Science.gov

Sample records for l2-5 experiment comparison

  1. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2, Cycle 36-04 using LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) Large Break Experiment L2-5

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, Young Seok; Lee, Sang Yong; Kim, Hho-Jung . Korea Nuclear Safety Center)

    1990-04-01

    The LOFT L2-5 LBLOCA Experiment was simulated using the RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 code to assess its capability to predict the phenomena in LBLOCA. One base case calculation and three cases of different nodalizations were carried out. The effect of different nodalization was studied in the area of the downcomer and core. For a sensitivity study, another calculation was executed using an updated version of RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04. A Split downcomer with one crossflow junction and two core channels were found to be effective in describing the ECC bypass and hot channel behavior. And the updated version was found to be effective in overcoming the code deficiency in the interfacial friction and reflood quenching. 11 refs., 55 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. 33alloy: comparison between experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M J; Mendelev, M I; Asta, M

    2014-04-22

    We report data on the structure of liquid Al and an Al67Mg33 alloy obtained from state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. To facilitate a direct comparison between these data, we develop a method to elongate the AIMD pair correlation function in order to obtain reliable AIMD structure factors. The comparison reveals an appreciable level of discrepancy between experimental and AIMD liquid structures, with the latter being consistently more ordered than the former at the same temperature. The discrepancy noted in this study is estimated to have significant implications for simulation-based calculations of liquid transport properties and solid–liquid interface kinetic properties.

  3. Comparison of bioseparation methods for microgravity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cohly, Hari H. P.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Barlow, Grant H.; Hymer, Wesley C.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of the 1-g version of the continuous-flow electrophoresis (CFE) system flown on Space Shuttle missions is compared with the efficiency of a commercial CFE for separating living cells (human kidney, liver, and pituitary-gland cells and T-lymphocytes). In addition, the CFE system and a reciprocal isoelectric focusing (RIEF) system are compared with respect to protein pyrification efficiency. Correlations were made among electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs), secretory functions of cells, and input sample concentrations. A significant reduction in mean and range EPM was observed when input sample concentrations exceeded a low threshohold. This effect was not observed in microgravity experiments conducted at sample concentrations three times greater than the threshold for the controls. Comparison of CFE and RIEF methods showed that there are apparent advantages for each method depending on the product. For example, RIEF purification of urokinase removed more protein impurities, but focused the enzyme at a pH different than the enzyme's known isoelectric point.

  4. OpenMP Experiences and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Terry; Thigpen, William W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The document discusses message passage interfaces (MPI), open message passage issues and parallelization. A comparison of the two vector platforms, C90 and SVlex is presented. Sections of the document are written in computer code.

  5. Comparison of integrated numerical experiments with accelerator and FEL experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cooper, R.K.; Elliott, J.C.; Gitomer, S.J.; Goldstein, J.C.; Jones, M.E.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Takeda, H.; Tokar, R.L.; Wang, T.S.; Young, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    Even at the conceptual level the strong coupling between the laser subsystem elements, such as the accelerator, wiggler, optics, and control, greatly complicates the understanding and design of an FEL. Given the requirements for a high-performance FEL, the coupling between the laser subsystems must be included in the design approach. To address the subsystem coupling the concept of an integrated numerical experiment (INEX) has been implemented. Unique features of the INEX approach are consistency and numerical equivalence of experimental diagnostic. The equivalent numerical diagnostics mitigates the major problem of misinterpretation that often occurs when theoretical and experimental data are compared. A complete INEX model has been applied to the 10{mu}m high-extraction-efficiency experiment at Los Alamos and the 0.6-{mu}m Burst Mode experiment at Boeing Aerospace. In addition, various subsets of the INEX model have been compared with a number of other experiments. Overall, the agreement between INEX and the experiments is very good. With the INEX approach, it now appears possible to design high-performance FELS for numerous applications. The first full-scale test of the INEX approach is the Los Alamos HIBAF experiment. The INEX concept, implementation, and validation with experiments are discussed. 28 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Comparison of secondary electron emission simulation to experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Ivanov, V.; Jokela, S. J.; Veryovkin, I.; Zinovev, A.; Frisch, H.

    2011-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, empirical theories, and close comparison to experiment were used to parameterize the secondary electron emission (SEE) yields of several highly emissive materials for microchannel plates. In addition, a detailed experiment and analysis of gold were carried out at Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results will be used in the selection of emissive and resistive materials for deposition and characterization experiments that will be conducted by a large-area fast detector project at Argonne.

  7. GASFLOW comparisons with bureau of mines experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy and Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the flammability of mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and air. The tests were performed in a spherical chamber under quiescent and turbulent conditions. This paper describes combustion calculations using the GASFLOW code and compares the calculated pressure ratios with experiments mentioned above. GASFLOW is a finite-volume computer code that solves the transient, three-dimensional, compressible fluid, Navier-Stokes equations with multiple species coupled with finite-rate chemical kinetics. The computational results show good agreement with the experimental data and confirm GASFLOW to be a valuable tool for evaluating the above combustion process.

  8. Disentangling forms of Lorentz violation with complementary clock comparison experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2009-03-15

    Atomic clock comparisons provide some of the most precise tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetries in the laboratory. With data from multiple such experiments using different nuclei, it is possible to constrain new regions of the parameter space for Lorentz violation. Relativistic effects in the nuclei allow us to disentangle forms of Lorentz violation which could not be separately measured in purely nonrelativistic experiments. The disentangled bounds in the neutron sectors are at the 10{sup -28} GeV level, far better than could be obtained with any other current technique.

  9. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows and Comparison With Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.; Markelov, Gennady N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents computational results obtained with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for several biconic test cases in which shock interactions and flow separation-reattachment are key features of the flow. Recent ground-based experiments have been performed for several biconic configurations, and surface heating rate and pressure measurements have been proposed for code validation studies. The present focus is to expand on the current validating activities for a relatively new DSMC code called DS2V that Bird (second author) has developed. Comparisons with experiments and other computations help clarify the agreement currently being achieved between computations and experiments and to identify the range of measurement variability of the proposed validation data when benchmarked with respect to the current computations. For the test cases with significant vibrational nonequilibrium, the effect of the vibrational energy surface accommodation on heating and other quantities is demonstrated.

  10. Comparison of simulation with experiment in an RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Boicourt, G.P.; Sander, O.R.; Wangler, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    The accelerator test stand (ATS) RFQ has provided an opportunity to compare the predictions of the RFQ beam-dynamics code PARMTEQ with actual operation of an RFQ. For this comparison, the code was adapted to simulate the measured operation parameters, which are somewhat different from those of the ideal design. A Monte Carlo code was written to provide input to PARMTEQ, based on measured input beam distributions. With these refinements, the code has given results that are in good agreement with measurements and has provided information leading to an explanation of an unexpected set of measurements. This paper describes the method used to generate a pseudo particle beam based on the measured transverse properties of the RFQ input beam and describes some of the comparisons between simulation and experiment. An explanation is provided for the energy-spectrum structure observed in the RFQ output beam during low-voltage operation. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Comparison of simulation with experiment in an RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Boicourt, G.P.; Sander, O.R.; Wangler, T.P.

    1985-10-01

    The accelerator test stand (ATS) RFQ has provided an opportunity to compare the predictions of the RFQ beam-dynamics code PARMTEQ with actual operation of an RFQ. For this comparison, the code was adapted to simulate the measured operation parameters, which are somewhat different from those of the ideal design. A Monte Carlo code was written to provide input to PARMTEQ, based on measured input beam distributions. With these refinements, the code has given results that are in good agreement with measurements and has provided information leading to an explanation of an unexpected set of measurements. This paper describes the method used to generate a pseudo particle beam based on the measured transverse properties of the RFQ input beam and describes some of the comparisons between simulation and experiment. An explanation is provided for the energy-spectrum structure observed in the RFQ output beam during low-voltage operation.

  12. Experience with CANDID: Comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.; Cannon, M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents results from the authors experience with CANDID (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases), which was designed to facilitate image retrieval by content using a query-by-example methodology. A global signature describing the texture, shape, or color content is first computed for every image stored in a database, and a normalized similarity measure between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to match signatures. This method can be used to retrieve images from a database that are similar to a user-provided example image. Results for three test applications are included.

  13. Initial NIF Shock Timing Experiments: Comparison with Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    Initial experiments are underway to demonstrate the techniques required to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and DANTE. The results of these measurements will be used to set the precision pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  14. Results from the International Halocarbons in Air Comparison Experiment (IHALACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. D.; Engel, A.; Mühle, J.; Elkins, J. W.; Artuso, F.; Atlas, E.; Aydin, M.; Blake, D.; Brunke, E.-G.; Chiavarini, S.; Fraser, P. J.; Happell, J.; Krummel, P. B.; Levin, I.; Loewenstein, M.; Maione, M.; Montzka, S. A.; O'Doherty, S.; Reimann, S.; Rhoderick, G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Scheel, H. E.; Steele, L. P.; Vollmer, M. K.; Weiss, R. F.; Worthy, D.; Yokouchi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The International Halocarbons in Air Comparison Experiment (IHALACE) was conducted to document relationships between calibration scales among various laboratories that measure atmospheric greenhouse and ozone depleting gases. This study included trace gases such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), as well as nitrous oxide, methane, sulfur hexafluoride, very short-lived halocompounds, and carbonyl sulfide. Many of these gases are present in the unpolluted atmosphere at pmol mol-1 (parts per trillion) or nmol mol-1 (parts per billion) levels. Six stainless steel cylinders containing natural and modified natural air samples were circulated among 19 laboratories. Results from this experiment reveal relatively good agreement (within a few percent) among commonly used calibration scales. Scale relationships for some gases, such as CFC-12 and CCl4, were found to be consistent with those derived from estimates of global mean mole fractions, while others, such as halon-1211 and CH3Br, revealed discrepancies. The transfer of calibration scales among laboratories was problematic in many cases, meaning that measurements tied to a particular scale may not, in fact, be compatible. Large scale transfer errors were observed for CH3CCl3 (10-100%) and CCl4 (2-30%), while much smaller scale transfer errors (< 1%) were observed for halon-1211, HCFC-22, and HCFC-142b. These results reveal substantial improvements in calibration over previous comparisons. However, there is room for improvement in communication and coordination of calibration activities with respect to the measurement of halogenated and related trace gases.

  15. Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment 1. II - Instrument calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Ucker, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    The science objective for the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is to accurately measure the full disk solar spectral irradiance in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region over a long time period. The SOLSTICE design was driven by the requirement for long-term, precise solar photometry conducted from space. The SOLSTICE 1 is on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), launched in September 1991 with the possibility for a 10-year operational mission. The in-flight calibration for SOLSTICE to meet its primary objective is the routine measurements of the UV radiation from a set of early-type stars, using the identical optical elements employed for the solar observations. The extensive preflight calibrations of the instrument have yielded a precise characterization of the three SOLSTICE channels. Details of the preflight and in-flight SOLSTICE calibrations are discussed in this paper.

  16. Numerical simulation of molten silicon flow; comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Koichi; Nicodème, Pierre; Lecomte, Michael; Dupret, François; Crochet, Marcel J.

    1991-12-01

    Numerical simulation containing fluid flow, heat conduction and heat exchange by radiation has been performed using the geometry of a real Czochralski furnace for silicon single crystal growth. The flow velocity fields of molten silicon are obtained from extrapolation of the stream function, which has been newly developed using the velocity boundary layer theory. The calculated flow velocity and particle path are semi-quantitatively identical to the results obtained from X-ray radiography experiment. The calculated value of the characteristic velocity is about 10 -2 m/s. The same order of flow velocity which is obtained from the experiment has been already reported. It has also become clear from a comparison of flow velocities between experimental and calculated results that the order of the volume expansion coefficient of the molten silicon (β) is 10 -4 K -1. The flow was almost axisymmetric and steady for a specific case with low crystal and crucible rotation rates and with a shallow melt. We also found that a flow with larger azimuthal velocity component exists just beneath a crystal, while that with opposite flow direction exists near the crucible wall.

  17. Extension of nanoconfined DNA: Quantitative comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iarko, V.; Werner, E.; Nyberg, L. K.; Müller, V.; Fritzsche, J.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Beech, J. P.; Tegenfeldt, J. O.; Mehlig, K.; Westerlund, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-12-01

    The extension of DNA confined to nanochannels has been studied intensively and in detail. However, quantitative comparisons between experiments and model calculations are difficult because most theoretical predictions involve undetermined prefactors, and because the model parameters (contour length, Kuhn length, effective width) are difficult to compute reliably, leading to substantial uncertainties. Here we use a recent asymptotically exact theory for the DNA extension in the "extended de Gennes regime" that allows us to compare experimental results with theory. For this purpose, we performed experiments measuring the mean DNA extension and its standard deviation while varying the channel geometry, dye intercalation ratio, and ionic strength of the buffer. The experimental results agree very well with theory at high ionic strengths, indicating that the model parameters are reliable. At low ionic strengths, the agreement is less good. We discuss possible reasons. In principle, our approach allows us to measure the Kuhn length and the effective width of a single DNA molecule and more generally of semiflexible polymers in solution.

  18. Comparison Between Theory and Experiment for Wings at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G

    1951-01-01

    This paper presents a critical comparison made between experimental and theoretical results for the aerodynamic characteristics of wings at supersonic flight speeds. As a preliminary, a brief, nonmathematical review is given of the basic assumptions and general findings of supersonic wing theory in two and three dimensions. Published data from two-dimensional pressure-distribution tests are then used to illustrate the effects of fluid viscosity and to assess the accuracy of linear theory as compared with the more exact theories which are available in the two-dimensional case. Finally, an account is presented of an NACA study of the over-all force characteristics of three-dimensional wings at supersonic speed. In this study, the lift, pitching moment, and drag characteristics of several families of wings of varying plan form and section were measured in the wind tunnel and compared with values predicted by the three-dimensional linear theory. The regions of agreement and disagreement between experiment and theory are noted and discussed.

  19. Comparison between experiment and simulation for argon inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Fei; Zhao Shuxia; Li Xiaosong; Wang Younian

    2009-11-15

    In order to include the nonlocal characteristics of electrons and investigate the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) resources more completely, we have developed a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/fluid hybrid model and calculated the axial and radial distributions of electron density, electron temperature, plasma potential, and electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) of Ar discharge in a planar ICP. Furthermore, to make the model more practical, we still incorporate the effects of metastable atoms, whose sets of rate coefficients and density are, respectively, calculated through the electron MC part and fluid module. Besides, the corresponding Langmuir probe measurements are used to compare these data to validate the simulated results. Under all the selected discharge powers and pressures, the theoretically simulated and experimentally measured quantity profiles agree reasonably with each other, embodied in the generally identical magnitude ranges and spatial distributions. Furthermore, the interpretations about their detailed differences are given, which are based on the designs of both experimental schematic and model configuration. The analysis implements that the inclusions of electron-electron collision and a neutral density distribution into the hybrid model are likely to improve the comparison between the model predictions and experiment diagnostics. Furthermore, the evolution of plasma parameters and EEDFs with discharge conditions is discussed.

  20. A Comparison of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Functional Measurement Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Acker, Frederik; Theuns, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Information Integration Theory (IIT) is concerned with how people combine information into an overall judgment. A method is hereby presented to perform Functional Measurement (FM) experiments, the methodological counterpart of IIT, on the Web. In a comparison of Web-based FM experiments, face-to-face experiments, and computer-based experiments in…

  1. Autoionization in atomic chlorine: Comparison of theories and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscic, B.; Berkowitz, J. )

    1989-12-01

    High-resolution spectra (0.07 and 0.14 A, full width at half-maximum) are presented for the region between 860 and 918 A of the photoionization spectrum of atomic chlorine. Comparison is made with several many-body theories. Significant disagreement with theory is found, particularly with the widths and profiles of the sharp autoionizing resonances.

  2. Test Experience Effects in Longitudinal Comparisons of Adult Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that experience with cognitive tests can influence estimates of cognitive change. Prior research has estimated experience effects at the level of groups by comparing the performance of a group of participants tested for the second time with the performance of a different group of participants at the same age tested for the…

  3. Theory and Experiment of Multielement Airfoils: A Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerwiec, Ryan; Edwards, J. R.; Rumsey, C. L.; Hassan, H. A.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed comparison of computed and measured pressure distributions, velocity profiles, transition onset, and Reynolds shear stresses for multi-element airfoils is presented. It is shown that the transitional k-zeta model, which is implemented into CFL3D, does a good job of predicting pressure distributions, transition onset, and velocity profiles with the exception of velocities in the slat wake region. Considering the fact that the hot wire used was not fine enough to resolve Reynolds stresses in the boundary layer, comparisons of turbulence stresses varied from good to fair. It is suggested that the effects of unsteadiness be thoroughly evaluated before more complicated transition/turbulence models are used. Further, it is concluded that the present work presents a viable and economical method for calculating laminar/transitional/turbuient flows over complex shapes without user interface.

  4. International hospital productivity comparison: experiences from the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Medin, Emma; Häkkinen, Unto; Linna, Miika; Anthun, Kjartan S; Kittelsen, Sverre A C; Rehnberg, Clas

    2013-09-01

    This article focuses on describing the methodological challenges intrinsic in international comparative studies of hospital productivity and how these challenges have been addressed within the context of hospital comparisons in the Nordic countries. The hospital sectors in the Nordic countries are suitable for international comparison as they exhibit similar structures in the organisation for hospital care, hold administrative data of good quality at the hospital level, apply a similar secondary patient classification system, and use similar definitions of operating costs. The results of a number of studies have suggested marked differences in hospital cost efficiency and hospital productivity across the Nordic countries and the Finnish hospitals have the highest estimates in all the analyses. Explanatory factors that were tested and seemed to be of limited importance included institutional, structural and technical. A factor that is yet to be included in the Nordic hospital productivity comparison is the quality of care. Patient-level data available from linkable national registers in each country enable the development of quality indicators and will be included in the forthcoming hospital productivity studies within the context of the EuroHOPE (European health care outcomes, performance and efficiency) project. PMID:23582633

  5. Test experience effects in longitudinal comparisons of adult cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    It is widely recognized that experience with cognitive tests can influence estimates of cognitive change. Prior research has estimated experience effects at the level of groups by comparing the performance of a group of participants tested for the second time with the performance of a different group of participants at the same age tested for the first time. This twice-minus-once-tested method was adapted in the current study to derive estimates of test experience at the level of individual participants. Among the major findings were that experience estimates were smaller at older ages, with measures of vocabulary and speed compared to measures of memory, reasoning, and spatial visualization, and with longer intervals between the first and second occasion. Although relations of overall cognitive ability with test experience effects were weak, there were significant correlations among the experience estimates in different cognitive domains. These results imply that at least in adulthood, simple measures of cognitive change likely underestimate maturational influences on cognitive functioning, and to a greater extent in young adults than in older adults. PMID:26098579

  6. A Comparison of Metamodeling Techniques via Numerical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of a few metamodeling techniques using numerical experiments for the single input-single output case. These experiments enable comparing the models' predictions with the phenomenon they are aiming to describe as more data is made available. These techniques include (i) prediction intervals associated with a least squares parameter estimate, (ii) Bayesian credible intervals, (iii) Gaussian process models, and (iv) interval predictor models. Aspects being compared are computational complexity, accuracy (i.e., the degree to which the resulting prediction conforms to the actual Data Generating Mechanism), reliability (i.e., the probability that new observations will fall inside the predicted interval), sensitivity to outliers, extrapolation properties, ease of use, and asymptotic behavior. The numerical experiments describe typical application scenarios that challenge the underlying assumptions supporting most metamodeling techniques.

  7. Experiments for comparison of small scale rainfall simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserloh, T.; Ries, J. B.

    2012-04-01

    Small scale portable rainfall simulators are an essential tool in research of recent process dynamics of soil erosion. Such rainfall simulators differ in design, rainfall intensities, rain spectra etc., impeding comparison of the results. Due to different research questions a standardisation of rainfall simulation is not in sight. Nevertheless, the data become progressively important for soil erosion modelling and therefore the basis for decision-makers in application-oriented erosion protection. The project aims at providing a criteria catalogue for estimation of the different simulators as well as the comparability of the results and a uniform calibration procedure for generated rainfall. Within the project "Comparability of simulation results of different rainfall simulators as input data for soil erosion modelling (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft - DFG, Project No. Ri 835/6-1)" many rainfall simulators used by European research groups were compared. The artificially generated rainfall of the rainfall simulators at the Universities Basel, La Rioja, Malaga, Trier, Tübingen, Valencia, Wageningen, Zaragoza and at different Spanish CSIC-institutes (Almeria, Cordoba, Granada, Murcia, Zaragoza) were measured with the same methods (Laser Precipitation Monitor for drop spectra and rain collectors for spatial distribution). The data are very beneficial for improvements of simulators and comparison of simulators and results. Furthermore, they can be used for comparative studies with natural rainfall spectra. A broad range of rainfall data was measured (e.g. intensity: 30 - 149 mmh-1, Christiansen Coefficient for spatial rainfall distribution 61 - 98 %, mean drop diameter 0.375 - 5.0 mm, mean kinetic energy expenditure 25 - 1322 J m-2 h-1, mean kinetic energy per unit area and unit depth of rainfall 4 - 14 J m-2 mm-1). Similarities among the simulators could be found e.g. concerning drop size distributions (maximum drop numbers are reached within the two smallest drop

  8. Validation of KENO V.a Comparison with Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    Section 1 of this report documents the validation of KENO V.a against 258 critical experiments. Experiments considered were primarily high or low enriched uranium systems. The results indicate that the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Criticality Program accurately calculates a broad range of critical experiments. A substantial number of the calculations showed a positive or negative bias in excess of 1 1/2% in k-effective (k{sub eff}). Classes of criticals which show a bias include 3% enriched green blocks, highly enriched uranyl fluoride slab arrays, and highly enriched uranyl nitrate arrays. If these biases are properly taken into account, the KENO V.a code can be used with confidence for the design and criticality safety analysis of uranium-containing systems. Section 2 of this report documents the results of investigation into the cause of the bias observed in Sect. 1. The results of this study indicate that the bias seen in Sect. 1 is caused by code bias, cross-section bias, reporting bias, and modeling bias. There is evidence that many of the experiments used in this validation and in previous validations are not adequately documented. The uncertainty in the experimental parameters overshadows bias caused by the code and cross sections and prohibits code validation to better than about 1% in k{sub eff}.

  9. A Comparison of Internship Stage Models: Evidence from Intern Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diambra, Joel F.; Cole-Zakrzewski, Kylie G.; Booher, Josh

    2004-01-01

    Human service interns completing their four-year Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Tennessee participated in this study which focused on investigating student internship experiences from the perspective of three different internship stage models. the three models studied include those of Infester and Boss (1998), Sweitzer and King…

  10. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  11. Male and Female Superintendents: A Comparison of Differences in Salaries, Interview Experiences, and Contract Negotiations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the results of a comparison of differences in salary, interview experiences, and contract negotiations for male and female superintendents. Other variables of interest include educational attainment and educational experiences. The study participants (N = 161) consisted of practicing superintendents from four regions of the…

  12. School Climate and the Experience of LGBT Students: A Comparison of the United States and Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizmony-Levy, Oren; Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the school experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in the United States and Israel. Through comparison of the sociocultural and edu-cational contexts, the authors assess whether school experience of LGBT students differs or operates similarly across countries. The authors use data from the…

  13. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kullberg, A. Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-15

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  14. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullberg, A.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  15. MISSE Thermal Control Materials with Comparison to Previous Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria; Pippin, H. Gary; Frey, George

    2008-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), including inorganic coatings, anodized aluminum, and multi-layer insulation materials. These and other material samples were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was limited for some samples. Materials flown on MISSE-1 and MISSE-2 were exposed to the space environment for nearly four years. Materials flown on MISSE-3, MISSE-4, and MISSE-5 were exposed to the space environment for one year. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. Effects of short duration versus long duration exposure on ISS are explored, as well as comparable data from previous flight experiments, such as the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA), Optical Properties Monitor (OPM), and Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).

  16. Comparison of experiment and theory for the Helium RF discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.; Greenberg, K.E.; Hebner, G.A.

    1992-12-01

    Electron and metastable densities were measured for Helium discharges in a symmetrically driven {open_quotes}GEC Reference Cell.{close_quotes} The electron density was determined using microwave interferometry. Spatially resolved singlet and triplet metastable profiles were determined using absorption spectroscopy. The authors compare these quantitative measurements with theoretical predictions of a 1D Boltzmann description of the system. The Boltzmann description of the electrons is used with a five-level model of He, including 14 electron-produced transitions. The ions and neutrals obey fluid equations. The Boltzmann calculations for the fast processes are used to compute rf-cycle-averaged rates and fields; these rates and fields drive the slow time-scale processes for the heavy particles, unrestricted by the rf time scale. In general they find the theoretical predictions of plasma density to be within a factor of four of the measured density. Comparisons of the measured spatial profiles of the metastable densities with theoretical predictions elucidates some of the discharge kinetics.

  17. Laser-Induced Ignition Modeling and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dors, Ivan; Qin, W.; Chen, Y.-L.; Parigger, C.; Lewis, J. W. L.

