Science.gov

Sample records for l2-5 experiment comparison

  1. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2, Cycle 36-04 using LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) Large Break Experiment L2-5

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, Young Seok; Lee, Sang Yong; Kim, Hho-Jung . Korea Nuclear Safety Center)

    1990-04-01

    The LOFT L2-5 LBLOCA Experiment was simulated using the RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 code to assess its capability to predict the phenomena in LBLOCA. One base case calculation and three cases of different nodalizations were carried out. The effect of different nodalization was studied in the area of the downcomer and core. For a sensitivity study, another calculation was executed using an updated version of RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04. A Split downcomer with one crossflow junction and two core channels were found to be effective in describing the ECC bypass and hot channel behavior. And the updated version was found to be effective in overcoming the code deficiency in the interfacial friction and reflood quenching. 11 refs., 55 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. 33alloy: comparison between experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M J; Mendelev, M I; Asta, M

    2014-04-22

    We report data on the structure of liquid Al and an Al67Mg33 alloy obtained from state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. To facilitate a direct comparison between these data, we develop a method to elongate the AIMD pair correlation function in order to obtain reliable AIMD structure factors. The comparison reveals an appreciable level of discrepancy between experimental and AIMD liquid structures, with the latter being consistently more ordered than the former at the same temperature. The discrepancy noted in this study is estimated to have significant implications for simulation-based calculations of liquid transport properties and solid–liquid interface kinetic properties.

  3. Comparison of bioseparation methods for microgravity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cohly, Hari H. P.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Barlow, Grant H.; Hymer, Wesley C.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of the 1-g version of the continuous-flow electrophoresis (CFE) system flown on Space Shuttle missions is compared with the efficiency of a commercial CFE for separating living cells (human kidney, liver, and pituitary-gland cells and T-lymphocytes). In addition, the CFE system and a reciprocal isoelectric focusing (RIEF) system are compared with respect to protein pyrification efficiency. Correlations were made among electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs), secretory functions of cells, and input sample concentrations. A significant reduction in mean and range EPM was observed when input sample concentrations exceeded a low threshohold. This effect was not observed in microgravity experiments conducted at sample concentrations three times greater than the threshold for the controls. Comparison of CFE and RIEF methods showed that there are apparent advantages for each method depending on the product. For example, RIEF purification of urokinase removed more protein impurities, but focused the enzyme at a pH different than the enzyme's known isoelectric point.

  4. OpenMP Experiences and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Terry; Thigpen, William W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The document discusses message passage interfaces (MPI), open message passage issues and parallelization. A comparison of the two vector platforms, C90 and SVlex is presented. Sections of the document are written in computer code.

  5. Comparison of integrated numerical experiments with accelerator and FEL experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cooper, R.K.; Elliott, J.C.; Gitomer, S.J.; Goldstein, J.C.; Jones, M.E.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Takeda, H.; Tokar, R.L.; Wang, T.S.; Young, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    Even at the conceptual level the strong coupling between the laser subsystem elements, such as the accelerator, wiggler, optics, and control, greatly complicates the understanding and design of an FEL. Given the requirements for a high-performance FEL, the coupling between the laser subsystems must be included in the design approach. To address the subsystem coupling the concept of an integrated numerical experiment (INEX) has been implemented. Unique features of the INEX approach are consistency and numerical equivalence of experimental diagnostic. The equivalent numerical diagnostics mitigates the major problem of misinterpretation that often occurs when theoretical and experimental data are compared. A complete INEX model has been applied to the 10{mu}m high-extraction-efficiency experiment at Los Alamos and the 0.6-{mu}m Burst Mode experiment at Boeing Aerospace. In addition, various subsets of the INEX model have been compared with a number of other experiments. Overall, the agreement between INEX and the experiments is very good. With the INEX approach, it now appears possible to design high-performance FELS for numerous applications. The first full-scale test of the INEX approach is the Los Alamos HIBAF experiment. The INEX concept, implementation, and validation with experiments are discussed. 28 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Comparison of secondary electron emission simulation to experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Ivanov, V.; Jokela, S. J.; Veryovkin, I.; Zinovev, A.; Frisch, H.

    2011-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, empirical theories, and close comparison to experiment were used to parameterize the secondary electron emission (SEE) yields of several highly emissive materials for microchannel plates. In addition, a detailed experiment and analysis of gold were carried out at Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results will be used in the selection of emissive and resistive materials for deposition and characterization experiments that will be conducted by a large-area fast detector project at Argonne.

  7. GASFLOW comparisons with bureau of mines experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy and Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the flammability of mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and air. The tests were performed in a spherical chamber under quiescent and turbulent conditions. This paper describes combustion calculations using the GASFLOW code and compares the calculated pressure ratios with experiments mentioned above. GASFLOW is a finite-volume computer code that solves the transient, three-dimensional, compressible fluid, Navier-Stokes equations with multiple species coupled with finite-rate chemical kinetics. The computational results show good agreement with the experimental data and confirm GASFLOW to be a valuable tool for evaluating the above combustion process.

  8. Disentangling forms of Lorentz violation with complementary clock comparison experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2009-03-15

    Atomic clock comparisons provide some of the most precise tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetries in the laboratory. With data from multiple such experiments using different nuclei, it is possible to constrain new regions of the parameter space for Lorentz violation. Relativistic effects in the nuclei allow us to disentangle forms of Lorentz violation which could not be separately measured in purely nonrelativistic experiments. The disentangled bounds in the neutron sectors are at the 10{sup -28} GeV level, far better than could be obtained with any other current technique.

  9. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows and Comparison With Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.; Markelov, Gennady N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents computational results obtained with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for several biconic test cases in which shock interactions and flow separation-reattachment are key features of the flow. Recent ground-based experiments have been performed for several biconic configurations, and surface heating rate and pressure measurements have been proposed for code validation studies. The present focus is to expand on the current validating activities for a relatively new DSMC code called DS2V that Bird (second author) has developed. Comparisons with experiments and other computations help clarify the agreement currently being achieved between computations and experiments and to identify the range of measurement variability of the proposed validation data when benchmarked with respect to the current computations. For the test cases with significant vibrational nonequilibrium, the effect of the vibrational energy surface accommodation on heating and other quantities is demonstrated.

  10. Comparison of simulation with experiment in an RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Boicourt, G.P.; Sander, O.R.; Wangler, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    The accelerator test stand (ATS) RFQ has provided an opportunity to compare the predictions of the RFQ beam-dynamics code PARMTEQ with actual operation of an RFQ. For this comparison, the code was adapted to simulate the measured operation parameters, which are somewhat different from those of the ideal design. A Monte Carlo code was written to provide input to PARMTEQ, based on measured input beam distributions. With these refinements, the code has given results that are in good agreement with measurements and has provided information leading to an explanation of an unexpected set of measurements. This paper describes the method used to generate a pseudo particle beam based on the measured transverse properties of the RFQ input beam and describes some of the comparisons between simulation and experiment. An explanation is provided for the energy-spectrum structure observed in the RFQ output beam during low-voltage operation. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Comparison of simulation with experiment in an RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Boicourt, G.P.; Sander, O.R.; Wangler, T.P.

    1985-10-01

    The accelerator test stand (ATS) RFQ has provided an opportunity to compare the predictions of the RFQ beam-dynamics code PARMTEQ with actual operation of an RFQ. For this comparison, the code was adapted to simulate the measured operation parameters, which are somewhat different from those of the ideal design. A Monte Carlo code was written to provide input to PARMTEQ, based on measured input beam distributions. With these refinements, the code has given results that are in good agreement with measurements and has provided information leading to an explanation of an unexpected set of measurements. This paper describes the method used to generate a pseudo particle beam based on the measured transverse properties of the RFQ input beam and describes some of the comparisons between simulation and experiment. An explanation is provided for the energy-spectrum structure observed in the RFQ output beam during low-voltage operation.

  12. Experience with CANDID: Comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.; Cannon, M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents results from the authors experience with CANDID (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases), which was designed to facilitate image retrieval by content using a query-by-example methodology. A global signature describing the texture, shape, or color content is first computed for every image stored in a database, and a normalized similarity measure between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to match signatures. This method can be used to retrieve images from a database that are similar to a user-provided example image. Results for three test applications are included.

  13. Initial NIF Shock Timing Experiments: Comparison with Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    Initial experiments are underway to demonstrate the techniques required to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and DANTE. The results of these measurements will be used to set the precision pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  14. Results from the International Halocarbons in Air Comparison Experiment (IHALACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. D.; Engel, A.; Mühle, J.; Elkins, J. W.; Artuso, F.; Atlas, E.; Aydin, M.; Blake, D.; Brunke, E.-G.; Chiavarini, S.; Fraser, P. J.; Happell, J.; Krummel, P. B.; Levin, I.; Loewenstein, M.; Maione, M.; Montzka, S. A.; O'Doherty, S.; Reimann, S.; Rhoderick, G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Scheel, H. E.; Steele, L. P.; Vollmer, M. K.; Weiss, R. F.; Worthy, D.; Yokouchi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The International Halocarbons in Air Comparison Experiment (IHALACE) was conducted to document relationships between calibration scales among various laboratories that measure atmospheric greenhouse and ozone depleting gases. This study included trace gases such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), as well as nitrous oxide, methane, sulfur hexafluoride, very short-lived halocompounds, and carbonyl sulfide. Many of these gases are present in the unpolluted atmosphere at pmol mol-1 (parts per trillion) or nmol mol-1 (parts per billion) levels. Six stainless steel cylinders containing natural and modified natural air samples were circulated among 19 laboratories. Results from this experiment reveal relatively good agreement (within a few percent) among commonly used calibration scales. Scale relationships for some gases, such as CFC-12 and CCl4, were found to be consistent with those derived from estimates of global mean mole fractions, while others, such as halon-1211 and CH3Br, revealed discrepancies. The transfer of calibration scales among laboratories was problematic in many cases, meaning that measurements tied to a particular scale may not, in fact, be compatible. Large scale transfer errors were observed for CH3CCl3 (10-100%) and CCl4 (2-30%), while much smaller scale transfer errors (< 1%) were observed for halon-1211, HCFC-22, and HCFC-142b. These results reveal substantial improvements in calibration over previous comparisons. However, there is room for improvement in communication and coordination of calibration activities with respect to the measurement of halogenated and related trace gases.

  15. Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment 1. II - Instrument calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Ucker, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    The science objective for the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is to accurately measure the full disk solar spectral irradiance in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region over a long time period. The SOLSTICE design was driven by the requirement for long-term, precise solar photometry conducted from space. The SOLSTICE 1 is on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), launched in September 1991 with the possibility for a 10-year operational mission. The in-flight calibration for SOLSTICE to meet its primary objective is the routine measurements of the UV radiation from a set of early-type stars, using the identical optical elements employed for the solar observations. The extensive preflight calibrations of the instrument have yielded a precise characterization of the three SOLSTICE channels. Details of the preflight and in-flight SOLSTICE calibrations are discussed in this paper.

  16. Numerical simulation of molten silicon flow; comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Koichi; Nicodème, Pierre; Lecomte, Michael; Dupret, François; Crochet, Marcel J.

    1991-12-01

    Numerical simulation containing fluid flow, heat conduction and heat exchange by radiation has been performed using the geometry of a real Czochralski furnace for silicon single crystal growth. The flow velocity fields of molten silicon are obtained from extrapolation of the stream function, which has been newly developed using the velocity boundary layer theory. The calculated flow velocity and particle path are semi-quantitatively identical to the results obtained from X-ray radiography experiment. The calculated value of the characteristic velocity is about 10 -2 m/s. The same order of flow velocity which is obtained from the experiment has been already reported. It has also become clear from a comparison of flow velocities between experimental and calculated results that the order of the volume expansion coefficient of the molten silicon (β) is 10 -4 K -1. The flow was almost axisymmetric and steady for a specific case with low crystal and crucible rotation rates and with a shallow melt. We also found that a flow with larger azimuthal velocity component exists just beneath a crystal, while that with opposite flow direction exists near the crucible wall.

  17. Extension of nanoconfined DNA: Quantitative comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iarko, V.; Werner, E.; Nyberg, L. K.; Müller, V.; Fritzsche, J.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Beech, J. P.; Tegenfeldt, J. O.; Mehlig, K.; Westerlund, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-12-01

    The extension of DNA confined to nanochannels has been studied intensively and in detail. However, quantitative comparisons between experiments and model calculations are difficult because most theoretical predictions involve undetermined prefactors, and because the model parameters (contour length, Kuhn length, effective width) are difficult to compute reliably, leading to substantial uncertainties. Here we use a recent asymptotically exact theory for the DNA extension in the "extended de Gennes regime" that allows us to compare experimental results with theory. For this purpose, we performed experiments measuring the mean DNA extension and its standard deviation while varying the channel geometry, dye intercalation ratio, and ionic strength of the buffer. The experimental results agree very well with theory at high ionic strengths, indicating that the model parameters are reliable. At low ionic strengths, the agreement is less good. We discuss possible reasons. In principle, our approach allows us to measure the Kuhn length and the effective width of a single DNA molecule and more generally of semiflexible polymers in solution.

  18. Comparison Between Theory and Experiment for Wings at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G

    1951-01-01

    This paper presents a critical comparison made between experimental and theoretical results for the aerodynamic characteristics of wings at supersonic flight speeds. As a preliminary, a brief, nonmathematical review is given of the basic assumptions and general findings of supersonic wing theory in two and three dimensions. Published data from two-dimensional pressure-distribution tests are then used to illustrate the effects of fluid viscosity and to assess the accuracy of linear theory as compared with the more exact theories which are available in the two-dimensional case. Finally, an account is presented of an NACA study of the over-all force characteristics of three-dimensional wings at supersonic speed. In this study, the lift, pitching moment, and drag characteristics of several families of wings of varying plan form and section were measured in the wind tunnel and compared with values predicted by the three-dimensional linear theory. The regions of agreement and disagreement between experiment and theory are noted and discussed.

  19. Comparison between experiment and simulation for argon inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Fei; Zhao Shuxia; Li Xiaosong; Wang Younian

    2009-11-15

    In order to include the nonlocal characteristics of electrons and investigate the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) resources more completely, we have developed a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/fluid hybrid model and calculated the axial and radial distributions of electron density, electron temperature, plasma potential, and electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) of Ar discharge in a planar ICP. Furthermore, to make the model more practical, we still incorporate the effects of metastable atoms, whose sets of rate coefficients and density are, respectively, calculated through the electron MC part and fluid module. Besides, the corresponding Langmuir probe measurements are used to compare these data to validate the simulated results. Under all the selected discharge powers and pressures, the theoretically simulated and experimentally measured quantity profiles agree reasonably with each other, embodied in the generally identical magnitude ranges and spatial distributions. Furthermore, the interpretations about their detailed differences are given, which are based on the designs of both experimental schematic and model configuration. The analysis implements that the inclusions of electron-electron collision and a neutral density distribution into the hybrid model are likely to improve the comparison between the model predictions and experiment diagnostics. Furthermore, the evolution of plasma parameters and EEDFs with discharge conditions is discussed.

  20. A Comparison of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Functional Measurement Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Acker, Frederik; Theuns, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Information Integration Theory (IIT) is concerned with how people combine information into an overall judgment. A method is hereby presented to perform Functional Measurement (FM) experiments, the methodological counterpart of IIT, on the Web. In a comparison of Web-based FM experiments, face-to-face experiments, and computer-based experiments in…

  1. Autoionization in atomic chlorine: Comparison of theories and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscic, B.; Berkowitz, J. )

    1989-12-01

    High-resolution spectra (0.07 and 0.14 A, full width at half-maximum) are presented for the region between 860 and 918 A of the photoionization spectrum of atomic chlorine. Comparison is made with several many-body theories. Significant disagreement with theory is found, particularly with the widths and profiles of the sharp autoionizing resonances.

  2. Test Experience Effects in Longitudinal Comparisons of Adult Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that experience with cognitive tests can influence estimates of cognitive change. Prior research has estimated experience effects at the level of groups by comparing the performance of a group of participants tested for the second time with the performance of a different group of participants at the same age tested for the…

  3. Theory and Experiment of Multielement Airfoils: A Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerwiec, Ryan; Edwards, J. R.; Rumsey, C. L.; Hassan, H. A.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed comparison of computed and measured pressure distributions, velocity profiles, transition onset, and Reynolds shear stresses for multi-element airfoils is presented. It is shown that the transitional k-zeta model, which is implemented into CFL3D, does a good job of predicting pressure distributions, transition onset, and velocity profiles with the exception of velocities in the slat wake region. Considering the fact that the hot wire used was not fine enough to resolve Reynolds stresses in the boundary layer, comparisons of turbulence stresses varied from good to fair. It is suggested that the effects of unsteadiness be thoroughly evaluated before more complicated transition/turbulence models are used. Further, it is concluded that the present work presents a viable and economical method for calculating laminar/transitional/turbuient flows over complex shapes without user interface.

  4. International hospital productivity comparison: experiences from the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Medin, Emma; Häkkinen, Unto; Linna, Miika; Anthun, Kjartan S; Kittelsen, Sverre A C; Rehnberg, Clas

    2013-09-01

    This article focuses on describing the methodological challenges intrinsic in international comparative studies of hospital productivity and how these challenges have been addressed within the context of hospital comparisons in the Nordic countries. The hospital sectors in the Nordic countries are suitable for international comparison as they exhibit similar structures in the organisation for hospital care, hold administrative data of good quality at the hospital level, apply a similar secondary patient classification system, and use similar definitions of operating costs. The results of a number of studies have suggested marked differences in hospital cost efficiency and hospital productivity across the Nordic countries and the Finnish hospitals have the highest estimates in all the analyses. Explanatory factors that were tested and seemed to be of limited importance included institutional, structural and technical. A factor that is yet to be included in the Nordic hospital productivity comparison is the quality of care. Patient-level data available from linkable national registers in each country enable the development of quality indicators and will be included in the forthcoming hospital productivity studies within the context of the EuroHOPE (European health care outcomes, performance and efficiency) project. PMID:23582633

  5. Test experience effects in longitudinal comparisons of adult cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    It is widely recognized that experience with cognitive tests can influence estimates of cognitive change. Prior research has estimated experience effects at the level of groups by comparing the performance of a group of participants tested for the second time with the performance of a different group of participants at the same age tested for the first time. This twice-minus-once-tested method was adapted in the current study to derive estimates of test experience at the level of individual participants. Among the major findings were that experience estimates were smaller at older ages, with measures of vocabulary and speed compared to measures of memory, reasoning, and spatial visualization, and with longer intervals between the first and second occasion. Although relations of overall cognitive ability with test experience effects were weak, there were significant correlations among the experience estimates in different cognitive domains. These results imply that at least in adulthood, simple measures of cognitive change likely underestimate maturational influences on cognitive functioning, and to a greater extent in young adults than in older adults. PMID:26098579

  6. A Comparison of Metamodeling Techniques via Numerical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of a few metamodeling techniques using numerical experiments for the single input-single output case. These experiments enable comparing the models' predictions with the phenomenon they are aiming to describe as more data is made available. These techniques include (i) prediction intervals associated with a least squares parameter estimate, (ii) Bayesian credible intervals, (iii) Gaussian process models, and (iv) interval predictor models. Aspects being compared are computational complexity, accuracy (i.e., the degree to which the resulting prediction conforms to the actual Data Generating Mechanism), reliability (i.e., the probability that new observations will fall inside the predicted interval), sensitivity to outliers, extrapolation properties, ease of use, and asymptotic behavior. The numerical experiments describe typical application scenarios that challenge the underlying assumptions supporting most metamodeling techniques.

  7. Experiments for comparison of small scale rainfall simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserloh, T.; Ries, J. B.

    2012-04-01

    Small scale portable rainfall simulators are an essential tool in research of recent process dynamics of soil erosion. Such rainfall simulators differ in design, rainfall intensities, rain spectra etc., impeding comparison of the results. Due to different research questions a standardisation of rainfall simulation is not in sight. Nevertheless, the data become progressively important for soil erosion modelling and therefore the basis for decision-makers in application-oriented erosion protection. The project aims at providing a criteria catalogue for estimation of the different simulators as well as the comparability of the results and a uniform calibration procedure for generated rainfall. Within the project "Comparability of simulation results of different rainfall simulators as input data for soil erosion modelling (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft - DFG, Project No. Ri 835/6-1)" many rainfall simulators used by European research groups were compared. The artificially generated rainfall of the rainfall simulators at the Universities Basel, La Rioja, Malaga, Trier, Tübingen, Valencia, Wageningen, Zaragoza and at different Spanish CSIC-institutes (Almeria, Cordoba, Granada, Murcia, Zaragoza) were measured with the same methods (Laser Precipitation Monitor for drop spectra and rain collectors for spatial distribution). The data are very beneficial for improvements of simulators and comparison of simulators and results. Furthermore, they can be used for comparative studies with natural rainfall spectra. A broad range of rainfall data was measured (e.g. intensity: 30 - 149 mmh-1, Christiansen Coefficient for spatial rainfall distribution 61 - 98 %, mean drop diameter 0.375 - 5.0 mm, mean kinetic energy expenditure 25 - 1322 J m-2 h-1, mean kinetic energy per unit area and unit depth of rainfall 4 - 14 J m-2 mm-1). Similarities among the simulators could be found e.g. concerning drop size distributions (maximum drop numbers are reached within the two smallest drop

  8. Validation of KENO V.a Comparison with Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    Section 1 of this report documents the validation of KENO V.a against 258 critical experiments. Experiments considered were primarily high or low enriched uranium systems. The results indicate that the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Criticality Program accurately calculates a broad range of critical experiments. A substantial number of the calculations showed a positive or negative bias in excess of 1 1/2% in k-effective (k{sub eff}). Classes of criticals which show a bias include 3% enriched green blocks, highly enriched uranyl fluoride slab arrays, and highly enriched uranyl nitrate arrays. If these biases are properly taken into account, the KENO V.a code can be used with confidence for the design and criticality safety analysis of uranium-containing systems. Section 2 of this report documents the results of investigation into the cause of the bias observed in Sect. 1. The results of this study indicate that the bias seen in Sect. 1 is caused by code bias, cross-section bias, reporting bias, and modeling bias. There is evidence that many of the experiments used in this validation and in previous validations are not adequately documented. The uncertainty in the experimental parameters overshadows bias caused by the code and cross sections and prohibits code validation to better than about 1% in k{sub eff}.

  9. A Comparison of Internship Stage Models: Evidence from Intern Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diambra, Joel F.; Cole-Zakrzewski, Kylie G.; Booher, Josh

    2004-01-01

    Human service interns completing their four-year Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Tennessee participated in this study which focused on investigating student internship experiences from the perspective of three different internship stage models. the three models studied include those of Infester and Boss (1998), Sweitzer and King…

  10. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  11. Male and Female Superintendents: A Comparison of Differences in Salaries, Interview Experiences, and Contract Negotiations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the results of a comparison of differences in salary, interview experiences, and contract negotiations for male and female superintendents. Other variables of interest include educational attainment and educational experiences. The study participants (N = 161) consisted of practicing superintendents from four regions of the…

  12. School Climate and the Experience of LGBT Students: A Comparison of the United States and Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizmony-Levy, Oren; Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the school experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in the United States and Israel. Through comparison of the sociocultural and edu-cational contexts, the authors assess whether school experience of LGBT students differs or operates similarly across countries. The authors use data from the…

  13. MISSE Thermal Control Materials with Comparison to Previous Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria; Pippin, H. Gary; Frey, George

    2008-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), including inorganic coatings, anodized aluminum, and multi-layer insulation materials. These and other material samples were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was limited for some samples. Materials flown on MISSE-1 and MISSE-2 were exposed to the space environment for nearly four years. Materials flown on MISSE-3, MISSE-4, and MISSE-5 were exposed to the space environment for one year. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. Effects of short duration versus long duration exposure on ISS are explored, as well as comparable data from previous flight experiments, such as the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA), Optical Properties Monitor (OPM), and Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).

  14. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kullberg, A. Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-15

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  15. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullberg, A.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  16. Comparison of experiment and theory for the Helium RF discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.; Greenberg, K.E.; Hebner, G.A.

    1992-12-01

    Electron and metastable densities were measured for Helium discharges in a symmetrically driven {open_quotes}GEC Reference Cell.{close_quotes} The electron density was determined using microwave interferometry. Spatially resolved singlet and triplet metastable profiles were determined using absorption spectroscopy. The authors compare these quantitative measurements with theoretical predictions of a 1D Boltzmann description of the system. The Boltzmann description of the electrons is used with a five-level model of He, including 14 electron-produced transitions. The ions and neutrals obey fluid equations. The Boltzmann calculations for the fast processes are used to compute rf-cycle-averaged rates and fields; these rates and fields drive the slow time-scale processes for the heavy particles, unrestricted by the rf time scale. In general they find the theoretical predictions of plasma density to be within a factor of four of the measured density. Comparisons of the measured spatial profiles of the metastable densities with theoretical predictions elucidates some of the discharge kinetics.

  17. Prebreakup arcs: A comparison between theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, P.L. ); Silevitch, M.B. ); Block, L.P.; Faelthammar, C.G. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have developed a model describing the structure of a prebreakup arc based on an ionospheric Cowling channel and its extension into the magnetosphere. A coupled two-circuit representation of the substorm current wedge is used which is locally superimposed on both westward and eastward electrojets. They find that brighter, more unstable prebreakup arcs are formed in the premidnight than in the postmidnight sector. This contributes to the observed prevalence of auroral activity in the premidnight sector. Also, the model predicts that the north-south dimensions of the current wedge in the ionospheree should vary from a few kilometers at an invarient latitude ({Lambda}) of 62{degree} to hundreds of kilometers above {Lambda} = 68{degree}. Comparison of the model results with the extensive observations of Marklund et al (1983) for a specific arc observed just after onset shows good agreement, particularly for the magnitude of the polarization electric field and the arc size. They conclude that this agreement is further evidence that the substorm breakup arises from magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the near magnetosphere and that the steady state model developed here is descriptive of the breakup arc before inductive effects become dominant.

  18. Laser-Induced Ignition Modeling and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dors, Ivan; Qin, W.; Chen, Y.-L.; Parigger, C.; Lewis, J. W. L.

    2000-11-01

    We have studied experimentally the ignition resulting from optical breakdowns in mixtures of oxygen and the fuel ammonia induced by a 10 nanosecond pulsewidth laser for a time of hundreds of milliseconds using laser spectroscopy. In these studies, we have for the first time characterized the laser-induced plasma, the formation of the combustion radicals, the detonation wave, the flame front and the combustion process itself. The objective of the modeling is to understand the fluid dynamic and chemical kinetic effects following the nominal 10 ns laser pulse until 1 millisecond after laser breakdown. The calculated images match the experimentally recorded data sets and show spatial details covering volumes of 1/10000 cc to 1000 cc. The code was provided by CFD Research Corporation of Huntsville, Alabama, and was appropriately augmented to compute the observed phenomena. The fully developed computational model now includes a kinetic mechanism that implements plasma equilibrium kinetics in ionized regions, and non-equilibrium, multistep, finite rate reactions in non-ionized regions. The predicted fluid phenomena agree with various flow patterns characteristic of laser spark ignition as measured in the CLA laboratories. Comparison of calculated and measured OH and NH concentration will be presented.

  19. Comparisons of Single Drop Impact Simulations with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medam, Krishna Teja

    As the size of electronic equipment is reduced, the ability to reject waste heat is also reduced due to smaller component surface areas, thereby affecting the component performance and finally leading to the damage of the component. Spray cooling offers a means to achieve high rates of heat transfer from microelectronic components and other high energy density devices. As a first step in investigating spray cooling, a single liquid drop impacting onto a thin liquid film was studied at isothermal conditions. 2D axisymmetric cases were simulated with ANSYS Fluent and 3D cases with OpenFOAM using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) model. The post processing of the results was performed in Surfer (Version 9) software in order to determine the liquid film thickness and then calculate the volume of the liquid under the cavity (sub-cavity liquid volume) as functions of time. These simulations agreed with the experimental data during the cavity formation phase, but did not closely match with the experiments during the refilling of the cavity in the majority of the cases. It was speculated that the discrepancies could be due to the three dimensional instabilities leading to droplet ejection from the crown during the retraction phase. These instabilities are omitted from the 2D simulations, and were not adequately resolved in the 3D simulations. For this reason, identical cases were simulated in 3D in OpenFOAM using the VOF model. The improved agreement with experiments obtained with the three dimensional simulations is discussed.

  20. Comparison of intersecting pedestrian flows based on experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Seyfried, A.

    2014-07-01

    Intersections of pedestrian flows feature multiple types, varying in the numbers of flow directions as well as intersecting angles. In this article results from intersecting flow experiments with two different intersecting angles are compared. To analyze the transport capabilities the Voronoi method is used to resolve the fine structure of the resulting velocity-density relations and spatial dependence of the measurements. The fundamental diagrams of various flow types are compared and show no apparent difference with respect to the intersecting angle 90° and 180°. This result indicates that head-on conflicts of different types of flow have the same influence on the transport properties of the system, which demonstrates the high self-organization capabilities of pedestrians.

  1. Comparison of Theory and Experiment on Aeroacoustic Loads and Deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.; Bourgine, A.; Bonomi, B.

    1999-01-01

    The correlation of acoustic pressure loads induced by a turbulent wake on a nearby structural panel is considered: this problem is relevant to the acoustic fatigue of aircraft, rocket and satellite structures. Both the correlation of acoustic pressure loads and the panel deflections, were measured in an 8-m diameter transonic wind tunnel. Using the measured correlation of acoustic pressures, as an input to a finite-element aeroelastic code, the panel response was reproduced. The latter was also satisfactorily reproduced, using again the aeroelastic code, with input given by a theoretical formula for the correlation of acoustic pressures; the derivation of this formula, and the semi-empirical parameters which appear in it, are included in this paper. The comparison of acoustic responses in aeroacoustic wind tunnels (AWT) and progressive wave tubes (PWT) shows that much work needs to be done to bridge that gap; this is important since the PWT is the standard test means, whereas the AWT is more representative of real flight conditions but also more demanding in resources. Since this may be the first instance of successful modelling of acoustic fatigue, it may be appropriate to list briefly the essential ``positive'' features and associated physical phenomena: (i) a standard aeroelastic structural code can predict acoustic fatigue, provided that the correlation of pressure loads be adequately specified; (ii) the correlation of pressure loads is determined by the interference of acoustic waves, which depends on the exact evaluation of multiple scattering integrals, involving the statistics of random phase shifts; (iii) for the relatively low frequencies (one to a few hundred Hz) of aeroacoustic fatigue, the main cause of random phase effects is scattering by irregular wakes, which are thin on wavelength scale, and appear as partially reflecting rough interfaces. It may also be appropriate to mention some of the ``negative'' features, to which may be attached illusory

  2. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  3. Pig Organ Energy Loss Comparison Experiments Using BBs.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nicholas R; Musgrave, Ian; Fisk, Wesley; Byard, Roger W

    2016-05-01

    Torso models for ballistics research require that the mechanical properties of simulant materials must match the heterogeneous nature of tissues/organs within the human thorax/abdomen. A series of energy loss experiments were conducted on fresh porcine organs/tissues at room temperature and 37°C, using steel 4.5 mm BBs fired from a Daisy(®) brand air rifle. They were compared to FBI and NATO specification ordnance gelatin and a candidate surrogate material called Simulant "A". Two CED M2 chronographs measured BB velocity. The resulting energy loss was established using KE = 1/2 mv² before and after target perforation. The combined results at room temperature and 37°C were as follows: FBI specification gelatin was similar (p > 0.05) to heart and lung, spleen was similar to NATO specification gelatin, Simulant "A" was similar to hindquarter muscle, and hindquarter muscle, kidney, and spleen were similar to each other regarding energy retardation. These results can be used as a basis for the development of simulant materials to create an anatomically correct heterogeneous model. PMID:27122406

  4. High frequency intensity fluctuations: Comparison of theory with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Steven D.; Bradley, David L.; Culver, R. Lee

    2003-10-01

    Amplitude fluctuations were measured during August 2002 near San Diego using 20 and 40 kHz cw and fm signals. Source-receiver separation was 1 km; source depths were 10 m to 67 m; receiver hydrophone depths were 44 m to 217 m. A 15-element chain of CTD sensors was towed to measure horizontal temperature and salinity variation with 1m resolution. Theory exists explaining the relationship between amplitude fluctuations and acoustic frequency, source-receiver separation, and index of refraction patch size in the ocean [e.g., Flatte et al., Sound Transmission Through a Fluctuating Ocean (Cambridge Press, 1979); Uscinsky et al., ``Intensity Fluctuations. Part 1: Theory,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 74 (1983)]. However, the amplitude fluctuations we observe are much lower than that predicted by theory [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 2333 (2003)]. Our frequencies are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those used in the experiments upon which the theory is based and our propagation ranges are considerable shorter 1 km versus many km. Results will be discussed from a more detailed analysis of the ray path locations within the water column activity (Langmuir cell formation and internal wave passage).

  5. Laboratory photoionized plasma experiments at Z - Comparison with modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, D.; Lockard, T.; Durmaz, T.; Hall, I.; Mancini, R.; Bailey, J.; Rochau, G.; Loisel, G.; Heeter, R.; Liedahl, D.

    2013-10-01

    Photoionized plasmas are common in astrophysical environments, such as x-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. We discuss an experimental and modeling effort to study the atomic kinetics in plasmas of this type via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. Results from a first pass thru our 2nd-generation dataset are compared with results of several modeling codes attempting to simulate our experimental conditions. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted by the collapse of a z-pinch to produce and backlight a Neon photoionized plasma in a cm-scale gas cell at various distances from the z-pinch. The filling pressure is monitored in situ providing the plasma particle number density. High-resolution spectra from a TREX spectrometer are processed with a suite of specially designed IDL tools to produce transmission spectra, which show absorption in several ionization stages of Neon. Analysis independent of atomic kinetics calculations yields the charge state distribution and ion areal densities used to benchmark atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature, extracted from a level population ratio, is used to test heating models. This work is sponsored in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas grant program through DOE Grant DE-FG52-09NA29551, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  6. Use of Social Comparisons in Interviews About Young Adults’ Experiences of Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this article I examine how young adults used social comparisons in research interviews about their experiences of chronic illness. The interviews were originally conducted not only to provide data for academic analysis but also to generate experiential accounts for publication online as part of an Internet-based health information resource for patients, professionals, and the public wanting to learn about people’s real-life experiences of illness in the United Kingdom. Through secondary analysis of these data, I show how the young adults used various social comparisons to represent themselves and their experiences to the target audience. Two new concepts—analogues and foils—are introduced to describe how the young adults likened themselves to, and contrasted themselves with, different reference groups in their accounts. Through these and related strategies, they created positive renditions of their experiences for the audience, helping to inform and support others in the process. PMID:25281241

  7. Bayesian Approach to Assessing Uncertainty and Calculating a Reference Value in Key Comparison Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Toman, Blaza

    2005-01-01

    International experiments called Key Comparisons pose an interesting statistical problem, the estimation of a quantity called a Reference Value. There are many possible forms that this estimator can take. Recently, this topic has received much international attention. In this paper, it is argued that a fully Bayesian approach to this problem is compatible with the current practice of metrology, and can easily be used to create statistical models which satisfy the varied properties and assumptions of these experiments. PMID:27308182

  8. Electromagnetic scattering from two dielectric spheres: Comparison between theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Dean, C. E.

    1982-08-01

    A comparison is made between theoretical and experimental results for cooperative scattering between two spheres. The overall agreement between theory and experiment is quite good. Also a large side scattering resonance which was measured to be 44 times larger than that due to a single sphere was calculated to be actually 47.6 times larger.

  9. Comparison of electron cloud simulation and experiments in the high-current experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Verboncoeur, J.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-08-27

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  10. Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Bieniosek, F; Seidl, P; Vay, J; Verboncoeur, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-10-07

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  11. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for three arrow-wing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of arrow-wing body configurations consisting of flat, twisted, and cambered twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading and trailing edge control surface deflections, were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.05 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory to experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using state of the art attached flow methods. Conditions under which these theories are valid for these wings are presented.

  12. Supersonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 1.54 to 2.50 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using a state-of-the-art inviscid flow, constant-pressure-panel method. Emphasis was on conditions under which this theory is valid for both flat and twisted wings.

  13. Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S M; Molvik, A W; Bieniosek, F M; Seidl, P A; Vay, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-11-11

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a common concern for accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly, weakly, and un-magnetized. We describe our approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. We present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam on an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrate the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  14. Microwave Transmission Through the Electron Cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector: Simulation and Comparison with Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Veitzer, Seth Andrew; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2009-04-01

    Simulations of the microwave transmission properties through the electron cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector have been implemented using the plasma simulation code 'VORPAL'. Phase shifts and attenuation curves have been calculated for the lowest frequency TE mode, slightly above the cutoff frequency, in field free regions, in the dipoles and quadrupoles. Preliminary comparisons with experimental results for the dipole case are showed and will guide the next generation of experiments.

