, Ivar S; Zhang, Mingxu; Tandan, Samvit; Hill, Joseph A; Horne, Mary C; Bers, Donald; Hell, Johannes W

    2010-12-01

    The L-type Ca(2+) channel Ca(v)1.2 forms macromolecular signaling complexes that comprise the β(2) adrenergic receptor, trimeric G(s) protein, adenylyl cyclase, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) for efficient signaling in heart and brain. The protein phosphatases PP2A and PP2B are part of this complex. PP2A counteracts increase in Ca(v)1.2 channel activity by PKA and other protein kinases, whereas PP2B can either augment or decrease Ca(v)1.2 currents in cardiomyocytes depending on the precise experimental conditions. We found that PP2A binds to two regions in the C-terminus of the central, pore-forming α(1) subunit of Ca(v)1.2: one region spans residues 1795-1818 and the other residues 1965-1971. PP2B binds immediately downstream of residue 1971. Injection of a peptide that contained residues 1965-1971 and displaced PP2A but not PP2B from endogenous Ca(v)1.2 increased basal and isoproterenol-stimulated L-type Ca(2+) currents in acutely isolated cardiomyocytes. Together with our biochemical data, these physiological results indicate that anchoring of PP2A at this site of Ca(v)1.2 in the heart negatively regulates cardiac L-type currents, likely by counterbalancing basal and stimulated phosphorylation that is mediated by PKA and possibly other kinases. PMID:21053940

  4. The CaV2.3 R-Type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel in Mouse Sleep Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Siwek, Magdalena Elisabeth; Müller, Ralf; Henseler, Christina; Broich, Karl; Papazoglou, Anna; Weiergräber, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are key elements in mediating thalamocortical rhythmicity. Low-voltage activated (LVA) CaV 3 T-type Ca2+ channels have been related to thalamic rebound burst firing and to generation of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. High-voltage activated (HVA) CaV 1 L-type Ca2+ channels, on the opposite, favor the tonic mode of action associated with higher levels of vigilance. However, the role of the HVA Non-L-type CaV2.3 Ca2+ channels, which are predominantly expressed in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN), still remains unclear. Recently, CaV2.3−/− mice were reported to exhibit altered spike-wave discharge (SWD)/absence seizure susceptibility supported by the observation that CaV2.3 mediated Ca2+ influx into RTN neurons can trigger small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+-channel type 2 (SK2) currents capable of maintaining thalamic burst activity. Based on these studies we investigated the role of CaV2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels in rodent sleep. Methods: The role of CaV2.3 Ca2+ channels was analyzed in CaV2.3−/− mice and controls in both spontaneous and artificial urethane-induced sleep, using implantable video-EEG radiotelemetry. Data were analyzed for alterations in sleep architecture using sleep staging software and time-frequency analysis. Results: CaV2.3 deficient mice exhibited reduced wake duration and increased slow-wave sleep (SWS). Whereas mean sleep stage durations remained unchanged, the total number of SWS epochs was increased in CaV2.3−/− mice. Additional changes were observed for sleep stage transitions and EEG amplitudes. Furthermore, urethane-induced SWS mimicked spontaneous sleep results obtained from CaV2.3 deficient mice. Quantitative Real-time PCR did not reveal changes in thalamic CaV3 T-type Ca2+ channel expression. The detailed mechanisms of SWS increase in CaV2.3−/− mice remain to be determined. Conclusions: Low-voltage activated CaV2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels in the thalamocortical

  5. Refined localization of the [alpha][sub 1]-subunit of the skeletal muscle L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (CACNL1A3) to human chromosome 1q32 by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Iles, D.E.; Segers, B.; Wieringa, B.; Weghuis, D.O.; Suijerbuijk, R. ); Mikala, G.; Schwartz, A. )

    1994-02-01

    The authors isolated and partially sequenced a cosmid clone containing the human skeletal muscle L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel gene (CACNL1A3). The cosmid clone, which was also found to contain a novel dinucleotide repeat marker for the CACNL1A3 gene, was used for the chromosomal localization of CACNL1A3 by in situ hybridization. The results refine the localization of CACNL1A3 on the long arm of human chromosome 1 to band q32. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Computational modeling of inhibition of voltage-gated Ca channels: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wing-Chiu; Ghouri, Iffath; Taggart, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs). Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models—of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC), cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN), and ventricular cells—to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents—the L-type (ICaL) and T-type (ICaT) Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10%) alone, or ICaT (40%) alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine specificity of action

  7. Mechanisms of pyrethroid insecticide-induced stimulation of calcium influx in neocortical neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Pyrethroids have also been reported to alter the function of other channel types, including activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ calcium chann...

  8. Voltage-gated Ca2+ entry and ryanodine receptor Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in preglomerular arterioles.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Susan K; Arendshorst, William J

    2007-05-01

    We have previously shown that in afferent arterioles, angiotensin II (ANG II) involves activation of the inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R), activation of adenine diphosphoribose (ADPR) cyclase, and amplification of the initial IP(3)R-stimulated release of cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (Fellner SK, Arendshorst WJ. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 288: F785-F791, 2004). The response of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) to local increases in [Ca(2+)](i) is defined as calcium-induced calcium release (CICR). To investigate whether Ca(2+) entry via voltage-gated channels (VGCC) can stimulate CICR, we treated fura 2-loaded, freshly isolated afferent arterioles with KCl (40 mM; high KCl). In control arterioles, peak [Ca(2+)](i) increased by 165 +/- 10 nM. Locking the RyR in the closed position with ryanodine (100 microM) inhibited the [Ca(2+)](i) response by 59% (P < 0.01). 8-Br cADPR, a specific blocker of the ability of cyclic ADPR (cADPR) to sensitize the RyR to Ca(2+), caused a 43% inhibition. We suggest that the lower inhibition by 8-Br cADPR (P = 0.02, ryanodine vs. 8-Br cADPR) represents endogenously active ADPR cyclase. Depletion of SR Ca(2+) stores by inhibiting the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase with cyclopiazonic acid or thapsigargin blocked the [Ca(2+)](i) responses to KCl by 51% (P not significant vs. ryanodine or 8-Br cADPR). These data suggest that about half of the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by high KCl is accomplished by activation of CICR through the ability of entered Ca(2+) to expose the RyR to high local concentrations of Ca(2+) and that endogenous cADPR contributes to the process. PMID:17190906

  9. Major diversification of voltage-gated K+ channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofan; Liu, Hansi; Chu Luo, Jose; Rhodes, Sarah A.; Trigg, Liana M.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Anishkin, Andriy; Diatta, Fortunay H.; Sassic, Jessica K.; Simmons, David K.; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Martindale, Mark Q.; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    We examined the origins and functional evolution of the Shaker and KCNQ families of voltage-gated K+ channels to better understand how neuronal excitability evolved. In bilaterians, the Shaker family consists of four functionally distinct gene families (Shaker, Shab, Shal, and Shaw) that share a subunit structure consisting of a voltage-gated K+ channel motif coupled to a cytoplasmic domain that mediates subfamily-exclusive assembly (T1). We traced the origin of this unique Shaker subunit structure to a common ancestor of ctenophores and parahoxozoans (cnidarians, bilaterians, and placozoans). Thus, the Shaker family is metazoan specific but is likely to have evolved in a basal metazoan. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Shaker subfamily could predate the divergence of ctenophores and parahoxozoans, but that the Shab, Shal, and Shaw subfamilies are parahoxozoan specific. In support of this, putative ctenophore Shaker subfamily channel subunits coassembled with cnidarian and mouse Shaker subunits, but not with cnidarian Shab, Shal, or Shaw subunits. The KCNQ family, which has a distinct subunit structure, also appears solely within the parahoxozoan lineage. Functional analysis indicated that the characteristic properties of Shaker, Shab, Shal, Shaw, and KCNQ currents evolved before the divergence of cnidarians and bilaterians. These results show that a major diversification of voltage-gated K+ channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans and imply that many fundamental mechanisms for the regulation of action potential propagation evolved at this time. Our results further suggest that there are likely to be substantial differences in the regulation of neuronal excitability between ctenophores and parahoxozoans. PMID:25691740

  10. Major diversification of voltage-gated K+ channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofan; Liu, Hansi; Chu Luo, Jose; Rhodes, Sarah A; Trigg, Liana M; van Rossum, Damian B; Anishkin, Andriy; Diatta, Fortunay H; Sassic, Jessica K; Simmons, David K; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Martindale, Mark Q; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    We examined the origins and functional evolution of the Shaker and KCNQ families of voltage-gated K(+) channels to better understand how neuronal excitability evolved. In bilaterians, the Shaker family consists of four functionally distinct gene families (Shaker, Shab, Shal, and Shaw) that share a subunit structure consisting of a voltage-gated K(+) channel motif coupled to a cytoplasmic domain that mediates subfamily-exclusive assembly (T1). We traced the origin of this unique Shaker subunit structure to a common ancestor of ctenophores and parahoxozoans (cnidarians, bilaterians, and placozoans). Thus, the Shaker family is metazoan specific but is likely to have evolved in a basal metazoan. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Shaker subfamily could predate the divergence of ctenophores and parahoxozoans, but that the Shab, Shal, and Shaw subfamilies are parahoxozoan specific. In support of this, putative ctenophore Shaker subfamily channel subunits coassembled with cnidarian and mouse Shaker subunits, but not with cnidarian Shab, Shal, or Shaw subunits. The KCNQ family, which has a distinct subunit structure, also appears solely within the parahoxozoan lineage. Functional analysis indicated that the characteristic properties of Shaker, Shab, Shal, Shaw, and KCNQ currents evolved before the divergence of cnidarians and bilaterians. These results show that a major diversification of voltage-gated K(+) channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans and imply that many fundamental mechanisms for the regulation of action potential propagation evolved at this time. Our results further suggest that there are likely to be substantial differences in the regulation of neuronal excitability between ctenophores and parahoxozoans. PMID:25691740

  11. Mechanisms of gain control by voltage-gated channels in intrinsically-firing neurons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ameera X; Burdakov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output) relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density) of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel), reduced (K+ channels), or produced little effect (h-type channel) on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing). For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other nervous systems

  12. The Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.8 Is Expressed in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Cejudo-Roman, Antonio; Pinto, Francisco M.; Subirán, Nerea; Ravina, Cristina G.; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Natalia; Pérez, Ricardo; Pacheco, Alberto; Irazusta, Jon; Candenas, Luz

    2013-01-01

    The role of Na+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM), the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca2+-containing or Ca2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na+, [Na+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:24086692

  13. A Voltage-Gated H+ Channel Underlying pH Homeostasis in Calcifying Coccolithophores

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Helen; Brownlee, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Marine coccolithophorid phytoplankton are major producers of biogenic calcite, playing a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Predicting the impacts of ocean acidification on coccolithophore calcification has received much recent attention and requires improved knowledge of cellular calcification mechanisms. Uniquely amongst calcifying organisms, coccolithophores produce calcified scales (coccoliths) in an intracellular compartment and secrete them to the cell surface, requiring large transcellular ionic fluxes to support calcification. In particular, intracellular calcite precipitation using HCO3− as the substrate generates equimolar quantities of H+ that must be rapidly removed to prevent cytoplasmic acidification. We have used electrophysiological approaches to identify a plasma membrane voltage-gated H+ conductance in Coccolithus pelagicus ssp braarudii with remarkably similar biophysical and functional properties to those found in metazoans. We show that both C. pelagicus and Emiliania huxleyi possess homologues of metazoan Hv1 H+ channels, which function as voltage-gated H+ channels when expressed in heterologous systems. Homologues of the coccolithophore H+ channels were also identified in a diversity of eukaryotes, suggesting a wide range of cellular roles for the Hv1 class of proteins. Using single cell imaging, we demonstrate that the coccolithophore H+ conductance mediates rapid H+ efflux and plays an important role in pH homeostasis in calcifying cells. The results demonstrate a novel cellular role for voltage gated H+ channels and provide mechanistic insight into biomineralisation by establishing a direct link between pH homeostasis and calcification. As the coccolithophore H+ conductance is dependent on the trans-membrane H+ electrochemical gradient, this mechanism will be directly impacted by, and may underlie adaptation to, ocean acidification. The presence of this H+ efflux pathway suggests that there is no obligate use of H+ derived from

  14. On the multiple roles of the voltage gated sodium channel β1 subunit in genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Debora; Moran, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are intrinsic plasma membrane proteins that initiate the action potential in electrically excitable cells. They are composed of a pore-forming α-subunit and associated β-subunits. The β1-subunit was the first accessory subunit to be cloned. It can be important for controlling cell excitability and modulating multiple aspects of sodium channel physiology. Mutations of β1 are implicated in a wide variety of inherited pathologies, including epilepsy and cardiac conduction diseases. This review summarizes β1-subunit related channelopathies pointing out the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and their underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:26042039

  15. Nonlinearity of a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Revealed by the Mechanical Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix operates by coupling the voltage-driven motion of a charged group of amino acids to the opening and closing of the pore. In this experiment, we drive this charged group with an ac field and observe the effect on the gating. The measurements for different frequencies and amplitudes of the forcing reveal an essential nonlinearity in the mechanical behavior of the molecule. Within a continuum-mechanics description, we extract the effective dissipation parameter γ for this conformational motion and find γ≈0.2g/s, similar to recent nanorheology measurements on the conformational motion of an enzyme.

  16. Electrical resonance with voltage-gated ion channels: perspectives from biophysical mechanisms and neural electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lin; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical resonance, providing selective signal amplification at preferred frequencies, is a unique phenomenon of excitable membranes, which has been observed in the nervous system at the cellular, circuit and system levels. The mechanisms underlying electrical resonance have not been fully elucidated. Prevailing hypotheses attribute the resonance to voltage-gated ion channels on the membrane of single neurons. In this review, we follow this line of thinking to summarize and analyze the biophysical/molecular mechanisms, and also the physiological relevance of channel-mediated electrical resonance. PMID:26725736

  17. Tuning voltage-gated channel activity and cellular excitability with a sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Combs, David J.; Shin, Hyeon-Gyu; Xu, Yanping; Ramu, Yajamana

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels generate action potentials in excitable cells and help set the resting membrane potential in nonexcitable cells like lymphocytes. It has been difficult to investigate what kinds of phospholipids interact with these membrane proteins in their native environments and what functional impacts such interactions create. This problem might be circumvented if we could modify specific lipid types in situ. Using certain voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes as a model, our group has shown previously that sphingomyelinase (SMase) D may serve this purpose. SMase D is known to remove the choline group from sphingomyelin, a phospholipid primarily present in the outer leaflet of plasma membranes. This SMase D action lowers the energy required for voltage sensors of a KV channel to enter the activated state, causing a hyperpolarizing shift of the Q-V and G-V curves and thus activating them at more hyperpolarized potentials. Here, we find that this SMase D effect vanishes after removing most of the voltage-sensor paddle sequence, a finding supporting the notion that SMase D modification of sphingomyelin molecules alters these lipids’ interactions with voltage sensors. Then, using SMase D to probe lipid–channel interactions, we find that SMase D not only similarly stimulates voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) and Ca2+ channels but also markedly slows NaV channel inactivation. However, the latter effect is not observed in tested mammalian cells, an observation highlighting the profound impact of the membrane environment on channel function. Finally, we directly demonstrate that SMase D stimulates both native KV1.3 in nonexcitable human T lymphocytes at their typical resting membrane potential and native NaV channels in excitable cells, such that it shifts the action potential threshold in the hyperpolarized direction. These proof-of-concept studies illustrate that the voltage-gated channel activity in both excitable and

  18. Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels: regulation by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Bukiya, Anna N.; Singh, Aditya K.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol (CLR) is an essential component of eukaryotic plasma membranes. CLR regulates the membrane physical state, microdomain formation and the activity of membrane-spanning proteins, including ion channels. Large conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-gated K+ (BK) channels link membrane potential to cell Ca2+ homeostasis. Thus, they control many physiological processes and participate in pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. Because plasmalemma BK channels cluster in CLR-rich membrane microdomains, a major driving force for studying BK channel-CLR interactions is determining how membrane CLR controls the BK current phenotype, including its pharmacology, channel sorting, distribution, and role in cell physiology. Since both BK channels and CLR tissue levels play a pathophysiological role in human disease, identifying functional and structural aspects of the CLR-BK channel interaction may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the studies documenting membrane CLR-BK channel interactions, dissecting out the many factors that determine the final BK current response to changes in membrane CLR content. We also summarize work in reductionist systems where recombinant BK protein is studied in artificial lipid bilayers, which documents a direct inhibition of BK channel activity by CLR and builds a strong case for a direct interaction between CLR and the BK channel-forming protein. Bilayer lipid-mediated mechanisms in CLR action are also discussed. Finally, we review studies of BK channel function during hypercholesterolemia, and underscore the many consequences that the CLR-BK channel interaction brings to cell physiology and human disease. PMID:22584144

  19. PERCHLOROETHYLENE (PERC) INHIBITS FUNCTION OF VOLTAGE-GATED CALCIUM CHANNELS IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The industrial solvent perchloroethylene (PERC) is listed as a hazardous air pollutant in the 1990 Ammendments to Clean Air Act and is a known neurotoxicant. However, the mechanisms by which PERC alters nervous system function are poorly understood. In recent years, it has been d...

  20. Optical electrophysiology for probing function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Reichert, Elaine; Cohen, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels mediate electrical dynamics in excitable tissues and are an important class of drug targets. Channels can gate in sub-millisecond timescales, show complex manifolds of conformational states, and often show state-dependent pharmacology. Mechanistic studies of ion channels typically involve sophisticated voltage-clamp protocols applied through manual or automated electrophysiology. Here, we develop all-optical electrophysiology techniques to study activity-dependent modulation of ion channels, in a format compatible with high-throughput screening. Using optical electrophysiology, we recapitulate many voltage-clamp protocols and apply to Nav1.7, a channel implicated in pain. Optical measurements reveal that a sustained depolarization strongly potentiates the inhibitory effect of PF-04856264, a Nav1.7-specific blocker. In a pilot screen, we stratify a library of 320 FDA-approved compounds by binding mechanism and kinetics, and find close concordance with patch clamp measurements. Optical electrophysiology provides a favorable tradeoff between throughput and information content for studies of NaV channels, and possibly other voltage-gated channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15202.001 PMID:27215841

  1. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na(+) channel function in mice.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Martini, Rudolf; Krarup, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na(+) channels on motor axons aggravating the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice. With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform expression was found by immunohistochemistry. The depolarizing excitability features were absent in Nav1.8 null mice, and they were counteracted in WT mice by a Nav1.8 blocker. Our data suggest that alteration in voltage-gated Na(+) channel isoform expression contributes to changes in motor axon function during aging. PMID:26923409

  2. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue. PMID:27032955

  3. Brivaracetam Differentially Affects Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents Without Impairing Sustained Repetitive Firing in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; André, Véronique Marie; Leclère, Nathalie; Hanon, Etienne; Ghisdal, Philippe; Wolff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Brivaracetam (BRV) is an antiepileptic drug in Phase III clinical development. BRV binds to synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) protein and is also suggested to inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). To evaluate whether the effect of BRV on VGSCs represents a relevant mechanism participating in its antiepileptic properties, we explored the pharmacology of BRV on VGSCs in different cell systems and tested its efficacy at reducing the sustained repetitive firing (SRF). Methods Brivaracetam investigations on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) were performed in N1E-155 neuroblastoma cells, cultured rat cortical neurons, and adult mouse CA1 neurons. SRF was measured in cultured cortical neurons and in CA1 neurons. All BRV (100–300 μM) experiments were performed in comparison with 100 μM carbamazepine (CBZ). Results Brivaracetam and CBZ reduced INa in N1E-115 cells (30% and 40%, respectively) and primary cortical neurons (21% and 47%, respectively) by modulating the fast-inactivated state of VGSCs. BRV, in contrast to CBZ, did not affect INa in CA1 neurons and SRF in cortical and CA1 neurons. CBZ consistently inhibited neuronal SRF by 75–93%. Conclusions The lack of effect of BRV on SRF in neurons suggests that the reported inhibition of BRV on VGSC currents does not contribute to its antiepileptic properties. PMID:25444522

  4. Identification of Functional Voltage-gated Na+ Channels in Cultured Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Tiffany; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical excitability, which plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling in the pulmonary vasculature, is regulated by transmembrane ion flux in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). This study aimed to characterize the electrophysiological properties and molecular identities of voltage-gated Na+ channels in cultured human PASMC. We recorded tetrodotoxin-sensitive and rapidly inactivating Na+ currents with properties similar to those described in cardiac myocytes. Using RT-PCR, we detected transcripts of seven Na+ channel α genes (SCN2A, 3A, 4A, 7A, 8A, 9A, and 11A), and two β subunit genes (SCN1B and 2B). Our results demonstrate that human PASMC express TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels. Their physiological functions remain unresolved, although our data suggest that Na+ channel activity does not directly influence membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ release, or proliferation in normal human PASMC. Whether their expression and/or activity are heightened in the pathological state is discussed. PMID:16052353

  5. Ionic selectivity and thermal adaptations within the voltage-gated sodium channel family of alkaliphilic Bacillus.

    PubMed

    DeCaen, Paul G; Takahashi, Yuka; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro; Clapham, David E

    2014-01-01

    Entry and extrusion of cations are essential processes in living cells. In alkaliphilic prokaryotes, high external pH activates voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), which allows Na(+) to enter and be used as substrate for cation/proton antiporters responsible for cytoplasmic pH homeostasis. Here, we describe a new member of the prokaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) channel family (NsvBa; Non-selective voltage-gated, Bacillus alcalophilus) that is nonselective among Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+) ions. Mutations in NsvBa can convert the nonselective filter into one that discriminates for Na(+) or divalent cations. Gain-of-function experiments demonstrate the portability of ion selectivity with filter mutations to other Bacillus Nav channels. Increasing pH and temperature shifts their activation threshold towards their native resting membrane potential. Furthermore, we find drugs that target Bacillus Nav channels also block the growth of the bacteria. This work identifies some of the adaptations to achieve ion discrimination and gating in Bacillus Nav channels. PMID:25385530

  6. Developmental expression of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels in the avian hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Doczi, Megan A; Vitzthum, Carl M; Forehand, Cynthia J

    2016-03-11

    Specialized hypothalamic neurons integrate the homeostatic balance between food intake and energy expenditure, processes that may become dysregulated during the development of diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders. Shaker family voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1) contribute to the maintenance of resting membrane potential, action potential characteristics, and neurotransmitter release in many populations of neurons, although hypothalamic Kv1 channel expression has been largely unexplored. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from avian hypothalamic brain slices demonstrate a developmental shift in the electrophysiological properties of avian arcuate nucleus neurons, identifying an increase in outward ionic current that corresponds with action potential maturation. Additionally, RT-PCR experiments identified the early expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.3, and Kv1.5 mRNA in the embryonic avian hypothalamus, suggesting that these channels may underlie the electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis on intact microdissections of embryonic hypothalamic tissue revealed a concomitant increase in Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 gene expression at key electrophysiological time points during development. This study is the first to demonstrate hypothalamic mRNA expression of Kv1 channels in developing avian embryos and may suggest a role for voltage-gated ion channel regulation in the physiological patterning of embryonic hypothalamic circuits governing energy homeostasis. PMID:26845562

  7. Molecular Mapping of General Anesthetic Sites in a Voltage-Gated Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Annika F.; Liang, Qiansheng; Amaral, Cristiano; Treptow, Werner; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Several voltage-gated ion channels are modulated by clinically relevant doses of general anesthetics. However, the structural basis of this modulation is not well understood. Previous work suggested that n-alcohols and inhaled anesthetics stabilize the closed state of the Shaw2 voltage-gated (Kv) channel (K-Shaw2) by directly interacting with a discrete channel site. We hypothesize that the inhibition of K-Shaw2 channels by general anesthetics is governed by interactions between binding and effector sites involving components of the channel's activation gate. To investigate this hypothesis, we applied Ala/Val scanning mutagenesis to the S4-S5 linker and the post-PVP S6 segment, and conducted electrophysiological analysis to evaluate the energetic impact of the mutations on the inhibition of the K-Shaw2 channel by 1-butanol and halothane. These analyses identified residues that determine an apparent binding cooperativity and residue pairs that act in concert to modulate gating upon anesthetic binding. In some instances, due to their critical location, key residues also influence channel gating. Complementing these results, molecular dynamics simulations and in silico docking experiments helped us visualize possible anesthetic sites and interactions. We conclude that the inhibition of K-Shaw2 by general anesthetics results from allosteric interactions between distinct but contiguous binding and effector sites involving inter- and intrasubunit interfaces. PMID:21961587

  8. Modulation of a voltage-gated Na+ channel by sevoflurane involves multiple sites and distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Annika F.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Halogenated inhaled general anesthetic agents modulate voltage-gated ion channels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Many general anesthetic agents regulate voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) channels, including the commonly used drug sevoflurane. Here, we investigated the putative binding sites and molecular mechanisms of sevoflurane action on the bacterial NaV channel NaChBac by using a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, electrophysiology, and kinetic analysis. Structural modeling revealed multiple sevoflurane interaction sites possibly associated with NaChBac modulation. Electrophysiologically, sevoflurane favors activation and inactivation at low concentrations (0.2 mM), and additionally accelerates current decay at high concentrations (2 mM). Explaining these observations, kinetic modeling suggests concurrent destabilization of closed states and low-affinity open channel block. We propose that the multiple effects of sevoflurane on NaChBac result from simultaneous interactions at multiple sites with distinct affinities. This multiple-site, multiple-mode hypothesis offers a framework to study the structural basis of general anesthetic action. PMID:24753583

  9. Voltage-Gated Proton Channels: Molecular Biology, Physiology, and Pathophysiology of the HV Family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels (HV) are unique, in part because the ion they conduct is unique. HV channels are perfectly selective for protons and have a very small unitary conductance, both arguably manifestations of the extremely low H+ concentration in physiological solutions. They open with membrane depolarization, but their voltage dependence is strongly regulated by the pH gradient across the membrane (ΔpH), with the result that in most species they normally conduct only outward current. The HV channel protein is strikingly similar to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD, the first four membrane-spanning segments) of voltage-gated K+ and Na+ channels. In higher species, HV channels exist as dimers in which each protomer has its own conduction pathway, yet gating is cooperative. HV channels are phylogenetically diverse, distributed from humans to unicellular marine life, and perhaps even plants. Correspondingly, HV functions vary widely as well, from promoting calcification in coccolithophores and triggering bioluminescent flashes in dinoflagellates to facilitating killing bacteria, airway pH regulation, basophil histamine release, sperm maturation, and B lymphocyte responses in humans. Recent evidence that hHV1 may exacerbate breast cancer metastasis and cerebral damage from ischemic stroke highlights the rapidly expanding recognition of the clinical importance of hHV1. PMID:23589829

  10. Structure of Voltage-gated Two-pore Channel TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Chen, Qingfeng; Lee, Changkeun; Chen, Liping; Yang, Yi; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang, Youxing

    2015-01-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) contain two copies of a Shaker-like six-transmembrane (6-TM) domain in each subunit and are ubiquitously expressed in both animals and plants as organellar cation channels. Here, we present the first crystal structure of a vacuolar two-pore channel from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtTPC1, which functions as a homodimer. AtTPC1 activation requires both voltage and cytosolic Ca2+. Ca2+ binding to the cytosolic EF-hand domain triggers conformational changes coupled to the pair of pore-lining inner helices (IS6 helices) from the first 6-TM domains, whereas membrane potential only activates the second voltage-sensing domain (VSD2) whose conformational changes are coupled to the pair of inner helices (IIS6 helices) from the second 6-TM domains. Luminal Ca2+ or Ba2+ can modulate voltage activation by stabilizing VSD2 in the resting state and shifts voltage activation towards more positive potentials. Our Ba2+ bound AtTPC1 structure reveals a voltage sensor in the resting state, providing hitherto unseen structural insight into the general voltage-gating mechanism among voltage-gated channels. PMID:26689363