    2000-11-01

    We have studied experimentally the ignition resulting from optical breakdowns in mixtures of oxygen and the fuel ammonia induced by a 10 nanosecond pulsewidth laser for a time of hundreds of milliseconds using laser spectroscopy. In these studies, we have for the first time characterized the laser-induced plasma, the formation of the combustion radicals, the detonation wave, the flame front and the combustion process itself. The objective of the modeling is to understand the fluid dynamic and chemical kinetic effects following the nominal 10 ns laser pulse until 1 millisecond after laser breakdown. The calculated images match the experimentally recorded data sets and show spatial details covering volumes of 1/10000 cc to 1000 cc. The code was provided by CFD Research Corporation of Huntsville, Alabama, and was appropriately augmented to compute the observed phenomena. The fully developed computational model now includes a kinetic mechanism that implements plasma equilibrium kinetics in ionized regions, and non-equilibrium, multistep, finite rate reactions in non-ionized regions. The predicted fluid phenomena agree with various flow patterns characteristic of laser spark ignition as measured in the CLA laboratories. Comparison of calculated and measured OH and NH concentration will be presented.

  18. Prebreakup arcs: A comparison between theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, P.L. ); Silevitch, M.B. ); Block, L.P.; Faelthammar, C.G. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have developed a model describing the structure of a prebreakup arc based on an ionospheric Cowling channel and its extension into the magnetosphere. A coupled two-circuit representation of the substorm current wedge is used which is locally superimposed on both westward and eastward electrojets. They find that brighter, more unstable prebreakup arcs are formed in the premidnight than in the postmidnight sector. This contributes to the observed prevalence of auroral activity in the premidnight sector. Also, the model predicts that the north-south dimensions of the current wedge in the ionospheree should vary from a few kilometers at an invarient latitude ({Lambda}) of 62{degree} to hundreds of kilometers above {Lambda} = 68{degree}. Comparison of the model results with the extensive observations of Marklund et al (1983) for a specific arc observed just after onset shows good agreement, particularly for the magnitude of the polarization electric field and the arc size. They conclude that this agreement is further evidence that the substorm breakup arises from magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the near magnetosphere and that the steady state model developed here is descriptive of the breakup arc before inductive effects become dominant.

  19. Comparisons of Single Drop Impact Simulations with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medam, Krishna Teja

    As the size of electronic equipment is reduced, the ability to reject waste heat is also reduced due to smaller component surface areas, thereby affecting the component performance and finally leading to the damage of the component. Spray cooling offers a means to achieve high rates of heat transfer from microelectronic components and other high energy density devices. As a first step in investigating spray cooling, a single liquid drop impacting onto a thin liquid film was studied at isothermal conditions. 2D axisymmetric cases were simulated with ANSYS Fluent and 3D cases with OpenFOAM using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) model. The post processing of the results was performed in Surfer (Version 9) software in order to determine the liquid film thickness and then calculate the volume of the liquid under the cavity (sub-cavity liquid volume) as functions of time. These simulations agreed with the experimental data during the cavity formation phase, but did not closely match with the experiments during the refilling of the cavity in the majority of the cases. It was speculated that the discrepancies could be due to the three dimensional instabilities leading to droplet ejection from the crown during the retraction phase. These instabilities are omitted from the 2D simulations, and were not adequately resolved in the 3D simulations. For this reason, identical cases were simulated in 3D in OpenFOAM using the VOF model. The improved agreement with experiments obtained with the three dimensional simulations is discussed.

  20. Comparison of intersecting pedestrian flows based on experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Seyfried, A.

    2014-07-01

    Intersections of pedestrian flows feature multiple types, varying in the numbers of flow directions as well as intersecting angles. In this article results from intersecting flow experiments with two different intersecting angles are compared. To analyze the transport capabilities the Voronoi method is used to resolve the fine structure of the resulting velocity-density relations and spatial dependence of the measurements. The fundamental diagrams of various flow types are compared and show no apparent difference with respect to the intersecting angle 90° and 180°. This result indicates that head-on conflicts of different types of flow have the same influence on the transport properties of the system, which demonstrates the high self-organization capabilities of pedestrians.

  1. Comparison of Theory and Experiment on Aeroacoustic Loads and Deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.; Bourgine, A.; Bonomi, B.

    1999-01-01

    The correlation of acoustic pressure loads induced by a turbulent wake on a nearby structural panel is considered: this problem is relevant to the acoustic fatigue of aircraft, rocket and satellite structures. Both the correlation of acoustic pressure loads and the panel deflections, were measured in an 8-m diameter transonic wind tunnel. Using the measured correlation of acoustic pressures, as an input to a finite-element aeroelastic code, the panel response was reproduced. The latter was also satisfactorily reproduced, using again the aeroelastic code, with input given by a theoretical formula for the correlation of acoustic pressures; the derivation of this formula, and the semi-empirical parameters which appear in it, are included in this paper. The comparison of acoustic responses in aeroacoustic wind tunnels (AWT) and progressive wave tubes (PWT) shows that much work needs to be done to bridge that gap; this is important since the PWT is the standard test means, whereas the AWT is more representative of real flight conditions but also more demanding in resources. Since this may be the first instance of successful modelling of acoustic fatigue, it may be appropriate to list briefly the essential ``positive'' features and associated physical phenomena: (i) a standard aeroelastic structural code can predict acoustic fatigue, provided that the correlation of pressure loads be adequately specified; (ii) the correlation of pressure loads is determined by the interference of acoustic waves, which depends on the exact evaluation of multiple scattering integrals, involving the statistics of random phase shifts; (iii) for the relatively low frequencies (one to a few hundred Hz) of aeroacoustic fatigue, the main cause of random phase effects is scattering by irregular wakes, which are thin on wavelength scale, and appear as partially reflecting rough interfaces. It may also be appropriate to mention some of the ``negative'' features, to which may be attached illusory

  2. Laboratory photoionized plasma experiments at Z - Comparison with modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, D.; Lockard, T.; Durmaz, T.; Hall, I.; Mancini, R.; Bailey, J.; Rochau, G.; Loisel, G.; Heeter, R.; Liedahl, D.

    2013-10-01

    Photoionized plasmas are common in astrophysical environments, such as x-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. We discuss an experimental and modeling effort to study the atomic kinetics in plasmas of this type via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. Results from a first pass thru our 2nd-generation dataset are compared with results of several modeling codes attempting to simulate our experimental conditions. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted by the collapse of a z-pinch to produce and backlight a Neon photoionized plasma in a cm-scale gas cell at various distances from the z-pinch. The filling pressure is monitored in situ providing the plasma particle number density. High-resolution spectra from a TREX spectrometer are processed with a suite of specially designed IDL tools to produce transmission spectra, which show absorption in several ionization stages of Neon. Analysis independent of atomic kinetics calculations yields the charge state distribution and ion areal densities used to benchmark atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature, extracted from a level population ratio, is used to test heating models. This work is sponsored in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas grant program through DOE Grant DE-FG52-09NA29551, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  3. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  4. Pig Organ Energy Loss Comparison Experiments Using BBs.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nicholas R; Musgrave, Ian; Fisk, Wesley; Byard, Roger W

    2016-05-01

    Torso models for ballistics research require that the mechanical properties of simulant materials must match the heterogeneous nature of tissues/organs within the human thorax/abdomen. A series of energy loss experiments were conducted on fresh porcine organs/tissues at room temperature and 37°C, using steel 4.5 mm BBs fired from a Daisy(®) brand air rifle. They were compared to FBI and NATO specification ordnance gelatin and a candidate surrogate material called Simulant "A". Two CED M2 chronographs measured BB velocity. The resulting energy loss was established using KE = 1/2 mv² before and after target perforation. The combined results at room temperature and 37°C were as follows: FBI specification gelatin was similar (p > 0.05) to heart and lung, spleen was similar to NATO specification gelatin, Simulant "A" was similar to hindquarter muscle, and hindquarter muscle, kidney, and spleen were similar to each other regarding energy retardation. These results can be used as a basis for the development of simulant materials to create an anatomically correct heterogeneous model. PMID:27122406

  5. High frequency intensity fluctuations: Comparison of theory with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Steven D.; Bradley, David L.; Culver, R. Lee

    2003-10-01

    Amplitude fluctuations were measured during August 2002 near San Diego using 20 and 40 kHz cw and fm signals. Source-receiver separation was 1 km; source depths were 10 m to 67 m; receiver hydrophone depths were 44 m to 217 m. A 15-element chain of CTD sensors was towed to measure horizontal temperature and salinity variation with 1m resolution. Theory exists explaining the relationship between amplitude fluctuations and acoustic frequency, source-receiver separation, and index of refraction patch size in the ocean [e.g., Flatte et al., Sound Transmission Through a Fluctuating Ocean (Cambridge Press, 1979); Uscinsky et al., ``Intensity Fluctuations. Part 1: Theory,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 74 (1983)]. However, the amplitude fluctuations we observe are much lower than that predicted by theory [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 2333 (2003)]. Our frequencies are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those used in the experiments upon which the theory is based and our propagation ranges are considerable shorter 1 km versus many km. Results will be discussed from a more detailed analysis of the ray path locations within the water column activity (Langmuir cell formation and internal wave passage).

  6. Use of Social Comparisons in Interviews About Young Adults’ Experiences of Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this article I examine how young adults used social comparisons in research interviews about their experiences of chronic illness. The interviews were originally conducted not only to provide data for academic analysis but also to generate experiential accounts for publication online as part of an Internet-based health information resource for patients, professionals, and the public wanting to learn about people’s real-life experiences of illness in the United Kingdom. Through secondary analysis of these data, I show how the young adults used various social comparisons to represent themselves and their experiences to the target audience. Two new concepts—analogues and foils—are introduced to describe how the young adults likened themselves to, and contrasted themselves with, different reference groups in their accounts. Through these and related strategies, they created positive renditions of their experiences for the audience, helping to inform and support others in the process. PMID:25281241

  7. Bayesian Approach to Assessing Uncertainty and Calculating a Reference Value in Key Comparison Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Toman, Blaza

    2005-01-01

    International experiments called Key Comparisons pose an interesting statistical problem, the estimation of a quantity called a Reference Value. There are many possible forms that this estimator can take. Recently, this topic has received much international attention. In this paper, it is argued that a fully Bayesian approach to this problem is compatible with the current practice of metrology, and can easily be used to create statistical models which satisfy the varied properties and assumptions of these experiments. PMID:27308182

  8. Electromagnetic scattering from two dielectric spheres: Comparison between theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Dean, C. E.

    1982-08-01

    A comparison is made between theoretical and experimental results for cooperative scattering between two spheres. The overall agreement between theory and experiment is quite good. Also a large side scattering resonance which was measured to be 44 times larger than that due to a single sphere was calculated to be actually 47.6 times larger.

  9. Comparison of electron cloud simulation and experiments in the high-current experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Verboncoeur, J.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-08-27

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  10. Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Bieniosek, F; Seidl, P; Vay, J; Verboncoeur, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-10-07

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  11. Supersonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 1.54 to 2.50 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using a state-of-the-art inviscid flow, constant-pressure-panel method. Emphasis was on conditions under which this theory is valid for both flat and twisted wings.

  12. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for three arrow-wing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of arrow-wing body configurations consisting of flat, twisted, and cambered twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading and trailing edge control surface deflections, were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.05 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory to experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using state of the art attached flow methods. Conditions under which these theories are valid for these wings are presented.

  13. Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S M; Molvik, A W; Bieniosek, F M; Seidl, P A; Vay, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-11-11

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a common concern for accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly, weakly, and un-magnetized. We describe our approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. We present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam on an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrate the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  14. Microwave Transmission Through the Electron Cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector: Simulation and Comparison with Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Veitzer, Seth Andrew; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2009-04-01

    Simulations of the microwave transmission properties through the electron cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector have been implemented using the plasma simulation code 'VORPAL'. Phase shifts and attenuation curves have been calculated for the lowest frequency TE mode, slightly above the cutoff frequency, in field free regions, in the dipoles and quadrupoles. Preliminary comparisons with experimental results for the dipole case are showed and will guide the next generation of experiments.

  15. Comparison of Computational Results with a Low-g, Nitrogen Slosh and Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark; Moder, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The proposed paper will compare a fluid/thermal simulation, in FLUENT, with a low-g, nitrogen slosh experiment. The French Space Agency, CNES, performed cryogenic nitrogen experiments in several zero gravity aircraft campaigns. The computational results have been compared with high-speed photographic data, pressure data, and temperature data from sensors on the axis of the cylindrically shaped tank. The comparison between these experimental and computational results is generally favorable: the initial temperature stratification is in good agreement, and the two-phase fluid motion is qualitatively captured.

  16. Preliminary comparison of theory and experiment for a conical, pressurized-fluidized-bed coal combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A published model was used for a comparison of theory with an actual combustor burning caking bituminous coal and using limestone to reduce sulfur dioxide emission. Theoretical bed pressure drop was in good agreement with experiment. The burnable carbon elutriated was not in agreement with experiment, at least partly because the exhaust port was apparently below the transport disengaging height. The observed nitrogen oxides emission rate was about half the theoretical value. There was order-or-magnitude agreement of sulfur dioxide emission rates.

  17. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Chiou, E. W.; Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Oltmans, S.; Rind, D.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a comparison beteen observations of the upper-tropospheric water vapor data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument and radiosonde observations for 1987 and radiosonde-based climatologies. Colocated SAGE II-radiosonde measurement pairs are compared individually and in a zonal mean sense. A straight comparison of monthly zonal means between SAGE II and radiosondes for 1987 and Global Atmospheric Statistics (1963-1973) indicates that the clear-sky SAGE II climatology is approximately half the level of clear/cloudy sky of both radiosonde climatologies. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again showed SAGE II to be significantly drier in many altitude bands.

  18. Comparison between theory and experiment for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter D.

    2011-06-15

    We compare the theoretical predictions for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas with the latest experimental measurements reported by the ENS group [S. Nascimbene et al., Nature (London) 463, 1057 (2010)] and the Tokyo group [M. Horikoshi et al., Science 327, 442 (2010)]. The theoretical results are obtained using two diagrammatic theories, together with a virial expansion theory combined with a Pade approximation. We find good agreement between theory and experiment. In particular, the virial expansion, using a Pade approximation up to third order, describes the experimental results extremely well down to the superfluid transition temperature, T{sub c{approx}}0.16T{sub F}, where T{sub F} is the Fermi temperature. The comparison in this work complements our previous comparative study on the universal thermodynamics of a strongly correlated but trapped Fermi gas. The comparison also raises interesting issues about the unitary entropy and the applicability of the Pade approximation.

  19. Structure of liquid Al and Al67Mg33 alloy: comparison between experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. J.; Mendelev, M. I.; Asta, M.

    2014-06-01

    We report data on the structure of liquid Al and an Al67Mg33 alloy obtained from state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. To facilitate a direct comparison between these data, we develop a method to elongate the AIMD pair correlation function in order to obtain reliable AIMD structure factors. The comparison reveals an appreciable level of discrepancy between experimental and AIMD liquid structures, with the latter being consistently more ordered than the former at the same temperature. The discrepancy noted in this study is estimated to have significant implications for simulation-based calculations of liquid transport properties and solid-liquid interface kinetic properties.

  20. Chinese students' science-related experiences: Comparison of the ROSE study in Xinjiang and Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Yau-yuen; Li, Yufeng

    2015-05-01

    Background: Students' daily-life experiences may render favorable effects on the students' affective domain like interest, enthusiasm, motivation, joy, curiosity, awareness, and eagerness to learn science as not commonly found in the classroom environment. However, no rigorous research has been reported on those aspects in Mainland China despite many recent studies done in various Western countries. Purpose: This paper aims to report and compare the science-related experiences of ninth-graders from two places (in Urumqi City of Xinjiang province and Shanghai) in China through a large-scale survey of their junior secondary three students. Sample: The sample consists of 4115 students in Urumqi City (from 28 schools) and Shanghai (from 25 schools). Design and methods: This study adopted a Likert scale questionnaire instrument, as translated from the international Relevance Of Science Education (ROSE) Project. From a confirmatory factor analysis of the data, we identify and focus on six factors which are directly correlated with students' science-related experiences outside school environment in Xinjiang and Shanghai and employ relevant factor scores to compare the gender, regional, and socioeconomic effects. Results: As revealed by the t-test, gender and regional differences were statistically significant in affecting (1) students' outdoor living experience, (2) hands-on experience of transportation, and (3) their daily-life experience with do-it-yourself tools and models. In all three aspects, boys and Xinjiang students possessed richer experiences than girls and Shanghai students, respectively. Conclusions: Based on ANOVA tests, Shanghai students' out-of-school science-related experiences were more often significantly affected by various socioeconomic variables (including their parents' education and occupation and their family income) than Xinjiang students. From cross-regional comparison, Chinese students had much fewer science-related experiences than those of

  1. Comparison of Fire Model Predictions with Experiments Conducted in a Hangar With a 15 Meter Ceiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. D.; Notarianni, K. A.; McGrattan, K. B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the predictive capabilities of fire models using the results of a series of fire experiments conducted in an aircraft hangar with a ceiling height of about 15 m. This study is designed to investigate model applicability at a ceiling height where only a limited amount of experimental data is available. This analysis deals primarily with temperature comparisons as a function of distance from the fire center and depth beneath the ceiling. Only limited velocity measurements in the ceiling jet were available but these are also compared with those models with a velocity predictive capability.

  2. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at midlatitudes (about 45 deg N) and tropical latitudes (12-25 deg S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At +/- 0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  3. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, P.; Lenoble, J. ); Ovarlez, J. ); Chu, W.P. )

    1993-03-20

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes ([approximately]45[degrees]N) and tropical latitudes (12[degrees]S-25[degrees]S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At [plus minus]0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more). 17 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Dissipation of alignment in CO2 gas: A comparison between ab initio predictions and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J.-M.; Boulet, C.; Vieillard, T.; Chaussard, F.; Billard, F.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present comparisons between measurements and ab initio calculations of the dissipation of the nonadiabatic laser-induced alignment in pure CO2 and CO2-He gas mixtures. The experiments were made for pressures between 2 and 20 bars at 295 K by using short non-resonant linearly polarized laser pulses for alignment and probe. The calculations are carried, free of any adjusted parameter, using refined intermolecular potentials and a requantized Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations approach presented previously but not yet confronted to experiments. The results demonstrate that the model accurately reproduces the decays with time of both the transient revivals and "permanent" component of the alignment. The significant differences observed between the behaviors resulting from CO2-CO2 and CO2-He collisions are also well predicted by the model.

  5. Effects of numerical methods on comparisons between experiments and simulations of shock-accelerated mixing.

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Tomkins, C. D.; Zoldi, C. A.; Prestridge, K. P.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.; Benjamin, R. F.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the detailed structures of mixing flows for Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments of Prestridge et al. [PRE 00] and Tomkins et al. [TOM 01] and examine the most recent measurements from the experimental apparatus. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods. We compare experimental data with simulations for configurations of one and two diffuse cylinders of SF{sub 6} in air using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. The details of the initial conditions have a significant effect on the computed results, especially in the case of the double cylinder. Additionally, these comparisons reveal sensitive dependence of the computed solution on the numerical method.

  6. Cooperative dynamics in homopolymer melts: a comparison of theoretical predictions with neutron spin echo experiments.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, M; Wischnewski, A; Monkenbusch, M; Willner, L; Richter, D; Falus, P; Farago, B; Guenza, M G

    2008-12-18

    We present a comparison between theoretical predictions of the generalized Langevin equation for cooperative dynamics (CDGLE) and neutron spin echo data of dynamic structure factors for polyethylene melts. Experiments cover an extended range of length and time scales, providing a compelling test for the theoretical approach. Samples investigated include chains with increasing molecular weights undergoing dynamics across the unentangled to entangled transition. Measured center-of-mass (com) mean-square displacements display a crossover from subdiffusive to diffusive dynamics. The generalized Langevin equation for cooperative dynamics relates this anomalous diffusion to the presence of the interpolymer potential, which correlates the dynamics of a group of slowly diffusing molecules in a dynamically heterogeneous liquid. Theoretical predictions of the subdiffusive behavior, of its crossover to free diffusion, and of the number of macromolecules undergoing cooperative motion are in quantitative agreement with experiments. PMID:19072142

  7. Quantitative comparison of experiment and theory for intense ultrashort laser-induced dissociation of H2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayler, A. M.; Anis, F.; McKenna, J.; Gaire, B.; Johnson, Nora G.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for intense ultrashort pulse laser-induced dissociation of H2^+ were performed under near identical conditions producing results for quantitative comparison. The 3D momentum distribution was measured for the fragments of an H2^+ beam after interaction with 10 fs, 790 nm pulses at intensities of 10^14, 10^13, and 10^12 W/cm^2. In parallel, the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation was solved in the Born-Oppenheimer representation including nuclear, rotational, and electronic excitation. To obtain angularly-resolved kinetic energy release distributions necessary to compare to measurements, the final wavefunctions, projected onto the scattering states, are averaged over the vibrational state, intensity volume, and thermal distribution appropriate to the experiment. The results of these measurements and calculations are contrasted, testing the quantitative agreement of theory and experiment for ultrashort pulses at these intensities.

  8. Comparison between initial Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments and integrated simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Geissel, M.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Harding, E. C.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) approach to ICF has obtained thermonuclear fusion yields using the Z facility. Integrated magnetohydrodynamic simulations provided the design for the first neutron-producing experiments using capabilities that presently exist, and the initial experiments measured stagnation radii rstag < 75 μm, temperatures around 3 keV, and isotropic neutron yields up to YnDD = 2 ×1012 from imploded liners reaching peak velocities around 70 km/s over an implosion time of about 60 ns. We present comparisons between the experimental observables and post-shot degraded integrated simulations. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes (~45°N) and tropical latitudes (12°S-25°S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique. At +/-0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  10. Visualizing the Impact of Art: An Update and Comparison of Current Psychological Models of Art Experience.

    PubMed

    Pelowski, Matthew; Markey, Patrick S; Lauring, Jon O; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction) and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate, and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art. PMID:27199697

  11. Visualizing the Impact of Art: An Update and Comparison of Current Psychological Models of Art Experience

    PubMed Central

    Pelowski, Matthew; Markey, Patrick S.; Lauring, Jon O.; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction) and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate, and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art. PMID:27199697

  12. RELAP5 assessment: LOFT large break L2-5

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S L; Kmetyk, L N

    1984-02-01

    RELAP5 is part of an effort to determine the ability of various systems codes to predict the detailed thermal/hydraulic response of LWRs during accident and off-normal conditions. The RELAP5 code is being assessed at SNLA against test data from various integral and separate effects test facilities. As part of this assessment matrix, a large break transient performed at the LOFT facility has been analyzed. The results show that RELAP5/MOD1 correctly calculates many of the major system variables (i.e., pressure, break flows, peak clad temperature) early in a large break LOCA. The major problems encountered in the analyses were incorrect pump coastdown and loop seal clearing early in the calculation, excessive pump speedup later in the transient (probably due to too much condensation-induced pressure drop at the ECC injection point), and excess ECC bypass calculated throughout the later portions of the test; only the latter problem significantly affected the overall results. This excess ECC bypass through the downcomer and vessel-side break resulted in too-large late-time break flows and high system pressure due to prolonged choked flow conditions. It also resulted in a second core heatup being calculated after the accumulator emptied, since water was not being retained in the vessel. Analogous calculations with a split-downcomer nodalization delivered some ECC water to the lower plenum, which was then swept up the core and upper plenum and out the other (pump-side) break; thus no significant differences in long-term overall behavior were evident between the calculations.

  13. Catchment Prediction In Changing Environments (CAPICHE): A Model Inter-Comparison Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Christopher; Nijzink, Remko; Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Capell, René; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei; Hrachowitz, Markus; Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    forcing, hydrological response and model parameter metrics (e.g. posterior distribution, parameter interactions). As part of the EUFP7 funded project Switch-On, the method is first applied in a collaborative model inter-comparison using open data from paired headwater catchments to analyse how different models simulate the effect of deforestation and subsequent re-growth on hydrological response. The simulation of paired catchments allows us to differentiate the effect of climate forcing and land-cover change on model parameters. In order to make the experiment open, the analysis code will be made available for re-use and therefore subsequent model inter-comparison.

  14. Comparison of runoff and soil loss generated on two plot sizes during rainfall simulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, Petr; Dostál, Tomáš; Bauer, Miroslav; Jáchymová, Barbora; Neumann, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Water erosion is a natural process of soil surface disturbance caused by rainfall and surface runoff and consequent transport of sediment and nutrients. Synthetic rainfall-runoff and erosion events and mathematical models are still actual and useful methods for analysing processes involved in surface runoff formation. Simulators with watered area of 1 m2 are often used due to the technical, financial and human resources limitations. Disadvantage of such small-scale simulators is that concentrated runoff seldom developes there which makes observations difficult to upscale. We present a set of experiments which were focused on the effect of plot size on observed surface runoff, soil loss and particle size distribution of suspended soils and on formation of preferential pathways. The contribution presents the results of two years of measuring with the rainfall simulator. Presented experiments were focused especially on the comparison of runoff process dynamics, total runoff volume and soil loss from two plots of the different size. Rainfall simulator which was designed and is operated at CTU in Prague was used for the experiments (EGU2015-11025). Raindrops are produced by four Fulljet nozzles (40-WSQ) which allow to spray maximum area of 2 x 9.5 m (Christiansen's index of uniformity is 80 % on 2 x 8 m plot). The pairs of the experiments were performed simultaneously on the same location under the same rain characteristics (intensity and duration). Two experimental field plots with different dimensions (2x8 m and 1x1 m) had the same surface conditions (cultivated fallow or vegetation). The surface runoff parameters and the suspended solids concentration in runoff from the two plots were measured in the same intervals. The water outflow and the sediment yield comparison were used for the determination of the relationship between the plot size, induced erosion and runoff characteristics. The experiments were described by specific runoff discharge (expressed in liters per

  15. Comparisons of target detection in clutter using data from the 1993 FOPEN experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Edwin M.; Schlangen, Michael J.; Hendrickson, Clark R.