  15. Comparison of Computational Results with a Low-g, Nitrogen Slosh and Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark; Moder, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The proposed paper will compare a fluid/thermal simulation, in FLUENT, with a low-g, nitrogen slosh experiment. The French Space Agency, CNES, performed cryogenic nitrogen experiments in several zero gravity aircraft campaigns. The computational results have been compared with high-speed photographic data, pressure data, and temperature data from sensors on the axis of the cylindrically shaped tank. The comparison between these experimental and computational results is generally favorable: the initial temperature stratification is in good agreement, and the two-phase fluid motion is qualitatively captured.

  16. Preliminary comparison of theory and experiment for a conical, pressurized-fluidized-bed coal combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A published model was used for a comparison of theory with an actual combustor burning caking bituminous coal and using limestone to reduce sulfur dioxide emission. Theoretical bed pressure drop was in good agreement with experiment. The burnable carbon elutriated was not in agreement with experiment, at least partly because the exhaust port was apparently below the transport disengaging height. The observed nitrogen oxides emission rate was about half the theoretical value. There was order-or-magnitude agreement of sulfur dioxide emission rates.

  17. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Chiou, E. W.; Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Oltmans, S.; Rind, D.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a comparison beteen observations of the upper-tropospheric water vapor data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument and radiosonde observations for 1987 and radiosonde-based climatologies. Colocated SAGE II-radiosonde measurement pairs are compared individually and in a zonal mean sense. A straight comparison of monthly zonal means between SAGE II and radiosondes for 1987 and Global Atmospheric Statistics (1963-1973) indicates that the clear-sky SAGE II climatology is approximately half the level of clear/cloudy sky of both radiosonde climatologies. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again showed SAGE II to be significantly drier in many altitude bands.

  18. Comparison between theory and experiment for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter D.

    2011-06-15

    We compare the theoretical predictions for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas with the latest experimental measurements reported by the ENS group [S. Nascimbene et al., Nature (London) 463, 1057 (2010)] and the Tokyo group [M. Horikoshi et al., Science 327, 442 (2010)]. The theoretical results are obtained using two diagrammatic theories, together with a virial expansion theory combined with a Pade approximation. We find good agreement between theory and experiment. In particular, the virial expansion, using a Pade approximation up to third order, describes the experimental results extremely well down to the superfluid transition temperature, T{sub c{approx}}0.16T{sub F}, where T{sub F} is the Fermi temperature. The comparison in this work complements our previous comparative study on the universal thermodynamics of a strongly correlated but trapped Fermi gas. The comparison also raises interesting issues about the unitary entropy and the applicability of the Pade approximation.

  19. Structure of liquid Al and Al67Mg33 alloy: comparison between experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. J.; Mendelev, M. I.; Asta, M.

    2014-06-01

    We report data on the structure of liquid Al and an Al67Mg33 alloy obtained from state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. To facilitate a direct comparison between these data, we develop a method to elongate the AIMD pair correlation function in order to obtain reliable AIMD structure factors. The comparison reveals an appreciable level of discrepancy between experimental and AIMD liquid structures, with the latter being consistently more ordered than the former at the same temperature. The discrepancy noted in this study is estimated to have significant implications for simulation-based calculations of liquid transport properties and solid-liquid interface kinetic properties.

  20. Chinese students' science-related experiences: Comparison of the ROSE study in Xinjiang and Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Yau-yuen; Li, Yufeng

    2015-05-01

    Background: Students' daily-life experiences may render favorable effects on the students' affective domain like interest, enthusiasm, motivation, joy, curiosity, awareness, and eagerness to learn science as not commonly found in the classroom environment. However, no rigorous research has been reported on those aspects in Mainland China despite many recent studies done in various Western countries. Purpose: This paper aims to report and compare the science-related experiences of ninth-graders from two places (in Urumqi City of Xinjiang province and Shanghai) in China through a large-scale survey of their junior secondary three students. Sample: The sample consists of 4115 students in Urumqi City (from 28 schools) and Shanghai (from 25 schools). Design and methods: This study adopted a Likert scale questionnaire instrument, as translated from the international Relevance Of Science Education (ROSE) Project. From a confirmatory factor analysis of the data, we identify and focus on six factors which are directly correlated with students' science-related experiences outside school environment in Xinjiang and Shanghai and employ relevant factor scores to compare the gender, regional, and socioeconomic effects. Results: As revealed by the t-test, gender and regional differences were statistically significant in affecting (1) students' outdoor living experience, (2) hands-on experience of transportation, and (3) their daily-life experience with do-it-yourself tools and models. In all three aspects, boys and Xinjiang students possessed richer experiences than girls and Shanghai students, respectively. Conclusions: Based on ANOVA tests, Shanghai students' out-of-school science-related experiences were more often significantly affected by various socioeconomic variables (including their parents' education and occupation and their family income) than Xinjiang students. From cross-regional comparison, Chinese students had much fewer science-related experiences than those of

  1. Comparison of Fire Model Predictions with Experiments Conducted in a Hangar With a 15 Meter Ceiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. D.; Notarianni, K. A.; McGrattan, K. B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the predictive capabilities of fire models using the results of a series of fire experiments conducted in an aircraft hangar with a ceiling height of about 15 m. This study is designed to investigate model applicability at a ceiling height where only a limited amount of experimental data is available. This analysis deals primarily with temperature comparisons as a function of distance from the fire center and depth beneath the ceiling. Only limited velocity measurements in the ceiling jet were available but these are also compared with those models with a velocity predictive capability.

  2. Effects of numerical methods on comparisons between experiments and simulations of shock-accelerated mixing.

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Tomkins, C. D.; Zoldi, C. A.; Prestridge, K. P.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.; Benjamin, R. F.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the detailed structures of mixing flows for Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments of Prestridge et al. [PRE 00] and Tomkins et al. [TOM 01] and examine the most recent measurements from the experimental apparatus. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods. We compare experimental data with simulations for configurations of one and two diffuse cylinders of SF{sub 6} in air using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. The details of the initial conditions have a significant effect on the computed results, especially in the case of the double cylinder. Additionally, these comparisons reveal sensitive dependence of the computed solution on the numerical method.

  3. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at midlatitudes (about 45 deg N) and tropical latitudes (12-25 deg S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At +/- 0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  4. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, P.; Lenoble, J. ); Ovarlez, J. ); Chu, W.P. )

    1993-03-20

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes ([approximately]45[degrees]N) and tropical latitudes (12[degrees]S-25[degrees]S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At [plus minus]0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more). 17 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Dissipation of alignment in CO2 gas: A comparison between ab initio predictions and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J.-M.; Boulet, C.; Vieillard, T.; Chaussard, F.; Billard, F.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present comparisons between measurements and ab initio calculations of the dissipation of the nonadiabatic laser-induced alignment in pure CO2 and CO2-He gas mixtures. The experiments were made for pressures between 2 and 20 bars at 295 K by using short non-resonant linearly polarized laser pulses for alignment and probe. The calculations are carried, free of any adjusted parameter, using refined intermolecular potentials and a requantized Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations approach presented previously but not yet confronted to experiments. The results demonstrate that the model accurately reproduces the decays with time of both the transient revivals and "permanent" component of the alignment. The significant differences observed between the behaviors resulting from CO2-CO2 and CO2-He collisions are also well predicted by the model.

  6. Comparison between initial Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments and integrated simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Geissel, M.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Harding, E. C.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) approach to ICF has obtained thermonuclear fusion yields using the Z facility. Integrated magnetohydrodynamic simulations provided the design for the first neutron-producing experiments using capabilities that presently exist, and the initial experiments measured stagnation radii rstag < 75 μm, temperatures around 3 keV, and isotropic neutron yields up to YnDD = 2 ×1012 from imploded liners reaching peak velocities around 70 km/s over an implosion time of about 60 ns. We present comparisons between the experimental observables and post-shot degraded integrated simulations. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes (~45°N) and tropical latitudes (12°S-25°S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique. At +/-0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  8. Cooperative dynamics in homopolymer melts: a comparison of theoretical predictions with neutron spin echo experiments.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, M; Wischnewski, A; Monkenbusch, M; Willner, L; Richter, D; Falus, P; Farago, B; Guenza, M G

    2008-12-18

    We present a comparison between theoretical predictions of the generalized Langevin equation for cooperative dynamics (CDGLE) and neutron spin echo data of dynamic structure factors for polyethylene melts. Experiments cover an extended range of length and time scales, providing a compelling test for the theoretical approach. Samples investigated include chains with increasing molecular weights undergoing dynamics across the unentangled to entangled transition. Measured center-of-mass (com) mean-square displacements display a crossover from subdiffusive to diffusive dynamics. The generalized Langevin equation for cooperative dynamics relates this anomalous diffusion to the presence of the interpolymer potential, which correlates the dynamics of a group of slowly diffusing molecules in a dynamically heterogeneous liquid. Theoretical predictions of the subdiffusive behavior, of its crossover to free diffusion, and of the number of macromolecules undergoing cooperative motion are in quantitative agreement with experiments. PMID:19072142

  9. Quantitative comparison of experiment and theory for intense ultrashort laser-induced dissociation of H2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayler, A. M.; Anis, F.; McKenna, J.; Gaire, B.; Johnson, Nora G.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for intense ultrashort pulse laser-induced dissociation of H2^+ were performed under near identical conditions producing results for quantitative comparison. The 3D momentum distribution was measured for the fragments of an H2^+ beam after interaction with 10 fs, 790 nm pulses at intensities of 10^14, 10^13, and 10^12 W/cm^2. In parallel, the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation was solved in the Born-Oppenheimer representation including nuclear, rotational, and electronic excitation. To obtain angularly-resolved kinetic energy release distributions necessary to compare to measurements, the final wavefunctions, projected onto the scattering states, are averaged over the vibrational state, intensity volume, and thermal distribution appropriate to the experiment. The results of these measurements and calculations are contrasted, testing the quantitative agreement of theory and experiment for ultrashort pulses at these intensities.

  10. Visualizing the Impact of Art: An Update and Comparison of Current Psychological Models of Art Experience.

    PubMed

    Pelowski, Matthew; Markey, Patrick S; Lauring, Jon O; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction) and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate, and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art. PMID:27199697

  11. Visualizing the Impact of Art: An Update and Comparison of Current Psychological Models of Art Experience

    PubMed Central

    Pelowski, Matthew; Markey, Patrick S.; Lauring, Jon O.; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction) and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate, and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art. PMID:27199697

  12. RELAP5 assessment: LOFT large break L2-5

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S L; Kmetyk, L N

    1984-02-01

    RELAP5 is part of an effort to determine the ability of various systems codes to predict the detailed thermal/hydraulic response of LWRs during accident and off-normal conditions. The RELAP5 code is being assessed at SNLA against test data from various integral and separate effects test facilities. As part of this assessment matrix, a large break transient performed at the LOFT facility has been analyzed. The results show that RELAP5/MOD1 correctly calculates many of the major system variables (i.e., pressure, break flows, peak clad temperature) early in a large break LOCA. The major problems encountered in the analyses were incorrect pump coastdown and loop seal clearing early in the calculation, excessive pump speedup later in the transient (probably due to too much condensation-induced pressure drop at the ECC injection point), and excess ECC bypass calculated throughout the later portions of the test; only the latter problem significantly affected the overall results. This excess ECC bypass through the downcomer and vessel-side break resulted in too-large late-time break flows and high system pressure due to prolonged choked flow conditions. It also resulted in a second core heatup being calculated after the accumulator emptied, since water was not being retained in the vessel. Analogous calculations with a split-downcomer nodalization delivered some ECC water to the lower plenum, which was then swept up the core and upper plenum and out the other (pump-side) break; thus no significant differences in long-term overall behavior were evident between the calculations.

  13. Catchment Prediction In Changing Environments (CAPICHE): A Model Inter-Comparison Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Christopher; Nijzink, Remko; Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Capell, René; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei; Hrachowitz, Markus; Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    forcing, hydrological response and model parameter metrics (e.g. posterior distribution, parameter interactions). As part of the EUFP7 funded project Switch-On, the method is first applied in a collaborative model inter-comparison using open data from paired headwater catchments to analyse how different models simulate the effect of deforestation and subsequent re-growth on hydrological response. The simulation of paired catchments allows us to differentiate the effect of climate forcing and land-cover change on model parameters. In order to make the experiment open, the analysis code will be made available for re-use and therefore subsequent model inter-comparison.

  14. Comparison of runoff and soil loss generated on two plot sizes during rainfall simulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, Petr; Dostál, Tomáš; Bauer, Miroslav; Jáchymová, Barbora; Neumann, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Water erosion is a natural process of soil surface disturbance caused by rainfall and surface runoff and consequent transport of sediment and nutrients. Synthetic rainfall-runoff and erosion events and mathematical models are still actual and useful methods for analysing processes involved in surface runoff formation. Simulators with watered area of 1 m2 are often used due to the technical, financial and human resources limitations. Disadvantage of such small-scale simulators is that concentrated runoff seldom developes there which makes observations difficult to upscale. We present a set of experiments which were focused on the effect of plot size on observed surface runoff, soil loss and particle size distribution of suspended soils and on formation of preferential pathways. The contribution presents the results of two years of measuring with the rainfall simulator. Presented experiments were focused especially on the comparison of runoff process dynamics, total runoff volume and soil loss from two plots of the different size. Rainfall simulator which was designed and is operated at CTU in Prague was used for the experiments (EGU2015-11025). Raindrops are produced by four Fulljet nozzles (40-WSQ) which allow to spray maximum area of 2 x 9.5 m (Christiansen's index of uniformity is 80 % on 2 x 8 m plot). The pairs of the experiments were performed simultaneously on the same location under the same rain characteristics (intensity and duration). Two experimental field plots with different dimensions (2x8 m and 1x1 m) had the same surface conditions (cultivated fallow or vegetation). The surface runoff parameters and the suspended solids concentration in runoff from the two plots were measured in the same intervals. The water outflow and the sediment yield comparison were used for the determination of the relationship between the plot size, induced erosion and runoff characteristics. The experiments were described by specific runoff discharge (expressed in liters per

  15. Comparisons of target detection in clutter using data from the 1993 FOPEN experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Edwin M.; Schlangen, Michael J.; Hendrickson, Clark R.

    1994-06-01

    During 1993, a series of experiments were performed under the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) sponsorship using the SRI ultra-wide band UHF synthetic aperture radar (SAR). These experiments were performed over a variety of clutter backgrounds to assess the foliage penetration capability of the technology and to investigate target detection in clutter. Experiments were conducted observing tropical rain forest backgrounds in Panama, several different desert backgrounds in the Yuma vicinity, and the mid-latitude temperate forest of Maine. SAR images were formed from the raw data using Differential GPS to aid in the focusing. The three locations represent different levels of foliage cover, ranging from the sparsely vegetated desert sites to the triple canopied rain forest. The characteristics of each site are discussed first through a presentation of photography and SAR imagery. The clutter characteristics are studied through a comparison of the cumulative distributions, which are plotted using a variety of conventions. For each case, at least one reference target is included in the test scene. The signal of that target as processed by a common algorithm will be compared to the processed clutter distribution.

  16. Comparisons of target detection clutter using data from the 1993 FOPEN experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, E. M.; Schlangen, M. J.; Hendrickson, C. R.

    1994-10-01

    During 1993, a series of experiments were performed under the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) sponsorship using the SRI Ultra-Wide Band UHF Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). These experiments were performed over a variety of clutter backgrounds to assess the foliage penetration capability of the technology and to investigate target detection in clutter. Experiments were conducted observing tropical rain forest backgrounds in Panama, several different desert backgrounds in the Yuma vicinity, and the mid-latitude temperate forest of Maine. SAR images were formed from the raw data using Differential GPS to aid in the focusing. The three locations represent different levels of foliage cover, ranging from the sparsely vegetated desert sites to the triple canopied rain forest. The characteristics of each site are discussed first through a presentation of photography and SAR imagery. The clutter characteristics are studied through a comparison of the cumulative distributions, which are plotted using a variety of conventions (e.g., log-normal, normal, Weibull). For each case, at least one reference target is included in the test scene. The signal of that target as processed by a common algorithm will be compared to the processed clutter distribution.

  17. Engrained experience--a comparison of microclimate perception schemata and microclimate measurements in Dutch urban squares.

    PubMed

    Lenzholzer, Sanda

    2010-03-01

    Acceptance of public spaces is often guided by perceptual schemata. Such schemata also seem to play a role in thermal comfort and microclimate experience. For climate-responsive design with a focus on thermal comfort it is important to acquire knowledge about these schemata. For this purpose, perceived and "real" microclimate situations were compared for three Dutch urban squares. People were asked about their long-term microclimate perceptions, which resulted in "cognitive microclimate maps". These were compared with mapped microclimate data from measurements representing the common microclimate when people stay outdoors. The comparison revealed some unexpected low matches; people clearly overestimated the influence of the wind. Therefore, a second assumption was developed: that it is the more salient wind situations that become engrained in people's memory. A comparison using measurement data from windy days shows better matches. This suggests that these more salient situations play a role in the microclimate schemata that people develop about urban places. The consequences from this study for urban design are twofold. Firstly, urban design should address not only the "real" problems, but, more prominently, the "perceived" problems. Secondly, microclimate simulations addressing thermal comfort issues in urban spaces should focus on these perceived, salient situations. PMID:19760436

  18. The magnetic field of a single axon. A comparison of theory and experiment.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, B J; Wikswo, J P

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic field and the transmembrane action potential of a single nerve axon were measured simultaneously. The volume conductor model was used to calculate the magnetic field from the measured action potential, allowing comparison of the model predictions with the experimental data. After analyzing the experiment for all systematic errors, we conclude that the shape of the magnetic field can be accurately predicted from the transmembrane potential and, more importantly, the shape of the transmembrane potential can be calculated from the magnetic field. The data are used to determine ri, the internal resistance per unit length of the axon, to be 19.3 +/- 1.9 k omega mm-1, implying a value for the internal conductivity of 1.44 +/- 0.33 omega -1 m-1. Magnetic measurements are compared with standard bioelectric techniques for studying nerve axons. PMID:4016213

  19. Iceberg capsize hydrodynamics: a comparison of laboratory experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. C.; Cathles, L. M.; Correa-Legisos, S.; Ellowitz, J.; Darnell, K.; Zhang, W. W.; MacAyeal, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Large icebergs are often observed to capsize in open water near fjords. During capsize, large amounts of gravitational potential energy are released which can lead to coastal tsunamis, mixing of the water column, and possibly lead to further calving at the glacier terminus. This process is rarely studied; in nature the scale and irregular timing of the events makes observations exceedingly difficult. Here we compare laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the capsize process to better understand the coupling of the hydrodynamic forces to the solid iceberg. Although the characteristic Reynolds number is much lower for both the laboratory model and the numerical simulations, the comparison provides a starting point to quantify and identify generic features that can be estimated in the field, such as hydrodynamic pressure, water flow velocities, vertical mixing, and elastic stresses on the iceberg itself, which could lead to fracture.

  20. Solar/Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottman, Gary J.; Woods, Thomas N.; London, Julius; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2003-01-01

    A final report on the operational activities related to the UARS Solar Stellar irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is presented. Scientific activities of SOLSTICE has also been supported. The UARS SOLSTICE originated at the University of Colorado in 1981. One year after the UARS launch in 1991, the operations and research support activities for SOLSTICE were moved to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The SOLSTICE program continued at HAO with the National Science Foundation, and after four years, it was moved once again back to the University of Colorado. At the University after 1997 this subject grant was issued to further extend the operations activities from July 2001 through September 2002. Although this is a final report for one particular activity, in fact the SOLSTICE operations activity -first at the University, then at HAO, and now again at the University -has continued in a seamless fashion.

  1. Coherent structures in a turbulent mixing layer - A comparison between direct numerical simulations and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, R. W.; Menon, S.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1985-01-01

    An eduction scheme has been developed in an attempt to determine the characteristics of large-scale vortical structures in a turbulent mixing layer. This analysis scheme has been applied to a set of experimental data taken in a new, larger mixing layer facility designed to minimize boundary and resonance effects. A similar scheme has been developed to apply to the results of a direct numerical simulation of a temporally growing mixing layer. A comparison of the two approaches shows important similarities in the coherent structures. The numerical simulations indicate that low levels of coherent forcing can dramatically change the evolution of the mixing layer. In the absence of such forcing, the numerical simulations and experiments show a lack of regularity in the transverse position, spacing, amplitude, shape and spanwise coherence of the large-scale vortical structures.

  2. Image Correlation Applied to Single Crystal Plasticity Experiments and Comparison to Strain Gage Data

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, M M; Florando, J N; Lassila, D H; Schmidt, T; Tyson II, J

    2005-06-29

    Full-field optical techniques are becoming increasingly popular for measuring the deformation of materials, especially in materials that exhibit non-uniform behavior. While there are many full-field techniques available (e.g. moire interferometry, electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), holography, and image correlation [1]), for our study of the deformation of single crystals, the image correlation technique was chosen for its insensitivity to vibrations and ability to measure large strains. While the theory and development of the algorithms for image correlation have been presented elsewhere [2,3] a comparative study to a conventional strain measurement device, such as a strain gage rosette, is desired to test the robustness and accuracy of the technique. The 6 Degrees of Freedom (6DOF) experiment, which was specifically designed to validate dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations [4], is ideally suited to compare the two methods. This experiment is different from previous experiments on single crystals in that it allows the crystal to deform essentially unconstrained, in both the elastic and plastic regimes, by allowing the bottom of the sample to move as the sample is being compressed. This unconstrained motion prevents the internal crystal planes from rotating during the deformation as typically seen in the pioneering work of Schmid [5] and Taylor [6]. In the early development of the 6DOF apparatus, stacked strain gage rosettes were used to provide the strain data [7]. While very accurate at small strains, strain gages provide an averaged measurement over a small area and cannot be used to measure the inhomogeneous plastic strains that typically occur during the 6DOF experiment. An image correlation technique can measure the full-field in-plane and out-of-plane deformation that occurs in single crystals, and a comparison to the strain gage data at small strains can test the accuracy of the method.

  3. Comparison of Spacecraft Contamination Models with Well-Defined Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    The report presents analyzed surface areas on particular experiment trays from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for silicone-based molecular contamination. The trays for examination were part of the Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE). These particular trays were chosen because each tray was identical to the others in construction, and the materials on each tray were well known, documented, and characterized. In particular, a known specific source of silicone contamination was present on each tray. Only the exposure conditions varied from tray to tray. The results of post-flight analyses of surfaces of three trays were compared with the predictions of the three different spacecraft molecular contamination models. Phase one tasks included: 1) documenting the detailed geometry of the hardware; 2) determining essential properties of the anodized aluminum, Velcro(Tm), silverized Teflon(Tm), silicone gaskets, and DC6-1104(Tm) silicone adhesive materials used to make the trays, tray covers, and thermal control blankets; 3) selecting and removing areas from each tray; and 4) beginning surface analysis of the selected tray walls. Phase two tasks included: 1) completion of surface analysis measurements of the selected tray surface, 2) obtaining auger depth profiles at selected locations, and 3) running versions of the ISEM, MOFLUX, and PLIMP (Plume Impingement) contamination prediction models and making comparisons with experimental results.

  4. Comparison of chemical and nuclear explosions: Numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J.R.; Bos, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper the authors discuss numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), which was an underground explosion conducted in September 1993 in the volcanic tuff of the Nevada Test Site. The NPE source consisted of 1.29 {times} 10{sup 6} kg of ANFO-emulsion blasting agent, with the approximate energy of 1.1 kt, emplaced 389 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa. The authors compare detailed numerical simulations of the NPE with data collected from that experiment, and with calculations of an equally energetic nuclear explosion in identical geology. Calculated waveforms, at ranges out to approximately 1 km, agree moderately well in the time domain with free-field data, and are in qualitative agreement with free-surface records. Comparison of computed waveforms for equally energetic chemical and nuclear sources reveals relatively minor differences beyond the immediate near-source region, with the chemical source having an {approximately}25% greater seismic moment but otherwise indistinguishable (close-in) seismic source properties. 41 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. A molecular model for adsorption of water on activated carbon: Comparison of simulation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, C.L.; McGrother, S.C.; Bandosz, T.J.; Mueller, E.A.; Gubbins, K.E.

    1999-01-19

    Experimental and molecular simulation results are presented for the adsorption of water onto activated carbons. The pore size distribution for the carbon studied was determined from nitrogen adsorption data using density functional theory, and the density of acidic and basic surface sites was found using Boehm and potentiometric titration. The total surface site density was 0.675 site/nm{sup 2}. Water adsorption was measured for relative pressures P/P{sub 0} down to 10{sup {minus}3}. A new molecular model for the water/activated carbon system is presented, which the authors term the effective single group model, and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are reported for the range of pressures covered in the experiments. A comparison of these simulations with the experiments show generally good agreement, although some discrepancies are attributed to the simplification of using a single surface group species, while those at high pressure are believed to arise from uncertainties in the pore size distribution. The simulation results throw new light on the adsorption mechanism for water at low pressures. The influence of varying both the density of surface sites and the size of the graphite microcrystals is studied using molecular simulation.

  6. 2D fluid simulations of acoustic waves in pulsed ICP discharges: Comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neutral depletion, which is mostly caused by gas heating under typical material processing conditions, is an important phenomenon in high-density plasmas. In low pressure pulsed discharges, experiments show that additional depletion due to electron pressure (Pe) may have a non-negligible influence on radical transport [1]. To evaluate this effect, comparisons between 2D fluid simulations and measurements of gas convection in Ar/Cl2 pulsed ICP plasmas are reported. In the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly by electron cooling which generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls. This in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Time-resolved measurements of atoms drift velocity and gas temperature by LIF and LAS in the early afterglow are consistent with gas drifting at acoustic wave velocity followed by rapid gas cooling. Similar results are predicted by the model. The ion flux at the reactor walls is also shown to oscillate in phase with the acoustic wave due to ion-neutral friction forces. Finally, during plasma ignition, experiments show opposite phenomena when Pe rises.[4pt] [1] Cunge et al, APL 96, 131501 (2010)

  7. Comparison of Measured and Simulated Albedo Signals in the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zatsepin, V. I.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    Albedo, radiation backscattered from an interaction and from the subsequent shower development, provides a 'background' for calorimeter experiments. In ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter), a balloon borne instrument to measure cosmic ray composition and energy spectra for elements from hydrogen to iron from 30 GeV to near 100 TeV, a fully active BGO calorimeter follows a carbon interaction target and scintillator holdoscopes. The first detector is a silicon matrix constructed of 4480 individual silicon pixels, each 2 cm x 1.5 cm, that provide a measurement of the charge of the primary particle in the presence of albedo. ATIC had two successful balloon flights in Antarctica: from 28 Dec 2000 to 13 Jan 2001 (ATIC-1) and from 29 Dec 2002 to 18 Jan 2003 (ATIC-2). A comparison of albedo signals in the silicon matri:x in ATIC-1 experiment with simulations performed using the GEANT 3.21 code and the QGSM event generator for nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented.

  8. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the I-mode high confinement regime and comparisons with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E. Howard, N. T.; Creely, A. J.; Chilenski, M. A.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Marmar, E.; Rice, J. E.; Sierchio, J. M.; Sung, C.; Walk, J. R.; Whyte, D. G.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Edlund, E. M.; Kung, C.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.; Petty, C. C.; Reinke, M. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    For the first time, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of I-mode plasmas are performed and compared with experiment. I-mode is a high confinement regime, featuring energy confinement similar to H-mode, but without enhanced particle and impurity particle confinement [D. G. Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)]. As a consequence of the separation between heat and particle transport, I-mode exhibits several favorable characteristics compared to H-mode. The nonlinear gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] is used to explore the effects of E × B shear and profile stiffness in I-mode and compare with L-mode. The nonlinear GYRO simulations show that I-mode core ion temperature and electron temperature profiles are more stiff than L-mode core plasmas. Scans of the input E × B shear in GYRO simulations show that E × B shearing of turbulence is a stronger effect in the core of I-mode than L-mode. The nonlinear simulations match the observed reductions in long wavelength density fluctuation levels across the L-I transition but underestimate the reduction of long wavelength electron temperature fluctuation levels. The comparisons between experiment and gyrokinetic simulations for I-mode suggest that increased E × B shearing of turbulence combined with increased profile stiffness are responsible for the reductions in core turbulence observed in the experiment, and that I-mode resembles H-mode plasmas more than L-mode plasmas with regards to marginal stability and temperature profile stiffness.

  9. Implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting: Comparison of in vitro experiments with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, Misael O.; Ebner, Armin D.; Ritter, James A.

    Implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) was studied both in vitro and theoretically, with extensive comparisons made between model and experiment. Magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) comprised of magnetite encased in a polymer were collected magnetically using a ferromagnetic, coiled, wire stent as the implant and a NdFeB permanent magnet for the applied magnetic field. A 2-D mathematical model with no adjustable parameters was developed and compared to the 3-D experimental results. The effects of the fluid velocity, stent and MDCP properties, and magnetic field strength on the performance of the system were evaluated in terms of the capture efficiency (CE) of the MDCPs. In nearly all cases, the parametric trends predicted by the model were in good agreement with the experimental results: the CE always increased with decreasing velocity, increasing magnetic field strength, increasing MDCP size or magnetite content, or increasing wire size. The only exception was when experiments showed an increase in the CE with an increase in the number of loops in the wire, while the model showed no dependence. The discrepancies between experiment and theory were attributed to phenomena not accounted for by the model, such as 3-D to 2-D geometric and magnetic field orientation differences, and interparticle interactions between the MDCPs that lead to magnetic agglomeration and shearing force effects. Overall, this work showed the effectiveness of a stent-based IA-MDT system through both in vitro experimentation and corroborated theory, with the designs of the ferromagnetic wire and the MDCPs both being paramount to the CE.

  10. Visualization tools for model/data comparisons and decision making during the Monterey Bay 2006 experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, L.; Kolber, D.; Godin, M.; Chavez, F. P.

    2006-12-01

    During summer 2006, almost 100 different oceanographic sensors have captured for more than one month the properties of the waters of the Californian Central Coast. Data were assimilated in quasi-real time by three hydrodynamical models to forecast the evolution of the local conditions such as currents, sea water temperature, salinity and to adapt accordingly the sampling strategy of the involved unmanned vehicles (AUV, gliders). Due to the high diversity of data and models (sources, file structures, time and spatial coverage, periodicity of sampling), the collected informations were first converted into a standardized format which allows one to quickly find and extract the relevant variables from the main data server of the experiment. Visualization softwares were developed to provide live maps of the latest locations of instruments, surface plots and vertical transects of currents, temperature and salinity from data and models. These products were mainly used for decision making, for model intercomparison and to evaluate the quality of the data assimilation process for each model. Plots were updated several times a day and automatically posted on an internet collaborative portal. Softwares were adaptive in regards of the availability of simulations and datasets from satellite, aircraft, robotic vehicles, research vessels, moorings, drifters Their modular structures allowed a quick implementation of new instruments during the experiment. Profiles from gliders and AUV served as references for intercomparisons between models for salinity and temperature. As simulations were not synchronized between models, the involved algorithm selected, for all gliders, relevant portions of their tracks to serve as references for model intercomparison. These portions were delimited to prioritize the comparison for each model between observations and nowcasts/hindcasts and also to evaluate the loss of forecasting capabilities with time. We provide here several examples of these

  11. Convection in a Very Compressible Fluid: Comparison of Simulations With Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H.; Furukawa, A.; Onuki, A.; Kogan, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    The time profile (Delta)T(t) of the temperature difference, measured across a very compressible fluid layer of supercritical He-3 after the start of a heat flow, shows a damped oscillatory behavior before steady state convection is reached. The results for (Delta)T(t) obtained from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments are compared over a temperature range where the compressibility varies by a factor of approx. = 40. First the steady-state convective heat current j(sup conv) as a function of the Rayleigh number R(alpha) is presented, and the agreement is found to be good. Second, the shape of the time profile and two characteristic times in the transient part of (Delta)T(t) from simulations and experiments are compared, namely: 1) t(sub osc), the oscillatory period and 2) t(sub p), the time of the first peak after starting the heat flow. These times, scaled by the diffusive time tau(sub D) versus R(alpha), are presented. The agreement is good for t(sup osc)/tau(sub D), where the results collapse on a single curve showing a powerlaw behavior. The simulation hence confirms the universal scaling behavior found experimentally. However for t(sub p)/tau(sub D), where the experimental data also collapse on a single curve, the simulation results show systematic departures from such a behavior. A possible reason for some of the disagreements, both in the time profile and in t(sub p) is discussed. In the Appendix a third characteristic time, t(sub m), between the first peak and the first oscillation minimum is plotted and a comparison between the results of experiments and simulations is made.

  12. Free-field ground motions for the nonproliferation experiment: Preliminary comparisons with nearby nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.H.; Peratt, A.L.

    1994-06-01

    Since 1987, we have installed fixed arrays of tri-axial accelerometers in the fire-field near the shot horizons for low-yield ({le} 20 kt) nuclear events in the N-tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa. For the Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) we augmented the array to achieve 23 free-field stations. Goals are: (a) to examine robustness and stability of various free-field source function estimates -- e.g., reduced displacement potentials (RDP) and spectra; (b) to compare close-in with regional estimates to test whether detailed close-in free-field and/or surface ground motion data can improve predictability of regional-teleseismic source functions; (c) to provide experimental data for checking two-dimensional numerical simulations. We report preliminary comparisons between experimental free-field data for NPE (1993) and three nearby nuclear events (MISTY ECHO, 1988; MINERAL QUARRY, 1990; HUNTERS TROPHY, 1992). All four working points are within 1 km of each other in the same wet tuff bed, thus reducing concerns about possible large differences in material properties between widely separated shots. Initial comparison of acceleration and velocity seismograms for the four events reveals: (1) There is a large departure from the spherical symmetry commonly assumed in analytic treatments of source theory; both vertical and tangential components are surprisingly large. (2) All shots show similar first-peak particle-velocity amplitude decay rates suggesting significant attenuation even in the supposedly purely elastic region. (3) Sharp (>20 Hz) arrivals are not observed at tunnel level from near-surface pP reflections or spall-closure sources -- but broadened peaks are seen that suggest more diffuse reflected energy from the surface and from the Paleozoic limestone basement below tunnel level.

  13. Comparison of experiments and simulations for zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2013-06-01

    A detailed comparison between recent direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiments of a turbulent boundary layer under zero pressure gradient at Re θ = 2,500 and 4,000 (based on the free-stream velocity and momentum-loss thickness) is presented. The well-resolved DNS is computed in a long spatial domain (Schlatter and Örlü in J Fluid Mech 659:116, 2010a), including the disturbance strip, while the experiments consist of single hot-wire probe and oil-film interferometry measurements. Remarkably, good agreement is obtained for integral quantities such as skin friction and shape factor, as well as mean and fluctuating streamwise velocity profiles, higher-order moments and probability density distributions. The agreement also extends to spectral/structural quantities such as the amplitude modulation of the small scales by the large-scale motion and temporal spectral maps throughout the boundary layer. Differences within the inner layer observed for statistical and spectral quantities could entirely be removed by spatially averaging the DNS to match the viscous-scaled length of the hot-wire sensor, thereby explaining observed differences solely by insufficient spatial resolution of the hot-wire sensor. For the highest Reynolds number, Re θ = 4,000, the experimental data exhibit a more pronounced secondary spectral peak in the outer region ( y/ δ 99 = 0.1) related to structures with length on the order of 5-7 boundary layer thicknesses, which is weaker and slightly moved towards lower temporal periods in the DNS. The cause is thought to be related to the limited spanwise box size which constrains the growth of the very large structures. In the light of the difficulty to obtain "canonical" flow conditions, both in DNS and the wind tunnel where effects such as boundary treatment, pressure gradient and turbulence tripping need to be considered, the present cross-validation of the data sets, at least for the present Re θ -range, provides important reference data

  14. A viscoplastic lubrication model for entrainment by avalanches and debris flows, and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Belinda; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Recently, experiments were designed and carried out examining how a viscoplastic avalanche begins to entrain a shallow layer of identical fluid lying in its path, much like a snow avalanche or mud flow which suddenly encounters an entrainable layer, described as a yield stress material. This represents a simplified problem, investigated in order to gain some physical insight into entrainment by avalanches. These experiments serve as a test for mathematical models of entraining gravity currents. Two classes of entrainment behaviour were observed: either the avalanche ``glided'' out over the entrainable bed, immediately shearing it in the downstream direction and progressively incorporating fluid down to the rigid base, or the avalanche seemed to ``roll'' out onto the entrainable bed, with strong motion in the slope-normal direction in the bed after yield. This difference in behaviour was dictated by the magnitude of the flume's slope. For the steeper flows studied (20 and 24 degrees), entrainment was principally in the former class, whereas for shallower slope angle (12 and 16 degrees) entrainment more closely resembled the latter type. This would suggest that there is a competition between the normal and shear stresses exerted on the bed, with bed-yield and entrainment occurring when these stresses exceed a critical value. An interesting phenomenon that was observed in all cases was a sort of buckling of the bed, downstream of the avalanche front. This was far more significant in the flows down shallower slopes, and regular waves were created in the bed with wavelength dependent on the flow depth. Based on theoretical comparisons with non-entraining Herschel Bulkley flows, the physics of entraining flows are investigated numerically for shallow viscoplastic gravity currents on different slopes. The predictions are compared with the experimental values for velocity field and surface height. The model was successful in reproducing velocities of the correct order, but

  15. Microstructure of ambient and supercritical water. Direct comparison between simulation and neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, A.A.; Cummings, P.T. |

    1996-01-25

    Molecular dynamics simulations of SPC, SPC/E, TIP4P, and ST2 water models are performed at ambient and two supercritical conditions make a direct comparison with recent microstructural data obtained by neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS) experiments. The models generally fail to accurately predict details of the NDIS results at supercritical conditions, even though they are somewhat successful at ambient conditions. The failure is not as pronounced as that expected by Postorino et al. because of an unusual density dependence in the structure predicted by two of the models. We also evaluate a model for supercritical water denoted SPCG, a modification of the SPC and SPC/E models, in which the dipole moment is reduced to the bare dipole moment of water. For this model, the predicted structure at supercritical conditions is in much better agreement with experiment. A geometric definition of hydrogen bonding is used to gain insight into the angular dependence of the H...O pair distribution function g{sub OH}(r,{omega}). The simulation results for the five models indicate a strong orientational dependence for the g{sub OH}(r,{omega}) along the H-bonding orientations, with an approximately constant relative strength from ambient to supercritical conditions, suggesting that the angle-averaged radial distribution function, g{sub OH}(r), and its volume integral over the first solvation shell, n{sub OH}(r), may not in themselves be good measures of the strength of the H-bonding. 46 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Three Conditions under Which Experiments and Observational Studies Produce Comparable Causal Estimates: New Findings from within-Study Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Thomas D.; Shadish, William R.; Wong, Vivian C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes 12 recent within-study comparisons contrasting causal estimates from a randomized experiment with those from an observational study sharing the same treatment group. The aim is to test whether different causal estimates result when a counterfactual group is formed, either with or without random assignment, and when statistical…

  17. COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL AND LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS ON DENSITY-STRATIFIED FLOWS AROUND A THREE-DIMENSIONAL HILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct comparisons between the results of a numerical model and laboratory experiments are presented for density-stratified flows around an isolated three-dimensional hill. The numerical model integrates the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible stratified flow using a finit...