  11. Voltage-gated proton channels: molecular biology, physiology, and pathophysiology of the H(V) family.

    PubMed

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2013-04-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels (H(V)) are unique, in part because the ion they conduct is unique. H(V) channels are perfectly selective for protons and have a very small unitary conductance, both arguably manifestations of the extremely low H(+) concentration in physiological solutions. They open with membrane depolarization, but their voltage dependence is strongly regulated by the pH gradient across the membrane (ΔpH), with the result that in most species they normally conduct only outward current. The H(V) channel protein is strikingly similar to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD, the first four membrane-spanning segments) of voltage-gated K(+) and Na(+) channels. In higher species, H(V) channels exist as dimers in which each protomer has its own conduction pathway, yet gating is cooperative. H(V) channels are phylogenetically diverse, distributed from humans to unicellular marine life, and perhaps even plants. Correspondingly, H(V) functions vary widely as well, from promoting calcification in coccolithophores and triggering bioluminescent flashes in dinoflagellates to facilitating killing bacteria, airway pH regulation, basophil histamine release, sperm maturation, and B lymphocyte responses in humans. Recent evidence that hH(V)1 may exacerbate breast cancer metastasis and cerebral damage from ischemic stroke highlights the rapidly expanding recognition of the clinical importance of hH(V)1. PMID:23589829

  12. Unfolding of a Temperature-Sensitive Domain Controls Voltage-Gated Channel Activation.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Cristina; Rohaim, Ahmed; Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Stein, Richard A; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Mishra, Smriti; Mchaourab, Hassane S; Minor, Daniel L

    2016-02-25

    Voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) are outfitted with diverse cytoplasmic domains that impact function. To examine how such elements may affect VGIC behavior, we addressed how the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (BacNa(V)) C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (CTD) affects function. Our studies show that the BacNa(V) CTD exerts a profound influence on gating through a temperature-dependent unfolding transition in a discrete cytoplasmic domain, the neck domain, proximal to the pore. Structural and functional studies establish that the BacNa(V) CTD comprises a bi-partite four-helix bundle that bears an unusual hydrophilic core whose integrity is central to the unfolding mechanism and that couples directly to the channel activation gate. Together, our findings define a general principle for how the widespread four-helix bundle cytoplasmic domain architecture can control VGIC responses, uncover a mechanism underlying the diverse BacNa(V) voltage dependencies, and demonstrate that a discrete domain can encode the temperature-dependent response of a channel. PMID:26919429

  13. Molecular determinants of the hanatoxin binding in voltage-gated K+-channel drk1.

    PubMed

    Lou, Kuo-Long; Huang, Po-Tsang; Shiau, Yu-Shuan; Shiau, Yuh-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    The carboxyl terminus of S3 segment (S3(C)) in voltage-gated potassium channels was proposed to bear the binding site for gating modifier toxins like Hanatoxin and a helical secondary structural arrangement was suggested. Due to the lack of complete structure in high resolution for such a channel molecule, no further direct experimental data to elucidate the mechanism for their binding conformations could thus far be derived. In order to examine the putative three-dimensional structure of S3(C) and to illustrate the residues required for Hanatoxin binding, molecular simulation and docking were performed, based on the solution structure of Hanatoxin and the structural information from lysine-scanning results for S3(C) fragment. From our results, it is indicated that both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are utilized to stabilize the toxin binding. Detailed docking residues and appropriate orientation for binding regarding hydrophobic/-philic environments are also described. Compared with the functional data proposed by previous studies, the helical structural arrangement for the C-terminus of S3 segment in voltage-gated potassium channels can therefore be further emphasized. PMID:12382234

  14. Structure of the voltage-gated two-pore channel TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Chen, Qingfeng; Lee, Changkeun; Chen, Liping; Yang, Yi; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang, Youxing

    2016-03-10

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) contain two copies of a Shaker-like six-transmembrane (6-TM) domain in each subunit and are ubiquitously expressed in both animals and plants as organellar cation channels. Here we present the crystal structure of a vacuolar two-pore channel from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtTPC1, which functions as a homodimer. AtTPC1 activation requires both voltage and cytosolic Ca(2+). Ca(2+) binding to the cytosolic EF-hand domain triggers conformational changes coupled to the pair of pore-lining inner helices from the first 6-TM domains, whereas membrane potential only activates the second voltage-sensing domain, the conformational changes of which are coupled to the pair of inner helices from the second 6-TM domains. Luminal Ca(2+) or Ba(2+) can modulate voltage activation by stabilizing the second voltage-sensing domain in the resting state and shift voltage activation towards more positive potentials. Our Ba(2+)-bound AtTPC1 structure reveals a voltage sensor in the resting state, providing hitherto unseen structural insight into the general voltage-gating mechanism among voltage-gated channels. PMID:26689363

  15. Voltage-gated and ATP-sensitive K+ channels are associated with cell proliferation and tumorigenesis of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qin; Tian, Xiang; Wu, Yu-Xiang; Wu, Ri-Hui; Pi, Ming-Shan; Li, Chao-Ying

    2014-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that potassium (K+) channels play important roles in the growth and development of human cancer. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of and the mechanism by which K+ channels control the proliferation and tumor development of U87-MG human glioma cells. A variety of K+ channel blockers and openers were used to differentiate the critical subtype of K+ channels involved. The in vitro data demonstrated that selective blockers of voltage-gated K+ (K(V)) channels or ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels significantly inhibited the proliferation of U87-MG cells, blocked the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis. In the U87-MG xenograft model in nude mice, K(V) or K(ATP) channel blockers markedly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, electrophysiological results showed that KV or KATP channel blockers inhibited K(V)/K(ATP) channel currents as well as cell proliferation and tumor growth over the same concentration range. In contrast, iberiotoxin, a selective blocker of calcium-activated K+ channels, had no apparent effect on the cell proliferation, cell cycle or apoptosis of U87-MG cells. In addition, the results of fluorescence assays indicated that blockers of K(V) or K(ATP) channels attenuated intracellular Ca2+ signaling by blocking Ca2+ influx in U87-MG cells. Taken together, these data suggest that K(V) and K(ATP) channels play important roles in the proliferation of U87-MG cells and that the influence of K(V) and K(ATP) channels may be mediated by a Ca2+-dependent mechanism. PMID:24284968

  16. Structure-activity and interaction effects of 14 different pyrethroids on voltage-gated chloride ion channels.

    PubMed

    Burr, Steven A; Ray, David E

    2004-02-01

    We have proposed that since the type II pyrethroids deltamethrin and cypermethrin, but not the type I pyrethroid cismethrin act on chloride channels, this could contribute to the bimodal nature of pyrethroid poisoning syndromes. We now examine a wider range of pyrethroid structures on the activity of these calcium-independent voltage-gated maxi-chloride channels. Excised inside-out membrane patches from differentiated mouse neuroblastoma cells were used, and mean channel open probabilities calculated. For single dosing at 10 microM, bioallethrin, beta-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, and fenpropathrin were all found to significantly decrease open channel probability (p < 0.05). Bifenthrin, bioresmethrin, cispermethrin, cisresmethrin, cyfluthrin isomers 2 and 4, lambda-cyhalothrin, esfenvalerate, and tefluthrin, did not significantly alter open channel probability (p > 0.05). Since the type II pyrethroids, esfenvalerate, and lambda-cyhalothrin were ineffective, we must conclude that actions at the chloride ion channel target cannot in themselves account for the differences between the two types of poisoning syndrome. Sequential dosing with type II pyrethroids caused no further chloride ion channel closure. The type I pyrethroid cisresmethrin did however prevent a subsequent effect by the mixed type pyrethroid fenpropathrin. In contrast, the type I pyrethroid cispermethrin did not prevent a subsequent effect due to the type II pyrethroid deltamethrin. The difference in effect may be the result of differences in potency, as deltamethrin had a greater effect than fenpropathrin. It therefore appears clear that in some combinations the type I and type II pyrethroids can compete and may bind to the same chloride channel target site. PMID:14657519

  17. Mechanisms of Pyrethroid Insecticide-Induced Stimulation of Calcium Influx in Neocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Shafer, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Pyrethroids have also been reported to alter the function of other channel types, including activation of voltage-gated calcium channels. Therefore, the present study compared the ability of 11 structurally diverse pyrethroids to evoke Ca2+ influx in primary cultures of mouse neocortical neurons. Nine pyrethroids (tefluthrin, deltamethrin, λ-cyhalothrin, β-cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, S-bioallethrin, fenpropathrin, cypermethrin, and bifenthrin) produced concentration-dependent elevations in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in neocortical neurons. Permethrin and resmethrin were without effect on [Ca2+]i. These pyrethroids displayed a range of efficacies on Ca2+ influx; however, the EC50 values for active pyrethroids all were within one order of magnitude. Tetrodotoxin blocked increases in [Ca2+]i caused by all nine active pyrethroids, indicating that the effects depended on VGSC activation. The pathways for deltamethrin- and tefluthrin-induced Ca2+ influx include N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors, L-type Ca2+ channels, and reverse mode of operation of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inasmuch as antagonists of these sites blocked deltamethrin-induced Ca2+ influx. These data demonstrate that pyrethroids stimulate Ca2+ entry into neurons subsequent to their actions on VGSCs. PMID:20881019

  18. Caveolin-3 is a direct molecular partner of the Cav1.1 subunit of the skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Couchoux, Harold; Bichraoui, Hicham; Chouabe, Christophe; Altafaj, Xavier; Bonvallet, Robert; Allard, Bruno; Ronjat, Michel; Berthier, Christine

    2011-05-01

    Caveolin-3 is the striated muscle specific isoform of the scaffolding protein family of caveolins and has been shown to interact with a variety of proteins, including ion channels. Mutations in the human CAV3 gene have been associated with several muscle disorders called caveolinopathies and among these, the P104L mutation (Cav-3(P104L)) leads to limb girdle muscular dystrophy of type 1C characterized by the loss of sarcolemmal caveolin. There is still no clear-cut explanation as to specifically how caveolin-3 mutations lead to skeletal muscle wasting. Previous results argued in favor of a role for caveolin-3 in dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) functional regulation and/or T-tubular membrane localization. It appeared worth closely examining such a functional link and investigating if it could result from the direct physical interaction of the two proteins. Transient expression of Cav-3(P104L) or caveolin-3 specific siRNAs in C2C12 myotubes both led to a significant decrease of the L-type Ca(2+) channel maximal conductance. Immunolabeling analysis of adult skeletal muscle fibers revealed the colocalization of a pool of caveolin-3 with the DHPR within the T-tubular membrane. Caveolin-3 was also shown to be present in DHPR-containing triadic membrane preparations from which both proteins co-immunoprecipitated. Using GST-fusion proteins, the I-II loop of Ca(v)1.1 was identified as the domain interacting with caveolin-3, with an apparent affinity of 60nM. The present study thus revealed a direct molecular interaction between caveolin-3 and the DHPR which is likely to underlie their functional link and whose loss might therefore be involved in pathophysiological mechanisms associated to muscle caveolinopathies. PMID:21262376

  19. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  20. The L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel long-term potentiation is higher in the dorsal compared with the ventral associational/commissural CA3 hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Moschovos, Christos; Papatheodoropoulos, Costas

    2016-05-01

    The diversification between dorsal (DH) and ventral (VH) hippocampus includes the different ability to support NMDA receptor-dependent long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP). In this study, we assessed the ability of associational/commissural connections in the CA3 hippocampal field to show NMDA receptor-independent LTP. We found that high-frequency stimulation under blockade of NMDA receptors induced greater LTP in DH (40.7±8.5%) than in VH (17.1±4.6%). The blocker of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCC) nifedipine prevented the induction of LTP. We hypothesize that the different ability for VDCC-LTP between DH and VH might have important implications in the memory-related information processing performed by the circuits of the two hippocampal segments. PMID:26541214

  1. Modulation of the Voltage-gated Potassium Channel (Kv4.3) and the Auxiliary Protein (KChIP3) Interactions by the Current Activator NS5806*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Walter G.; Pham, Khoa; Miksovska, Jaroslava

    2014-01-01

    KChIP3 (potassium channel interacting protein 3) is a calcium-binding protein that binds at the N terminus of the Kv4 voltage-gated potassium channel through interactions at two contact sites and has been shown to regulate potassium current gating kinetics as well as channel trafficking in cardiac and neuronal cells. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal calorimetry, and docking simulations we show that the novel potassium current activator, NS5806, binds at a hydrophobic site on the C terminus of KChIP3 in a calcium-dependent manner, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2–5 μm in the calcium-bound form. We further determined that the association between KChIP3 and the hydrophobic N terminus of Kv4.3 is calcium-dependent, with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the apo-state of 70 ± 3 μm and 2.7 ± 0.1 μm in the calcium-bound form. NS5806 increases the affinity between KChIP3 and the N terminus of Kv4.3 (Kd = 1.9 ± 0.1 μm) in the presence and absence of calcium. Mutation of Tyr-174 or Phe-218 on KChIP3 abolished the enhancement of Kv4.3 site 1 binding in the apo-state, highlighting the role of these residues in drug and K4.3 binding. Kinetic studies show that NS5806 decreases the rate of dissociation between KChIP3 and the N terminus of KV4.3. Overall, these studies support the idea that NS5806 directly interacts with KChIP3 and modulates the interactions between this calcium-binding protein and the T1 domain of the Kv4.3 channels through reorientation of helix 10 on KChIP3. PMID:25228688

  2. Modeling of the Binding of Peptide Blockers to Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: Approaches and Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Novoseletsky, V. N.; Volyntseva, A. D.; Shaitan, K. V.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.; Feofanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of the structure of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels bound to peptide blockers aims to identify the key amino acid residues dictating affinity and provide insights into the toxin-channel interface. Computational approaches open up possibilities for in silico rational design of selective blockers, new molecular tools to study the cellular distribution and functional roles of potassium channels. It is anticipated that optimized blockers will advance the development of drugs that reduce over activation of potassium channels and attenuate the associated malfunction. Starting with an overview of the recent advances in computational simulation strategies to predict the bound state orientations of peptide pore blockers relative to KV-channels, we go on to review algorithms for the analysis of intermolecular interactions, and then take a look at the results of their application. PMID:27437138

  3. Conotoxins That Could Provide Analgesia through Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Munasinghe, Nehan R; Christie, MacDonald J

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pain creates a large socio-economic burden around the world. It is physically and mentally debilitating, and many suffers are unresponsive to current therapeutics. Many drugs that provide pain relief have adverse side effects and addiction liabilities. Therefore, a great need has risen for alternative treatment strategies. One rich source of potential analgesic compounds that has immerged over the past few decades are conotoxins. These toxins are extremely diverse and display selective activity at ion channels. Voltage gated sodium (NaV) channels are one such group of ion channels that play a significant role in multiple pain pathways. This review will explore the literature around conotoxins that bind NaV channels and determine their analgesic potential. PMID:26690478

  4. Identification and functional characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weifeng; Lu, Chunjing; Wu, Yong; Ouyang, Shou; Chen, Yuanzhong

    2015-03-01

    A variety of ion channels has been discovered in lymphocytes. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis revealed that ALL (acute lymphocytic leukemia) cell lines and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells mainly expressed TTX (tetrodotoxin)-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Expression of VGSC protein was confirmed by western blots and Immunofluorescence. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings showed that a sub-population (20%) of MOLT-4 cells expressed functional VGSCs, which were TTX-sensitive. Importantly, 2 μM TTX decreased the invasion of Jurkat and MOLT-4 cells ∼90%. These results indicate that the activity of VGSCs could represent a novel mechanism potentiating the invasive capacity of these cells. PMID:25645019

  5. Structure and function of voltage-gated sodium channels at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Catterall, William A

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate action potentials in nerve, muscle and other excitable cells. Early physiological studies described sodium selectivity, voltage-dependent activation and fast inactivation, and developed conceptual models for sodium channel function. This review article follows the topics of my 2013 Sharpey-Schafer Prize Lecture and gives an overview of research using a combination of biochemical, molecular biological, physiological and structural biological approaches that have elucidated the structure and function of sodium channels at the atomic level. Structural models for voltage-dependent activation, sodium selectivity and conductance, drug block and both fast and slow inactivation are discussed. A perspective for the future envisions new advances in understanding the structural basis for sodium channel function and the opportunity for structure-based discovery of novel therapeutics. PMID:24097157

  6. The voltage-gated proton channel: a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The main properties of voltage gated proton channels are described, along with what is known about how the channel protein structure accomplishes these functions. Just as protons are unique among ions, proton channels are unique among ion channels. Their four transmembrane helices sense voltage, the pH gradient, and conduct protons exclusively. Selectivity is achieved by the unique ability of H3O+ to protonate an Asp-Arg salt bridge. Pathognomonic sensitivity of gating to the pH gradient ensures channel opening only when acid extrusion will result, which is crucial to most biological functions. An exception occurs in dinoflagellates in which H+ influx through HV1 triggers the bioluminescent flash. Pharmacological interventions that promise to ameliorate cancer, asthma, brain damage in ischemic stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, autoimmune diseases, and numerous other conditions, await future progress. PMID:25964989

  7. State-Dependent Modification of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels by Pyrethroids

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Pyrethroids disrupt nerve function by altering the rapid kinetic transitions between conducting and nonconducting states of voltage-gated sodium channels that underlie the generation of nerve action potentials. Recent studies of pyrethroid action on cloned insect and mammalian sodium channel isoforms expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes show that in some cases pyrethroid modification is either absolutely dependent on or significantly enhanced by repeated channel activation. These use-dependent effects have been interpreted as evidence of preferential binding of at least some pyrethroids to the open, rather than resting, state of the sodium channel. This paper reviews the evidence for state-dependent modification of insect and mammalian sodium channels expressed in oocytes by pyrethroids and considers the implications of state-dependent effects for understanding the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid action and the development and testing of models of the pyrethroid receptor. PMID:20652092

  8. Functional evidence for oxygen-sensitive voltage-gated potassium channels in human placental vasculature.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, M F; Barrie, A; Szkolar, J; Mills, T A; Wareing, M

    2010-06-01

    Hypoxic fetoplacental vasoconstriction (HFPV), involving voltage-gated potassium (K(V)) channels, has been suggested in human placenta; the identity of these channels remains unclear. Using wire myography, chorionic plate blood vessels were exposed to isoform-specific K(V) channel blockers. Dose-response curves (thromboxane mimetic U46619; 0.1-2000 nM) pre- and post-addition of K(V) channel modulator were analysed. Arterial U46619-induced contraction increased with margatoxin and stromatoxin-1, whilst only correolide increased U46619-induced contraction in veins (P < 0.05 two-way ANOVA). Basal tone was unaffected in arteries or veins. These data implicate K(V)1.2 and/or K(V)2.1 and K(V)1.5 in the control of agonist-induced contraction of human placental arteries and veins respectively. PMID:20451247

  9. Voltage-gated Na+ channels: Potential for β subunits as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Brackenbury, William J.; Isom, Lori L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Voltage gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) contain a pore-forming α subunit and one or more β subunits. VGSCs are involved in a wide variety of pathophysiologies, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, Multiple Sclerosis, periodic paralysis, migraine, neuropathic and inflammatory pain, Huntington’s disease, and cancer. Increasing evidence implicates the β subunits as key players in these disorders. Objective The purpose of this report is to review the recent literature describing the multifunctional roles of VGSC β subunits in the context of their role(s) in disease. Methods An extensive review of the literature on β subunits was performed. Results/conclusion β subunits are multifunctional. As components of VGSC complexes, β subunits mediate signaling processes regulating electrical excitability, adhesion, migration, pathfinding, and transcription. β subunits may prove useful in disease diagnosis and therapy. PMID:18694383

  10. Apoptotic proteins Reaper and Grim induce stable inactivation in voltage-gated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Avdonin, V.; Kasuya, J.; Ciorba, M. A.; Kaplan, B.; Hoshi, T.; Iverson, L.

    1998-01-01

    Drosophila genes reaper, grim, and head-involution-defective (hid) induce apoptosis in several cellular contexts. N-terminal sequences of these proteins are highly conserved and are similar to N-terminal inactivation domains of voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels. Synthetic Reaper and Grim N terminus peptides induced fast inactivation of Shaker-type K+ channels when applied to the cytoplasmic side of the channel that was qualitatively similar to the inactivation produced by other K+ channel inactivation particles. Mutations that reduce the apoptotic activity of Reaper also reduced the synthetic peptide’s ability to induce channel inactivation, indicating that K+ channel inactivation correlated with apoptotic activity. Coexpression of Reaper RNA or direct injection of full length Reaper protein caused near irreversible block of the K+ channels. These results suggest that Reaper and Grim may participate in initiating apoptosis by stably blocking K+ channels. PMID:9751729

  11. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease.

    PubMed

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation. PMID:24903967

  12. Venom Peptides From Cone Snails: Pharmacological Probes for Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Green, B R; Olivera, B M

    2016-01-01

    The venoms of cone snails provide a rich source of neuroactive peptides (conotoxins). Several venom peptide families have been identified that are either agonists (ι- and δ-conotoxins) or antagonists (μ- and μO-conotoxins) of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Members of these conotoxin classes have been integral in identifying and characterizing specific neurotoxin binding sites on the channel. Furthermore, given the specificity of some of these peptides for one sodium channel subtype over another, conotoxins have also proven useful in exploring differences between VGSC subtypes. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge of the structure and function based on the results of conotoxin interactions with VGSCs and correlates the peptides with the phylogeny of the Conus species from which they were derived. PMID:27586281

  13. Artificial phosphorylation sites modulate the activity of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The KvAP potassium channel is representative of a family of voltage-gated ion channels where the membrane potential is sensed by a transmembrane helix containing several positively charged arginines. Previous work by Wang and Zocchi [A. Wang and G. Zocchi, PLoS ONE 6, e18598 (2011), 10.1371/journal.pone.0018598] showed how a negatively charged polyelectrolyte attached in proximity to the voltage sensing element can bias the opening probability of the channel. Here we introduce three phosphorylation sites at the same location and show that the response curve of the channel shifts by about 20 mV upon phosphorylation, while other characteristics such as the single-channel conductance are unaffected. In summary, we construct an artificial phosphorylation site which confers allosteric regulation to the channel.

  14. Molecular basis of functional diversity of voltage-gated potassium channels in mammalian brain.

    PubMed Central

    Stühmer, W; Ruppersberg, J P; Schröter, K H; Sakmann, B; Stocker, M; Giese, K P; Perschke, A; Baumann, A; Pongs, O

    1989-01-01

    Cloning and sequencing of cDNAs isolated from a rat cortex cDNA library reveals that a gene family encodes several highly homologous K+ channel forming (RCK) proteins. Functional characterization of the channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes following microinjection of in vitro transcribed RCK-specific RNAs shows that each of the RCK proteins forms K+ channels that differ greatly in both their functional and pharmacological properties. This suggests that the molecular basis for the diversity of voltage-gated K+ channels in mammalian brain is based, at least partly, on the expression of several RCK proteins by a family of genes and their assembly to homooligomeric K+ channels with different functional properties. Images PMID:2555158

  15. Conotoxins That Could Provide Analgesia through Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Munasinghe, Nehan R.; Christie, MacDonald J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain creates a large socio-economic burden around the world. It is physically and mentally debilitating, and many sufferers are unresponsive to current therapeutics. Many drugs that provide pain relief have adverse side effects and addiction liabilities. Therefore, a great need has risen for alternative treatment strategies. One rich source of potential analgesic compounds that has emerged over the past few decades are conotoxins. These toxins are extremely diverse and display selective activity at ion channels. Voltage gated sodium (NaV) channels are one such group of ion channels that play a significant role in multiple pain pathways. This review will explore the literature around conotoxins that bind NaV channels and determine their analgesic potential. PMID:26690478

  16. Molecular basis of ion permeability in a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Claire E; Bagnéris, Claire; DeCaen, Paul G; Sula, Altin; Scaglione, Antonella; Clapham, David E; Wallace, B A

    2016-04-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for electrical signalling across cell membranes. They exhibit strong selectivities for sodium ions over other cations, enabling the finely tuned cascade of events associated with action potentials. This paper describes the ion permeability characteristics and the crystal structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel, showing for the first time the detailed locations of sodium ions in the selectivity filter of a sodium channel. Electrostatic calculations based on the structure are consistent with the relative cation permeability ratios (Na(+) ≈ Li(+) ≫ K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) measured for these channels. In an E178D selectivity filter mutant constructed to have altered ion selectivities, the sodium ion binding site nearest the extracellular side is missing. Unlike potassium ions in potassium channels, the sodium ions in these channels appear to be hydrated and are associated with side chains of the selectivity filter residues, rather than polypeptide backbones. PMID:26873592

  17. Identification and Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Currents in Zebrafish Rohon-Beard Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yu-Jin; Ono, Fumihito

    2011-01-01

    Electrically excitable cells have voltage-dependent ion channels on the plasma membrane that regulate membrane permeability to specific ions. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are especially important as Ca2+ serves as both a charge carrier and second messenger. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are an important model vertebrate for studies of neuronal excitability, circuits, and behavior. However, electrophysiological properties of zebrafish VGCCs remain largely unexplored because a suitable preparation for whole cell voltage-clamp studies is lacking. Rohon-Beard (R-B) sensory neurons represent an attractive candidate for this purpose because of their relatively large somata and functional homology to mammalian dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Transgenic zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein in R-B neurons, (Isl2b:EGFP)ZC7, were used to identify dissociated neurons suitable for whole cell patch-clamp experiments. Based on biophysical and pharmacological properties, zebrafish R-B neurons express both high- and low-voltage-gated Ca2+ current (HVA- and LVA-ICa, respectively). Ni+-sensitive LVA-ICa occur in the minority of R-B neurons (30%) and ω-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive CaV2.2 (N-type) Ca2+ channels underlie the vast majority (90%) of HVA-ICa. To identify G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that modulate HVA-ICa, a panel of neurotransmitters was screened. Application of GABA/baclofen or serotonin produced a voltage-dependent inhibition while application of the mu-opioid agonist DAMGO resulted in a voltage-independent inhibition. Unlike in mammalian neurons, GPCR-mediated voltage-dependent modulation of ICa appears to be transduced primarily via a cholera toxin-sensitive Gα subunit. These results provide the basis for using the zebrafish model system to understanding Ca2+ channel function, and in turn, how Ca2+ channels contribute to mechanosensory function. PMID:20962070

  18. The hitchhiker’s guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure–function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na+ selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts. PMID:26712848

  19. Axons provide the secretory machinery for trafficking of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    González, Carolina; Cánovas, José; Fresno, Javiera; Couve, Eduardo; Court, Felipe A; Couve, Andrés

    2016-02-16

    The regulation of the axonal proteome is key to generate and maintain neural function. Fast and slow axoplasmic waves have been known for decades, but alternative mechanisms to control the abundance of axonal proteins based on local synthesis have also been identified. The presence of the endoplasmic reticulum has been documented in peripheral axons, but it is still unknown whether this localized organelle participates in the delivery of axonal membrane proteins. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for action potentials and are mostly concentrated in the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Despite their fundamental role, little is known about the intracellular trafficking mechanisms that govern their availability in mature axons. Here we describe the secretory machinery in axons and its contribution to plasma membrane delivery of sodium channels. The distribution of axonal secretory components was evaluated in axons of the sciatic nerve and in spinal nerve axons after in vivo electroporation. Intracellular protein trafficking was pharmacologically blocked in vivo and in vitro. Axonal voltage-gated sodium channel mRNA and local trafficking were examined by RT-PCR and a retention-release methodology. We demonstrate that mature axons contain components of the endoplasmic reticulum and other biosynthetic organelles. Axonal organelles and sodium channel localization are sensitive to local blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. More importantly, secretory organelles are capable of delivering sodium channels to the plasma membrane in isolated axons, demonstrating an intrinsic capacity of the axonal biosynthetic route in regulating the axonal proteome in mammalian axons. PMID:26839409

  20. Temperature dependence of proton permeation through a voltage-gated proton channel

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Miyuki; Ando, Hiroyuki; Morihata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiromu; Mori, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are found in many different types of cells, where they facilitate proton movement through the membrane. The mechanism of proton permeation through the channel is an issue of long-term interest, but it remains an open question. To address this issue, we examined the temperature dependence of proton permeation. Under whole cell recordings, rapid temperature changes within a few milliseconds were imposed. This method allowed for the measurement of current amplitudes immediately before and after a temperature jump, from which the ratios of these currents (Iratio) were determined. The use of Iratio for evaluating the temperature dependence minimized the contributions of factors other than permeation. Temperature jumps of various degrees (ΔT, −15 to 15°C) were applied over a wide temperature range (4–49°C), and the Q10s for the proton currents were evaluated from the Iratios. Q10 exhibited a high temperature dependence, varying from 2.2 at 10°C to 1.3 at 40°C. This implies that processes with different temperature dependencies underlie the observed Q10. A novel resistivity pulse method revealed that the access resistance with its low temperature dependence predominated in high temperature ranges. The measured temperature dependence of Q10 was decomposed into Q10 of the channel and of the access resistances. Finally, the Q10 for proton permeation through the voltage-gated proton channel itself was calculated and found to vary from 2.8 at 5°C to 2.2 at 45°C, as expected for an activation enthalpy of 64 kJ/mol. The thermodynamic features for proton permeation through proton-selective channels were discussed for the underlying mechanism. PMID:19720960

  1. The hitchhiker's guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Christopher A; Payandeh, Jian; Bosmans, Frank; Chanda, Baron

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure-function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na(+) selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts. PMID:26712848

  2. Designing a C84 fullerene as a specific voltage-gated sodium channel blocker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2013-07-01

    Fullerene derivatives demonstrate considerable potential for numerous biological applications, such as the effective inhibition of HIV protease. Recently, they were identified for their ability to indiscriminately block biological ion channels. A fullerene derivative which specifically blocks a particular ion channel could lead to a new set of drug leads for the treatment of various ion channel-related diseases. Here, we demonstrate their extraordinary potential by designing a fullerene which mimics some of the functions of μ-conotoxin, a peptide derived from cone snail venom which potently binds to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (NavAb). We show, using molecular dynamics simulations, that the C84 fullerene with six lysine derivatives uniformly attached to its surface is selective to NavAb over a voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3). The side chain of one of the lysine residues protrudes into the selectivity filter of the channel, while the methionine residues located just outside of the channel form hydrophobic contacts with the carbon atoms of the fullerene. The modified C84 fullerene strongly binds to the NavAb channel with an affinity of 46 nM but binds weakly to Kv1.3 with an affinity of 3 mM. This potent blocker of NavAb may serve as a structural template from which potent compounds can be designed for the targeting of mammalian Nav channels. There is a genuine need to target mammalian Nav channels as a form of treatment of various diseases which have been linked to their malfunction, such as epilepsy and chronic pain.