    1994-06-01

    During 1993, a series of experiments were performed under the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) sponsorship using the SRI ultra-wide band UHF synthetic aperture radar (SAR). These experiments were performed over a variety of clutter backgrounds to assess the foliage penetration capability of the technology and to investigate target detection in clutter. Experiments were conducted observing tropical rain forest backgrounds in Panama, several different desert backgrounds in the Yuma vicinity, and the mid-latitude temperate forest of Maine. SAR images were formed from the raw data using Differential GPS to aid in the focusing. The three locations represent different levels of foliage cover, ranging from the sparsely vegetated desert sites to the triple canopied rain forest. The characteristics of each site are discussed first through a presentation of photography and SAR imagery. The clutter characteristics are studied through a comparison of the cumulative distributions, which are plotted using a variety of conventions. For each case, at least one reference target is included in the test scene. The signal of that target as processed by a common algorithm will be compared to the processed clutter distribution.

  16. Comparisons of target detection clutter using data from the 1993 FOPEN experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, E. M.; Schlangen, M. J.; Hendrickson, C. R.

    1994-10-01

    During 1993, a series of experiments were performed under the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) sponsorship using the SRI Ultra-Wide Band UHF Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). These experiments were performed over a variety of clutter backgrounds to assess the foliage penetration capability of the technology and to investigate target detection in clutter. Experiments were conducted observing tropical rain forest backgrounds in Panama, several different desert backgrounds in the Yuma vicinity, and the mid-latitude temperate forest of Maine. SAR images were formed from the raw data using Differential GPS to aid in the focusing. The three locations represent different levels of foliage cover, ranging from the sparsely vegetated desert sites to the triple canopied rain forest. The characteristics of each site are discussed first through a presentation of photography and SAR imagery. The clutter characteristics are studied through a comparison of the cumulative distributions, which are plotted using a variety of conventions (e.g., log-normal, normal, Weibull). For each case, at least one reference target is included in the test scene. The signal of that target as processed by a common algorithm will be compared to the processed clutter distribution.

  17. Engrained experience--a comparison of microclimate perception schemata and microclimate measurements in Dutch urban squares.

    PubMed

    Lenzholzer, Sanda

    2010-03-01

    Acceptance of public spaces is often guided by perceptual schemata. Such schemata also seem to play a role in thermal comfort and microclimate experience. For climate-responsive design with a focus on thermal comfort it is important to acquire knowledge about these schemata. For this purpose, perceived and "real" microclimate situations were compared for three Dutch urban squares. People were asked about their long-term microclimate perceptions, which resulted in "cognitive microclimate maps". These were compared with mapped microclimate data from measurements representing the common microclimate when people stay outdoors. The comparison revealed some unexpected low matches; people clearly overestimated the influence of the wind. Therefore, a second assumption was developed: that it is the more salient wind situations that become engrained in people's memory. A comparison using measurement data from windy days shows better matches. This suggests that these more salient situations play a role in the microclimate schemata that people develop about urban places. The consequences from this study for urban design are twofold. Firstly, urban design should address not only the "real" problems, but, more prominently, the "perceived" problems. Secondly, microclimate simulations addressing thermal comfort issues in urban spaces should focus on these perceived, salient situations. PMID:19760436

  18. Coherent structures in a turbulent mixing layer - A comparison between direct numerical simulations and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, R. W.; Menon, S.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1985-01-01

    An eduction scheme has been developed in an attempt to determine the characteristics of large-scale vortical structures in a turbulent mixing layer. This analysis scheme has been applied to a set of experimental data taken in a new, larger mixing layer facility designed to minimize boundary and resonance effects. A similar scheme has been developed to apply to the results of a direct numerical simulation of a temporally growing mixing layer. A comparison of the two approaches shows important similarities in the coherent structures. The numerical simulations indicate that low levels of coherent forcing can dramatically change the evolution of the mixing layer. In the absence of such forcing, the numerical simulations and experiments show a lack of regularity in the transverse position, spacing, amplitude, shape and spanwise coherence of the large-scale vortical structures.

  19. Iceberg capsize hydrodynamics: a comparison of laboratory experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. C.; Cathles, L. M.; Correa-Legisos, S.; Ellowitz, J.; Darnell, K.; Zhang, W. W.; MacAyeal, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Large icebergs are often observed to capsize in open water near fjords. During capsize, large amounts of gravitational potential energy are released which can lead to coastal tsunamis, mixing of the water column, and possibly lead to further calving at the glacier terminus. This process is rarely studied; in nature the scale and irregular timing of the events makes observations exceedingly difficult. Here we compare laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the capsize process to better understand the coupling of the hydrodynamic forces to the solid iceberg. Although the characteristic Reynolds number is much lower for both the laboratory model and the numerical simulations, the comparison provides a starting point to quantify and identify generic features that can be estimated in the field, such as hydrodynamic pressure, water flow velocities, vertical mixing, and elastic stresses on the iceberg itself, which could lead to fracture.

  20. Solar/Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottman, Gary J.; Woods, Thomas N.; London, Julius; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2003-01-01

    A final report on the operational activities related to the UARS Solar Stellar irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is presented. Scientific activities of SOLSTICE has also been supported. The UARS SOLSTICE originated at the University of Colorado in 1981. One year after the UARS launch in 1991, the operations and research support activities for SOLSTICE were moved to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The SOLSTICE program continued at HAO with the National Science Foundation, and after four years, it was moved once again back to the University of Colorado. At the University after 1997 this subject grant was issued to further extend the operations activities from July 2001 through September 2002. Although this is a final report for one particular activity, in fact the SOLSTICE operations activity -first at the University, then at HAO, and now again at the University -has continued in a seamless fashion.

  1. The magnetic field of a single axon. A comparison of theory and experiment.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, B J; Wikswo, J P

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic field and the transmembrane action potential of a single nerve axon were measured simultaneously. The volume conductor model was used to calculate the magnetic field from the measured action potential, allowing comparison of the model predictions with the experimental data. After analyzing the experiment for all systematic errors, we conclude that the shape of the magnetic field can be accurately predicted from the transmembrane potential and, more importantly, the shape of the transmembrane potential can be calculated from the magnetic field. The data are used to determine ri, the internal resistance per unit length of the axon, to be 19.3 +/- 1.9 k omega mm-1, implying a value for the internal conductivity of 1.44 +/- 0.33 omega -1 m-1. Magnetic measurements are compared with standard bioelectric techniques for studying nerve axons. PMID:4016213

  2. Image Correlation Applied to Single Crystal Plasticity Experiments and Comparison to Strain Gage Data

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, M M; Florando, J N; Lassila, D H; Schmidt, T; Tyson II, J

    2005-06-29

    Full-field optical techniques are becoming increasingly popular for measuring the deformation of materials, especially in materials that exhibit non-uniform behavior. While there are many full-field techniques available (e.g. moire interferometry, electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), holography, and image correlation [1]), for our study of the deformation of single crystals, the image correlation technique was chosen for its insensitivity to vibrations and ability to measure large strains. While the theory and development of the algorithms for image correlation have been presented elsewhere [2,3] a comparative study to a conventional strain measurement device, such as a strain gage rosette, is desired to test the robustness and accuracy of the technique. The 6 Degrees of Freedom (6DOF) experiment, which was specifically designed to validate dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations [4], is ideally suited to compare the two methods. This experiment is different from previous experiments on single crystals in that it allows the crystal to deform essentially unconstrained, in both the elastic and plastic regimes, by allowing the bottom of the sample to move as the sample is being compressed. This unconstrained motion prevents the internal crystal planes from rotating during the deformation as typically seen in the pioneering work of Schmid [5] and Taylor [6]. In the early development of the 6DOF apparatus, stacked strain gage rosettes were used to provide the strain data [7]. While very accurate at small strains, strain gages provide an averaged measurement over a small area and cannot be used to measure the inhomogeneous plastic strains that typically occur during the 6DOF experiment. An image correlation technique can measure the full-field in-plane and out-of-plane deformation that occurs in single crystals, and a comparison to the strain gage data at small strains can test the accuracy of the method.

  3. Comparison of chemical and nuclear explosions: Numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J.R.; Bos, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper the authors discuss numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), which was an underground explosion conducted in September 1993 in the volcanic tuff of the Nevada Test Site. The NPE source consisted of 1.29 {times} 10{sup 6} kg of ANFO-emulsion blasting agent, with the approximate energy of 1.1 kt, emplaced 389 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa. The authors compare detailed numerical simulations of the NPE with data collected from that experiment, and with calculations of an equally energetic nuclear explosion in identical geology. Calculated waveforms, at ranges out to approximately 1 km, agree moderately well in the time domain with free-field data, and are in qualitative agreement with free-surface records. Comparison of computed waveforms for equally energetic chemical and nuclear sources reveals relatively minor differences beyond the immediate near-source region, with the chemical source having an {approximately}25% greater seismic moment but otherwise indistinguishable (close-in) seismic source properties. 41 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. A molecular model for adsorption of water on activated carbon: Comparison of simulation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, C.L.; McGrother, S.C.; Bandosz, T.J.; Mueller, E.A.; Gubbins, K.E.

    1999-01-19

    Experimental and molecular simulation results are presented for the adsorption of water onto activated carbons. The pore size distribution for the carbon studied was determined from nitrogen adsorption data using density functional theory, and the density of acidic and basic surface sites was found using Boehm and potentiometric titration. The total surface site density was 0.675 site/nm{sup 2}. Water adsorption was measured for relative pressures P/P{sub 0} down to 10{sup {minus}3}. A new molecular model for the water/activated carbon system is presented, which the authors term the effective single group model, and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are reported for the range of pressures covered in the experiments. A comparison of these simulations with the experiments show generally good agreement, although some discrepancies are attributed to the simplification of using a single surface group species, while those at high pressure are believed to arise from uncertainties in the pore size distribution. The simulation results throw new light on the adsorption mechanism for water at low pressures. The influence of varying both the density of surface sites and the size of the graphite microcrystals is studied using molecular simulation.

  5. 2D fluid simulations of acoustic waves in pulsed ICP discharges: Comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neutral depletion, which is mostly caused by gas heating under typical material processing conditions, is an important phenomenon in high-density plasmas. In low pressure pulsed discharges, experiments show that additional depletion due to electron pressure (Pe) may have a non-negligible influence on radical transport [1]. To evaluate this effect, comparisons between 2D fluid simulations and measurements of gas convection in Ar/Cl2 pulsed ICP plasmas are reported. In the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly by electron cooling which generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls. This in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Time-resolved measurements of atoms drift velocity and gas temperature by LIF and LAS in the early afterglow are consistent with gas drifting at acoustic wave velocity followed by rapid gas cooling. Similar results are predicted by the model. The ion flux at the reactor walls is also shown to oscillate in phase with the acoustic wave due to ion-neutral friction forces. Finally, during plasma ignition, experiments show opposite phenomena when Pe rises.[4pt] [1] Cunge et al, APL 96, 131501 (2010)

  6. Comparison of Measured and Simulated Albedo Signals in the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zatsepin, V. I.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    Albedo, radiation backscattered from an interaction and from the subsequent shower development, provides a 'background' for calorimeter experiments. In ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter), a balloon borne instrument to measure cosmic ray composition and energy spectra for elements from hydrogen to iron from 30 GeV to near 100 TeV, a fully active BGO calorimeter follows a carbon interaction target and scintillator holdoscopes. The first detector is a silicon matrix constructed of 4480 individual silicon pixels, each 2 cm x 1.5 cm, that provide a measurement of the charge of the primary particle in the presence of albedo. ATIC had two successful balloon flights in Antarctica: from 28 Dec 2000 to 13 Jan 2001 (ATIC-1) and from 29 Dec 2002 to 18 Jan 2003 (ATIC-2). A comparison of albedo signals in the silicon matri:x in ATIC-1 experiment with simulations performed using the GEANT 3.21 code and the QGSM event generator for nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented.

  7. Comparison of Spacecraft Contamination Models with Well-Defined Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    The report presents analyzed surface areas on particular experiment trays from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for silicone-based molecular contamination. The trays for examination were part of the Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE). These particular trays were chosen because each tray was identical to the others in construction, and the materials on each tray were well known, documented, and characterized. In particular, a known specific source of silicone contamination was present on each tray. Only the exposure conditions varied from tray to tray. The results of post-flight analyses of surfaces of three trays were compared with the predictions of the three different spacecraft molecular contamination models. Phase one tasks included: 1) documenting the detailed geometry of the hardware; 2) determining essential properties of the anodized aluminum, Velcro(Tm), silverized Teflon(Tm), silicone gaskets, and DC6-1104(Tm) silicone adhesive materials used to make the trays, tray covers, and thermal control blankets; 3) selecting and removing areas from each tray; and 4) beginning surface analysis of the selected tray walls. Phase two tasks included: 1) completion of surface analysis measurements of the selected tray surface, 2) obtaining auger depth profiles at selected locations, and 3) running versions of the ISEM, MOFLUX, and PLIMP (Plume Impingement) contamination prediction models and making comparisons with experimental results.

  8. Visualization tools for model/data comparisons and decision making during the Monterey Bay 2006 experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, L.; Kolber, D.; Godin, M.; Chavez, F. P.

    2006-12-01

    During summer 2006, almost 100 different oceanographic sensors have captured for more than one month the properties of the waters of the Californian Central Coast. Data were assimilated in quasi-real time by three hydrodynamical models to forecast the evolution of the local conditions such as currents, sea water temperature, salinity and to adapt accordingly the sampling strategy of the involved unmanned vehicles (AUV, gliders). Due to the high diversity of data and models (sources, file structures, time and spatial coverage, periodicity of sampling), the collected informations were first converted into a standardized format which allows one to quickly find and extract the relevant variables from the main data server of the experiment. Visualization softwares were developed to provide live maps of the latest locations of instruments, surface plots and vertical transects of currents, temperature and salinity from data and models. These products were mainly used for decision making, for model intercomparison and to evaluate the quality of the data assimilation process for each model. Plots were updated several times a day and automatically posted on an internet collaborative portal. Softwares were adaptive in regards of the availability of simulations and datasets from satellite, aircraft, robotic vehicles, research vessels, moorings, drifters Their modular structures allowed a quick implementation of new instruments during the experiment. Profiles from gliders and AUV served as references for intercomparisons between models for salinity and temperature. As simulations were not synchronized between models, the involved algorithm selected, for all gliders, relevant portions of their tracks to serve as references for model intercomparison. These portions were delimited to prioritize the comparison for each model between observations and nowcasts/hindcasts and also to evaluate the loss of forecasting capabilities with time. We provide here several examples of these

  9. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the I-mode high confinement regime and comparisons with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E. Howard, N. T.; Creely, A. J.; Chilenski, M. A.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Marmar, E.; Rice, J. E.; Sierchio, J. M.; Sung, C.; Walk, J. R.; Whyte, D. G.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Edlund, E. M.; Kung, C.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.; Petty, C. C.; Reinke, M. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    For the first time, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of I-mode plasmas are performed and compared with experiment. I-mode is a high confinement regime, featuring energy confinement similar to H-mode, but without enhanced particle and impurity particle confinement [D. G. Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)]. As a consequence of the separation between heat and particle transport, I-mode exhibits several favorable characteristics compared to H-mode. The nonlinear gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] is used to explore the effects of E × B shear and profile stiffness in I-mode and compare with L-mode. The nonlinear GYRO simulations show that I-mode core ion temperature and electron temperature profiles are more stiff than L-mode core plasmas. Scans of the input E × B shear in GYRO simulations show that E × B shearing of turbulence is a stronger effect in the core of I-mode than L-mode. The nonlinear simulations match the observed reductions in long wavelength density fluctuation levels across the L-I transition but underestimate the reduction of long wavelength electron temperature fluctuation levels. The comparisons between experiment and gyrokinetic simulations for I-mode suggest that increased E × B shearing of turbulence combined with increased profile stiffness are responsible for the reductions in core turbulence observed in the experiment, and that I-mode resembles H-mode plasmas more than L-mode plasmas with regards to marginal stability and temperature profile stiffness.

  10. Implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting: Comparison of in vitro experiments with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, Misael O.; Ebner, Armin D.; Ritter, James A.

    Implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) was studied both in vitro and theoretically, with extensive comparisons made between model and experiment. Magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) comprised of magnetite encased in a polymer were collected magnetically using a ferromagnetic, coiled, wire stent as the implant and a NdFeB permanent magnet for the applied magnetic field. A 2-D mathematical model with no adjustable parameters was developed and compared to the 3-D experimental results. The effects of the fluid velocity, stent and MDCP properties, and magnetic field strength on the performance of the system were evaluated in terms of the capture efficiency (CE) of the MDCPs. In nearly all cases, the parametric trends predicted by the model were in good agreement with the experimental results: the CE always increased with decreasing velocity, increasing magnetic field strength, increasing MDCP size or magnetite content, or increasing wire size. The only exception was when experiments showed an increase in the CE with an increase in the number of loops in the wire, while the model showed no dependence. The discrepancies between experiment and theory were attributed to phenomena not accounted for by the model, such as 3-D to 2-D geometric and magnetic field orientation differences, and interparticle interactions between the MDCPs that lead to magnetic agglomeration and shearing force effects. Overall, this work showed the effectiveness of a stent-based IA-MDT system through both in vitro experimentation and corroborated theory, with the designs of the ferromagnetic wire and the MDCPs both being paramount to the CE.

  11. Convection in a Very Compressible Fluid: Comparison of Simulations With Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H.; Furukawa, A.; Onuki, A.; Kogan, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    The time profile (Delta)T(t) of the temperature difference, measured across a very compressible fluid layer of supercritical He-3 after the start of a heat flow, shows a damped oscillatory behavior before steady state convection is reached. The results for (Delta)T(t) obtained from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments are compared over a temperature range where the compressibility varies by a factor of approx. = 40. First the steady-state convective heat current j(sup conv) as a function of the Rayleigh number R(alpha) is presented, and the agreement is found to be good. Second, the shape of the time profile and two characteristic times in the transient part of (Delta)T(t) from simulations and experiments are compared, namely: 1) t(sub osc), the oscillatory period and 2) t(sub p), the time of the first peak after starting the heat flow. These times, scaled by the diffusive time tau(sub D) versus R(alpha), are presented. The agreement is good for t(sup osc)/tau(sub D), where the results collapse on a single curve showing a powerlaw behavior. The simulation hence confirms the universal scaling behavior found experimentally. However for t(sub p)/tau(sub D), where the experimental data also collapse on a single curve, the simulation results show systematic departures from such a behavior. A possible reason for some of the disagreements, both in the time profile and in t(sub p) is discussed. In the Appendix a third characteristic time, t(sub m), between the first peak and the first oscillation minimum is plotted and a comparison between the results of experiments and simulations is made.

  12. Free-field ground motions for the nonproliferation experiment: Preliminary comparisons with nearby nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.H.; Peratt, A.L.

    1994-06-01

    Since 1987, we have installed fixed arrays of tri-axial accelerometers in the fire-field near the shot horizons for low-yield ({le} 20 kt) nuclear events in the N-tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa. For the Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) we augmented the array to achieve 23 free-field stations. Goals are: (a) to examine robustness and stability of various free-field source function estimates -- e.g., reduced displacement potentials (RDP) and spectra; (b) to compare close-in with regional estimates to test whether detailed close-in free-field and/or surface ground motion data can improve predictability of regional-teleseismic source functions; (c) to provide experimental data for checking two-dimensional numerical simulations. We report preliminary comparisons between experimental free-field data for NPE (1993) and three nearby nuclear events (MISTY ECHO, 1988; MINERAL QUARRY, 1990; HUNTERS TROPHY, 1992). All four working points are within 1 km of each other in the same wet tuff bed, thus reducing concerns about possible large differences in material properties between widely separated shots. Initial comparison of acceleration and velocity seismograms for the four events reveals: (1) There is a large departure from the spherical symmetry commonly assumed in analytic treatments of source theory; both vertical and tangential components are surprisingly large. (2) All shots show similar first-peak particle-velocity amplitude decay rates suggesting significant attenuation even in the supposedly purely elastic region. (3) Sharp (>20 Hz) arrivals are not observed at tunnel level from near-surface pP reflections or spall-closure sources -- but broadened peaks are seen that suggest more diffuse reflected energy from the surface and from the Paleozoic limestone basement below tunnel level.

  13. Comparison of experiments and simulations for zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2013-06-01

    A detailed comparison between recent direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiments of a turbulent boundary layer under zero pressure gradient at Re θ = 2,500 and 4,000 (based on the free-stream velocity and momentum-loss thickness) is presented. The well-resolved DNS is computed in a long spatial domain (Schlatter and Örlü in J Fluid Mech 659:116, 2010a), including the disturbance strip, while the experiments consist of single hot-wire probe and oil-film interferometry measurements. Remarkably, good agreement is obtained for integral quantities such as skin friction and shape factor, as well as mean and fluctuating streamwise velocity profiles, higher-order moments and probability density distributions. The agreement also extends to spectral/structural quantities such as the amplitude modulation of the small scales by the large-scale motion and temporal spectral maps throughout the boundary layer. Differences within the inner layer observed for statistical and spectral quantities could entirely be removed by spatially averaging the DNS to match the viscous-scaled length of the hot-wire sensor, thereby explaining observed differences solely by insufficient spatial resolution of the hot-wire sensor. For the highest Reynolds number, Re θ = 4,000, the experimental data exhibit a more pronounced secondary spectral peak in the outer region ( y/ δ 99 = 0.1) related to structures with length on the order of 5-7 boundary layer thicknesses, which is weaker and slightly moved towards lower temporal periods in the DNS. The cause is thought to be related to the limited spanwise box size which constrains the growth of the very large structures. In the light of the difficulty to obtain "canonical" flow conditions, both in DNS and the wind tunnel where effects such as boundary treatment, pressure gradient and turbulence tripping need to be considered, the present cross-validation of the data sets, at least for the present Re θ -range, provides important reference data

  14. A viscoplastic lubrication model for entrainment by avalanches and debris flows, and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Belinda; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Recently, experiments were designed and carried out examining how a viscoplastic avalanche begins to entrain a shallow layer of identical fluid lying in its path, much like a snow avalanche or mud flow which suddenly encounters an entrainable layer, described as a yield stress material. This represents a simplified problem, investigated in order to gain some physical insight into entrainment by avalanches. These experiments serve as a test for mathematical models of entraining gravity currents. Two classes of entrainment behaviour were observed: either the avalanche ``glided'' out over the entrainable bed, immediately shearing it in the downstream direction and progressively incorporating fluid down to the rigid base, or the avalanche seemed to ``roll'' out onto the entrainable bed, with strong motion in the slope-normal direction in the bed after yield. This difference in behaviour was dictated by the magnitude of the flume's slope. For the steeper flows studied (20 and 24 degrees), entrainment was principally in the former class, whereas for shallower slope angle (12 and 16 degrees) entrainment more closely resembled the latter type. This would suggest that there is a competition between the normal and shear stresses exerted on the bed, with bed-yield and entrainment occurring when these stresses exceed a critical value. An interesting phenomenon that was observed in all cases was a sort of buckling of the bed, downstream of the avalanche front. This was far more significant in the flows down shallower slopes, and regular waves were created in the bed with wavelength dependent on the flow depth. Based on theoretical comparisons with non-entraining Herschel Bulkley flows, the physics of entraining flows are investigated numerically for shallow viscoplastic gravity currents on different slopes. The predictions are compared with the experimental values for velocity field and surface height. The model was successful in reproducing velocities of the correct order, but

  15. Microstructure of ambient and supercritical water. Direct comparison between simulation and neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, A.A.; Cummings, P.T. |

    1996-01-25

    Molecular dynamics simulations of SPC, SPC/E, TIP4P, and ST2 water models are performed at ambient and two supercritical conditions make a direct comparison with recent microstructural data obtained by neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS) experiments. The models generally fail to accurately predict details of the NDIS results at supercritical conditions, even though they are somewhat successful at ambient conditions. The failure is not as pronounced as that expected by Postorino et al. because of an unusual density dependence in the structure predicted by two of the models. We also evaluate a model for supercritical water denoted SPCG, a modification of the SPC and SPC/E models, in which the dipole moment is reduced to the bare dipole moment of water. For this model, the predicted structure at supercritical conditions is in much better agreement with experiment. A geometric definition of hydrogen bonding is used to gain insight into the angular dependence of the H...O pair distribution function g{sub OH}(r,{omega}). The simulation results for the five models indicate a strong orientational dependence for the g{sub OH}(r,{omega}) along the H-bonding orientations, with an approximately constant relative strength from ambient to supercritical conditions, suggesting that the angle-averaged radial distribution function, g{sub OH}(r), and its volume integral over the first solvation shell, n{sub OH}(r), may not in themselves be good measures of the strength of the H-bonding. 46 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL AND LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS ON DENSITY-STRATIFIED FLOWS AROUND A THREE-DIMENSIONAL HILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct comparisons between the results of a numerical model and laboratory experiments are presented for density-stratified flows around an isolated three-dimensional hill. The numerical model integrates the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible stratified flow using a finit...