  18. Contrail Cirrus Forecasts for the ML-CIRRUS Experiment and Some Comparison Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Graf, Kaspar; Bugliaro, Luca; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Giez, Andreas; Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Krämer, Martina; Minikin, Andreas; Schäfler, Andreas; Voigt, Christiane; Wirth, Martin; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Model simulations with the contrail cirrus prediction model CoCiP driven by numerical weather prediction (NWP) data provided from the European Centre for Medium Range Forecasts (ECMWF) and global aircraft waypoint data show a mean computed cover (for optical depth larger than 0.1) of 0.23% globally, and 5.4% over mid Europe (Schumann and Graf, JGR, 2013). The computed mean longwave radiative forcing (RF) reaches 3 W m-2 over mid Europe (10°W-20°E and 40°N-55°N), and 0.13 W m-2 globally. The global net RF is about 40-60% smaller because of compensating shortwave cooling induced by contrails during daytime. The results depend on several model details such as the number of ice particles forming from aircraft soot emissions, the contrail plume dispersion, ice particle sedimentation etc., all influencing contrail life time and their optical properties. The quantitative results depend also strongly on ambient relative humidity, vertical motion and on ice water content of other cirrus predicted by the NWP model. In order to test and possibly improve this and other contrail models, high-quality observations are needed to which multi-parameter model output can be compared. The Mid-Latitude Cirrus Experiment ML-CIRRUS was performed (see C. Voigt et al., this conference) with a suite of in-situ and Lidar instruments for airborne measurements on the research aircraft HALO. Before and during the mission, CoCiP was run daily to provide 3-days forecasts of contrail cover using operational ECMWF forecasts and historical traffic data. CoCiP forecast output was made available in an internet tool twice a day for experiment planning. The one-day and two-day contrail forecasts often showed only small differences. Still, most recent forecasts and detailed satellite observations results were transmitted via satellite link to the crew for onboard campaign optimization. After the campaign, a data base of realistic air traffic data has been setup from various sources, and CoCiP was

  19. Ab initio molecular dynamics of protonated dialanine and comparison to infrared multiphoton dissociation experiments.

    PubMed

    Marinica, D C; Grégoire, G; Desfrançois, C; Schermann, J P; Borgis, D; Gaigeot, M P

    2006-07-20

    Finite temperature Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are performed for the protonated dialanine peptide in vacuo, in relation to infrared multiphoton dissociation experiments. The simulations emphasize the flexibility of the different torsional angles at room temperature and the dynamical exchange between different conformers which were previously identified as stable at 0 K. A proton transfer occurring spontaneously at the N-terminal side is also observed and characterized. The theoretical infrared absorption spectrum is computed from the dipole time correlation function, and, in contrast to traditional static electronic structure calculations, it accounts directly for anharmonic and finite temperature effects. The comparison to the experimental infrared multiphoton dissociation spectrum turns out very good in terms of both band positions and band shapes. It does help the identification of a predominant conformer and the attribution of the different bands. The synergy shown between the experimental and theoretical approaches opens the door to the study of the vibrational properties of complex and floppy biomolecules in the gas phase at finite temperature. PMID:16836443

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Force Field Evaluation and Comparison with Experiment.

    PubMed

    Henriques, João; Cragnell, Carolina; Skepö, Marie

    2015-07-14

    An increasing number of studies using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) suggest that current force fields sample conformations that are overly collapsed. Here, we study the applicability of several state-of-the-art MD force fields, of the AMBER and GROMOS variety, for the simulation of Histatin 5, a short (24 residues) cationic salivary IDP with antimicrobial and antifungal properties. The quality of the simulations is assessed in three complementary analyses: (i) protein shape and size comparison with recent experimental small-angle X-ray scattering data; (ii) secondary structure prediction; (iii) energy landscape exploration and conformational class analysis. Our results show that, indeed, standard force fields sample conformations that are too compact, being systematically unable to reproduce experimental evidence such as the scattering function, the shape of the protein as compared with the Kratky plot, and intrapeptide distances obtained through the pair distance distribution function, p(r). The consistency of this deviation suggests that the problem is not mainly due to protein-protein or water-water interactions, whose parametrization varies the most between force fields and water models. In fact, as originally proposed in [ Best et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2014, 10, 5113 - 5124.], balanced protein-water interactions may be the key to solving this problem. Our simulations using this approach produce results in very good agreement with experiment. PMID:26575776

  1. Comparison of Time Domain Reflectometry Performance Factors for Several Dielectric Geometries: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwarla, S. V.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Boehm, Robert F.

    1995-08-01

    We propose three nontraditional dielectric geometries and present an experimental and theoretical analysis and comparison of time domain reflectometry (TDR) performances for them. The traditional geometry (the probes inserted in material of essentially infinite extent) is compared to three nontraditional geometries where the probes are affixed outside of a core sample, inside of a bore, or flat on the surface of a semi-infinite solid. Our derivation relates the velocity of electromagnetic wave propagation to the complex permittivities and permeabilities of the media and the geometry for the three nontraditional configurations. Experimental results for air, styrofoam, dry sand, wet sand of varying water content, nylon, dry wood, and ferromagnetic steel are obtained for the three proposed configurations and are in fair agreement with the literature within the experimental uncertainties. Through experiments and theoretical analysis, the TDR performance is found to be the same within the experimental uncertainties for the three nontraditional geometries. The proposed geometries yield slightly lower sensitivities compared to the traditional geometry. Advantages and disadvantages of the geometries compared to the traditional geometry are also discussed.

  2. Stratospheric aerosol and gas experiments I and II comparisons with ozonesondes

    SciTech Connect

    Veiga, R.E.; Cunnold, D.M.; Chu, W.P.

    1995-05-20

    Ozone profiles measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) I and II are compared with ozonesonde profiles at 24 stations over the period extending from 1979 through 1991. Ozonesonde/satellite differences at 21 stations with SAGE II overpasses were computed down to 11.5 km in the midlatitudes, to 15.5 km in the lower latitudes, and for nine stations with SAGE I overpasses down to 15.5 km. The set of individual satellite and ozonesonde profile comparisons most closely colocated in time and space shows mean absolute differences relative to the satellite measurement of 6 {plus_minus} 2% for SAGE II and 8 {plus_minus}3% for SAGE I. The ensemble of ozonesonde/satellite differences, when averaged over all altitudes, shows that for SAGE II, 70% were less than 5%, whereas for SAGE I, 50% were less than 5%. The best agreement occurred in the altitude region near the ozone density maximum where almost all the relative differences were less than 5%. Most of the statistically significant differences occurred below the ozone maximum down to the tropopause in the region of steepest ozone gradients and typically ranged between 0 and {minus}20%. Correlations between ozone and aerosol extinction in the northern midlatitudes indicate that aerosols had no discernible impact on the ozonesonde/satellite differences and on the stratosphere during 1984 to mid-1991. 42 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Comparisons between MCNP, EGS4 and experiment for clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Jeraj, R; Keall, P J; Ostwald, P M

    1999-03-01

    Understanding the limitations of Monte Carlo codes is essential in order to avoid systematic errors in simulations, and to suggest further improvement of the codes. MCNP and EGS4, Monte Carlo codes commonly used in medical physics, were compared and evaluated against electron depth dose data and experimental backscatter results obtained using clinical radiotherapy beams. Different physical models and algorithms used in the codes give significantly different depth dose curves and electron backscattering factors. The default version of MCNP calculates electron depth dose curves which are too penetrating. The MCNP results agree better with experiment if the ITS-style energy-indexing algorithm is used. EGS4 underpredicts electron backscattering for high-Z materials. The results slightly improve if optimal PRESTA-I parameters are used. MCNP simulates backscattering well even for high-Z materials. To conclude the comparison, a timing study was performed. EGS4 is generally faster than MCNP and use of a large number of scoring voxels dramatically slows down the MCNP calculation. However, use of a large number of geometry voxels in MCNP only slightly affects the speed of the calculation. PMID:10211804

  4. Post-Shot Simulations of NIC Experiments with Comparison to X-ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, David; Jones, Oggie; Suter, Larry; Moore, Alastair; Schneider, Marilyn

    2012-10-01

    National Ignition Campaign experiments at NIF are ongoing and post-shot simulations play an important role in understanding the physical processes occurring in the quest for demonstrating fusion burn. In particular, it is important to understand the x-ray environment inside the hohlraum targets, which is studied using various x-ray diagnostics. The Dante instrument measures the time dependent x-ray emission escaping out of the hohlraum laser entrance holes (LEHs) and the SXI instrument provides a time-integrated image of both soft and hard x-rays. We compare calculated total x-ray emission with Dante data as well as the relative high energy Mband emission that contributes to capsule preheat. We correct our calculated x-ray emission to account for differences between simulation and data on LEH closure using SXI data. We provide results for both ``standard candle'' simulation with no added multipliers and for simulations with time-dependent multipliers that are used to obtain agreement with shock timing and implosion velocity data. The physics justification for the use of multipliers is to account for potential missing energy or incorrect ablation modeling. The relative importance of these two effects can be studied through comparison of post-shot simulations with x-ray measurements.

  5. Sequential Development of Interfering Metamorphic Core Complexes: Numerical Experiments and Comparison to the Cyclades, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirel, C.; Gautier, P.; van Hinsbergen, D.; Wortel, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Cycladic extensional province (Greece) contains classical examples of metamorphic core complexes (MCCs), where exhumation was accommodated along multiple interfering and/or sequentially developed syn- and antithetic extensional detachment zones. Previous studies on the development of MCCs did not take into account the possible interference between multiple and closely spaced MCCs. In the present study, we have performed new lithosphere-scale experiments in which the deformation is not a priori localized so as to explore the conditions of the development of several MCCs in a direction parallel to extension. In a narrow range of conditions, MCCs are closely spaced, interfere with each other, and develop in sequence. From a comparison between numerical results and geological observations, we find that the Cyclades metamorphic core complexes are in good agreement with the model in terms of Moho geometry and depth, kinematic and structural history, timing and duration of core complex formation and metamorphic history. We infer that, for Cycladic MCC-type to develop, an initial crustal thickness prior to the onset of post-orogenic extension between 40 and 44 km, a boundary velocity close to 2 cm/yr and an initial thermal lithospheric thickness of about 60 km are required. The latter may be explained by a significant heating due to delamination of subducting continental crust or vigorous small-scale thermal convection.

  6. Numerical modeling of exhaust smoke dispersion for a generic frigate and comparisons with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, Selma; Dobrucalı, Erinç

    2014-06-01

    The exhaust smoke dispersion for a generic frigate is investigated numerically through the numerical solution of the governing fluid flow, energy, species and turbulence equations. The main objective of this work is to obtain the effects of the yaw angle, velocity ratio and buoyancy on the dispersion of the exhaust smoke. The numerical method is based on the fully conserved control-volume representation of the fully elliptic Navier-Stokes equations. Turbulence is modeled using a two-equation ( k- ɛ) model. The flow visualization tests using a 1/100 scale model of the frigate in the wind tunnel were also carried out to determine the exhaust plume path and to validate the computational results. The results show that down wash phenomena occurs for the yaw angles between ψ =10° and 20°. The results with different exhaust gas temperatures show that the buoyancy effect increases with the increasing of the exhaust gas temperature. However, its effect on the plume rise is less significant in comparison with its momentum. A good agreement between the predictions and experiment results is obtained.

  7. Determination of forces in a magnetic bearing actuator - Numerical computation with comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. D.; Xia, Z.; Mccaul, E.; Hacker, H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the forces exerted on a journal by a magnetic bearing actuator are presented, along with comparisons to experimentally measured forces. The calculations are based on two-dimensional solutions for the flux distribution in the metal parts and free space, using finite but constant permeability in the metals. Above a relative permeability of 10,000 the effects of changes in permeability are negligible, but below 10,000 decreases in permeability cause significant decreases in the force. The calculated forces are shown to depend on the metal permeability more strongly when the journal is displaced from its centered position. The predicted forces in the principal attractive direction are in good agreement with experiment when a relatively low value of permeability is chosen. The forces measured normal to the axis of symmetry when the journal is displaced from that axis, however, are significantly higher than predicted by theory, even with a value of relative permeability larger than 5000. These results indicate a need for further work including nonlinear permeability distributions.

  8. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments 1 and 2: Comparisons with ozonesondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veiga, Robert E.; Cunnold, Derek M.; Chu, William P.; McCormick, M. Patrick

    1995-01-01

    Ozone profiles measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) 1 and 2 are compared with ozonesonde profiles at 24 stations over the period extending from 1979 through 1991. Ozonesonde/satellite differences at 21 stations with SAGE 2 overpasses were computed down to 11.5 km in midlatitudes, to 15.5 km in the lower latitudes, and for nine stations with SAGE 1 overpasses down to 15.5 km. The set of individual satellite and ozonesonde profile comparisons most closely colocated in time and space shows mean absolute differences relative to the satellite measurement of 6 +/- 2% for SAGE 2 and 8 +/- 3% for SAGE 1. The ensemble of ozonesonde/satellite differences, when averaged over all altitudes, shows that for SAGE 2, 70% were less than 5%, whereas for SAGE 1, 50% were less than 5%. The best agreement occurred in the altitude region near the ozone density maximum where almost all the relative differences were less than 5%. Most of the statistically significant differences occurred below the ozone maximum down to the tropopause in the region of steepest ozone gradients and typically ranged between 0 and -20%. Correlations between ozone and aerosol extinction in the northern midlatitudes indicate that aerosols had no discernible impact on the ozonesonde/satellite differences and on the SAGE 2 ozone retrieval for the levels of extinction encountered in the lower stratosphere during 1984 to mid-1991.

  9. Defect printability of alternating phase-shift mask: a critical comparison of simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Ken; Komizo, Tooru; Kikuchi, Koji; Ohnuma, Hidetoshi; Kawahira, Hiroichi

    2002-07-01

    An alternative phase shift mask (alt-PSM) is a promising device for extending optical lithography to finer design rules. There have been few reports, however, on the mask's ability to identify phase defects. We report here an alt-PSM of a dual-trench type for KrF exposure, with programmed quartz defects used to evaluate defect printability by measuring aerial images with a Zeiss MSM100 measuring system. The experimental results are simulated using the TEMPEST program. First, a critical comparison of the simulation and the experiment is conducted. The actual measured topography of quartz defects are used in the simulation. Moreover, a general simulation study on defect printability using an alt-PSM for ArF exposure is conducted. The defect dimensions, which produce critical CD errors are determined by simulation that takes into account the full 3-dimensional structure of phase defects as well as a simplified structure. The critical dimensions of an isolated defect identified by the alt-PSM of a single-trench type for ArF exposure are 240 nm in bottom diameter and 50 degrees in height (phase) for the cylindrical shape and 240 nm in bottom diameter and 90 degrees in height (phase) for the rotating trapezoidal shape, where the CD error limit is +/- 5%.

  10. Comparison of In Situ Aerosol Data from the ACE-Asia 2001 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Pietras, C.; Miller, M. A.; Reynolds, R. M.; Frouin, R.; Quinn, P. K.; Deschamps, P. Y.; Werdell, P. J.; Fargion, G. S.

    2002-05-01

    The Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) is an international, multidisciplinary project to further knowledge about atmospheric aerosols. ACE-Asia included an intensive field measurement campaign during the spring of 2001 off the coasts of China, Japan and Korea. The Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project participated in the ACE-Asia cruise of the R/V Ronald H. Brown, which departed from Hawaii on 2001/03/15, sailed west to the Sea of Japan, and finished in Yokosuka, Japan on 2001/04/19. The SIMBIOS Project compares and merges data projects from multiple ocean color missions. As In Situ data are essential for merger and comparison of satellite ocean color measurements, the Project is interested in instrumentation devopment and data base building. The SeaWiFS Bio-optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS) is the database used and maintained by the SIMBIOS project. The ACE-Asia cruise was an excellent opportunity to compare data from a variety of maritime sun photometers, as several aerosol conditions were experienced. These included low Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) maritime conditions near Hawaii and extremely high AOT dust conditions in the Sea of Japan. Concurrant measurements were made with the PREDE POM-01 Mark II radiometer, a Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD, a Laboratorie d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD-a, two Solar Light, Inc. Microtops II's, and Brookhaven National Laboratory's Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (FRSR). In addition, a Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) was deployed that provides vertical aerosol distributions. Data were processed utilizing new algorithms to screen errors due to improper pointing at the sun, a problem previously recognized for the Microtops II. Comparisons of AOT at 500nm and Angstrom Exponent were made for all the instruments. The hand held, direct solar sun photometers (Microtops II, SIMBAD and SIMBADa

  11. Comparison among five hydrodynamic codes with a diverging-converging nozzle experiment

    SciTech Connect

    L. E. Thode; M. C. Cline; B. G. DeVolder; M. S. Sahota; D. K. Zerkle

    1999-09-01

    A realistic open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket simulation model must be capable of a self-consistent nozzle calculation in conjunction with coupled radiation and neutron transport in three spatial dimensions. As part of the development effort for such a model, five hydrodynamic codes were used to compare with a converging-diverging nozzle experiment. The codes used in the comparison are CHAD, FLUENT, KIVA2, RAMPANT, and VNAP2. Solution accuracy as a function of mesh size is important because, in the near term, a practical three-dimensional simulation model will require rather coarse zoning across the nozzle throat. In the study, four different grids were considered. (1) coarse, radially uniform grid, (2) coarse, radially nonuniform grid, (3) fine, radially uniform grid, and (4) fine, radially nonuniform grid. The study involves code verification, not prediction. In other words, the authors know the solution they want to match, so they can change methods and/or modify an algorithm to best match this class of problem. In this context, it was necessary to use the higher-order methods in both FLUENT and RAMPANT. In addition, KIVA2 required a modification that allows significantly more accurate solutions for a converging-diverging nozzle. From a predictive point of view, code accuracy with no tuning is an important result. The most accurate codes on a coarse grid, CHAD and VNAP2, did not require any tuning. Their main comparison among the codes was the radial dependence of the Mach number across the nozzle throat. All five codes yielded a very similar solution with fine, radially uniform and radially nonuniform grids. However, the codes yielded significantly different solutions with coarse, radially uniform and radially nonuniform grids. For all the codes, radially nonuniform zoning across the throat significantly increased solution accuracy with a coarse mesh. None of the codes agrees in detail with the weak shock located downstream of the nozzle throat, but all the

  12. Springtime Arctic Trace Gas Measurements and Comparisons With the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment on SCISAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenmaier, R.; Batchelor, R.; Strong, K.; Walker, K.; Manney, G.; Daffer, W.

    2009-05-01

    The process of rapid stratospheric ozone loss in the polar regions begins during the polar winter, when dynamical and chemical conditions lead to the formation of reactive chlorine and bromine radicals. Arctic ozone loss varies significantly from year to year because of changing dynamical conditions. Therefore, long-term data sets of Arctic chemical composition measurements are needed to better understand the process of ozone loss, the links between ozone depletion and climate change, and the future evolution of ozone. Solar absorption spectra have been recorded at Eureka, Nunavut in the sunlit part of each year since July 2006, when a Bruker 125HR high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL). Applying the optimal estimation technique, total columns and some vertical profile information are retrieved for a suite of trace gases that are involved in stratospheric ozone depletion. Total columns of O3, HCl, ClONO2, HNO3, and HF will be presented, with a focus on three Canadian Arctic ACE Validation spring campaigns that took place in 2007, 2008, and 2009. Very different dynamical situations were observed over Eureka during these three spring periods: the impact of these conditions on the trace gas measurements will be shown. SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian satellite mission for remote sounding of the Earth's atmosphere and was launched on August 12, 2003. Its primary instrument is a high spectral resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) measuring sequences of atmospheric absorption spectra in solar occultation. From these spectra the vertical distribution of trace gases can be determined. Results of the Bruker 125HR comparisons with the ACE-FTS, made with the purpose of validating the satellite measurements, will be also shown.

  13. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Chiou, E. W.; Chu, W. P.; McCormick, M. P.; McMaster, L. R.; Oltmans, S.; Rind, D.

    1993-03-01

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, we took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. We show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere.

  14. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.C.; Chiou, E.W. ); Chu, W.P.; McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R. ); Oltmans, S. ); Rind, D. )

    1993-03-20

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, the authors took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. The authors show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere. 31 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Tomogram-based comparison of geostatistical models: Application to the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Niklas; Lochbühler, Tobias; Dogan, Mine; Van Dam, Remke L.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new framework to compare alternative geostatistical descriptions of a given site. Multiple realizations of each of the considered geostatistical models and their corresponding tomograms (based on inversion of noise-contaminated simulated data) are used as a multivariate training image. The training image is scanned with a direct sampling algorithm to obtain conditional realizations of hydraulic conductivity that are not only in agreement with the geostatistical model, but also honor the spatially varying resolution of the site-specific tomogram. Model comparison is based on the quality of the simulated geophysical data from the ensemble of conditional realizations. The tomogram in this study is obtained by inversion of cross-hole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) first-arrival travel time data acquired at the MAcro-Dispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Mississippi (USA). Various heterogeneity descriptions ranging from multi-Gaussian fields to fields with complex multiple-point statistics inferred from outcrops are considered. Under the assumption that the relationship between porosity and hydraulic conductivity inferred from local measurements is valid, we find that conditioned multi-Gaussian realizations and derivatives thereof can explain the crosshole geophysical data. A training image based on an aquifer analog from Germany was found to be in better agreement with the geophysical data than the one based on the local outcrop, which appears to under-represent high hydraulic conductivity zones. These findings are only based on the information content in a single resolution-limited tomogram and extending the analysis to tracer or higher resolution surface GPR data might lead to different conclusions (e.g., that discrete facies boundaries are necessary). Our framework makes it possible to identify inadequate geostatistical models and petrophysical relationships, effectively narrowing the space of possible heterogeneity representations.

  16. Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the Mock Urban Setting Test Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Steve; Platt, Nathan; Heagy, James F.; Jordan, Jason E.; Bieberbach, George

    2006-10-01

    The potential effects of a terrorist attack involving the atmospheric release of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or other hazardous materials continue to be of concern to the United States. The Defense Threat Reduction Agency has developed a Hazard Prediction Assessment Capability (HPAC) that includes initial features to address hazardous releases within an urban environment. Improved characterization and understanding of urban transport and dispersion are required to allow for more robust modeling. In 2001, a scaled urban setting was created in the desert of Utah using shipping containers, and tracer gases were released. This atmospheric tracer and meteorological study is known as the Mock Urban Setting Test (MUST). This paper describes the creation of sets of HPAC predictions and comparisons with the MUST field experiment. Strong consistency between the conclusions of this study and a previously reported HPAC evaluation that relied on urban tracer observations within the downtown area of Salt Lake City was found. For example, in both cases, improved predictions were associated with the inclusion of a simple empirically based urban dispersion model within HPAC, whereas improvements associated with the inclusion of a more computationally intensive wind field module were not found. The use of meteorological observations closest to the array and well above the obstacle array—the sonic anemometer measurements 16 m above ground level—resulted in predictions with the best fit to the observed tracer concentrations. The authors speculate that including meteorological observations or vertical wind profiles above or upwind of an urban region might be a sufficient input to create reasonable HPAC hazard-area predictions.

  17. Alternating current dielectrophoresis of core-shell nanoparticles: Experiments and comparison with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chungja

    Nanoparticles are fascinating where physical and optical properties are related to size. Highly controllable synthesis methods and nanoparticle assembly are essential for highly innovative technological applications. Well-defined shaped and sized nanoparticles enable comparisons between experiments, theory and subsequent new models to explain experimentally observed phenomena. Among nanoparticles, nonhomogeneous core-shell nanoparticles (CSnp) have new properties that arise when varying the relative dimensions of the core and the shell. This CSnp structure enables various optical resonances, and engineered energy barriers, in addition to the high charge to surface ratio. Assembly of homogeneous nanoparticles into functional structures has become ubiquitous in biosensors (i.e. optical labeling), nanocoatings, and electrical circuits. Limited nonhomogenous nanoparticle assembly has only been explored. Many conventional nanoparticle assembly methods exist, but this work explores dielectrophoresis (DEP) as a new method. DEP is particle polarization via non-uniform electric fields while suspended in conductive fluids. Most prior DEP efforts involve microscale particles. Prior work on core-shell nanoparticle assemblies and separately, nanoparticle characterizations with dielectrophoresis and electrorotation, did not systematically explore particle size, dielectric properties (permittivity and electrical conductivity), shell thickness, particle concentration, medium conductivity, and frequency. This work is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to systematically examine these dielectrophoretic properties for core-shell nanoparticles. Further, we conduct a parametric fitting to traditional core-shell models. These biocompatible core-shell nanoparticles were studied to fill a knowledge gap in the DEP field. Experimental results (chapter 5) first examine medium conductivity, size and shell material dependencies of dielectrophoretic behaviors of spherical CSnp into 2D and

  18. Comparisons of neutrino event generators from an oscillation-experiment perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Nathan

    2015-05-15

    Monte Carlo generators are crucial to the analysis of high energy physics data, ideally giving a baseline comparison between the state-of-art theoretical models and experimental data. Presented here is a comparison between three of final state distributions from the GENIE, Neut, NUANCE, and NuWro neutrino Monte Carlo event generators. The final state distributions chosen for comparison are: the electromagnetic energy fraction in neutral current interactions, the energy of the leading π{sup 0} vs. the scattering angle for neutral current interactions, and the muon energy vs. scattering angle of ν{sub µ} charged current interactions.

  19. Comparisons of neutrino event generators from an oscillation-experiment perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Nathan

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo generators are crucial to the analysis of high energy physics data, ideally giving a baseline comparison between the state-of-art theoretical models and experimental data. Presented here is a comparison between three of final state distributions from the GENIE, Neut, NUANCE, and NuWro neutrino Monte Carlo event generators. The final state distributions chosen for comparison are: the electromagnetic energy fraction in neutral current interactions, the energy of the leading π0 vs. the scattering angle for neutral current interactions, and the muon energy vs. scattering angle of νµ charged current interactions.

  20. The winds of the comparison data set for the Seasat Gulf of Alaska Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.; Peteherych, S.; Wilkerson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ship and data buoy winds used for comparison in the validation of Seasat-derived winds are described in terms of the time series of hourly wind observations from the buoys and in terms of the techniques used to produce 20- and 30-min average winds from the ships. Attention is given to the comparison data, the synoptic scale wind, turbulence concepts, the data buoy winds, Ocean Weather Station PAPA, the oceanographer data, and the results from Ocean Station PAPA Ship Quadra and from the oceanographer. Sources of scatter in the comparison data are reviewed.

  1. INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON EXPERIMENT ON THE DETERMINATION OF VOCS EMITTED FROM INDOOR MATERIALS USING SMALL TEST CHAMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an interlaboratory comparison of three materials to assess the agreement among laboratories for characterizing volatile organic compounds emitted from indoor materials and products using small test chambers. esults from the 20 participating laboratories showed...

  2. Cyclosporine in psoriasis: comparison of a 25-year real-world Italian experience to current European guidelines.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Gianfranco; Ayala, Fabio; Bardazzi, Federico; Bellia, Gilberto; Chimenti, Sergio; Colombo, Delia; Flori, Maria L; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Micali, Giuseppe; Parodi, Aurora; Peris, Ketty; Vena, Gino A

    2016-08-01

    Cyclosporine (CsA) is an effective and safe therapeutic option in various dermatoses in both adults and children. Over the last 25 years, Italian dermatologists have gained relevant experience about the use of CsA in the treatment of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, and an Italian Consensus Conference has recently provided recommendations in adult patients. A comparison between these real-world indications and current European guidelines is hereby provided. PMID:25786483

  3. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  4. A Comparison of Technology Experiences Included in Alternative and Traditional Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strycker, Jesse D.

    2011-01-01

    Though an educational technology experience is required as part of a traditional teacher education program student's educational preparation, research has been limited into the experiences had by alternative teacher education program students. Similarly, little research has been done comparing technology experiences between both types of teacher…

  5. A Comparison of Induction Experiences of Beginning Vocational Teachers with and without Teacher Education Backgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G.; Heath-Camp, Betty

    The nature, dynamics, and scope of the induction experience of beginning secondary vocational education teachers was examined. The study determined induction experiences encountered and compared induction experiences of teachers with formal teacher education programs (teacher education certified or TEC) to those without such preparation…

  6. Social comparison processes, narrative mapping and their shaping of the cancer experience: a case study of an elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Andrew C; Pérez-Samaniego, Víctor; Smith, Brett

    2012-09-01

    Drawing on data generated by life history interviews and fieldwork observations we illuminate the ways in which a young elite athlete named David (a pseudonym) gave meaning to his experiences of cancer that eventually led to his death. Central to this process were the ways in which David utilized both social comparisons and a narrative map provided by the published autobiography of Lance Armstrong (2000). Our analysis reveals the selective manner in which social comparison processes operated around the following key dimensions: mental attitude to treatment; the sporting body; the ageing body; and physical appearance. The manner in which different comparison targets were chosen, the ways in which these were framed by Armstrong's autobiography, and the work that the restitution narrative as an actor did in this process are also examined. Some reflections are offered regarding the experiential consequences of the social comparison processes utilized by David when these are shaped by specific forms of embodiment and selective narrative maps of cancer survival. PMID:22199179

  7. A Comparison of Sexual Coercion Experiences Reported by Men and Women in Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struckman-Johnson, Cindy; Struckman-Johnson, David

    2006-01-01

    Comparisons were made between self-reports from 382 men and 51 women who had experienced sexual coercion while incarcerated. Victim data were obtained from a sample of 1,788 male inmates and 263 female inmates who responded to an anonymous written survey distributed in 10 midwestern prisons. Men reported that their perpetrators in worst-case…

  8. Estimation of Effect Size from a Series of Experiments Involving Paired Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Robert D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A distribution theory is derived for a G. V. Glass-type (1976) estimator of effect size from studies involving paired comparisons. The possibility of combining effect sizes from studies involving a mixture of related and unrelated samples is also explored. Resulting estimates are illustrated using data from previous psychiatric research. (SLD)

  9. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator With Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  10. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  11. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; Griffith, C.; Hedges, S.; Dilmore, R.; Goodman, A.; Black, J.; Haese, R.; Deusner, C.; Bigalke, N.; Haeckel, M.; Fischer, S.; Liebscher, A.; Icenhower, J. P.; Daval, D.; Saldi, G. D.; Knauss, K. G.; Schmidt, M.; Mito, S.; Sorai, M.; Truche, L.

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in composition of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.

  12. Electron transport and energy degradation in the ionosphere: Evaluation of the numerical solution, comparison with laboratory experiments and auroral observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Lilensten, J.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral electron transport calculations are a critical part of auroral models. We evaluate a numerical solution to the transport and energy degradation problem. The numerical solution is verified by reproducing simplified problems to which analytic solutions exist, internal self-consistency tests, comparison with laboratory experiments of electron beams penetrating a collision chamber, and by comparison with auroral observations, particularly the emission ratio of the N2 second positive to N2(+) first negative emissions. Our numerical solutions agree with range measurements in collision chambers. The calculated N(2)2P to N2(+)1N emission ratio is independent of the spectral characteristics of the incident electrons, and agrees with the value observed in aurora. Using different sets of energy loss cross sections and different functions to describe the energy distribution of secondary electrons that emerge from ionization collisions, we discuss the uncertainties of the solutions to the electron transport equation resulting from the uncertainties of these input parameters.

  13. Love and Dating Experience in Early and Middle Adolescence: Grade and Gender Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Sorell, Gwendolyn T.

    1998-01-01

    Examines male and female adolescents and their experience of "being in love." Qualitative analyses suggest that early and middle adolescents are actively reasoning about the nature and meaning of romantic feelings and experiences. Discusses results from standpoint of psychosocial-development theory. (Author/JDM)

  14. A Comparison of Web Resource Access Experiments: Planning for the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jane

    This paper reports on research that compared five leading experiments that aim to improve access to the growing number of information resources on the World Wide Web. The objective was to identify characteristics of success and considerations for improvement in experiments providing access to Web resources via bibliographic control methods. The…

  15. CONTROLLED EXPERIMENTS FOR DENSE GAS DIFFUSION - EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND EXECUTION, MODEL COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental baseline CO2 release experiment at the DOE Spill Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site in Southern Nevada is described. his experiment was unique in its use of CO2 as a surrogate gas representative of a variety of specific chemicals. ntroductory discussion places ...

  16. Sharing the Holocaust Experience: A Comparison of Communication Patterns in Two Groups of Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kav-Venaki, Sophie; And Others

    This study focuses on the communication patterns (that is, talking of individual experiences and knowledge of other's experiences) of Holocaust related issues in the families of survivors and investigates the consequences of these patterns as reflected in the descendants' knowledge about the Holocaust and their attitudes toward its survivors. A…

  17. A Comparison of Premenarcheal Expectations and Postmenarcheal Experiences in Chinese Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; Yeung, Dannii Y. L.; Lee, Antoinette Marie

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined Chinese early adolescents' expectations and experiences of their first menstruation. It included 952 participants, 476 premenarcheal and 476 postmenarcheal girls matched by age and by grade level. Results showed that compared to experiences of postmenarcheal girls, premenarcheal girls anticipated more negative emotional…

  18. Partitioning of soil respiration at the PHACE experiment: A two-method comparison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated CO2 and warming are both known to stimulate soil respiration rates, leading to concerns regarding soil-related feedback effects on climate change. We investigated soil C cycling at the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment near Cheyenne, WY, a factorial experiment combining ...

  19. Comparison of Sexual Experience and Behavior between Bipolar Outpatients and Outpatients without Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Jennifer; Friedman, Richard C.; Haase, Elizabeth; Goldenberg, David; Bell, Robinette; Edsall, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Sexual behavior over the past year of 32 outpatients with Bipolar disorder is compared to that of 44 Comparison patients that had never had an episode of affective illness. Subjects were outpatients treated with drugs and psychotherapy in routine office practice. Differences in sexual behavior between the two groups as a whole were minimal, but meaningful differences emerged when subgroups were compared. Compared to control men, Bipolar men had had more partners in the last year and were more likely to have had sex without condoms. Compared to Bipolar females, Bipolar males had more sex partners, had more sex with strangers, and were more likely to have engaged in homosexual behavior. Even so, some patients in the Comparison group also had engaged in risky sexual behavior. They had failed to use condoms and had had sex with strangers and prostitutes during the previous year. PMID:27190984

  20. Cognitive Experiences Reported by Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects: A 16-year Prospective Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Wedig, Michelle M.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study assesses three main types of cognition: nonpsychotic thought (odd thinking, unusual perceptual experiences, and non-delusional paranoia), quasi-psychotic thought, and true-psychotic thought in borderline patients followed prospectively for 16 years. It also compares the rates of these disturbed cognitions to those reported by axis II comparison subjects. Method The cognitive experiences of 362 inpatients—290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects—were assessed at study entry using the cognitive section of the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines. Their cognitive experiences were reassessed every two years using the same interview. Results Each of the five main types of thought studied was reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients than axis II comparison subjects over time. Each of these types of thought, except true-psychotic thought, declined significantly over time for those in both groups. Eleven of the 17 more specific forms of thought studied were also reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients over the years of follow-up: magical thinking, overvalued ideas, recurrent illusions, depersonalization, derealization, undue suspiciousness, ideas of reference, other paranoid ideation, quasi-psychotic delusions, quasi-psychotic hallucinations, and true-psychotic hallucinations. Fourteen specific forms of thought were found to decline significantly over time for those in both groups: all forms of thought mentioned above except true-psychotic hallucinations plus marked superstitiousness, sixth sense, telepathy, and clairvoyance. Conclusions Disturbed cognitions are common among borderline patients and distinguishing for the disorder. They also decline substantially over time but remain a problem, particularly those of a nonpsychotic nature. PMID:23558452

  1. Systematic Ion Irradiation Experiments to Olivine: Comparison with Space Weathered Rims of Itokawa Regolith Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Watanabe, N.; Yasuda, K.; Miyake, A.; Nakauchi, Y.; Okada, T.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Uesugi, M.; Karouji, Y.; Nakato, A.; Hashiguschi, M.; Kumagai, K.