  3. Streptozotocin induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis via disruption of calcium homeostasis in mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Changhwan; An, Beum-Soo; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2015-09-01

    Calcium homeostasis refers to the regulation of calcium ion concentration in the body. This concentration is tightly controlled by a stabilizing system consisting of calcium channels and calcium buffering proteins. Calcium homeostasis is crucial for cell survival. Various forms of cell death (e.g., necrosis and apoptosis) also share calcium signaling pathways and molecular effectors. Calcium acts not only as a ubiquitous second messenger involved in apoptosis along with various cell death inducers but also a regulator for the synthesis of enzymes/hormones such as insulin. We hypothesized that streptozotocin disrupts calcium homeostasis and the altered intracellular calcium levels may induce cell death. After streptozotocin administration, blood glucose level was increased while insulin levels decreased. The expression of insulin response markers also decreased relative to the vehicle group. L-type voltage-gated calcium channel expression and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase were increased by streptozotocin. Calcium buffering protein calbindin-D9k and calmodulin family members were also increased. The expression of genes involved in transporting calcium ions to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was decrease while the expression of those affecting the removal of calcium from the ER was increased. Depletion of calcium from the ER leads to ER-stress and can induce apoptosis. In the streptozotocin-treatment group, apoptosis markers were increased. Taken together, these results imply that the disruption of calcium homeostasis by streptozotocin induces ER-stress and leads to the apoptosis of pancreatic cells. Additionally, findings from this study suggest that imbalances in calcium homeostasis could promote pancreatic beta cell death and result in type I diabetes. PMID:26003140

  4. Differentiation of voltage-gated potassium current and modulation of excitability in cultured amphibian spinal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Barish, M E

    1986-01-01

    Gigaohm-seal whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques were used to study the development of ionic currents in the membrane of embryonic amphibian (Ambystoma) spinal neurones during in vitro differentiation. Dissociated neural plate cells, some of which are neuronal precursor cells, were placed into culture. Cells became excitable at the time of neurite outgrowth, 2-3 days later, and over the next 2-10 days the duration of the action potential shortened from about 100 ms to about 1 ms. Voltage-clamp recordings demonstrated that at the time of appearance of neurites, activatable Na, Ca and voltage-gated K channels were present in the membrane (Ca-dependent K channels were not studied). Over succeeding days in culture, records of total membrane current indicated that the amplitudes of peak inward and steady-state outward currents both increased. As a result of these increases, the pattern of total membrane current came to be increasingly dominated by outward currents. With inward Na and Ca currents blocked, a voltage-gated K current (IK(V] could be studied in isolation. The reversal potential of this current varied in good agreement with the equilibrium potential for K ions predicted by the Nernst relation. The wave form of IK(V) activation was sigmoidal. Activation was more rapid at more positive voltages (relative to the usual holding potential of -70 mV), and deactivation was more rapid at more negative voltages. The amplitude of IK(V) increased during neural development, while cell size remained approximately constant. Increases in rates of activation and deactivation were observed in parallel with the increase in current density. When measured at 0 mV, cells studied on day 4 of culture or earlier showed steady-state chord conductances (gK(V] of less than 20 nS, and one-half activation times (t1/2) of 2 X 5-10 ms. Older cells showed gK(V)s of 10-80 nS, and t1/2s of 0 X 8-2 X 5 ms. As Na, and to a lesser extent Ca, current amplitudes were also increasing during

  5. GABA transport and calcium dynamics in horizontal cells from the skate retina.

    PubMed Central

    Haugh-Scheidt, L; Malchow, R P; Ripps, H

    1995-01-01

    1. Changes in intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i in response to extracellularly applied gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were studied in isolated horizontal cells from the all-rod skate retina. 2. Calcium measurements were made using fura-2 AM, both with and without whole-cell voltage clamp. Superfusion with GABA, in the absence of voltage clamp, resulted in an increase in [Ca2+]i; the threshold for detection was approximately 50 microM GABA, and a maximal response was elicited by 500 microM GABA. 3. The rise in [Ca2+]i was not mimicked by baclofen nor was it blocked by phaclofen, picrotoxin or bicuculline. However, the GABA-induced [Ca2+]i increase was completely abolished when extracellular sodium was replaced with N-methyl-D-glucamine. 4. With the horizontal cell voltage clamped at -70 mV, GABA evoked a large inward current, but there was no concomitant change in [Ca2+]i. Nifedipine, which blocks L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, suppressed the GABA-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. These findings suggest that the calcium response was initiated by GABA activation of sodium dependent electrogenic transport, and that the resultant depolarization led to the opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and a rise in [Ca2+]i. 5. The GABA-induced influx of calcium appears not to have been the sole source of the calcium increase. The GABA-induced rise in [Ca2+]i was reduced by dantrolene, indicating that internal Ca2+ stores contributed to the GABA-mediated Ca2+ response. 6. These observations demonstrate that activation of the GABA transporter induces changes in [Ca2+]i which may have important implications for the functional properties of horizontal cells. PMID:8576848

  6. Gambierol inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels augments spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in cerebrocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengyu; Cui, Yanjun; Busse, Eric; Mehrotra, Suneet; Rainier, Jon D; Murray, Thomas F

    2014-09-01

    Gambierol is a marine polycyclic ether toxin produced by the marine dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus and is a member of the ciguatoxin toxin family. Gambierol has been demonstrated to be either a low-efficacy partial agonist/antagonist of voltage-gated sodium channels or a potent blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kvs). Here we examined the influence of gambierol on intact cerebrocortical neurons. We found that gambierol produced both a concentration-dependent augmentation of spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations, and an inhibition of Kv channel function with similar potencies. In addition, an array of selective as well as universal Kv channel inhibitors mimicked gambierol in augmenting spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations in cerebrocortical neurons. These data are consistent with a gambierol blockade of Kv channels underlying the observed increase in spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillation frequency. We also found that gambierol produced a robust stimulation of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Gambierol-stimulated ERK1/2 activation was dependent on both inotropic [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)] and type I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) inasmuch as MK-801 [NMDA receptor inhibitor; (5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate], S-(4)-CGP [S-(4)-carboxyphenylglycine], and MTEP [type I mGluR inhibitors; 3-((2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl) pyridine] attenuated the response. In addition, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor inhibitor, and U73122 (1-[6-[[(17b)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione), a phospholipase C inhibitor, both suppressed gambierol-induced ERK1/2 activation, further confirming the role of type I mGluR-mediated signaling in the observed ERK1/2 activation. Finally, we found that gambierol produced a concentration-dependent stimulation of neurite outgrowth that was mimicked by 4-aminopyridine, a universal

  7. Gambierol Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels Augments Spontaneous Ca2+ Oscillations in Cerebrocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Cui, Yanjun; Busse, Eric; Mehrotra, Suneet; Rainier, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Gambierol is a marine polycyclic ether toxin produced by the marine dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus and is a member of the ciguatoxin toxin family. Gambierol has been demonstrated to be either a low-efficacy partial agonist/antagonist of voltage-gated sodium channels or a potent blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kvs). Here we examined the influence of gambierol on intact cerebrocortical neurons. We found that gambierol produced both a concentration-dependent augmentation of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations, and an inhibition of Kv channel function with similar potencies. In addition, an array of selective as well as universal Kv channel inhibitors mimicked gambierol in augmenting spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in cerebrocortical neurons. These data are consistent with a gambierol blockade of Kv channels underlying the observed increase in spontaneous Ca2+ oscillation frequency. We also found that gambierol produced a robust stimulation of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Gambierol-stimulated ERK1/2 activation was dependent on both inotropic [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)] and type I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) inasmuch as MK-801 [NMDA receptor inhibitor; (5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate], S-(4)-CGP [S-(4)-carboxyphenylglycine], and MTEP [type I mGluR inhibitors; 3-((2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl) pyridine] attenuated the response. In addition, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor inhibitor, and U73122 (1-[6-[[(17b)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione), a phospholipase C inhibitor, both suppressed gambierol-induced ERK1/2 activation, further confirming the role of type I mGluR-mediated signaling in the observed ERK1/2 activation. Finally, we found that gambierol produced a concentration-dependent stimulation of neurite outgrowth that was mimicked by 4-aminopyridine, a universal potassium

  8. Actions of sea anemone type 1 neurotoxins on voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms.

    PubMed

    Wanke, Enzo; Zaharenko, André Junqueira; Redaelli, Elisa; Schiavon, Emanuele

    2009-12-15

    As voltage-gated Na(+) channels are responsible for the conduction of electrical impulses in most excitable tissues in the majority of animals (except nematodes), they have become important targets for the toxins of venomous animals, from sea anemones to molluscs, scorpions, spiders and even fishes. During their evolution, different animals have developed a set of cysteine-rich peptides capable of binding different extracellular sites of this channel protein. A fundamental question concerning the mechanism of action of these toxins is whether they act at a common receptor site in Na(+) channels when exerting their different pharmacological effects, or at distinct receptor sites in different Na(v) channels subtypes whose particular properties lead to these pharmacological differences. The alpha-subunits of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Na(v)1.x) have been divided into at least nine subtypes on the basis of amino acid sequences. Sea anemones have been extensively studied from the toxinological point of view for more than 40 years. There are about 40 sea anemone type 1 peptides known to be active on Na(v)1.x channels and all are 46-49 amino acid residues long, with three disulfide bonds and their molecular weights range between 3000 and 5000 Da. About 12 years ago a general model of Na(v)1.2-toxin interaction, developed for the alpha-scorpion toxins, was shown to fit also to action of sea anemone toxin such as ATX-II. According to this model these peptides are specifically acting on the type 3 site known to be between segments 3 and 4 in domain IV of the Na(+) channel protein. This region is indeed responsible for the normal Na(+) currents fast inactivation that is potently slowed by these toxins. This fundamental "gain-of-function" mechanism is responsible for the strong increase in the action potential duration. They constitute a class of tools by means of which physiologists and pharmacologists can study the structure/function relationships of channel proteins. As

  9. Intra-membrane Signaling Between the Voltage-Gated Ca2+-Channel and Cysteine Residues of Syntaxin 1A Coordinates Synchronous Release

    PubMed Central

    Bachnoff, Niv; Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Trus, Michael; Atlas, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of syntaxin 1A (Sx1A) with voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) is required for depolarization-evoked release. However, it is unclear how the signal is transferred from the channel to the exocytotic machinery and whether assembly of Sx1A and the calcium channel is conformationally linked to triggering synchronous release. Here we demonstrate that depolarization-evoked catecholamine release was decreased in chromaffin cells infected with semliki forest viral vectors encoding Sx1A mutants, Sx1AC271V, or Sx1AC272V, or by direct oxidation of these Sx1A transmembrane (TM) cysteine residues. Mutating or oxidizing these highly conserved Sx1A Cys271 and Cys272 equally disrupted the Sx1A interaction with the channel. The results highlight the functional link between the VGCC and the exocytotic machinery, and attribute the redox sensitivity of the release process to the Sx1A TM C271 and C272. This unique intra-membrane signal-transduction pathway enables fast signaling, and triggers synchronous release by conformational-coupling of the channel with Sx1A. PMID:23567899

  10. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Samira; Stein, Matthias; Elinder, Fredrik; Andersson, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD), the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA) and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins. PMID:26751683

  11. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Mechanistic Insights From Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Oakes, V; Furini, S; Domene, C

    2016-01-01

    The permeation of ions and other molecules across biological membranes is an inherent requirement of all cellular organisms. Ion channels, in particular, are responsible for the conduction of charged species, hence modulating the propagation of electrical signals. Despite the universal physiological implications of this property, the molecular functioning of ion channels remains ambiguous. The combination of atomistic structural data with computational methodologies, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is now considered routine to investigate structure-function relationships in biological systems. A fuller understanding of conduction, selectivity, and gating, therefore, is steadily emerging due to the applicability of these techniques to ion channels. However, because their structure is known at atomic resolution, studies have consistently been biased toward K(+) channels, thus the molecular determinants of ionic selectivity, activation, and drug blockage in Na(+) channels are often overlooked. The recent increase of available crystallographic data has eminently encouraged the investigation of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels via computational methods. Here, we present an overview of simulation studies that have contributed to our understanding of key principles that underlie ionic conduction and selectivity in Na(+) channels, in comparison to the K(+) channel analogs. PMID:27586285

  12. Computational Structural Pharmacology and Toxicology of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are targets for many toxins and medically important drugs. Despite decades of intensive studies in industry and academia, atomic mechanisms of action are still not completely understood. The major cause is a lack of high-resolution structures of eukaryotic channels and their complexes with ligands. In these circumstances a useful approach is homology modeling that employs as templates X-ray structures of potassium channels and prokaryotic sodium channels. On one hand, due to inherent limitations of this approach, results should be treated with caution. In particular, models should be tested against relevant experimental data. On the other hand, docking of drugs and toxins in homology models provides a unique possibility to integrate diverse experimental data provided by mutational analysis, electrophysiology, and studies of structure-activity relations. Here we describe how homology modeling advanced our understanding of mechanisms of several classes of ligands. These include tetrodotoxins and mu-conotoxins that block the outer pore, local anesthetics that block of the inner pore, batrachotoxin that binds in the inner pore but, paradoxically, activates the channel, pyrethroid insecticides that activate the channel by binding at lipid-exposed repeat interfaces, and scorpion alpha and beta-toxins, which bind between the pore and voltage-sensing domains and modify the channel gating. We emphasize importance of experimental data for elaborating the models. PMID:27586283

  13. Functional Interaction between the Scaffold Protein Kidins220/ARMS and Neuronal Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Cesca, Fabrizia; Satapathy, Annyesha; Ferrea, Enrico; Nieus, Thierry; Benfenati, Fabio; Scholz-Starke, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Kidins220 (kinase D-interacting substrate of 220 kDa)/ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning (ARMS) acts as a signaling platform at the plasma membrane and is implicated in a multitude of neuronal functions, including the control of neuronal activity. Here, we used the Kidins220−/− mouse model to study the effects of Kidins220 ablation on neuronal excitability. Multielectrode array recordings showed reduced evoked spiking activity in Kidins220−/− hippocampal networks, which was compatible with the increased excitability of GABAergic neurons determined by current-clamp recordings. Spike waveform analysis further indicated an increased sodium conductance in this neuronal subpopulation. Kidins220 association with brain voltage-gated sodium channels was shown by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and Na+ current recordings in transfected HEK293 cells, which revealed dramatic alterations of kinetics and voltage dependence. Finally, an in silico interneuronal model incorporating the Kidins220-induced Na+ current alterations reproduced the firing phenotype observed in Kidins220−/− neurons. These results identify Kidins220 as a novel modulator of Nav channel activity, broadening our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating network excitability. PMID:26037926

  14. Characterization of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaarschmidt, Grit; Wegner, Florian; Schwarz, Sigrid C.; Schmidt, Hartmut; Schwarz, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Background Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are among the earliest ion channels to appear during brain development, suggesting a functional requirement for progenitor cell proliferation and/or differentiation. We tested this hypothesis, using human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) as a model system. Methodology/Principal Findings In proliferating hNPCs a broad spectrum of Kv channel subtypes was identified using quantitative real-time PCR with a predominant expression of the A-type channel Kv4.2. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings Kv currents were separated into a large transient component characteristic for fast-inactivating A-type potassium channels (IA) and a small, sustained component produced by delayed-rectifying channels (IK). During differentiation the expression of IA as well as A-type channel transcripts dramatically decreased, while IK producing delayed-rectifiers were upregulated. Both Kv currents were differentially inhibited by selective neurotoxins like phrixotoxin-1 and α-dendrotoxin as well as by antagonists like 4-aminopyridine, ammoniumchloride, tetraethylammonium chloride and quinidine. In viability and proliferation assays chronic inhibition of the A-type currents severely disturbed the cell cycle and precluded proper hNPC proliferation, while the blockade of delayed-rectifiers by α-dendrotoxin increased proliferation. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that A-type potassium currents are essential for proper proliferation of immature multipotent hNPCs. PMID:19584922

  15. More than Memory Impairment in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Complex Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bettcher, Brianne M.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.; Irani, Sarosh R.; Neuhaus, John; Forner, Sven; Hess, Christopher P.; Geschwind, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Autoimmune encephalopathies (AE) are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders that affect cognition. Although memory difficulties are commonly endorsed, few reports of AE inclusively assess all cognitive domains in detail. Our aim was to perform an unbiased cognitive evaluation of AE patients with voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKCC-Abs) in order to delineate cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Methods We assessed serial VGKCC-Abs AE subjects (n=12) with a comprehensive evaluation of memory, executive functions, visuospatial skills, and language. Clinical MRI (n=10/12) was evaluated. Five subjects had serial cognitive testing available, permitting descriptive analysis of change. Results Subjects demonstrated mild to moderate impairment in memory (mean Z=−1.9) and executive functions (mean Z=−1.5), with variable impairments in language and sparing of visuospatial skills. MRI findings showed T2 hyperintensities in medial temporal lobe (10/10) and basal ganglia (2/10). Serial cognitive examination revealed heterogeneity in cognitive function; whereas most patients improved in one or more domains, residual impairments were observed in some patients. Conclusions This study augments prior neuropsychological analyses in VGKCC-Ab AE by identifying not only memory and executive function deficits, but also language impairments, with preservation of visuospatial functioning. This study further highlights the importance of domain-specific testing to parse out the complex cognitive phenotypes of VGKCC-Ab AE. PMID:24981998

  16. Structural Characteristics of the Redox-sensing Coiled Coil in the Voltage-gated H+ Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation is an important biochemical defense mechanism, but it also elicits toxicity; therefore, oxidation must be under strict control. In phagocytotic events in neutrophils, the voltage-gated H+ (Hv) channel is a key regulator of the production of reactive oxygen species against invading bacteria. The cytoplasmic domain of the Hv channel forms a dimeric coiled coil underpinning a dimerized functional unit. Importantly, in the alignment of the coiled-coil core, a conserved cysteine residue forms a potential intersubunit disulfide bond. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the coiled-coil domain in reduced, oxidized, and mutated (Cys → Ser) states. The crystal structures indicate that a pair of Cys residues forms an intersubunit disulfide bond dependent on the redox conditions. CD spectroscopy revealed that the disulfide bond increases the thermal stability of the coiled-coil protein. We also reveal that two thiol modifier molecules are able to bind to Cys in a redox-dependent manner without disruption of the dimeric coiled-coil assembly. Thus, the biochemical properties of the cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain in the Hv channel depend on the redox condition, which may play a role in redox sensing in the phagosome. PMID:23667254

  17. Modulation of voltage-gated K+ channels by the sodium channel β1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hai M.; Miyazaki, Haruko; Hoshi, Naoto; Smith, Brian J.; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Goldin, Alan L.; Chandy, K. George

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) and potassium (KV) channels are critical components of neuronal action potential generation and propagation. Here, we report that NaVβ1 encoded by SCN1b, an integral subunit of NaV channels, coassembles with and modulates the biophysical properties of KV1 and KV7 channels, but not KV3 channels, in an isoform-specific manner. Distinct domains of NaVβ1 are involved in modulation of the different KV channels. Studies with channel chimeras demonstrate that NaVβ1-mediated changes in activation kinetics and voltage dependence of activation require interaction of NaVβ1 with the channel’s voltage-sensing domain, whereas changes in inactivation and deactivation require interaction with the channel’s pore domain. A molecular model based on docking studies shows NaVβ1 lying in the crevice between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of KV channels, making significant contacts with the S1 and S5 segments. Cross-modulation of NaV and KV channels by NaVβ1 may promote diversity and flexibility in the overall control of cellular excitability and signaling. PMID:23090990

  18. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits voltage-gated proton currents in BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sanghee; Park, Mijung; Song, Jin-Ho

    2013-01-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the principal constituent of green tea, protects neurons from toxic insults by suppressing the microglial secretion of neurotoxic inflammatory mediators. Voltage-gated proton channels are expressed in microglia, and are required for NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species generation. Brain damage after ischemic stroke is dependent on proton channel activity. Accordingly, we examined whether EGCG could inhibit proton channel function in the murine microglial BV2 cells. EGCG potently inhibited proton currents with an IC(50) of 3.7 μM. Other tea catechins, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechin and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, were far less potent than EGCG. EGCG did not change the kinetics of proton currents such as the activation and the deactivation time constants, the reversal potential and the activation voltage, suggesting that the gating process of proton channels were not altered by EGCG. EGCG is known to disturb lipid rafts by sequestering cholesterol. However, neither extraction of cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or cholesterol supplementation could reverse the EGCG inhibition of proton currents. In addition, the EGCG effect was preserved in the presence of the cytoskeletal stabilizers paclitaxel and phalloidin, phosphatase inhibitors, the antioxidant Trolox, superoxide dismutase or catalase. The proton channel inhibition can be a substantial mechanism for EGCG to suppress microglial activation and subsequent neurotoxic events. PMID:23201067

  19. Voltage-gated sodium channels and cancer: is excitability their primary role?

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Sébastien; Gillet, Ludovic; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Besson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are molecular characteristics of excitable cells. Their activation, triggered by membrane depolarization, generates transient sodium currents that initiate action potentials in neurons and muscle cells. Sodium currents were discovered by Hodgkin and Huxley using the voltage clamp technique and reported in their landmark series of papers in 1952. It was only in the 1980's that sodium channel proteins from excitable membranes were molecularly characterized by Catterall and his collaborators. Non-excitable cells can also express NaV channels in physiological conditions as well as in pathological conditions. These NaV channels can sustain biological roles that are not related to the generation of action potentials. Interestingly, it is likely that the abnormal expression of NaV in pathological tissues can reflect the re-expression of a fetal phenotype. This is especially true in epithelial cancer cells for which these channels have been identified and sodium currents recorded, while it was not the case for cells from the cognate normal tissues. In cancers, the functional activity of NaV appeared to be involved in regulating the proliferative, migrative, and invasive properties of cells. This review is aimed at addressing the non-excitable roles of NaV channels with a specific emphasis in the regulation of cancer cell biology. PMID:26283962

  20. Dynamic memory of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel: A stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2015-05-14

    In this work, we have studied the stochastic response of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel to a periodic external voltage that keeps the system out-of-equilibrium. The system exhibits memory, resulting from time-dependent driving, that is reflected in terms of dynamic hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. The hysteresis loop area has a maximum at some intermediate voltage frequency and disappears in the limits of low and high frequencies. However, the (average) dissipation at long-time limit increases and finally goes to saturation with rising frequency. This raises the question: how diminishing hysteresis can be associated with growing dissipation? To answer this, we have studied the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system and analyzed different thermodynamic functions which also exhibit hysteresis. Interestingly, by applying a temporal symmetry analysis in the high-frequency limit, we have analytically shown that hysteresis in some of the periodic responses of the system does not vanish. On the contrary, the rates of free energy and internal energy change of the system as well as the rate of dissipative work done on the system show growing hysteresis with frequency. Hence, although the current-voltage hysteresis disappears in the high-frequency limit, the memory of the ion channel is manifested through its specific nonequilibrium thermodynamic responses. PMID:25978913

  1. On the Natural and Unnatural History of the Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channel.

    PubMed

    Moczydlowski, E G

    2016-01-01

    This review glances at the voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) channel (NaV) from the skewed perspective of natural history and the history of ideas. Beginning with the earliest natural philosophers, the objective of biological science and physiology was to understand the basis of life and discover its intimate secrets. The idea that the living state of matter differs from inanimate matter by an incorporeal spirit or mystical force was central to vitalism, a doctrine based on ancient beliefs that persisted until the last century. Experimental electrophysiology played a major role in the abandonment of vitalism by elucidating physiochemical mechanisms that explained the electrical excitability of muscle and nerve. Indeed, as a principal biomolecule underlying membrane excitability, the NaV channel may be considered as the physical analog or surrogate for the vital spirit once presumed to animate higher forms of life. NaV also epitomizes the "other secret of life" and functions as a quantal transistor element of biological intelligence. Subplots of this incredible but true story run the gamut from electric fish to electromagnetism, invention of the battery, venomous animals, neurotoxins, channelopathies, arrhythmia, anesthesia, astrobiology, etc. PMID:27586279

  2. Voltage-gated potassium channels autoantibodies in a child with rasmussen encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Marie-Aude; Dubois-Teklali, Fanny; Vercueil, Laurent; Sabourdy, Cécile; Nugues, Frédérique; Vincent, Angela; Oliver, Viviana; Bulteau, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a severe epileptic and inflammatory encephalopathy of unknown etiology, responsible for focal neurological signs and cognitive decline. The current leading hypothesis suggests a sequence of immune reactions induced by an indeterminate factor. This sequence is thought to be responsible for the production of autoantibody-mediated central nervous system degeneration. However, these autoantibodies are not specific to the disease and not all patients present with them. We report the case of a 4-year-old girl suffering from RE displaying some atypical features such as fast evolution and seizures of left parietal onset refractory to several antiepileptics, intravenous immunoglobulins, and corticosteroids. Serum autoantibodies directed against voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) were evidenced at 739 pM, a finding never previously reported in children. This screening was performed because of an increased signal in the temporolimbic areas on brain magnetic resonance imaging, which was similar to what is observed during limbic encephalitis. The patient experienced epilepsia partialis continua with progressive right hemiplegia and aphasia. She underwent left hemispherotomy at the age of 5.5 years after which she became seizure free with great cognitive improvement. First described in adults, VGKC autoantibodies have been recently described in children with various neurological manifestations. The implication of VGKC autoantibodies in RE is a new observation and opens up new physiopathological and therapeutic avenues of investigation. PMID:25062271

  3. Voltage-gated Na+ channels: multiplicity of expression, plasticity, functional implications and pathophysiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Diss, J K J; Fraser, S P; Djamgoz, M B A

    2004-05-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are well known for mediating regenerative cell membrane depolarization and conduction of electrical signalling in nerves and muscles. However, VGSCs may also be expressed in traditionally "non-excitable" cell types, including lymphocytes, glia, fibroblasts and metastatic cancer cells of epithelial origin. Both the diversity and modulation of VGSC expression are far more complex than was initially apparent. There are at least 10 different genes that encode the alpha-subunits of VGSCs. Since VGSCs can contribute to a range of human disease conditions, it is important to understand both the control and consequences of VGSC functioning and how these aspects may be altered under pathophysiological conditions. Such mechanisms can be at the transcriptional, pre-translational or post-translational levels. This article reviews recent literature that has contributed to our understanding of how individual VGSC subtypes can generate their unique physiological signatures within different cell types. We also highlight emerging areas of interest, in particular, the finding of multiple expression of individual VGSC subtypes within single cells, the generation of alternative splice variants and the increasingly complex set of mechanisms of plasticity through which individual VGSC subtypes may be subtly controlled, including intracellular trafficking of VGSC protein. PMID:14963621

  4. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel in Grasshopper Mice Defends Against Bark Scorpion Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Matthew P.; Cummins, Theodore R.; Zakon, Harold H.