  17. Three Conditions under Which Experiments and Observational Studies Produce Comparable Causal Estimates: New Findings from within-Study Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Thomas D.; Shadish, William R.; Wong, Vivian C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes 12 recent within-study comparisons contrasting causal estimates from a randomized experiment with those from an observational study sharing the same treatment group. The aim is to test whether different causal estimates result when a counterfactual group is formed, either with or without random assignment, and when statistical…

  18. Contrail Cirrus Forecasts for the ML-CIRRUS Experiment and Some Comparison Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Graf, Kaspar; Bugliaro, Luca; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Giez, Andreas; Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Krämer, Martina; Minikin, Andreas; Schäfler, Andreas; Voigt, Christiane; Wirth, Martin; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Model simulations with the contrail cirrus prediction model CoCiP driven by numerical weather prediction (NWP) data provided from the European Centre for Medium Range Forecasts (ECMWF) and global aircraft waypoint data show a mean computed cover (for optical depth larger than 0.1) of 0.23% globally, and 5.4% over mid Europe (Schumann and Graf, JGR, 2013). The computed mean longwave radiative forcing (RF) reaches 3 W m-2 over mid Europe (10°W-20°E and 40°N-55°N), and 0.13 W m-2 globally. The global net RF is about 40-60% smaller because of compensating shortwave cooling induced by contrails during daytime. The results depend on several model details such as the number of ice particles forming from aircraft soot emissions, the contrail plume dispersion, ice particle sedimentation etc., all influencing contrail life time and their optical properties. The quantitative results depend also strongly on ambient relative humidity, vertical motion and on ice water content of other cirrus predicted by the NWP model. In order to test and possibly improve this and other contrail models, high-quality observations are needed to which multi-parameter model output can be compared. The Mid-Latitude Cirrus Experiment ML-CIRRUS was performed (see C. Voigt et al., this conference) with a suite of in-situ and Lidar instruments for airborne measurements on the research aircraft HALO. Before and during the mission, CoCiP was run daily to provide 3-days forecasts of contrail cover using operational ECMWF forecasts and historical traffic data. CoCiP forecast output was made available in an internet tool twice a day for experiment planning. The one-day and two-day contrail forecasts often showed only small differences. Still, most recent forecasts and detailed satellite observations results were transmitted via satellite link to the crew for onboard campaign optimization. After the campaign, a data base of realistic air traffic data has been setup from various sources, and CoCiP was

  19. Sequential Development of Interfering Metamorphic Core Complexes: Numerical Experiments and Comparison to the Cyclades, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirel, C.; Gautier, P.; van Hinsbergen, D.; Wortel, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Cycladic extensional province (Greece) contains classical examples of metamorphic core complexes (MCCs), where exhumation was accommodated along multiple interfering and/or sequentially developed syn- and antithetic extensional detachment zones. Previous studies on the development of MCCs did not take into account the possible interference between multiple and closely spaced MCCs. In the present study, we have performed new lithosphere-scale experiments in which the deformation is not a priori localized so as to explore the conditions of the development of several MCCs in a direction parallel to extension. In a narrow range of conditions, MCCs are closely spaced, interfere with each other, and develop in sequence. From a comparison between numerical results and geological observations, we find that the Cyclades metamorphic core complexes are in good agreement with the model in terms of Moho geometry and depth, kinematic and structural history, timing and duration of core complex formation and metamorphic history. We infer that, for Cycladic MCC-type to develop, an initial crustal thickness prior to the onset of post-orogenic extension between 40 and 44 km, a boundary velocity close to 2 cm/yr and an initial thermal lithospheric thickness of about 60 km are required. The latter may be explained by a significant heating due to delamination of subducting continental crust or vigorous small-scale thermal convection.

  20. Numerical modeling of exhaust smoke dispersion for a generic frigate and comparisons with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, Selma; Dobrucalı, Erinç

    2014-06-01

    The exhaust smoke dispersion for a generic frigate is investigated numerically through the numerical solution of the governing fluid flow, energy, species and turbulence equations. The main objective of this work is to obtain the effects of the yaw angle, velocity ratio and buoyancy on the dispersion of the exhaust smoke. The numerical method is based on the fully conserved control-volume representation of the fully elliptic Navier-Stokes equations. Turbulence is modeled using a two-equation ( k- ɛ) model. The flow visualization tests using a 1/100 scale model of the frigate in the wind tunnel were also carried out to determine the exhaust plume path and to validate the computational results. The results show that down wash phenomena occurs for the yaw angles between ψ =10° and 20°. The results with different exhaust gas temperatures show that the buoyancy effect increases with the increasing of the exhaust gas temperature. However, its effect on the plume rise is less significant in comparison with its momentum. A good agreement between the predictions and experiment results is obtained.

  1. Ab initio molecular dynamics of protonated dialanine and comparison to infrared multiphoton dissociation experiments.

    PubMed

    Marinica, D C; Grégoire, G; Desfrançois, C; Schermann, J P; Borgis, D; Gaigeot, M P

    2006-07-20

    Finite temperature Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are performed for the protonated dialanine peptide in vacuo, in relation to infrared multiphoton dissociation experiments. The simulations emphasize the flexibility of the different torsional angles at room temperature and the dynamical exchange between different conformers which were previously identified as stable at 0 K. A proton transfer occurring spontaneously at the N-terminal side is also observed and characterized. The theoretical infrared absorption spectrum is computed from the dipole time correlation function, and, in contrast to traditional static electronic structure calculations, it accounts directly for anharmonic and finite temperature effects. The comparison to the experimental infrared multiphoton dissociation spectrum turns out very good in terms of both band positions and band shapes. It does help the identification of a predominant conformer and the attribution of the different bands. The synergy shown between the experimental and theoretical approaches opens the door to the study of the vibrational properties of complex and floppy biomolecules in the gas phase at finite temperature. PMID:16836443

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Force Field Evaluation and Comparison with Experiment.

    PubMed

    Henriques, João; Cragnell, Carolina; Skepö, Marie

    2015-07-14

    An increasing number of studies using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) suggest that current force fields sample conformations that are overly collapsed. Here, we study the applicability of several state-of-the-art MD force fields, of the AMBER and GROMOS variety, for the simulation of Histatin 5, a short (24 residues) cationic salivary IDP with antimicrobial and antifungal properties. The quality of the simulations is assessed in three complementary analyses: (i) protein shape and size comparison with recent experimental small-angle X-ray scattering data; (ii) secondary structure prediction; (iii) energy landscape exploration and conformational class analysis. Our results show that, indeed, standard force fields sample conformations that are too compact, being systematically unable to reproduce experimental evidence such as the scattering function, the shape of the protein as compared with the Kratky plot, and intrapeptide distances obtained through the pair distance distribution function, p(r). The consistency of this deviation suggests that the problem is not mainly due to protein-protein or water-water interactions, whose parametrization varies the most between force fields and water models. In fact, as originally proposed in [ Best et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2014, 10, 5113 - 5124.], balanced protein-water interactions may be the key to solving this problem. Our simulations using this approach produce results in very good agreement with experiment. PMID:26575776

  3. Comparison of Time Domain Reflectometry Performance Factors for Several Dielectric Geometries: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwarla, S. V.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Boehm, Robert F.

    1995-08-01

    We propose three nontraditional dielectric geometries and present an experimental and theoretical analysis and comparison of time domain reflectometry (TDR) performances for them. The traditional geometry (the probes inserted in material of essentially infinite extent) is compared to three nontraditional geometries where the probes are affixed outside of a core sample, inside of a bore, or flat on the surface of a semi-infinite solid. Our derivation relates the velocity of electromagnetic wave propagation to the complex permittivities and permeabilities of the media and the geometry for the three nontraditional configurations. Experimental results for air, styrofoam, dry sand, wet sand of varying water content, nylon, dry wood, and ferromagnetic steel are obtained for the three proposed configurations and are in fair agreement with the literature within the experimental uncertainties. Through experiments and theoretical analysis, the TDR performance is found to be the same within the experimental uncertainties for the three nontraditional geometries. The proposed geometries yield slightly lower sensitivities compared to the traditional geometry. Advantages and disadvantages of the geometries compared to the traditional geometry are also discussed.

  4. Stratospheric aerosol and gas experiments I and II comparisons with ozonesondes

    SciTech Connect

    Veiga, R.E.; Cunnold, D.M.; Chu, W.P.

    1995-05-20

    Ozone profiles measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) I and II are compared with ozonesonde profiles at 24 stations over the period extending from 1979 through 1991. Ozonesonde/satellite differences at 21 stations with SAGE II overpasses were computed down to 11.5 km in the midlatitudes, to 15.5 km in the lower latitudes, and for nine stations with SAGE I overpasses down to 15.5 km. The set of individual satellite and ozonesonde profile comparisons most closely colocated in time and space shows mean absolute differences relative to the satellite measurement of 6 {plus_minus} 2% for SAGE II and 8 {plus_minus}3% for SAGE I. The ensemble of ozonesonde/satellite differences, when averaged over all altitudes, shows that for SAGE II, 70% were less than 5%, whereas for SAGE I, 50% were less than 5%. The best agreement occurred in the altitude region near the ozone density maximum where almost all the relative differences were less than 5%. Most of the statistically significant differences occurred below the ozone maximum down to the tropopause in the region of steepest ozone gradients and typically ranged between 0 and {minus}20%. Correlations between ozone and aerosol extinction in the northern midlatitudes indicate that aerosols had no discernible impact on the ozonesonde/satellite differences and on the stratosphere during 1984 to mid-1991. 42 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Comparisons between MCNP, EGS4 and experiment for clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Jeraj, R; Keall, P J; Ostwald, P M

    1999-03-01

    Understanding the limitations of Monte Carlo codes is essential in order to avoid systematic errors in simulations, and to suggest further improvement of the codes. MCNP and EGS4, Monte Carlo codes commonly used in medical physics, were compared and evaluated against electron depth dose data and experimental backscatter results obtained using clinical radiotherapy beams. Different physical models and algorithms used in the codes give significantly different depth dose curves and electron backscattering factors. The default version of MCNP calculates electron depth dose curves which are too penetrating. The MCNP results agree better with experiment if the ITS-style energy-indexing algorithm is used. EGS4 underpredicts electron backscattering for high-Z materials. The results slightly improve if optimal PRESTA-I parameters are used. MCNP simulates backscattering well even for high-Z materials. To conclude the comparison, a timing study was performed. EGS4 is generally faster than MCNP and use of a large number of scoring voxels dramatically slows down the MCNP calculation. However, use of a large number of geometry voxels in MCNP only slightly affects the speed of the calculation. PMID:10211804

  6. Post-Shot Simulations of NIC Experiments with Comparison to X-ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, David; Jones, Oggie; Suter, Larry; Moore, Alastair; Schneider, Marilyn

    2012-10-01

    National Ignition Campaign experiments at NIF are ongoing and post-shot simulations play an important role in understanding the physical processes occurring in the quest for demonstrating fusion burn. In particular, it is important to understand the x-ray environment inside the hohlraum targets, which is studied using various x-ray diagnostics. The Dante instrument measures the time dependent x-ray emission escaping out of the hohlraum laser entrance holes (LEHs) and the SXI instrument provides a time-integrated image of both soft and hard x-rays. We compare calculated total x-ray emission with Dante data as well as the relative high energy Mband emission that contributes to capsule preheat. We correct our calculated x-ray emission to account for differences between simulation and data on LEH closure using SXI data. We provide results for both ``standard candle'' simulation with no added multipliers and for simulations with time-dependent multipliers that are used to obtain agreement with shock timing and implosion velocity data. The physics justification for the use of multipliers is to account for potential missing energy or incorrect ablation modeling. The relative importance of these two effects can be studied through comparison of post-shot simulations with x-ray measurements.

  7. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments 1 and 2: Comparisons with ozonesondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veiga, Robert E.; Cunnold, Derek M.; Chu, William P.; McCormick, M. Patrick

    1995-01-01

    Ozone profiles measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) 1 and 2 are compared with ozonesonde profiles at 24 stations over the period extending from 1979 through 1991. Ozonesonde/satellite differences at 21 stations with SAGE 2 overpasses were computed down to 11.5 km in midlatitudes, to 15.5 km in the lower latitudes, and for nine stations with SAGE 1 overpasses down to 15.5 km. The set of individual satellite and ozonesonde profile comparisons most closely colocated in time and space shows mean absolute differences relative to the satellite measurement of 6 +/- 2% for SAGE 2 and 8 +/- 3% for SAGE 1. The ensemble of ozonesonde/satellite differences, when averaged over all altitudes, shows that for SAGE 2, 70% were less than 5%, whereas for SAGE 1, 50% were less than 5%. The best agreement occurred in the altitude region near the ozone density maximum where almost all the relative differences were less than 5%. Most of the statistically significant differences occurred below the ozone maximum down to the tropopause in the region of steepest ozone gradients and typically ranged between 0 and -20%. Correlations between ozone and aerosol extinction in the northern midlatitudes indicate that aerosols had no discernible impact on the ozonesonde/satellite differences and on the SAGE 2 ozone retrieval for the levels of extinction encountered in the lower stratosphere during 1984 to mid-1991.

  8. Defect printability of alternating phase-shift mask: a critical comparison of simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Ken; Komizo, Tooru; Kikuchi, Koji; Ohnuma, Hidetoshi; Kawahira, Hiroichi

    2002-07-01

    An alternative phase shift mask (alt-PSM) is a promising device for extending optical lithography to finer design rules. There have been few reports, however, on the mask's ability to identify phase defects. We report here an alt-PSM of a dual-trench type for KrF exposure, with programmed quartz defects used to evaluate defect printability by measuring aerial images with a Zeiss MSM100 measuring system. The experimental results are simulated using the TEMPEST program. First, a critical comparison of the simulation and the experiment is conducted. The actual measured topography of quartz defects are used in the simulation. Moreover, a general simulation study on defect printability using an alt-PSM for ArF exposure is conducted. The defect dimensions, which produce critical CD errors are determined by simulation that takes into account the full 3-dimensional structure of phase defects as well as a simplified structure. The critical dimensions of an isolated defect identified by the alt-PSM of a single-trench type for ArF exposure are 240 nm in bottom diameter and 50 degrees in height (phase) for the cylindrical shape and 240 nm in bottom diameter and 90 degrees in height (phase) for the rotating trapezoidal shape, where the CD error limit is +/- 5%.

  9. Determination of forces in a magnetic bearing actuator - Numerical computation with comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. D.; Xia, Z.; Mccaul, E.; Hacker, H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the forces exerted on a journal by a magnetic bearing actuator are presented, along with comparisons to experimentally measured forces. The calculations are based on two-dimensional solutions for the flux distribution in the metal parts and free space, using finite but constant permeability in the metals. Above a relative permeability of 10,000 the effects of changes in permeability are negligible, but below 10,000 decreases in permeability cause significant decreases in the force. The calculated forces are shown to depend on the metal permeability more strongly when the journal is displaced from its centered position. The predicted forces in the principal attractive direction are in good agreement with experiment when a relatively low value of permeability is chosen. The forces measured normal to the axis of symmetry when the journal is displaced from that axis, however, are significantly higher than predicted by theory, even with a value of relative permeability larger than 5000. These results indicate a need for further work including nonlinear permeability distributions.

  10. Comparison among five hydrodynamic codes with a diverging-converging nozzle experiment

    SciTech Connect

    L. E. Thode; M. C. Cline; B. G. DeVolder; M. S. Sahota; D. K. Zerkle

    1999-09-01

    A realistic open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket simulation model must be capable of a self-consistent nozzle calculation in conjunction with coupled radiation and neutron transport in three spatial dimensions. As part of the development effort for such a model, five hydrodynamic codes were used to compare with a converging-diverging nozzle experiment. The codes used in the comparison are CHAD, FLUENT, KIVA2, RAMPANT, and VNAP2. Solution accuracy as a function of mesh size is important because, in the near term, a practical three-dimensional simulation model will require rather coarse zoning across the nozzle throat. In the study, four different grids were considered. (1) coarse, radially uniform grid, (2) coarse, radially nonuniform grid, (3) fine, radially uniform grid, and (4) fine, radially nonuniform grid. The study involves code verification, not prediction. In other words, the authors know the solution they want to match, so they can change methods and/or modify an algorithm to best match this class of problem. In this context, it was necessary to use the higher-order methods in both FLUENT and RAMPANT. In addition, KIVA2 required a modification that allows significantly more accurate solutions for a converging-diverging nozzle. From a predictive point of view, code accuracy with no tuning is an important result. The most accurate codes on a coarse grid, CHAD and VNAP2, did not require any tuning. Their main comparison among the codes was the radial dependence of the Mach number across the nozzle throat. All five codes yielded a very similar solution with fine, radially uniform and radially nonuniform grids. However, the codes yielded significantly different solutions with coarse, radially uniform and radially nonuniform grids. For all the codes, radially nonuniform zoning across the throat significantly increased solution accuracy with a coarse mesh. None of the codes agrees in detail with the weak shock located downstream of the nozzle throat, but all the

  11. Comparison of In Situ Aerosol Data from the ACE-Asia 2001 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Pietras, C.; Miller, M. A.; Reynolds, R. M.; Frouin, R.; Quinn, P. K.; Deschamps, P. Y.; Werdell, P. J.; Fargion, G. S.

    2002-05-01

    The Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) is an international, multidisciplinary project to further knowledge about atmospheric aerosols. ACE-Asia included an intensive field measurement campaign during the spring of 2001 off the coasts of China, Japan and Korea. The Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project participated in the ACE-Asia cruise of the R/V Ronald H. Brown, which departed from Hawaii on 2001/03/15, sailed west to the Sea of Japan, and finished in Yokosuka, Japan on 2001/04/19. The SIMBIOS Project compares and merges data projects from multiple ocean color missions. As In Situ data are essential for merger and comparison of satellite ocean color measurements, the Project is interested in instrumentation devopment and data base building. The SeaWiFS Bio-optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS) is the database used and maintained by the SIMBIOS project. The ACE-Asia cruise was an excellent opportunity to compare data from a variety of maritime sun photometers, as several aerosol conditions were experienced. These included low Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) maritime conditions near Hawaii and extremely high AOT dust conditions in the Sea of Japan. Concurrant measurements were made with the PREDE POM-01 Mark II radiometer, a Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD, a Laboratorie d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD-a, two Solar Light, Inc. Microtops II's, and Brookhaven National Laboratory's Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (FRSR). In addition, a Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) was deployed that provides vertical aerosol distributions. Data were processed utilizing new algorithms to screen errors due to improper pointing at the sun, a problem previously recognized for the Microtops II. Comparisons of AOT at 500nm and Angstrom Exponent were made for all the instruments. The hand held, direct solar sun photometers (Microtops II, SIMBAD and SIMBADa

  12. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Chiou, E. W.; Chu, W. P.; McCormick, M. P.; McMaster, L. R.; Oltmans, S.; Rind, D.

    1993-03-01

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, we took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. We show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere.

  13. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.C.; Chiou, E.W. ); Chu, W.P.; McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R. ); Oltmans, S. ); Rind, D. )

    1993-03-20

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, the authors took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. The authors show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere. 31 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Tomogram-based comparison of geostatistical models: Application to the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Niklas; Lochbühler, Tobias; Dogan, Mine; Van Dam, Remke L.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new framework to compare alternative geostatistical descriptions of a given site. Multiple realizations of each of the considered geostatistical models and their corresponding tomograms (based on inversion of noise-contaminated simulated data) are used as a multivariate training image. The training image is scanned with a direct sampling algorithm to obtain conditional realizations of hydraulic conductivity that are not only in agreement with the geostatistical model, but also honor the spatially varying resolution of the site-specific tomogram. Model comparison is based on the quality of the simulated geophysical data from the ensemble of conditional realizations. The tomogram in this study is obtained by inversion of cross-hole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) first-arrival travel time data acquired at the MAcro-Dispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Mississippi (USA). Various heterogeneity descriptions ranging from multi-Gaussian fields to fields with complex multiple-point statistics inferred from outcrops are considered. Under the assumption that the relationship between porosity and hydraulic conductivity inferred from local measurements is valid, we find that conditioned multi-Gaussian realizations and derivatives thereof can explain the crosshole geophysical data. A training image based on an aquifer analog from Germany was found to be in better agreement with the geophysical data than the one based on the local outcrop, which appears to under-represent high hydraulic conductivity zones. These findings are only based on the information content in a single resolution-limited tomogram and extending the analysis to tracer or higher resolution surface GPR data might lead to different conclusions (e.g., that discrete facies boundaries are necessary). Our framework makes it possible to identify inadequate geostatistical models and petrophysical relationships, effectively narrowing the space of possible heterogeneity representations.

  15. Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the Mock Urban Setting Test Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Steve; Platt, Nathan; Heagy, James F.; Jordan, Jason E.; Bieberbach, George

    2006-10-01

    The potential effects of a terrorist attack involving the atmospheric release of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or other hazardous materials continue to be of concern to the United States. The Defense Threat Reduction Agency has developed a Hazard Prediction Assessment Capability (HPAC) that includes initial features to address hazardous releases within an urban environment. Improved characterization and understanding of urban transport and dispersion are required to allow for more robust modeling. In 2001, a scaled urban setting was created in the desert of Utah using shipping containers, and tracer gases were released. This atmospheric tracer and meteorological study is known as the Mock Urban Setting Test (MUST). This paper describes the creation of sets of HPAC predictions and comparisons with the MUST field experiment. Strong consistency between the conclusions of this study and a previously reported HPAC evaluation that relied on urban tracer observations within the downtown area of Salt Lake City was found. For example, in both cases, improved predictions were associated with the inclusion of a simple empirically based urban dispersion model within HPAC, whereas improvements associated with the inclusion of a more computationally intensive wind field module were not found. The use of meteorological observations closest to the array and well above the obstacle array—the sonic anemometer measurements 16 m above ground level—resulted in predictions with the best fit to the observed tracer concentrations. The authors speculate that including meteorological observations or vertical wind profiles above or upwind of an urban region might be a sufficient input to create reasonable HPAC hazard-area predictions.

  16. Springtime Arctic Trace Gas Measurements and Comparisons With the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment on SCISAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenmaier, R.; Batchelor, R.; Strong, K.; Walker, K.; Manney, G.; Daffer, W.

    2009-05-01

    The process of rapid stratospheric ozone loss in the polar regions begins during the polar winter, when dynamical and chemical conditions lead to the formation of reactive chlorine and bromine radicals. Arctic ozone loss varies significantly from year to year because of changing dynamical conditions. Therefore, long-term data sets of Arctic chemical composition measurements are needed to better understand the process of ozone loss, the links between ozone depletion and climate change, and the future evolution of ozone. Solar absorption spectra have been recorded at Eureka, Nunavut in the sunlit part of each year since July 2006, when a Bruker 125HR high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL). Applying the optimal estimation technique, total columns and some vertical profile information are retrieved for a suite of trace gases that are involved in stratospheric ozone depletion. Total columns of O3, HCl, ClONO2, HNO3, and HF will be presented, with a focus on three Canadian Arctic ACE Validation spring campaigns that took place in 2007, 2008, and 2009. Very different dynamical situations were observed over Eureka during these three spring periods: the impact of these conditions on the trace gas measurements will be shown. SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian satellite mission for remote sounding of the Earth's atmosphere and was launched on August 12, 2003. Its primary instrument is a high spectral resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) measuring sequences of atmospheric absorption spectra in solar occultation. From these spectra the vertical distribution of trace gases can be determined. Results of the Bruker 125HR comparisons with the ACE-FTS, made with the purpose of validating the satellite measurements, will be also shown.