    2015-11-01

    We performed H and He ion irradiation experiments using olivine fragments, in order to reveal formation time-scales of space weathered rims and formation processes of blisters by solar wind irradiation.

  2. Results of GEANT simulations and comparison with first experiments at DANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Reifarth, R.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Browne, J. C.; Esch, E. I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2003-07-29

    This report describes intensive Monte Carlo simulations carried out to be compared with the results of the first run cycle with DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments). The experimental results were gained during the commissioning phase 2002/2003 with only a part of the array. Based on the results of these simulations the most important items to be improved before the next experiments will be addressed.

  3. Comparison of Resource Requirements for a Wind Tunnel Test Designed with Conventional vs. Modern Design of Experiments Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard; Micol, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The factors that determine data volume requirements in a typical wind tunnel test are identified. It is suggested that productivity in wind tunnel testing can be enhanced by managing the inference error risk associated with evaluating residuals in a response surface modeling experiment. The relationship between minimum data volume requirements and the factors upon which they depend is described and certain simplifications to this relationship are realized when specific model adequacy criteria are adopted. The question of response model residual evaluation is treated and certain practical aspects of response surface modeling are considered, including inference subspace truncation. A wind tunnel test plan developed by using the Modern Design of Experiments illustrates the advantages of an early estimate of data volume requirements. Comparisons are made with a representative One Factor At a Time (OFAT) wind tunnel test matrix developed to evaluate a surface to air missile.

  4. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; Van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment to measure photoemission with the predictions of three different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. The Monte Carlo codes TIGER and TIGERP can calculate the net photon-induced electron emission but accurate results may require that statistical error be minimized. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. The authors find that all of the codes substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. However, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, the codes overpredict relative to measurements.

  5. Mothers with intellectual disability, their experiences of maltreatment, and their children's attachment representations: a small-group matched comparison study.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Pehr; Forslund, Tommie; Fransson, Mari; Springer, Lydia; Lindberg, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Maternal intellectual disability (ID) is regarded a risk factor in child development, but there is no scientific evidence on maternal ID in relation to children's attachment. Using a matched comparison design, a small group (n = 23) of mothers diagnosed with ID was studied to help fill this gap. Besides maternal ID, we examined the role of abuse/trauma/maltreatment (ATM) in the mothers' biographies, along with potential confounds. Comparison group mothers (n = 25) had normal variations in intelligence and matched mothers with ID on residential area, income, child age, and sex. History of maternal ATM was assessed using a semi-structured interview and was found to be significantly more likely in the ID group mothers' experience than the comparison group mothers. Children's (M age = 77 months) attachment representations were assessed with the Separation Anxiety Test. Among children of mothers with ID, a substantial minority (35%) had a secure and the vast majority (>80%) an organized attachment representation. Mothers with ID who had suffered elevated ATM were significantly more likely to have children who were scored high on disorganization and insecurity. We discuss possible implications of our findings for societal considerations regarding parenting and child attachment in the context of parental ID status. PMID:24931835

  6. Comparison of an unsaturated soil zone model (SESOIL) predictions with a laboratory leaching experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, D.M.; Travis, C.C.; Kinerson, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Model predictions of a modified version of the soil compartment model SESOIL are compared with laboratory measurements of pollutant transport in soil. A brief description of SESOIL is given and modifications that have been made to the model are summarized. Comparisons are performed using data from a laboratory soil column study involving six chemicals (dicamba, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, diazinon, pentachlorophenol, and lindane). Overall, SESOIL model predictions are in good agreement with the empirical data. Limitation of the model are discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. A Comparison of Theory and Experiment for High-speed Free-molecule Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Jackson R; Goodwin, Glen; Creager, Marcus O

    1951-01-01

    A comparison is made of free-molecule-flow theory with the results of wind-tunnel tests performed to determine the drag and temperature-rise characteristics of a transverse circular cylinder. The measured values of the cylinder center-point temperature confirmed the salient point of the heat-transfer analysis which was the prediction that an insulated cylinder would attain a temperature higher than the stagnation temperature of the stream. Good agreement was obtained between the theoretical and the experimental values for the drag coefficient.

  8. Oscillation and extinction thresholds of the clarinet: comparison of analytical results and experiments.

    PubMed

    Dalmont, Jean-Pierre; Frappé, Cyrille

    2007-08-01

    In the context of a simplified model of the clarinet in which the losses are assumed to be frequency independent the analytic expressions of the various thresholds have been calculated in a previous paper [Dalmont et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 32.94-3305 (2005)]. The present work is a quantitative comparison between "theoretical" values of the thresholds and their experimental values measured by using an artificial mouth. It is shown that the "Raman" model, providing that nonlinear losses are taken into account, is reliable and able to predict the values of thresholds. PMID:17672663

  9. Catalytic honeycomb combustor - Steady-state model and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A steady-state lean combustion model for monolithic catalytic combustors is given. The model, consisting of several semi-global chemical reaction steps in the gas-phase and on the surface, is capable of analyzing CO and THC emissions. In the model computation presented, the influence of operating and design parameters on the minimum combustor length is studied. Special attention is given to the effect of after-bed gas-phase reaction space. Comparison with experimental data indicates good agreement in the range of parameters covered.

  10. Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, M.P.

    1994-02-01

    This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

  11. A Comparison of Climate Feedback Strength between CO2 Doubling and LGM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Yokohata, T.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of past climate potentially provide a constraint on the uncertainty of climate sensitivity, but previous studies warn against a simple scaling to the future. The climate sensitivity is determined by various feedback processes and they may vary with climate states and forcings. In this study, we investigate similarities and differences of feedbacks for a CO2 doubling, a last glacial maximum (LGM), and LGM greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing experiments, using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. After computing the radiative forcing, the individual feedback strengths: water vapor, lapse rate, albedo, and cloud feedbacks, are evaluated explicitly. For this particular model, the difference in the climate sensitivity among experiments is attributed to the shortwave cloud feedback in which there is a tendency that it becomes weaker or even negative in the cooling experiments. No significant difference is found in the water vapor feedback between warming and cooling experiments by GHGs despite the nonlinear dependence of the Clausius-Clapeyron relation on temperature. The weaker water vapor feedback in the LGM experiment due to a relatively weaker tropical forcing is compensated by the stronger lapse rate feedback due to a relatively stronger extratropical forcing. A hypothesis is proposed which explains the asymmetric cloud response between warming and cooling experiments associated with a displacement of the region of mixed- phase clouds. The difference in the total feedback strength between experiments is, however, relatively small compared to the current intermodel spread, and does not necessarily preclude the use of LGM climate as a future constraint.

  12. Online or not? A comparison of students' experiences of an online and an on-campus class.

    PubMed

    Mgutshini, Tennyson

    2013-01-01

    Educational discourse has long portrayed online, or e-based, learning and all non-campus-based learning options as second best to traditional face-to-face options. Critically much of the research and debate in this area of study has focused on evidence relating to student performance, attrition and retention with little consideration of the total learning experience, which values both the traditional learning outcome measures side-by-side with student-centered factors, such as students' satisfaction with their learning experience. The objective of this study was to present a synchronous head-to-head comparison between online and campus-based students' experiences of an undergraduate course. This paper reports on a qualitative comparative cross-sectional study, which used multiple data collection approaches to assess student learning and student satisfaction of 61 students who completed a semester of an undergraduate course. Of the 61 students, 34 were enrolled purely as online students, whilst the remaining 27 students studied the same material entirely through the traditional face-to-face medium. Methods included a standardised student satisfaction survey and an 'achievement of learning outcomes' measurement tool. Students on the online cohort performed better in areas where 'self-direction' in learning was indicated, for example self-directed problem-based tasks within the course. Online students gave less positive self-assessments of their perceived content mastery than their campus-based counterparts, despite performing just as well in both summative and formative assignments. A multi-factorial comparison shows online students to have comparable educational success and that, in terms of student satisfaction, online learners reported more satisfaction with their learning experience than their campus-based counterparts. PMID:23718147

  13. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations: Comparison with experiment and implications for predicting turbulence and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Candy, J.; Creely, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    To better understand the role of cross-scale coupling in experimental conditions, a series of multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations were performed on Alcator C-Mod, L-mode plasmas. These simulations, performed using all experimental inputs and realistic ion to electron mass ratio ((mi/me)1/2 = 60.0), simultaneously capture turbulence at the ion ( kθρs˜O (1.0 ) ) and electron-scales ( kθρe˜O (1.0 ) ). Direct comparison with experimental heat fluxes and electron profile stiffness indicates that Electron Temperature Gradient (ETG) streamers and strong cross-scale turbulence coupling likely exist in both of the experimental conditions studied. The coupling between ion and electron-scales exists in the form of energy cascades, modification of zonal flow dynamics, and the effective shearing of ETG turbulence by long wavelength, Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) turbulence. The tightly coupled nature of ITG and ETG turbulence in these realistic plasma conditions is shown to have significant implications for the interpretation of experimental transport and fluctuations. Initial attempts are made to develop a "rule of thumb" based on linear physics, to help predict when cross-scale coupling plays an important role and to inform future modeling of experimental discharges. The details of the simulations, comparisons with experimental measurements, and implications for both modeling and experimental interpretation are discussed.

  14. Comparison of Properties of Solid Lubricant Between Two Exposure Experiments Aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Suzuki, Mineo; Kimoto, Yugo

    To evaluate the degradation of materials in low Earth orbit space environment, the Space Environment Exposure Device (SEED) experiments were carried out on the International Space Station. As part of these experiments, changes in the tribological properties of a molybdenum disulfide bonded film that is used as a solid lubricant, were evaluated. The results of friction tests in a vacuum and surface analysis by XPS were compared between two exposure experiments aboard the Service Module (SM) and the Japan Experimental Module (JEM). The investigations revealed silicon and fluorine contaminations in the JEM/SEED flight sample, but with a lower amount of silicon contamination than the SM/SEED flight sample. The JEM/SEED flight sample and ground-based tested samples showed lower friction coefficients than a reference sample at the beginning of the tests. The friction behavior of the JEM/SEED flight sample was similar to those of SM/SEED flight samples.

  15. Hyperaccumulative property comparison of 24 weed species to heavy metals using a pot culture experiment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Zhou, Qixing; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Chuanjie; Hu, Yahu; Ren, Liping

    2009-05-01

    The screening of hyperaccumulators is still very much needed for phytoremediation. With properties such as strong tolerance to adverse environment, fast growing and highly reproductive rate, weed species may be an ideal plant for phytoremediation. The objectives of this study were to examine the tolerance and hyperaccumulative characteristics of 24 species in 9 families to Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn by using the outdoor pot-culture experiment. In the screening experiment, only Conyza canadensis and Rorippa globosa displayed Cd-hyperaccumulative characteristics. In a further concentration gradient experiment, C. canadensis was affirmed that it is not a Cd hyperaccumulator. Only R. globosa, indicated all Cd hyperaccumulative characteristics, especially Cd concentration in its stems and leaves were higher than 100 mg/kg, the minimum Cd concentration what a Cd-hyperaccumulator should accumulate. Thus, R. globosa was further validated as a Cd-hyperaccumulator. PMID:18483772

  16. A comparison of quality and satisfaction experiences of patients attending chiropractic and physician offices in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Improving the quality of healthcare is a common goal of consumers, providers, payer groups, and governments. There is evidence that patient satisfaction influences the perceptions of the quality of care received. Methods: This exploratory, qualitative study described and analyzed, the similarities and differences in satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences of patients attending physicians (social justice) and chiropractors (market justice) for healthcare services in Niagara Region, Ontario. Using inductive content analysis the satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences were themed to develop groups, categories, and sub-categories of quality judgments of care experiences. Results: Study participants experienced both satisfying and dissatisfying critical incidents in the areas of standards of practice, professional and practice attributes, time management, and treatment outcomes. Cost was not a marked source of satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Conclusion: Patients may be more capable of generating quality judgments on the technical aspects of medical and chiropractic care, particularly treatment outcomes and standards of practice, than previously thought. PMID:24587494

  17. Comparison of simulations and data from a seismo-acoustic tank experiment.

    PubMed

    Collis, Jon M; Siegmann, William L; Collins, Michael D; Simpson, Harry J; Soukup, Raymond J

    2007-10-01

    A tank experiment was carried out to investigate underwater sound propagation over an elastic bottom in flat and sloping configurations. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate range-dependent propagation models with high-quality experimental data. The sea floor was modeled as an elastic medium by a polyvinyl chloride slab. The relatively high rigidity of the slab requires accounting for shear waves in this environment. Acoustic measurements were obtained along virtual arrays in the water column using a robotic apparatus. Elastic parabolic equation solutions are in excellent agreement with data. PMID:17902835

  18. Is it really so bad? A comparison of positive and negative experiences in Antarctic winter stations.

    PubMed

    Wood, J; Hysong, S J; Lugg, D J; Harm, D L

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the range of positive and negative themes reported by 104 Australian Antarctic winter personnel at four stations during two austral winters. Reports from the expeditioners were subjected to a content analysis using the TextSmart software from SPSS, Inc. Results indicated that, although the list of negative experiences is lengthy, most events are relatively rare. On the other hand, although the list of positive experiences is short, the frequencies with which they are reported are much greater than for most of the problems. Possible explanations for these themes and for future directions are discussed. PMID:11542948

  19. Is it really so bad? A comparison of positive and negative experiences in Antarctic winter stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J.; Hysong, S. J.; Lugg, D. J.; Harm, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the range of positive and negative themes reported by 104 Australian Antarctic winter personnel at four stations during two austral winters. Reports from the expeditioners were subjected to a content analysis using the TextSmart software from SPSS, Inc. Results indicated that, although the list of negative experiences is lengthy, most events are relatively rare. On the other hand, although the list of positive experiences is short, the frequencies with which they are reported are much greater than for most of the problems. Possible explanations for these themes and for future directions are discussed.

  20. Chapter 4: A Comparison of Personal Attributes and Experiences among Physically Active and Inactive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Darla M.; Erwin, Heather E.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the researchers aim to compare the personal attributes and experiences of children who met or exceeded physical activity guidelines with those who did not. By creating profiles, the researchers could compare motor performance, physical fitness, self-efficacy, time spent outdoors during physical activity, social support from friends…

  1. A Comparison Between Girls' and Boys' Experiences of Unwanted Sexual Behaviour in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmerman, Greetje

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study examines gender differences (and similarities) in the context, meaning and effects of unwanted sexual behaviour in secondary schools. Purpose First, the study's purpose is exploration of variables that discriminate between girls' and boys' experiences of unwanted sexual behaviour. Secondly, the aim is to find empirical…

  2. Behavioural self-analysis in the medical curriculum: a comparison of Malaysian and American experiences.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, H E; Tan, E S

    1979-03-01

    Behavioural self-analysis projects were introduced into the second year medical curriculum in behavioural sciences at the University of Malaya. Students performance and evaluation of the experience were compared with those of American medical students. It was concluded that receptivity of medical students to principles of behaviour therapy is relatively similar in the two societies. PMID:431423

  3. Early Learning Experience and Adolescent Anxiety: A Cross-Cultural Comparison between Japan and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Ishikawa, Shin-ichi; Sasagawa, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the frequency of anxiety symptoms among adolescents in Japan and England, and to examine the association between early learning experiences and anxiety symptoms. A total of 299 adolescents (147 from England and 152 from Japan), aged 12 to 17 years were investigated. Results showed that adolescents in…

  4. Receiving the Initial Down Syndrome Diagnosis: A Comparison of Prenatal and Postnatal Parent Group Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson Goff, Briana S.; Springer, Nicole; Foote, Laura Cline; Frantz, Courtney; Peak, Madison; Tracy, Courtney; Veh, Taylor; Bentley, Gail E.; Cross, Kayli A.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the preliminary experiences of parents upon learning of their child's diagnosis of Down syndrome. Qualitative data from a web-based, national survey were analyzed based on two groups: prenatal ("n" = 46) or postnatal ("n" = 115) diagnosis. Three primary categories emerged from the data analysis:…

  5. A Comparison of Ionic and Covalent Iodine Dihalides: An Integrated Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Alfred A.

    1978-01-01

    Compares the preparation and decomposition of potassium dibromoiodate and of phenyl iodine dichloride in a flexible experiment which accustoms the student to handle halogens, to test for halogens in mixtures, and to appreciate the difference between thermodynamic and kinetic control of reactions. (Author/MA)

  6. Chinese Students' Science-Related Experiences: Comparison of the ROSE Study in Xinjiang and Shanghai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Yau-yuen; Li, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Students' daily-life experiences may render favorable effects on the students' affective domain like interest, enthusiasm, motivation, joy, curiosity, awareness, and eagerness to learn science as not commonly found in the classroom environment. However, no rigorous research has been reported on those aspects in Mainland China despite…

  7. Preservice Teachers' Reflection on Clinical Experiences: A Comparison of Blog and Final Paper Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Darci J.; Wondra, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the depth of reflection in the writing of preservice teachers who completed end-of-the-semester reflective papers or reflective blogs for undergraduate education courses associated with clinical experiences. Coders rated the depth of reflection as one of four categories: non-reflection, understanding, reflection, or critical…

  8. A Comparison of the Abuse Experiences of Male and Female Adults Molested as Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall-Tackett, Kathleen A.; Simon, Arthur F.

    To determine whether the molestation experiences of boys and girls differ, this study analyzed data from 365 adults (40 male and 325 female) molested as children, and compared findings for males and females on the identity of the perpetrator, age at onset and end of molestation, duration of molestation, type of sexual acts, and whether the…

  9. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  10. A Comparison of Methods to Test for Mediation in Multisite Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pituch, Keenan A.; Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Stapleton, Laura M.

    2005-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study extended the research of MacKinnon, Lockwood, Hoffman, West, and Sheets (2002) for single-level designs by examining the statistical performance of four methods to test for mediation in a multilevel experimental design. The design studied was a two-group experiment that was replicated across several sites, included a single…

  11. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Adolescents' Experience Related to Cyberbullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study explores the issues of cyberbullying from a cross-cultural perspective. The focus is on the examination of the extent of a sample of Canadian and Chinese adolescents' experiences and possible culture differences related to bullying and cyberbullying. Sample: Two sets of data were collected in Canada and China. In…

  12. Regional Differences in Spanking Experiences and Attitudes: A Comparison of Northeastern and Southern College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Clifton P.

    1996-01-01

    Examines regional differences in college student experiences with corporal punishment as children. Students from a northeastern and a southern university were surveyed. Results indicated that students attending the northeastern university were less likely to have been spanked as children. Effect of region was more important for attitudes than…

  13. Preparing Beginning Reading Teachers: An Experimental Comparison of Initial Early Literacy Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Lake, Vickie E.; Greulich, Luana; Folsom, Jessica S.; Guidry, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This randomized-control trial examined the learning of preservice teachers taking an initial Early Literacy course in an early childhood education program and of the kindergarten or first grade students they tutored in their field experience. Preservice teachers were randomly assigned to one of two tutoring programs: Book Buddies and Tutor…

  14. A Comparison of the Internship Experience for Student Interns Placed in Different Urban School Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Sueanne E.; Finke, Janet A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if there was a difference in the internship experience between student interns placed in either an urban Professional Development School or an urban non-Professional Development School. Student interns from two urban universities who have partnerships with neighboring urban school districts…

  15. COMPARISON OF MODELLED AND MEASURED TRACER GAS CONCENTRATIONS DURING THE ACROSS NORTH AMERICA TRACER EXPERIMENT (ANATEX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 24-hour surface concentrations of several perfluorocarbon tracer gases measured during the 1987 Across North America Tracer Experiment (ANATEX) provided a unique continental-scale data set with which to evaluate long-range transport and diffusion models. One such model, a mul...

  16. Statistical comparison between experiments and numerical simulations of shock-accelerated gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Zoldi, C. A.; Tomkins, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed spatial analysis comparing experimental data and numerical simulation results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of Prestridge et al. and Tomkins et al. These experiments consist, respectively, of one and two diffuse cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shockwave in air. The subsequent fluid evolution and mixing is driven by the deposition of baroclinic vorticity at the interface between the two fluids. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods, including a new weighted adaptive Runge-Kutta (WARK) scheme. We quantify the nature of the mixing using using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. Our investigation of the gas cylinder configurations follows the path of our earlier studies of the geometrically and dynamically more complex gas 'curtain' experiment. In those studies, we found significant discrepancies in the details of the experimentally measured mixing and the details of the numerical simulations. Here we evaluate the effects of these hydrodynamic integration techniques on the diffuse gas cylinder simulations, which we quantitatively compare with experimental data.

  17. Critical review of elastic and plastic thermal contact conductance models and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, M.R.; Yovanovich, M.M. )

    1993-01-01

    More than 450 thermal contact resistance data points obtained from isotropic conforming rough surfaces for five different materials; Ni200, SS304, two Zirconium alloys and Al6061 have been compared with the existing elastic and plastic models. For the first time data have been reduced to a dimensionless form assuming both elastic as well as plastic deformation. Normally data were compared with either the elastic model or the plastic model assuming a type of deformation a priori. The relative merits of different models and the surface factors influencing the mode of deformation are still not clear. Hence the aim of the present work was to compare most of the models available in the literature with themselves as well as with isotropic data. Comparison showed that generally smoother surfaces deform elastically and rougher ones plastically. However there are some data sets which compare well with both the elastic as well as the plastic models. 20 refs.

  18. Comparison of two sample preparation techniques for sniffing experiments with broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica Plenck).

    PubMed

    Ulrich, D; Krumbein, A; Schonhof, I; Hoberg, E

    1998-12-01

    The suitability of the headspace solid phase microextraction (HSSPME) for gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) with aroma extract dilution analysis in comparison to the dynamic head space sampling on a Tenax trap was tested exemplarily by the aroma volatiles of fresh broccoli. A high number of odour sensations in qualitative olfactometry was registered with both sample preparation techniques. The key aroma compounds of the fresh broccoli material are represented by high flavour dilution factors with dynamic head space sampling and headspace SPME. The SPME method has found to be a convenient and fast technique suitable especially for qualitative GC-O. The adsorption selectivity of the fiber and the substance discrimination have to be taken into account for quantitative use like aroma extract dilution analysis. PMID:9881367

  19. Data-Model Comparisons for Sea Surface Waves from the ASIAEX East China Sea Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Zhou, Ji-Xun; Rogers, Peter H.

    2010-09-01

    During ASIAEX, surface directional wave spectra were recorded for nine consecutive days. Data are analyzed in this paper to show the characteristics of the surface wave field in the East China Sea. Three surface spectrum models, Pierson-Moskowitz, JONSWAP, and Toba, are evaluated and compared with the ASIAEX RMS surface wave height data. The data-model comparisons show that the JONSWAP-Mitsuyasu model is the best fit to the experimental results. Model performance can be improved by a combined model, JONSWAP-Mitsuyasu for U/cp<0.8 and Toba-Donelan for U/cp>0.8. The preliminary results suggest that locally measured wave age can be used to find the most appropriate surface model for acoustic prediction purposes.

  20. Comparison of seismic and hydrodynamic yield determinations for the Soviet joint verification experiment of 1988

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynn R.; Ekström, Göran

    1989-01-01

    Seismic magnitudes determined from surface and body waves for the Soviet underground nuclear explosion of September 14, 1988, are used to calculate the yield of that event from previously derived calibration curves. The yield obtained by combining the two seismic estimates is 113 kilotons, which is very close to those obtained by hydrodynamic measurements made on-site. This comparison substantiates previous conclusions about the sizes of past Soviet weapons tests and compliance with the Threshold Test Ban Treaty. The factor of uncertainty in the combined seismic yield is 1.28 at the 68% and 1.62 at the 95% confidence levels, demonstrating that accuracies considerably better than a factor of 2 can be obtained by combining seismic determinations of yield. PMID:16594040

  1. Supercritical wing design using numerical optimization and comparisons with experiment. [to improve C-141 cruise performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Smith, P. R.; Hicks, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical minimization scheme is used in conjunction with two-dimensional and three-dimensional inviscid transonic flow analysis codes to provide procedures for wing leading edge aerodynamic design. The procedures are demonstrated in the design of a new leading edge to improve C-141 cruise performance. For the high aspect ratio moderately swept C-141 wing, the 2-D procedure is shown to yield results which are in close agreement with those obtained using the 3-D technique. Although the 2-D approach uses much less computation time than the 3-D technique, the latter requires fewer manhours than the former. Comparisons of predicted and wind tunnel measured performance improvements are presented which verify the design procedures.

  2. Calculation of viscous effects on transonic flow for oscillating airfoils and comparisons with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, James T.; Bland, Samuel R.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for calculating unsteady transonic flow with viscous interaction by coupling a steady integral boundary-layer code with an unsteady, transonic, inviscid small-disturbance computer code in a quasi-steady fashion. Explicit coupling of the equations together with viscous -inviscid iterations at each time step yield converged solutions with computer times about double those required to obtain inviscid solutions. The accuracy and range of applicability of the method are investigated by applying it to four AGARD standard airfoils. The first-harmonic components of both the unsteady pressure distributions and the lift and moment coefficients have been calculated. Comparisons with inviscid calcualtions and experimental data are presented. The results demonstrate that accurate solutions for transonic flows with viscous effects can be obtained for flows involving moderate-strength shock waves.

  3. Comprehensive fracture diagnostics experiment. Part II. Comparison of seven fracture azimuth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.B.; Ren, N.K.; Sorrells, G.G.; Teufel, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    A great deal of effort has been devoted recently to find geophysical techniques for measuring the hydraulic fracture azimuth. This paper discusses a comparison of seven different measurements used to determine the azimuth in a sandstone formation at a depth of 1000 ft (320 m). The azimuth was determined as N95E, but significant differences existed between some of the results. This is of fundamental importance since in developing new measurements, the limits of these must be found and honored. Of particular interest are the results from microseismic monitoring. The lack of results suggests that remote (e.g., surface) monitoring for seismic events may be impractical for normal, sedimentary, hydrocarbon-bearing formations. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Mixing of a point-source indoor pollutant: Numerical predictions and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lobscheid, C.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    In most practical estimates of indoor pollutant exposures, it is common to assume that the pollutant is uniformly and instantaneously mixed in the indoor space. It is also commonly known that this assumption is simplistic, particularly for point sources, and for short-term or localized indoor exposures. We report computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of mixing time of a point-pulse release of a pollutant in an unventilated mechanically mixed isothermal room. We aimed to determine the adequacy of the standard RANS two-equation ({kappa}-{var_epsilon}) turbulence model to predict the mixing times under these conditions. The predictions were made for the twelve mixing time experiments performed by Drescher et al. (1995). We paid attention to adequate grid resolution, suppression of numerical diffusion, and careful simulation of the mechanical blowers used in the experiments. We found that the predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Comprehensive comparisons of geodesic acoustic mode characteristics and dynamics between Tore Supra experiments and gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Storelli, A. Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Singh, Rameswar; Morel, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, P.; Görler, T.

    2015-06-15

    In a dedicated collisionality scan in Tore Supra, the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is detected and identified with the Doppler backscattering technique. Observations are compared to the results of a simulation with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. We found that the GAM frequency in experiments is lower than predicted by simulation and theory. Moreover, the disagreement is higher in the low collisionality scenario. Bursts of non harmonic GAM oscillations have been characterized with filtering techniques, such as the Hilbert-Huang transform. When comparing this dynamical behaviour between experiments and simulation, the probability density function of GAM amplitude and the burst autocorrelation time are found to be remarkably similar. In the simulation, where the radial profile of GAM frequency is continuous, we observed a phenomenon of radial phase mixing of the GAM oscillations, which could influence the burst autocorrelation time.

  6. A comparison of older adults' subjective experiences with virtual and real environments during dynamic balance activities.

    PubMed

    Proffitt, Rachel; Lange, Belinda; Chen, Christina; Winstein, Carolee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the subjective experience of older adults interacting with both virtual and real environments. Thirty healthy older adults engaged with real and virtual tasks of similar motor demands: reaching to a target in standing and stepping stance. Immersive tendencies and absorption scales were administered before the session. Game engagement and experience questionnaires were completed after each task, followed by a semistructured interview at the end of the testing session. Data were analyzed respectively using paired t tests and grounded theory methodology. Participants preferred the virtual task over the real task. They also reported an increase in presence and absorption with the virtual task, describing an external focus of attention. Findings will be used to inform future development of appropriate game-based balance training applications that could be embedded in the home or community settings as part of evidence-based fall prevention programs. PMID:24334299

  7. Comparison of Monte Carlo simulations of cytochrome b6f with experiment using Latin hypercube sampling.

    PubMed

    Schumaker, Mark F; Kramer, David M

    2011-09-01

    We have programmed a Monte Carlo simulation of the Q-cycle model of electron transport in cytochrome b(6)f complex, an enzyme in the photosynthetic pathway that converts sunlight into biologically useful forms of chemical energy. Results were compared with published experiments of Kramer and Crofts (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1183:72-84, 1993). Rates for the simulation were optimized by constructing large numbers of parameter sets using Latin hypercube sampling and selecting those that gave the minimum mean square deviation from experiment. Multiple copies of the simulation program were run in parallel on a Beowulf cluster. We found that Latin hypercube sampling works well as a method for approximately optimizing very noisy objective functions of 15 or 22 variables. Further, the simplified Q-cycle model can reproduce experimental results in the presence or absence of a quinone reductase (Q(i)) site inhibitor without invoking ad hoc side-reactions. PMID:21221830

  8. Acceleration of heavy and light particles in turbulence: Comparison between experiments and direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, R.; Calzavarini, E.; Verhille, G.; Lohse, D.; Mordant, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Toschi, F.

    2008-08-01

    We compare experimental data and numerical simulations for the dynamics of inertial particles with finite density in turbulence. In the experiment, bubbles and solid particles are optically tracked in a turbulent flow of water using an Extended Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique. The probability density functions (PDF) of particle accelerations and their auto-correlation in time are computed. Numerical results are obtained from a direct numerical simulation in which a suspension of passive pointwise particles is tracked, with the same finite density and the same response time as in the experiment. We observe a good agreement for both the variance of acceleration and the autocorrelation time scale of the dynamics; small discrepancies on the shape of the acceleration PDF are observed. We discuss the effects induced by the finite size of the particles, not taken into account in the present numerical simulations.

  9. Experiments examining the shapes of isolated bars in comparison with those occurring in braided rivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    Sand bars and islands within braided rivers have characteristic rhomboid or diamond shapes, often becoming very complex in form as the density of islands increases. Similar forms are observed in the martian outflow channels where the islands occur in groups. This contrasts with the more isolated martian islands which have airfoil shapes, as do isolated streamlined islands in rivers and in the Channeled Scabland. These observations indicate that the bar and island forms are controlled by the density of the islands, with increasing island interaction and flow modification as the density increases. As a continuation of previous flume experiments on the shapes of isolated islands, a new series of experiments investigate the modifications produced by a progressive increase in island density, finally leading to a true braided system.

  10. Electronic structure Fermi liquid theory of high Tc superconductors: Comparison of predictions with experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jaejun; Freeman, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Predictions of local density functional (LDF) calculations of the electronic structure and transport properties of high T(sub c) superconductors are presented. As evidenced by the excellent agreement with both photoemission and positron annihilation experiments, a Fermi liquid nature of the 'normal' state of the high T(sub c) superconductors become clear for the metallic phase of these oxides. In addition, LDF predictions on the normal state transport properties are qualitatively in agreement with experiments on single crystals. It is emphasized that the signs of the Hall coefficients for the high T(sub c) superconductors are not consistent with the types of dopants (e.g., electron-doped or hole-doped) but are determined by the topology of the Fermi surfaces obtained from the LDF calculations.

  11. A comparison of older adults' subjective experience with virtual and real environments during dynamic balance activities

    PubMed Central

    Proffitt, Rachel; Lange, Belinda; Chen, Christina; Winstein, Carolee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the subjective experience of older adults interacting with both virtual and real environments. Thirty healthy older adults engaged with real and virtual tasks of similar motor demands: reaching to a target in standing and stepping stance. Immersive tendencies and absorption scales were administered before the session. Game engagement and experience questionnaires were completed after each task, followed by a semi-structured interview at the end of the testing session. Data were analyzed respectively using paired t-tests and grounded theory methodology. Participants preferred the virtual task over the real task. They also reported an increase in presence and absorption with the virtual task, describing an external focus of attention. Findings will be used to inform future development of appropriate game-based balance training applications that could be embedded in the home or community settings as part of evidence-based fall prevention programs. PMID:24334299

  12. Critical transition for the edge shear layer formation: Comparison of model and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Garcia, L.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2006-12-15

    The experimental results for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer in TJ-II [C. Alehaldre et al.Fusion Technol. 17, 131 (1990)] can be explained using a simple model for a second-order transition based on the sheared flow amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence suppression by shearing. In the dynamics of the model, the resistive interchange instability is used. This model gives power dependence on density gradients before and after the transition, consistent with experiment.

  13. Isentropic Compression for TATB Based HE Samples, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A; Vandersall, K; L'Eplattenier, P; Burger, M

    2006-02-06

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on TATB based HE were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE [1]. 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1967.

  14. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Marek Koza, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other. PMID:27112937

  15. Infiltration and drainage in the unsaturated zone: comparison of numerical simulations to a monitored field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papafotiou, Alexandros; Ganz, Christina; Altfelder, Sven; Noell, Ursula; Neuweiler, Insa

    2010-05-01

    The unsaturated zone has a prominent role for groundwater resources, as it controls through flow and transport any mass exchange between atmosphere and groundwater. However, providing reliable predictions for the unsaturated zone is very demanding, as it is dominated by complex two-phase flow processes that produce high uncertainty with respect to the hydraulic properties. When modeling unsaturated flow, the typically unknown spatial distribution of hydraulic properties in the soil constitutes a primary source of uncertainty. Even if information on the exact distribution is known, additional uncertainty may stem from the non-uniqueness of the hydraulic properties, most profoundly expressed through hysteresis in the capillary pressure-saturation relationship, also known as water retention curve. In this work, we present modeling considerations for predicting an infiltration and drainage event in the unsaturated zone during a field experiment. The experiment was performed by infiltrating brilliant-blue solution while monitoring the plume movement with ERT. After the completion of infiltration (and the consequent drainage), the upper 1 meter of the soil was excavated in slices to obtain the 3D distribution of water saturation and pressure. Numerical simulations are carried out with a two-phase flow model. The results illustrate possibilities and limitations of predicting such flow processes based on the experimental information available. We demonstrate the influence and significance of hysteresis by comparing experimental findings with model runs that explicitly consider wetting and drying conditions in the experiment. Our approach allows us to identify key processes that have to be accounted for. In a feedback loop with the design of future experiments we aim at improving input specifications necessary for reliable predictive modeling of unsaturated flow.

  16. Comparison of continuous and discontinuous collisional bumpers: Dimensionally scaled impact experiments into single wire meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark; See, Thomas; Bernhard, Ronald; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William; Haynes, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    An experimental inquiry into the utility of discontinuous bumpers was conducted to investigate the collisional outcomes of impacts into single grid-like targets and to compare the results with more traditional bumper designs that employ continuous sheet stock. We performed some 35 experiments using 6.3 and 3.2 mm diameter spherical soda-lime glass projectiles at low velocities (less than 2.5 km/s) and 13 at velocities between 5 and 6 km/s, using 3.2 mm spheres only. The thrust of the experiments related to the characterization of collisional fragments as a function of target thickness or areal shield mass of both bumper designs. The primary product of these experiments was witness plates that record the resulting population of collisional fragments. Substantial interpretive and predictive insights into bumper performance were obtained. All qualitative observations (on the witness plates) and detailed measurements of displaced masses seem simply and consistently related only to bumper mass available for interaction with the impactor. This renders the grid bumper into the superior shield design. These findings present evidence that discontinuous bumpers are a viable concept for collisional shields, possibly superior to continuous geometries.

  17. Capillary trapping mechanism in strongly water wet systems: Comparison between Experiment and Percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, H. W.; Mohammadian, S.; Vogel, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    To understand capillary trapping mechanism, we conduct a real Monte-Carlo experiment by using packed glass beads with nearly the same pore size distribution, but different stochastic realizations. We study gas phase trapping during imbibition for capillary number from 2×10-7 to 10-6 by X-ray computer tomography (μ-CT) and compare the experimental results with predictions from percolation theory. We found excellent agreement. Percolation theory could explain (i) that the capillary desaturation curves are not dependent on flow rate, (ii) the linear dependence of the total gas surface on gas saturation that is a direct consequence of the linear relationship between cluster surface and cluster volume, which is a prediction from percolation theory for large finite clusters, (iii) the power-like cluster size distribution with an exponent τexp = 2.15 that only deviates by 2% from the theoretical one (τtheor = 2.19), and (iv) that the maximal z-extension of trapped large gas cluster is described by the cut-off correlation length ξB (B - bond number). In order to support the findings from μ-CT-experiments and to study the dynamics of capillary trapping, we conduct visualization experiments using monolayer- and microstructure-models. The Figure shows the residual trapped air (red colored) after water imbibition: left: 2D-cut through a 3D-reconstructed image, right: 3D-slice of a 3D-reconstructed image.