    2014-01-01

    Painful venoms are used to deter predators. Pain itself, however, can signal damage and thus serves an important adaptive function. Evolution to reduce general pain responses, although valuable for preying on venomous species, is rare, likely because it comes with the risk of reduced response to tissue damage. Bark scorpions capitalize on the protective pain pathway of predators by inflicting intensely painful stings. However, grasshopper mice regularly attack and consume bark scorpions, grooming only briefly when stung. Bark scorpion venom induces pain in many mammals (house mice, rats, humans) by activating the voltage-gated Na+ channel Nav1.7, but has no effect on Nav1.8. Grasshopper mice Nav1.8 has amino acid variants that bind bark scorpion toxins and inhibit Na+ currents, blocking action potential propagation and inducing analgesia. Thus, grasshopper mice have solved the predator-pain problem by using a toxin bound to a nontarget channel to block transmission of the pain signals the venom itself is initiating. PMID:24159039

  5. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons. PMID:26423360

  6. A voltage-gated K(+) current in renal inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Laura I; Martínez-Téllez, Julio C; Salas, Monica; Castilla, Salvador A; Carrisoza, Rolando; Tapia, Dagoberto; Vázquez, Mario; Bargas, José; Bolívar, Juan J

    2004-04-01

    We studied the K(+)-selective conductances in primary cultures of rat renal inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) using perforated-patch and conventional whole cell techniques. Depolarizations above -20 mV induced a time-dependent outward K(+) current (I(vto)) similar to a delayed rectifier. I(vto) showed a half-maximal activation around 5.6 mV with a slope factor of 6.8 mV. Its K(+)/Na(+) selectivity ratio was 11.7. It was inhibited by tetraethylammonium, quinidine, 4-aminopyridine, and Ba(2+) and was not Ca(2+) dependent. The delayed rectifying characteristics of I(vto) prompted us to screen the expression of Kv1 and Kv3 families by RT-PCR. Analysis of RNA isolated from cell cultures revealed the presence of three Kv alpha-subunits (Kv1.1, Kv1.3, and Kv1.6). Western blot analysis with Kv alpha-subunit antibodies for Kv1.1 and Kv1.3 showed labeling of approximately 70-kDa proteins from inner medulla plasmatic and microsome membranes. Immunocytochemical analysis of cell culture and kidney inner medulla showed that Kv1.3 is colocalized with the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase at the basolateral membrane, although it is also in the cytoplasm. This is the first evidence of recording, protein expression, and localization of a voltage-gated Kv1 in the kidney IMCD cells. PMID:14684382

  7. KCNE1 and KCNE3: The yin and yang of voltage-gated K(+) channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2016-01-15

    The human KCNE gene family comprises five genes encoding single transmembrane-spanning ion channel regulatory subunits. The primary function of KCNE subunits appears to be regulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, and the best-understood KCNE complexes are with the KCNQ1 Kv α subunit. Here, we review the often opposite effects of KCNE1 and KCNE3 on Kv channel biology, with an emphasis on regulation of KCNQ1. Slow-activating IKs channel complexes formed by KCNQ1 and KCNE1 are essential for human ventricular myocyte repolarization, while constitutively active KCNQ1-KCNE3 channels are important in the intestine. Inherited sequence variants in human KCNE1 and KCNE3 cause cardiac arrhythmias but by different mechanisms, and each is important for hearing in unique ways. Because of their contrasting effects on KCNQ1 function, KCNE1 and KCNE3 have proved invaluable tools in the mechanistic understanding of how channel gating can be manipulated, and each may also provide a window into novel insights and new therapeutic opportunities in K(+) channel pharmacology. Finally, findings from studies of Kcne1(-/-) and Kcne3(-/-) mouse lines serve to illustrate the complexity of KCNE biology and KCNE-linked disease states. PMID:26410412

  8. Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in the PNS: Novel Therapies for Neuropathic Pain?

    PubMed

    Tibbs, Gareth R; Posson, David J; Goldstein, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    Neuropathic pain arises from injury to the nervous system. Conditions associated with neuropathic pain are diverse, and lesions and/or pathological changes in the central nervous system (CNS) or peripheral nervous system (PNS) can frequently, but not always, be identified. It is difficult to treat, with patients often on multiple, different classes of medications, all with appreciable adverse side effect profiles. Consequently, there is a pressing need for the development of new medications. The development of such therapeutics is predicated on a clear understanding of the relevant molecular and cellular processes that contribute to the development, and maintenance, of the neuropathic pain state. One proposed mechanism thought to contribute to the ontogeny of neuropathic pain is altered expression, trafficking, and functioning of ion channels expressed by primary sensory neurons. Here, we will focus on three voltage-gated ion channel families, CaV, HCN, and NaV, first reviewing the preclinical data and then the human data where it exists. PMID:27233519

  9. Tetraspanin-13 modulates voltage-gated CaV2.2 Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Mallmann, Robert T.; Wilmes, Thomas; Lichvarova, Lucia; Bührer, Anja; Lohmüller, Barbara; Castonguay, Jan; Lacinova, Lubica; Klugbauer, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Integration of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in a network of protein-interactions is a crucial requirement for proper regulation of channel activity. In this study, we took advantage of the specific properties of the yeast split-ubiquitin system to search for and characterize so far unknown interaction partners of CaV2 Ca2+ channels. We identified tetraspanin-13 (TSPAN-13) as an interaction partner of the α1 subunit of N-type CaV2.2, but not of P/Q-type CaV2.1 or L- and T-type Ca2+ channels. Interaction could be located between domain IV of CaV2.2 and transmembrane segments S1 and S2 of TSPAN-13. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that TSPAN-13 specifically modulates the efficiency of coupling between voltage sensor activation and pore opening of the channel and accelerates the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of the Ba2+ current through CaV2.2. These data indicate that TSPAN-13 might regulate CaV2.2 Ca2+ channel activity in defined synaptic membrane compartments and thereby influences transmitter release. PMID:23648579

  10. Combinatorial augmentation of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels by chemical openers

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qiaojie; Sun, Haiyan; Zhang, Yangming; Nan, Fajun; Li, Min

    2008-01-01

    Noninactivating potassium current formed by KCNQ2 (Kv7.2) and KCNQ3 (Kv7.3) subunits resembles neuronal M-currents which are activated by voltage and play a critical role in controlling membrane excitability. Activation of voltage-gated potassium channels by a chemical opener is uncommon. Therefore, the mechanisms of action are worthy further investigation. Retigabine and zinc pyrithione are two activators for KCNQ channels but their molecular interactions with KCNQ channel remain largely elusive. Here we report that retigabine and zinc pyrithione recognize two different sites of KCNQ2 channels. Their agonistic actions are noncompetitive and allow for simultaneous binding of two different activators on the same channel complex, hence giving rise to combinatorial potentiation with characteristic properties of both openers. Examining their effects on mutant channels, we showed zinc pyrithione is capable of opening nonconductive channels and coapplication of zinc pyrithione and retigabine could restore a disease mutant channel similar to wild type. Our results indicate two independent activator binding sites present in KCNQ channels. The resultant combinatorial potentiation by multiple synthetic chemical openers indicates that KCNQ channels are accessible to various types and combinations of pharmacological regulation. PMID:18272489

  11. Extracellular Protons Inhibit Charge Immobilization in the Cardiac Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D.K.; Claydon, T.W.; Ruben, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Low pH depolarizes the voltage-dependence of cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV1.5) channel activation and fast inactivation and destabilizes the fast-inactivated state. The molecular basis for these changes in protein behavior has not been reported. We hypothesized that changes in the kinetics of voltage sensor movement may destabilize the fast-inactivated state in NaV1.5. To test this idea, we recorded NaV1.5 gating currents in Xenopus oocytes using a cut-open voltage-clamp with extracellular solution titrated to either pH 7.4 or pH 6.0. Reducing extracellular pH significantly depolarized the voltage-dependence of both the QON/V and QOFF/V curves, and reduced the total charge immobilized during depolarization. We conclude that destabilized fast-inactivation and reduced charge immobilization in NaV1.5 at low pH are functionally related effects. PMID:23823228

  12. Regulation of the voltage-gated cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 by interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Abriel, Hugues; Kass, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    Na(v)1.5, the major cardiac voltage-gated Na(+) channel, plays a central role in the generation of the cardiac action potential and in the propagation of electrical impulses in the heart. Its importance for normal heart function has been recently exemplified by reports of numerous mutations found in the gene SCN5A--which encodes Na(v)1.5--in patients with various pathologic cardiac phenotypes, indicating that even subtle alterations of Na(v)1.5 cell biology and function may underlie human diseases. Similar to other ion channels, Na(v)1.5 is most likely part of dynamic multiprotein complexes located in the different cellular compartments. This review focuses on five intracellular proteins that have been recently reported to directly bind to and contribute to the regulation of Na(v)1.5: ankyrin proteins, fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 1B, calmodulin, Nedd4-like ubiquitin-protein ligases, and syntrophin proteins. PMID:15795161

  13. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators. PMID:26671526

  14. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors. PMID:25136136

  15. Consequences of Phosphate-Arginine Complexes in Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael E.

    2008-11-01

    There are two reasons for suspecting that phosphate complexes of arginine make it very difficult to derive gating charge in voltage gated potassium (and presumably sodium) channels from the motion of charged arginines. For one thing, the arginines should be complexed with phosphate, thereby neutralizing the charge, at least partially. Second, Li et al.(1) have shown that there is a large energy penalty for putting a charged arginine into a membrane. on channel gating current is generally attributed to S4 motion, in that the S4 segment of the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of these channels contains arginines, some of which are not (or at least not obviously) salt bridged, or otherwise charge compensated. There is, however, good reason to expect that there should be a complex of these arginines with phosphate, very probably from lipid headgroups. This has consequences for gating current; the complexed arginines, if they moved, would carry too much of the membrane along. This leads to the suggestion that an alternative to S4 physical motion, H+ transport, should be considered as a possible resolution of the apparent paradox. The consequences for a gating model that was proposed in our earlier work are discussed; there is one major difference in the model in the present form (a conformational change), but the proton cascade as gating current and the role of water in the closed state are reinforced.

  16. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI–DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI–DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII–DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  17. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI–DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI–DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII–DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes. PMID:27439594

  18. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16: Voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen Ph; Catterall, William A; Kelly, Eamonn; Marrion, Neil; Peters, John A; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Southan, Christopher; Davies, Jamie A

    2015-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/16 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 1750 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13350/full. Voltage-gated ion channels are one of the eight major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, other ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors, enzymes and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The Concise Guide is published in landscape format in order to facilitate comparison of related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2015, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in the previous Guides to Receptors & Channels and the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:26650441

  19. High temperature sensitivity is intrinsic to voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are members of the large tetrameric cation channels superfamily but are considered to be uniquely sensitive to heat, which has been presumed to be due to the existence of an unidentified temperature-sensing domain. Here we report that the homologous voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels also exhibit high temperature sensitivity comparable to that of TRPV1, which is detectable under specific conditions when the voltage sensor is functionally decoupled from the activation gate through either intrinsic mechanisms or mutations. Interestingly, mutations could tune Shaker channel to be either heat-activated or heat-deactivated. Therefore, high temperature sensitivity is intrinsic to both TRP and Kv channels. Our findings suggest important physiological roles of heat-induced variation in Kv channel activities. Mechanistically our findings indicate that temperature-sensing TRP channels may not contain a specialized heat-sensor domain; instead, non-obligatory allosteric gating permits the intrinsic heat sensitivity to drive channel activation, allowing temperature-sensitive TRP channels to function as polymodal nociceptors. PMID:25030910

  20. Dynamic memory of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel: A stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2015-05-14

    In this work, we have studied the stochastic response of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel to a periodic external voltage that keeps the system out-of-equilibrium. The system exhibits memory, resulting from time-dependent driving, that is reflected in terms of dynamic hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. The hysteresis loop area has a maximum at some intermediate voltage frequency and disappears in the limits of low and high frequencies. However, the (average) dissipation at long-time limit increases and finally goes to saturation with rising frequency. This raises the question: how diminishing hysteresis can be associated with growing dissipation? To answer this, we have studied the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system and analyzed different thermodynamic functions which also exhibit hysteresis. Interestingly, by applying a temporal symmetry analysis in the high-frequency limit, we have analytically shown that hysteresis in some of the periodic responses of the system does not vanish. On the contrary, the rates of free energy and internal energy change of the system as well as the rate of dissipative work done on the system show growing hysteresis with frequency. Hence, although the current-voltage hysteresis disappears in the high-frequency limit, the memory of the ion channel is manifested through its specific nonequilibrium thermodynamic responses.

  1. High temperature sensitivity is intrinsic to voltage-gated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are members of the large tetrameric cation channels superfamily but are considered to be uniquely sensitive to heat, which has been presumed to be due to the existence of an unidentified temperature-sensing domain. Here we report that the homologous voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels also exhibit high temperature sensitivity comparable to that of TRPV1, which is detectable under specific conditions when the voltage sensor is functionally decoupled from the activation gate through either intrinsic mechanisms or mutations. Interestingly, mutations could tune Shaker channel to be either heat-activated or heat-deactivated. Therefore, high temperature sensitivity is intrinsic to both TRP and Kv channels. Our findings suggest important physiological roles of heat-induced variation in Kv channel activities. Mechanistically our findings indicate that temperature-sensing TRP channels may not contain a specialized heat-sensor domain; instead, non-obligatory allosteric gating permits the intrinsic heat sensitivity to drive channel activation, allowing temperature-sensitive TRP channels to function as polymodal nociceptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03255.001 PMID:25030910

  2. Vincamine and vincanol are potent blockers of voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Erdo, S A; Molnár, P; Lakics, V; Bence, J Z; Tömösközi, Z

    1996-10-24

    The effects of three vinca derivatives on [3H]batrachotoxin binding in rat cortical synaptosomes, on the inhibition of whole-cell Na+ currents evoked in voltage-clamped cortical neurones of the rat, on the protection against veratridine-induced cell death in cortical cultures and on the maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice were compared. Vinpocetine, vincamine and vincanol reduced [3H]batrachotoxin binding with IC50 values of 0.34, 1.9 and 10.7 microM, blocked Na+ currents with IC50 values of 44.72 and 40 microM, and protected cortical against veratridine-induced cell death with IC50 values of 0.49, 26 and 33 microM, respectively. Upon i.p. administration, vinpocetine, vincamine and vincanol attenuated maximal electric shock-induced convulsions in a dose-dependent manner with ED50 values of 27, 15.4 and 14.6 mg/kg, respectively. The present findings indicate that the three vinca derivatives are potent blockers of voltage-gated Na+ channels, a mechanism that may contribute at least in part to the pharmacological/therapeutic benefit of these drugs. PMID:8957220

  3. A specialized molecular motion opens the Hv1 voltage-gated proton channel

    PubMed Central

    Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Hv1 proton channel is unique among voltage-gated channels for containing the pore and gate within its voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Opening of the pore has been proposed to include assembly of the selectivity filter between the third arginine (R3) of S4 and an aspartate of S1 (D1). We asked whether gating involves a motion of S1 using Ciona intestinalis Hv1. We find that channel opening is concomitant with solution access from the cytoplasm deep into the pore-lining face of S1. Voltage- and patch-clamp fluorometry show that this involves a motion of S1 relative to its surround. S1 motion, and the S4 motion that precedes it, are each influenced by residues on the other helix, suggesting a dynamic interaction between S1 and S4. Our findings suggest that the S1 of Hv1 has specialized to function as part of the channel's gate. PMID:25730777

  4. Selectivity Mechanism of the Voltage-gated Proton Channel, HV1

    PubMed Central

    Dudev, Todor; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Smith, Susan M. E.; Mazmanian, Karine; DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Lim, Carmay

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, trigger bioluminescence in dinoflagellates, enable calcification in coccolithophores, and play multifarious roles in human health. Because the proton concentration is minuscule, exquisite selectivity for protons over other ions is critical to HV1 function. The selectivity of the open HV1 channel requires an aspartate near an arginine in the selectivity filter (SF), a narrow region that dictates proton selectivity, but the mechanism of proton selectivity is unknown. Here we use a reduced quantum model to elucidate how the Asp–Arg SF selects protons but excludes other ions. Attached to a ring scaffold, the Asp and Arg side chains formed bidentate hydrogen bonds that occlude the pore. Introducing H3O+ protonated the SF, breaking the Asp–Arg linkage and opening the conduction pathway, whereas Na+ or Cl– was trapped by the SF residue of opposite charge, leaving the linkage intact, thus preventing permeation. An Asp–Lys SF behaved like the Asp–Arg one and was experimentally verified to be proton-selective, as predicted. Hence, interacting acidic and basic residues form favorable AspH0–H2O0–Arg+ interactions with hydronium but unfavorable Asp––X–/X+–Arg+ interactions with anions/cations. This proposed mechanism may apply to other proton-selective molecules engaged in bioenergetics, homeostasis, and signaling. PMID:25955978

  5. Neuronal Voltage-Gated K+ (Kv) Channels Function in Macromolecular Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Aaron J.; Foeger, Nicholas C.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that native neuronal voltage-gated K+ (Kv) currents reflect the functioning of macromolecular Kv channel complexes, composed of pore-forming (α) subunits, cytosolic and transmembrane accessory subunits, together with regulatory and scaffolding proteins. The individual components of these macromolecular complexes appear to influence the stability, the trafficking, the localization and/or the biophysical properties of the channels. Recent studies suggest that Kv channel accessory subunits subserve multiple roles in the generation of native neuronal Kv channels. Additional recent findings suggest that Kv channel accessory subunits can respond to changes in intracellular Ca2+ or metabolism and thereby integrate signaling pathways to regulate Kv channel expression and properties. Although studies in heterologous cells have provided important insights into the effects of accessory subunits on Kv channel expression/properties, it has become increasingly clear that experiments in neurons are required to define the physiological roles of Kv channel accessory and associated proteins. A number of technological and experimental hurdles remain that must be overcome in the design, execution and interpretation of experiments aimed at detailing the functional roles of accessory subunits and associated proteins in the generation of native neuronal Kv channels. With the increasing association of altered Kv channel functioning with neurological disorders, the potential impact of these efforts is clear. PMID:20813163

  6. Selectivity Mechanism of the Voltage-gated Proton Channel, HV1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudev, Todor; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Smith, Susan M. E.; Mazmanian, Karine; Decoursey, Thomas E.; Lim, Carmay

    2015-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, trigger bioluminescence in dinoflagellates, enable calcification in coccolithophores, and play multifarious roles in human health. Because the proton concentration is minuscule, exquisite selectivity for protons over other ions is critical to HV1 function. The selectivity of the open HV1 channel requires an aspartate near an arginine in the selectivity filter (SF), a narrow region that dictates proton selectivity, but the mechanism of proton selectivity is unknown. Here we use a reduced quantum model to elucidate how the Asp-Arg SF selects protons but excludes other ions. Attached to a ring scaffold, the Asp and Arg side chains formed bidentate hydrogen bonds that occlude the pore. Introducing H3O+ protonated the SF, breaking the Asp-Arg linkage and opening the conduction pathway, whereas Na+ or Cl- was trapped by the SF residue of opposite charge, leaving the linkage intact, thus preventing permeation. An Asp-Lys SF behaved like the Asp-Arg one and was experimentally verified to be proton-selective, as predicted. Hence, interacting acidic and basic residues form favorable AspH0-H2O0-Arg+ interactions with hydronium but unfavorable Asp--X-/X+-Arg+ interactions with anions/cations. This proposed mechanism may apply to other proton-selective molecules engaged in bioenergetics, homeostasis, and signaling.

  7. Molecular determinants of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels for recognition of local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Takushi; Irie, Katsumasa; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-08-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) inhibit mammalian voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Navs) and are thus clinically important. LAs also inhibit prokaryotic Navs (BacNavs), which have a simpler structure than mammalian Navs. To elucidate the detailed mechanisms of LA inhibition to BacNavs, we used NavBh, a BacNav from Bacillus halodurans, to analyze the interactions of several LAs and quaternary ammoniums (QAs). Based on the chemical similarity of QA with the tertiary-alkylamine (TAA) group of LAs, QAs were used to determine the residues required for the recognition of TAA by NavBh. We confirmed that two residues, Thr220 and Phe227, are important for LA binding; a methyl group of Thr220 is important for recognizing both QAs and LAs, whereas Phe227 is involved in holding blockers at the binding site. In addition, we found that NavBh holds blockers in a closed state, consistent with the large inner cavity observed in the crystal structures of BacNavs. These findings reveal the inhibition mechanism of LAs in NavBh, where the methyl group of Thr220 provides the main receptor site for the TAA group and the bulky phenyl group of Phe227 holds the blockers inside the large inner cavity. These two residues correspond to the two LA recognition residues in mammalian Navs, which suggests the relevance of the LA recognition between BacNavs and mammalian Navs. PMID:27273848

  8. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI-DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI-DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII-DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes. PMID:27439594

  9. Kcnh1 voltage-gated potassium channels are essential for early zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Rayk; Rivera-Milla, Eric; Sahoo, Nirakar; Ebert, Christina; Bollig, Frank; Heinemann, Stefan H; Schönherr, Roland; Englert, Christoph

    2012-10-12

    The Kcnh1 gene encodes a voltage-gated potassium channel highly expressed in neurons and involved in tumor cell proliferation, yet its physiological roles remain unclear. We have used the zebrafish as a model to analyze Kcnh1 function in vitro and in vivo. We found that the kcnh1 gene is duplicated in teleost fish (i.e. kcnh1a and kcnh1b) and that both genes are maternally expressed during early development. In adult zebrafish, kcnh1a and kcnh1b have distinct expression patterns but share expression in brain and testis. Heterologous expression of both genes in Xenopus oocytes revealed a strong conservation of characteristic functional properties between human and fish channels, including a unique sensitivity to intracellular Ca(2+)/calmodulin and modulation of voltage-dependent gating by extracellular Mg(2+). Using a morpholino antisense approach, we demonstrate a strong kcnh1 loss-of-function phenotype in developing zebrafish, characterized by growth retardation, delayed hindbrain formation, and embryonic lethality. This late phenotype was preceded by transcriptional up-regulation of known cell-cycle inhibitors (p21, p27, cdh2) and down-regulation of pro-proliferative factors, including cyclin D1, at 70% epiboly. These results reveal an unanticipated basic activity of kcnh1 that is crucial for early embryonic development and patterning. PMID:22927438

  10. Alternative splicing at C terminus of Ca(V)1.4 calcium channel modulates calcium-dependent inactivation, activation potential, and current density.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gregory Ming Yeong; Yu, Dejie; Wang, Juejin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The Ca(V)1.4 voltage-gated calcium channel is predominantly expressed in the retina, and mutations to this channel have been associated with human congenital stationary night blindness type-2. The L-type Ca(V)1.4 channel displays distinct properties such as absence of calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and slow voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) due to the presence of an autoinhibitory domain (inhibitor of CDI) in the distal C terminus. We hypothesized that native Ca(V)1.4 is subjected to extensive alternative splicing, much like the other voltage-gated calcium channels, and employed the transcript scanning method to identify alternatively spliced exons within the Ca(V)1.4 transcripts isolated from the human retina. In total, we identified 19 alternative splice variations, of which 16 variations have not been previously reported. Characterization of the C terminus alternatively spliced exons using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology revealed a splice variant that exhibits robust CDI. This splice variant arose from the splicing of a novel alternate exon (43*) that can be found in 13.6% of the full-length transcripts screened. Inclusion of exon 43* inserts a stop codon that truncates half the C terminus. The Ca(V)1.4 43* channel exhibited robust CDI, a larger current density, a hyperpolarized shift in activation potential by ∼10 mV, and a slower VDI. Through deletional experiments, we showed that the inhibitor of CDI was responsible for modulating channel activation and VDI, in addition to CDI. Calcium currents in the photoreceptors were observed to exhibit CDI and are more negatively activated as compared with currents elicited from heterologously expressed full-length Ca(V)1.4. Naturally occurring alternative splice variants may in part contribute to the properties of the native Ca(V)1.4 channels. PMID:22069316

  11. Location Matters: Synaptotagmin Helps Place Vesicles Near Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Benjamin D.; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Positioning releasable vesicles near voltage-gated calcium channels may ensure transmitter release upon calcium influx. Disruption of vesicle positioning may underlie short-term synaptic depression. However, how this positioning is achieved is unclear. In this issue of Neuron, Young and Neher find that synaptotagmin 2 helps to align readily releasable vesicles near calcium channels at nerve terminals. PMID:19709623

  12. Comparison of the Antialbuminuric Effects of L-/N-type and L-type Calcium Channel Blockers in Hypertensive Patients with Diabetes and Microalbuminuria: The Study of Assessment for Kidney Function by Urinary Microalbumin in Randomized (SAKURA) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Katsuayuki; Ueshima, Kenji; Tanaka, Sachiko; Kosugi, Shinji; Sato, Tosiya; Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Nakao, Kazuwa; Fujita, Toshiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To clarify whether the L-/N-type calcium channel blocker (CCB) cilnidipine is more renoprotective than the L-type CCB amlodipine in patients with early-stage diabetic nephropathy. Methods: In this prospective, multicenter, open-labeled, randomized trial, the antialbuminuric effects of cilnidipine and amlodipine were examined in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitor-treated patients with hypertension (blood pressure [BP]: 130-180/80-110 mmHg), type 2 diabetes, and microalbuminuria (urinary albumin to creatinine [Cr] ratio [UACR]: 30-300 mg/g). Results: Patients received cilnidipine (n = 179, final dose: 10.27 ± 4.13 mg/day) or amlodipine (n = 186, 4.87 ± 2.08 mg/day) for 12 months. Cilnidipine and amlodipine equally decreased BP. The UACR values for the cilnidipine and amlodipine groups were 111.50 ± 138.97 and 88.29 ± 63.45 mg/g, respectively, before treatment and 107.93 ± 130.23 and 89.07 ± 97.55 mg/g, respectively, after treatment. The groups showed similar changes for the natural logarithm of the UACR, serum Cr, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Conclusions: Cilnidipine did not offer greater renoprotection than amlodipine in RAS inhibitor-treated hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria. PMID:23935398

  13. Crystal Structure of a Voltage-gated K+ Channel Pore Module in a Closed State in Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Jose S.; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo A.; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Syeda, Ruhma; Cherezov, Vadim; Baker, Kent A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Montal, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels underlie the electrical excitability of cells. Each subunit of the functional tetramer consists of the tandem fusion of two modules, an N-terminal voltage-sensor and a C-terminal pore. To investigate how sensor coupling to the pore generates voltage-dependent channel opening, we solved the crystal structure and characterized the function of a voltage-gated K+ channel pore in a lipid membrane. The structure of a functional channel in a membrane environment at 3.1 Å resolution establishes an unprecedented connection between channel structure and function. The structure is unique in delineating an ion-occupied ready to conduct selectivity filter, a confined aqueous cavity, and a closed activation gate, embodying a dynamic entity trapped in an unstable closed state. PMID:23095758

  14. Atom-by-atom engineering of voltage-gated ion channels: Magnified insights into function and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Pless, Stephan A; Kim, Robin Y; Ahern, Christopher A; Kurata, Harley T

    2015-01-01

    Unnatural amino acid incorporation into ion channels has proven to be a valuable approach to interrogate detailed hypotheses arising from atomic resolution structures. In this short review, we provide a brief overview of some of the basic principles and methods for incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins. We also review insights into the function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels that have emerged from unnatural amino acid mutagenesis approaches. PMID:25640301

  15. Molecular dynamics of ion transport through the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Bagnéris, Claire; McCusker, Emily C.; DeCaen, Paul G.; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E.; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.; Wallace, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel pore from Magnetococcus sp. (NaVMs) has provided the basis for a molecular dynamics study defining the channel’s full ion translocation pathway and conductance process, selectivity, electrophysiological characteristics, and ion-binding sites. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations permitted a complete time-course characterization of the protein in a membrane system, capturing the plethora of conductance events and revealing a complex mixture of single and multi-ion phenomena with decoupled rapid bidirectional water transport. The simulations suggest specific localization sites for the sodium ions, which correspond with experimentally determined electron density found in the selectivity filter of the crystal structure. These studies have also allowed us to identify the ion conductance mechanism and its relation to water movement for the NavMs channel pore and to make realistic predictions of its conductance properties. The calculated single-channel conductance and selectivity ratio correspond closely with the electrophysiology measurements of the NavMs channel expressed in HEK 293 cells. The ion translocation process seen in this voltage-gated sodium channel is clearly different from that exhibited by members of the closely related family of voltage-gated potassium channels and also differs considerably from existing proposals for the conductance process in sodium channels. These studies simulate sodium channel conductance based on an experimentally determined structure of a sodium channel pore that has a completely open transmembrane pathway and activation gate. PMID:23542377

  16. (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone, a new gastrointestinal smooth muscle L-type calcium channel inhibitor, which underlies the spasmolytic properties of Garcinia buchananii stem bark extract

    PubMed Central

    Balemba, Onesmo B.; Lösch, Sofie; Patterson, Savannah; McMillan, John S.; Hofmann, Thomas; Mawe, Gary M.; Stark, Timo D.