  17. Alternating current dielectrophoresis of core-shell nanoparticles: Experiments and comparison with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chungja

    Nanoparticles are fascinating where physical and optical properties are related to size. Highly controllable synthesis methods and nanoparticle assembly are essential for highly innovative technological applications. Well-defined shaped and sized nanoparticles enable comparisons between experiments, theory and subsequent new models to explain experimentally observed phenomena. Among nanoparticles, nonhomogeneous core-shell nanoparticles (CSnp) have new properties that arise when varying the relative dimensions of the core and the shell. This CSnp structure enables various optical resonances, and engineered energy barriers, in addition to the high charge to surface ratio. Assembly of homogeneous nanoparticles into functional structures has become ubiquitous in biosensors (i.e. optical labeling), nanocoatings, and electrical circuits. Limited nonhomogenous nanoparticle assembly has only been explored. Many conventional nanoparticle assembly methods exist, but this work explores dielectrophoresis (DEP) as a new method. DEP is particle polarization via non-uniform electric fields while suspended in conductive fluids. Most prior DEP efforts involve microscale particles. Prior work on core-shell nanoparticle assemblies and separately, nanoparticle characterizations with dielectrophoresis and electrorotation, did not systematically explore particle size, dielectric properties (permittivity and electrical conductivity), shell thickness, particle concentration, medium conductivity, and frequency. This work is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to systematically examine these dielectrophoretic properties for core-shell nanoparticles. Further, we conduct a parametric fitting to traditional core-shell models. These biocompatible core-shell nanoparticles were studied to fill a knowledge gap in the DEP field. Experimental results (chapter 5) first examine medium conductivity, size and shell material dependencies of dielectrophoretic behaviors of spherical CSnp into 2D and

  18. Comparisons of neutrino event generators from an oscillation-experiment perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Nathan

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo generators are crucial to the analysis of high energy physics data, ideally giving a baseline comparison between the state-of-art theoretical models and experimental data. Presented here is a comparison between three of final state distributions from the GENIE, Neut, NUANCE, and NuWro neutrino Monte Carlo event generators. The final state distributions chosen for comparison are: the electromagnetic energy fraction in neutral current interactions, the energy of the leading π0 vs. the scattering angle for neutral current interactions, and the muon energy vs. scattering angle of νµ charged current interactions.

  19. Comparisons of neutrino event generators from an oscillation-experiment perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Nathan

    2015-05-15

    Monte Carlo generators are crucial to the analysis of high energy physics data, ideally giving a baseline comparison between the state-of-art theoretical models and experimental data. Presented here is a comparison between three of final state distributions from the GENIE, Neut, NUANCE, and NuWro neutrino Monte Carlo event generators. The final state distributions chosen for comparison are: the electromagnetic energy fraction in neutral current interactions, the energy of the leading π{sup 0} vs. the scattering angle for neutral current interactions, and the muon energy vs. scattering angle of ν{sub µ} charged current interactions.

  20. The winds of the comparison data set for the Seasat Gulf of Alaska Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.; Peteherych, S.; Wilkerson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ship and data buoy winds used for comparison in the validation of Seasat-derived winds are described in terms of the time series of hourly wind observations from the buoys and in terms of the techniques used to produce 20- and 30-min average winds from the ships. Attention is given to the comparison data, the synoptic scale wind, turbulence concepts, the data buoy winds, Ocean Weather Station PAPA, the oceanographer data, and the results from Ocean Station PAPA Ship Quadra and from the oceanographer. Sources of scatter in the comparison data are reviewed.

  1. INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON EXPERIMENT ON THE DETERMINATION OF VOCS EMITTED FROM INDOOR MATERIALS USING SMALL TEST CHAMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an interlaboratory comparison of three materials to assess the agreement among laboratories for characterizing volatile organic compounds emitted from indoor materials and products using small test chambers. esults from the 20 participating laboratories showed...

  2. Cyclosporine in psoriasis: comparison of a 25-year real-world Italian experience to current European guidelines.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Gianfranco; Ayala, Fabio; Bardazzi, Federico; Bellia, Gilberto; Chimenti, Sergio; Colombo, Delia; Flori, Maria L; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Micali, Giuseppe; Parodi, Aurora; Peris, Ketty; Vena, Gino A

    2016-08-01

    Cyclosporine (CsA) is an effective and safe therapeutic option in various dermatoses in both adults and children. Over the last 25 years, Italian dermatologists have gained relevant experience about the use of CsA in the treatment of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, and an Italian Consensus Conference has recently provided recommendations in adult patients. A comparison between these real-world indications and current European guidelines is hereby provided. PMID:25786483

  3. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  4. A Comparison of Technology Experiences Included in Alternative and Traditional Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strycker, Jesse D.

    2011-01-01

    Though an educational technology experience is required as part of a traditional teacher education program student's educational preparation, research has been limited into the experiences had by alternative teacher education program students. Similarly, little research has been done comparing technology experiences between both types of teacher…

  5. A Comparison of Induction Experiences of Beginning Vocational Teachers with and without Teacher Education Backgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G.; Heath-Camp, Betty

    The nature, dynamics, and scope of the induction experience of beginning secondary vocational education teachers was examined. The study determined induction experiences encountered and compared induction experiences of teachers with formal teacher education programs (teacher education certified or TEC) to those without such preparation…

  6. Social comparison processes, narrative mapping and their shaping of the cancer experience: a case study of an elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Andrew C; Pérez-Samaniego, Víctor; Smith, Brett

    2012-09-01

    Drawing on data generated by life history interviews and fieldwork observations we illuminate the ways in which a young elite athlete named David (a pseudonym) gave meaning to his experiences of cancer that eventually led to his death. Central to this process were the ways in which David utilized both social comparisons and a narrative map provided by the published autobiography of Lance Armstrong (2000). Our analysis reveals the selective manner in which social comparison processes operated around the following key dimensions: mental attitude to treatment; the sporting body; the ageing body; and physical appearance. The manner in which different comparison targets were chosen, the ways in which these were framed by Armstrong's autobiography, and the work that the restitution narrative as an actor did in this process are also examined. Some reflections are offered regarding the experiential consequences of the social comparison processes utilized by David when these are shaped by specific forms of embodiment and selective narrative maps of cancer survival. PMID:22199179

  7. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator With Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  8. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  9. A Comparison of Sexual Coercion Experiences Reported by Men and Women in Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struckman-Johnson, Cindy; Struckman-Johnson, David

    2006-01-01

    Comparisons were made between self-reports from 382 men and 51 women who had experienced sexual coercion while incarcerated. Victim data were obtained from a sample of 1,788 male inmates and 263 female inmates who responded to an anonymous written survey distributed in 10 midwestern prisons. Men reported that their perpetrators in worst-case…

  10. Estimation of Effect Size from a Series of Experiments Involving Paired Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Robert D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A distribution theory is derived for a G. V. Glass-type (1976) estimator of effect size from studies involving paired comparisons. The possibility of combining effect sizes from studies involving a mixture of related and unrelated samples is also explored. Resulting estimates are illustrated using data from previous psychiatric research. (SLD)

  11. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; Griffith, C.; Hedges, S.; Dilmore, R.; Goodman, A.; Black, J.; Haese, R.; Deusner, C.; Bigalke, N.; Haeckel, M.; Fischer, S.; Liebscher, A.; Icenhower, J. P.; Daval, D.; Saldi, G. D.; Knauss, K. G.; Schmidt, M.; Mito, S.; Sorai, M.; Truche, L.

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in composition of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.

  12. Electron transport and energy degradation in the ionosphere: Evaluation of the numerical solution, comparison with laboratory experiments and auroral observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Lilensten, J.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral electron transport calculations are a critical part of auroral models. We evaluate a numerical solution to the transport and energy degradation problem. The numerical solution is verified by reproducing simplified problems to which analytic solutions exist, internal self-consistency tests, comparison with laboratory experiments of electron beams penetrating a collision chamber, and by comparison with auroral observations, particularly the emission ratio of the N2 second positive to N2(+) first negative emissions. Our numerical solutions agree with range measurements in collision chambers. The calculated N(2)2P to N2(+)1N emission ratio is independent of the spectral characteristics of the incident electrons, and agrees with the value observed in aurora. Using different sets of energy loss cross sections and different functions to describe the energy distribution of secondary electrons that emerge from ionization collisions, we discuss the uncertainties of the solutions to the electron transport equation resulting from the uncertainties of these input parameters.

  13. A Comparison of Premenarcheal Expectations and Postmenarcheal Experiences in Chinese Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; Yeung, Dannii Y. L.; Lee, Antoinette Marie

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined Chinese early adolescents' expectations and experiences of their first menstruation. It included 952 participants, 476 premenarcheal and 476 postmenarcheal girls matched by age and by grade level. Results showed that compared to experiences of postmenarcheal girls, premenarcheal girls anticipated more negative emotional…

  14. Sharing the Holocaust Experience: A Comparison of Communication Patterns in Two Groups of Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kav-Venaki, Sophie; And Others

    This study focuses on the communication patterns (that is, talking of individual experiences and knowledge of other's experiences) of Holocaust related issues in the families of survivors and investigates the consequences of these patterns as reflected in the descendants' knowledge about the Holocaust and their attitudes toward its survivors. A…

  15. Love and Dating Experience in Early and Middle Adolescence: Grade and Gender Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Sorell, Gwendolyn T.

    1998-01-01

    Examines male and female adolescents and their experience of "being in love." Qualitative analyses suggest that early and middle adolescents are actively reasoning about the nature and meaning of romantic feelings and experiences. Discusses results from standpoint of psychosocial-development theory. (Author/JDM)

  16. A Comparison of Web Resource Access Experiments: Planning for the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jane

    This paper reports on research that compared five leading experiments that aim to improve access to the growing number of information resources on the World Wide Web. The objective was to identify characteristics of success and considerations for improvement in experiments providing access to Web resources via bibliographic control methods. The…

  17. CONTROLLED EXPERIMENTS FOR DENSE GAS DIFFUSION - EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND EXECUTION, MODEL COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental baseline CO2 release experiment at the DOE Spill Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site in Southern Nevada is described. his experiment was unique in its use of CO2 as a surrogate gas representative of a variety of specific chemicals. ntroductory discussion places ...

  18. Partitioning of soil respiration at the PHACE experiment: A two-method comparison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated CO2 and warming are both known to stimulate soil respiration rates, leading to concerns regarding soil-related feedback effects on climate change. We investigated soil C cycling at the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment near Cheyenne, WY, a factorial experiment combining ...

  19. Comparison of Sexual Experience and Behavior between Bipolar Outpatients and Outpatients without Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Jennifer; Friedman, Richard C.; Haase, Elizabeth; Goldenberg, David; Bell, Robinette; Edsall, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Sexual behavior over the past year of 32 outpatients with Bipolar disorder is compared to that of 44 Comparison patients that had never had an episode of affective illness. Subjects were outpatients treated with drugs and psychotherapy in routine office practice. Differences in sexual behavior between the two groups as a whole were minimal, but meaningful differences emerged when subgroups were compared. Compared to control men, Bipolar men had had more partners in the last year and were more likely to have had sex without condoms. Compared to Bipolar females, Bipolar males had more sex partners, had more sex with strangers, and were more likely to have engaged in homosexual behavior. Even so, some patients in the Comparison group also had engaged in risky sexual behavior. They had failed to use condoms and had had sex with strangers and prostitutes during the previous year. PMID:27190984

  20. Cognitive Experiences Reported by Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects: A 16-year Prospective Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Wedig, Michelle M.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study assesses three main types of cognition: nonpsychotic thought (odd thinking, unusual perceptual experiences, and non-delusional paranoia), quasi-psychotic thought, and true-psychotic thought in borderline patients followed prospectively for 16 years. It also compares the rates of these disturbed cognitions to those reported by axis II comparison subjects. Method The cognitive experiences of 362 inpatients—290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects—were assessed at study entry using the cognitive section of the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines. Their cognitive experiences were reassessed every two years using the same interview. Results Each of the five main types of thought studied was reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients than axis II comparison subjects over time. Each of these types of thought, except true-psychotic thought, declined significantly over time for those in both groups. Eleven of the 17 more specific forms of thought studied were also reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients over the years of follow-up: magical thinking, overvalued ideas, recurrent illusions, depersonalization, derealization, undue suspiciousness, ideas of reference, other paranoid ideation, quasi-psychotic delusions, quasi-psychotic hallucinations, and true-psychotic hallucinations. Fourteen specific forms of thought were found to decline significantly over time for those in both groups: all forms of thought mentioned above except true-psychotic hallucinations plus marked superstitiousness, sixth sense, telepathy, and clairvoyance. Conclusions Disturbed cognitions are common among borderline patients and distinguishing for the disorder. They also decline substantially over time but remain a problem, particularly those of a nonpsychotic nature. PMID:23558452

  1. Systematic Ion Irradiation Experiments to Olivine: Comparison with Space Weathered Rims of Itokawa Regolith Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Watanabe, N.; Yasuda, K.; Miyake, A.; Nakauchi, Y.; Okada, T.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Uesugi, M.; Karouji, Y.; Nakato, A.; Hashiguschi, M.; Kumagai, K.

    2015-11-01

    We performed H and He ion irradiation experiments using olivine fragments, in order to reveal formation time-scales of space weathered rims and formation processes of blisters by solar wind irradiation.

  2. Results of GEANT simulations and comparison with first experiments at DANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Reifarth, R.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Browne, J. C.; Esch, E. I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2003-07-29

    This report describes intensive Monte Carlo simulations carried out to be compared with the results of the first run cycle with DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments). The experimental results were gained during the commissioning phase 2002/2003 with only a part of the array. Based on the results of these simulations the most important items to be improved before the next experiments will be addressed.

  3. Comparison of Resource Requirements for a Wind Tunnel Test Designed with Conventional vs. Modern Design of Experiments Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard; Micol, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The factors that determine data volume requirements in a typical wind tunnel test are identified. It is suggested that productivity in wind tunnel testing can be enhanced by managing the inference error risk associated with evaluating residuals in a response surface modeling experiment. The relationship between minimum data volume requirements and the factors upon which they depend is described and certain simplifications to this relationship are realized when specific model adequacy criteria are adopted. The question of response model residual evaluation is treated and certain practical aspects of response surface modeling are considered, including inference subspace truncation. A wind tunnel test plan developed by using the Modern Design of Experiments illustrates the advantages of an early estimate of data volume requirements. Comparisons are made with a representative One Factor At a Time (OFAT) wind tunnel test matrix developed to evaluate a surface to air missile.

  4. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; Van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment to measure photoemission with the predictions of three different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. The Monte Carlo codes TIGER and TIGERP can calculate the net photon-induced electron emission but accurate results may require that statistical error be minimized. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. The authors find that all of the codes substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. However, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, the codes overpredict relative to measurements.

  5. Mothers with intellectual disability, their experiences of maltreatment, and their children's attachment representations: a small-group matched comparison study.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Pehr; Forslund, Tommie; Fransson, Mari; Springer, Lydia; Lindberg, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Maternal intellectual disability (ID) is regarded a risk factor in child development, but there is no scientific evidence on maternal ID in relation to children's attachment. Using a matched comparison design, a small group (n = 23) of mothers diagnosed with ID was studied to help fill this gap. Besides maternal ID, we examined the role of abuse/trauma/maltreatment (ATM) in the mothers' biographies, along with potential confounds. Comparison group mothers (n = 25) had normal variations in intelligence and matched mothers with ID on residential area, income, child age, and sex. History of maternal ATM was assessed using a semi-structured interview and was found to be significantly more likely in the ID group mothers' experience than the comparison group mothers. Children's (M age = 77 months) attachment representations were assessed with the Separation Anxiety Test. Among children of mothers with ID, a substantial minority (35%) had a secure and the vast majority (>80%) an organized attachment representation. Mothers with ID who had suffered elevated ATM were significantly more likely to have children who were scored high on disorganization and insecurity. We discuss possible implications of our findings for societal considerations regarding parenting and child attachment in the context of parental ID status. PMID:24931835

  6. Catalytic honeycomb combustor - Steady-state model and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A steady-state lean combustion model for monolithic catalytic combustors is given. The model, consisting of several semi-global chemical reaction steps in the gas-phase and on the surface, is capable of analyzing CO and THC emissions. In the model computation presented, the influence of operating and design parameters on the minimum combustor length is studied. Special attention is given to the effect of after-bed gas-phase reaction space. Comparison with experimental data indicates good agreement in the range of parameters covered.

  7. Oscillation and extinction thresholds of the clarinet: comparison of analytical results and experiments.

    PubMed

    Dalmont, Jean-Pierre; Frappé, Cyrille

    2007-08-01

    In the context of a simplified model of the clarinet in which the losses are assumed to be frequency independent the analytic expressions of the various thresholds have been calculated in a previous paper [Dalmont et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 32.94-3305 (2005)]. The present work is a quantitative comparison between "theoretical" values of the thresholds and their experimental values measured by using an artificial mouth. It is shown that the "Raman" model, providing that nonlinear losses are taken into account, is reliable and able to predict the values of thresholds. PMID:17672663

  8. Comparison of an unsaturated soil zone model (SESOIL) predictions with a laboratory leaching experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, D.M.; Travis, C.C.; Kinerson, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Model predictions of a modified version of the soil compartment model SESOIL are compared with laboratory measurements of pollutant transport in soil. A brief description of SESOIL is given and modifications that have been made to the model are summarized. Comparisons are performed using data from a laboratory soil column study involving six chemicals (dicamba, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, diazinon, pentachlorophenol, and lindane). Overall, SESOIL model predictions are in good agreement with the empirical data. Limitation of the model are discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A Comparison of Theory and Experiment for High-speed Free-molecule Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Jackson R; Goodwin, Glen; Creager, Marcus O

    1951-01-01

    A comparison is made of free-molecule-flow theory with the results of wind-tunnel tests performed to determine the drag and temperature-rise characteristics of a transverse circular cylinder. The measured values of the cylinder center-point temperature confirmed the salient point of the heat-transfer analysis which was the prediction that an insulated cylinder would attain a temperature higher than the stagnation temperature of the stream. Good agreement was obtained between the theoretical and the experimental values for the drag coefficient.

  10. Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, M.P.

    1994-02-01

    This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

  11. Online or not? A comparison of students' experiences of an online and an on-campus class.

    PubMed

    Mgutshini, Tennyson

    2013-01-01

    Educational discourse has long portrayed online, or e-based, learning and all non-campus-based learning options as second best to traditional face-to-face options. Critically much of the research and debate in this area of study has focused on evidence relating to student performance, attrition and retention with little consideration of the total learning experience, which values both the traditional learning outcome measures side-by-side with student-centered factors, such as students' satisfaction with their learning experience. The objective of this study was to present a synchronous head-to-head comparison between online and campus-based students' experiences of an undergraduate course. This paper reports on a qualitative comparative cross-sectional study, which used multiple data collection approaches to assess student learning and student satisfaction of 61 students who completed a semester of an undergraduate course. Of the 61 students, 34 were enrolled purely as online students, whilst the remaining 27 students studied the same material entirely through the traditional face-to-face medium. Methods included a standardised student satisfaction survey and an 'achievement of learning outcomes' measurement tool. Students on the online cohort performed better in areas where 'self-direction' in learning was indicated, for example self-directed problem-based tasks within the course. Online students gave less positive self-assessments of their perceived content mastery than their campus-based counterparts, despite performing just as well in both summative and formative assignments. A multi-factorial comparison shows online students to have comparable educational success and that, in terms of student satisfaction, online learners reported more satisfaction with their learning experience than their campus-based counterparts. PMID:23718147

  12. A Comparison of Climate Feedback Strength between CO2 Doubling and LGM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Yokohata, T.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of past climate potentially provide a constraint on the uncertainty of climate sensitivity, but previous studies warn against a simple scaling to the future. The climate sensitivity is determined by various feedback processes and they may vary with climate states and forcings. In this study, we investigate similarities and differences of feedbacks for a CO2 doubling, a last glacial maximum (LGM), and LGM greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing experiments, using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. After computing the radiative forcing, the individual feedback strengths: water vapor, lapse rate, albedo, and cloud feedbacks, are evaluated explicitly. For this particular model, the difference in the climate sensitivity among experiments is attributed to the shortwave cloud feedback in which there is a tendency that it becomes weaker or even negative in the cooling experiments. No significant difference is found in the water vapor feedback between warming and cooling experiments by GHGs despite the nonlinear dependence of the Clausius-Clapeyron relation on temperature. The weaker water vapor feedback in the LGM experiment due to a relatively weaker tropical forcing is compensated by the stronger lapse rate feedback due to a relatively stronger extratropical forcing. A hypothesis is proposed which explains the asymmetric cloud response between warming and cooling experiments associated with a displacement of the region of mixed- phase clouds. The difference in the total feedback strength between experiments is, however, relatively small compared to the current intermodel spread, and does not necessarily preclude the use of LGM climate as a future constraint.

  13. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations: Comparison with experiment and implications for predicting turbulence and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Candy, J.; Creely, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    To better understand the role of cross-scale coupling in experimental conditions, a series of multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations were performed on Alcator C-Mod, L-mode plasmas. These simulations, performed using all experimental inputs and realistic ion to electron mass ratio ((mi/me)1/2 = 60.0), simultaneously capture turbulence at the ion ( kθρs˜O (1.0 ) ) and electron-scales ( kθρe˜O (1.0 ) ). Direct comparison with experimental heat fluxes and electron profile stiffness indicates that Electron Temperature Gradient (ETG) streamers and strong cross-scale turbulence coupling likely exist in both of the experimental conditions studied. The coupling between ion and electron-scales exists in the form of energy cascades, modification of zonal flow dynamics, and the effective shearing of ETG turbulence by long wavelength, Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) turbulence. The tightly coupled nature of ITG and ETG turbulence in these realistic plasma conditions is shown to have significant implications for the interpretation of experimental transport and fluctuations. Initial attempts are made to develop a "rule of thumb" based on linear physics, to help predict when cross-scale coupling plays an important role and to inform future modeling of experimental discharges. The details of the simulations, comparisons with experimental measurements, and implications for both modeling and experimental interpretation are discussed.

  14. Hyperaccumulative property comparison of 24 weed species to heavy metals using a pot culture experiment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Zhou, Qixing; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Chuanjie; Hu, Yahu; Ren, Liping

    2009-05-01

    The screening of hyperaccumulators is still very much needed for phytoremediation. With properties such as strong tolerance to adverse environment, fast growing and highly reproductive rate, weed species may be an ideal plant for phytoremediation. The objectives of this study were to examine the tolerance and hyperaccumulative characteristics of 24 species in 9 families to Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn by using the outdoor pot-culture experiment. In the screening experiment, only Conyza canadensis and Rorippa globosa displayed Cd-hyperaccumulative characteristics. In a further concentration gradient experiment, C. canadensis was affirmed that it is not a Cd hyperaccumulator. Only R. globosa, indicated all Cd hyperaccumulative characteristics, especially Cd concentration in its stems and leaves were higher than 100 mg/kg, the minimum Cd concentration what a Cd-hyperaccumulator should accumulate. Thus, R. globosa was further validated as a Cd-hyperaccumulator. PMID:18483772

  15. Comparison of Properties of Solid Lubricant Between Two Exposure Experiments Aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Suzuki, Mineo; Kimoto, Yugo

    To evaluate the degradation of materials in low Earth orbit space environment, the Space Environment Exposure Device (SEED) experiments were carried out on the International Space Station. As part of these experiments, changes in the tribological properties of a molybdenum disulfide bonded film that is used as a solid lubricant, were evaluated. The results of friction tests in a vacuum and surface analysis by XPS were compared between two exposure experiments aboard the Service Module (SM) and the Japan Experimental Module (JEM). The investigations revealed silicon and fluorine contaminations in the JEM/SEED flight sample, but with a lower amount of silicon contamination than the SM/SEED flight sample. The JEM/SEED flight sample and ground-based tested samples showed lower friction coefficients than a reference sample at the beginning of the tests. The friction behavior of the JEM/SEED flight sample was similar to those of SM/SEED flight samples.

  16. A comparison of quality and satisfaction experiences of patients attending chiropractic and physician offices in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Improving the quality of healthcare is a common goal of consumers, providers, payer groups, and governments. There is evidence that patient satisfaction influences the perceptions of the quality of care received. Methods: This exploratory, qualitative study described and analyzed, the similarities and differences in satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences of patients attending physicians (social justice) and chiropractors (market justice) for healthcare services in Niagara Region, Ontario. Using inductive content analysis the satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences were themed to develop groups, categories, and sub-categories of quality judgments of care experiences. Results: Study participants experienced both satisfying and dissatisfying critical incidents in the areas of standards of practice, professional and practice attributes, time management, and treatment outcomes. Cost was not a marked source of satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Conclusion: Patients may be more capable of generating quality judgments on the technical aspects of medical and chiropractic care, particularly treatment outcomes and standards of practice, than previously thought. PMID:24587494

  17. Comparison of simulations and data from a seismo-acoustic tank experiment.

    PubMed

    Collis, Jon M; Siegmann, William L; Collins, Michael D; Simpson, Harry J; Soukup, Raymond J

    2007-10-01

    A tank experiment was carried out to investigate underwater sound propagation over an elastic bottom in flat and sloping configurations. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate range-dependent propagation models with high-quality experimental data. The sea floor was modeled as an elastic medium by a polyvinyl chloride slab. The relatively high rigidity of the slab requires accounting for shear waves in this environment. Acoustic measurements were obtained along virtual arrays in the water column using a robotic apparatus. Elastic parabolic equation solutions are in excellent agreement with data. PMID:17902835

  18. Is it really so bad? A comparison of positive and negative experiences in Antarctic winter stations.

    PubMed

    Wood, J; Hysong, S J; Lugg, D J; Harm, D L

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the range of positive and negative themes reported by 104 Australian Antarctic winter personnel at four stations during two austral winters. Reports from the expeditioners were subjected to a content analysis using the TextSmart software from SPSS, Inc. Results indicated that, although the list of negative experiences is lengthy, most events are relatively rare. On the other hand, although the list of positive experiences is short, the frequencies with which they are reported are much greater than for most of the problems. Possible explanations for these themes and for future directions are discussed. PMID:11542948

  19. Is it really so bad? A comparison of positive and negative experiences in Antarctic winter stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J.; Hysong, S. J.; Lugg, D. J.; Harm, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the range of positive and negative themes reported by 104 Australian Antarctic winter personnel at four stations during two austral winters. Reports from the expeditioners were subjected to a content analysis using the TextSmart software from SPSS, Inc. Results indicated that, although the list of negative experiences is lengthy, most events are relatively rare. On the other hand, although the list of positive experiences is short, the frequencies with which they are reported are much greater than for most of the problems. Possible explanations for these themes and for future directions are discussed.