  18. Computer-assisted comparison of analysis and test results in transportation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.D.; Ammerman, D.J.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-05-10

    As a part of its ongoing research efforts, Sandia National Laboratories` Transportation Surety Center investigates the integrity of various containment methods for hazardous materials transport, subject to anomalous structural and thermal events such as free-fall impacts, collisions, and fires in both open and confined areas. Since it is not possible to conduct field experiments for every set of possible conditions under which an actual transportation accident might occur, accurate modeling methods must be developed which will yield reliable simulations of the effects of accident events under various scenarios. This requires computer software which is capable of assimilating and processing data from experiments performed as benchmarks, as well as data obtained from numerical models that simulate the experiment. Software tools which can present all of these results in a meaningful and useful way to the analyst are a critical aspect of this process. The purpose of this work is to provide software resources on a long term basis, and to ensure that the data visualization capabilities of the Center keep pace with advancing technology. This will provide leverage for its modeling and analysis abilities in a rapidly evolving hardware/software environment.

  19. Numerical simulations of the flow with the prescribed displacement of the airfoil and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řidký, V.; Šidlof, P.; Vlček, V.

    2013-04-01

    The work is devoted to comparing measured data with the results of numerical simulations. As mathematical model was used mathematical model whitout turbulence for incompressible flow In the experiment was observed the behavior of designed NACA0015 airfoil in airflow. For the numerical solution was used OpenFOAM computational package, this is open-source software based on finite volume method. In the numerical solution is prescribed displacement of the airfoil, which corresponds to the experiment. The velocity at a point close to the airfoil surface is compared with the experimental data obtained from interferographic measurements of the velocity field. Numerical solution is computed on a 3D mesh composed of about 1 million ortogonal hexahedron elements. The time step is limited by the Courant number. Parallel computations are run on supercomputers of the CIV at Technical University in Prague (HAL and FOX) and on a computer cluster of the Faculty of Mechatronics of Liberec (HYDRA). Run time is fixed at five periods, the results from the fifth periods and average value for all periods are then be compared with experiment.

  20. An observational comparison of the older and younger bus passenger experience in a developing world city.

    PubMed

    Aceves-González, Carlos; May, Andrew; Cook, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    This study was an unobtrusive observational analysis of 333 older and younger bus passengers in Guadalajara, Mexico. A set of data were collected for each observed passenger, as well as more general observations related to driver behaviour, bus design and bus service characteristics. There were significant differences between older and younger passengers in terms of boarding and alighting times, use of handrails, seat location preferences, passenger stability and coping strategies in order to maintain postural stability. The conditions of travel are conducive to a poor passenger experience for the older passengers in particular. Although the problems may be attributed to bus design and driver behaviour typical of that in developing countries, they are also influenced by the wider transport infrastructure, and a lack of a regulatory regime which places drivers under time pressure and in direct competition with each other. Practitioner Summary: Bus services must cater for all ages of passengers, including the elderly. This unobtrusive observational study investigated the passenger experience in a developing world city. Bus and wider service design were found to compromise the journey experience, with the older users being particularly negatively impacted. Design recommendations are provided. PMID:26548352

  1. Quantum state-resolved, bulk gas energetics: Comparison of theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    McCaffery, Anthony J

    2016-05-21

    Until very recently, the computational model of state-to-state energy transfer in large gas mixtures, introduced by the author and co-workers, has had little experimental data with which to assess the accuracy of its predictions. In a novel experiment, Alghazi et al. [Chem. Phys. 448, 76 (2015)] followed the equilibration of highly vibrationally excited CsH(D) in baths of H2(D2) with simultaneous time- and quantum state-resolution. Modal temperatures of vibration, rotation, and translation for CsH(D) were obtained and presented as a function of pump-probe delay time. Here the data from this study are used as a test of the accuracy of the computational method, and in addition, the consequent changes in bath gas modal temperatures, not obtainable in the experiment, are predicted. Despite large discrepancies between initial CsH(D) vibrational states in the experiment and those available using the computational model, the quality of agreement is sufficient to conclude that the model's predictions constitute at least a very good representation of the overall equilibration that, for some measurements, is very accurate. PMID:27208946

  2. Quantum state-resolved, bulk gas energetics: Comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffery, Anthony J.

    2016-05-01

    Until very recently, the computational model of state-to-state energy transfer in large gas mixtures, introduced by the author and co-workers, has had little experimental data with which to assess the accuracy of its predictions. In a novel experiment, Alghazi et al. [Chem. Phys. 448, 76 (2015)] followed the equilibration of highly vibrationally excited CsH(D) in baths of H2(D2) with simultaneous time- and quantum state-resolution. Modal temperatures of vibration, rotation, and translation for CsH(D) were obtained and presented as a function of pump-probe delay time. Here the data from this study are used as a test of the accuracy of the computational method, and in addition, the consequent changes in bath gas modal temperatures, not obtainable in the experiment, are predicted. Despite large discrepancies between initial CsH(D) vibrational states in the experiment and those available using the computational model, the quality of agreement is sufficient to conclude that the model's predictions constitute at least a very good representation of the overall equilibration that, for some measurements, is very accurate.

  3. Validation of KENO-VI: A comparison with hexagonal lattice light-water-reactor critical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenwalter, J.J.

    1998-06-01

    The KENO-VI Monte Carlo code, released with Version 4.3 of the SCALE Code System, provides the capability to model more complex geometries than previously allowed by KENO-V.a. One significant improvement is the simplistic specification of hexprism unit cells and hexagonal arrays, an arduous task to complete in KENO-V.a. This report documents the validation of KENO-VI against 30 critical experiments consisting of low enriched uranium, light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods in hexagonal lattices with no poisons. The reference, enrichment, pitch, cladding, and core identification of the experiments are given. The results indicate that KENO-VI accurately calculates these critical experiments, with a bias of {minus}0.51% for the 238 group cross section library and {minus}0.24% for the 44 group cross section library. If these biases are properly taken into account, the KENO-VI code can be used with confidence for the design and safety analysis of storage and transportation systems of similar LWR type fuels.

  4. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This report documents comparisons between post-irradiation examination measurements and model predictions of silver (Ag), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) release from selected tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program that occurred from December 2006 to November 2009 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact) but it can be assessed at the particle level by adjusting the diffusivity in the fuel matrix to very high values. Furthermore, the diffusivity of each layer can be individually set to a high value (typically 10-6 m2/s) to simulate a failed layer with no capability of fission product retention. In this study, the comparison to PIE focused on fission product release and because of the lack of failure in the irradiation, the probability of particle failure was not calculated. During the AGR-1 irradiation campaign, the fuel kernel produced and released fission products, which migrated through the successive

  5. Structural Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Depend Strongly on Force Field: A Comparison to Experiment.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Sarah; Gapsys, Vytautas; Gajda, Michal J; Zweckstetter, Markus; de Groot, Bert L; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-11-10

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are notoriously challenging to study both experimentally and computationally. The structure of IDPs cannot be described by a single conformation but must instead be described as an ensemble of interconverting conformations. Atomistic simulations are increasingly used to obtain such IDP conformational ensembles. Here, we have compared the IDP ensembles generated by eight all-atom empirical force fields against primary small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and NMR data. Ensembles obtained with different force fields exhibit marked differences in chain dimensions, hydrogen bonding, and secondary structure content. These differences are unexpectedly large: changing the force field is found to have a stronger effect on secondary structure content than changing the entire peptide sequence. The CHARMM 22* ensemble performs best in this force field comparison: it has the lowest error in chemical shifts and J-couplings and agrees well with the SAXS data. A high population of left-handed α-helix is present in the CHARMM 36 ensemble, which is inconsistent with measured scalar couplings. To eliminate inadequate sampling as a reason for differences between force fields, extensive simulations were carried out (0.964 ms in total); the remaining small sampling uncertainty is shown to be much smaller than the observed differences. Our findings highlight how IDPs, with their rugged energy landscapes, are highly sensitive test systems that are capable of revealing force field deficiencies and, therefore, contributing to force field development. PMID:26574339

  6. Sound propagation in and radiation from acoustically lined flow ducts: A comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Dean, P. D.; Wynne, G. A.; Burrin, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of many of the fundamental details of sound propagation in hard wall and soft wall annular flow ducts are reported. The theory of sound propagation along such ducts and the theory for determining the complex radiation impedance of higher order modes of an annulus are outlined, and methods for generating acoustic duct modes are developed. The results of a detailed measurement program on propagation in rigid wall annular ducts with and without airflow through the duct are presented. Techniques are described for measuring cut-on frequencies, modal phase speed, and radial and annular mode shapes. The effects of flow velocity on cut-on frequencies and phase speed are measured. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions for all of the effects studies. The two microphone method of impedance is used to measure the effects of flow on acoustic liners. A numerical study of sound propagation in annular ducts with one or both walls acoustically lined is presented.

  7. Comparison of analysis and experiment for dynamics of low-contact-ratio spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Rebbechi, Brian; Zakrajsek, James J.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1991-01-01

    Low-contact-ratio spur gears were tested in NASA gear-noise-rig to study gear dynamics including dynamic load, tooth bending stress, vibration, and noise. The experimental results were compared with a NASA gear dynamics code to validate the code as a design tool for predicting transmission vibration and noise. Analytical predictions and experimental data for gear-tooth dynamic loads and tooth-root bending stress were compared at 28 operating conditions. Strain gage data were used to compute the normal load between meshing teeth and the bending stress at the tooth root for direct comparison with the analysis. The computed and measured waveforms for dynamic load and stress were compared for several test conditions. These are very similar in shape, which means the analysis successfully simulates the physical behavior of the test gears. The predicted peak value of the dynamic load agrees with the measurement results within an average error of 4.9 percent except at low-torque, high-speed conditions. Predictions of peak dynamic root stress are generally within 10 to 15 percent of the measured values.

  8. Optimization design of submerged propeller in oxidation ditch by computational fluid dynamics and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuquan; Zheng, Yuan; Fernandez-Rodriguez, E; Yang, Chunxia; Zhu, Yantao; Liu, Huiwen; Jiang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The operating condition of a submerged propeller has a significant impact on flow field and energy consumption of the oxidation ditch. An experimentally validated numerical model, based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool, is presented to optimize the operating condition by considering two important factors: flow field and energy consumption. Performance demonstration and comparison of different operating conditions were carried out in a Carrousel oxidation ditch at the Yingtang wastewater treatment plants in Anhui Province, China. By adjusting the position and rotating speed together with the number of submerged propellers, problems of sludge deposit and the low velocity in the bend could be solved in a most cost-effective way. The simulated results were acceptable compared with the experimental data and the following results were obtained. The CFD model characterized flow pattern and energy consumption in the full-scale oxidation ditch. The predicted flow field values were within -1.28 ± 7.14% difference from the measured values. By determining three sets of propellers under the rotating speed of 6.50 rad/s with one located 5 m from the first curved wall, after numerical simulation and actual measurement, not only the least power density but also the requirement of the flow pattern could be realized. PMID:27508373

  9. Composition modulation in GaInNAs quantum wells: Comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, M.; González, D.; Hopkinson, M.; Gutiérrez, M.; Navaretti, P.; Liu, H. Y.; García, R.

    2005-04-01

    Composition modulation observed in GaInNAs quantum wells imposes an important handicap to their potential application within optical components, particularly as the indium and nitrogen contents are increased to reach longer wavelengths. In this paper, we compare our experimental results of phase separation in GaInNAs quantum wells grown at different temperatures with recent theoretical models of spinodal decomposition from the literature. This comparison has shown that the regular solution approximation, which explains the higher composition modulation compared to GaInAs samples, provides a more appropriate explanation of GaInNAs decomposition than the usual delta lattice-parameter approximation. Transmission electron microscopy shows no composition modulation contrasts with the chemical sensitive 002 dark field reflection and a strong increase in the intensity of the strain contrasts observed with 220 bright field reflection as the growth temperature increases from 360to460°C. These observations can be explained by an uncoupling between N and In composition profiles forming separate In-rich and N-rich regions according to the regular solution approximation model. We therefore believe that the compositional fluctuations in GaInNAs are not only due to GaInAs decomposition, but that an uncoupled modulation of the III and V elements is also present.

  10. A newly designed compact remote TDL sensing system for air pollutants -- Field experiments and comparison measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.; Herzog, R.; Lamp, T.; Ropertz, A.; Weber, K.

    1999-07-01

    The remote sensing system for local or diffuse concentrations of gaseous air pollutants developed and realized by the ILK Dresden is a very compact and low mass apparatus based on the tunable diode laser (TDL) techniques in pulse or cw mode regime. The prototypes are characterized by compact design (300x150x300mm3) and stand-alone and mains-independent operation that allows a fast, flexible and mobile use in different applications. The first hardware version works as an one laser monitor while the advanced version provides for the simultaneous operation of two lasers and can thus measure two gaseous pollutants at the same time. The sensitivity limits for CO and NO were determined at 13ppb x 100m and at 22ppb x 100m respectively. Optical measurement paths are possible up to 700m. The paper presented results of field measurements of the gaseous pollutants in the open atmosphere, i.e. traffic-induced CO and NO as well as CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} landfill gases. Furthermore, the authors have investigated in co-operation with the FH Duesseldorf the ILK TDL-system and commercial remote sensing systems for air pollutant monitoring, especially the FTIR and DOAS systems, in different comparison measurements under real field conditions.

  11. Comparison of Finite Element Predictions to Measurements from the Sandia Microslip Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    LOBITZ,DONALD W.; GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; SMALLWOOD,DAVID O.

    2000-11-09

    When embarking on an experimental program for purposes of discovery and understanding, it is only prudent to use appropriate analysis tools to aid in the discovery process. Due to the limited scope of experimental measurement analytical results can significantly complement the data after a reasonable validation process has occurred. In this manner the analytical results can help to explain certain measurements, suggest other measurements to take and point to possible modifications to the experimental apparatus. For these reasons it was decided to create a detailed nonlinear finite element model of the Sandia Microslip Experiment. This experiment was designed to investigate energy dissipation due to microslip in bolted joints and to identify the critical parameters involved. In an attempt to limit the microslip to a single interface a complicated system of rollers and cables was devised to clamp the two slipping members together with a prescribed normal load without using a bolt. An oscillatory tangential load is supplied via a shaker. The finite element model includes the clamping device in addition to the sequence of steps taken in setting up the experiment. The interface is modeled using Coulomb friction requiring a modest validation procedure for estimating the coefficient of friction. Analysis results have indicated misalignment problems in the experimental procedure, identified transducer locations for more accurate measurements, predicted complex interface motions including the potential for galling, identified regions where microslip occurs and during which parts of the loading cycle it occurs, all this in addition to the energy dissipated per cycle. A number of these predictions have been experimentally corroborated in varying degrees and are presented in the paper along with the details of the finite element model.

  12. A Comparison of Seismicity Characteristics and Fault Structure Between Stick-Slip Experiments and Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Sammis, C. G.; Becker, T. W.; Dresen, G.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2015-08-01

    Fault zones contain structural complexity on all scales. This complexity influences fault mechanics including the dynamics of large earthquakes as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of small seismic events. Incomplete earthquake records, unknown stresses, and unresolved fault structures within the crust complicate a quantitative assessment of the parameters that control factors affecting seismicity. To better understand the relationship between fault structure and seismicity, we examined dynamic faulting under controlled conditions in the laboratory by creating saw-cut-guided natural fractures in cylindrical granite samples. The resulting rough surfaces were triaxially loaded to produce a sequence of stick-slip events. During these experiments, we monitored stress, strain, and seismic activity. After the experiments, fault structures were imaged in thin sections and using computer tomography. The laboratory fault zones showed many structural characteristics observed in upper crustal faults, including zones of localized slip embedded in a layer of fault gouge. Laboratory faults also exhibited a several millimeter wide damage zone with decreasing micro-crack density at larger distances from the fault axis. In addition to the structural similarities, we also observed many similarities between our observed distribution of acoustic emissions (AEs) and natural seismicity. The AEs followed the Gutenberg-Richter and Omori-Utsu relationships commonly used to describe natural seismicity. Moreover, we observed a connection between along-strike fault heterogeneity and variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value. As suggested by natural seismicity studies, areas of low b value marked the nucleation points of large slip events and were located at large asperities within the fault zone that were revealed by post-experimental tomography scans. Our results emphasize the importance of stick-slip experiments for the study of fault mechanics. The direct correlation of

  13. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived by Diverse Techniques In Two North Atlantic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Livingston, J. M.; McIntosh, D. M.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, P. V.; Quinn, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo omega (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical depths from satellite radiances. Recently, two experiments in the North Atlantic region, the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), determined aerosol omega by a variety of techniques. The techniques included fitting of calculated to measured radiative fluxes; retrievals of omega from skylight radiances; best fits of complex refractive index to profiles of backscatter extinction, and size distribution; and in situ measurements of scattering and absorption at the surface and aloft. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 found a fairly wide range of values for omega at midvisable wavelengths approx. 550 nm, with omega(sub midvis) greater than or equal to 0.85 and less than or equal to 0.99 for the marine aerosol impacted by continental pollution. Frequency distributions of omega could usually be approximated by lognormals in omega(sub max) - omega, with some occurrence of bimodality, suggesting the influence of different aerosol sources or processing. In both TARFOX and ACE-2, closure tests between measured and calculated radiative fluxes yielded best-fit values of omega(sub midvis) 0.90 +/- 0.04 for the polluted boundary layer. Although these results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., thermal offsets, unknown gas absorption) The other techniques gave larger values for omega(sub midvis) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of omega(sub midvis) = 0.95 +/- 0.04. Current uncertainties in omega are large in terms of climate effects More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of

  14. Model of a fibreoptic phase-sensitive reflectometer and its comparison with the experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tosoni, O; Podivilov, Evgenii V; Babin, Sergei A; Aksenov, S B

    2010-12-09

    A statistical model describing the Rayleigh-scattering reflectograms of narrowband Gaussian pulses in optical fibres is constructed taking into account linear (the finite spectral linewidth because of frequency fluctuations, finite frequency band of the photodetector) and nonlinear (modulation instability) effects influencing the reflectograms' visibility. The model is compared with the experiment, demonstrating the adequacy of the theoretical description. The possibilities of obtaining optimal parameters, important for practical applications of the phase-sensitive reflectometer as a distributed fibreoptic intrusion sensor are discussed. (optical fibres)

  15. Quasi-cylindrical theory of wing-body interference at supersonic speeds and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N

    1955-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for calculating the flow field about wing-body combinations employing bodies deviating only slightly in shape from a circular cylinder. The method is applied to the calculation of the pressure field acting between a circular cylindrical body and a rectangular wing. The case of zero body angle of attack and variable wing incidence is considered as well as the case of zero wing incidence and variable body angle of attack. An experiment was performed especially for the purpose of checking the calculative examples.

  16. [Comparison of the Results of Satellite Studies of "Mars-500" Experiment Participans in Syktyvkar and Almaty].

    PubMed

    Solonin, Iu G; Markov, A L; Bojko, E R; Akanov, A A; Yeshmanova, A K

    2015-01-01

    Participants of "Mars-500" experiment living in Syktyvkar (northerners) and Almaty (southerners) were studied throughout the year in various seasons. Latitude-caused differences of vegetative index values (RMSSD and pNN50) between groups were found in summer. Northerners were found to have significant seasonal shifts in thermoregulation parameters and RMSSD and pNN50 values. Southerners showed no seasonal changes in abovementioned indices. Participants from both groups were shown to have deviations of several physiological parameters from moderate latitude norms. Many participants from both groups demonstrated stress in adaptation mechanisms. Orthostatic tests performed in both groups revealed deficiencies in regulation of blood circulation. PMID:26237953

  17. Comparison of hydrodynamic model of graphene with recent experiment on measuring the Casimir interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the reflection coefficients from a graphene sheet deposited on a material substrate under a condition that graphene is described by the hydrodynamic model. Using these coefficients, the gradient of the Casimir force in the configuration of a recent experiment is calculated in the framework of the Lifshitz theory. It is shown that the hydrodynamic model is excluded by the measurement data at a 99% confidence level over a wide range of separations. From the fact that the same data are in very good agreement with theoretical predictions of the Dirac model of graphene, the low-energy character of the Casimir interaction is confirmed.

  18. Zeeman splitting of light hole in quantum wells: Comparison of theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durnev, M. V.

    2014-07-01

    The theory for light-hole Zeeman splitting developed in [5] is compared with experimental data found in literature for GaAs/AlGaAs, InGaAs/InP, and CdTe/CdMgTe quantum wells. It is shown that the description of experiments is possible with account for excitonic effects and peculiarities of the hole energy spectrum in a quantum well including complex structure of the valence band and the interface mixing of light and heavy holes. It is demonstrated that the absolute values and the sign of the light-hole g-factor are extremely sensitive to the parametrization of the Luttinger Hamiltonian.

  19. Comparison of unstable water infiltration in porous media in 2D and 3D experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, C.; Neuweiler, I.; Lehmann, P.; Papafotiou, A.; Vontobel, P.; Hartmann, S.

    2010-05-01

    Water infiltration into unsaturated soil is an important process for groundwater recharge and thus for water balance of natural hydrosystems. The characteristics of infiltration patterns depend on porous media properties and initial moisture content. Infiltration fronts into soil can be unstable in layered media with fine over dry coarse material. To predict arrival times of infiltration fronts and average water content in upscaled models, it is necessary to understand occurrence of instabilities. The unstable flow behavior is not captured by standard models and finger characteristics have mostly been investigated experimentally. Most experiments in the past were carried out in 2D setups and it is not clear how the results of such studies relate to real 3D systems. The aim of this study is to compare development and finger characteristics of unstable infiltration in 2D and 3D setups. We carried out laboratory experiments on fast infiltration in 2D and 3D setups and measured water content in porous media with neutron transmission technology at the NEUTRA beam line at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The 2D experiments were carried out in a glass sandbox (260 mm high, 75 mm wide and 11 mm deep). For the 3D experiments aluminum cylindrical column (150 mm in height and 100 mm in diameter) were used. Both columns were filled homogeneously with coarse quartz sand (grain size 0.7 - 1.2 mm) below fine sand layer (0.1 - 0.3 mm) of 20 - 30 mm thickness. Two dimensional projection images of water content with spatial resolution of 125 microns were deduced from neutron images every 2 second. For the 3D setup water content distribution was reconstructed in 3D to monitor water content inside the fingers over time. Water content and finger-width (15 - 23 mm) were similar for 2D and 3D setups. In both cases water content was maximum when the front passes and was decreasing afterwards (indicating "overshoot" behavior). Also the water content difference between values after

  20. HAMLET -Matroshka IIA and IIB experiments aboard the ISS: comparison of organ doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Zoltan; Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Bilski, Pawel; Hajek, Michael; Sihver, Lembit; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Hager, Luke; Burmeister, Soenke

    The Matroshka experiments and the related FP7 HAMLET project aimed to study the dose burden of the cosmic rays in the organs of the crew working inside and outside the ISS. Two of the experiments will be discussed. They were performed in two different locations inside the ISS: during the Matroshka 2A (in 2006) the phantom was stored in the Russian Docking Module (Pirs), while during the Matroshka 2B (in 2007-08) it was inside the Russian Service Module (Zvezda). Both experiments were performed in the decreasing phase of the solar cycle. Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were applied to investigate the dose contribution of the high LET radiation above ˜10 keV/µm. Two configurations of SSNTDs stacks were constructed: one for the exposure in the so called organ dose boxes (in the lung and kidney), another one for the skin dose measurements, embedded in the nomex poncho of the Phantom. In addition a reference package was placed outside the phantom. After exposure the detectors were transferred to the Earth for data evaluation. Short and long etching procedures were applied to distinguish the high and low LET particles, respectively. The particle tracks were evaluated by a semi automated image analyzer. Addi-tionally manual track parameter measurements were performed on very long tracks. As the result of measurements the LET spectra were deduced. Based on these spectra, the absorbed dose, the dose equivalent and the mean quality factor were calculated. The configuration of the stacks, the methods of the calibration and evaluation and finally the results will be presented and compared. The multiple etching and the combined evaluation method allowed to determine the fraction of the dose originated from HZE particles (Z>2 and range > major axis). Further on, data eval-uation was performed to separate the secondary particles (target fragments) from the primary particles. Although the number of high LET particles above a ˜80 keV/µm was found to be higher during

  1. Numerical simulations of impacts involving porous bodies. II. Comparison with laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, Martin; Michel, Patrick; Hiraoka, Kensuke; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Benz, Willy

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we compare the outcome of high-velocity impact experiments on porous targets, composed of pumice, with the results of simulations by a 3D SPH hydrocode in which a porosity model has been implemented. The different populations of small bodies of our Solar System are believed to be composed, at least partially, of objects with a high degree of porosity. To describe the fragmentation of such porous objects, a different model is needed than that used for non-porous bodies. In the case of porous bodies, the impact process is not only driven by the presence of cracks which propagate when a stress threshold is reached, it is also influenced by the crushing of pores and compaction. Such processes can greatly affect the whole body's response to an impact. Therefore, another physical model is necessary to improve our understanding of the collisional process involving porous bodies. Such a model has been developed recently and introduced successfully in a 3D SPH hydrocode [Jutzi, M., Benz, W., Michel, P., 2008. Icarus 198, 242-255]. Basic tests have been performed which already showed that it is implemented in a consistent way and that theoretical solutions are well reproduced. However, its full validation requires that it is also capable of reproducing the results of real laboratory impact experiments. Here we present simulations of laboratory experiments on pumice targets for which several of the main material properties have been measured. We show that using the measured material properties and keeping the remaining free parameters fixed, our numerical model is able to reproduce the outcome of these experiments carried out under different impact conditions. This first complete validation of our model, which will be tested for other porous materials in the future, allows us to start addressing problems at larger scale related to small bodies of our Solar System, such as collisions in the Kuiper Belt or the formation of a family by the disruption of a porous

  2. Evaluation of the Monte Carlo method (KTMAN-2) in fluoroscopic dosimetry and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minho; Lee, Hyounggun; Kim, Hyosim; Park, Hongmin; Lee, Wonho; Park, Sungho

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the Monte Carlo method for determining the dose calculation in fluoroscopy by using a realistic human phantom. The dose was calculated by using Monte Carlo N-particle extended (MCNPX) in simulations and was measured by using Korean Typical Man-2 (KTMAN-2) phantom in the experiments. MCNPX is a widely-used simulation tool based on the Monte-Carlo method and uses random sampling. KTMAN-2 is a virtual phantom written in MCNPX language and is based on the typical Korean man. This study was divided into two parts: simulations and experiments. In the former, the spectrum generation program (SRS-78) was used to obtain the output energy spectrum for fluoroscopy; then, each dose to the target organ was calculated using KTMAN-2 with MCNPX. In the latter part, the output of the fluoroscope was calibrated first and TLDs (Thermoluminescent dosimeter) were inserted in the ART (Alderson Radiation Therapy) phantom at the same places as in the simulation. Thus, the phantom was exposed to radiation, and the simulated and the experimental doses were compared. In order to change the simulation unit to the dose unit, we set the normalization factor (NF) for unit conversion. Comparing the simulated with the experimental results, we found most of the values to be similar, which proved the effectiveness of the Monte Carlo method in fluoroscopic dose evaluation. The equipment used in this study included a TLD, a TLD reader, an ART phantom, an ionization chamber and a fluoroscope.

  3. Undergraduate science research: a comparison of influences and experiences between premed and non-premed students.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Lara Brongo; Thomson, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Most students participating in science undergraduate research (UR) plan to attend either medical school or graduate school. This study examines possible differences between premed and non-premed students in their influences to do research and expectations of research. Questionnaire responses from 55 premed students and 80 non-premed students were analyzed. No differences existed in the expectations of research between the two groups, but attitudes toward science and intrinsic motivation to learn more about science were significantly higher for non-premed students. Follow-up interviews with 11 of the students, including a case study with one premed student, provided explanation for the observed differences. Premed students, while not motivated to learn more about science, were motivated to help people, which is why most of them are pursuing medicine. They viewed research as a way to help them become doctors and to rule out the possibility of research as a career. Non-premed students participated in research to learn more about a specific science topic and gain experience that may be helpful in graduate school research. The difference in the reasons students want to do UR may be used to tailor UR experiences for students planning to go to graduate school or medical school. PMID:21633068

  4. Evolution of Black Carbon Optical Properties during Atmospheric Aging: Comparison Between Theoretical Calculations and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Li, Q.; Yang, P.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    The optical properties of black carbon (BC) are significantly affected by its aging process in the atmosphere. We have built a conceptual model defining three BC aging stages, including freshly emitted BC aggregates, coating by soluble material and hygroscopic growth. We apply an improved geometric-optics surface-wave approach (Liou et al., 2011; Takano et al., 2013) to calculate the absorption and scattering properties of BC at each stage and compare the theoretical results with those obtained from laboratory experiments (Zhang et al., 2008; Khalizov et al., 2009). Preliminary results show a general agreement between calculated and measured BC absorption cross sections (bias < 10%) and scattering cross sections (bias < 30%) for BC aerosols with mobility diameters of 155, 245 and 320 nm at Stages 1 and 2, where BC is coated by sulfuric acid and its water solution, respectively. We find that the calculated scattering and absorption cross sections for fresh BC aggregates (Stage 0) with different sizes are invariably larger than experimental results partly because of the uncertainty in theoretical calculations for BC with size parameters less than 1. It appears that the uncertainty in the experiment could also contribute to the discrepancy, considering that the measuring instrument missed some scattering in certain angles (0-7° and 170-180°). Finally, we will apply the conceptual model and the single-scattering results to assess the effects of BC aging processes on direct radiative forcing using observed BC vertical profiles.

  5. Sedimentation equilibria in polydisperse ferrofluids: critical comparisons between experiment, theory, and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A; Ivanov, Alexey O; Lakhtina, Ekaterina V; Pshenichnikov, Alexander F; Camp, Philip J

    2016-05-14

    The sedimentation equilibrium of dipolar particles in a ferrofluid is studied using experiment, theory, and computer simulation. A theory of the particle-concentration profile in a dipolar hard-sphere fluid is developed, based on the local-density approximation and accurate expressions from a recently introduced logarithmic free energy approach. The theory is tested critically against Monte Carlo simulation results for monodisperse and bidisperse dipolar hard-sphere fluids in homogeneous gravitational fields. In the monodisperse case, the theory is very accurate over broad ranges of gravitational field strength, volume fraction, and dipolar coupling constant. In the bidisperse case, with realistic dipolar coupling constants and compositions, the theory is excellent at low volume fraction, but is slightly inaccurate at high volume fraction in that it does not capture a maximum in the small-particle concentration profile seen in simulations. Possible reasons for this are put forward. Experimental measurements of the magnetic-susceptibility profile in a real ferrofluid are then analysed using the theory. The concentration profile is linked to the susceptibility profile using the second-order modified mean-field theory. It is shown that the experimental results are not consistent with the sample being monodisperse. By introducing polydispersity in the simplest possible way, namely by assuming the system is a binary mixture, almost perfect agreement between theory and experiment is achieved. PMID:27042815

  6. Comparison of Computational Results with a Low-g, Nitrogen Slosh and Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares a fluid/thermal simulation, in Fluent, with a low-g, nitrogen slosh and boiling experiment. In 2010, the French Space Agency, CNES, performed cryogenic nitrogen experiments in a low-g aircraft campaign. From one parabolic flight, a low-g interval was simulated that focuses on low-g motion of nitrogen liquid and vapor with significant condensation, evaporation, and boiling. The computational results are compared with high-speed video, pressure data, heat transfer, and temperature data from sensors on the axis of the cylindrically shaped tank. These experimental and computational results compare favorably. The initial temperature stratification is in good agreement, and the two-phase fluid motion is qualitatively captured. Temperature data is matched except that the temperature sensors are unable to capture fast temperature transients when the sensors move from wet to dry (liquid to vapor) operation. Pressure evolution is approximately captured, but condensation and evaporation rate modeling and prediction need further theoretical analysis.

  7. How to Score the Sexual Experiences Survey? A Comparison of Nine Methods

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kelly Cue; Gilmore, Amanda K.; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Balsan, Michael J.; George, William H.; Norris, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although assessments of sexual assault victimization and perpetration have greatly improved, current scoring methods do not fully utilize the wealth of information they provide. The present studies assessed new methods for scoring sexual assault severity using the Sexual Experiences Survey (SES; Koss et al., 2007). Method In two studies of female (n = 436) and male (n = 313) non-problem drinkers who had engaged in unprotected sex within the past year, we compared three severity ranking schemes as well as three scoring methods per severity scheme for a total of nine scoring methods. New severity ranking schemes considered tactic types separately, varied combinations of assault outcomes, and accounted for multiple types and frequencies of assaults. Measures assessing convergent validity were also administered. Results Seventy-eight percent (n = 340) of the women reported victimization, and 58% (n = 180) of the men reported perpetration. All severity scoring methods were strongly associated with convergent measures. Conclusions Each scoring method is viable; however especially among samples with greater victimization/perpetration rates, there can be advantages to incorporating multiple types and frequencies of assault experiences into SES scores. Recent refinements of the SES necessitate commensurate improvements in its scoring methods in order to significantly advance the field of sexual assault assessment. PMID:25512879

  8. Calculation of Oxygen Fugacity in High Pressure Metal-Silicate Experiments and Comparison to Standard Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Ghiorso, M.

    2009-01-01

    Calculation of oxygen fugacity in high pressure and temperature experiments in metal-silicate systems is usually approximated by the ratio of Fe in the metal and FeO in the silicate melt: (Delta)IW=2*log(X(sub Fe)/X(sub FeO)), where IW is the iron-wustite reference oxygen buffer. Although this is a quick and easy calculation to make, it has been applied to a huge variety of metallic (Fe- Ni-S-C-O-Si systems) and silicate liquids (SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, FeO, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O systems). This approach has surely led to values that have little meaning, yet are applied with great confidence, for example, to a terrestrial mantle at "IW-2". Although fO2 can be circumvented in some cases by consideration of Fe-M distribution coefficient, these do not eliminate the effects of alloy or silicate liquid compositional variation, or the specific chemical effects of S in the silicate liquid, for example. In order to address the issue of what the actual value of fO2 is in any given experiment, we have calculated fO2 from the equilibria 2Fe (metal) + SiO2 (liq) + O2 = Fe2SiO4 (liq).

  9. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energy regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.

  10. Comparison of Raman Scattering Measurements and Modeling in NIF Ignition Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Town, R J; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Moody, J D

    2011-11-04

    Recent NIF indirect-drive experiments have shown significant Raman scattering from the inner beams. NIF data has motivated improvements to rad-hydro modeling, leading to the 'high flux model' [M. D. Rosen et al., HEDP 7, 180 (2011)]. Cross-beam energy transfer [P. A. Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010] in the laser entrance hole is an important tool for achieving round implosions, and is uniformly distributed across the laser spot in rad-hydro simulations (but not necessarily in experiments). We find the Raman linear gain spectra computed with these plasma conditions agree well in time-dependent peak wavelength with the measured data, especially when overlapping laser-beam intensities are used. More detailed, spatially non-uniform modeling of the cross-beam transfer has been performed. The resulting gains better follow the time history of the measured backscatter. We shall present the impact of spatially non-uniform energy transfer on SRS gain. This metric is valid when amplification is in a linear regime, and so we shall also present an assessment of whether electron trapping in Langmuir waves can play a role in these shots.