    2016-01-01

    Garcinia buchananii Baker stem bark extract (GBB) is a traditional medication of diarrhea and dysentery in sub-Saharan Africa. It is believed that GBB causes gastrointestinal smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to determine whether GBB has spasmolytic actions and identify compounds underlying these actions. Calcium (Ca2+) imaging was used to analyze the effect of GBB on Ca2+ flashes and Ca2+ waves in guinea pig gallbladder and distal colon smooth muscle. Intracellular microelectrode recording was used to determine the effect of GBB, six fractions of GBB, M1–5 and M7, and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone, a compound isolated from M3 on action potentials in gallbladder smooth muscle. The technique was also used to analyze the effect of GBB, M3, and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone on action potentials in the circular muscle of mouse and guinea pig distal colons, and the effect of GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone on slow waves in porcine ileum. GBB inhibited Ca2+ flashes and Ca2+ waves. GBB, M3 and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone inhibited action potentials. L-type Ca2+ channel activator Bay K 8644 increased the discharge of action potentials in mouse colon but did not trigger or increase action potentials in the presence of GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone. GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone inhibited action potentials in the presence of Bay K 8644. GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone reduced the amplitude but did not alter the frequency of slow waves in the porcine ileum. In conclusion, GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone relax smooth muscle by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels, thus have potential for use as therapies of gastrointestinal smooth muscle spasms, and arrhythmias. PMID:26081368

  17. (2R,3S,2'' R,3''R)-manniflavanone, a new gastrointestinal smooth muscle L-type calcium channel inhibitor, which underlies the spasmolytic properties of Garcinia buchananii stem bark extract.

    PubMed

    Balemba, Onesmo B; Stark, Timo D; Lösch, Sofie; Patterson, Savannah; McMillan, John S; Mawe, Gary M; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Garcinia buchananii Baker stem bark extract (GBB) is a traditional medication of diarrhea and dysentery in sub-Saharan Africa. It is believed that GBB causes gastrointestinal smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to determine whether GBB has spasmolytic actions and identify compounds underlying these actions. Calcium (Ca(2+)) imaging was used to analyze the effect of GBB on Ca(2+) flashes and Ca(2+) waves in guinea pig gallbladder and distal colon smooth muscle. Intracellular microelectrode recording was used to determine the effect of GBB, six fractions of GBB, M1-5 and M7, and (2R,3S,2'' R,3''R)-manniflavanone, a compound isolated from M3 on action potentials in gallbladder smooth muscle. The technique was also used to analyze the effect of GBB, M3, and (2R,3S,2'' R,3''R)-manniflavanone on action potentials in the circular muscle of mouse and guinea pig distal colons, and the effect of GBB and (2R,3S,2''R,3'' R)-manniflavanone on slow waves in porcine ileum. GBB inhibited Ca(2+) flashes and Ca(2+) waves. GBB, M3 and (2R,3 S,2''R,3''R)-manniflavanone inhibited action potentials. L-type Ca(2+) channel activator Bay K 8644 increased the discharge of action potentials in mouse colon but did not trigger or increase action potentials in the presence of GBB and (2R,3S,2''R,3'' R)-manniflavanone. GBB and (2R,3S,2'' R,3''R)-manniflavanone inhibited action potentials in the presence of Bay K 8644. GBB and (2R,3 S,2''R,3''R)-manniflavanone reduced the amplitude but did not alter the frequency of slow waves in the porcine ileum. In conclusion, GBB and (2R,3S,2'' R,3''R)-manniflavanone relax smooth muscle by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels, thus have potential for use as therapies of gastrointestinal smooth muscle spasms, and arrhythmias. PMID:26081368

  18. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  19. CaMKII-Based Regulation of Voltage-Gated Na+ Channel in Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Olha M.; Snyder, Jedidiah S.; Wolf, Roseanne M.; Pavlovicz, Ryan E.; Glynn, Patric; Curran, Jerry; Leymaster, Nicholas D.; Dun, Wen; Wright, Patrick J.; Cardona, Natalia; Qian, Lan; Mitchell, Colleen C.; Boyden, Penelope A.; Binkley, Philip F.; Li, Chenglong; Anderson, Mark E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Hund, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human gene variants affecting ion channel biophysical activity and/or membrane localization are linked with potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias. However, the mechanism for many human arrhythmia variants remains undefined despite over a decade of investigation. Post-translational modulation of membrane proteins is essential for normal cardiac function. Importantly, aberrant myocyte signaling has been linked to defects in cardiac ion channel post-translational modifications and disease. We recently identified a novel pathway for post-translational regulation of the primary cardiac voltage-gated Na+ channel (Nav1.5) by CaMKII. However, a role for this pathway in cardiac disease has not been evaluated. Methods and Results We evaluated the role of CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation in human genetic and acquired disease. We report an unexpected link between a short motif in the Nav1.5 DI-DII loop, recently shown to be critical for CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation, and Nav1.5 function in monogenic arrhythmia and common heart disease. Experiments in heterologous cells and primary ventricular cardiomyocytes demonstrate that human arrhythmia susceptibility variants (A572D and Q573E) alter CaMKII-dependent regulation of Nav1.5 resulting in abnormal channel activity and cell excitability. In silico analysis reveals that these variants functionally mimic the phosphorylated channel resulting in increased susceptibility to arrhythmia-triggering afterdepolarizations. Finally, we report that this same motif is aberrantly regulated in a large animal model of acquired heart disease and in failing human myocardium. Conclusions We identify the mechanism for two human arrhythmia variants that affect Nav1.5 channel activity through direct effects on channel post-translational modification. We propose that the CaMKII phosphorylation motif in the Nav1.5 DI-DII cytoplasmic loop is a critical nodal point for pro-arrhythmic changes to Nav1.5 in congenital and acquired cardiac

  20. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Laedermann, Cedric J.; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) is very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential (AP). Navs are composed of nine different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the AP and consequently modify nociceptive transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions. Post-translational modification (PTM) of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e., peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B, and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological tools to alleviate pain. PMID

  1. Voltage-gated potassium channel-complex autoimmunity and associated clinical syndromes.

    PubMed

    Irani, Sarosh R; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antibodies are defined by the radioimmunoprecipitation of Kv1 potassium channel subunits from brain tissue extracts and were initially discovered in patients with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH). Subsequently, they were found in patients with PNH plus psychosis, insomnia, and dysautonomia, collectively termed Morvan's syndrome (MoS), and in a limbic encephalopathy (LE) with prominent amnesia and frequent seizures. Most recently, they have been described in patients with pure epilepsies, especially in patients with the novel and distinctive semiology termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). In each of these conditions, there is a close correlation between clinical measures and antibody levels. The VGKC-complex is a group of proteins that are strongly associated in situ and after extraction in mild detergent. Two major targets of the autoantibodies are leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2). The patients with PNH or MoS are most likely to have CASPR2 antibodies, whereas LGI1 antibodies are found characteristically in patients with FBDS and LE. Crucially, each of these conditions has a good response to immunotherapies, often corticosteroids and plasma exchange, although optimal regimes require further study. VGKC-complex antibodies have also been described in neuropathic pain syndromes, chronic epilepsies, a polyradiculopathy in porcine abattoir workers, and some children with status epilepticus. Increasingly, however, the antigenic targets in these patients are not defined and in some cases the antibodies may be secondary rather than the primary cause. Future serologic studies should define all the antigenic components of the VGKC-complex, and further inform mechanisms of antibody pathogenicity and related inflammation. PMID:27112678

  2. The intimate and controversial relationship between voltage-gated proton channels and the phagocyte NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    One of the most fascinating and exciting periods in my scientific career entailed dissecting the symbiotic relationship between two membrane transporters, the Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced form (NADPH) oxidase complex and voltage-gated proton channels (HV 1). By the time I entered this field, there had already been substantial progress toward understanding NADPH oxidase, but HV 1 were known only to a tiny handful of cognoscenti around the world. Having identified the first proton currents in mammalian cells in 1991, I needed to find a clear function for these molecules if the work was to become fundable. The then-recent discoveries of Henderson, Chappell, and colleagues in 1987-1988 that led them to hypothesize interactions of both molecules during the respiratory burst of phagocytes provided an excellent opportunity. In a nutshell, both transporters function by moving electrical charge across the membrane: NADPH oxidase moves electrons and HV 1 moves protons. The consequences of electrogenic NADPH oxidase activity on both membrane potential and pH strongly self-limit this enzyme. Fortunately, both consequences specifically activate HV 1, and HV 1 activity counteracts both consequences, a kind of yin-yang relationship. Notwithstanding a decade starting in 1995 when many believed the opposite, these are two separate molecules that function independently despite their being functionally interdependent in phagocytes. The relationship between NADPH oxidase and HV 1 has become a paradigm that somewhat surprisingly has now extended well beyond the phagocyte NADPH oxidase - an industrial strength producer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - to myriad other cells that produce orders of magnitude less ROS for signaling purposes. These cells with their seven NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms provide a vast realm of mechanistic obscurity that will occupy future studies for years to come. PMID:27558336

  3. Ion conduction and conformational flexibility of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; Allen, Toby W

    2014-03-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels play an essential role in electrical signaling in the nervous system and are key pharmacological targets for a range of disorders. The recent solution of X-ray structures for the bacterial channel NavAb has provided an opportunity to study functional mechanisms at the atomic level. This channel's selectivity filter exhibits an EEEE ring sequence, characteristic of mammalian Ca(2+), not Na(+), channels. This raises the fundamentally important question: just what makes a Na(+) channel conduct Na(+) ions? Here we explore ion permeation on multimicrosecond timescales using the purpose-built Anton supercomputer. We isolate the likely protonation states of the EEEE ring and observe a striking flexibility of the filter that demonstrates the necessity for extended simulations to study conduction in this channel. We construct free energy maps to reveal complex multi-ion conduction via knock-on and "pass-by" mechanisms, involving concerted ion and glutamate side chain movements. Simulations in mixed ionic solutions reveal relative energetics for Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) within the pore that are consistent with the modest selectivity seen experimentally. We have observed conformational changes in the pore domain leading to asymmetrical collapses of the activation gate, similar to proposed inactivated structures of NavAb, with helix bending involving conserved residues that are critical for slow inactivation. These structural changes are shown to regulate access to fenestrations suggested to be pathways for lipophilic drugs and provide deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms connecting drug activity and slow inactivation. PMID:24550503

  4. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liu, Huihui; Xia, Mengdie; Gong, Haipeng

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions), a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh) to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group. PMID:27584582

  5. Regulation of persistent Na current by interactions between beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels.

    PubMed

    Aman, Teresa K; Grieco-Calub, Tina M; Chen, Chunling; Rusconi, Raffaella; Slat, Emily A; Isom, Lori L; Raman, Indira M

    2009-02-18

    The beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels (Scnxb) regulate the gating of pore-forming alpha subunits, as well as their trafficking and localization. In heterologous expression systems, beta1, beta2, and beta3 subunits influence inactivation and persistent current in different ways. To test how the beta4 protein regulates Na channel gating, we transfected beta4 into HEK (human embryonic kidney) cells stably expressing Na(V)1.1. Unlike a free peptide with a sequence from the beta4 cytoplasmic domain, the full-length beta4 protein did not block open channels. Instead, beta4 expression favored open states by shifting activation curves negative, decreasing the slope of the inactivation curve, and increasing the percentage of noninactivating current. Consequently, persistent current tripled in amplitude. Expression of beta1 or chimeric subunits including the beta1 extracellular domain, however, favored inactivation. Coexpressing Na(V)1.1 and beta4 with beta1 produced tiny persistent currents, indicating that beta1 overcomes the effects of beta4 in heterotrimeric channels. In contrast, beta1(C121W), which contains an extracellular epilepsy-associated mutation, did not counteract the destabilization of inactivation by beta4 and also required unusually large depolarizations for channel opening. In cultured hippocampal neurons transfected with beta4, persistent current was slightly but significantly increased. Moreover, in beta4-expressing neurons from Scn1b and Scn1b/Scn2b null mice, entry into inactivated states was slowed. These data suggest that beta1 and beta4 have antagonistic roles, the former favoring inactivation, and the latter favoring activation. Because increased Na channel availability may facilitate action potential firing, these results suggest a mechanism for seizure susceptibility of both mice and humans with disrupted beta1 subunits. PMID:19228957

  6. Dual roles of voltage-gated sodium channels in development and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Faheemmuddeen; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric protein complexes containing pore-forming α subunits together with non-pore-forming β subunits. There are nine α subunits, Nav1.1-Nav1.9, and four β subunits, β1-β4. The β subunits are multifunctional, modulating channel activity, cell surface expression, and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules. VGSCs are classically responsible for action potential initiation and conduction in electrically excitable cells, including neurons and muscle cells. In addition, through the β1 subunit, VGSCs regulate neurite outgrowth and pathfinding in the developing central nervous system. Reciprocal signalling through Nav1.6 and β1 collectively regulates Na+ current, electrical excitability and neurite outgrowth in cerebellar granule neurons. Thus, α and β subunits may have diverse interacting roles dependent on cell/tissue type. VGSCs are also expressed in non-excitable cells, including cells derived from a number of types of cancer. In cancer cells, VGSC α and β subunits regulate cellular morphology, migration, invasion and metastasis. VGSC expression associates with poor prognosis in several studies. It is hypothesised that VGSCs are up-regulated in metastatic tumours, favouring an invasive phenotype. Thus, VGSCs may have utility as prognostic markers, and/or as novel therapeutic targets for reducing/preventing metastatic disease burden. VGSCs appear to regulate a number of key cellular processes, both during normal postnatal development of the CNS and during cancer metastasis, by a combination of conducting (i.e. via Na+ current) and non-conducting mechanisms. PMID:26009234

  7. In vivo potency of different ligands on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Safrany-Fark, Arpad; Petrovszki, Zita; Kekesi, Gabriella; Liszli, Peter; Benedek, Gyorgy; Keresztes, Csilla; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2015-09-01

    The Ranvier nodes of thick myelinated nerve fibers contain almost exclusively voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs), while the unmyelinated fibers have several receptors (e.g., cannabinoid, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1), too. Therefore, a nerve which contains only motor fibers can be an appropriate in vivo model for selective influence of Navs. The goals were to evaluate the potency of local anesthetic drugs on such a nerve in vivo; furthermore, to investigate the effects of ligands with different structures (arachidonic acid, anandamide, capsaicin and nisoxetine) that were proved to inhibit Navs in vitro with antinociceptive properties. The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was explored in anesthetized Wistar rats; after its stimulation, the electrical activity of the vibrissae muscles was registered following the perineural injection of different drugs. Lidocaine, bupivacaine and ropivacaine evoked dose-dependent decrease in electromyographic activity, i.e., lidocaine had lower potency than bupivacaine or ropivacaine. QX-314 did not cause any effect by itself, but its co-application with lidocaine produced a prolonged inhibition. Nisoxetine had a very low potency. While anandamide and capsaicin in high doses caused about 50% decrease in the amplitude of action potential, arachidonic acid did not influence the responses. We proved that the classical local anesthetics have high potency on motor nerves, suggesting that this method might be a reliable model for selective targeting of Navs in vivo circumstances. It is proposed that the effects of these endogenous lipids and capsaicin on sensory fibers are not primarily mediated by Navs. PMID:26033207

  8. Regulation of persistent Na current by interactions between β subunits of voltage-gated Na channels

    PubMed Central

    Aman, Teresa K.; Grieco-Calub, Tina M.; Chen, Chunling; Rusconi, Raffaella; Slat, Emily A.; Isom, Lori L.; Raman, Indira M.

    2009-01-01

    The β subunits of voltage-gated Na channels (Scnxb) regulate the gating of pore-forming α subunits, as well as their trafficking and localization. In heterologous expression systems, β1, β2, and β3 subunits influence inactivation and persistent current in different ways. To test how the β4 protein regulates Na channel gating, we transfected β4 into HEK cells stably expressing NaV1.1. Unlike a free peptide with a sequence from the β4 cytoplasmic domain, the full-length β4 protein did not block open channels. Instead, β4 expression favored open states by shifting activation curves negative, decreasing the slope of the inactivation curve, and increasing the percentage of non-inactivating current. Consequently, persistent current tripled in amplitude. Expression of β1 or chimeric subunits including the β1 extracellular domain, however, favored inactivation. Co-expressing NaV1.1 and β4 with β1 produced tiny persistent currents, indicating that β1 overcomes the effects of β4 in heterotrimeric channels. In contrast, β1C121W, which contains an extracellular epilepsy-associated mutation, did not counteract the destabilization of inactivation by β4, and also required unusually large depolarizations for channel opening. In cultured hippocampal neurons transfected with β4, persistent current was slightly but significantly increased. Moreover, in β4-expressing neurons from Scn1b and Scn1b/Scn2b null mice, entry into inactivated states was slowed. These data suggest that β1 and β4 have antagonistic roles, the former favoring inactivation and the latter favoring activation. Because increased Na channel availability may facilitate action potential firing, these results suggest a mechanism for seizure susceptibility of both mice and humans with disrupted β1 subunits. PMID:19228957

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 14 is an intracellular modulator of voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jun-Yang; Laezza, Fernanda; Gerber, Benjamin R; Xiao, Maolei; Yamada, Kathryn A; Hartmann, Hali; Craig, Ann Marie; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Ornitz, David M

    2005-01-01

    Genetic ablation of the fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 14 gene in mice or a missense mutation in Fgf14 in humans causes ataxia and cognitive deficits. These phenotypes suggest that the neuronally expressed Fgf14 gene is essential for regulating normal neuronal activity. Here, we demonstrate that FGF14 interacts directly with multiple voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channel α subunits heterologously expressed in non-neuronal cells or natively expressed in a murine neuroblastoma cell line. Functional studies reveal that these interactions result in the potent inhibition of Nav channel currents (INa) and in changes in the voltage dependence of channel activation and inactivation. Deletion of the unique amino terminus of the splice variant of Fgf14, Fgf14-1b, or expression of the splice variant Fgf14-1a modifies the modulatory effects on INa, suggesting an important role for the amino terminus domain of FGF14 in the regulation of Nav channels. To investigate the function of FGF14 in neurones, we directly expressed Fgf14 in freshly isolated primary rat hippocampal neurones. In these cells, the addition of FGF14-1a–GFP or FGF14-1b–GFP increased INa density and shifted the voltage dependence of channel activation and inactivation. In fully differentiated neurones, FGF14-1a–GFP or FGF14-1b–GFP preferentially colocalized with endogenous Nav channels at the axonal initial segment, a critical region for action potential generation. Together, these findings implicate FGF14 as a unique modulator of Nav channel activity in the CNS and provide a possible mechanism to explain the neurological phenotypes observed in mice and humans with mutations in Fgf14. PMID:16166153

  10. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Cedric J; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) is very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential (AP). Navs are composed of nine different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the AP and consequently modify nociceptive transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions. Post-translational modification (PTM) of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e., peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B, and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological tools to alleviate pain. PMID

  11. Effect of dielectric interface on charge aggregation in the voltage-gated K+ ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Adhya, Lipika; Mapder, Tarunendu; Adhya, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is experimental evidence of many cases of stable macromolecular conformations with charged amino-acids facing lipid, an arrangement thought to be energetically unfavourable. Methods and Objectives: Employing classical electrostatics, we show that, this is not necessarily the case and studied the physical basis of the specific role of proximity of charges to the dielectric interface between two different environments. We illustrate how self and induced energies due to the dielectric medium polarization, on either side of the interface, contribute differentially to the stability of a pair of charges and hence the mutual conformation of the S3b-S4 α-helix pair of the voltage-gated K+ channel. Results and Conclusion: We show that (1) a pair of opposite charges on either side of lipid-protein interface confers significant stability; (2) hydrophobic media has an important role in holding together two similar repelling charges; (3) dielectric interface has stabilizing effect on a pair of charges, when an ion is closer to its interface than its neighboring charge; (4) in spite of the presence of dielectric interface, there is a nonexistence of any dielectric effect, when an ion is equidistant from its image and neighboring charge. We also demonstrate that, variation in dielectric media of the surrounding environment confers new mutual conformations to S3b-S4 α-helices of voltage sensor domain at zero potential, especially lipid environment on the helix side, which improved stability to the configuration by lowering the potential energy. Our results provide an answer to the long standing question of why charges face hydrophobic lipid membranes in the stable conformation of a protein. PMID:25810659

  12. Evidence for gene duplication in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ademir Jesus; Brito, Luiz Paulo; Linss, Jutta Gerlinde Birggitt; Rivas, Gustavo Bueno da Silva; Machado, Ricardo; Bruno, Rafaela Vieira; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Valle, Denise; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives: Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene (NaV), known as kdr mutations, are associated with pyrethroid and DDT insecticide resistance in a number of species. In the mosquito dengue vector Aedes aegypti, besides kdr, other polymorphisms allowed grouping AaNaV sequences as type ‘A’ or ‘B’. Here, we point a series of evidences that these polymorphisms are actually involved in a gene duplication event. Methodology: Four series of methods were employed: (i) genotypying, with allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), of two AaNaV sites that can harbor kdr mutations (Ile1011Met and Val1016Ile), (ii) cloning and sequencing of part of the AaNaV gene, (iii) crosses with specific lineages and analysis of the offspring genotypes and (iv) copy number variation assays, with TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR. Results: kdr mutations in 1011 and 1016 sites were present only in type ‘A’ sequences, but never in the same haplotype. In addition, although the 1011Met-mutant allele is widely disseminated, no homozygous (1011Met/Met) was detected. Sequencing revealed three distinct haplotypes in some individuals, raising the hypothesis of gene duplication, which was supported by the genotype frequencies in the offspring of specific crosses. Furthermore, it was estimated that a laboratory strain selected for insecticide resistance had 5-fold more copies of the sodium channel gene compared with a susceptible reference strain. Conclusions and implications: The AaNaV duplication here found might be a recent adaptive response to the intense use of insecticides, maintaining together wild-type and mutant alleles in the same organism, conferring resistance and reducing some of its deleterious effects. PMID:24481195

  13. Adaptive evolution of voltage-gated sodium channels: The first 800 million years

    PubMed Central

    Zakon, Harold H.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+-permeable (Nav) channels form the basis for electrical excitability in animals. Nav channels evolved from Ca2+ channels and were present in the common ancestor of choanoflagellates and animals, although this channel was likely permeable to both Na+ and Ca2+. Thus, like many other neuronal channels and receptors, Nav channels predated neurons. Invertebrates possess two Nav channels (Nav1 and Nav2), whereas vertebrate Nav channels are of the Nav1 family. Approximately 500 Mya in early chordates Nav channels evolved a motif that allowed them to cluster at axon initial segments, 50 million years later with the evolution of myelin, Nav channels “capitalized” on this property and clustered at nodes of Ranvier. The enhancement of conduction velocity along with the evolution of jaws likely made early gnathostomes fierce predators and the dominant vertebrates in the ocean. Later in vertebrate evolution, the Nav channel gene family expanded in parallel in tetrapods and teleosts (∼9 to 10 genes in amniotes, 8 in teleosts). This expansion occurred during or after the late Devonian extinction, when teleosts and tetrapods each diversified in their respective habitats, and coincided with an increase in the number of telencephalic nuclei in both groups. The expansion of Nav channels may have allowed for more sophisticated neural computation and tailoring of Nav channel kinetics with potassium channel kinetics to enhance energy savings. Nav channels show adaptive sequence evolution for increasing diversity in communication signals (electric fish), in protection against lethal Nav channel toxins (snakes, newts, pufferfish, insects), and in specialized habitats (naked mole rats). PMID:22723361

  14. Nuclear Localization and Functional Characteristics of Voltage-gated Potassium Channel Kv1.3*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K+ gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos. PMID:25829491

  15. Nuclear localization and functional characteristics of voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-05-15

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K(+) gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos. PMID:25829491