  20. Receiving the Initial Down Syndrome Diagnosis: A Comparison of Prenatal and Postnatal Parent Group Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson Goff, Briana S.; Springer, Nicole; Foote, Laura Cline; Frantz, Courtney; Peak, Madison; Tracy, Courtney; Veh, Taylor; Bentley, Gail E.; Cross, Kayli A.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the preliminary experiences of parents upon learning of their child's diagnosis of Down syndrome. Qualitative data from a web-based, national survey were analyzed based on two groups: prenatal ("n" = 46) or postnatal ("n" = 115) diagnosis. Three primary categories emerged from the data analysis:…

  1. A Comparison of Ionic and Covalent Iodine Dihalides: An Integrated Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Alfred A.

    1978-01-01

    Compares the preparation and decomposition of potassium dibromoiodate and of phenyl iodine dichloride in a flexible experiment which accustoms the student to handle halogens, to test for halogens in mixtures, and to appreciate the difference between thermodynamic and kinetic control of reactions. (Author/MA)

  2. Chinese Students' Science-Related Experiences: Comparison of the ROSE Study in Xinjiang and Shanghai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Yau-yuen; Li, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Students' daily-life experiences may render favorable effects on the students' affective domain like interest, enthusiasm, motivation, joy, curiosity, awareness, and eagerness to learn science as not commonly found in the classroom environment. However, no rigorous research has been reported on those aspects in Mainland China despite…

  3. Preservice Teachers' Reflection on Clinical Experiences: A Comparison of Blog and Final Paper Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Darci J.; Wondra, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the depth of reflection in the writing of preservice teachers who completed end-of-the-semester reflective papers or reflective blogs for undergraduate education courses associated with clinical experiences. Coders rated the depth of reflection as one of four categories: non-reflection, understanding, reflection, or critical…

  4. A Comparison of the Abuse Experiences of Male and Female Adults Molested as Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall-Tackett, Kathleen A.; Simon, Arthur F.

    To determine whether the molestation experiences of boys and girls differ, this study analyzed data from 365 adults (40 male and 325 female) molested as children, and compared findings for males and females on the identity of the perpetrator, age at onset and end of molestation, duration of molestation, type of sexual acts, and whether the…

  5. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  6. Chapter 4: A Comparison of Personal Attributes and Experiences among Physically Active and Inactive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Darla M.; Erwin, Heather E.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the researchers aim to compare the personal attributes and experiences of children who met or exceeded physical activity guidelines with those who did not. By creating profiles, the researchers could compare motor performance, physical fitness, self-efficacy, time spent outdoors during physical activity, social support from friends…

  7. A Comparison Between Girls' and Boys' Experiences of Unwanted Sexual Behaviour in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmerman, Greetje

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study examines gender differences (and similarities) in the context, meaning and effects of unwanted sexual behaviour in secondary schools. Purpose First, the study's purpose is exploration of variables that discriminate between girls' and boys' experiences of unwanted sexual behaviour. Secondly, the aim is to find empirical…

  8. Behavioural self-analysis in the medical curriculum: a comparison of Malaysian and American experiences.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, H E; Tan, E S

    1979-03-01

    Behavioural self-analysis projects were introduced into the second year medical curriculum in behavioural sciences at the University of Malaya. Students performance and evaluation of the experience were compared with those of American medical students. It was concluded that receptivity of medical students to principles of behaviour therapy is relatively similar in the two societies. PMID:431423

  9. Early Learning Experience and Adolescent Anxiety: A Cross-Cultural Comparison between Japan and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Ishikawa, Shin-ichi; Sasagawa, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the frequency of anxiety symptoms among adolescents in Japan and England, and to examine the association between early learning experiences and anxiety symptoms. A total of 299 adolescents (147 from England and 152 from Japan), aged 12 to 17 years were investigated. Results showed that adolescents in…

  10. A Comparison of the Internship Experience for Student Interns Placed in Different Urban School Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Sueanne E.; Finke, Janet A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if there was a difference in the internship experience between student interns placed in either an urban Professional Development School or an urban non-Professional Development School. Student interns from two urban universities who have partnerships with neighboring urban school districts…

  11. Statistical comparison between experiments and numerical simulations of shock-accelerated gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Zoldi, C. A.; Tomkins, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed spatial analysis comparing experimental data and numerical simulation results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of Prestridge et al. and Tomkins et al. These experiments consist, respectively, of one and two diffuse cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shockwave in air. The subsequent fluid evolution and mixing is driven by the deposition of baroclinic vorticity at the interface between the two fluids. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods, including a new weighted adaptive Runge-Kutta (WARK) scheme. We quantify the nature of the mixing using using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. Our investigation of the gas cylinder configurations follows the path of our earlier studies of the geometrically and dynamically more complex gas 'curtain' experiment. In those studies, we found significant discrepancies in the details of the experimentally measured mixing and the details of the numerical simulations. Here we evaluate the effects of these hydrodynamic integration techniques on the diffuse gas cylinder simulations, which we quantitatively compare with experimental data.

  12. Preparing Beginning Reading Teachers: An Experimental Comparison of Initial Early Literacy Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Lake, Vickie E.; Greulich, Luana; Folsom, Jessica S.; Guidry, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This randomized-control trial examined the learning of preservice teachers taking an initial Early Literacy course in an early childhood education program and of the kindergarten or first grade students they tutored in their field experience. Preservice teachers were randomly assigned to one of two tutoring programs: Book Buddies and Tutor…

  13. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Adolescents' Experience Related to Cyberbullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study explores the issues of cyberbullying from a cross-cultural perspective. The focus is on the examination of the extent of a sample of Canadian and Chinese adolescents' experiences and possible culture differences related to bullying and cyberbullying. Sample: Two sets of data were collected in Canada and China. In…

  14. COMPARISON OF MODELLED AND MEASURED TRACER GAS CONCENTRATIONS DURING THE ACROSS NORTH AMERICA TRACER EXPERIMENT (ANATEX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 24-hour surface concentrations of several perfluorocarbon tracer gases measured during the 1987 Across North America Tracer Experiment (ANATEX) provided a unique continental-scale data set with which to evaluate long-range transport and diffusion models. One such model, a mul...

  15. A Comparison of Methods to Test for Mediation in Multisite Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pituch, Keenan A.; Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Stapleton, Laura M.

    2005-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study extended the research of MacKinnon, Lockwood, Hoffman, West, and Sheets (2002) for single-level designs by examining the statistical performance of four methods to test for mediation in a multilevel experimental design. The design studied was a two-group experiment that was replicated across several sites, included a single…

  16. Regional Differences in Spanking Experiences and Attitudes: A Comparison of Northeastern and Southern College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Clifton P.

    1996-01-01

    Examines regional differences in college student experiences with corporal punishment as children. Students from a northeastern and a southern university were surveyed. Results indicated that students attending the northeastern university were less likely to have been spanked as children. Effect of region was more important for attitudes than…

  17. Comparison of seismic and hydrodynamic yield determinations for the Soviet joint verification experiment of 1988

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynn R.; Ekström, Göran

    1989-01-01

    Seismic magnitudes determined from surface and body waves for the Soviet underground nuclear explosion of September 14, 1988, are used to calculate the yield of that event from previously derived calibration curves. The yield obtained by combining the two seismic estimates is 113 kilotons, which is very close to those obtained by hydrodynamic measurements made on-site. This comparison substantiates previous conclusions about the sizes of past Soviet weapons tests and compliance with the Threshold Test Ban Treaty. The factor of uncertainty in the combined seismic yield is 1.28 at the 68% and 1.62 at the 95% confidence levels, demonstrating that accuracies considerably better than a factor of 2 can be obtained by combining seismic determinations of yield. PMID:16594040

  18. Supercritical wing design using numerical optimization and comparisons with experiment. [to improve C-141 cruise performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Smith, P. R.; Hicks, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical minimization scheme is used in conjunction with two-dimensional and three-dimensional inviscid transonic flow analysis codes to provide procedures for wing leading edge aerodynamic design. The procedures are demonstrated in the design of a new leading edge to improve C-141 cruise performance. For the high aspect ratio moderately swept C-141 wing, the 2-D procedure is shown to yield results which are in close agreement with those obtained using the 3-D technique. Although the 2-D approach uses much less computation time than the 3-D technique, the latter requires fewer manhours than the former. Comparisons of predicted and wind tunnel measured performance improvements are presented which verify the design procedures.

  19. Comprehensive fracture diagnostics experiment. Part II. Comparison of seven fracture azimuth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.B.; Ren, N.K.; Sorrells, G.G.; Teufel, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    A great deal of effort has been devoted recently to find geophysical techniques for measuring the hydraulic fracture azimuth. This paper discusses a comparison of seven different measurements used to determine the azimuth in a sandstone formation at a depth of 1000 ft (320 m). The azimuth was determined as N95E, but significant differences existed between some of the results. This is of fundamental importance since in developing new measurements, the limits of these must be found and honored. Of particular interest are the results from microseismic monitoring. The lack of results suggests that remote (e.g., surface) monitoring for seismic events may be impractical for normal, sedimentary, hydrocarbon-bearing formations. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Critical review of elastic and plastic thermal contact conductance models and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, M.R.; Yovanovich, M.M. )

    1993-01-01

    More than 450 thermal contact resistance data points obtained from isotropic conforming rough surfaces for five different materials; Ni200, SS304, two Zirconium alloys and Al6061 have been compared with the existing elastic and plastic models. For the first time data have been reduced to a dimensionless form assuming both elastic as well as plastic deformation. Normally data were compared with either the elastic model or the plastic model assuming a type of deformation a priori. The relative merits of different models and the surface factors influencing the mode of deformation are still not clear. Hence the aim of the present work was to compare most of the models available in the literature with themselves as well as with isotropic data. Comparison showed that generally smoother surfaces deform elastically and rougher ones plastically. However there are some data sets which compare well with both the elastic as well as the plastic models. 20 refs.

  1. Comparison of two sample preparation techniques for sniffing experiments with broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica Plenck).

    PubMed

    Ulrich, D; Krumbein, A; Schonhof, I; Hoberg, E

    1998-12-01

    The suitability of the headspace solid phase microextraction (HSSPME) for gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) with aroma extract dilution analysis in comparison to the dynamic head space sampling on a Tenax trap was tested exemplarily by the aroma volatiles of fresh broccoli. A high number of odour sensations in qualitative olfactometry was registered with both sample preparation techniques. The key aroma compounds of the fresh broccoli material are represented by high flavour dilution factors with dynamic head space sampling and headspace SPME. The SPME method has found to be a convenient and fast technique suitable especially for qualitative GC-O. The adsorption selectivity of the fiber and the substance discrimination have to be taken into account for quantitative use like aroma extract dilution analysis. PMID:9881367

  2. Data-Model Comparisons for Sea Surface Waves from the ASIAEX East China Sea Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Zhou, Ji-Xun; Rogers, Peter H.

    2010-09-01

    During ASIAEX, surface directional wave spectra were recorded for nine consecutive days. Data are analyzed in this paper to show the characteristics of the surface wave field in the East China Sea. Three surface spectrum models, Pierson-Moskowitz, JONSWAP, and Toba, are evaluated and compared with the ASIAEX RMS surface wave height data. The data-model comparisons show that the JONSWAP-Mitsuyasu model is the best fit to the experimental results. Model performance can be improved by a combined model, JONSWAP-Mitsuyasu for U/cp<0.8 and Toba-Donelan for U/cp>0.8. The preliminary results suggest that locally measured wave age can be used to find the most appropriate surface model for acoustic prediction purposes.

  3. Calculation of viscous effects on transonic flow for oscillating airfoils and comparisons with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, James T.; Bland, Samuel R.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for calculating unsteady transonic flow with viscous interaction by coupling a steady integral boundary-layer code with an unsteady, transonic, inviscid small-disturbance computer code in a quasi-steady fashion. Explicit coupling of the equations together with viscous -inviscid iterations at each time step yield converged solutions with computer times about double those required to obtain inviscid solutions. The accuracy and range of applicability of the method are investigated by applying it to four AGARD standard airfoils. The first-harmonic components of both the unsteady pressure distributions and the lift and moment coefficients have been calculated. Comparisons with inviscid calcualtions and experimental data are presented. The results demonstrate that accurate solutions for transonic flows with viscous effects can be obtained for flows involving moderate-strength shock waves.

  4. Experiments examining the shapes of isolated bars in comparison with those occurring in braided rivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    Sand bars and islands within braided rivers have characteristic rhomboid or diamond shapes, often becoming very complex in form as the density of islands increases. Similar forms are observed in the martian outflow channels where the islands occur in groups. This contrasts with the more isolated martian islands which have airfoil shapes, as do isolated streamlined islands in rivers and in the Channeled Scabland. These observations indicate that the bar and island forms are controlled by the density of the islands, with increasing island interaction and flow modification as the density increases. As a continuation of previous flume experiments on the shapes of isolated islands, a new series of experiments investigate the modifications produced by a progressive increase in island density, finally leading to a true braided system.

  5. Electronic structure Fermi liquid theory of high Tc superconductors: Comparison of predictions with experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jaejun; Freeman, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Predictions of local density functional (LDF) calculations of the electronic structure and transport properties of high T(sub c) superconductors are presented. As evidenced by the excellent agreement with both photoemission and positron annihilation experiments, a Fermi liquid nature of the 'normal' state of the high T(sub c) superconductors become clear for the metallic phase of these oxides. In addition, LDF predictions on the normal state transport properties are qualitatively in agreement with experiments on single crystals. It is emphasized that the signs of the Hall coefficients for the high T(sub c) superconductors are not consistent with the types of dopants (e.g., electron-doped or hole-doped) but are determined by the topology of the Fermi surfaces obtained from the LDF calculations.

  6. Mixing of a point-source indoor pollutant: Numerical predictions and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lobscheid, C.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    In most practical estimates of indoor pollutant exposures, it is common to assume that the pollutant is uniformly and instantaneously mixed in the indoor space. It is also commonly known that this assumption is simplistic, particularly for point sources, and for short-term or localized indoor exposures. We report computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of mixing time of a point-pulse release of a pollutant in an unventilated mechanically mixed isothermal room. We aimed to determine the adequacy of the standard RANS two-equation ({kappa}-{var_epsilon}) turbulence model to predict the mixing times under these conditions. The predictions were made for the twelve mixing time experiments performed by Drescher et al. (1995). We paid attention to adequate grid resolution, suppression of numerical diffusion, and careful simulation of the mechanical blowers used in the experiments. We found that the predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  7. Comprehensive comparisons of geodesic acoustic mode characteristics and dynamics between Tore Supra experiments and gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Storelli, A. Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Singh, Rameswar; Morel, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, P.; Görler, T.

    2015-06-15

    In a dedicated collisionality scan in Tore Supra, the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is detected and identified with the Doppler backscattering technique. Observations are compared to the results of a simulation with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. We found that the GAM frequency in experiments is lower than predicted by simulation and theory. Moreover, the disagreement is higher in the low collisionality scenario. Bursts of non harmonic GAM oscillations have been characterized with filtering techniques, such as the Hilbert-Huang transform. When comparing this dynamical behaviour between experiments and simulation, the probability density function of GAM amplitude and the burst autocorrelation time are found to be remarkably similar. In the simulation, where the radial profile of GAM frequency is continuous, we observed a phenomenon of radial phase mixing of the GAM oscillations, which could influence the burst autocorrelation time.

  8. A comparison of older adults' subjective experiences with virtual and real environments during dynamic balance activities.

    PubMed

    Proffitt, Rachel; Lange, Belinda; Chen, Christina; Winstein, Carolee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the subjective experience of older adults interacting with both virtual and real environments. Thirty healthy older adults engaged with real and virtual tasks of similar motor demands: reaching to a target in standing and stepping stance. Immersive tendencies and absorption scales were administered before the session. Game engagement and experience questionnaires were completed after each task, followed by a semistructured interview at the end of the testing session. Data were analyzed respectively using paired t tests and grounded theory methodology. Participants preferred the virtual task over the real task. They also reported an increase in presence and absorption with the virtual task, describing an external focus of attention. Findings will be used to inform future development of appropriate game-based balance training applications that could be embedded in the home or community settings as part of evidence-based fall prevention programs. PMID:24334299

  9. A comparison of older adults' subjective experience with virtual and real environments during dynamic balance activities

    PubMed Central

    Proffitt, Rachel; Lange, Belinda; Chen, Christina; Winstein, Carolee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the subjective experience of older adults interacting with both virtual and real environments. Thirty healthy older adults engaged with real and virtual tasks of similar motor demands: reaching to a target in standing and stepping stance. Immersive tendencies and absorption scales were administered before the session. Game engagement and experience questionnaires were completed after each task, followed by a semi-structured interview at the end of the testing session. Data were analyzed respectively using paired t-tests and grounded theory methodology. Participants preferred the virtual task over the real task. They also reported an increase in presence and absorption with the virtual task, describing an external focus of attention. Findings will be used to inform future development of appropriate game-based balance training applications that could be embedded in the home or community settings as part of evidence-based fall prevention programs. PMID:24334299

  10. Acceleration of heavy and light particles in turbulence: Comparison between experiments and direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, R.; Calzavarini, E.; Verhille, G.; Lohse, D.; Mordant, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Toschi, F.

    2008-08-01

    We compare experimental data and numerical simulations for the dynamics of inertial particles with finite density in turbulence. In the experiment, bubbles and solid particles are optically tracked in a turbulent flow of water using an Extended Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique. The probability density functions (PDF) of particle accelerations and their auto-correlation in time are computed. Numerical results are obtained from a direct numerical simulation in which a suspension of passive pointwise particles is tracked, with the same finite density and the same response time as in the experiment. We observe a good agreement for both the variance of acceleration and the autocorrelation time scale of the dynamics; small discrepancies on the shape of the acceleration PDF are observed. We discuss the effects induced by the finite size of the particles, not taken into account in the present numerical simulations.

  11. Comparison of Monte Carlo simulations of cytochrome b6f with experiment using Latin hypercube sampling.

    PubMed

    Schumaker, Mark F; Kramer, David M

    2011-09-01

    We have programmed a Monte Carlo simulation of the Q-cycle model of electron transport in cytochrome b(6)f complex, an enzyme in the photosynthetic pathway that converts sunlight into biologically useful forms of chemical energy. Results were compared with published experiments of Kramer and Crofts (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1183:72-84, 1993). Rates for the simulation were optimized by constructing large numbers of parameter sets using Latin hypercube sampling and selecting those that gave the minimum mean square deviation from experiment. Multiple copies of the simulation program were run in parallel on a Beowulf cluster. We found that Latin hypercube sampling works well as a method for approximately optimizing very noisy objective functions of 15 or 22 variables. Further, the simplified Q-cycle model can reproduce experimental results in the presence or absence of a quinone reductase (Q(i)) site inhibitor without invoking ad hoc side-reactions. PMID:21221830

  12. Infiltration and drainage in the unsaturated zone: comparison of numerical simulations to a monitored field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papafotiou, Alexandros; Ganz, Christina; Altfelder, Sven; Noell, Ursula; Neuweiler, Insa

    2010-05-01

    The unsaturated zone has a prominent role for groundwater resources, as it controls through flow and transport any mass exchange between atmosphere and groundwater. However, providing reliable predictions for the unsaturated zone is very demanding, as it is dominated by complex two-phase flow processes that produce high uncertainty with respect to the hydraulic properties. When modeling unsaturated flow, the typically unknown spatial distribution of hydraulic properties in the soil constitutes a primary source of uncertainty. Even if information on the exact distribution is known, additional uncertainty may stem from the non-uniqueness of the hydraulic properties, most profoundly expressed through hysteresis in the capillary pressure-saturation relationship, also known as water retention curve. In this work, we present modeling considerations for predicting an infiltration and drainage event in the unsaturated zone during a field experiment. The experiment was performed by infiltrating brilliant-blue solution while monitoring the plume movement with ERT. After the completion of infiltration (and the consequent drainage), the upper 1 meter of the soil was excavated in slices to obtain the 3D distribution of water saturation and pressure. Numerical simulations are carried out with a two-phase flow model. The results illustrate possibilities and limitations of predicting such flow processes based on the experimental information available. We demonstrate the influence and significance of hysteresis by comparing experimental findings with model runs that explicitly consider wetting and drying conditions in the experiment. Our approach allows us to identify key processes that have to be accounted for. In a feedback loop with the design of future experiments we aim at improving input specifications necessary for reliable predictive modeling of unsaturated flow.

  13. Critical transition for the edge shear layer formation: Comparison of model and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Garcia, L.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2006-12-15

    The experimental results for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer in TJ-II [C. Alehaldre et al.Fusion Technol. 17, 131 (1990)] can be explained using a simple model for a second-order transition based on the sheared flow amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence suppression by shearing. In the dynamics of the model, the resistive interchange instability is used. This model gives power dependence on density gradients before and after the transition, consistent with experiment.

  14. Isentropic Compression for TATB Based HE Samples, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A; Vandersall, K; L'Eplattenier, P; Burger, M

    2006-02-06

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on TATB based HE were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE [1]. 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1967.

  15. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Marek Koza, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other. PMID:27112937

  16. Quantum state-resolved, bulk gas energetics: Comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffery, Anthony J.

    2016-05-01

    Until very recently, the computational model of state-to-state energy transfer in large gas mixtures, introduced by the author and co-workers, has had little experimental data with which to assess the accuracy of its predictions. In a novel experiment, Alghazi et al. [Chem. Phys. 448, 76 (2015)] followed the equilibration of highly vibrationally excited CsH(D) in baths of H2(D2) with simultaneous time- and quantum state-resolution. Modal temperatures of vibration, rotation, and translation for CsH(D) were obtained and presented as a function of pump-probe delay time. Here the data from this study are used as a test of the accuracy of the computational method, and in addition, the consequent changes in bath gas modal temperatures, not obtainable in the experiment, are predicted. Despite large discrepancies between initial CsH(D) vibrational states in the experiment and those available using the computational model, the quality of agreement is sufficient to conclude that the model's predictions constitute at least a very good representation of the overall equilibration that, for some measurements, is very accurate.

  17. An observational comparison of the older and younger bus passenger experience in a developing world city.

    PubMed

    Aceves-González, Carlos; May, Andrew; Cook, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    This study was an unobtrusive observational analysis of 333 older and younger bus passengers in Guadalajara, Mexico. A set of data were collected for each observed passenger, as well as more general observations related to driver behaviour, bus design and bus service characteristics. There were significant differences between older and younger passengers in terms of boarding and alighting times, use of handrails, seat location preferences, passenger stability and coping strategies in order to maintain postural stability. The conditions of travel are conducive to a poor passenger experience for the older passengers in particular. Although the problems may be attributed to bus design and driver behaviour typical of that in developing countries, they are also influenced by the wider transport infrastructure, and a lack of a regulatory regime which places drivers under time pressure and in direct competition with each other. Practitioner Summary: Bus services must cater for all ages of passengers, including the elderly. This unobtrusive observational study investigated the passenger experience in a developing world city. Bus and wider service design were found to compromise the journey experience, with the older users being particularly negatively impacted. Design recommendations are provided. PMID:26548352

  18. Validation of KENO-VI: A comparison with hexagonal lattice light-water-reactor critical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenwalter, J.J.

    1998-06-01

    The KENO-VI Monte Carlo code, released with Version 4.3 of the SCALE Code System, provides the capability to model more complex geometries than previously allowed by KENO-V.a. One significant improvement is the simplistic specification of hexprism unit cells and hexagonal arrays, an arduous task to complete in KENO-V.a. This report documents the validation of KENO-VI against 30 critical experiments consisting of low enriched uranium, light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods in hexagonal lattices with no poisons. The reference, enrichment, pitch, cladding, and core identification of the experiments are given. The results indicate that KENO-VI accurately calculates these critical experiments, with a bias of {minus}0.51% for the 238 group cross section library and {minus}0.24% for the 44 group cross section library. If these biases are properly taken into account, the KENO-VI code can be used with confidence for the design and safety analysis of storage and transportation systems of similar LWR type fuels.