  11. Comparison of Aseptic Compounding Errors Before and After Modified Laboratory and Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Owora, Arthur H.; Kirkpatrick, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether aseptic compounding errors were reduced at the end of the third professional year after modifying pharmacy practice laboratories and implementing an institutional introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE). Design. An aseptic compounding laboratory, previously occurring during the third-year spring semester, was added to the second-year spring semester. An 80-hour institutional IPPE was also added in the summer between the second and third years. Instructors recorded aseptic compounding errors using a grading checklist for second-year and third-year student assessments. Third-year student aseptic compounding errors were assessed prior to the curricular changes and for 2 subsequent years for students on the Oklahoma City and Tulsa campuses of the University of Oklahoma. Assessment. Both third-year cohorts committed fewer aseptic technique errors than they did during their second years, and the probability was significantly lower for students on the Oklahoma City campus. The probability of committing major aseptic technique errors was significantly lower for 2 consecutive third-year cohorts after the curricular changes. Conclusion. The addition of second-year aseptic compounding laboratory experiences and third-year institutional IPPE content reduced instructor-assessed errors at the end of the third year. PMID:26889070

  12. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energymore » regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.« less

  13. Forced imbibition in natural porous media: comparison between experiments and continuum models.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Amir; Tang, Guo-Qing; Tchelepi, Hamdi A; Kovscek, Anthony R

    2007-03-01

    A well-characterized set of large-scale laboratory experiments is presented, illustrating forced imbibition displacements in the presence of irreducible wetting phase saturation in a cylindrical, homogeneous Berea sandstone rock. Experiments are designed to operate in the regime of compact microscopic flows and large-scale viscous instability. The distribution of fluid phases during the flow process is visualized by high-resolution computed tomography imaging. Linear stability analysis and high-accuracy numerical simulations are employed to analyze the ability of macroscopic continuum equations to provide a consistent approximation of the displacement process. The validity of the equilibrium relative permeability functions, which form the basis for the continuum model, is fundamentally related to the stability of the displacement process. It is shown that not only is the stable flow regime modeled accurately by existing continuum models, but the onset of instability as well as the initial unstable modes are also determined with reasonable accuracy for unstable flows. However, the continuum model is found to be deficient in the case of fully developed unstable flows. PMID:17500789

  14. Numerical Calculations of 3-D High-Lift Flows and Comparison with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William B, III

    2015-01-01

    Solutions were obtained with the Navier-Stokes CFD code TLNS3D to predict the flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing, a high-lift wing composed of three elements: the main-wing element, a deployed leading-edge slat, and a deployed trailing-edge flap. Turbulence was modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. One case with massive separation was repeated using Menter's two-equation SST (Menter's Shear Stress Transport) k-omega turbulence model in an attempt to improve the agreement with experiment. The investigation was conducted at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, and at angles of attack ranging from 10.004 degrees to 34.858 degrees. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing was 4.3 x 10 (sup 6). Compared to experiment, the numerical procedure predicted the surface pressures very well at angles of attack in the linear range of the lift. However, computed maximum lift was 5% low. Drag was mainly under predicted. The procedure correctly predicted several well-known trends and features of high-lift flows, such as off-body separation. The two turbulence models yielded significantly different solutions for the repeated case.

  15. Profile stiffness measurements in the Helically Symmetric experiment and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, G. M.; Faber, B. J.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.

    2015-05-15

    Stiffness measurements are presented in the quasi-helically symmetric experiment (HSX), in which the neoclassical transport is comparable to that in a tokamak and turbulent transport dominates throughout the plasma. Electron cyclotron emission is used to measure the local electron temperature response to modulated electron cyclotron resonant heating. The amplitude and phase of the heat wave through the steep electron temperature gradient (ETG) region of the plasma are used to determine a transient electron thermal diffusivity that is close to the steady-state diffusivity. The low stiffness in the region between 0.2 ≤ r/a ≤ 0.4 agrees with the scaling of the steady-state heat flux with temperature gradient in this region. These experimental results are compared to gyrokinetic calculations in a flux-tube geometry using the gyrokinetic electromagnetic numerical experiment code with two kinetic species. Linear simulations show that the ETG mode may be experimentally relevant within r/a ≤ 0.2, while the Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) is the dominant long-wavelength microturbulence instability across most of the plasma. The TEM is primarily driven by the density gradient. Non-linear calculations of the saturated heat flux driven by the TEM and ETG bracket the experimental heat flux.

  16. Numerical simulation of mud erosion rate in sand-mud alternate layer and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Oyama, H.; Sato, T.

    2015-12-01

    For gas production from methane hydrates in sand-mud alternate layers, depressurization method is expected as feasible. After methane hydrate is dissociated, gas and water flow in pore space. There is a concern about the erosion of mud surface and it may result in flow blockage that disturbs the gas production. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we developed a numerical simulation of water-induced mud erosion in pore-scale sand-mud domains to model such mud erosion. The size of which is of the order of 100 micro meter. Water flow is simulated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and mud surface is treated as solid boundary with arbitrary shape, which changes with time. Periodic boundary condition is adopted at the domain boundaries, except for the surface of mud layers and the upper side. Shear stress acting on the mud surface is calculated using a momentum-exchange method. Mud layer is eroded when the shear stress exceeds a threshold coined a critical shear stress. In this study, we compared the simulated mud erosion rate with experimental data acquired from an experiment using artificial sand-mud core. As a result, the simulated erosion rate agrees well with that of the experiment.

  17. Modelling of tokamak glow discharge cleaning II: comparison with experiment and application to ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, D.; Douai, D.; Hagelaar, G.; Pitts, R. A.

    2015-02-01

    The primary function of the ITER glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system will be the preparation of in-vessel component surfaces prior to the machine start-up. It may also contribute to tritium removal in the nuclear phase. In GDC, conditioning efficiency is strongly dependent on the homogeneity of the flux of ions impinging onto wall surfaces. In order to assess the wall particle flux distribution in ITER, a novel 2D multi-fluid model, described in a companion paper, has recently been developed and is benchmarked here against both experimental glow discharge data obtained in a small laboratory chamber with cylindrical geometry and from two large toroidal devices: the JET tokamak and the RFX reverse field pinch. In the laboratory plasma, simulated and measured plasma electron density and temperature are in a good agreement in the negative glow region, while discrepancies exist in the anode glow, where the fluid description of the model is inaccurate due to long mean free paths of electrons. Calculated and measured ion flux distribution profiles in RFX are found in good agreement, whereas in JET comparison it is more difficult, due to the complex geometry of the first wall which leads to local inhomogeneities in the measured flux. Simulations of H2-GDC for ITER with one or two anodes indicate fairly homogeneous plasma parameters and wall ion flux in the negative glow at 0.5 Pa, a commonly used gas pressure for GDC in existing fusion devices. Although the axisymmetric geometry in the model does not allow all seven ITER anodes to be powered simultaneously in the simulations, the results can be extrapolated to the full system and predict ion current densities on wall surfaces close to the simple expectation of total anode current divided by wall surface area (0.21 A m-2), which is relevant to GDC in JET and other machines.

  18. FVCOM validation experiments: Comparisons with ROMS for three idealized barotropic test problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haosheng; Chen, Changsheng; Cowles, Geoffrey W.; Winant, Clinton D.; Beardsley, Robert C.; Hedstrom, Kate S.; Haidvogel, Dale B.

    2008-07-01

    The unstructured-grid Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) is evaluated using three idealized benchmark test problems: the Rossby equatorial soliton, the hydraulic jump, and the three-dimensional barotropic wind-driven basin. These test cases examine the properties of numerical dispersion and damping, the performance of the nonlinear advection scheme for supercritical flow conditions, and the accuracy of the implicit vertical viscosity scheme in barotropic settings, respectively. It is demonstrated that FVCOM provides overall a second-order spatial accuracy for the vertically averaged equations (i.e., external mode), and with increasing grid resolution the model-computed solutions show a fast convergence toward the analytic solutions regardless of the particular triangulation method. Examples are provided to illustrate the ability of FVCOM to facilitate local grid refinement and speed up computation. Comparisons are also made between FVCOM and the structured-grid Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) for these test cases. For the linear problem in a simple rectangular domain, i.e., the wind-driven basin case, the performance of the two models is quite similar. For the nonlinear case, such as the Rossby equatorial soliton, the second-order advection scheme used in FVCOM is almost as accurate as the fourth-order advection scheme implemented in ROMS if the horizontal resolution is relatively high. FVCOM has taken advantage of the new development in computational fluid dynamics in resolving flow problems containing discontinuities. One salient feature illustrated by the three-dimensional barotropic wind-driven basin case is that FVCOM and ROMS simulations show different responses to the refinement of grid size in the horizontal and in the vertical.

  19. Local experience in cervical cancer imaging: Comparison in tumour assessment between TRUS and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ordeanu, Claudia; Pop, Diana Cristina; Badea, Radu; Csutak, Csaba; Todor, Nicolae; Ordeanu, Calin; Kerekes, Reka; Coza, Ovidiu; Nagy, Viorica; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Irimie, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of study was to analyze the accuracy of TRUS (transrectal ultrasound) vs. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and clinical gynecological examination estimation in the evaluation of tumor dimensions. Methods The patients inclusion criterion included primarily pathologically squamous cell carcinoma, but excluded were patients who had not undergone BT (brachytherapy) and treated with palliative intent. We offer two types of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer: (a) radiochemotherapy followed by surgery and (b) exclusive radiochemotherapy. Imaging tests follow the presence of tumor and tumor size (width and thickness). Each examination was performed by a different physician who had no knowledge of the others’ findings. All patients underwent MRI prior to EBRT (external beam radiation therapy) while 18 of them also at the time of the first brachytherapy application. For the analysis we used the r-Pearson correlation coefficient. Results In 2013, 26 patients with cervical cancer were included. A total of 44 gynecological examinations were performed, 44 MRIs and 18 TRUSs. For the comparisons prior to EBRT the correlation coefficient between TRUS vs. MRI was r = 0.79 for AP and r = 0.83 for LL, for GYN vs. MRI was r = 0.6 for AP and r = 0.75 for LL. Prior to BT for GYN vs. MRI, r values were 0.60 and 0.63 for AP and LL, respectively; for GYN vs. TRUS, r values were 0.56 and 0.78 for AP and LL, respectively. Conclusions A high correlation between the three examinations was obtained. As such, TRUS can be considered a suitable method in the evaluation of tumor dimensions. PMID:25949227

  20. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; et al

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in compositionmore » of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.« less

  1. A comparison of Solar Mesosphere Explorer and Stratosphere Aerosol and Gas Experiment II ozone densities near the stratopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Clancy, R. T.; Mccormick, M. P.; Zawodny, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Ozone measurements made by the SME UV Spectrometer and the Stratosphere Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) spectometer are compared at 1.0 mbar for the time period from October 1984 to December 1986, using a model of the diurnal variation of ozone to correct for the difference in local times of the two measurements. The absolute values of the ozone mixing ratio measured by the two spectrometers were found to agree to better than 5 percent, with no significant divergence between the instruments. It is concluded that, since the SAGE II data are not dependent on the absolute calibration of the instrument, these data can be used as time-dependent 'ground truth' measurements for comparisons with other instruments.

  2. [Comparison of different G-CSF treatment effectiveness in experiments on irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvenskiĭ, L M; Shchegoleva, R A; Deshevoĭ, Iu B; Lisina, N I; Titov, B A

    2012-01-01

    In the experiments on F1 (CBA x C57BL) and BALB mice irradiated by 137Cs gamma-rays, preparations of unglycosilated G-SCF such as Neupogen and their domestic analogs Leucostim and Neupomax were investigated. The tests such as 9-day bone marrow cellularity (BMC) and endogenous CFUs, the neutrophile number restoration, the 30-day survival index have shown that all three preparations have an approximately equal effectiveness relating to acute radiation disease treatment and granulopoiesis stimulation after a 5-10 day consecutive administration following irradiation of mice at lethal and sublethal doses. We have come to the conclusion that Leucostim and Neupomax can be regarded as adequate substitutes for Neupogen. PMID:23227714

  3. Isentropic Compression up to 200 KBars for LX 04, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Hare, D.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on LX-04 (HMX / Viton 85/15) were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE. 2D and 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1067 on LX 04. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  4. Copper Tube Compression in Z-Current Geometry, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Cyclope Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Metallic tubes compressions in Z-current geometry were performed at the Cyclope facility from Gramat Research Center in order to study the behavior of metals under large strain at high strain rate. 3D configurations of cylinder compressions have been calculated here to benchmark the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the Cyclope experiments. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  5. Isentropic Compression with a Rectangular Configuration for Tungstene and Tantalum, Computations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Reisman, D. B.; Bastea, M.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on metals are performed at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope, associated Hugoniot and phase changes of these metals. 3D configurations have been calculated here to benchmark the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shots 1511 and 1555. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  6. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  7. Time dependence of the paramagnetic Meissner effect: Comparison between model calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Magnusson, J.; Andersson, J.; Bjoernander, M.; Nordblad, P.; Svedlindh, P.

    1995-05-01

    Experimental results of the temperature, field, and time dependence of the magnetization in high-temperature superconductors displaying the paramagnetic Meissner effect are compared with numerical results from model calculations. In experiments the relaxation rate of the zero-field-cooled magnetization exhibits novel field-dependent properties and the field-cooled magnetization is found to increase with time. A model based on an ensemble of superconducting loops, each loop containing an ordinary Josephson junction or a {pi} junction, is shown to be able to account for most of the experimental results. The time-dependent magnetization is explained by thermally activated flipping of spontaneous orbital magnetic moments, a dynamical process which is fundamentally different from the flux-creep phenomenon usually observed in type-II superconductors.

  8. Calculated rotation-bending energy levels of CH 5+ and a comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-05-01

    We report J > 0 CH 5+ levels computed by fixing stretch coordinates. They are computed by using a simple product basis, exploiting symmetry, and carefully parallelizing the calculation. The J > 0 CH 5+ levels are compared with those obtained from other theoretical methods and with experimental ground state combination differences of Asvany et al. [Science, 347, 1346 (2015)]. If the assignment of Asvany et al. is correct, there are important differences between the levels we compute and those observed. We propose a different assignment of the experimental levels that reduces the maximum error from 34 to 2 cm-1. The new assignment can only be correct if states of both parities exist in the experiment. Although, ro-vibrational levels of CH 5+ cannot be associated with individual vibrational states, they do occur in blocks separated by gaps.

  9. Calculated rotation-bending energy levels of CH5 (+) and a comparison with experiment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-05-28

    We report J > 0 CH5 (+) levels computed by fixing stretch coordinates. They are computed by using a simple product basis, exploiting symmetry, and carefully parallelizing the calculation. The J > 0 CH5 (+) levels are compared with those obtained from other theoretical methods and with experimental ground state combination differences of Asvany et al. [Science, 347, 1346 (2015)]. If the assignment of Asvany et al. is correct, there are important differences between the levels we compute and those observed. We propose a different assignment of the experimental levels that reduces the maximum error from 34 to 2 cm(-1). The new assignment can only be correct if states of both parities exist in the experiment. Although, ro-vibrational levels of CH5 (+) cannot be associated with individual vibrational states, they do occur in blocks separated by gaps. PMID:27250303

  10. Prediction of transonic flutter for a supercritical wing by modified strip analysis and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. C., Jr.; Wynne, E. C.; Farmer, M. G.; Desmarais, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    Use of a supercritical airfoil can adversely affect wing flutter speeds in the transonic range. As adequate theories for three dimensional unsteady transonic flow are not yet available, the modified strip analysis was used to predict the transonic flutter boundary for the supercritical wing. The steady state spanwise distributions of section lift curve slope and aerodynamic center, required as input for the flutter calculations, were obtained from pressure distributions. The calculated flutter boundary is in agreement with experiment in the subsonic range. In the transonic range, a transonic bucket is calculated which closely resembles the experimental one with regard to both shape and depth, but it occurs at about 0.04 Mach number lower than the experimental one.

  11. Comparison of modelled and measured tracer gas concentrations during the Across North America Tracer Experiment (ANATEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.L.; Cohn, R.D.; Seilkop, S.K.; Draxler, R.R.; Heffter, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The 24-hour surface concentrations of several perfluorocarbon tracer gases measured during the 1987 Across North America Tracer Experiment (ANATEX) provided a unique continental-scale data set with which to evaluate long-range transport and diffusion models. One such model, a multilayer Lagrangian model, was evaluated in the ANATEX Model Evaluation Study (AMES) by comparing distributions and time series of calculated and measured tracer concentrations at bands of sampling sites nearly equidistant from one of the two tracer release sites and by computing spatial differences in the concentration-weighted centroids of 20, 24-hour tracer footprints or composite plumes. The results for this model indicated that it overemphasized the effects of the stronger upper-level winds. In spite of the bias in transport speed, the distributions of the calculated and measured concentrations were quite similar.

  12. Hemolysis Related to Turbulent Eddy Size Distributions Using Comparisons of Experiments to Computations.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mesude; O'Rear, Edgar A; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent blood flow in medical devices contributes to blood trauma, yet the exact mechanism(s) have not been fully elucidated. Local turbulent stresses, viscous stresses, and the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy have been proffered as hypotheses to describe and predict blood damage. In this work, simulations of experiments in a Couette flow viscometer and a capillary tube were used to examine extensive properties of the turbulent flow field and to investigate contributing factors for red blood cell hemoglobin release in turbulence by eddy analysis. It was found that hemolysis occurred when dissipative eddies were comparable in size to the red blood cells. The Kolmogorov length scale was used to quantify the size of smaller turbulent eddies, indicating correspondence of hemolysis with number and surface area of eddies smaller than about 10 μm when a k-ε turbulence model is adopted. PMID:26412190

  13. Multi-channel transport experiments at Alcator C-Mod and comparison with gyrokinetic simulationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Sung, C.; Baek, S.; Barnes, M.; Candy, J.; Dominguez, A.; Ernst, D.; Gao, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Lin, Y.; Mikkelsen, D.; Parra, F.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J. E.; Walk, J.; Wukitch, S. J.; Team, Alcator C-Mod

    2013-05-01

    Multi-channel transport experiments have been conducted in auxiliary heated (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [Marmar and Alcator C-Mod Group, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. These plasmas provide good diagnostic coverage for measurements of kinetic profiles, impurity transport, and turbulence (electron temperature and density fluctuations). In the experiments, a steady sawtoothing L-mode plasma with 1.2 MW of on-axis RF heating is established and density is scanned by 20%. Measured rotation profiles change from peaked to hollow in shape as density is increased, but electron density and impurity profiles remain peaked. Ion or electron heat fluxes from the two plasmas are the same. The experimental results are compared directly to nonlinear gyrokinetic theory using synthetic diagnostics and the code GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. We find good agreement with experimental ion heat flux, impurity particle transport, and trends in the fluctuation level ratio (T˜e/Te)/(n ˜e/ne), but underprediction of electron heat flux. We find that changes in momentum transport (rotation profiles changing from peaked to hollow) do not correlate with changes in particle transport, and also do not correlate with changes in linear mode dominance, e.g., Ion Temperature Gradient versus Trapped Electron Mode. The new C-Mod results suggest that the drives for momentum transport differ from drives for heat and particle transport. The experimental results are inconsistent with present quasilinear models, and the strong sensitivity of core rotation to density remains unexplained.

  14. Microfacies analysis of Green River Formation stromatolites and comparison to microbial mat experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. E.; Bahniuk Rumbelsperger, A. M.; Sauvage, J. F.; Jarrett, A. J.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Corsetti, F. A.; Shapiro, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Stromatolites were collected from the Laney Member of the Early Eocene Green River Formation near LaClede, Wyoming. LaClede stromatolites are laminated at the micron scale and form domes ~10 cm in diameter. Relatively coarse sediments (>300 μm) fill interdomal depressions, but are rare within fine-grained laminae (a grain size distribution common in Proterozoic stromatolites). On the sides of domes, laminae thin significantly and are nearly vertical. Stromatolite growth and infill sedimentation likely occurred simultaneously, as laminae are draped into interdomal areas and are rarely cut by infill. Grains longer than 200 μm are absent on the steep edges of stromatolite domes, despite the presence of >200 μm grains deposited concomitantly in interdomal depressions. To test whether microbial mats are capable of collecting relatively coarse sediments at steep angles, sedimentation experiments were conducted using cyanobacterial mats collected from Catalina Harbor, Catalina Island, California. Fine (0.125-0.250 mm), medium (0.50-1.0 mm), and coarse (1.0-2.0 mm) sediments were dropped on mats inclined at six angles (15° increments from 0-75°). Coarse grains did not adhere to mats steeper than 45°, and all fine grains were captured by mats at angles less than 45°. All grains that settled on mats were strongly bound after one day of further microbial growth. Although we cannot conclude that fine-grained stromatolites were formed by cyanobacteria, our results suggest that coarse-grained stromatolites (e.g., most modern marine stromatolites) require processes not typically observed in modern cyanobacterial mats (e.g., processes associated with algal eukaryotes, diatoms, and/or copious extracellular polymeric substances, or EPS). Similar sedimentation experiments using other microbial mats, such as those with a thicker coating of EPS or a eukaryotic component, may yield additional information on the origins of coarse- and fine-grained stromatolites. This research was

  15. Multi-channel transport experiments at Alcator C-Mod and comparison with gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Sung, C.; Baek, S.; Barnes, M.; Dominguez, A.; Ernst, D.; Gao, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Lin, Y.; Parra, F.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J. E.; Walk, J.; Wukitch, S. J.; Team, Alcator C-Mod; Candy, J.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Multi-channel transport experiments have been conducted in auxiliary heated (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [Marmar and Alcator C-Mod Group, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. These plasmas provide good diagnostic coverage for measurements of kinetic profiles, impurity transport, and turbulence (electron temperature and density fluctuations). In the experiments, a steady sawtoothing L-mode plasma with 1.2 MW of on-axis RF heating is established and density is scanned by 20%. Measured rotation profiles change from peaked to hollow in shape as density is increased, but electron density and impurity profiles remain peaked. Ion or electron heat fluxes from the two plasmas are the same. The experimental results are compared directly to nonlinear gyrokinetic theory using synthetic diagnostics and the code GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. We find good agreement with experimental ion heat flux, impurity particle transport, and trends in the fluctuation level ratio (T(tilde sign){sub e}/T{sub e})/(ñ{sub e}/n{sub e}), but underprediction of electron heat flux. We find that changes in momentum transport (rotation profiles changing from peaked to hollow) do not correlate with changes in particle transport, and also do not correlate with changes in linear mode dominance, e.g., Ion Temperature Gradient versus Trapped Electron Mode. The new C-Mod results suggest that the drives for momentum transport differ from drives for heat and particle transport. The experimental results are inconsistent with present quasilinear models, and the strong sensitivity of core rotation to density remains unexplained.

  16. Melts of garnet lherzolite: experiments, models and comparison to melts of pyroxenite and carbonated lherzolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, Timothy L.; Holbig, Eva S.; Barr, Jay A.; Till, Christy B.; Krawczynski, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Phase equilibrium experiments on a compositionally modified olivine leucitite from the Tibetan plateau have been carried out from 2.2 to 2.8 GPa and 1,380–1,480 °C. The experiments-produced liquids multiply saturated with spinel and garnet lherzolite phase assemblages (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel ± garnet) under nominally anhydrous conditions. These SiO2-undersaturated liquids and published experimental data are utilized to develop a predictive model for garnet lherzolite melting of compositionally variable mantle under anhydrous conditions over the pressure range of 1.9–6 GPa. The model estimates the major element compositions of garnet-saturated melts for a range of mantle lherzolite compositions and predicts the conditions of the spinel to garnet lherzolite phase transition for natural peridotite compositions at above-solidus temperatures and pressures. We compare our predicted garnet lherzolite melts to those of pyroxenite and carbonated lherzolite and develop criteria for distinguishing among melts of these different source types. We also use the model in conjunction with a published predictive model for plagioclase and spinel lherzolite to characterize the differences in major element composition for melts in the plagioclase, spinel and garnet facies and develop tests to distinguish between melts of these three lherzolite facies based on major elements. The model is applied to understand the source materials and conditions of melting for high-K lavas erupted in the Tibetan plateau, basanite–nephelinite lavas erupted early in the evolution of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, as well as younger tholeiitic to alkali lavas from Kilauea.

  17. Physical mechanism of the Schwarzschild effect in film dosimetry—theoretical model and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouguela, A.; Kollhoff, R.; Rühmann, A.; Willborn, K. C.; Harder, D.; Poppe, B.

    2006-09-01

    In consideration of the importance of film dosimetry for the dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment plans, the Schwarzschild effect or failure of the reciprocity law, i.e. the reduction of the net optical density under 'protraction' or 'fractionation' conditions at constant dose, has been experimentally studied for Kodak XOMAT-V (Martens et al 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2221-34) and EDR 2 dosimetry films (Djouguela et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 N317-N321). It is known that this effect results from the competition between two solid-state physics reactions involved in the latent-image formation of the AgBr crystals, the aggregation of two Ag atoms freshly formed from Ag+ ions near radiation-induced occupied electron traps and the spontaneous decomposition of the Ag atoms. In this paper, we are developing a mathematical model of this mechanism which shows that the interplay of the mean lifetime τ of the Ag atoms with the time pattern of the irradiation determines the magnitude of the observed effects of the temporal dose distribution on the net optical density. By comparing this theory with our previous protraction experiments and recent fractionation experiments in which the duration of the pause between fractions was varied, a value of the time constant τ of roughly 10 s at room temperature has been determined for EDR 2. The numerical magnitude of the Schwarzschild effect in dosimetry films under the conditions generally met in radiotherapy amounts to only a few per cent of the net optical density (net OD), so that it can frequently be neglected from the viewpoint of clinical applications. But knowledge of the solid-state physical mechanism and a description in terms of a mathematical model involving a typical time constant of about 10 s are now available to estimate the magnitude of the effect should the necessity arise, i.e. in cases of large fluctuations of the temporal pattern of film exposure.

  18. Polarized x-ray-absorption spectroscopy of the uranyl ion: Comparison of experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Allen, P.G.; Terminello, L.J.; Denecke, M.A.; Reich, T.

    1996-07-01

    The x-ray linear dichroism of the uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and {ital L}{sub 1}- and {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), has been investigated both by experiment and theory. A striking polarization dependence is observed in the experimental XANES and EXAFS for an oriented single crystal of uranyl acetate dihydrate [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O], with the x-ray polarization vector aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the bond axis of the linear uranyl cation (O-U-O). Single-crystal results are compared to experimental spectra for a polycrystalline uranyl acetate sample and to calculations using the {ital ab} {ital initio} multiple-scattering (MS) code FEFF 6. Theoretical XANES spectra for uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) reproduce all the features of the measured uranyl acetate spectra. By identifying scattering paths which contribute to individual features in the calculated spectrum, a detailed understanding of the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES is obtained. MS paths within the uranyl cation have a notable influence upon the XANES. The measured {ital L}{sub 3}-edge EXAFS is also influenced by MS, especially when the x-ray polarization is parallel to the uranyl species. These MS contributions are extracted from the total EXAFS and compared to calculations. The best agreement with the isolated MS signal is obtained by using nonoverlapped muffin-tin spheres in the FEFF 6 calculation. This contrasts the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES calculations, in which overlapping was required for the best agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Assessing patient experiences in the pediatric patient-centered medical home: a comparison of two instruments.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Chakravorty, Shourjo; Madden, Vanessa; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Gubernick, Ruth; Kairys, Steven; Pelaez-Velez, Cristina; Sanders, Lee M; Thompson, Lindsay

    2014-11-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a model of care that has been promoted as a way to transform a broken primary care system in the US. However, in order to convince more practices to make the transformation and to properly reimburse practices who are PCMHs, valid and reliable data are needed. Data that capture patient experiences in a PCMH is valuable, but which instrument should be used remains unclear. Our study aims to compare the validity and reliability of two national PCMH instruments. Telephone surveys were conducted with children who receive care from 20 pediatric practices across Florida (n = 990). All of the children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program. Analyses were conducted to compare the Consumer Assessment of Health Plan Survey-Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS-PCMH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) medical home domain. Respondents were mainly White non-Hispanic, female, under 35 years old, and from a two-parent household. The NS-CSHCN outperformed the CAHPS-PCMH in regard to scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients all ≥0.81 vs. 0.56-0.85, respectively). In regard to item-domain convergence and discriminant validity the CAHPS-PCMH fared better than the NS-CSHCN (range of convergence 0.66-0.93 vs. 0.32-1.00). The CAHPS-PCMH did not correspond to the scale structure in construct validity testing. Neither instrument performed well in the known-groups validity tests. No clear best instrument was determined. Further revision and calibration may be needed to accurately assess patient experiences in the PCMH. PMID:24585412

  20. Polarized x-ray-absorption spectroscopy of the uranyl ion: Comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, E. A.; Allen, P. G.; Terminello, L. J.; Denecke, M. A.; Reich, T.

    1996-07-01

    The x-ray linear dichroism of the uranyl ion (UO2+2) in uranium L3-edge extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and L1- and L3-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), has been investigated both by experiment and theory. A striking polarization dependence is observed in the experimental XANES and EXAFS for an oriented single crystal of uranyl acetate dihydrate [UO2(CH3CO2)2.2H2O], with the x-ray polarization vector aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the bond axis of the linear uranyl cation (O-U-O). Single-crystal results are compared to experimental spectra for a polycrystalline uranyl acetate sample and to calculations using the ab initio multiple-scattering (MS) code FEFF 6. Theoretical XANES spectra for uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) reproduce all the features of the measured uranyl acetate spectra. By identifying scattering paths which contribute to individual features in the calculated spectrum, a detailed understanding of the L1-edge XANES is obtained. MS paths within the uranyl cation have a notable influence upon the XANES. The measured L3-edge EXAFS is also influenced by MS, especially when the x-ray polarization is parallel to the uranyl species. These MS contributions are extracted from the total EXAFS and compared to calculations. The best agreement with the isolated MS signal is obtained by using nonoverlapped muffin-tin spheres in the FEFF 6 calculation. This contrasts the L1-edge XANES calculations, in which overlapping was required for the best agreement with experiment.

  1. Comparisons of physical experiment and discrete element simulations of sheared granular materials in an annular shear cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, S.; Hanes, D.M.; Shen, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we report a direct comparison between a physical test and a computer simulation of rapidly sheared granular materials. An annular shear cell experiment was conducted. All parameters were kept the same between the physical and the computational systems to the extent possible. Artificially softened particles were used in the simulation to reduce the computational time to a manageable level. Sensitivity study on the particle stiffness ensured such artificial modification was acceptable. In the experiment, a range of normal stress was applied to a given amount of particles sheared in an annular trough with a range of controlled shear speed. Two types of particles, glass and Delrin, were used in the experiment. Qualitatively, the required torque to shear the materials under different rotational speed compared well with those in the physical experiments for both the glass and the Delrin particles. However, the quantitative discrepancies between the measured and simulated shear stresses were nearly a factor of two. Boundary conditions, particle size distribution, particle damping and friction, including a sliding and rolling, contact force model, were examined to determine their effects on the computational results. It was found that of the above, the rolling friction between particles had the most significant effect on the macro stress level. This study shows that discrete element simulation is a viable method for engineering design for granular material systems. Particle level information is needed to properly conduct these simulations. However, not all particle level information is equally important in the study regime. Rolling friction, which is not commonly considered in many discrete element models, appears to play an important role. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Laparoscopic resection for hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison between Middle Eastern and Western experience

    PubMed Central

    Piardi, Tullio; Sommacale, Daniele; Baumert, Thomas; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) is growing in popularity, but the short- and long-term outcome of patients undergoing LLR for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been established. Methods A literature search was performed using PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science (WoS) from cited English and Chinese publications. Clinical and survival parameters were extracted. The search was last conducted in October 2013. After application of selective criteria, 24 remaining original studies with more than 15 patients were analyzed. Results In the Western experience, mean operative time was between 150 to 300 minutes, and mean blood loss ranged from 55 to 452 mL. Transfusion was required in all series, ranging from 2.8% to 50%. The conversion rate ranged from 5% to 19.4%. Three cases of death were reported. General morbidity rate ranged from 1.5% to 25%. Specific complications were divided into hemorrhage (2.4% to 25%), ascites (3.7% to 15.3%), and biliary collection (0.6% to 5%). Liver insufficiency was reported in two cases. Mean hospital stay ranged from 5.4 to 15 days. In all case-matched studies, LLR was statistically associated with a shorter hospital stay. The 5-year overall survival rate ranged from 55% to 70%. No trocar-site recurrence was observed. The recurrence rate ranged from 21.4% to 50%. Comparative studies did not demonstrate any significant difference in terms of recurrence between LLR and open liver resection (OLR). In the Middle Eastern experience, mean operative time ranged from 147 to 325 minutes, and mean blood loss ranged from 88 to 808 mL. Transfusion was required, ranging from 1.8% to 19.2%. The conversion rate ranged from 1.8% to 18.6%, and four series reported no conversion. There was no mortality. The main specific complication was ascites (1.7% to 26.6%). A biliary collection was reported in only two series (10.7% and 13.3%), and only one case of postoperative liver insufficiency was reported. Mean hospital stay ranged from 4 to

  3. Modelling of a viscoplastic granular column collapse and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nathan; Ionescu, Ioan; Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, François; Roche, Olivier; Farin, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    Landslides and, more generally, large scale granular flows, represent a wide variety of geophysical flows also including mud or debris flow and snow avalanches. In a continuum mechanics context, the accurate simulation of these flows strongly depends on the modelling of their rheology and their boundary conditions, namely the sliding law and processes of erosion. In particular the description of the static and of the flowing states of granular media is still an open issue. We focus here on the quantitative reproduction of laboratory experiments using a mechanical and numerical model of dry granular flows with the so-called μ(I) rheology associated to a Drucker-Prager plasticity criterion and a shear rate and pressure dependent viscosity η(||D||,p). A Coulomb type friction law is considered at the base of the flow. The modelling is achieved in a finite-element context using the software FreeFem++. The simulations are bidimensionnal and well reproduce quantitatively both the dynamical and final shapes of the deposit. The effects of the sidewalls of the experimental channel, neglected in 2D simulations, are investigated by introducing an extra term in the equations varying with the inverse of the width of the channel, providing an enhanced agreement with the experiments. The numerical results show that the flow is essentially located in a surface layer behind the front, while the whole granular material is flowing near the front where basal sliding occurs. The static/flowing interface changes as a function of space and time, in good agreement with experimental observations. The resulting dynamic viscosity varies from very small values near the free surface and near the front to 1.5Pa.s within the quasi-static zone. The results show a rather small yet computationnaly expensive difference between a constant viscosity model and a μ(I) rheology in the case of a rigid bed. This has important implication for application to real geophysical flows. The role of an erodible

  4. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first

  5. Simulating Thermal Explosion of Octahydrotetranitrotetrazine-based explosives: Model Comparison with Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Nichols, A L; Tarver, C M

    2006-02-07

    The authors compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives are heated at a rate of 1 C per hour until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydro time scale. During the pre-ignition phase, quasi-static mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydro dynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two octahydrotetranitrotetrazine (HMX)-based explosives, LX-04 and LX-10, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The present HMX modeling work shows very first violence calculations with thermal predictions associated with a confined thermal explosion test. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in larger scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HE's are predicted to within 1 C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase.

  6. The probability of evolutionary rescue: towards a quantitative comparison between theory and evolution experiments

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Guillaume; Aguilée, Robin; Ramsayer, Johan; Kaltz, Oliver; Ronce, Ophélie

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary rescue occurs when a population genetically adapts to a new stressful environment that would otherwise cause its extinction. Forecasting the probability of persistence under stress, including emergence of drug resistance as a special case of interest, requires experimentally validated quantitative predictions. Here, we propose general analytical predictions, based on diffusion approximations, for the probability of evolutionary rescue. We assume a narrow genetic basis for adaptation to stress, as is often the case for drug resistance. First, we extend the rescue model of Orr & Unckless (Am. Nat. 2008 172, 160–169) to a broader demographic and genetic context, allowing the model to apply to empirical systems with variation among mutation effects on demography, overlapping generations and bottlenecks, all common features of microbial populations. Second, we confront our predictions of rescue probability with two datasets from experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (bacterium). The tests show the qualitative agreement between the model and observed patterns, and illustrate how biologically relevant quantities, such as the per capita rate of rescue, can be estimated from fits of empirical data. Finally, we use the results of the model to suggest further, more quantitative, tests of evolutionary rescue theory. PMID:23209169

  7. Preparing beginning reading teachers: An experimental comparison of initial early literacy field experiences.

    PubMed

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Lake, Vickie E; Greulich, Luana; Folsom, Jessica S; Guidry, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This randomized-control trial examined the learning of preservice teachers taking an initial Early Literacy course in an early childhood education program and of the kindergarten or first grade students they tutored in their field experience. Preservice teachers were randomly assigned to one of two tutoring programs: Book Buddies and Tutor Assisted Intensive Learning Strategies (TAILS), which provided identical meaning-focused instruction (shared book reading), but differed in the presentation of code-focused skills. TAILS used explicit, scripted lessons, and the Book Buddies required that code-focused instruction take place during shared book reading. Our research goal was to understand which tutoring program would be most effective in improving knowledge about reading, lead to broad and deep language and preparedness of the novice preservice teachers, and yield the most successful student reading outcomes. Findings indicate that all pre-service teachers demonstrated similar gains in knowledge, but preservice teachers in the TAILS program demonstrated broader and deeper application of knowledge and higher self-ratings of preparedness to teach reading. Students in both conditions made similar comprehension gains, but students tutored with TAILS showed significantly stronger decoding gains. PMID:24204096

  8. Comparison of Abuse Experiences of Rural and Urban African American Women During Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Shreya; Bullock, Linda F. C.; Richardson, Jeanita W.; Kimeto, Pamela; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Sharps, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    A subsample of 12 African American women (6 urban and 6 rural) were selected from a larger longitudinal, randomized control trial, Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE-R01 900903 National Institute of Nursing Research [NINR]/National Institutes of Health [NIH]). All African American women were chosen to control for any racial- and/or race-related cultural differences that may exist among women across geographical areas. The experiences of abuse during the perinatal period are drawn from in-depth interviews conducted at five points in time during pregnancy and the post-partum period. The analysis describes three major themes that highlight the similarities and differences among rural and urban women. The main themes found were (1) types of abuse, (2) location of abuse, and (3) response to abuse. In addition, two sub-themes (a) defiance and compliance and (b) role of children were also identified. Implications for universal screening for women of reproductive age, safer gun laws, and the need for further research are discussed. PMID:25315478

  9. Comparison of abuse experiences of rural and urban African American women during perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Shreya; Bullock, Linda F C; Richardson, Jeanita W; Kimeto, Pamela; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2015-07-01

    A subsample of 12 African American women (6 urban and 6 rural) were selected from a larger longitudinal, randomized control trial, Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE-R01 900903 National Institute of Nursing Research [NINR]/National Institutes of Health [NIH]). All African American women were chosen to control for any racial- and/or race-related cultural differences that may exist among women across geographical areas. The experiences of abuse during the perinatal period are drawn from in-depth interviews conducted at five points in time during pregnancy and the post-partum period. The analysis describes three major themes that highlight the similarities and differences among rural and urban women. The main themes found were (1) types of abuse, (2) location of abuse, and (3) response to abuse. In addition, two sub-themes (a) defiance and compliance and (b) role of children were also identified. Implications for universal screening for women of reproductive age, safer gun laws, and the need for further research are discussed. PMID:25315478

  10. Wave Impact on a Wall: Comparison of Experiments with Similarity Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Duncan, J. H.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2014-11-01

    The impact of a steep water wave on a fixed partially submerged cube is studied with experiments and theory. The temporal evolution of the water surface profile upstream of the front face of the cube in its center plane is measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique using frame rates up to 4,500 Hz. For a small range of cube positions, the surface profiles are found to form a nearly circular arc with upward curvature between the front face of the cube and a point just downstream of the wave crest. As the crest approaches the cube, the effective radius of this portion of the profile decreases rapidly. At the same time, the portion of the profile that is upstream of the crest approaches a straight line with a downward slope of about 15°. As the wave impact continues, the circular arc shrinks to zero radius with very high acceleration and a sudden transition to a high-speed vertical jet occurs. This flow singularity is modeled with a power-law scaling in time, which is used to create a time-independent system of equations of motion. The scaled governing equations are solved numerically and the similarly scaled measured free surface shapes, are favorably compared with the solutions. The support of the Office of Naval Research is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Growth of sinuous waves on thin liquid sheets: Comparison of predictions with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Nayanika; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2016-05-01

    A recent theory [M. S. Tirumkudulu and M. Paramati, "Stability of a moving radial liquid sheet: Time dependent equations," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 102-107 (2013)] has shown that a radially expanding liquid sheet is unstable to sinuous wave disturbances due to the thinning of the liquid sheet while ignoring the presence of a surrounding gas phase. In this work, we compare the predictions of the aforementioned theory with the measurements of Crapper et al. ["Large amplitude Kelvin-Helmholtz waves on thin liquid sheets," Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 342(1629), 209-224 (1975)] who measured the amplitude and spatial growth rates of sinuous waves induced in radially expanding liquid sheets produced by fan spray nozzles. The predicted growth rates are remarkably close to the measurements over a range of forcing frequencies and amplitudes even though the experiments were performed in the presence of a surrounding gas phase. This is in contrast to large discrepancies observed by Crapper et al. when the same measurements were compared with the predictions of a spatial stability analysis for a moving liquid sheet that accounts for the inertia of the surrounding gas phase but ignores the thickness variation of the sheet.