  16. Lipid bilayer modification alters the gating properties and pharmacological sensitivity of voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Wu, Bin; Feng, Yi-Jun; Tao, Jie; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2015-06-25

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are widely distributed in most cells and tissues, performing many physiological functions. As one kind of membrane proteins in the lipid bilayer, whether lipid composition plays a role in the gating and pharmacological sensitivity of VGSCs still remains unknown. Through the application of sphingomyelinase D (SMaseD), the gating and pharmacological sensitivity of the endogenous VGSCs in neuroblastoma ND7-23 cell line to BmK I and BmK AS, two sodium channel-specific modulators from the venom of Buthus martensi Karsch (BmK), were assessed before and after lipid modification. The results showed that, in ND7-23 cells, SMaseD did not change the gating properties of VGSCs. However, SMaseD application altered the slope factor of activation with the treatment of 30 nmol/L BmK I, but caused no significant effects at 100 and 500 nmol/L BmK I. With low concentration of BmK I (30 and 100 nmol/L) treatment, the application of SMaseD exerted hyperpolarizing effects on both slow-inactivation and steady-state inactivation, and increased the recovery time constant, whereas total inactivation and recovery remained unaltered at 500 nmol/L BmK I. Meanwhile, SMaseD modulation hyperpolarized the voltage dependence of slow-inactivation at 0.1 nmol/L BmK AS and altered the slope factor of slow-inactivation at 10 nmol/L BmK AS, whereas other parameters remained unchanged. These results indicated a possibility that the lipid bilayer would disturb the pharmacological sensitivity of VGSCs for the first time, which might open a new way of developing new drugs for treating sodium channelopathies. PMID:26109300

  17. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels inhibits invasion of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    MOHAMMED, FATIMA H.; KHAJAH, MAITHAM A.; YANG, MING; BRACKENBURY, WILLIAM J.; LUQMANI, YUNUS A.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are membrane proteins which are normally expressed in excitable cells but have also been detected in cancer cells, where they are thought to be involved in malignancy progression. In this study we examined the ion current and expression profile of VGSC (Nav1.5) in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (MCF-7) and silenced (pII) breast cancer cells and its possible influence on their proliferation, motility and invasion. VGSC currents were analysed by whole cell patch clamp recording. Nav1.5 expression and localization, in response to EGF stimulation, was examined by western blotting and immunofluorescence respectively. Cell invasion (under-agarose and Matrigel assays), motility (wound healing assay) and proliferation (MTT assay) were assessed in pII cells in response to VGSC blockers, phenytoin (PHT) and tetrodotoxin (TTX), or by siRNA knockdown of Nav1.5. The effect of PHT and TTX on modulating EGF-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 was determined by western blotting. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) was determined using a fluorometric-based activity assay. The level of various human proteases was detected by using proteome profiler array kit. VGSC currents were detected in pII cells, but were absent in MCF-7. Nav1.5 showed cytoplasmic and perinuclear expression in both MCF-7 and pII cells, with enhanced expression upon EGF stimulation. Treatment of pII cells with PHT, TTX or siRNA significantly reduced invasion towards serum components and EGF, in part through reduction of P-ERK1/2 and proteases such as cathepsin E, kallikrein-10 and MMP-7, as well as total MMP activity. At high concentrations, PHT inhibited motility while TTX reduced cell proliferation. Pharmacological or genetic blockade of Nav1.5 may serve as a potential anti-metastatic therapy for breast cancer. PMID:26718772

  18. Structural Models for the KCNQ1 Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jarrod; Vanoye, Carlos G.; George, Alfred L.; Meiler, Jens; Sanders, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1 are associated with predisposition to deafness and various cardiac arrhythmia syndromes including congenital long QT syndrome, familial atrial fibrillation, and sudden infant death syndrome. In this work 3-D structural models were developed for both the open and closed states of human KCNQ1 to facilitate structurally-based hypotheses regarding mutation-phenotype relationships. The KCNQ1 open state was modeled using Rosetta in conjunction with Molecular Operating Environment software, and is based primarily on the recently-determined open state structure of rat Kv1.2 (S.B Long et al., 2005, Science 309, 897−903). The closed state model for KCNQ1 was developed based on the crystal structures of bacterial potassium channels and the closed state model for Kv1.2 of Yarov-Yarovoy et al. (2006, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 103, 7292−7207). Using the new models for KCNQ1, we generated a database for the location and predicted residue-residue interactions for more than 85 disease-linked sites in both open and closed states. These data can be used to generate structure-based hypotheses for disease phenotypes associated with each mutation. The potential utility of these models and the database is exemplified by the surprising observation that four of the five known mutations in KCNQ1 that are associated with gain-of-function KCNQ1 defects are predicted to share a common interface in the open state structure between the S1 segment of the voltage sensor in one subunit and both the S5 segment and top of the pore helix from another subunit. This interface evidently plays an important role in channel gating. PMID:17999538

  19. PIST (GOPC) modulates the oncogenic voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Solveig; Ninkovic, Milena; Kohl, Tobias; Pardo, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Although crucial for their correct function, the mechanisms controlling surface expression of ion channels are poorly understood. In the case of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1, this is determinant not only for its physiological function in brain, but also for its pathophysiology in tumors and possible use as a therapeutic target. The Golgi resident protein PIST binds several membrane proteins, thereby modulating their expression. Here we describe a PDZ domain-mediated interaction of KV10.1 and PIST, which enhances surface levels of KV10.1. The functional, but not the physical interaction of both proteins is dependent on the coiled-coil and PDZ domains of PIST; insertion of eight amino acids in the coiled-coil domain to render the neural form of PIST (nPIST) and the corresponding short isoform in an as-of-yet unknown form abolishes the effect. In addition, two new isoforms of PIST (sPIST and nsPIST) lacking nearly the complete PDZ domain were cloned and shown to be ubiquitously expressed. PIST and KV10.1 co-precipitate from native and expression systems. nPIST also showed interaction, but did not alter the functional expression of the channel. We could not document physical interaction between KV10.1 and sPIST, but it reduced KV10.1 functional expression in a dominant-negative manner. nsPIST showed weak physical interaction and no functional effect on KV10.1. We propose these isoforms to work as modulators of PIST function via regulating the binding on interaction partners. PMID:23966943

  20. The effects of huwentoxin-I on the voltage-gated sodium channels of rat hippocampal and cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meichi; Rong, Mingqiang; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping

    2012-03-01

    Huwentoxin-I (HWTX-I) is a 33-residue peptide isolated from the venom of Ornithoctonus huwena and could inhibit TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels and N-type calcium channels in mammalian dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. However, the effects of HWTX-I on mammalian central neuronal and insect sodium channel subtypes remain unknown. In this study, we found that HWTX-I potently inhibited sodium channels in rat hippocampal and cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons with the IC(50) values of 66.1±5.2 and 4.80±0.58nM, respectively. Taken together with our previous work on DRG neurons (IC(50)≈55nM), the order of sodium channel sensitivity to HWTX-I inhibition was insect central DUM≫mammalian peripheral>mammalian central neurons. HWTX-I exhibited no effect on the steady-state activation and inactivation of sodium channels in rat hippocampal and cockroach DUM neurons. PMID:22094230

  1. NMR and restrained molecular dynamics study of the three-dimensional solution structure of toxin FS2, a specific blocker of the L-type calcium channel, isolated from black mamba venom.

    PubMed

    Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M J; Pascaud, F; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1995-05-01

    The three-dimensional solution structure of toxin FS2, a 60-residue polypeptide isolated from the venom of black mamba snake (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis), has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using 600 NOE constraints and 55 dihedral angle constraints, a set of 20 structures obtained from distance-geometry calculations was further refined by molecular dynamics calculations using a combined simulated annealing-restrained MD protocol. The resulting 20 conformers, taken to represent the solution structure, give an average rmsd of 1.2 A for their backbone atoms, relative to the average structure. The overall resulting three-fingered structure is similar to those already observed in several postsynaptic neurotoxins, cardiotoxins, and fasciculins, which all share with toxin FS2 the same network of four disulfide bridges. The overall concavity of the molecule, considered as a flat bottomed dish, is oriented toward the C-terminal loop of the molecule. This orientation is similar to that of fasciculins and cardiotoxins but opposite to that of neurotoxins. On the basis of the local rms displacements between the 20 conformers, the structure of the first loop appears to be less well defined in FS2 than in the previously reported neurotoxin structures, but fasciculin 1 shows a similar trend with particularly high temperature factors for this part of the X-ray structure. The concave side which presents most of the positively charged residues is quite similar in FS2 and fasciculin 1. The main difference is shown by the convex side of the third loop, mostly hydrophobic in FS2, in contrast to the pair of negatively charged aspartates in fasciculin 1. This difference could be one of the factors leading to the distinct pharmacological properties-L-type calcium channel blocker for FS2 and cholinesterase inhibitor for fasciculin--observed for these two subgroups of the "angusticeps-type" toxins. PMID:7727450

  2. Effect of L-type calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) on myocardial iron deposition in patients with thalassaemia with moderate-to-severe myocardial iron deposition: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Amarah; Zahoor, Maaman; Sadaf, Alina; Alvi, Najveen; Fadoo, Zehra; Rizvi, Arjumand; Quadri, Farheen; Tipoo, Fateh Ali; Khurshid, Mohammad; Sajjad, Zaffar; Colan, Steven; Hasan, Babar S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sideroblastic cardiomyopathy secondary to repeated blood transfusions is a feared complication in thalassaemia. Control of myocardial iron is thus becoming the cornerstone of thalassaemia management. Recent evidence suggests a role for L-type Ca2+ channels in mediating iron uptake by the heart. Blocking the cellular iron uptake through these channels may add to the benefit of therapy to standard chelation in reducing myocardial iron. We aim to determine the efficacy of amlodipine (a calcium channel blocker) as an adjunct to standard aggressive chelation in retarding myocardial iron deposition in thalassaemics with or without cardiomyopathy. Outcomes The primary outcome is to compare the efficacy of amlodipine+chelation (intervention) versus standard chelation (control) in retarding myocardial iron deposition. Secondary outcomes include the effect of amlodipine therapy on systolic and diastolic function, strain and strain rate and liver iron content. Methods and analysis This is a single-centre, parallel-group, prospective randomised control trial. Twenty patients will be randomised in a 1:1 allocation ratio into the intervention and control arms. In addition to conventional echocardiography, MRI T2* values for assessment of cardiac and liver iron load will be obtained at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. Cardiac T2* will be reported as the geometric mean and per cent coefficient of variation, and an increase in cardiac T2* values from baseline will be used as an end point to compare the efficacy of therapy. A p Value of <0.05 will be considered significant. Study setting Department of Pediatric and Child Health, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Ethics Review Committee and Clinical Trials Unit at The Aga Khan University with respect to scientific content and compliance with applicable research and human subjects regulations. Findings will be reported through scientific

  3. Divergent biophysical properties, gating mechanisms, and possible functions of the two skeletal muscle CaV1.1 calcium channel splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Tuluc, Petronel; Flucher, Bernhard E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes that specifically allow calcium ions to enter the cell in response to membrane depolarization. But, for many years it seemed that the skeletal muscle calcium channel CaV1.1 is the exception. The classical splice variant CaV1.1a activates slowly, has a very small current amplitude and poor voltage sensitivity. In fact adult muscle fibers work perfectly well even in the absence of calcium influx. Recently a new splice variant of the skeletal muscle calcium channel CaV1.1e has been characterized. The lack of the 19 amino acid exon 29 in this splice variant results in a rapidly activating calcium channel with high current amplitude and good voltage sensitivity. CaV1.1e is the dominant channel in embryonic muscle, where the expression of this high calcium-conducting CaV1.1 isoform readily explains developmental processes depending on L-type calcium currents. Moreover, the availability of these two structurally similar but functionally distinct channel variants facilitates the analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique current properties of the classical CaV1.1a channel. PMID:22057633

  4. Reduced availability of voltage-gated sodium channels by depolarization or blockade by tetrodotoxin boosts burst firing and catecholamine release in mouse chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandael, David H F; Ottaviani, Matteo M; Legros, Christian; Lefort, Claudie; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Allio, Arianna; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Action potential (AP) firing in mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) is mainly sustained by Cav1.3 L-type channels that drive BK and SK currents and regulate the pacemaking cycle. As secretory units, CCs optimally recruit Ca2+ channels when stimulated, a process potentially dependent on the modulation of the AP waveform. Our previous work has shown that a critical determinant of AP shape is voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) channel availability. Here, we studied the contribution of Nav channels to firing patterns and AP shapes at rest (−50 mV) and upon stimulation (−40 mV). Using quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting, we show that MCCs mainly express tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, fast-inactivating Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels that carry little or no Na+ current during slow ramp depolarizations. Time constants and the percentage of recovery from fast inactivation and slow entry into closed-state inactivation are similar to that of brain Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels. The fraction of available Nav channels is reduced by half after 10 mV depolarization from −50 to −40 mV. This leads to low amplitude spikes and a reduction in repolarizing K+ currents inverting the net current from outward to inward during the after-hyperpolarization. When Nav channel availability is reduced by up to 20% of total, either by TTX block or steady depolarization, a switch from tonic to burst firing is observed. The spontaneous occurrence of high frequency bursts is rare under control conditions (14% of cells) but leads to major Ca2+-entry and increased catecholamine release. Thus, Nav1.3/Nav1.7 channel availability sets the AP shape, burst-firing initiation and regulates catecholamine secretion in MCCs. Nav channel inactivation becomes important during periods of high activity, mimicking stress responses. PMID:25620605

  5. Basal activity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels controls the IP3-mediated contraction by α(1)-adrenoceptor stimulation of mouse aorta segments.

    PubMed

    Leloup, Arthur J; Van Hove, Cor E; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Schrijvers, Dorien M; Fransen, Paul

    2015-08-01

    α1-Adrenoceptor stimulation of mouse aorta causes intracellular Ca(2+) release from sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores via stimulation of inositoltriphosphate (IP3) receptors. It is hypothesized that this Ca(2+) release from the contractile and IP3-sensitive Ca(2+) store is under the continuous dynamic control of time-independent basal Ca(2+) influx via L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LCC) residing in their window voltage range. Mouse aortic segments were α1-adrenoceptor stimulated with phenylephrine in the absence of external Ca(2+) (0Ca) to measure phasic isometric contractions. They gradually decreased with time in 0Ca, were inhibited with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, and declined with previous membrane potential hyperpolarization (levcromakalim) or with previous inhibition of LCC (diltiazem). Former basal stimulation of LCC with depolarization (15 mM K(+)) or with BAY K8644 increased the subsequent phasic contractions by phenylephrine in 0Ca. Although exogenous NO (diethylamine NONOate) reduced the phasic contractions by phenylephrine, stimulation of endothelial cells with acetylcholine in 0Ca failed to attenuate these phasic contractions. Finally, inhibition of the basal release of NO with N(Ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester also attenuated the phasic contractions by phenylephrine. Results indicated that α1-adrenoceptor stimulation with phenylephrine causes phasic contractions, which are controlled by basal LCC and endothelial NO synthase activity. Endothelial NO release by acetylcholine was absent in 0Ca. Given the growing interest in the active regulation of arterial compliance, the dependence of contractile SR Ca(2+) store-refilling in basal conditions on the activity of LCC and basal eNOS may contribute to a more thorough understanding of physiological mechanisms leading to arterial stiffness. PMID:25913240

  6. Functional characterization of voltage-gated K+ channels in mouse pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun A; Burg, Elyssa D; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Msefya, Joseph; Firth, Amy L; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2007-09-01

    Mice are useful animal models to study pathogenic mechanisms involved in pulmonary vascular disease. Altered expression and function of voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have been implicated in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. K(V) currents (I(K(V))) in mouse PASMCs have not been comprehensively characterized. The main focus of this study was to determine the biophysical and pharmacological properties of I(K(V)) in freshly dissociated mouse PASMCs with the patch-clamp technique. Three distinct whole cell I(K(V)) were identified based on the kinetics of activation and inactivation: rapidly activating and noninactivating currents (in 58% of the cells tested), rapidly activating and slowly inactivating currents (23%), and slowly activating and noninactivating currents (17%). Of the cells that demonstrated the rapidly activating noninactivating current, 69% showed I(K(V)) inhibition with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), while 31% were unaffected. Whole cell I(K(V)) were very sensitive to tetraethylammonium (TEA), as 1 mM TEA decreased the current amplitude by 32% while it took 10 mM 4-AP to decrease I(K(V)) by a similar amount (37%). Contribution of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (K(Ca)) channels to whole cell I(K(V)) was minimal, as neither pharmacological inhibition with charybdotoxin or iberiotoxin nor perfusion with Ca(2+)-free solution had an effect on the whole cell I(K(V)). Steady-state activation and inactivation curves revealed a window K(+) current between -40 and -10 mV with a peak at -31.5 mV. Single-channel recordings revealed large-, intermediate-, and small-amplitude currents, with an averaged slope conductance of 119.4 +/- 2.7, 79.8 +/- 2.8, 46.0 +/- 2.2, and 23.6 +/- 0.6 pS, respectively. These studies provide detailed electrophysiological and pharmacological profiles of the native K(V) currents in mouse PASMCs. PMID:17581857

  7. Developmental regulation of voltage-gated K+ channel and GABAA receptor expression in Bergmann glial cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Fritschy, J M; Grosche, J; Pratt, G D; Möhler, H; Kettenmann, H

    1994-05-01

    Bergmann glial cells are closely associated with neurons: during development they provide guiding structures for migrating granule cells and in the adult cerebellum they display intimate interactions with Purkinje cells. In this study, we have addressed the question of whether such changes in neuronal-glial interactions during development are accompanied by variations in the membrane properties of Bergmann glial cells. We used a mouse cerebellum slice preparation to study membrane currents of the Bergmann glial cells at various stages of development in situ using the patch-clamp technique. The distinct morphology of Bergmann glial cells was revealed by Lucifer yellow injections during recording. While Bergmann glial cells in mice of postnatal day 20 (P20) to P30 have thick processes with arborized, irregularly shaped leaf-like appendages, the processes of cells from younger mice (P5-P7) are thinner and smoother. This morphological maturation is accompanied by a variation in voltage-gated currents. In cells from P5 to P7, delayed outward- and inward-rectifying K+ currents were recorded, while older Bergmann glial cells were characterized by, large, voltage- and time-independent K+ currents. In addition, application of GABA induces two effects, a rapid activation of a Cl- conductance and a longer-lasting decrease in the (resting) K+ conductance. Both effects were mediated by benzodiazepine-insensitive GABAA receptors. Responses in cells of P5-P7 mice were large as compared to the small or even undetectable responses in P20-P30 cells. These GABAA receptors were characterized immunohistochemically in mice and rat brain sections with five subunit-specific antibodies. Bergmann glial cells exhibit a distinct but transient immunoreactivity for the GABAA receptor alpha 2-, alpha 3-, and delta-subunits. Staining is maximal between P7 and P10 and decreases gradually thereafter. In contrast, antibodies to the alpha 1- and beta 2,3-subunits fail to decorate Bergmann glial cells

  8. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: a study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licensed as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Nav1.5 sodium and Cav1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:23707769

  9. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile☆

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Nav1.5 sodium and Cav1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:23707769

  10. Targeting the voltage sensor of Kv7.2 voltage-gated K+ channels with a new gating-modifier.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Asher; Pell, Liat; Gofman, Yana; Haitin, Yoni; Shamgar, Liora; Patrich, Eti; Kornilov, Polina; Gourgy-Hacohen, Orit; Ben-Tal, Nir; Attali, Bernard

    2010-08-31

    The pore and gate regions of voltage-gated cation channels have been often targeted with drugs acting as channel modulators. In contrast, the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) was practically not exploited for therapeutic purposes, although it is the target of various toxins. We recently designed unique diphenylamine carboxylates that are powerful Kv7.2 voltage-gated K(+) channel openers or blockers. Here we show that a unique Kv7.2 channel opener, NH29, acts as a nontoxin gating modifier. NH29 increases Kv7.2 currents, thereby producing a hyperpolarizing shift of the activation curve and slowing both activation and deactivation kinetics. In neurons, the opener depresses evoked spike discharges. NH29 dampens hippocampal glutamate and GABA release, thereby inhibiting excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Mutagenesis and modeling data suggest that in Kv7.2, NH29 docks to the external groove formed by the interface of helices S1, S2, and S4 in a way that stabilizes the interaction between two conserved charged residues in S2 and S4, known to interact electrostatically, in the open state of Kv channels. Results indicate that NH29 may operate via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism similar to that suggested for scorpion and sea-anemone toxins. Reflecting the promiscuous nature of the VSD, NH29 is also a potent blocker of TRPV1 channels, a feature similar to that of tarantula toxins. Our data provide a structural framework for designing unique gating-modifiers targeted to the VSD of voltage-gated cation channels and used for the treatment of hyperexcitability disorders. PMID:20713704

  11. Congenital deafness and sinoatrial node dysfunction in mice lacking class D L-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Platzer, J; Engel, J; Schrott-Fischer, A; Stephan, K; Bova, S; Chen, H; Zheng, H; Striessnig, J

    2000-07-01

    Voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) containing a pore-forming alpha1D subunit (D-LTCCs) are expressed in neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Their relative contribution to total L-type Ca2+ currents and their physiological role and significance as a drug target remain unknown. Therefore, we generated D-LTCC deficient mice (alpha1D-/-) that were viable with no major disturbances of glucose metabolism. alpha1D-/-mice were deaf due to the complete absence of L-type currents in cochlear inner hair cells and degeneration of outer and inner hair cells. In wild-type controls, D-LTCC-mediated currents showed low activation thresholds and slow inactivation kinetics. Electrocardiogram recordings revealed sinoatrial node dysfunction (bradycardia and arrhythmia) in alpha1D-/- mice. We conclude that alpha1D can form LTCCs with negative activation thresholds essential for normal auditory function and control of cardiac pacemaker activity. PMID:10929716

  12. Reversible dementia: two nursing home patients with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Reintjes, Wesley; Romijn, Marloes D M; Hollander, Daan; Ter Bruggen, Jan P; van Marum, Rob J

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (VGKC-LE) is a rare disease that is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for medical practitioners. Two patients with VGKC-LE, both developing dementia are presented. Following treatment, both patients showed remarkable cognitive and functional improvement enabling them to leave the psychogeriatric nursing homes they both were admitted to. Patients with VGKC-LE can have a major cognitive and functional improvement even after a diagnostic delay of more than 1 year. Medical practitioners who treat patients with unexplained cognitive decline, epileptic seizures, or psychiatric symptoms should be aware of LE as an underlying rare cause. PMID:26170033

  13. Blood pressure and risk of cancer progression - A possible connection with salt and voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2015-11-01

    Although it is well known that high blood pressure promotes cancer, the underlying cause(s) is not well understood. Here, we advance the hypothesis that the extracellular sodium level could be a contributing factor. The hypothesis is based upon emerging evidence showing (i) that voltage-gated sodium channels are expressed de novo in cancer cells and tissues, and (ii) that the influx of sodium from the extracellular medium into cancer cells, mediated by the channel activity, promotes their metastatic potential. Clinical and lifestyle implications of the hypothesis are discussed. PMID:26272607

  14. A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

    1988-02-01

    A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Acxtive Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed.

  15. A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

    1987-10-01

    A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Active Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs, and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  16. L-type calcium channels contribute to 5-HT3-receptor-evoked CaMKIIα and ERK activation and induction of emesis in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Tarun E; Zhong, Weixia; Chebolu, Seetha; Wilson, Sean M; Darmani, Nissar A

    2015-05-15

    Activation of serotonergic 5-HT3 receptors by its selective agonist 2-methyl serotonin (2-Me-5-HT) induces vomiting, which is sensitive to selective antagonists of both 5-HT3 receptors (palonosetron) and L-type calcium channels (LTCC) (amlodipine or nifedipine). Previously we demonstrated that 5-HT3 receptor activation also causes increases in a palonosetron-sensitive manner in: i) intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, ii) attachment of calmodulin (CaM) to 5-HT3 receptor, and iii) phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Here, we investigate the role of the short-acting LTCC blocker nifedipine on 2-Me-5-HT-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) increase and on downstream intracellular emetic signaling, which have been shown to be coupled with 2-Me-5-HT׳s emetic effects in the least shrew. Using the cell-permeant Ca(2+) indicator fluo-4 AM, here we present evidence for the contribution of Ca(2+) influx through LTCCs (sensitive to nifedipine) in 2-Me-5-HT (1µM) -evoked rise in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in least shrew brainstem slices. Nifedipine pretreatment (10mg/kg, s.c.) also suppressed 2-Me-5-HT-evoked interaction of 5-HT3 receptors with CaM as well as phosphorylation of CaMKIIα and ERK1/2 in the least shrew brainstem, and 5-HT3 receptors -CaM colocalization in jejunum of the small intestine. In vitro exposure of isolated enterochromaffin cells of the small intestine to 2-Me-5-HT (1µM) caused CaMKIIα phosphorylation, which was also abrogated by nifedipine pretreatment (0.1µM). In addition, pretreatment with the CaMKII inhibitor KN62 (10mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed emesis and also the activation of CaMKIIα, and ERK in brainstem caused by 2-Me-5-HT (5mg/kg, i.p.). This study provides further mechanistic explanation for our published findings that nifedipine can dose-dependently protect shrews from 2-Me-5-HT-induced vomiting. PMID:25748600

  17. Differential distribution of voltage-gated channels in myelinated and unmyelinated baroreceptor afferents.

    PubMed

    Schild, John H; Kunze, Diana L

    2012-12-24

    Voltage gated ion channels (VGC) make possible the frequency coding of arterial pressure and the neurotransmission of this information along myelinated and unmyelinated fiber pathways. Although many of the same VGC isoforms are expressed in both fiber types, it is the relative expression of each that defines the unique discharge properties of myelinated A-type and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptors. For example, the fast inward Na⁺ current is a major determinant of the action potential threshold and the regenerative transmembrane current needed to sustain repetitive discharge. In A-type baroreceptors the TTX-sensitive Na(v)1.7 VGC contributes to the whole cell Na⁺ current. Na(v)1.7 is expressed at a lower density in C-type neurons and in conjunction with TTX-insensitive Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 VGC. As a result, action potentials of A-type neurons have firing thresholds that are 15-20 mV more negative and upstroke velocities that are 5-10 times faster than unmyelinated C-type neurons. A more depolarized threshold in conjunction with a broader complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC subtypes produces C-type action potentials that are 3-4 times longer in duration than A-type neurons and at markedly lower levels of cell excitability. Unmyelinated baroreceptors also express KCa1.1 which provides approximately 25% of the total outward K⁺ current. KCa1.1 plays a critically important role in shaping the action potential profile of C-type neurons and strongly impacts neuronal excitability. A-type neurons do not functionally express the KCa1.1 channel despite having a whole cell Ca(V) current quite similar to that of C-type neurons. As a result, A-type neurons do not have the frequency-dependent braking forces of KCa1.1. Lack of a KCa current and only a limited complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC in addition to a hyperpolarization activated HCN1 current that is nearly 10 times larger than in C-type neurons leads to elevated levels of discharge in A-type neurons, a

  18. Direct Interaction between the Voltage Sensors Produces Cooperative Sustained Deactivation in Voltage-gated H+ Channel Dimers.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Hiroko; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Takano, Yu; Okamura, Yasushi; Fujiwara, Yuichiro