  19. Comparison of continuous and discontinuous collisional bumpers: Dimensionally scaled impact experiments into single wire meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark; See, Thomas; Bernhard, Ronald; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William; Haynes, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    An experimental inquiry into the utility of discontinuous bumpers was conducted to investigate the collisional outcomes of impacts into single grid-like targets and to compare the results with more traditional bumper designs that employ continuous sheet stock. We performed some 35 experiments using 6.3 and 3.2 mm diameter spherical soda-lime glass projectiles at low velocities (less than 2.5 km/s) and 13 at velocities between 5 and 6 km/s, using 3.2 mm spheres only. The thrust of the experiments related to the characterization of collisional fragments as a function of target thickness or areal shield mass of both bumper designs. The primary product of these experiments was witness plates that record the resulting population of collisional fragments. Substantial interpretive and predictive insights into bumper performance were obtained. All qualitative observations (on the witness plates) and detailed measurements of displaced masses seem simply and consistently related only to bumper mass available for interaction with the impactor. This renders the grid bumper into the superior shield design. These findings present evidence that discontinuous bumpers are a viable concept for collisional shields, possibly superior to continuous geometries.

  20. Capillary trapping mechanism in strongly water wet systems: Comparison between Experiment and Percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, H. W.; Mohammadian, S.; Vogel, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    To understand capillary trapping mechanism, we conduct a real Monte-Carlo experiment by using packed glass beads with nearly the same pore size distribution, but different stochastic realizations. We study gas phase trapping during imbibition for capillary number from 2×10-7 to 10-6 by X-ray computer tomography (μ-CT) and compare the experimental results with predictions from percolation theory. We found excellent agreement. Percolation theory could explain (i) that the capillary desaturation curves are not dependent on flow rate, (ii) the linear dependence of the total gas surface on gas saturation that is a direct consequence of the linear relationship between cluster surface and cluster volume, which is a prediction from percolation theory for large finite clusters, (iii) the power-like cluster size distribution with an exponent τexp = 2.15 that only deviates by 2% from the theoretical one (τtheor = 2.19), and (iv) that the maximal z-extension of trapped large gas cluster is described by the cut-off correlation length ξB (B - bond number). In order to support the findings from μ-CT-experiments and to study the dynamics of capillary trapping, we conduct visualization experiments using monolayer- and microstructure-models. The Figure shows the residual trapped air (red colored) after water imbibition: left: 2D-cut through a 3D-reconstructed image, right: 3D-slice of a 3D-reconstructed image.

  1. Computer-assisted comparison of analysis and test results in transportation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.D.; Ammerman, D.J.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-05-10

    As a part of its ongoing research efforts, Sandia National Laboratories` Transportation Surety Center investigates the integrity of various containment methods for hazardous materials transport, subject to anomalous structural and thermal events such as free-fall impacts, collisions, and fires in both open and confined areas. Since it is not possible to conduct field experiments for every set of possible conditions under which an actual transportation accident might occur, accurate modeling methods must be developed which will yield reliable simulations of the effects of accident events under various scenarios. This requires computer software which is capable of assimilating and processing data from experiments performed as benchmarks, as well as data obtained from numerical models that simulate the experiment. Software tools which can present all of these results in a meaningful and useful way to the analyst are a critical aspect of this process. The purpose of this work is to provide software resources on a long term basis, and to ensure that the data visualization capabilities of the Center keep pace with advancing technology. This will provide leverage for its modeling and analysis abilities in a rapidly evolving hardware/software environment.

  2. Numerical simulations of the flow with the prescribed displacement of the airfoil and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řidký, V.; Šidlof, P.; Vlček, V.

    2013-04-01

    The work is devoted to comparing measured data with the results of numerical simulations. As mathematical model was used mathematical model whitout turbulence for incompressible flow In the experiment was observed the behavior of designed NACA0015 airfoil in airflow. For the numerical solution was used OpenFOAM computational package, this is open-source software based on finite volume method. In the numerical solution is prescribed displacement of the airfoil, which corresponds to the experiment. The velocity at a point close to the airfoil surface is compared with the experimental data obtained from interferographic measurements of the velocity field. Numerical solution is computed on a 3D mesh composed of about 1 million ortogonal hexahedron elements. The time step is limited by the Courant number. Parallel computations are run on supercomputers of the CIV at Technical University in Prague (HAL and FOX) and on a computer cluster of the Faculty of Mechatronics of Liberec (HYDRA). Run time is fixed at five periods, the results from the fifth periods and average value for all periods are then be compared with experiment.

  3. Quantum state-resolved, bulk gas energetics: Comparison of theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    McCaffery, Anthony J

    2016-05-21

    Until very recently, the computational model of state-to-state energy transfer in large gas mixtures, introduced by the author and co-workers, has had little experimental data with which to assess the accuracy of its predictions. In a novel experiment, Alghazi et al. [Chem. Phys. 448, 76 (2015)] followed the equilibration of highly vibrationally excited CsH(D) in baths of H2(D2) with simultaneous time- and quantum state-resolution. Modal temperatures of vibration, rotation, and translation for CsH(D) were obtained and presented as a function of pump-probe delay time. Here the data from this study are used as a test of the accuracy of the computational method, and in addition, the consequent changes in bath gas modal temperatures, not obtainable in the experiment, are predicted. Despite large discrepancies between initial CsH(D) vibrational states in the experiment and those available using the computational model, the quality of agreement is sufficient to conclude that the model's predictions constitute at least a very good representation of the overall equilibration that, for some measurements, is very accurate. PMID:27208946

  4. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This report documents comparisons between post-irradiation examination measurements and model predictions of silver (Ag), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) release from selected tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program that occurred from December 2006 to November 2009 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact) but it can be assessed at the particle level by adjusting the diffusivity in the fuel matrix to very high values. Furthermore, the diffusivity of each layer can be individually set to a high value (typically 10-6 m2/s) to simulate a failed layer with no capability of fission product retention. In this study, the comparison to PIE focused on fission product release and because of the lack of failure in the irradiation, the probability of particle failure was not calculated. During the AGR-1 irradiation campaign, the fuel kernel produced and released fission products, which migrated through the successive

  5. Comparison of analysis and experiment for dynamics of low-contact-ratio spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Rebbechi, Brian; Zakrajsek, James J.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1991-01-01

    Low-contact-ratio spur gears were tested in NASA gear-noise-rig to study gear dynamics including dynamic load, tooth bending stress, vibration, and noise. The experimental results were compared with a NASA gear dynamics code to validate the code as a design tool for predicting transmission vibration and noise. Analytical predictions and experimental data for gear-tooth dynamic loads and tooth-root bending stress were compared at 28 operating conditions. Strain gage data were used to compute the normal load between meshing teeth and the bending stress at the tooth root for direct comparison with the analysis. The computed and measured waveforms for dynamic load and stress were compared for several test conditions. These are very similar in shape, which means the analysis successfully simulates the physical behavior of the test gears. The predicted peak value of the dynamic load agrees with the measurement results within an average error of 4.9 percent except at low-torque, high-speed conditions. Predictions of peak dynamic root stress are generally within 10 to 15 percent of the measured values.

  6. Optimization design of submerged propeller in oxidation ditch by computational fluid dynamics and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuquan; Zheng, Yuan; Fernandez-Rodriguez, E; Yang, Chunxia; Zhu, Yantao; Liu, Huiwen; Jiang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The operating condition of a submerged propeller has a significant impact on flow field and energy consumption of the oxidation ditch. An experimentally validated numerical model, based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool, is presented to optimize the operating condition by considering two important factors: flow field and energy consumption. Performance demonstration and comparison of different operating conditions were carried out in a Carrousel oxidation ditch at the Yingtang wastewater treatment plants in Anhui Province, China. By adjusting the position and rotating speed together with the number of submerged propellers, problems of sludge deposit and the low velocity in the bend could be solved in a most cost-effective way. The simulated results were acceptable compared with the experimental data and the following results were obtained. The CFD model characterized flow pattern and energy consumption in the full-scale oxidation ditch. The predicted flow field values were within -1.28 ± 7.14% difference from the measured values. By determining three sets of propellers under the rotating speed of 6.50 rad/s with one located 5 m from the first curved wall, after numerical simulation and actual measurement, not only the least power density but also the requirement of the flow pattern could be realized. PMID:27508373

  7. Composition modulation in GaInNAs quantum wells: Comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, M.; González, D.; Hopkinson, M.; Gutiérrez, M.; Navaretti, P.; Liu, H. Y.; García, R.

    2005-04-01

    Composition modulation observed in GaInNAs quantum wells imposes an important handicap to their potential application within optical components, particularly as the indium and nitrogen contents are increased to reach longer wavelengths. In this paper, we compare our experimental results of phase separation in GaInNAs quantum wells grown at different temperatures with recent theoretical models of spinodal decomposition from the literature. This comparison has shown that the regular solution approximation, which explains the higher composition modulation compared to GaInAs samples, provides a more appropriate explanation of GaInNAs decomposition than the usual delta lattice-parameter approximation. Transmission electron microscopy shows no composition modulation contrasts with the chemical sensitive 002 dark field reflection and a strong increase in the intensity of the strain contrasts observed with 220 bright field reflection as the growth temperature increases from 360to460°C. These observations can be explained by an uncoupling between N and In composition profiles forming separate In-rich and N-rich regions according to the regular solution approximation model. We therefore believe that the compositional fluctuations in GaInNAs are not only due to GaInAs decomposition, but that an uncoupled modulation of the III and V elements is also present.

  8. Structural Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Depend Strongly on Force Field: A Comparison to Experiment.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Sarah; Gapsys, Vytautas; Gajda, Michal J; Zweckstetter, Markus; de Groot, Bert L; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-11-10

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are notoriously challenging to study both experimentally and computationally. The structure of IDPs cannot be described by a single conformation but must instead be described as an ensemble of interconverting conformations. Atomistic simulations are increasingly used to obtain such IDP conformational ensembles. Here, we have compared the IDP ensembles generated by eight all-atom empirical force fields against primary small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and NMR data. Ensembles obtained with different force fields exhibit marked differences in chain dimensions, hydrogen bonding, and secondary structure content. These differences are unexpectedly large: changing the force field is found to have a stronger effect on secondary structure content than changing the entire peptide sequence. The CHARMM 22* ensemble performs best in this force field comparison: it has the lowest error in chemical shifts and J-couplings and agrees well with the SAXS data. A high population of left-handed α-helix is present in the CHARMM 36 ensemble, which is inconsistent with measured scalar couplings. To eliminate inadequate sampling as a reason for differences between force fields, extensive simulations were carried out (0.964 ms in total); the remaining small sampling uncertainty is shown to be much smaller than the observed differences. Our findings highlight how IDPs, with their rugged energy landscapes, are highly sensitive test systems that are capable of revealing force field deficiencies and, therefore, contributing to force field development. PMID:26574339

  9. Sound propagation in and radiation from acoustically lined flow ducts: A comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Dean, P. D.; Wynne, G. A.; Burrin, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of many of the fundamental details of sound propagation in hard wall and soft wall annular flow ducts are reported. The theory of sound propagation along such ducts and the theory for determining the complex radiation impedance of higher order modes of an annulus are outlined, and methods for generating acoustic duct modes are developed. The results of a detailed measurement program on propagation in rigid wall annular ducts with and without airflow through the duct are presented. Techniques are described for measuring cut-on frequencies, modal phase speed, and radial and annular mode shapes. The effects of flow velocity on cut-on frequencies and phase speed are measured. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions for all of the effects studies. The two microphone method of impedance is used to measure the effects of flow on acoustic liners. A numerical study of sound propagation in annular ducts with one or both walls acoustically lined is presented.

  10. A newly designed compact remote TDL sensing system for air pollutants -- Field experiments and comparison measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.; Herzog, R.; Lamp, T.; Ropertz, A.; Weber, K.

    1999-07-01

    The remote sensing system for local or diffuse concentrations of gaseous air pollutants developed and realized by the ILK Dresden is a very compact and low mass apparatus based on the tunable diode laser (TDL) techniques in pulse or cw mode regime. The prototypes are characterized by compact design (300x150x300mm3) and stand-alone and mains-independent operation that allows a fast, flexible and mobile use in different applications. The first hardware version works as an one laser monitor while the advanced version provides for the simultaneous operation of two lasers and can thus measure two gaseous pollutants at the same time. The sensitivity limits for CO and NO were determined at 13ppb x 100m and at 22ppb x 100m respectively. Optical measurement paths are possible up to 700m. The paper presented results of field measurements of the gaseous pollutants in the open atmosphere, i.e. traffic-induced CO and NO as well as CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} landfill gases. Furthermore, the authors have investigated in co-operation with the FH Duesseldorf the ILK TDL-system and commercial remote sensing systems for air pollutant monitoring, especially the FTIR and DOAS systems, in different comparison measurements under real field conditions.

  11. Comparison of Finite Element Predictions to Measurements from the Sandia Microslip Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    LOBITZ,DONALD W.; GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; SMALLWOOD,DAVID O.

    2000-11-09

    When embarking on an experimental program for purposes of discovery and understanding, it is only prudent to use appropriate analysis tools to aid in the discovery process. Due to the limited scope of experimental measurement analytical results can significantly complement the data after a reasonable validation process has occurred. In this manner the analytical results can help to explain certain measurements, suggest other measurements to take and point to possible modifications to the experimental apparatus. For these reasons it was decided to create a detailed nonlinear finite element model of the Sandia Microslip Experiment. This experiment was designed to investigate energy dissipation due to microslip in bolted joints and to identify the critical parameters involved. In an attempt to limit the microslip to a single interface a complicated system of rollers and cables was devised to clamp the two slipping members together with a prescribed normal load without using a bolt. An oscillatory tangential load is supplied via a shaker. The finite element model includes the clamping device in addition to the sequence of steps taken in setting up the experiment. The interface is modeled using Coulomb friction requiring a modest validation procedure for estimating the coefficient of friction. Analysis results have indicated misalignment problems in the experimental procedure, identified transducer locations for more accurate measurements, predicted complex interface motions including the potential for galling, identified regions where microslip occurs and during which parts of the loading cycle it occurs, all this in addition to the energy dissipated per cycle. A number of these predictions have been experimentally corroborated in varying degrees and are presented in the paper along with the details of the finite element model.

  12. A Comparison of Seismicity Characteristics and Fault Structure Between Stick-Slip Experiments and Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Sammis, C. G.; Becker, T. W.; Dresen, G.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2015-08-01

    Fault zones contain structural complexity on all scales. This complexity influences fault mechanics including the dynamics of large earthquakes as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of small seismic events. Incomplete earthquake records, unknown stresses, and unresolved fault structures within the crust complicate a quantitative assessment of the parameters that control factors affecting seismicity. To better understand the relationship between fault structure and seismicity, we examined dynamic faulting under controlled conditions in the laboratory by creating saw-cut-guided natural fractures in cylindrical granite samples. The resulting rough surfaces were triaxially loaded to produce a sequence of stick-slip events. During these experiments, we monitored stress, strain, and seismic activity. After the experiments, fault structures were imaged in thin sections and using computer tomography. The laboratory fault zones showed many structural characteristics observed in upper crustal faults, including zones of localized slip embedded in a layer of fault gouge. Laboratory faults also exhibited a several millimeter wide damage zone with decreasing micro-crack density at larger distances from the fault axis. In addition to the structural similarities, we also observed many similarities between our observed distribution of acoustic emissions (AEs) and natural seismicity. The AEs followed the Gutenberg-Richter and Omori-Utsu relationships commonly used to describe natural seismicity. Moreover, we observed a connection between along-strike fault heterogeneity and variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value. As suggested by natural seismicity studies, areas of low b value marked the nucleation points of large slip events and were located at large asperities within the fault zone that were revealed by post-experimental tomography scans. Our results emphasize the importance of stick-slip experiments for the study of fault mechanics. The direct correlation of

  13. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived by Diverse Techniques In Two North Atlantic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Livingston, J. M.; McIntosh, D. M.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, P. V.; Quinn, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo omega (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical depths from satellite radiances. Recently, two experiments in the North Atlantic region, the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), determined aerosol omega by a variety of techniques. The techniques included fitting of calculated to measured radiative fluxes; retrievals of omega from skylight radiances; best fits of complex refractive index to profiles of backscatter extinction, and size distribution; and in situ measurements of scattering and absorption at the surface and aloft. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 found a fairly wide range of values for omega at midvisable wavelengths approx. 550 nm, with omega(sub midvis) greater than or equal to 0.85 and less than or equal to 0.99 for the marine aerosol impacted by continental pollution. Frequency distributions of omega could usually be approximated by lognormals in omega(sub max) - omega, with some occurrence of bimodality, suggesting the influence of different aerosol sources or processing. In both TARFOX and ACE-2, closure tests between measured and calculated radiative fluxes yielded best-fit values of omega(sub midvis) 0.90 +/- 0.04 for the polluted boundary layer. Although these results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., thermal offsets, unknown gas absorption) The other techniques gave larger values for omega(sub midvis) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of omega(sub midvis) = 0.95 +/- 0.04. Current uncertainties in omega are large in terms of climate effects More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of

  14. Comparison of hydrodynamic model of graphene with recent experiment on measuring the Casimir interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the reflection coefficients from a graphene sheet deposited on a material substrate under a condition that graphene is described by the hydrodynamic model. Using these coefficients, the gradient of the Casimir force in the configuration of a recent experiment is calculated in the framework of the Lifshitz theory. It is shown that the hydrodynamic model is excluded by the measurement data at a 99% confidence level over a wide range of separations. From the fact that the same data are in very good agreement with theoretical predictions of the Dirac model of graphene, the low-energy character of the Casimir interaction is confirmed.

  15. Zeeman splitting of light hole in quantum wells: Comparison of theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durnev, M. V.

    2014-07-01

    The theory for light-hole Zeeman splitting developed in [5] is compared with experimental data found in literature for GaAs/AlGaAs, InGaAs/InP, and CdTe/CdMgTe quantum wells. It is shown that the description of experiments is possible with account for excitonic effects and peculiarities of the hole energy spectrum in a quantum well including complex structure of the valence band and the interface mixing of light and heavy holes. It is demonstrated that the absolute values and the sign of the light-hole g-factor are extremely sensitive to the parametrization of the Luttinger Hamiltonian.

  16. Comparison of unstable water infiltration in porous media in 2D and 3D experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, C.; Neuweiler, I.; Lehmann, P.; Papafotiou, A.; Vontobel, P.; Hartmann, S.

    2010-05-01

    Water infiltration into unsaturated soil is an important process for groundwater recharge and thus for water balance of natural hydrosystems. The characteristics of infiltration patterns depend on porous media properties and initial moisture content. Infiltration fronts into soil can be unstable in layered media with fine over dry coarse material. To predict arrival times of infiltration fronts and average water content in upscaled models, it is necessary to understand occurrence of instabilities. The unstable flow behavior is not captured by standard models and finger characteristics have mostly been investigated experimentally. Most experiments in the past were carried out in 2D setups and it is not clear how the results of such studies relate to real 3D systems. The aim of this study is to compare development and finger characteristics of unstable infiltration in 2D and 3D setups. We carried out laboratory experiments on fast infiltration in 2D and 3D setups and measured water content in porous media with neutron transmission technology at the NEUTRA beam line at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The 2D experiments were carried out in a glass sandbox (260 mm high, 75 mm wide and 11 mm deep). For the 3D experiments aluminum cylindrical column (150 mm in height and 100 mm in diameter) were used. Both columns were filled homogeneously with coarse quartz sand (grain size 0.7 - 1.2 mm) below fine sand layer (0.1 - 0.3 mm) of 20 - 30 mm thickness. Two dimensional projection images of water content with spatial resolution of 125 microns were deduced from neutron images every 2 second. For the 3D setup water content distribution was reconstructed in 3D to monitor water content inside the fingers over time. Water content and finger-width (15 - 23 mm) were similar for 2D and 3D setups. In both cases water content was maximum when the front passes and was decreasing afterwards (indicating "overshoot" behavior). Also the water content difference between values after

  17. Model of a fibreoptic phase-sensitive reflectometer and its comparison with the experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tosoni, O; Podivilov, Evgenii V; Babin, Sergei A; Aksenov, S B

    2010-12-09

    A statistical model describing the Rayleigh-scattering reflectograms of narrowband Gaussian pulses in optical fibres is constructed taking into account linear (the finite spectral linewidth because of frequency fluctuations, finite frequency band of the photodetector) and nonlinear (modulation instability) effects influencing the reflectograms' visibility. The model is compared with the experiment, demonstrating the adequacy of the theoretical description. The possibilities of obtaining optimal parameters, important for practical applications of the phase-sensitive reflectometer as a distributed fibreoptic intrusion sensor are discussed. (optical fibres)

  18. Quasi-cylindrical theory of wing-body interference at supersonic speeds and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N

    1955-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for calculating the flow field about wing-body combinations employing bodies deviating only slightly in shape from a circular cylinder. The method is applied to the calculation of the pressure field acting between a circular cylindrical body and a rectangular wing. The case of zero body angle of attack and variable wing incidence is considered as well as the case of zero wing incidence and variable body angle of attack. An experiment was performed especially for the purpose of checking the calculative examples.

  19. [Comparison of the Results of Satellite Studies of "Mars-500" Experiment Participans in Syktyvkar and Almaty].

    PubMed

    Solonin, Iu G; Markov, A L; Bojko, E R; Akanov, A A; Yeshmanova, A K

    2015-01-01

    Participants of "Mars-500" experiment living in Syktyvkar (northerners) and Almaty (southerners) were studied throughout the year in various seasons. Latitude-caused differences of vegetative index values (RMSSD and pNN50) between groups were found in summer. Northerners were found to have significant seasonal shifts in thermoregulation parameters and RMSSD and pNN50 values. Southerners showed no seasonal changes in abovementioned indices. Participants from both groups were shown to have deviations of several physiological parameters from moderate latitude norms. Many participants from both groups demonstrated stress in adaptation mechanisms. Orthostatic tests performed in both groups revealed deficiencies in regulation of blood circulation. PMID:26237953

  20. Numerical simulations of impacts involving porous bodies. II. Comparison with laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, Martin; Michel, Patrick; Hiraoka, Kensuke; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Benz, Willy

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we compare the outcome of high-velocity impact experiments on porous targets, composed of pumice, with the results of simulations by a 3D SPH hydrocode in which a porosity model has been implemented. The different populations of small bodies of our Solar System are believed to be composed, at least partially, of objects with a high degree of porosity. To describe the fragmentation of such porous objects, a different model is needed than that used for non-porous bodies. In the case of porous bodies, the impact process is not only driven by the presence of cracks which propagate when a stress threshold is reached, it is also influenced by the crushing of pores and compaction. Such processes can greatly affect the whole body's response to an impact. Therefore, another physical model is necessary to improve our understanding of the collisional process involving porous bodies. Such a model has been developed recently and introduced successfully in a 3D SPH hydrocode [Jutzi, M., Benz, W., Michel, P., 2008. Icarus 198, 242-255]. Basic tests have been performed which already showed that it is implemented in a consistent way and that theoretical solutions are well reproduced. However, its full validation requires that it is also capable of reproducing the results of real laboratory impact experiments. Here we present simulations of laboratory experiments on pumice targets for which several of the main material properties have been measured. We show that using the measured material properties and keeping the remaining free parameters fixed, our numerical model is able to reproduce the outcome of these experiments carried out under different impact conditions. This first complete validation of our model, which will be tested for other porous materials in the future, allows us to start addressing problems at larger scale related to small bodies of our Solar System, such as collisions in the Kuiper Belt or the formation of a family by the disruption of a porous

  1. HAMLET -Matroshka IIA and IIB experiments aboard the ISS: comparison of organ doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Zoltan; Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Bilski, Pawel; Hajek, Michael; Sihver, Lembit; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Hager, Luke; Burmeister, Soenke

    The Matroshka experiments and the related FP7 HAMLET project aimed to study the dose burden of the cosmic rays in the organs of the crew working inside and outside the ISS. Two of the experiments will be discussed. They were performed in two different locations inside the ISS: during the Matroshka 2A (in 2006) the phantom was stored in the Russian Docking Module (Pirs), while during the Matroshka 2B (in 2007-08) it was inside the Russian Service Module (Zvezda). Both experiments were performed in the decreasing phase of the solar cycle. Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were applied to investigate the dose contribution of the high LET radiation above ˜10 keV/µm. Two configurations of SSNTDs stacks were constructed: one for the exposure in the so called organ dose boxes (in the lung and kidney), another one for the skin dose measurements, embedded in the nomex poncho of the Phantom. In addition a reference package was placed outside the phantom. After exposure the detectors were transferred to the Earth for data evaluation. Short and long etching procedures were applied to distinguish the high and low LET particles, respectively. The particle tracks were evaluated by a semi automated image analyzer. Addi-tionally manual track parameter measurements were performed on very long tracks. As the result of measurements the LET spectra were deduced. Based on these spectra, the absorbed dose, the dose equivalent and the mean quality factor were calculated. The configuration of the stacks, the methods of the calibration and evaluation and finally the results will be presented and compared. The multiple etching and the combined evaluation method allowed to determine the fraction of the dose originated from HZE particles (Z>2 and range > major axis). Further on, data eval-uation was performed to separate the secondary particles (target fragments) from the primary particles. Although the number of high LET particles above a ˜80 keV/µm was found to be higher during

  2. Calculation of Oxygen Fugacity in High Pressure Metal-Silicate Experiments and Comparison to Standard Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Ghiorso, M.