  12. Structure and interactions in fluids of prolate colloidal ellipsoids: comparison between experiment, theory, and simulation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A P; Janai, E; Rapaport, D C; Schofield, A B; Sloutskin, E

    2012-11-14

    The microscopic structure of fluids of simple spheres is well known. However, the constituents of most real-life fluids are non-spherical, leading to a coupling between the rotational and translational degrees of freedom. The structure of simple dense fluids of spheroids - ellipsoids of revolution - was only recently determined by direct experimental techniques [A. P. Cohen, E. Janai, E. Mogilko, A. B. Schofield, and E. Sloutskin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 238301 (2011)]. Using confocal microscopy, it was demonstrated that the structure of these simple fluids cannot be described by hard particle models based on the widely used Percus-Yevick approximation. In this paper, we describe a new protocol for determining the shape of the experimental spheroids, which allows us to expand our previous microscopy measurements of these fluids. To avoid the approximations in the theoretical approach, we have also used molecular dynamics simulations to reproduce the experimental radial distribution functions g(r) and estimate the contribution of charge effects to the interactions. Accounting for these charge effects within the Percus-Yevick framework leads to similar agreement with the experiment. PMID:23163381

  13. Preparing beginning reading teachers: An experimental comparison of initial early literacy field experiences

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Vickie E.; Greulich, Luana; Folsom, Jessica S.; Guidry, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This randomized-control trial examined the learning of preservice teachers taking an initial Early Literacy course in an early childhood education program and of the kindergarten or first grade students they tutored in their field experience. Preservice teachers were randomly assigned to one of two tutoring programs: Book Buddies and Tutor Assisted Intensive Learning Strategies (TAILS), which provided identical meaning-focused instruction (shared book reading), but differed in the presentation of code-focused skills. TAILS used explicit, scripted lessons, and the Book Buddies required that code-focused instruction take place during shared book reading. Our research goal was to understand which tutoring program would be most effective in improving knowledge about reading, lead to broad and deep language and preparedness of the novice preservice teachers, and yield the most successful student reading outcomes. Findings indicate that all pre-service teachers demonstrated similar gains in knowledge, but preservice teachers in the TAILS program demonstrated broader and deeper application of knowledge and higher self-ratings of preparedness to teach reading. Students in both conditions made similar comprehension gains, but students tutored with TAILS showed significantly stronger decoding gains. PMID:24204096

  14. Idaho Field Experiment 1981. Volume 3. Comparison of trajectories, tracer concentration patterns and MESODIF model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Start, G E; Cate, J H; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Dickson, C R; Nukari, N H; Thorngren, L G

    1985-02-01

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeast Idaho over the Upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46 m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24 km square. Also, a single total integrated sample, of about 30 hours duration, was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72 km (using 6 km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL mesonet. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High-altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were also collected. Volume III contains descriptions of the nine intensive measurement days. General meteorological conditions are described, trajectories and their relationships to analyses of gaseous tracer data are discussed, and overviews of test day cases are presented. Calculations using the ARLFRD MESODIF model are included and related to the gaseous tracer data. Finally, a summary and a list of recommendations are presented. 11 references, 39 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Capillary trapping mechanism in strongly water wet systems: Comparison between experiment and percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Mohammadian, Sadjad

    2015-05-01

    To understand capillary trapping mechanism, we conduct a real Monte-Carlo experiment by using packed glass beads with nearly the same pore size distribution, but different stochastic realizations. We study gas phase trapping during imbibition for capillary numbers from 2 × 10-7 to 10-6 using X-ray micro tomography and compare the experimental results with predictions from percolation theory. We found excellent agreement. Percolation theory explains (i) that the capillary desaturation curves are not dependent on flow rate, (ii) the linear dependence of the total gas surface on gas saturation that is a direct consequence of the linear relationship between cluster surface area and cluster volume, which is a prediction from percolation theory for large finite clusters, (iii) the power-like cluster size distribution with an exponent τexp = 2.15 that only deviates by 2% from the theoretical one (τtheor = 2.19), and (iv) that the maximal z-extension of trapped large gas cluster is described by the cut-off correlation length ξB (B - bond number).

  16. Comparison of Veteran experiences of low-cost, home-based diet and exercise interventions.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Bree; Krein, Sarah L; Bentley, Douglas R; Hughes, Maria E; Giardino, Nicholas D; Richardson, Caroline R

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem among Veterans who receive care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, as it is for so many other Americans. Veterans from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) experience a myriad of chronic conditions, which can make it difficult to maintain a physically active lifestyle. This pilot study tested the feasibility and user satisfaction with three low-cost, home-based diet and exercise programs, as well as point-of-decision prompts among these Veterans. The three programs target mechanisms that have been shown to improve healthy behavior change, including (1) online mediated social support, (2) objective monitoring of physical activity, and (3) structured high-intensity workouts. This was a randomized crossover trial; each participant used two of the three programs, and all used the point-of-decision prompts. Our qualitative results identified five overall themes related to social support, objective monitoring, structured activity, awareness and understanding, and the point-of-decision prompts. In general, participants were satisfied with and lost weight with each of the interventions. This study demonstrated that these low-cost interventions could be successful with the OIF/OEF Veteran population. A larger and longer study is planned to further investigate the effectiveness of these interventions. PMID:24805901

  17. Comparison of the 1999 beam-park experiment results with space debris models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehn, R.

    2001-01-01

    In order to validate space debris environment models they have to be compared with measurement data. US radars and the German FGAN radar are used since some years to measure the debris environment in the centimetre size range. In 1999, two 24-hour beam-park experiments were performed at FGAN in the framework of the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). The observed detection rates can be evaluated to derive a confidence interval for the total number of objects in specified altitude bins which can be directly compared with the models. The difficulty consists in the fact that a radar does not have a uniform detection sensitivity within the radar beam. Thus, the concept of "average detection threshold" is described and used in this paper. For the FGAN TIRA system this average detection threshold is 1.6 cm for objects at 500 km range and 2.5 cm at 1100 km range. The analysis shows that the ESA MASTER (Meteoroid And Space debris Terrestrial Environment Reference) model, the DERA IDES (Integrated Debris Evolution Suite) model, the NASA/JSC EVOLVE model and the CNUCE Orbital Debris Reference Model (CODRM) are at the lower end or even below the measurement derived confidence intervals at most altitudes which means an underestimation of the current space debris environment.

  18. Comparison Experiments of Different Model Error Schemes in Ensemble Kalman Filter Soil Moisture Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Suping; Zhu, Jiang; Luo, Yong

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the performances of different model error scheme in soil moisture data assimilation. Based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the atmosphere-vegetation interaction model (AVIM), point-scale analysis results for three schemes, 1) covariance inflation (CI), 2) direct random disturbance (DRD), and 3) error source random disturbance (ESRD), are combined under conditions of different observational error estimations, different observation layers, and different observation intervals using a series of idealized experiments. The results shows that all these schemes obtain good assimilation results when the assumed observational error is an accurate statistical representation of the actual error used to perturb the original truth value, and the ESRD scheme has the least root mean square error (RMSE). Overestimation or underestimation of the observational errors can affect the assimilation results of CI and DRD schemes sensitively. The performances of these two schemes deteriorate obviously while the ESRD scheme keeps its capability well. When the observation layers or observation interval increase, the performances of both CI and DRD schemes decline evidently. But for the ESRD scheme, as it can assimilate multi-layer observations coordinately, the increased observations improve the assimilation results further. Moreover, as the ESRD scheme contains a certain amount of model error estimation functions in its assimilation process, it also has a good performance in assimilating sparse-time observations.

  19. Influence of inhomogeneity of optical absorbers on optoacoustic signals: a comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertsch, A. G.; Jaeger, M.; Bush, N. L.; Frenz, M.; Bamber, J. C.

    2009-02-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging allows optical absorption contrast to be visualised using thermoelastically generated ultrasound. To date, optoacoustic theory has been applied to homogeneously absorbing tissue models that may describe, for example, large vessels filled with blood, where the whole target will act as a coherent source of sound. Here we describe a new model in which the optical absorbers are distributed inhomogeneously, as appropriate to describe microvasculature, or perhaps the distribution of molecularly targeted OA contrast agents inside a tumour. The degree of coherence over the resulting distributed acoustic source is influenced by parameters that describe the scale of the inhomogeneity, such as the sizes of the absorbers and the distances between them. To investigate the influence of these parameters on OA image appearance, phantoms with homogeneously and imhomogeneously absorbing regions were built and imaged. Simulations of the same situation were conducted using a time domain acoustic propagation method. Both simulations and experiments showed that introducing inhomogeneity of absorption produces more complete images of macroscopic targets than are obtained with a homogeneous absorption. Image improvement and target detectability were found to reach a maximum at an intermediate value of the length-scale of the inhomogeneity that was similar to the axial resolution of the acoustic receiver employed. As the scale of inhomogeneity became finer than this the target's detectability and appearance began to revert to that for homogeneous absorption. Further understanding of this topic is believed to be important for optimising the design of clinical optoacoustic imaging systems.

  20. Calculations of ADS with deep subcritical uranium active cores - comparison with experiments and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivkov, P.; Furman, W.; Stoyanov, Ch

    2014-09-01

    The main characteristics of the neutron field formed within the massive (512 kg) natural uranium target assembly (TA) QUINTA irradiated by deuteron beam of JINR Nuclotron with energies 1,2,4, and 8 GeV as well as the spatial distributions and the integral numbers of (n,f), (n,γ) and (n,xn)- reactions were calculated and compared with experimental data [1] . The MCNPX 27e code with ISABEL/ABLA/FLUKA and INCL4/ABLA models of intra-nuclear cascade (INC) and experimental cross-sections of the corresponding reactions were used. Special attention was paid to the elucidation of the role of charged particles (protons and pions) in the fission of natural uranium of TA QUINTA. Extensive calculations have been done for quasi-infinite (with very small neutron leakage) depleted uranium TA BURAN having mass about 20 t which are intended to be used in experiments at Nuclotron in 2014-2016. As in the case of TA QUINTA which really models the central zone of TA BURAN the total numbers of fissions, produced 239Pu nuclei and total neutron multiplicities are predicted to be proportional to proton or deuteron energy up to 12 GeV. But obtained values of beam power gain are practically constant in studied incident energy range and are approximately four. These values are in contradiction with the experimental result [2] obtained for the depleted uranium core weighting three tons at incident proton energy 0.66 GeV.

  1. Rate Coefficient for the (4)Heμ + CH4 Reaction at 500 K: Comparison between Theory and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Arseneau, Donald J; Fleming, Donald G; Li, Yongle; Li, Jun; Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-01

    The rate constant for the H atom abstraction reaction from methane by the muonic helium atom, Heμ + CH4 → HeμH + CH3, is reported at 500 K and compared with theory, providing an important test of both the potential energy surface (PES) and reaction rate theory for the prototypical polyatomic CH5 reaction system. The theory used to characterize this reaction includes both variational transition-state (CVT/μOMT) theory (VTST) and ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations on a recently developed PES, which are compared as well with earlier calculations on different PESs for the H, D, and Mu + CH4 reactions, the latter, in particular, providing for a variation in atomic mass by a factor of 36. Though rigorous quantum calculations have been carried out for the H + CH4 reaction, these have not yet been extended to the isotopologues of this reaction (in contrast to H3), so it is important to provide tests of less rigorous theories in comparison with kinetic isotope effects measured by experiment. In this regard, the agreement between the VTST and RPMD calculations and experiment for the rate constant of the Heμ + CH4 reaction at 500 K is excellent, within 10% in both cases, which overlaps with experimental error. PMID:26484648

  2. Comparison of fast ion confinement during on-axis and off-axis neutral beam experiments on NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hao, G. Z.; Podesta, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Medley, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    A second and more tangential neutral beam line is a major upgrade component of the National Spherical Torus Experiment - Upgrade (NSTX-U) with the purpose of improving neutral beam current drive efficiency and providing more flexibility in current/pressure profile control. Good fast ion confinement is essential to achieve the anticipated improvements in performance. In a planed ``sanity check'' experiment, various short and long (relative to fast ion slowing-down time) neutral beam (NB) pulses with different source mixes will be injected into quiescent L-mode plasmas to characterize the fast ion confinement and distribution function produced by the new and the existing NBI lines. The neutron rate decay after the turn-off of short NB pulses will be used to estimate the fast ion confinement time and to investigate its dependence on NB source/geometry, injection energy, and plasma current. The newly installed Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) and Fast-Ion D-Alapha (FIDA) diagnostics will be described and will be used to measure fast ion slowing-down distribution function and spatial profile during the injection of relatively long NB pulses. Fast ion prompt losses will be monitored with a scintillator Fast Lost Ion Probe (sFLIP) diagnostic. The experimental techniques, measurements of fast ion confinement time and distribution function, and comparisons with classical predictions from NUBEAM modeling will be presented in detail. Work supported by US DOE.

  3. Kinetic simulation of direct-drive capsule implosions and its comparison with experiments and radiation hydrodynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Thomas; Le, Ari; Schmitt, Mark; Herrmann, Hans; Batha, Steve

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out simulations of direct-drive capsule implosion experiments conducted on Omega laser facility at the Laboratory of Laser energetics of the University of Rochester. The capsules had a glass shell (SiO2) with D, T, He-3 fills at various proportions. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic calculations and kinetic particle/hybrid simulations with LSP were carried out for the post-shot analysis to compare neutron yield, yield ratio, and shell convergence in assessing the effects of plasma kinetic effects. The LSP simulations were initiated with the output from the rad-hydro simulations at the end of the laser-drive. The electrons are treated as a fluid while all the ion species by the kinetic PIC technique. Our LSP simulations clearly showed species separation between the deuterons, tritons and He-3 during the implosion but significantly less after the compression. The neutron yield, gamma bang-time and -width from the LSP simulations compared favorably with experiments. Detail comparison among the kinetic simulations, rad-hydro simulations, and experimental results will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  4. Comparisons among three types of generalist physicians: Personal characteristics, medical school experiences, financial aid, and other factors influencing career choice.

    PubMed

    Xu, G; Veloski, J J; Barzansky, B; Hojat, M; Diamond, J; Silenzio, V M

    1996-01-01

    A national survey of family physicians, general internists, and general pediatricians was conducted in the US to examine differences among the three groups of generalists physicians, with particular regard to the factors influencing their choice of generalist career. Family physicians were more likely to have made their career decision before medical school, and were more likely to have come from inner-city or rural areas. Personal values and early role models play a very important role in influencing their career choice. In comparison, a higher proportion of general internists had financial aid service obligations and their choice of the specialty was least influenced by personal values. General pediatricians had more clinical experiences either in primary care or with underserved populations, and they regarded medical school experiences as more important in influencing their specialty choice than did the other two groups. Admission committees may use these specialty-related factors to develop strategies to attract students into each type of generalist career. PMID:24179019

  5. A model-dye comparison experiment in the tidal mixing front zone on the southern flank of Georges Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changsheng; Xu, Qichun; Houghton, Robert; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2008-02-01

    A process-oriented model-dye comparison experiment was conducted to examine the ability of a numerical ocean model to simulate the observed movement of dye across the tidal mixing front on the southern flank of Georges Bank during 22-26 May 1999. The experiment was made using the unstructured-grid Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) with varying horizontal resolution. The results indicate that the observed cross-isobath movement of the dye patch was primarily controlled by meso-scale temporal and spatial variability of the water temperature and salinity fields. Onset of vertical stratification tended to slow down an upward stretching of the dye column and trapped the dye within the bottom mixed layer. To reach a convergent numerical solution that reproduced the observed lateral turbulent dispersion of dye, the FVCOM grid required a horizontal resolution of ˜500 m in the dye study region. Within the tidal mixing front of Georges Bank, the movement of the center of the dye patch was mainly driven by the ensemble velocity integrated over the dye volume, with a first-order contribution from vertical shear of the dye's horizontal velocity.

  6. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and QUICKE2 net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment with the predictions of four different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, TIGER and QUICKE2) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. Accurate calculation of net photon-induced electron emission yields at material interfaces using Monte Carlo codes can be particularly difficult if the forward and reverse partial yields are of similar magnitudes. In such a circumstance, the statistical error in the Monte Carlo solution (TIGER or TIGERP) must be kept to a minimum to accurately resolve the difference. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. QUICKE2 evaluates an analytical approximation and is also much less expensive to run than the Monte Carlo codes. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. We find that all of the codes except QUICKE2 substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. Howver, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, all the codes overpredict relative to measurements.

  7. Low-energy physical properties of high- Tc superconducting Cu oxides: A comparison between the resonating valence bond and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai-Yu; Shih, C. T.; Chou, C. P.; Huang, S. M.; Lee, T. K.; Xiang, T.; Zhang, F. C.

    2006-06-01

    In a recent review by Anderson and co-workers, it was pointed out that an early resonating valence bond (RVB) theory is able to explain a number of unusual properties of high-temperature superconducting (SC) Cu oxides. Here we extend previous calculations to study more systematically the low-energy physical properties of the plain vanilla d -wave RVB state, and to compare the results with the available experiments. We use a renormalized mean-field theory combined with variational Monte Carlo and power Lanczos methods to study the RVB state of an extended t-J model in a square lattice with parameters suitable for the hole-doped Cu oxides. The physical observable quantities we study include the specific heat, the linear residual thermal conductivity, the in-plane magnetic penetration depth, the quasiparticle energy at the antinode (π,0) , the superconducting energy gap, the quasiparticle spectra, and the Drude weights. The traits of nodes (including kF , the Fermi velocity vF , and the velocity along Fermi surface v2 ), and the SC order parameter are studied. Comparisons of the theory and the experiments in cuprates show an overall qualitative agreement, especially on their doping dependences.

  8. Simulating thermal explosion of RDX-based explosives: Model comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F; Tarver, C M

    2004-10-11

    We compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives are heated at a rate of 1 C per hour until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydro time scale. During the pre-ignition phase, quasi-static mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydro dynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two RDX-based explosives, C-4 and PBXN-109, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in large scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HE's are predicted to within 5 C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase. During the heating phase, simulated wall strains provide only an approximate representation of measured values indicating a better numerical treatment is needed to provide accurate results. The results also show that more numerical accuracy is needed for vessels with lesser confinement strength. For PBXN-109, the measured wall strains during the explosion are well represented by the ALE3D calculations.

  9. Gentamicin nephrotoxicity--a comparison of in vitro findings with in vivo experiments in equines.

    PubMed

    van der Harst, M R; Bull, S; Laffont, C M; Klein, W R

    2005-04-01

    The aminoglycoside gentamicin is often used in equine practice. Despite its clinical use, concerns remain regarding the potential toxic side-effects, such as nephrotoxicity, in equine patients, particularly after repeated dosing. The aim of the study was to investigate first in vitro the mechanisms contributing to the renal toxicity of gentamicin and to identify sensitive biomarkers indicating proximal tubule damage. To this end, the kidney-derived cell lines LLC-PKI and MDCK were treated with gentamicin at different concentrations. Toxicity was assessed by measuring the release of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cell viability was measured using Alamar blue (AB) and Neutral red (NR) cytotoxicity assays. Gentamicin exerted a dose-dependent toxicity. Primarily, loss of brush border membrane integrity, indicated by GGT leakage, and an increased ROS production were observed. As GGT was found to be a sensitive marker for gentamicin-induced renal cell injury, in the subsequent in vivo experiments, in which ponies were given gentamicin (3.0 mg/kg bw three times daily and 4.5 mg/kg bw twice daily) for five consecutive days, plasma levels and the urinary excretion of GGT and creatinine were measured and the GGT:creatinine ratio was calculated. Elevated GGT levels in urine following gentamicin therapy were observed, but this enzyme leakage was transient and returned to baseline values after cessation of therapy. It could thus be concluded that even a conservative dose regimen of gentamicin did not result in significant renal toxicity in healthy ponies. PMID:15736857

  10. Comparisons of Box Model Calculations and Measurements of Formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, G. J.; Fried, Alan; Lee, Y.- N.; Wert, B.; Henry, B.; Drummond, J. R.; Evans, M. J.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Goldan, P. D.; Holloway, J. S.; Hubler, Gerhard F.; Jakoubek, R.; Jobson, B Tom T.; Knapp, K.; Kuster, W. C.; Roberts, J.; Rudolph, Jochen; Ryerson, T. B.; Stohl, A.; Stroud, C.; Sueper, D. T.; Trainer, Michael; Williams, J.

    2002-04-18

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements from two independent instruments are compared with photochemical box model calculations. The measurements were made on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration P-3 aircraft as part of the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE 97). The data set considered here consists of air masses sampled between 0 and 8 km over the North Atlantic Ocean which do not show recent influence from emissions or transport. These air masses therefore should be in photochemical steady state with respect to CH2O when constrained by the other P-3 measurements, and methane oxidation was expected to be the predominant source of CH2O in these air masses. For this data set both instruments measured identical CH2O concentrations to within 40 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) on average over the 0–800 pptv range, although differences larger than the combined 2s total uncertainty estimates were observed between the two instruments in 11% of the data. Both instruments produced higher CH2O concentrations than the model in more than 90% of this data set, with a median measured-modeled [CH2O] difference of 0.13 or 0.18 ppbv (depending on the instrument), or about a factor of 2. Such large differences cannot be accounted for by varying model input parameters within their respective uncertainty ranges. After examining the possible reasons for the model-measurement discrepancy, we conclude that there are probably one or more additional unknown sources of CH2O in the North Atlantic troposphere.

  11. Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, G. J.; Fried, A.; Lee, Y.-N.; Wert, B.; Henry, B.; Drummond, J. R.; Evans, M. J.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Goldan, P. D.; Holloway, J. S.; Hübler, G.; Jakoubek, R.; Jobson, B. T.; Knapp, K.; Kuster, W. C.; Roberts, J.; Rudolph, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Stohl, A.; Stroud, C.; Sueper, D. T.; Trainer, M.; Williams, J.

    2002-04-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements from two independent instruments are compared with photochemical box model calculations. The measurements were made on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration P-3 aircraft as part of the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE 97). The data set considered here consists of air masses sampled between 0 and 8 km over the North Atlantic Ocean which do not show recent influence from emissions or transport. These air masses therefore should be in photochemical steady state with respect to CH2O when constrained by the other P-3 measurements, and methane oxidation was expected to be the predominant source of CH2O in these air masses. For this data set both instruments measured identical CH2O concentrations to within 40 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) on average over the 0-800 pptv range, although differences larger than the combined 2σ total uncertainty estimates were observed between the two instruments in 11% of the data. Both instruments produced higher CH2O concentrations than the model in more than 90% of this data set, with a median measured-modeled [CH2O] difference of 0.13 or 0.18 ppbv (depending on the instrument), or about a factor of 2. Such large differences cannot be accounted for by varying model input parameters within their respective uncertainty ranges. After examining the possible reasons for the model-measurement discrepancy, we conclude that there are probably one or more additional unknown sources of CH2O in the North Atlantic troposphere.

  12. Comparison of numerical simulations to experiments for atomization in a jet nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Lelong, Nicolas; Vecellio, Laurent; Sommer de Gélicourt, Yann; Tanguy, Christian; Diot, Patrice; Junqua-Moullet, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The development of jet nebulizers for medical purposes is an important challenge of aerosol therapy. The performance of a nebulizer is characterized by its output rate of droplets with a diameter under 5 µm. However the optimization of this parameter through experiments has reached a plateau. The purpose of this study is to design a numerical model simulating the nebulization process and to compare it with experimental data. Such a model could provide a better understanding of the atomization process and the parameters influencing the nebulizer output. A model based on the Updraft nebulizer (Hudson) was designed with ANSYS Workbench. Boundary conditions were set with experimental data then transient 3D calculations were run on a 4 µm mesh with ANSYS Fluent. Two air flow rate (2 L/min and 8 L/min, limits of the operating range) were considered to account for different turbulence regimes. Numerical and experimental results were compared according to phenomenology and droplet size. The behavior of the liquid was compared to images acquired through shadowgraphy with a CCD Camera. Three experimental methods, laser diffractometry, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) and shadowgraphy were used to characterize the droplet size distributions. Camera images showed similar patterns as numerical results. Droplet sizes obtained numerically are overestimated in relation to PDA and diffractometry, which only consider spherical droplets. However, at both flow rates, size distributions extracted from numerical image processing were similar to distributions obtained from shadowgraphy image processing. The simulation then provides a good understanding and prediction of the phenomena involved in the fragmentation of droplets over 10 µm. The laws of dynamics apply to droplets down to 1 µm, so we can assume the continuity of the distribution and extrapolate the results for droplets between 1 and 10 µm. So, this model could help predicting nebulizer output with defined geometrical and

  13. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived By Diverse Techniques in Two North Atlantic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Livingston, J. M.; McIntosh, D. M.; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, P. V.; Quinn, P. K.; Carrico, C. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo w (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical depths from satellite radiances. Recently, two experiments in the North Atlantic region, TARFOX and ACE-2, determined aerosol w by a variety of techniques. The techniques included fitting of calculated to measured fluxes; retrievals of w from skylight radiances; best fits of complex refractive index to profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution; and in situ measurements of scattering and absorption at the surface and aloft. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 found a fairly wide range of values for w at midvisible wavelengths, with 0.85 less than wmidvis less than 0.99 for the marine aerosol impacted by continental pollution. Frequency distributions of w could usually be approximated by lognormals in wmax-w, with some occurrence of bimodality, suggesting the influence of different aerosol sources or processing. In both TARFOX and ACE-2, closure tests between measured and calculated radiative fluxes yielded best-fit values of wmidvis of 0.90+/-0.04 for the polluted boundary layer. Although these results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and possible artifacts (e.g., unknown gas absorption). The other techniques gave larger values for wmidvis for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of wmidvis = 0.95+/-0.04, Current uncertainties in vv are large in terms of climate effects. More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of humidification effects on w.

  14. Sediment pulses in mountain rivers: 2. Comparison between experiments and numerical predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yantao; Parker, Gary; Pizzuto, James; Lisle, Thomas E.

    2003-09-01

    Mountain rivers in particular are prone to sediment input in the form of pulses rather than a more continuous supply. These pulses often enter in the form of landslides from adjacent hillslopes or debris flows from steeper tributaries. The activities of humans such as timber harvesting, road building, and urban development can increase the frequency of sediment pulses. The question as to how mountain rivers accommodate pulses of sediment thus becomes of practical as well as academic significance. In part 1 [, 2003], the results of three laboratory experiments on sediment pulses are reported. It was found there that the pulses were eliminated from the flume predominantly by dispersion of the topographic high. Significant translation was observed only when the pulse material was substantially finer than the ambient load in the river. Here the laboratory data are used to test a numerical model originally devised for predicting the evolution of sediment pulses in field-scale gravel bed streams. The model successfully reproduces the predominantly dispersive deformation of the experimental pulses. Rates of dispersion are generally underestimated, largely because bed load transport rates are underestimated by the transport equation used in the model. The model reproduces the experimental data best when the pulse is significantly coarser than the ambient sediment. In this case, the model successfully predicts the formation and downstream progradation of a delta that formed in the backwater zone of the pulse in run 3. The performance of the model is less successful when the pulse is composed primarily of sand. This is likely because the bed load equation used in the study is specifically designed for gravel. When the model is adapted to conditions characteristic of large, sand bed rivers with low Froude numbers, it predicts substantial translation of pulses as well as dispersion.

  15. Comparison of prototype and laboratory experiments on MOMA GCMS: results from the AMASE11 campaign.

    PubMed

    Siljeström, Sandra; Freissinet, Caroline; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald; Goetz, Walter; Steele, Andrew; Amundsen, Hans

    2014-09-01

    The characterization of any organic molecules on Mars is a top-priority objective for the ExoMars European Space Agency-Russian Federal Space Agency joint mission. The main instrument for organic analysis on the ExoMars rover is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA). In preparation for the upcoming mission in 2018, different Mars analog samples are studied with MOMA and include samples collected during the Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) to Svalbard, Norway. In this paper, we present results obtained from two different Mars analog sites visited during AMASE11, Colletthøgda and Botniahalvøya. Measurements were performed on the samples during AMASE11 with a MOMA gas chromatograph (GC) prototype connected to a commercial mass spectrometer (MS) and later in home institutions with commercial pyrolysis-GCMS instruments. In addition, derivatization experiments were performed on the samples during AMASE11 and in the laboratory. Three different samples were studied from the Colletthøgda that included one evaporite and two carbonate-bearing samples. Only a single sample was studied from the Botniahalvøya site, a weathered basalt covered by a shiny surface consisting of manganese and iron oxides. Organic molecules were detected in all four samples and included aromatics, long-chained hydrocarbons, amino acids, nucleobases, sugars, and carboxylic acids. Both pyrolysis and derivatization indicated the presence of extinct biota by the detection of carboxylic acids in the samples from Colletthøgda, while the presence of amino acids, nucleobases, carboxylic acids, and sugars indicated an active biota in the sample from Botniahalvøya. The results obtained with the prototype flight model in the field coupled with repeat measurements with commercial instruments within the laboratory were reassuringly similar. This demonstrates the performance of the MOMA instrument and validates that the instrument will aid researchers in their efforts to answer fundamental

  16. Comparison of Numerical Simulations to Experiments for Atomization in a Jet Nebulizer

    PubMed Central

    Lelong, Nicolas; Vecellio, Laurent; Sommer de Gélicourt, Yann; Tanguy, Christian; Diot, Patrice; Junqua-Moullet, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The development of jet nebulizers for medical purposes is an important challenge of aerosol therapy. The performance of a nebulizer is characterized by its output rate of droplets with a diameter under 5 µm. However the optimization of this parameter through experiments has reached a plateau. The purpose of this study is to design a numerical model simulating the nebulization process and to compare it with experimental data. Such a model could provide a better understanding of the atomization process and the parameters influencing the nebulizer output. A model based on the Updraft nebulizer (Hudson) was designed with ANSYS Workbench. Boundary conditions were set with experimental data then transient 3D calculations were run on a 4 µm mesh with ANSYS Fluent. Two air flow rate (2 L/min and 8 L/min, limits of the operating range) were considered to account for different turbulence regimes. Numerical and experimental results were compared according to phenomenology and droplet size. The behavior of the liquid was compared to images acquired through shadowgraphy with a CCD Camera. Three experimental methods, laser diffractometry, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) and shadowgraphy were used to characterize the droplet size distributions. Camera images showed similar patterns as numerical results. Droplet sizes obtained numerically are overestimated in relation to PDA and diffractometry, which only consider spherical droplets. However, at both flow rates, size distributions extracted from numerical image processing were similar to distributions obtained from shadowgraphy image processing. The simulation then provides a good understanding and prediction of the phenomena involved in the fragmentation of droplets over 10 µm. The laws of dynamics apply to droplets down to 1 µm, so we can assume the continuity of the distribution and extrapolate the results for droplets between 1 and 10 µm. So, this model could help predicting nebulizer output with defined geometrical and

  17. A biomechanical comparison of composite femurs and cadaver femurs used in experiments on operated hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Basso, Trude; Klaksvik, Jomar; Syversen, Unni; Foss, Olav A

    2014-12-18

    Fourth generation composite femurs (4GCFs, models #3406 and #3403) simulate femurs of males <80 years with good bone quality. Since most hip fractures occur in old women with fragile bones, concern is raised regarding the use of standard 4GCFs in biomechanical experiments. In this study the stability of hip fracture fixations in 4GCFs was compared to human cadaver femurs (HCFs) selected to represent patients with hip fractures. Ten 4GCFs (Sawbones, Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc., Vashon, WA, USA) were compared to 24 HCFs from seven females and five males >60 years. Proximal femur anthropometric measurements were noted. Strain gauge rosettes were attached and femurs were mounted in a hip simulator applying a combined subject-specific axial load and torque. Baseline measurements of resistance to deformation were recorded. Standardized femoral neck fractures were surgically stabilized before the constructs were subjected to 20,000 load-cycles. An optical motion tracking system measured relative movements. Median (95% CI) head fragment migration was 0.8mm (0.4 to 1.1) in the 4GCF group versus 2.2mm (1.5 to 4.6) in the cadaver group (p=0.001). This difference in fracture stability could not be explained by observed differences in femoral anthropometry or potential overloading of 4GCFs. 4GCFs failed with fracture-patterns different from those observed in cadavers. To conclude, standard 4GCFs provide unrealistically stable bone-implant constructs and fail with fractures not observed in cadavers. Until a validated osteopenic or osteoporotic composite femur model is provided, standard 4GCFs should only be used when representing the biomechanical properties of young healthy femurs. PMID:25468304

  18. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase III: Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate a technique by which erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters of the magnetic-layer type can be eliminated has been completed. The first principles of the technique, now known as "magnetic shielding," were derived based on the findings of numerical simulations in 2-D axisymmetric geometry. The simulations, in turn, guided the modification of an existing 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster. This magnetically shielded (MS) thruster was then built and tested. Because neither theory nor experiment alone can validate fully the first principles of the technique, the objective of the 2-yr effort was twofold: (1) to demonstrate in the laboratory that the erosion rates can be reduced by >order of magnitude, and (2) to demonstrate that the near-wall plasma properties can be altered according to the theoretical predictions. This paper concludes the demonstration of magnetic shielding by reporting on a wide range of comparisons between results from numerical simulations and laboratory diagnostics. Collectively, we find that the comparisons validate the theory. Near the walls of the MS thruster, theory and experiment agree: (1) the plasma potential has been sustained at values near the discharge voltage, and (2) the electron temperature has been lowered by at least 2.5-3 times compared to the unshielded (US) thruster. Also, based on carbon deposition measurements, the erosion rates at the inner and outer walls of the MS thruster are found to be lower by at least 2300 and 1875 times, respectively. Erosion was so low along these walls that the rates were below the resolution of the profilometer. Using a sputtering yield model with an energy threshold of 25 V, the simulations predict a reduction of 600 at the MS inner wall. At the outer wall ion energies are computed to be below 25 V, for which case we set the erosion to zero in the simulations. When a 50-V threshold is used the computed ion energies are below the threshold at both

  19. Comparison of Calculated and Measured Neutron Fluence in Fuel/Cladding Irradiation Experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James

    2011-01-01

    A recently-designed thermal neutron irradiation facility has been used for a first series of irradiations of PWR fuel pellets in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since June 2010, irradiations of PWR fuel pellets made of UN or UO{sub 2}, clad in SiC, have been ongoing in the outer small VXF sites in the beryllium reflector region of the HFIR, as seen in Fig. 1. HFIR is a versatile, 85 MW isotope production and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light-water-cooled and -moderated, flux-trap type reactor that uses highly enriched (in {sup 235}U) uranium (HEU) as the fuel. The reactor core consists of a series of concentric annular regions, each about 2 ft (0.61 m) high. A 5-in. (12.70-cm)-diam hole, referred to as the flux trap, forms the center of the core. The fuel region is composed of two concentric fuel elements made up of many involute-shaped fuel plates: an inner element that contains 171 fuel plates, and an outer element that contains 369 fuel plates. The fuel plates are curved in the shape of an involute, which provides constant coolant channel width between plates. The fuel (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermet) is nonuniformly distributed along the arc of the involute to minimize the radial peak-to-average power density ratio. A burnable poison (B{sub 4}C) is included in the inner fuel element primarily to reduce the negative reactivity requirements of the reactor control plates. A typical HEU core loading in HFIR is 9.4 kg of {sup 235}U and 2.8 g of {sup 10}B. The thermal neutron flux in the flux trap region can exceed 2.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s while the fast flux in this region exceeds 1 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The inner and outer fuel elements are in turn surrounded by a concentric ring of beryllium reflector approximately 1 ft (0.30 m) thick. The beryllium reflector consists of three regions

  20. Simulations of inorganic-bioorganic interfaces to discover new materials: insights, comparisons to experiment, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Hendrik; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi

    2016-01-21

    Natural and man-made materials often rely on functional interfaces between inorganic and organic compounds. Examples include skeletal tissues and biominerals, drug delivery systems, catalysts, sensors, separation media, energy conversion devices, and polymer nanocomposites. Current laboratory techniques are limited to monitor and manipulate assembly on the 1 to 100 nm scale, time-consuming, and costly. Computational methods have become increasingly reliable to understand materials assembly and performance. This review explores the merit of simulations in comparison to experiment at the 1 to 100 nm scale, including connections to smaller length scales of quantum mechanics and larger length scales of coarse-grain models. First, current simulation methods, advances in the understanding of chemical bonding, in the development of force fields, and in the development of chemically realistic models are described. Then, the recognition mechanisms of biomolecules on nanostructured metals, semimetals, oxides, phosphates, carbonates, sulfides, and other inorganic materials are explained, including extensive comparisons between modeling and laboratory measurements. Depending on the substrate, the role of soft epitaxial binding mechanisms, ion pairing, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions, and conformation effects is described. Applications of the knowledge from simulation to predict binding of ligands and drug molecules to the inorganic surfaces, crystal growth and shape development, catalyst performance, as well as electrical properties at interfaces are examined. The quality of estimates from molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations is validated in comparison to measurements and design rules described where available. The review further describes applications of simulation methods to polymer composite materials, surface modification of nanofillers, and interfacial interactions in building materials. The complexity of functional multiphase materials creates

  1. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release from

  2. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-11-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  3. HTR-2014 Paper Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2001-10-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict fission product release from tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements provided data on release of fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of fission products in the compacts outside of the SiC layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of these fission products was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed silicon carbide (SiC) layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of about two, corresponding to an over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of about 100. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by an average of about an order of magnitude, which could additionally be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 30%. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-estimated by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release from intact particles varied considerably from compact to compact, making it difficult to assess the effective over-estimation of the diffusivities. Furthermore, the release of strontium from particles with failed SiC is difficult to observe experimentally due to the release from intact particles, preventing any conclusions to be made on the accuracy or validity of the

  4. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts andmore » fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  5. Comparison and modeling of effects of normal and reduced precipitation supply in field experiment with spring barley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohanková, Eva; Orság, Matěj; Fischer, Milan; Hlavinka, Petr

    2015-04-01

    This paper evaluates two-year (2013 and 2014) results of field experiments with spring barley (cultivar Bojos) under reduced precipitation supply. The field experiments were carried out at the experimental station in Domanínek (Czech Republic; 49°31,470'N, 16°14,400'E, altitude 530 m a.s.l.) and conducted by Institute of Agrosystems and bioclimatology at Mendel Univerzity in Brno in cooperation with Global Change Research Centre AS CR. The field experiments consisted of small plots in two variants and three repetitions. The first variant was uncovered the second was partially covered to exclude rain through out the whole vegetation season. For the partial covering of the plot, a material which transmits solar radiation and diverts rainwater away from the percentage coverage of the plots was used. In 2013, the covered area of the experimental plot was 30%, and in 2014, it was 70%. The main aim was to determine whether there are any differences in the spring barley's development, growth and yield in the uncovered and the partially covered plots, and a comparison of the results. Firstly, differences of key parameters (seasonal dynamics of the leaf area index and above ground biomass, soil water content, yield components and yields) compared; secondly, the results of the field experiments served as input data for the crop growth model DAISY. Subsequently, the crop growth model' ability to simulate crop growth and crop development which were affected by the drought stress was explored. The results were assessed using the following statistical indexes: root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias error (MBE). This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought" No. CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0248, NAZV-JPI - project supported by Czech National Agency of Agricultural Research No. QJ1310123 "Crop modelling as a tool for increasing the production potential and food security of the Czech Republic under Climate Change" and project LD

  6. Effects of upward and downward social comparison information on the efficacy of an appearance-based sun protection intervention: a randomized, controlled experiment

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, James A.; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X.