    2016-03-11

    The voltage-gated H(+) channel (Hv) is a voltage sensor domain-like protein consisting of four transmembrane segments (S1-S4). The native Hv structure is a homodimer, with the two channel subunits functioning cooperatively. Here we show that the two voltage sensor S4 helices within the dimer directly cooperate via a π-stacking interaction between Trp residues at the middle of each segment. Scanning mutagenesis showed that Trp situated around the original position provides the slow gating kinetics characteristic of the dimer's cooperativity. Analyses of the Trp mutation on the dimeric and monomeric channel backgrounds and analyses with tandem channel constructs suggested that the two Trp residues within the dimer are functionally coupled during Hv deactivation but are less so during activation. Molecular dynamics simulation also showed direct π-stacking of the two Trp residues. These results provide new insight into the cooperative function of voltage-gated channels, where adjacent voltage sensor helices make direct physical contact and work as a single unit according to the gating process. PMID:26755722

  19. The Proton-Driven Rotor of ATP Synthase: Ohmic Conductance (10 fS), and Absence of Voltage Gating

    PubMed Central

    Feniouk, Boris A.; Kozlova, Maria A.; Knorre, Dmitry A.; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.; Junge, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    The membrane portion of F0F1-ATP synthase, F0, translocates protons by a rotary mechanism. Proton conduction by F0 was studied in chromatophores of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. The discharge of a light-induced voltage jump was monitored by electrochromic absorption transients to yield the unitary conductance of F0. The current-voltage relationship of F0 was linear from 7 to 70 mV. The current was extremely proton-specific (>107) and varied only slightly (≈threefold) from pH 6 to 10. The maximum conductance was ≈10 fS at pH 8, equivalent to 6240 H+ s−1 at 100-mV driving force, which is an order-of-magnitude greater than of coupled F0F1. There was no voltage-gating of F0 even at low voltage, and proton translocation could be driven by ΔpH alone, without voltage. The reported voltage gating in F0F1 is thus attributable to the interaction of F0 with F1 but not to F0 proper. We simulated proton conduction by a minimal rotary model including the rotating c-ring and two relay groups mediating proton exchange between the ring and the respective membrane surface. The data fit attributed pK values of ≈6 and ≈10 to these relays, and placed them close to the membrane/electrolyte interface. PMID:15189903

  20. The insecticidal neurotoxin Aps III is an atypical knottin peptide that potently blocks insect voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Bende, Niraj S.; Kang, Eunji; Herzig, Volker; Bosmans, Frank; Nicholson, Graham M.; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most potent insecticidal venom peptides described to date is Aps III from the venom of the trapdoor spider Apomastus schlingeri. Aps III is highly neurotoxic to lepidopteran crop pests, making it a promising candidate for bioinsecticide development. However, its disulfide-connectivity, three-dimensional structure, and mode of action have not been determined. Here we show that recombinant Aps III (rAps III) is an atypical knottin peptide; three of the disulfide bridges form a classical inhibitor cystine knot motif while the fourth disulfide acts as a molecular staple that restricts the flexibility of an unusually large β hairpin loop that often houses the pharmacophore in this class of toxins. We demonstrate that the irreversible paralysis induced in insects by rAps III results from a potent block of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. Channel block by rAps III is voltage-independent insofar as it occurs without significant alteration in the voltage-dependence of channel activation or steady-state inactivation. Thus, rAps III appears to be a pore blocker that plugs the outer vestibule of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. This mechanism of action contrasts strikingly with virtually all other sodium channel modulators isolated from spider venoms that act as gating modifiers by interacting with one or more of the four voltage-sensing domains of the channel. PMID:23473802

  1. Locating the Route of Entry and Binding Sites of Benzocaine and Phenytoin in a Bacterial Voltage Gated Sodium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lewis J.; Corry, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Sodium channel blockers are used to control electrical excitability in cells as a treatment for epileptic seizures and cardiac arrhythmia, and to provide short term control of pain. Development of the next generation of drugs that can selectively target one of the nine types of voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in the body requires a much better understanding of how current channel blockers work. Here we make use of the recently determined crystal structure of the bacterial voltage gated sodium channel NavAb in molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the position at which the sodium channel blocking drugs benzocaine and phenytoin bind to the protein as well as to understand how these drugs find their way into resting channels. We show that both drugs have two likely binding sites in the pore characterised by nonspecific, hydrophobic interactions: one just above the activation gate, and one at the entrance to the the lateral lipid filled fenestrations. Three independent methods find the same sites and all suggest that binding to the activation gate is slightly more favourable than at the fenestration. Both drugs are found to be able to pass through the fenestrations into the lipid with only small energy barriers, suggesting that this can represent the long posited hydrophobic entrance route for neutral drugs. Our simulations highlight the importance of a number of residues in directing drugs into and through the fenestration, and in forming the drug binding sites. PMID:24992293

  2. Nonlinear conductance and heterogeneity of voltage-gated ion channels allow defining electrical surface domains in cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, José A.; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    The membrane potential of a cell measured by typical electrophysiological methods is only an average magnitude and experimental techniques allowing a more detailed mapping of the cell surface have shown the existence of spatial domains with locally different electric potentials and currents. Electrical potentials in non-neural cells are regulated by the nonlinear conductance of membrane ion channels. Voltage-gated potassium channels participate in cell hyperpolarization/depolarization processes and control the electrical signals over the cell surface, constituting good candidates to study basic biological questions on a more simplified scale than the complex cell membrane. These channels show also a high heterogeneity, making it possible to analyze the effects of diversity in the electrical responses of channels localized on spatial domains. We use a phenomenological approach of voltage gating that reproduces the observed rectification characteristics of inward rectifying potassium channels and relate the threshold voltage heterogeneity of the channels to the establishment of spatial domains with different electrical sensitivities. Although our model is only a limited picture of the whole cell membrane, it shows that domains with different ion channels may permit or suppress steady state bioelectrical signals over the cell surface according to their particular voltage sensitivity. Also, the nonlinear electrical coupling of channels with different threshold potentials can lead to a rich variety of bioelectrical phenomena, including regions of membrane potential bi-stability.

  3. Microglial voltage-gated sodium channels modulate cellular response in Alzheimer's disease--a new perspective on an old problem.

    PubMed

    Cătălin, Bogdan; Mitran, Smaranda; Ciorbagiu, Mihai; Osiac, Eugen; Bălşeanu, Tudor Adrian; Mogoantă, LaurenŢiu; Dinescu, Sorin Nicolae; Albu, Carmen Valeria; Mirea, Cecil Sorin; Vîlcea, Ionică Daniel; Iancău, Maria; Sfredel, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) determines gradual loss of cognition and memory function, eventually leading to clinical manifest dementia. The pathogenic mechanisms of AD remain elusive and treatment options unsatisfactory, targeting only symptoms like memory loss, behavior changes, sleep disorders and seizures. These therapies are not stopping the disease's progression, at their best they can only delay it. Accumulating evidence suggests that AD is associated with a microglial dysfunction. Microglia are resident immune cells that provide continuous surveillance within the brain. When excessively activated, microglial response can also have detrimental effects via the exacerbation of inflammatory processes and release of neurotoxic substances. Recently, it was recognized that microglia express voltage-gated ion channels, in particularly voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Pharmacological block of VGSC has been attempted symptomatically in AD to control the epileptic features often associated with AD, as well as to relieve detrimental behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The success of VGSC treatment in AD was unexpectedly variable, ranging from very beneficial to plain detrimental. This variability could not be satisfactorily explained solely by the neuronal effects. This article will try to discuss possible implication of microglial VGSC dysfunction in AD according to available data, own personal experience of the authors and propose a new way to investigate its possible implications. PMID:25826483

  4. Lack of variation in voltage-gated sodium channels of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) exposed to neurotoxic algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Cammen, Kristina M; Rosel, Patricia E; Wells, Randall S; Read, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    In coastal marine ecosystems, neurotoxins produced by harmful algal blooms (HABs) often result in large-scale mortality events of many marine species. Historical and frequent exposure to HABs therefore may provide a strong selective pressure for adaptations that result in toxin resistance. Neurotoxin resistance has independently evolved in a variety of terrestrial and marine species via mutations in genes encoding the toxin binding sites within the voltage-gated sodium channel gene complex. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in the putative binding site of brevetoxins in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) explains differences among individuals or populations in resistance to harmful Karenia brevis blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. We found very little variation in the sodium channel exons encoding the putative brevetoxin binding site among bottlenose dolphins from central-west Florida and the Florida Panhandle. Our study included samples from several bottlenose dolphin mortality events associated with HABs, but we found no association between genetic variation and survival. We observed a significant effect of geographic region on genetic variation for some sodium channel isoforms, but this can be primarily explained by rare private alleles and is more likely a reflection of regional genetic differentiation than the cause of different levels of HAB resistance between regions. In contrast to many other previously studied neurotoxin-resistant species, we conclude that bottlenose dolphins have not evolved resistance to HABs via mutations in genes encoding the brevetoxin binding site on the voltage-gated sodium channels. PMID:25456229

  5. The insecticidal neurotoxin Aps III is an atypical knottin peptide that potently blocks insect voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Bende, Niraj S; Kang, Eunji; Herzig, Volker; Bosmans, Frank; Nicholson, Graham M; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F

    2013-05-15

    One of the most potent insecticidal venom peptides described to date is Aps III from the venom of the trapdoor spider Apomastus schlingeri. Aps III is highly neurotoxic to lepidopteran crop pests, making it a promising candidate for bioinsecticide development. However, its disulfide-connectivity, three-dimensional structure, and mode of action have not been determined. Here we show that recombinant Aps III (rAps III) is an atypical knottin peptide; three of the disulfide bridges form a classical inhibitor cystine knot motif while the fourth disulfide acts as a molecular staple that restricts the flexibility of an unusually large β hairpin loop that often houses the pharmacophore in this class of toxins. We demonstrate that the irreversible paralysis induced in insects by rAps III results from a potent block of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. Channel block by rAps III is voltage-independent insofar as it occurs without significant alteration in the voltage-dependence of channel activation or steady-state inactivation. Thus, rAps III appears to be a pore blocker that plugs the outer vestibule of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. This mechanism of action contrasts strikingly with virtually all other sodium channel modulators isolated from spider venoms that act as gating modifiers by interacting with one or more of the four voltage-sensing domains of the channel. PMID:23473802

  6. Voltage-gated sodium channel as a target for metastatic risk reduction with re-purposed drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koltai, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the exact role of sodium channel proteins in migration, invasion and metastasis and understand the possible anti-invasion and anti-metastatic activity of repurposed drugs with voltage gated sodium channel blocking properties. Material and methods: A review of the published medical literature was performed searching for pharmaceuticals used in daily practice, with inhibitory activity on voltage gated sodium channels. For every drug found, the literature was reviewed in order to define if it may act against cancer cells as an anti-invasion and anti-metastatic agent and if it was tested with this purpose in the experimental and clinical settings. Results: The following pharmaceuticals that fulfill the above mentioned effects, were found: phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, lamotrigine, ranolazine, resveratrol, ropivacaine, lidocaine, mexiletine, flunarizine, and riluzole. Each of them are independently described and analyzed. Conclusions: The above mentioned pharmaceuticals have shown anti-metastatic and anti-invasion activity and many of them deserve to be tested in well-planned clinical trials as adjunct therapies for solid tumors and as anti-metastatic agents. Antiepileptic drugs like phenytoin, carbamazepine and valproate and the vasodilator flunarizine emerged as particularly useful for anti-metastatic purposes. PMID:27408684

  7. Amitriptyline and carbamazepine utilize voltage-gated ion channel suppression to impair excitability of sensory dorsal horn neurons in thin tissue slice: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Matthias; Czorlich, Patrick; Nagaraj, Chandran; Schnöbel-Ehehalt, Rose; Li, Yingji; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Olschewski, Horst; Heschl, Stefan; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Amitriptyline, carbamazepine and gabapentin are often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, their analgesic action on central sensory neurons is still not fully understood. Moreover, the expression pattern of their target ion channels is poorly elucidated in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Thus, we performed patch-clamp investigations in visualized neurons of lamina I-III of the spinal cord. The expression of the different voltage-gated ion channels, as the targets of these drugs, was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Neurons of the lamina I-III express the TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na(+) as well as voltage-gated K(+) subunits assembling the fast inactivating (A-type) currents and the delayed rectifier K(+) currents. Our pharmacological studies show that tonically-firing, adapting-firing and single spike neurons responded dose-dependently to amitriptyline and carbamazepine. The ion channel inhibition consecutively reduced the firing rate of tonically-firing and adapting-firing neurons. This study provides evidence for the distribution of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) subunits in lamina I-III of the spinal cord and for the action of drugs used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our work confirms that modulation of voltage-gated ion channels in the central nervous system contributes to the antinociceptive effects of these drugs. PMID:26945616

  8. The L-type Ca(2+) Channel Blocker Nifedipine Inhibits Mycelial Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence of Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peiqing; Gong, Jie; Ding, Xueling; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Guoliang; Li, Benjin; Weng, Qiyong; Chen, Qinghe

    2016-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici causes significant losses of important vegetable crops worldwide. Calcium and other plant nutrients have been used in disease management of oomycete pathogens. Calcium homeostasis and signaling is essential for numerous biological processes, and Ca(2+) channel blockers prevent excessive Ca(2+) influx into the fungal cell. However, it is not known whether voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers improve control over oomycete pathogens. In the present study, we compared the inhibitory effects of CaCl2 and the extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EDTA on mycelial growth and found that calcium assimilation plays a key role in P. capsici mycelial growth. Next, we involved the voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil (VP) and nifedipine (NFD) to analyze the effect of Ca(2+) channel blockers on mycelial growth and sporulation; the results suggested that NFD, but not VP, caused significant inhibition. Ion rescue in an NFD-induced inhibition assay suggested that NFD-induced inhibition is calcium-dependent. In addition, NFD increased P. capsici sensitivity to H2O2 in a calcium-dependent manner, and extracellular calcium rescued it. Furthermore, NFD inhibited the virulence and gene expression related to its pathogenicity. These results suggest that NFD inhibits mycelial growth, sporulation, and virulence of P. capsici. PMID:27540377

  9. The L-type Ca2+ Channel Blocker Nifedipine Inhibits Mycelial Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence of Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peiqing; Gong, Jie; Ding, Xueling; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Guoliang; Li, Benjin; Weng, Qiyong; Chen, Qinghe

    2016-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici causes significant losses of important vegetable crops worldwide. Calcium and other plant nutrients have been used in disease management of oomycete pathogens. Calcium homeostasis and signaling is essential for numerous biological processes, and Ca2+ channel blockers prevent excessive Ca2+ influx into the fungal cell. However, it is not known whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blockers improve control over oomycete pathogens. In the present study, we compared the inhibitory effects of CaCl2 and the extracellular Ca2+ chelator EDTA on mycelial growth and found that calcium assimilation plays a key role in P. capsici mycelial growth. Next, we involved the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil (VP) and nifedipine (NFD) to analyze the effect of Ca2+ channel blockers on mycelial growth and sporulation; the results suggested that NFD, but not VP, caused significant inhibition. Ion rescue in an NFD-induced inhibition assay suggested that NFD-induced inhibition is calcium-dependent. In addition, NFD increased P. capsici sensitivity to H2O2 in a calcium-dependent manner, and extracellular calcium rescued it. Furthermore, NFD inhibited the virulence and gene expression related to its pathogenicity. These results suggest that NFD inhibits mycelial growth, sporulation, and virulence of P. capsici. PMID:27540377

  10. NO Hyperpolarizes Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Decreases the Intracellular Ca2+ Concentration by Activating Voltage-Gated K+ Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Jian; Tod, Mary L.; Rubin, Lewis J.; Blaustein, Mordecai P.

    1996-09-01

    NO causes pulmonary vasodilation in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, the activity of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels controls resting membrane potential. In turn, membrane potential is an important regulator of the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and pulmonary vascular tone. We used patch clamp methods to determine whether the NO-induced pulmonary vasodilation is mediated by activation of KV channels. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy was employed to test the effect of NO on the depolarization-induced rise in [Ca2+]i. Blockade of KV channels by 4-aminopyridine (5 mM) depolarized pulmonary artery myocytes to threshold for initiation of Ca2+ action potentials, and thereby increased [Ca2+]i. NO (≈ 3 μ M) and the NO-generating compound sodium nitroprusside (5-10 μ M) opened KV channels in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. The enhanced K+ currents then hyperpolarized the cells, and blocked Ca2+-dependent action potentials, thereby preventing the evoked increases in [Ca2+]i. Nitroprusside also increased the probability of KV channel opening in excised, outside-out membrane patches. This raises the possibility that NO may act either directly on the channel protein or on a closely associated molecule rather than via soluble guanylate cyclase. In isolated pulmonary arteries, 4-aminopyridine significantly inhibited NO-induced relaxation. We conclude that NO promotes the opening of KV channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. The resulting membrane hyperpolarization, which lowers [Ca2+]i, is apparently one of the mechanisms by which NO induces pulmonary vasodilation.

  11. Sine-wave electrical stimulation initiates a voltage-gated potassium channel-dependent soft tissue response characterized by induction of hemocyte recruitment and collagen deposition.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Brandon M; Maroudas, Eleni; Osborn, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Soft tissue repair is a complex process that requires specific communication between multiple cell types to orchestrate effective restoration of physiological functions. Macrophages play a critical role in this wound healing process beginning at the onset of tissue injury. Understanding the signaling mechanisms involved in macrophage recruitment to the wound site is an essential step for developing more effective clinical therapies. Macrophages are known to respond to electrical fields, but the underlying cellular mechanisms mediating this response is unknown. This study demonstrated that low-amplitude sine-wave electrical stimulation (ES) initiates a soft tissue response in the absence of injury in Procambarus clarkii This cellular response was characterized by recruitment of macrophage-like hemocytes to the stimulation site indicated by increased hemocyte density at the site. ES also increased tissue collagen deposition compared to sham treatment (P < 0.05). Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channel inhibition with either 4-aminopyridine or astemizole decreased both hemocyte recruitment and collagen deposition compared to saline infusion (P < 0.05), whereas inhibition of calcium-permeable channels with ruthenium red did not affect either response to ES Thus, macrophage-like hemocytes in P. clarkii elicit a wound-like response to exogenous ES and this is accompanied by collagen deposition. This response is mediated by KV channels but independent of Ca(2+) channels. We propose a significant role for KV channels that extends beyond facilitating Ca(2+) transport via regulation of cellular membrane potentials during ES of soft tissue. PMID:27335435

  12. Immunohistochemical and Calcium Imaging Methods in Wholemount Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.; De Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the tools, reagents, and the practical steps that are needed for: 1) successful preparation of wholemount retinas for immunohistochemistry and, 2) calcium imaging for the study of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) mediated calcium signaling in retinal ganglion cells. The calcium imaging method we describe circumvents issues concerning non-specific loading of displaced amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer. PMID:25349920

  13. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on ion channels are a

  14. Voltage-gated Cav1 channels in disorders of vision and hearing

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Mei-ling A.; Lee, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Cav1 channels mediate L-type Ca2+ currents that trigger the exocytotic release of glutamate from the specialized “ribbon” synapse of retinal photoreceptors (PRs) and cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs). Genetic evidence from animal models and humans support a role for Cav1.3 and Cav1.4 as the primary Cav channels in IHCs and PRs, respectively. Because of the unique features of transmission at ribbon synapses, Cav1.3 and Cav1.4 exhibit unusual properties that are well-suited for their physiological roles. These properties may be intrinsic to the channel subunit(s) and/or may be conferred by regulatory interactions with synaptic signaling molecules. This review will cover advances in our understanding of the function of Cav1 channels at sensory ribbon synapses, and how dysregulation of these channels leads to disorders of vision and hearing. PMID:25966695

  15. Molecular and biophysical basis of glutamate and trace metal modulation of voltage-gated Cav2.3 calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Vitko, Iuliia; Lazarenko, Roman M.; Orestes, Peihan; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a new mechanism by which glutamate (Glu) and trace metals reciprocally modulate activity of the Cav2.3 channel by profoundly shifting its voltage-dependent gating. We show that zinc and copper, at physiologically relevant concentrations, occupy an extracellular binding site on the surface of Cav2.3 and hold the threshold for activation of these channels in a depolarized voltage range. Abolishing this binding by chelation or the substitution of key amino acid residues in IS1–IS2 (H111) and IS2–IS3 (H179 and H183) loops potentiates Cav2.3 by shifting the voltage dependence of activation toward more negative membrane potentials. We demonstrate that copper regulates the voltage dependence of Cav2.3 by affecting gating charge movements. Thus, in the presence of copper, gating charges transition into the “ON” position slower, delaying activation and reducing the voltage sensitivity of the channel. Overall, our results suggest a new mechanism by which Glu and trace metals transiently modulate voltage-dependent gating of Cav2.3, potentially affecting synaptic transmission and plasticity in the brain. PMID:22371363

  16. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells and regulates insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Che, Yongzhe; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shangrong; Gao, Ying-Tang; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xudong; Xi, Wang; Zuo, Weiyan; Li, Shu Jie

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a potent acid extruder that participates in the extrusion of the intracellular acid. Here, we showed for the first time, Hv1 is highly expressed in mouse and human pancreatic islet β-cells, as well as β-cell lines. Imaging studies demonstrated that Hv1 resides in insulin-containing granules in β-cells. Knockdown of Hv1 with RNA interference significantly reduces glucose- and K(+)-induced insulin secretion in isolated islets and INS-1 (832/13) β-cells and has an impairment on glucose- and K(+)-induced intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Our data demonstrated that the expression of Hv1 in pancreatic islet β-cells regulates insulin secretion through regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26559003

  17. Polarized localization of voltage-gated Na+ channels is regulated by concerted FGF13 and FGF14 action.

    PubMed

    Pablo, Juan Lorenzo; Wang, Chaojian; Presby, Matthew M; Pitt, Geoffrey S

    2016-05-10

    Clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) within the neuronal axon initial segment (AIS) is critical for efficient action potential initiation. Although initially inserted into both somatodendritic and axonal membranes, VGSCs are concentrated within the axon through mechanisms that include preferential axonal targeting and selective somatodendritic endocytosis. How the endocytic machinery specifically targets somatic VGSCs is unknown. Here, using knockdown strategies, we show that noncanonical FGF13 binds directly to VGSCs in hippocampal neurons to limit their somatodendritic surface expression, although exerting little effect on VGSCs within the AIS. In contrast, homologous FGF14, which is highly concentrated in the proximal axon, binds directly to VGSCs to promote their axonal localization. Single-point mutations in FGF13 or FGF14 abrogating VGSC interaction in vitro cannot support these specific functions in neurons. Thus, our data show how the concerted actions of FGF13 and FGF14 regulate the polarized localization of VGSCs that supports efficient action potential initiation. PMID:27044086

  18. A case study of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis with PET/MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian K.; Eisenman, Lawrence; Black, Joseph; Maccotta, Luigi; Hogan, R. Edward

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the significance of inflammation and autoantibodies in epilepsy, and the use of immunotherapies in certain situations has become an established practice. Temporal lobe epilepsy can follow paraneoplastic or nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with antibodies directed against brain antigens. Here, we focus on a patient with worsening confusion and temporal lobe seizures despite treatment with antiepileptic medications. Serial brain MRIs did not conclusively reveal structural abnormalities, so the patient underwent brain PET/MRI to simultaneously evaluate brain structure and function, revealing bitemporal abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis based on clinical presentation, imaging findings, and antibody testing. Treatment included the addition of a second antiepileptic agent and oral steroids. His seizures and cognitive deficits improved and stabilized. PMID:26106579

  19. Auditory hallucinations as ictal phenomena in a patient with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Michael; Attarian, Hrayr; Raizer, Jeffrey; Kumthekar, Priya; Macken, Micheal P; Schuele, Stephan U; Gerard, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    Limbic encephalitis involving anti-voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC-LE) has become increasingly recognised, with seizures and psychotic features, such as hallucinations being typical clinical manifestations. Though the literature supports auditory hallucinations as ictal phenomena, there are no reported cases of these hallucinations correlating with electrographic seizure for this disease entity. Early recognition of auditory hallucinations as seizures could alter treatment and subsequently affect short-term outcomes in these patients. We report the case of a patient with auditory hallucinations and progressive cognitive decline, as well as serological evidence of VGKC antibodies, in whom ictal hallucinations were identified by continuous video-EEG monitoring. This case highlights the subtlety of this entity, in both clinical and electrographic detection. [Published with video sequences]. PMID:24571022

  20. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related encephalopathy: a case which may extend the documented phenotype of this condition

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Janet T; Scally, Caroline; Peden, Norman; Macleod, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with a focal epileptic, fluctuating encephalopathy. Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC-Abs) were detected in his serum. Several features of this case were different from those previously reported in VGKC-Ab-associated encephalitis, illustrating that it may have a broader phenotype than previously documented. These features were: excess hepatic iron deposits without cirrhosis, reduced consciousness and fluctuating neurological signs. Previous history included personality change, depression, type 2 diabetes mellitus, pupil sparing third nerve palsy and epilepsy secondary to a head injury. He had never drunk alcohol and had recovered from a similar episode 4 years previously. Both episodes resolved after approximately 2 months. The cerebrospinal fluid had a raised protein content but no organisms. The patient was heterozygous for C282Y and negative for H63D mutations excluding classical idiopathic haemochromatosis. He recovered with supportive care to his premorbid level of health. PMID:22693327

  1. YM155, a selective survivin inhibitor, reverses chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats via upregulating voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zaiwen; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Huiguo; Li, Yang; Wang, Dong; Liu, Ying; Li, Jian; Wang, Ning; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (CH-PH) is associated with increased survivin and decreased voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels expression in pulmonary arteries, rats were randomized as: normoxia (N); normoxia + YM155, survivin suppressor (NY); hypoxia (H); hypoxia + YM155 (HY). HY group had significantly reduced pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular weight and right ventricular hypertrophy compared with H group. Survivin mRNA and protein were detected in pulmonary arteries of rats with CH-PH, but not rats without CH-PH. YM155 downregulated survivin protein and mRNA. KV channel expression and activity were upregulated after YM155 treatment. Survivin may play a role in the pathogenesis of CH-PH. PMID:25856227

  2. Application of stochastic automata networks for creation of continuous time Markov chain models of voltage gating of gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Snipas, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Paulauskas, Nerijus; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC) of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ) channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs), which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ~20 times. PMID:25705700

  3. G-Protein Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels from Isolated Adult Rat Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Van B; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons isolated from adult rat superior cervical ganglia (SCG) are a well-established model to study G-protein modulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). SCG neurons can be easily dissociated and are amendable to heterologous expression of genes, including genetic tools to study G-protein signaling pathways, within a time frame to maintain good spatial voltage-clamp control of membrane potential during electrophysiological recordings (8-36 h postdissociation). This protocol focuses on examining G-protein modulation of VGCCs; however, the procedures and experimental setup for acute application of agonists can be applied to study modulation of other ion channels (e.g., M-current, G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels). We also discuss some common sources of artifacts that can arise during acute drug application onto dissociated neurons, which can mislead interpretation of results. PMID:27140920

  4. The Drosophila Sodium Channel 1 (DSC1): The founding member of a new family of voltage-gated cation channels.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Wang, Lingxin; Xu, Peng

    2015-05-01

    It has been nearly three decades since the identification of the Drosophila Sodium Channel 1 (DSC1) gene from Drosophila melanogaster. The orthologs of the DSC1 gene have now been identified in other insect species including BSC1 from Blattella germanica. Functional analyses of DSC1/BSC1 channels in Xenopus oocytes reveal that DSC1 and BSC1 encode voltage-gated cation channels that are more permeable to Ca(2+) than to Na(+). Genetic and electrophysiological analyses show that knockout of the DSC1 gene in D. melanogaster causes behavioral and neurological modifications. In this review, we summarize major findings from recent studies and highlight a unique role of the DSC1 channel, distinct from that of the sodium channel, in regulating membrane excitability and modulating toxicity of pyrethroid insecticides. PMID:25987218

  5. Asymmetric synthesis of crambescin A-C carboxylic acids and their inhibitory activity on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Nakazaki, Atsuo; Nakane, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Yuki; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Nishikawa, Toshio

    2016-06-21

    Synthesis of both enantiomers of crambescin B carboxylic acid is described. A cis-enyne starting material was epoxidized under the conditions of Katsuki asymmetric epoxidation to give 95% ee of the epoxide, which was transformed to crambescin B carboxylic acid via bromocation-triggered cascade cyclization as the key step. Enantiomerically pure crambescin A and C carboxylic acids were also synthesized from the product of the cascade reaction. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies against voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) inhibition using those synthetic compounds revealed that the natural enantiomer of crambescin B carboxylic acid was most active and comparable to tetrodotoxin, and the unalkylated cyclic guanidinium structure is indispensible, while the carboxylate moiety is not important. The absolute stereochemistry of crambescin A was determined by a comparison of the methyl ester derived from natural crambescin A with that derived from the stereochemically defined crambescin A carboxylic acid synthesized in this study. PMID:27215973

  6. Marked difference in saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin affinity for the human nociceptive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.7)

    PubMed Central

    Walker, James R.; Novick, Paul A.; Parsons, William H.; McGregor, Malcolm; Zablocki, Jeff; Pande, Vijay S.; Du Bois, J.