    2009-01-01

    Calculation of oxygen fugacity in high pressure and temperature experiments in metal-silicate systems is usually approximated by the ratio of Fe in the metal and FeO in the silicate melt: (Delta)IW=2*log(X(sub Fe)/X(sub FeO)), where IW is the iron-wustite reference oxygen buffer. Although this is a quick and easy calculation to make, it has been applied to a huge variety of metallic (Fe- Ni-S-C-O-Si systems) and silicate liquids (SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, FeO, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O systems). This approach has surely led to values that have little meaning, yet are applied with great confidence, for example, to a terrestrial mantle at "IW-2". Although fO2 can be circumvented in some cases by consideration of Fe-M distribution coefficient, these do not eliminate the effects of alloy or silicate liquid compositional variation, or the specific chemical effects of S in the silicate liquid, for example. In order to address the issue of what the actual value of fO2 is in any given experiment, we have calculated fO2 from the equilibria 2Fe (metal) + SiO2 (liq) + O2 = Fe2SiO4 (liq).

  3. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energy regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.

  4. Comparison of Raman Scattering Measurements and Modeling in NIF Ignition Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Town, R J; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Moody, J D

    2011-11-04

    Recent NIF indirect-drive experiments have shown significant Raman scattering from the inner beams. NIF data has motivated improvements to rad-hydro modeling, leading to the 'high flux model' [M. D. Rosen et al., HEDP 7, 180 (2011)]. Cross-beam energy transfer [P. A. Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010] in the laser entrance hole is an important tool for achieving round implosions, and is uniformly distributed across the laser spot in rad-hydro simulations (but not necessarily in experiments). We find the Raman linear gain spectra computed with these plasma conditions agree well in time-dependent peak wavelength with the measured data, especially when overlapping laser-beam intensities are used. More detailed, spatially non-uniform modeling of the cross-beam transfer has been performed. The resulting gains better follow the time history of the measured backscatter. We shall present the impact of spatially non-uniform energy transfer on SRS gain. This metric is valid when amplification is in a linear regime, and so we shall also present an assessment of whether electron trapping in Langmuir waves can play a role in these shots.

  5. Comparison of Aseptic Compounding Errors Before and After Modified Laboratory and Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Owora, Arthur H.; Kirkpatrick, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether aseptic compounding errors were reduced at the end of the third professional year after modifying pharmacy practice laboratories and implementing an institutional introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE). Design. An aseptic compounding laboratory, previously occurring during the third-year spring semester, was added to the second-year spring semester. An 80-hour institutional IPPE was also added in the summer between the second and third years. Instructors recorded aseptic compounding errors using a grading checklist for second-year and third-year student assessments. Third-year student aseptic compounding errors were assessed prior to the curricular changes and for 2 subsequent years for students on the Oklahoma City and Tulsa campuses of the University of Oklahoma. Assessment. Both third-year cohorts committed fewer aseptic technique errors than they did during their second years, and the probability was significantly lower for students on the Oklahoma City campus. The probability of committing major aseptic technique errors was significantly lower for 2 consecutive third-year cohorts after the curricular changes. Conclusion. The addition of second-year aseptic compounding laboratory experiences and third-year institutional IPPE content reduced instructor-assessed errors at the end of the third year. PMID:26889070

  6. Evaluation of the Monte Carlo method (KTMAN-2) in fluoroscopic dosimetry and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minho; Lee, Hyounggun; Kim, Hyosim; Park, Hongmin; Lee, Wonho; Park, Sungho

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the Monte Carlo method for determining the dose calculation in fluoroscopy by using a realistic human phantom. The dose was calculated by using Monte Carlo N-particle extended (MCNPX) in simulations and was measured by using Korean Typical Man-2 (KTMAN-2) phantom in the experiments. MCNPX is a widely-used simulation tool based on the Monte-Carlo method and uses random sampling. KTMAN-2 is a virtual phantom written in MCNPX language and is based on the typical Korean man. This study was divided into two parts: simulations and experiments. In the former, the spectrum generation program (SRS-78) was used to obtain the output energy spectrum for fluoroscopy; then, each dose to the target organ was calculated using KTMAN-2 with MCNPX. In the latter part, the output of the fluoroscope was calibrated first and TLDs (Thermoluminescent dosimeter) were inserted in the ART (Alderson Radiation Therapy) phantom at the same places as in the simulation. Thus, the phantom was exposed to radiation, and the simulated and the experimental doses were compared. In order to change the simulation unit to the dose unit, we set the normalization factor (NF) for unit conversion. Comparing the simulated with the experimental results, we found most of the values to be similar, which proved the effectiveness of the Monte Carlo method in fluoroscopic dose evaluation. The equipment used in this study included a TLD, a TLD reader, an ART phantom, an ionization chamber and a fluoroscope.

  7. Undergraduate science research: a comparison of influences and experiences between premed and non-premed students.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Lara Brongo; Thomson, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Most students participating in science undergraduate research (UR) plan to attend either medical school or graduate school. This study examines possible differences between premed and non-premed students in their influences to do research and expectations of research. Questionnaire responses from 55 premed students and 80 non-premed students were analyzed. No differences existed in the expectations of research between the two groups, but attitudes toward science and intrinsic motivation to learn more about science were significantly higher for non-premed students. Follow-up interviews with 11 of the students, including a case study with one premed student, provided explanation for the observed differences. Premed students, while not motivated to learn more about science, were motivated to help people, which is why most of them are pursuing medicine. They viewed research as a way to help them become doctors and to rule out the possibility of research as a career. Non-premed students participated in research to learn more about a specific science topic and gain experience that may be helpful in graduate school research. The difference in the reasons students want to do UR may be used to tailor UR experiences for students planning to go to graduate school or medical school. PMID:21633068

  8. Evolution of Black Carbon Optical Properties during Atmospheric Aging: Comparison Between Theoretical Calculations and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Li, Q.; Yang, P.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    The optical properties of black carbon (BC) are significantly affected by its aging process in the atmosphere. We have built a conceptual model defining three BC aging stages, including freshly emitted BC aggregates, coating by soluble material and hygroscopic growth. We apply an improved geometric-optics surface-wave approach (Liou et al., 2011; Takano et al., 2013) to calculate the absorption and scattering properties of BC at each stage and compare the theoretical results with those obtained from laboratory experiments (Zhang et al., 2008; Khalizov et al., 2009). Preliminary results show a general agreement between calculated and measured BC absorption cross sections (bias < 10%) and scattering cross sections (bias < 30%) for BC aerosols with mobility diameters of 155, 245 and 320 nm at Stages 1 and 2, where BC is coated by sulfuric acid and its water solution, respectively. We find that the calculated scattering and absorption cross sections for fresh BC aggregates (Stage 0) with different sizes are invariably larger than experimental results partly because of the uncertainty in theoretical calculations for BC with size parameters less than 1. It appears that the uncertainty in the experiment could also contribute to the discrepancy, considering that the measuring instrument missed some scattering in certain angles (0-7° and 170-180°). Finally, we will apply the conceptual model and the single-scattering results to assess the effects of BC aging processes on direct radiative forcing using observed BC vertical profiles.

  9. Sedimentation equilibria in polydisperse ferrofluids: critical comparisons between experiment, theory, and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A; Ivanov, Alexey O; Lakhtina, Ekaterina V; Pshenichnikov, Alexander F; Camp, Philip J

    2016-05-14

    The sedimentation equilibrium of dipolar particles in a ferrofluid is studied using experiment, theory, and computer simulation. A theory of the particle-concentration profile in a dipolar hard-sphere fluid is developed, based on the local-density approximation and accurate expressions from a recently introduced logarithmic free energy approach. The theory is tested critically against Monte Carlo simulation results for monodisperse and bidisperse dipolar hard-sphere fluids in homogeneous gravitational fields. In the monodisperse case, the theory is very accurate over broad ranges of gravitational field strength, volume fraction, and dipolar coupling constant. In the bidisperse case, with realistic dipolar coupling constants and compositions, the theory is excellent at low volume fraction, but is slightly inaccurate at high volume fraction in that it does not capture a maximum in the small-particle concentration profile seen in simulations. Possible reasons for this are put forward. Experimental measurements of the magnetic-susceptibility profile in a real ferrofluid are then analysed using the theory. The concentration profile is linked to the susceptibility profile using the second-order modified mean-field theory. It is shown that the experimental results are not consistent with the sample being monodisperse. By introducing polydispersity in the simplest possible way, namely by assuming the system is a binary mixture, almost perfect agreement between theory and experiment is achieved. PMID:27042815

  10. Comparison of Computational Results with a Low-g, Nitrogen Slosh and Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares a fluid/thermal simulation, in Fluent, with a low-g, nitrogen slosh and boiling experiment. In 2010, the French Space Agency, CNES, performed cryogenic nitrogen experiments in a low-g aircraft campaign. From one parabolic flight, a low-g interval was simulated that focuses on low-g motion of nitrogen liquid and vapor with significant condensation, evaporation, and boiling. The computational results are compared with high-speed video, pressure data, heat transfer, and temperature data from sensors on the axis of the cylindrically shaped tank. These experimental and computational results compare favorably. The initial temperature stratification is in good agreement, and the two-phase fluid motion is qualitatively captured. Temperature data is matched except that the temperature sensors are unable to capture fast temperature transients when the sensors move from wet to dry (liquid to vapor) operation. Pressure evolution is approximately captured, but condensation and evaporation rate modeling and prediction need further theoretical analysis.

  11. How to Score the Sexual Experiences Survey? A Comparison of Nine Methods

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kelly Cue; Gilmore, Amanda K.; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Balsan, Michael J.; George, William H.; Norris, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although assessments of sexual assault victimization and perpetration have greatly improved, current scoring methods do not fully utilize the wealth of information they provide. The present studies assessed new methods for scoring sexual assault severity using the Sexual Experiences Survey (SES; Koss et al., 2007). Method In two studies of female (n = 436) and male (n = 313) non-problem drinkers who had engaged in unprotected sex within the past year, we compared three severity ranking schemes as well as three scoring methods per severity scheme for a total of nine scoring methods. New severity ranking schemes considered tactic types separately, varied combinations of assault outcomes, and accounted for multiple types and frequencies of assaults. Measures assessing convergent validity were also administered. Results Seventy-eight percent (n = 340) of the women reported victimization, and 58% (n = 180) of the men reported perpetration. All severity scoring methods were strongly associated with convergent measures. Conclusions Each scoring method is viable; however especially among samples with greater victimization/perpetration rates, there can be advantages to incorporating multiple types and frequencies of assault experiences into SES scores. Recent refinements of the SES necessitate commensurate improvements in its scoring methods in order to significantly advance the field of sexual assault assessment. PMID:25512879

  12. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energymore » regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.« less

  13. Numerical simulation of mud erosion rate in sand-mud alternate layer and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Oyama, H.; Sato, T.

    2015-12-01

    For gas production from methane hydrates in sand-mud alternate layers, depressurization method is expected as feasible. After methane hydrate is dissociated, gas and water flow in pore space. There is a concern about the erosion of mud surface and it may result in flow blockage that disturbs the gas production. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we developed a numerical simulation of water-induced mud erosion in pore-scale sand-mud domains to model such mud erosion. The size of which is of the order of 100 micro meter. Water flow is simulated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and mud surface is treated as solid boundary with arbitrary shape, which changes with time. Periodic boundary condition is adopted at the domain boundaries, except for the surface of mud layers and the upper side. Shear stress acting on the mud surface is calculated using a momentum-exchange method. Mud layer is eroded when the shear stress exceeds a threshold coined a critical shear stress. In this study, we compared the simulated mud erosion rate with experimental data acquired from an experiment using artificial sand-mud core. As a result, the simulated erosion rate agrees well with that of the experiment.

  14. Forced imbibition in natural porous media: comparison between experiments and continuum models.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Amir; Tang, Guo-Qing; Tchelepi, Hamdi A; Kovscek, Anthony R

    2007-03-01

    A well-characterized set of large-scale laboratory experiments is presented, illustrating forced imbibition displacements in the presence of irreducible wetting phase saturation in a cylindrical, homogeneous Berea sandstone rock. Experiments are designed to operate in the regime of compact microscopic flows and large-scale viscous instability. The distribution of fluid phases during the flow process is visualized by high-resolution computed tomography imaging. Linear stability analysis and high-accuracy numerical simulations are employed to analyze the ability of macroscopic continuum equations to provide a consistent approximation of the displacement process. The validity of the equilibrium relative permeability functions, which form the basis for the continuum model, is fundamentally related to the stability of the displacement process. It is shown that not only is the stable flow regime modeled accurately by existing continuum models, but the onset of instability as well as the initial unstable modes are also determined with reasonable accuracy for unstable flows. However, the continuum model is found to be deficient in the case of fully developed unstable flows. PMID:17500789

  15. Numerical Calculations of 3-D High-Lift Flows and Comparison with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William B, III

    2015-01-01

    Solutions were obtained with the Navier-Stokes CFD code TLNS3D to predict the flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing, a high-lift wing composed of three elements: the main-wing element, a deployed leading-edge slat, and a deployed trailing-edge flap. Turbulence was modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. One case with massive separation was repeated using Menter's two-equation SST (Menter's Shear Stress Transport) k-omega turbulence model in an attempt to improve the agreement with experiment. The investigation was conducted at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, and at angles of attack ranging from 10.004 degrees to 34.858 degrees. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing was 4.3 x 10 (sup 6). Compared to experiment, the numerical procedure predicted the surface pressures very well at angles of attack in the linear range of the lift. However, computed maximum lift was 5% low. Drag was mainly under predicted. The procedure correctly predicted several well-known trends and features of high-lift flows, such as off-body separation. The two turbulence models yielded significantly different solutions for the repeated case.

  16. Profile stiffness measurements in the Helically Symmetric experiment and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, G. M.; Faber, B. J.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.

    2015-05-15

    Stiffness measurements are presented in the quasi-helically symmetric experiment (HSX), in which the neoclassical transport is comparable to that in a tokamak and turbulent transport dominates throughout the plasma. Electron cyclotron emission is used to measure the local electron temperature response to modulated electron cyclotron resonant heating. The amplitude and phase of the heat wave through the steep electron temperature gradient (ETG) region of the plasma are used to determine a transient electron thermal diffusivity that is close to the steady-state diffusivity. The low stiffness in the region between 0.2 ≤ r/a ≤ 0.4 agrees with the scaling of the steady-state heat flux with temperature gradient in this region. These experimental results are compared to gyrokinetic calculations in a flux-tube geometry using the gyrokinetic electromagnetic numerical experiment code with two kinetic species. Linear simulations show that the ETG mode may be experimentally relevant within r/a ≤ 0.2, while the Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) is the dominant long-wavelength microturbulence instability across most of the plasma. The TEM is primarily driven by the density gradient. Non-linear calculations of the saturated heat flux driven by the TEM and ETG bracket the experimental heat flux.

  17. Modelling of tokamak glow discharge cleaning II: comparison with experiment and application to ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, D.; Douai, D.; Hagelaar, G.; Pitts, R. A.

    2015-02-01

    The primary function of the ITER glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system will be the preparation of in-vessel component surfaces prior to the machine start-up. It may also contribute to tritium removal in the nuclear phase. In GDC, conditioning efficiency is strongly dependent on the homogeneity of the flux of ions impinging onto wall surfaces. In order to assess the wall particle flux distribution in ITER, a novel 2D multi-fluid model, described in a companion paper, has recently been developed and is benchmarked here against both experimental glow discharge data obtained in a small laboratory chamber with cylindrical geometry and from two large toroidal devices: the JET tokamak and the RFX reverse field pinch. In the laboratory plasma, simulated and measured plasma electron density and temperature are in a good agreement in the negative glow region, while discrepancies exist in the anode glow, where the fluid description of the model is inaccurate due to long mean free paths of electrons. Calculated and measured ion flux distribution profiles in RFX are found in good agreement, whereas in JET comparison it is more difficult, due to the complex geometry of the first wall which leads to local inhomogeneities in the measured flux. Simulations of H2-GDC for ITER with one or two anodes indicate fairly homogeneous plasma parameters and wall ion flux in the negative glow at 0.5 Pa, a commonly used gas pressure for GDC in existing fusion devices. Although the axisymmetric geometry in the model does not allow all seven ITER anodes to be powered simultaneously in the simulations, the results can be extrapolated to the full system and predict ion current densities on wall surfaces close to the simple expectation of total anode current divided by wall surface area (0.21 A m-2), which is relevant to GDC in JET and other machines.

  18. Local experience in cervical cancer imaging: Comparison in tumour assessment between TRUS and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ordeanu, Claudia; Pop, Diana Cristina; Badea, Radu; Csutak, Csaba; Todor, Nicolae; Ordeanu, Calin; Kerekes, Reka; Coza, Ovidiu; Nagy, Viorica; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Irimie, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of study was to analyze the accuracy of TRUS (transrectal ultrasound) vs. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and clinical gynecological examination estimation in the evaluation of tumor dimensions. Methods The patients inclusion criterion included primarily pathologically squamous cell carcinoma, but excluded were patients who had not undergone BT (brachytherapy) and treated with palliative intent. We offer two types of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer: (a) radiochemotherapy followed by surgery and (b) exclusive radiochemotherapy. Imaging tests follow the presence of tumor and tumor size (width and thickness). Each examination was performed by a different physician who had no knowledge of the others’ findings. All patients underwent MRI prior to EBRT (external beam radiation therapy) while 18 of them also at the time of the first brachytherapy application. For the analysis we used the r-Pearson correlation coefficient. Results In 2013, 26 patients with cervical cancer were included. A total of 44 gynecological examinations were performed, 44 MRIs and 18 TRUSs. For the comparisons prior to EBRT the correlation coefficient between TRUS vs. MRI was r = 0.79 for AP and r = 0.83 for LL, for GYN vs. MRI was r = 0.6 for AP and r = 0.75 for LL. Prior to BT for GYN vs. MRI, r values were 0.60 and 0.63 for AP and LL, respectively; for GYN vs. TRUS, r values were 0.56 and 0.78 for AP and LL, respectively. Conclusions A high correlation between the three examinations was obtained. As such, TRUS can be considered a suitable method in the evaluation of tumor dimensions. PMID:25949227

  19. FVCOM validation experiments: Comparisons with ROMS for three idealized barotropic test problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haosheng; Chen, Changsheng; Cowles, Geoffrey W.; Winant, Clinton D.; Beardsley, Robert C.; Hedstrom, Kate S.; Haidvogel, Dale B.

    2008-07-01

    The unstructured-grid Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) is evaluated using three idealized benchmark test problems: the Rossby equatorial soliton, the hydraulic jump, and the three-dimensional barotropic wind-driven basin. These test cases examine the properties of numerical dispersion and damping, the performance of the nonlinear advection scheme for supercritical flow conditions, and the accuracy of the implicit vertical viscosity scheme in barotropic settings, respectively. It is demonstrated that FVCOM provides overall a second-order spatial accuracy for the vertically averaged equations (i.e., external mode), and with increasing grid resolution the model-computed solutions show a fast convergence toward the analytic solutions regardless of the particular triangulation method. Examples are provided to illustrate the ability of FVCOM to facilitate local grid refinement and speed up computation. Comparisons are also made between FVCOM and the structured-grid Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) for these test cases. For the linear problem in a simple rectangular domain, i.e., the wind-driven basin case, the performance of the two models is quite similar. For the nonlinear case, such as the Rossby equatorial soliton, the second-order advection scheme used in FVCOM is almost as accurate as the fourth-order advection scheme implemented in ROMS if the horizontal resolution is relatively high. FVCOM has taken advantage of the new development in computational fluid dynamics in resolving flow problems containing discontinuities. One salient feature illustrated by the three-dimensional barotropic wind-driven basin case is that FVCOM and ROMS simulations show different responses to the refinement of grid size in the horizontal and in the vertical.

  20. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; et al

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in compositionmore » of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.« less

  1. A comparison of Solar Mesosphere Explorer and Stratosphere Aerosol and Gas Experiment II ozone densities near the stratopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Clancy, R. T.; Mccormick, M. P.; Zawodny, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Ozone measurements made by the SME UV Spectrometer and the Stratosphere Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) spectometer are compared at 1.0 mbar for the time period from October 1984 to December 1986, using a model of the diurnal variation of ozone to correct for the difference in local times of the two measurements. The absolute values of the ozone mixing ratio measured by the two spectrometers were found to agree to better than 5 percent, with no significant divergence between the instruments. It is concluded that, since the SAGE II data are not dependent on the absolute calibration of the instrument, these data can be used as time-dependent 'ground truth' measurements for comparisons with other instruments.

  2. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  3. Time dependence of the paramagnetic Meissner effect: Comparison between model calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Magnusson, J.; Andersson, J.; Bjoernander, M.; Nordblad, P.; Svedlindh, P.

    1995-05-01

    Experimental results of the temperature, field, and time dependence of the magnetization in high-temperature superconductors displaying the paramagnetic Meissner effect are compared with numerical results from model calculations. In experiments the relaxation rate of the zero-field-cooled magnetization exhibits novel field-dependent properties and the field-cooled magnetization is found to increase with time. A model based on an ensemble of superconducting loops, each loop containing an ordinary Josephson junction or a {pi} junction, is shown to be able to account for most of the experimental results. The time-dependent magnetization is explained by thermally activated flipping of spontaneous orbital magnetic moments, a dynamical process which is fundamentally different from the flux-creep phenomenon usually observed in type-II superconductors.

  4. Calculated rotation-bending energy levels of CH 5+ and a comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-05-01

    We report J > 0 CH 5+ levels computed by fixing stretch coordinates. They are computed by using a simple product basis, exploiting symmetry, and carefully parallelizing the calculation. The J > 0 CH 5+ levels are compared with those obtained from other theoretical methods and with experimental ground state combination differences of Asvany et al. [Science, 347, 1346 (2015)]. If the assignment of Asvany et al. is correct, there are important differences between the levels we compute and those observed. We propose a different assignment of the experimental levels that reduces the maximum error from 34 to 2 cm-1. The new assignment can only be correct if states of both parities exist in the experiment. Although, ro-vibrational levels of CH 5+ cannot be associated with individual vibrational states, they do occur in blocks separated by gaps.

  5. Calculated rotation-bending energy levels of CH5 (+) and a comparison with experiment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-05-28

    We report J > 0 CH5 (+) levels computed by fixing stretch coordinates. They are computed by using a simple product basis, exploiting symmetry, and carefully parallelizing the calculation. The J > 0 CH5 (+) levels are compared with those obtained from other theoretical methods and with experimental ground state combination differences of Asvany et al. [Science, 347, 1346 (2015)]. If the assignment of Asvany et al. is correct, there are important differences between the levels we compute and those observed. We propose a different assignment of the experimental levels that reduces the maximum error from 34 to 2 cm(-1). The new assignment can only be correct if states of both parities exist in the experiment. Although, ro-vibrational levels of CH5 (+) cannot be associated with individual vibrational states, they do occur in blocks separated by gaps. PMID:27250303

  6. Prediction of transonic flutter for a supercritical wing by modified strip analysis and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. C., Jr.; Wynne, E. C.; Farmer, M. G.; Desmarais, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    Use of a supercritical airfoil can adversely affect wing flutter speeds in the transonic range. As adequate theories for three dimensional unsteady transonic flow are not yet available, the modified strip analysis was used to predict the transonic flutter boundary for the supercritical wing. The steady state spanwise distributions of section lift curve slope and aerodynamic center, required as input for the flutter calculations, were obtained from pressure distributions. The calculated flutter boundary is in agreement with experiment in the subsonic range. In the transonic range, a transonic bucket is calculated which closely resembles the experimental one with regard to both shape and depth, but it occurs at about 0.04 Mach number lower than the experimental one.

  7. [Comparison of different G-CSF treatment effectiveness in experiments on irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvenskiĭ, L M; Shchegoleva, R A; Deshevoĭ, Iu B; Lisina, N I; Titov, B A

    2012-01-01

    In the experiments on F1 (CBA x C57BL) and BALB mice irradiated by 137Cs gamma-rays, preparations of unglycosilated G-SCF such as Neupogen and their domestic analogs Leucostim and Neupomax were investigated. The tests such as 9-day bone marrow cellularity (BMC) and endogenous CFUs, the neutrophile number restoration, the 30-day survival index have shown that all three preparations have an approximately equal effectiveness relating to acute radiation disease treatment and granulopoiesis stimulation after a 5-10 day consecutive administration following irradiation of mice at lethal and sublethal doses. We have come to the conclusion that Leucostim and Neupomax can be regarded as adequate substitutes for Neupogen. PMID:23227714

  8. Isentropic Compression up to 200 KBars for LX 04, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Hare, D.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on LX-04 (HMX / Viton 85/15) were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE. 2D and 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1067 on LX 04. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  9. Copper Tube Compression in Z-Current Geometry, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Cyclope Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Metallic tubes compressions in Z-current geometry were performed at the Cyclope facility from Gramat Research Center in order to study the behavior of metals under large strain at high strain rate. 3D configurations of cylinder compressions have been calculated here to benchmark the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the Cyclope experiments. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  10. Isentropic Compression with a Rectangular Configuration for Tungstene and Tantalum, Computations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Reisman, D. B.; Bastea, M.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on metals are performed at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope, associated Hugoniot and phase changes of these metals. 3D configurations have been calculated here to benchmark the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shots 1511 and 1555. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.