    2012-01-01

    Human nociceptive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.7), a target of significant interest for the development of antinociceptive agents, is blocked by low nanomolar concentrations of (−)-tetrodotoxin(TTX) but not (+)-saxitoxin (STX) and (+)-gonyautoxin-III (GTX-III). These findings question the long-accepted view that the 1.7 isoform is both tetrodotoxin– and saxitoxin-sensitive and identify the outer pore region of the channel as a possible target for the design of Nav1.7-selective inhibitors. Single- and double-point amino acid mutagenesis studies along with whole-cell electrophysiology recordings establish two domain III residues (T1398 and I1399), which occur as methionine and aspartate in other Nav isoforms, as critical determinants of STX and gonyautoxin-III binding affinity. An advanced homology model of the Nav pore region is used to provide a structural rationalization for these surprising results. PMID:23077250

  7. Slow Inactivation in Voltage Gated Potassium Channels Is Insensitive to the Binding of Pore Occluding Peptide Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Carolina; González, Vivian; Naranjo, David

    2005-01-01

    Voltage gated potassium channels open and inactivate in response to changes of the voltage across the membrane. After removal of the fast N-type inactivation, voltage gated Shaker K-channels (Shaker-IR) are still able to inactivate through a poorly understood closure of the ion conduction pore. This, usually slower, inactivation shares with binding of pore occluding peptide toxin two important features: i), both are sensitive to the occupancy of the pore by permeant ions or tetraethylammonium, and ii), both are critically affected by point mutations in the external vestibule. Thus, mutual interference between these two processes is expected. To explore the extent of the conformational change involved in Shaker slow inactivation, we estimated the energetic impact of such interference. We used κ−conotoxin-PVIIA (κ−PVIIA) and charybdotoxin (CTX) peptides that occlude the pore of Shaker K-channels with a simple 1:1 stoichiometry and with kinetics 100-fold faster than that of slow inactivation. Because inactivation appears functionally different between outside-out patches and whole oocytes, we also compared the toxin effect on inactivation with these two techniques. Surprisingly, the rate of macroscopic inactivation and the rate of recovery, regardless of the technique used, were toxin insensitive. We also found that the fraction of inactivated channels at equilibrium remained unchanged at saturating κ−PVIIA. This lack of interference with toxin suggests that during slow inactivation the toxin receptor site remains unaffected, placing a strong geometry-conservative constraint on the possible structural configurations of a slow inactivated K-channel. Such a constraint could be fulfilled by a concerted rotation of the external vestibule. PMID:15923220

  8. Regulatory Evolution and Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Expression in Squid Axon: Selection-Mutation Balance and Fitness Cliffs

    PubMed Central

    MacCarthy, Thomas; Rosati, Barbara; McKinnon, David

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that optimization of either axonal conduction velocity or the energy efficiency of action potential conduction predominates in the selection of voltage-gated sodium conductance levels in the squid axon. A population genetics model of channel gene regulatory function was used to examine the role of these and other evolutionary forces on the selection of both sodium and potassium channel expression levels. In this model, the accumulating effects of mutations result in degradation of gene regulatory function, causing channel gene expression to fall to near-zero in the absence of positive selection. In the presence of positive selection, channel expression levels fall to the lowest values consistent with the selection criteria, thereby establishing a selection-mutation balance. Within the parameter space of sodium and potassium conductance values, the physiological performance of the squid axon model showed marked discontinuities associated with conduction failure and excitability. These discontinuities in physiological function may produce fitness cliffs. A fitness cliff associated with conduction failure, combined with the effects of phenotypic noise, can account for the selection of sodium conductance levels, without considering either conduction velocity or metabolic cost. A fitness cliff associated with a transition in axonal excitability, combined with phenotypic noise, can explain the selection of potassium channel expression levels. The results suggest that voltage-gated ion channel expression will fall to low levels, consistent with key functional constraints, even in the absence of positive selection for energy efficiency. Channel expression levels and individual variation in channel expression within the population can be explained by regulatory evolution in combination with genetic variation in regulatory function and phenotypic noise, without resorting to more complex mechanisms, such as activity-dependent homeostasis. Only a

  9. Comparative Study of the Gating Motif and C-type Inactivation in Prokaryotic Voltage-gated Sodium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Katsumasa; Kitagawa, Kazuya; Nagura, Hitoshi; Imai, Tomoya; Shimomura, Takushi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are homotetramers and are thought to inactivate through a single mechanism, named C-type inactivation. Here we report the voltage dependence and inactivation rate of the NaChBac channel from Bacillus halodurans, the first identified prokaryotic NaV, as well as of three new homologues cloned from Bacillus licheniformis (NaVBacL), Shewanella putrefaciens (NaVSheP), and Roseobacter denitrificans (NaVRosD). We found that, although activated by a lower membrane potential, NaVBacL inactivates as slowly as NaChBac. NaVSheP and NaVRosD inactivate faster than NaChBac. Mutational analysis of helix S6 showed that residues corresponding to the “glycine hinge” and “PXP motif” in voltage-gated potassium channels are not obligatory for channel gating in these prokaryotic NaVs, but mutations in the regions changed the inactivation rates. Mutation of the region corresponding to the glycine hinge in NaVBacL (A214G), NaVSheP (A216G), and NaChBac (G219A) accelerated inactivation in these channels, whereas mutation of glycine to alanine in the lower part of helix S6 in NaChBac (G229A), NaVBacL (G224A), and NaVRosD (G217A) reduced the inactivation rate. These results imply that activation gating in prokaryotic NaVs does not require gating motifs and that the residues of helix S6 affect C-type inactivation rates in these channels. PMID:19959480

  10. 12-Lipoxygenase regulates hippocampal long-term potentiation by modulating L-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    DeCostanzo, Anthony J; Voloshyna, Iryna; Rosen, Zev B; Feinmark, Steven J; Siegelbaum, Steven A

    2010-02-01

    Although long-term potentiation (LTP) has been intensively studied, there is disagreement as to which molecules mediate and modulate LTP. This is partly attributable to the presence of mechanistically distinct forms of LTP that are induced by different patterns of stimulation and that depend on distinct Ca(2+) sources. Here, we report a novel role for the arachidonic acid-metabolizing enzyme 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO) in LTP at CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses that is dependent on the pattern of tetanic stimulation. We find that 12-LO activity is required for the induction of LTP in response to a theta burst stimulation protocol that depends on Ca(2+) influx through both NMDA receptors and L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In contrast, LTP induced by 100 Hz tetanic stimulation, which requires Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors but not L-type channels, does not require 12-LO. We find that 12-LO regulates LTP by enhancing postsynaptic somatodendritic Ca(2+) influx through L-type channels during theta burst stimulation, an action exerted via 12(S)-HPETE [12(S)-hydroperoxyeicosa-5Z,8Z,10E,14Z-tetraenoic acid], a downstream metabolite of 12-LO. These results help define the role of a long-disputed signaling enzyme in LTP. PMID:20130191

  11. Myorelaxant action of fluorine-containing pinacidil analog, flocalin, in bladder smooth muscle is mediated by inhibition of L-type calcium channels rather than activation of KATP channels.

    PubMed

    Philyppov, Igor B; Golub, Andriy А; Boldyriev, Oleksiy I; Shtefan, Natalia L; Totska, Khrystyna; Voitychuk, Oleg I; Shuba, Yaroslav M

    2016-06-01

    Flocalin (FLO) is a new ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel opener (KCO) derived from pinacidil (PIN) by adding fluorine group to the drug's structure. FLO acts as a potent cardioprotector against ischemia-reperfusion damage in isolated heart and whole animal models primarily via activating cardiac-specific Kir6.2/SUR2A KATP channels. Given that FLO also confers relaxation on several types of smooth muscles and can partially inhibit L-type Ca(2+) channels, in this study, we asked what is the mechanism of FLO action in bladder detrusor smooth muscle (DSM). The actions of FLO and PIN on contractility of rat and guinea pig DSM strips and membrane currents of isolated DSM cells were compared by tensiometry and patch clamp. Kir6 and SUR subunit expression in rat DSM was assayed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In contrast to PIN (10 μM), FLO (10 μM) did not produce glibenclamide-sensitive DSM strips' relaxation and inhibition of spontaneous and electrically evoked contractions. However, FLO, but not PIN, inhibited contractions evoked by high K(+) depolarization. FLO (40 μM) did not change the level of isolated DSM cell's background K(+) current, but suppressed by 20 % L-type Ca(2+) current. Determining various Kir6 and SUR messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions in rat DSM by RT-PCR indicated that dominant KATP channel in rat DSM is of vascular type involving association of Kir6.1 and SUR2B subunits. Myorelaxant effects of FLO in bladder DSM are explained by partial blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx rather than by hyperpolarization associated with increased K(+) permeability. Thus, insertion of fluorine group in PIN's structure made the drug more discriminative between Kir6.2/SUR2A cardiac- and Kir6.1/SUR2B vascular-type KATP channels and rendered it partial L-type Ca(2+) channel-blocking potency. PMID:26976335

  12. Construction and validation of a homology model of the human voltage-gated proton channel hHV1

    PubMed Central

    Kulleperuma, Kethika; Smith, Susan M.E.; Morgan, Deri; Musset, Boris; Holyoake, John; Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Cherny, Vladimir V.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The topological similarity of voltage-gated proton channels (HV1s) to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of other voltage-gated ion channels raises the central question of whether HV1s have a similar structure. We present the construction and validation of a homology model of the human HV1 (hHV1). Multiple structural alignment was used to construct structural models of the open (proton-conducting) state of hHV1 by exploiting the homology of hHV1 with VSDs of K+ and Na+ channels of known three-dimensional structure. The comparative assessment of structural stability of the homology models and their VSD templates was performed using massively repeated molecular dynamics simulations in which the proteins were allowed to relax from their initial conformation in an explicit membrane mimetic. The analysis of structural deviations from the initial conformation based on up to 125 repeats of 100-ns simulations for each system reveals structural features consistently retained in the homology models and leads to a consensus structural model for hHV1 in which well-defined external and internal salt-bridge networks stabilize the open state. The structural and electrostatic properties of this open-state model are compatible with proton translocation and offer an explanation for the reversal of charge selectivity in neutral mutants of Asp112. Furthermore, these structural properties are consistent with experimental accessibility data, providing a valuable basis for further structural and functional studies of hHV1. Each Arg residue in the S4 helix of hHV1 was replaced by His to test accessibility using Zn2+ as a probe. The two outermost Arg residues in S4 were accessible to external solution, whereas the innermost one was accessible only to the internal solution. Both modeling and experimental data indicate that in the open state, Arg211, the third Arg residue in the S4 helix in hHV1, remains accessible to the internal solution and is located near the charge transfer center, Phe150

  13. CK2 activity is required for the interaction of FGF14 with voltage-gated sodium channels and neuronal excitability.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Chun J; Scala, Federico; Nenov, Miroslav N; Wildburger, Norelle C; Elferink, Hannah; Singh, Aditya K; Chesson, Charles B; Buzhdygan, Tetyana; Sohail, Maveen; Shavkunov, Alexander S; Panova, Neli I; Nilsson, Carol L; Rudra, Jai S; Lichti, Cheryl F; Laezza, Fernanda

    2016-06-01

    Recent data shows that fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14) binds to and controls the function of the voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel with phenotypic outcomes on neuronal excitability. Mutations in the FGF14 gene in humans have been associated with brain disorders that are partially recapitulated in Fgf14(-/-) mice. Thus, signaling pathways that modulate the FGF14:Nav channel interaction may be important therapeutic targets. Bioluminescence-based screening of small molecule modulators of the FGF14:Nav1.6 complex identified 4,5,6,7 -: tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBB), a potent casein kinase 2 (CK2) inhibitor, as a strong suppressor of FGF14:Nav1.6 interaction. Inhibition of CK2 through TBB reduces the interaction of FGF14 with Nav1.6 and Nav1.2 channels. Mass spectrometry confirmed direct phosphorylation of FGF14 by CK2 at S228 and S230, and mutation to alanine at these sites modified FGF14 modulation of Nav1.6-mediated currents. In 1 d in vitro hippocampal neurons, TBB induced a reduction in FGF14 expression, a decrease in transient Na(+) current amplitude, and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of Nav channel steady-state inactivation. In mature neurons, TBB reduces the axodendritic polarity of FGF14. In cornu ammonis area 1 hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, TBB impairs neuronal excitability by increasing action potential threshold and lowering firing frequency. Importantly, these changes in excitability are recapitulated in Fgf14(-/-) mice, and deletion of Fgf14 occludes TBB-dependent phenotypes observed in wild-type mice. These results suggest that a CK2-FGF14 axis may regulate Nav channels and neuronal excitability.-Hsu, W.-C. J., Scala, F., Nenov, M. N., Wildburger, N. C., Elferink, H., Singh, A. K., Chesson, C. B., Buzhdygan, T., Sohail, M., Shavkunov, A. S., Panova, N. I., Nilsson, C. L., Rudra, J. S., Lichti, C. F., Laezza, F. CK2 activity is required for the interaction of FGF14 with voltage-gated sodium channels and neuronal

  14. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate blocks electrical coupling and inhibits voltage-gated K+ channels in guinea pig arteriole cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke-Tao; Guan, Bing-Cai; Yang, Yu-Qin; Nuttall, Alfred L; Jiang, Zhi-Gen

    2011-01-01

    2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) analogs are potentially better vascular gap junction blockers than others widely used, but they remain to be characterized. Using whole cell and intracellular recording techniques, we studied the actions of 2-APB and its potent analog diphenylborinic anhydride (DPBA) on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells in situ of or dissociated from arteriolar segments of the cochlear spiral modiolar artery, brain artery, and mesenteric artery. We found that both 2-APB and DPBA reversibly suppressed the input conductance (G(input)) of in situ VSMCs (IC(50) ≈ 4-8 μM). Complete electrical isolation of the recorded VSMC was achieved at 100 μM. A similar gap junction blockade was observed in endothelial cell tubules of the spiral modiolar artery. Similar to the action of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA), 2-APB and DPBA depolarized VSMCs. In dissociated VSMCs, 2-APB and DPBA inhibited the delayed rectifier K(+) current (I(K)) with an IC(50) of ∼120 μM in the three vessels but with no significant effect on G(input) or the current-voltage relation between -140 and -40 mV. 2-APB inhibition of I(K) was more pronounced at potentials of ≤20 mV than at +40 mV and more marked on the fast component than on the slow component, which was mimicked by 4-aminopyridine but not by tetraethylammonium, nitrendipine, or charybdotoxin. In contrast, 18β-GA caused a linear inhibition of I(K) between 0 to +40 mV, which was similar to the action of tetraethylammonium or charybdotoxin. Finally, the 2-APB-induced inhibition of electrical coupling and I(K) was not affected by the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonist xestospongin C. We conclude that 2-APB analogs are a class of potent and reversible vascular gap junction blockers with a weak side effect of voltage-gated K(+) channel inhibition. They could be gap junction blockers superior to 18β-GA only when Ca(2+)-actived K(+) channel inhibition by the latter is a concern but

  15. Modulation of BK channel voltage gating by different auxiliary β subunits

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Gustavo F.; Neely, Alan; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK) are regulated by a multiplicity of signals. The prevailing view is that different BK gating mechanisms converge to determine channel opening and that these gating mechanisms are allosterically coupled. In most instances the pore forming α subunit of BK is associated with one of four alternative β subunits that appear to target specific gating mechanisms to regulate the channel activity. In particular, β1 stabilizes the active configuration of the BK voltage sensor having a large effect on BK Ca2+ sensitivity. To determine the extent to which β subunits regulate the BK voltage sensor, we measured gating currents induced by the pore-forming BK α subunit alone and with the different β subunits expressed in Xenopus oocytes (β1, β2IR, β3b, and β4). We found that β1, β2, and β4 stabilize the BK voltage sensor in the active conformation. β3 has no effect on voltage sensor equilibrium. In addition, β4 decreases the apparent number of charges per voltage sensor. The decrease in the charge associated with the voltage sensor in α β4 channels explains most of their biophysical properties. For channels composed of the α subunit alone, gating charge increases slowly with pulse duration as expected if a significant fraction of this charge develops with a time course comparable to that of K+ current activation. In the presence of β1, β2, and β4 this slow component develops in advance of and much more rapidly than ion current activation, suggesting that BK channel opening proceeds in two steps. PMID:23112204

  16. Ankyrin-G directly binds to kinesin-1 to transport voltage-gated Na+ channels into axons.

    PubMed

    Barry, Joshua; Gu, Yuanzheng; Jukkola, Peter; O'Neill, Brian; Gu, Howard; Mohler, Peter J; Rajamani, Keerthi Thirtamara; Gu, Chen

    2014-01-27

    Action potentials (APs) propagating along axons require the activation of voltage-gated Na(+) (Nav) channels. How Nav channels are transported into axons is unknown. We show that KIF5/kinesin-1 directly binds to ankyrin-G (AnkG) to transport Nav channels into axons. KIF5 and Nav1.2 channels bind to multiple sites in the AnkG N-terminal domain that contains 24 ankyrin repeats. Disrupting AnkG-KIF5 binding with small interfering RNA or dominant-negative constructs markedly reduced Nav channel levels at the axon initial segment (AIS) and along entire axons, thereby decreasing AP firing. Live-cell imaging showed that fluorescently tagged AnkG or Nav1.2 cotransported with KIF5 along axons. Deleting AnkG in vivo or virus-mediated expression of a dominant-negative KIF5 construct specifically decreased the axonal level of Nav, but not Kv1.2, channels in mouse cerebellum. These results indicate that AnkG functions as an adaptor to link Nav channels to KIF5 during axonal transport before anchoring them to the AIS and nodes of Ranvier. PMID:24412576

  17. Cell adhesion molecule L1 contributes to neuronal excitability regulating the function of voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Lignani, Gabriele; Medrihan, Lucian; Bosco, Federica; Contestabile, Andrea; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Ferrea, Enrico; Schachner, Melitta; Benfenati, Fabio; Giovedì, Silvia; Baldelli, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    L1 (also known as L1CAM) is a trans-membrane glycoprotein mediating neuron-neuron adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic interactions. Although experimental evidence has implicated L1 in axonal outgrowth, fasciculation and pathfinding, its contribution to voltage-gated Na(+) channel function and membrane excitability has remained unknown. Here, we show that firing rate, single cell spiking frequency and Na(+) current density are all reduced in hippocampal excitatory neurons from L1-deficient mice both in culture and in slices owing to an overall reduced membrane expression of Na(+) channels. Remarkably, normal firing activity was restored when L1 was reintroduced into L1-deficient excitatory neurons, indicating that abnormal firing patterns are not related to developmental abnormalities, but are a direct consequence of L1 deletion. Moreover, L1 deficiency leads to impairment of action potential initiation, most likely due to the loss of the interaction of L1 with ankyrin G that produces the delocalization of Na(+) channels at the axonal initial segment. We conclude that L1 contributes to functional expression and localization of Na(+) channels to the neuronal plasma membrane, ensuring correct initiation of action potential and normal firing activity. PMID:26985064

  18. Regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel expression in cancer: hormones, growth factors and auto-regulation.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Scott P; Ozerlat-Gunduz, Iley; Brackenbury, William J; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M; Campbell, Thomas M; Coombes, R Charles; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2014-03-19

    Although ion channels are increasingly being discovered in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and shown to contribute to different aspects and stages of the cancer process, much less is known about the mechanisms controlling their expression. Here, we focus on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) which are upregulated in many types of carcinomas where their activity potentiates cell behaviours integral to the metastatic cascade. Regulation of VGSCs occurs at a hierarchy of levels from transcription to post-translation. Importantly, mainstream cancer mechanisms, especially hormones and growth factors, play a significant role in the regulation. On the whole, in major hormone-sensitive cancers, such as breast and prostate cancer, there is a negative association between genomic steroid hormone sensitivity and functional VGSC expression. Activity-dependent regulation by positive feedback has been demonstrated in strongly metastatic cells whereby the VGSC is self-sustaining, with its activity promoting further functional channel expression. Such auto-regulation is unlike normal cells in which activity-dependent regulation occurs mostly via negative feedback. Throughout, we highlight the possible clinical implications of functional VGSC expression and regulation in cancer. PMID:24493753

  19. Membrane potential bistability in nonexcitable cells as described by inward and outward voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Javier; Alcaraz, Antonio; Mafe, Salvador

    2014-10-30

    The membrane potential of nonexcitable cells, defined as the electrical potential difference between the cell cytoplasm and the extracellular environment when the current is zero, is controlled by the individual electrical conductance of different ion channels. In particular, inward- and outward-rectifying voltage-gated channels are crucial for cell hyperpolarization/depolarization processes, being amenable to direct physical study. High (in absolute value) negative membrane potentials are characteristic of terminally differentiated cells, while low membrane potentials are found in relatively depolarized, more plastic cells (e.g., stem, embryonic, and cancer cells). We study theoretically the hyperpolarized and depolarized values of the membrane potential, as well as the possibility to obtain a bistability behavior, using simplified models for the ion channels that regulate this potential. The bistability regions, which are defined in the multidimensional state space determining the cell state, can be relevant for the understanding of the different model cell states and the transitions between them, which are triggered by changes in the external environment. PMID:25286866

  20. Stretch-activation and stretch-inactivation of Shaker-IR, a voltage-gated K+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, C X; Juranka, P F; Morris, C E

    2001-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cell types but baffling because of their contentious physiologies and diverse molecular identities. In some cellular contexts mechanically responsive ion channels are undoubtedly mechanosensory transducers, but it does not follow that all MS channels are mechanotransducers. Here we demonstrate, for an archetypical voltage-gated channel (Shaker-IR; inactivation-removed), robust MS channel behavior. In oocyte patches subjected to stretch, Shaker-IR exhibits both stretch-activation (SA) and stretch-inactivation (SI). SA is seen when prestretch P(open) (set by voltage) is low, and SI is seen when it is high. The stretch effects occur in cell-attached and excised patches at both macroscopic and single-channel levels. Were one ignorant of this particular MS channel's identity, one might propose it had been designed as a sophisticated reporter of bilayer tension. Knowing Shaker-IR's provenance and biology, however, such a suggestion would be absurd. We argue that the MS responses of Shaker-IR reflect not overlooked "mechano-gating" specializations of Shaker, but a common property of multiconformation membrane proteins: inherent susceptibility to bilayer tension. The molecular diversity of MS channels indicates that susceptibility to bilayer tension is hard to design out of dynamic membrane proteins. Presumably the cost of being insusceptible to bilayer tension often outweighs the benefits, especially where the in situ milieu of channels can provide mechanoprotection. PMID:11371444

  1. A surface plasmon resonance approach to monitor toxin interactions with an isolated voltage-gated sodium channel paddle motif

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Ferracci, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Animal toxins that inhibit voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel fast inactivation can do so through an interaction with the S3b–S4 helix-turn-helix region, or paddle motif, located in the domain IV voltage sensor. Here, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR), an optical approach that uses polarized light to measure the refractive index near a sensor surface to which a molecule of interest is attached, to analyze interactions between the isolated domain IV paddle and Nav channel–selective α-scorpion toxins. Our SPR analyses showed that the domain IV paddle can be removed from the Nav channel and immobilized on sensor chips, and suggest that the isolated motif remains susceptible to animal toxins that target the domain IV voltage sensor. As such, our results uncover the inherent pharmacological sensitivities of the isolated domain IV paddle motif, which may be exploited to develop a label-free SPR approach for discovering ligands that target this region. PMID:25624450

  2. Preferential Targeting of Nav1.6 Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels to the Axon Initial Segment during Development

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Elizabeth J.; Solé, Laura; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Tamkun, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    During axonal maturation, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels accumulate at the axon initial segment (AIS) at high concentrations. This localization is necessary for the efficient initiation of action potentials. The mechanisms underlying channel trafficking to the AIS during axonal development have remained elusive due to a lack of Nav reagents suitable for high resolution imaging of channels located specifically on the cell surface. Using an optical pulse-chase approach in combination with a novel Nav1.6 construct containing an extracellular biotinylation domain we demonstrate that Nav1.6 channels are preferentially inserted into the AIS membrane during neuronal development via direct vesicular trafficking. Single-molecule tracking illustrates that axonal channels are immediately immobilized following delivery, while channels delivered to the soma are often mobile. Neither a Nav1.6 channel lacking the ankyrin-binding motif nor a chimeric Kv2.1 channel containing the Nav ankyrinG-binding domain show preferential AIS insertion. Together these data support a model where ankyrinG-binding is required for preferential Nav1.6 insertion into the AIS plasma membrane. In contrast, ankyrinG-binding alone does not confer the preferential delivery of proteins to the AIS. PMID:25874799

  3. Blockade of voltage-gated K⁺ currents in rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells by MK801.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Min; Park, Sang Woong; Lin, Hai Yue; Shin, Kyung Chul; Sung, Dong Jun; Kim, Jae Gon; Cho, Hana; Kim, Bokyung; Bae, Young Min

    2015-01-01

    MK801 (dizocilpine), a phencyclidine (PCP) derivative, is a potent noncompetitive antagonist of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr). Another PCP derivative, ketamine, was reported to block voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels, which was independent of NMDAr function. Kv currents are major regulators of the membrane potential (Em) and excitability of muscles and neurons. Here, we investigated the effect of MK801 on the Kv channels and Em in rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells (RMASMCs). We used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to analyze the effect of MK801 enantiomers on Kv channels and Em. (+)MK801 inhibited Kv channels in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 89.1 ± 13.1 μM, Hill coefficient of 1.05 ± 0.08). The inhibition was voltage- and state- independent. (+)MK801 didn't influence steady-state activation and inactivation of Kv channels. (+)MK801 treatment depolarized Em in a concentration-dependent manner and concomitantly decreased membrane conductance. (-)MK801 also similarly inhibited the Kv channels (IC50 of 134.0 ± 17.5 μM, Hill coefficient of 0.87 ± 0.09). These results indicate that MK801 directly inhibits the Kv channel in a state-independent manner in RMASMCs. This MK801-mediated inhibition of Kv channels should be considered when assessing the various pharmacological effects produced by MK801, such as schizophrenia, neuroprotection, and hypertension. PMID:25704024

  4. Voltage-gated potassium channels involved in regulation of physiological function in MrgprA3-specific itch neurons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Min; Wu, Guanyi; Wang, Zhongli; Yang, Niuniu; Shi, Hao; He, Qian; Zhu, Chan; Yang, Yan; Yu, Guang; Wang, Changming; Yuan