    2010-01-01

    This experiment examined the impact of adding upward and/or downward social comparison information on the efficacy of an appearance-based sun protection intervention (UV photos and photoaging information). Southern California college students (N = 126) were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: control, intervention, intervention plus upward social comparison, intervention plus downward social comparison. The results demonstrated that all those who received the basic UV photo/photoaging intervention reported greater perceived susceptibility to photoaging (d = .74), less favorable tanning cognitions (d = .44), and greater intentions to sun protect (d = 1.32) relative to controls. Of more interest, while the basic intervention increased sun protective behavior during the subsequent 5 weeks relative to controls (d = .44), the addition of downward comparison information completely negated this benefit. Upward comparison information produced sun protection levels that were only slightly (and nonsignificantly) greater than in the basic intervention condition and, as such, does not appear to be a cost-effective addition. Possible mechanisms that may have reduced the benefits of upward comparison information and contributed to the undermining effects of downward comparison information are discussed. PMID:20652391

  7. Choice of experimental venue matters in ecotoxicology studies: Comparison of a laboratory-based and an outdoor mesocosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Imrei, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2015-10-01

    The heavy application of pesticides and its potential effects on natural communities has attracted increasing attention to inadvertent impacts of these chemicals. Toxicologists conventionally use laboratory-based tests to assess lethal concentrations of pesticides. However, these tests often do not take into account indirect, interactive and long-term effects, and tend to ignore different rates of disintegration in the laboratory and under natural conditions. Our aim was to investigate the importance of the experimental venue for ecotoxicology tests. We reared tadpoles of the agile frog (Rana dalmatina) in the laboratory and in outdoor mesocosms and exposed them to three initial concentrations of a glyphosate-based herbicide (0, 2 and 6.5 mg a.e./L glyphosate), and to the presence or absence of caged predators (dragonfly larvae). The type of experimental venue had a large effect on the outcome: The herbicide was less lethal to tadpoles reared in outdoor mesocosms than in the laboratory. Further, while the herbicide had a negative effect on development time and on body mass in the laboratory, tadpoles exposed to the herbicide in mesocosms were larger at metamorphosis and developed faster in comparison to those reared in the absence of the herbicide. The effect of the herbicide on morphological traits of tadpoles also differed between the two venues. Finally, in the presence of the herbicide, tadpoles tended to be more active and to stay closer to the bottom of laboratory containers, while tadpole behaviour shifted in the opposite direction in outdoor mesocosms. Our results demonstrate major discrepancies between results of a classic laboratory-based ecotoxicity test and outcomes of an experiment performed in outdoor mesocosms. Consequently, the use of standard laboratory tests may have to be reconsidered and their benefits carefully weighed against the difficulties of performing experiments under more natural conditions. Tests validating experimentally estimated

  8. Comparison of benefit–risk preferences of patients and physicians regarding cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors using discrete choice experiments

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Ji-Hye; Kwon, Sun-Hong; Lee, Ji-Eun; Cheon, Ji-Eun; Jang, Eun-Jin; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate and compare benefit–risk preferences among Korean patients and physicians concerning cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) inhibitor treatments for arthritis. Materials and methods Subjects included 100 patients with arthritis and 60 board-certified orthopedic surgeon physicians in South Korea. Through a systematic review of the literature, beneficial attributes of using Cox-2 inhibitors were defined as a decrease in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index for pain score and improvement in physical function. Likewise, risk attributes included upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications and cardiovascular (CV) adverse events. Discrete choice experiments were used to determine preferences for these four attributes among Korean patients and physicians. Relative importance and maximum acceptable risk for improving beneficial attributes were assessed by analyzing the results of the discrete choice experiment by using a conditional logit model. Results Patients ranked the relative importance of benefit–risk attributes as follows: pain reduction (35.2%); physical function improvement (30.0%); fewer CV adverse events (21.5%); fewer GI complications (13.4%). The physicians’ ranking for the same attributes was as follows: fewer CV (33.5%); pain reduction (32.4%); fewer GI complications (18.1%); physical function improvement (16.0%). Patients were more willing than physicians to accept risks when pain improved from 20% or 45% to 55% and physical function improved from 15% or 35% to 45%. Conclusion We confirmed that patients and physicians had different benefit–risk preferences regarding Cox-2 inhibitors. Patients with arthritis prioritized the benefits of Cox-2 inhibitors over the risks; moreover, in comparison with the physicians, arthritis patients were more willing to accept the trade-off between benefits and risks to achieve the best treatment level. To reduce the preference gap and achieve treatment goals, physicians must better

  9. Comparisons of Derived Metrics from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanned Images of Fluvial Sediment from Gravel-Bed Flume Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, Hal; Ahmed, Sharif; Hodge, Rebecca; Leyland, Julian; Sear, David

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty in bedload estimates for gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize arrangement, orientation and resultant forces of fluvial sediment in river beds. Water working of grains leads to structural differences between areas of the bed through particle sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. In this study, non-destructive, micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging in 3D is used to visualize, quantify and assess the internal geometry of sections of a flume bed that have been extracted keeping their fabric intact. Flume experiments were conducted at 1:1 scaling of our prototype river. From the volume, center of mass, points of contact, and protrusion of individual grains derived from 3D scan data we estimate 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and local grain exposure. Here metrics are derived for images from two flume experiments: one with a bed of coarse grains (>4mm) and the other where sand and clay were incorporated into the coarse flume bed. In addition to deriving force networks, comparison of metrics such as critical shear stress, pivot angles, grain distributions, principle axis orientation, and pore space over depth are made. This is the first time bed stability has been studied in 3D using CT scanned images of sediment from the bed surface to depths well into the subsurface. The derived metrics, inter-granular relationships and characterization of bed structures will lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty, as well as improved understanding of relationships between sediment structure, grain size distribution and channel topography.

  10. Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in anExperimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFDPredictions

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaraman, Buvaneswari; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Sohn, MichaelD.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Price, Phillip N.; Wood, Emily E.; Sextro,Richard G.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2006-01-01

    We compare computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions using a steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model with experimental data on airflow and pollutant dispersion under mixed-convection conditions in a 7 x 9 x 11m high experimental facility. The Rayleigh number, based on height, was O(10{sup 11}) and the atrium was mechanically ventilated. We released tracer gas in the atrium and measured the spatial distribution of concentrations; we then modeled the experiment using four different levels of modeling detail. The four computational models differ in the choice of temperature boundary conditions and the choice of turbulence model. Predictions from a low-Reynolds-number k-{var_epsilon} model with detailed boundary conditions agreed well with the data using three different model-measurement comparison metrics. Results from the same model with a single temperature prescribed for each wall also agreed well with the data. Predictions of a standard k-{var_epsilon} model were about the same as those of an isothermal model; neither performed well. Implications of the results for practical applications are discussed.

  11. Biomechanical comparison of different combinations of hook and screw in one spine motion unit - an experiment in porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The biomechanical performance of the hooks and screws in spinal posterior instrumentation is not well-characterized. Screw-bone interface failure at the uppermost and lowermost vertebrae is not uncommon. Some have advocated for the use of supplement hooks to prevent screw loosening. However, studies describing methods for combined hook and screw systems that fully address the benefits of these systems are lacking. Thus, the choice of which implant to use in a given case is often based solely on a surgeon’s experience instead of on the biomechanical features and advantages of each device. Methods We conducted a biomechanical comparison of devices instrumented with different combinations of hooks and screws. Thirty-six fresh low thoracic porcine spines were assigned to three groups (12 per group) according to the configuration used for of fixation: (1) pedicle screw; (2) lamina hook and (3) combination of pedicle screw and lamina hook. Axial pullout tests backward on transverse plane in the direction normal to the rods were performed using a material testing machine and a specially designed grip with self-aligned function. Results The pullout force for the pedicle screws group was significantly greater than for the hooks and the combination (p < 0.05). However, no significant difference was found between the hooks and the combination (p > 0.05). Conclusions Pedicle screws achieve the maximal pullout strength for spinal posterior instrumentation. PMID:24913189

  12. A comparison of airborne and ground-based radar observations with rain gages during the CaPE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satake, Makoto; Short, David A.; Iguchi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    The vicinity of KSC, where the primary ground truth site of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) program is located, was the focal point of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment in Jul. and Aug. 1991. In addition to several specialized radars, local coverage was provided by the C-band (5 cm) radar at Patrick AFB. Point measurements of rain rate were provided by tipping bucket rain gage networks. Besides these ground-based activities, airborne radar measurements with X- and Ka-band nadir-looking radars on board an aircraft were also recorded. A unique combination data set of airborne radar observations with ground-based observations was obtained in the summer convective rain regime of central Florida. We present a comparison of these data intending a preliminary validation. A convective rain event was observed simultaneously by all three instrument types on the evening of 27 Jul. 1991. The high resolution aircraft radar was flown over convective cells with tops exceeding 10 km and observed reflectivities of 40 to 50 dBZ at 4 to 5 km altitude, while the low resolution surface radar observed 35 to 55 dBZ echoes and a rain gage indicated maximum surface rain rates exceeding 100 mm/hr. The height profile of reflectivity measured with the airborne radar show an attenuation of 6.5 dB/km (two way) for X-band, corresponding to a rainfall rate of 95 mm/hr.

  13. A comparison of airborne and ground-based radar observations with rain gages during the CaPE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satake, Makoto; Short, David A.; Iguchi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    The vicinity of KSC, where the primary ground truth site of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) program is located, was the focal point of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment in July and Aug. 1991. In addition to several specialized radars, local coverage was provided by the C-band (5 cm) radar at Patrick AFB. Point measurements of rain rate were provided by tipping bucket rain gage networks. Besides these ground-based activities, airborne radar measurements with X- and Ka-band nadir-looking radars on board an aircraft were also recorded. A unique combination data set of airborne radar observations with ground-based observations was obtained in the summer convective rain regime of central Florida. We present a comparison of these data intending a preliminary validation. A convective rain event was observed simultaneously by all three instrument types on the evening of 27 July 1991. The high resolution aircraft radar was flown over convective cells with tops exceeding 10 km and observed reflectivities of 40 to 50 dBZ at 4 to 5 km altitude, while the low resolution surface radar observed 35 to 55 dBZ echoes and a rain gage indicated maximum surface rain rates exceeding 100 mm/hr. The height profile of reflectivity measured with the airborne radar show an attenuation of 6.5 dB/km (two way) for X-band, corresponding to a rainfall rate of 95 mm/hr.

  14. Comparison of Dental Caries Experience in Children Suffering From Epilepsy with and without Administration of Long Term Liquid Oral Medication

    PubMed Central

    Bhadravathi, Manjunath Chaluvaiah; Kumar, Adarsh; Narang, Ridhi; Gupta, Ambika; Singh, Harneet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sucrose is added as sweetening agent in liquid oral medication (LOM) to mask the acrid taste of medicines which may be potentially cariogenic. Many children under long term LOM therapy for treatment of epilepsy may be susceptible to dental caries. Aim To assess and compare dental caries experience in children under long term liquid oral medication with those not under such medication among 2-12 years old children suffering from epilepsy. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken on a total of 84 children aged 2–12 years, who were suffering from epilepsy receiving liquid oral medication for more than 3 months were selected (study group) and for comparison 106 children of similar age group and disease but on other forms of medication were included as control group. Dental caries was assessed using DMFT/DMFS (Decayed, Missing, Fillled Teeth / Surfaces), dmft/dft and dmfs/dfs indices. One-way ANOVA and t-test were used with p-value fixed at 0.05. Univariate logistic regression was applied. Results Children on LOM were at increased risk of dental caries than those with other forms of medications (OR: 2.55, 95% CI (2.37-4.15) p=0.000, HS). Caries prevalence was high in the study group (76.1%) when compared to control group (55.6%). Conclusion Long term use of liquid medicines containing sucrose is a risk factor for dental caries among children with epilepsy. PMID:27504416

  15. Cylindrical magnetization model for glass-coated microwires with circumferential anisotropy: Comparison with experiments and skin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrejon, J.; Thiaville, A.; Adenot-Engelvin, A.-L.; Vazquez, M.

    2014-05-01

    The present manuscript represents the third part of a series of studies about a continuous micromagnetic model for amorphous microwires with non-uniform magnetic structure (Torrejon et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 323 (2011) 283; Torrejon et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 333 (2013) 144). Here we compare the predictions of this model with experiments, and show the validity of this approach when a uniform magnetic structure in the microwire cannot be considered. The analyzed microwires exhibit ultrasoft magnetic behaviour and negative magnetostriction, with a non-uniform magnetic structure composed of an axially magnetized inner core exchange-coupled with a circumferentially magnetized outer shell. The static properties were obtained by magnetometry. The high frequency response, axial permeability, was measured from a conventional single coil permeameter connected to a network analyzer. The microwave response is strongly affected by skin effect, which therefore needs to be taken into account for comparison with theory. The validity of the continuous model is proved through the experimental dependence of the permeability on axial static field. Finally, the efficient dynamic magnetization is evaluated from the imaginary component of permeability.

  16. Biomechanical comparison of straight and helical compression plates for fixation of transverse and oblique bone fractures: Modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Sezek, Sinan; Aksakal, Bunyamin; Gürger, Murat; Malkoc, Melih; Say, Y

    2016-08-12

    Total deformation and stability of straight and helical compression plates were studied by means of the finite element method (FEM) and in vitro biomechanical experiments. Fixations of transverse (TF) and oblique (45°) bone (OF) fractures have been analyzed on sheep tibias by designing the straight compression (SP) and Helical Compression Plate (HP) models. The effects of axial compression, bending and torsion loads on both plating systems were analyzed in terms of total displacements. Numerical models and experimental models suggested that under compression loadings, bone fracture gap closures for both fracture types were found to be in the favor of helical plate designs. The helical plate (HP) fixations provided maximum torsional resistance compared to the (SP) fixations. The fracture gap closure and stability of helical plate fixation for transverse fractures was determined to be higher than that found for the oblique fractures. The comparison of average compression stress, bending and torsion moments showed that the FEM and experimental results are in good agreement and such designs are likely to have a positive impact in future bone fracture fixation designs. PMID:27567775

  17. Abinitio calculations of the spectral shapes of CO2 isolated lines including non-Voigt effects and comparisons with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J.-M.; Tran, H.; Ngo, N. H.; Landsheere, X.; Chelin, P.; Lu, Y.; Liu, A.-W.; Hu, S.-M.; Gianfrani, L.; Casa, G.; Castrillo, A.; Lepère, M.; Delière, Q.; Dhyne, M.; Fissiaux, L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a fully ab initio model and calculations of the spectral shapes of absorption lines in a pure molecular gas under conditions where the influences of collisions and of the Doppler effect are significant. Predictions of the time dependence of dipole autocorrelation functions (DACFs) are made for pure CO2 at room temperature using requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. These are carried, free of any adjusted parameter, on the basis of an accurate anisotropic intermolecular potential. The Fourier-Laplace transforms of these DACFs then yield calculated spectra which are analyzed, as some measured ones, through fits using Voigt line profiles. Comparisons between theory and various experiments not only show that the main line-shape parameters (Lorentz pressure-broadening coefficients) are accurately predicted, but that subtle observed non-Voigt features are also quantitatively reproduced by the model. These successes open renewed perspectives for the understanding of the mechanisms involved (translational-velocity and rotational-state changes and their dependences on the molecular speed) and the quantification of their respective contributions. The proposed model should also be of great help for the test of widely used empirical line-shape models and, if needed, the construction of more physically based ones.

  18. Spatial distribution of protons at high and low altitudes in the radiation belts. Comparison of theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Panasyuk, M.I.; Reizman, S.Y.; Sosnovets, E.N.

    1986-05-01

    A comparative analysis of experimental data on the spatial distributions of protons with energies (E) greater than 0.1 MeV at high and low latitudes, which were obtained on the Molniya-1, Kosmos-900, Elektron, and 1964-45A satellites, is carried out. As a result of the comparison of the experimental data relating to the measurements of protons with E - 0.2 MeV with the calculation including radial drift of particles under the action of electric and magnetic field fluctuations, it is shown that radial diffusion with a diffusion coefficient independent of geomagnetic latitude is the primary mechanism shaping the spatial distributions of protons at geomagnetic latitudes up to ..lambda.. approx. = 40/sup 0/. The results of the experiments and the calculations agree under the assumption of both magnetic and electric diffusion, but the latter case requires the inclusion of the model of a spatially inhomogeneous convection electric field. At ..lambda.. greater than or equal to 50/sup 0/ pitchangle scattering makes the primary contribution to the shaping of the spatial structure of the protons at low altitudes. A value of 2 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 4 is obtained for the exponent of the slope of the radial distribution of cold electrons N /sub e/ (r)..cap alpha.. /sup -n/ at 2 less than or equal to L less than or equal to 4.

  19. Defect printability of ArF alternative phase-shift mask: a critical comparison of simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Ken; Komizo, Tooru; Ohnuma, Hidetoshi

    2002-07-01

    An alternative phase shift mask (alt-PSM) is a promising device for extending optical lithography to finer design rules. There have been few reports, however, on the mask's ability to identify phase defects. We report here an alt-PSM of a single-trench type with undercut for ArF exposure, with programmed phase defects used to evaluate defect printability by measuring aerial images with a Zeiss MSM193 measuring system. The experimental results are simulated using the TEMPEST program. First, a critical comparison of the simulation and the experiment is conducted. The actual measured topographies of quartz defects are used in the simulation. Moreover, a general simulation study on defect printability using an alt-PSM for ArF exposure is conducted. The defect dimensions, which produce critical CD errors, are determined by simulation that takes into account the full 3-dimensional structure of phase defects as well as a simplified structure. The critical dimensions of an isolated bump defect identified by the alt-PSM of a single-trench type with undercut for ArF exposure are 300 nm in bottom dimension and 74 degrees in height (phase) for the real shape, where the depth of wet-etching is 100 nm and the CD error limit is +/- 5 percent.

  20. Comparison of Hydraulic Methods and Tracer Experiments as Applied to the Development of Conceptual Models for Discrete Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakowski, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    The development of conceptual models for solute migration in discrete fracture networks has typically been based on a combination of core logs, borehole geophysics, and some form of single-well hydraulic test using discrete zones. More rarely, interwell hydraulic tests and interwell tracer experiments are utilised to directly explore potential transport pathways. The latter methods are less widely employed simply due to potentially significant increases in the cost and effort in site characterization. To date however there is a paucity of literature comparing the efficacy of the standard procedure with what should be more definitive identification of transport pathways using interwell methods. In the present study, a detailed comparison is conducted by developing conceptual models from three separate data sets, the first based on core logs, geology and single-well hydraulic tests, the second based on a large suite of pulse interference tests, and the third based on a series of radially-divergent and injection-withdrawal tracer experiments. The study was conducted in an array of five HQ-sized wells, 28-32 m in depth and arranged in a five star pattern, 10 m on a side. The wells penetrate the contact between a Cambrian-aged limestone, and underlying Precambrian gneiss. The core was logged for potentially open fractures using a ranking system, and 87 contiguous hydraulic tests were conducted using a 0.85-m packer spacing. A total of 57 pulse interference tests were conducted using two wells as injection points, and 11 tracer experiments were conducted using either sample collection or in-situ detection via a submersible fluorometer. The results showed very distinct conceptual models depending on the data set, with the model based on the single-well testing significantly over-predicting the number and connection of solute transport pathways. The results of the pulse interference tests also over predict the transport pathways, but to a lesser degree. Quantification of

  1. NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates: 3-D Characterization and Comparison of Vegetation Structure in a Tropical Premontane Wet Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington-Allen, R. A.; Davis, K.; Falkowski, T.; Tarbox, B.; Delgado, A.; March, R.; Moore, G. W.; Tjoelker, M.; Gonzalez, E.; Houser, C.

    2011-12-01

    This National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) site hosted by Texas A&M University to allow selected undergraduate students to conduct original research on various aspects of the ecohydrology of understudied tropical pre-montane forest at the Texas A&M Soltis Center for Research and Education in Central Costa Rica. This particular study was conducted by 3 students under the guidance of 5 mentors who assisted in experimental design, equipment use, maintenance, and training, plant species identification and other logistical requirements. The goal of this study was to determine the change in 3-D structure of tropical premontane wet forest under 3 different land uses: a carbon tree farm, secondary logged forest, and primary unlogged forest. Traditional forest mensuration techniques including glass prisms (stand basal area), laser clinometers (height), vertical and horizontal PAR, spherical densiometers, and hemispherical photography (GAP fraction and LAI) and, root cores, and diameter-at-breast height (DBH) tapes were acquired in one 30-m diameter plot per land and use compared to similar metrics collected by a terrestrial scanning laser (TSL) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) at 400 MHz and 1.5 GHz across 3 land uses along an elevation gradient from ~380-masl to 525-masl. Besides discovery, another goal of this study was to see if the TSL and GPR can help meet the Tier 2 and 3 monitoring and verification goals of the United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries for estimating above- and below-ground biomass using remote sensing. This is of particular importance because the GPR may be able to capture below-ground biomass in a more efficient manner than traditional coring and the TSL and GPR can capture data on highly sloped terrain where both airborne and satellite RADAR and LIDAR are limited. The 50, 000 pts/sec 532 nm TSL collected 3 to 5 scans per

  2. Ground-based microwave monitoring of middle atmosphere ozone: Comparison to lidar and Stratospheric and Gas Experiment 2 satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, J. J.; Connor, Brian J.; Parrish, Alan; Mcdermid, I. Stuart; Chu, William P.

    1995-01-01

    A dedicated ground-based microwave radiometer was in operation to monitor the middle atmospheric ozone concentration at Table Mountain Facility (TMF) of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California (34.4 deg N, 117.7 deg W) from July 1989 to June 1992, as a part of the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change. Ozone profiles from 56 to 0.04 mbar (approximately 20 - 70 km) were retrieved from the microwave data. The focus in this paper is to validate the microwave ozone observations from 56 to 1 mbar by comparing the results from a JPL ground-based lidar located at the same site and from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) satellite overpasses within 1000 km of TMF and to examine the ability of these instruments to detect short-term, seasonal, and annual variations in ozone. The profile comparison results show that the mean differences of microwave ozone from lidar and SAGE 2 are about 5% or less and the root-mean-square scatter about the mean is mainly from the precision of the instruments. A correlation analysis of ozone time series suggests highly significant correlations up to 2.4 mbar between lidar and microwave measurements and up to 1 mbar between SAGE 2 and microwave. The short-term and seasonal variation of the ozone profile seen in the microwave measurements is shown to be consistent with the observations of lidar and SAGE 2, and the interannual variation of ozone appears to be detectable within an accuracy of a few percent with the microwave instrument.

  3. Ground-based microwave monitoring of middle atmosphere ozone: Comparison to lidar and Stratospheric and Gas Experiment 2 satellite observations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.J.; Connor, B.J.; Parrish, A.; Mcdermid, I.S.; Chu, W.P. |||

    1995-02-01

    A dedicated ground-based microwave radiometer was in operation to monitor the middle atmospheric ozone concentration at Table Mountain Facility (TMF) of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California (34.4 deg N, 117.7 deg W) from July 1989 to June 1992, as a part of the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change. Ozone profiles from 56 to 0.04 mbar (approximately 20 - 70 km) were retrieved from the microwave data. The focus in this paper is to validate the microwave ozone observations from 56 to 1 mbar by comparing the results from a JPL ground-based lidar located at the same site and from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) satellite overpasses within 1000 km of TMF and to examine the ability of these instruments to detect short-term, seasonal, and annual variations in ozone. The profile comparison results show that the mean differences of microwave ozone from lidar and SAGE 2 are about 5% or less and the root-mean-square scatter about the mean is mainly from the precision of the instruments. A correlation analysis of ozone time series suggests highly significant correlations up to 2.4 mbar between lidar and microwave measurements and up to 1 mbar between SAGE 2 and microwave. The short-term and seasonal variation of the ozone profile seen in the microwave measurements is shown to be consistent with the observations of lidar and SAGE 2, and the interannual variation of ozone appears to be detectable within an accuracy of a few percent with the microwave instrument.

  4. Comparison of 2D and 3D Numerical Models with Experiments of Tsunami Flow through a Built Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVeque, R. J.; Motley, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    A series of tsunami wave basin experiments of flow through a scale model of Seaside, Oregon have been used as validation data for a 2015 benchmarking workshop hosted by the National Tsunami Mitigation Program, which focused on better understanding the ability of tsunami models to predict flow velocities and inundation depths following a coastal inundation event. As researchers begin to assess the safety of coastal infrastructures, proper assessment of tsunami-induced forces on coastal structures is critical. Hydrodynamic forces on these structures are fundamentally proportional to the local momentum flux of the fluid, and experimental data included momentum flux measurements at many instrumented gauge locations. The GeoClaw tsunami model, which solves the two-dimensional shallow water equations, was compared against other codes during the benchmarking workshop, and more recently a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model using the open-source OpenFOAM software has been developed and results from this model are being compared with both the experimental data and the 2D GeoClaw results. In addition, the 3D model allows for computation of fluid forces on the faces of structures, permitting an investigation of the common use of momentum flux as a proxy for these forces. This work aims to assess the potential to apply these momentum flux predictions locally within the model to determine tsunami-induced forces on critical structures. Difficulties in working with these data sets and cross-model comparisons will be discussed. Ultimately, application of the more computationally efficient GeoClaw model, informed by the 3D OpenFOAM models, to predict forces on structures at the community scale can be expected to improve the safety and resilience of coastal communities.

  5. Monitoring transport conditions of key comparison travelling standards using a data logger. Experiences from key comparison CCAUV.U-K3.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Julian; Koch, Christian

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of the international key comparison CCAUV.U-K3.1, a data logger was used to monitor temperature, pressure, humidity, and acceleration during transportation of an artefact travelling between participating laboratories. From the recorded data, environmental conditions of different kinds of transportation have been investigated and corresponding recommendations for the safe and proper transfer of artefacts between laboratories could be deduced. Transportation by courier services bears the risk of strong mechanical shocks and exposure to comparably high or low temperatures due to inappropriate handling or storage and is thus only suitable for insensitive or well-packed artefacts. Quite low temperatures (T  ≈  5 °C) have been observed in the cargo area during flights, so that hand-carrying of an artefact with transportation in the passenger cabin during flights is recommended, particularly for temperature-sensitive artefacts. Significant decreases of the pressure (p  ≈  750 mbar) have been recorded both for transportation in the passenger cabin and in the cargo area. Air-tight packing is thus recommended for pressure-sensitive devices. In general, the suitability of a data logger to provide evidence of the transport conditions during a key comparison has been demonstrated and the use of such a device is recommended for all key comparisons. The data logger has also been successfully employed to validate the protection properties of the passively insulating packaging of the artefact against pressure and temperature changes.

  6. Bromine Explosions In Smog Chamber Experiments: A comparison of Cavity-Enhanced (CE) and White-cell DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxmann, J.; Hoch, D. J.; Sihler, H.; Pöhler, D.; Platt, U.; Bleicher, S.; Balzer, N.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS), such as Cl, Br or BrO, can significantly influence chemical processes in the troposphere, including the destruction of ozone, change in the chemical balance of hydrogen radicals (OH, HO2), increased deposition of toxic compounds (like mercury) with potential consequences for the global climate. Previous studies have shown that salt lakes can be significant sources for gaseous RHS. Environmental conditions such as salt composition, relative humidity (RH), pH, and temperature (T) can strongly influence reactive bromine levels, but are difficult to quantify in the field. Therefore, we conducted laboratory experiments by exposing NaCl salt containing 0.33% (by weight) NaBr to simulated sunlight in a Teflon smog-chamber under various conditions of RH and ozone concentrations. BrO levels were observed by a Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectrometer (DOAS) in combination with a multi-reflection cell (White-cell). The concentrations of OH- and Cl- radicals were quantified by the radical clock method. We present the first direct observation of BrO from the "Bromine Explosion" (auto catalytic release of reactive bromine from salt surfaces - key to ozone destruction) in the laboratory above a simulated salt pan. The maximum BrO mixing ratio of 6419±71 ppt at 60% RH was observed to be one order of magnitude higher than at 37% RH and 2% RH. The release of RHS from the salt pan is possibly controlled by the thickness of the quasi liquid layer, covering the reactive surface of the halide crystals, as the layer thickness strongly depends on RH. Furthermore, a new cavity enhanced DOAS (CE-DOAS) instrument was designed and successfully used in chamber experiments. For the first time, such an instrument uses a spectral interval in the UV - wavelength range (325-365 nm) to identify BrO. We show a comparison of the CE-DOAS and White-cell DOAS instrument in a series of experiments, where e.g. a peak BrO mixing ratio up to 380 ppt within the first

  7. Meaning-Making in Memories: A Comparison of Memories of Death-Related and Low Point Life Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackay, Michael M.; Bluck, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Because of their extensive experience with death and dying, hospice volunteers may be more successful at engaging in meaning-making regarding their death-related experiences than their low point life experiences (e.g., job loss). Consequently, their memories of death-related experiences will manifest more meaning-making strategies (e.g.,…

  8. The development of a Krook model for nonlocal transport in laser produced plasmas II. Comparisons with Fokker Planck, experiment and other models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombant, Denis; Manheimer, Wallace

    2008-11-01

    The Krook model described in the previous talk has been incorporated into a fluid simulation. These fluid simulations are then compared with Fokker Planck simulations and also with a recent NRL Nike experiment. We also examine several other models for electron energy transport that have been used in laser fusion research. As regards comparison with Fokker Planck simulation, the Krook model gives better agreement than the other models, especially in the time asymptotic limit. As regards the NRL experiment, all models except one give reasonable agreement.

  9. Super-thermal particles in hot plasmas—Kinetic models, numerical solution strategies, and comparison to tokamak experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauber, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    The excitation of collective instabilities by super-thermal particles in hot plasmas and the related transport processes attract increasing interest due to their fundamental challenges for theoretical models and their practical importance for burning fusion plasmas. In fact, the physics of a self-heated thermonuclear plasma due to fusion-born 3.5 MeV α-particles is one of the most important outstanding fundamental research topics on the way to a fusion power plant with magnetic confinement. Within the last 10 years significant advances on both the theoretical and the experimental sides have been made leading to a more detailed and quantitative understanding of fast-particle-driven instabilities. On the theoretical side, the crucial step was to move from fluid models for the plasma background with a hybrid kinetic expression for the energetic particles to a fully kinetic model for all the plasma species, i.e. background ions, background electrons, and fast ions. This improvement allows one to describe consistently the resonant interaction between global plasma waves such as shear Alfvén and Alfvén-acoustic waves, and the particles via Landau damping, i.e. the dynamics parallel to the magnetic background field. Also, mode conversion mechanisms require the inclusion of background ion scales in a kinetic, non-perturbative way. This accurate treatment of the plasma background leads not only to changes in the linear mode properties such as frequency, growth/damping rate, and mode structure but also influences the non-linear dynamics. Due to major advances, innovations and installation of diagnostics in present day experiments, this comparison can be carried out in a more detailed and comprehensive way than a few years ago. For example, the measurement of damping rates via active external antennas, the imaging of 2D mode structures via electron-cyclotron-emission spectroscopy, and the direct detection of escaping fast ions allow to diagnose various kinetic features of

  10. A Comparison of Inventoried and Measured U.S. Urban/Industrial Hg Emission Factors during the NOMADSS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, J. L., II; Gratz, L.; Jaffe, D. A.; Apel, E. C.; Campos, T. L.; Flocke, F. M.; Guenther, A. B.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Knapp, D. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, L.; Yuan, B.

    2014-12-01

    We performed an airborne survey of some large anthropogenic mercury (Hg) emission sources in the Southeast U.S. during the 2013 Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distribution, Sources, and Sinks (NOMADSS) experiment. The observations included speciated atmospheric Hg, and tracers of urban/industrial emissions and associated photochemistry (e.g., carbon monoxide, CO; carbon dioxide, CO2; sulfur dioxide, SO2; nitrogen oxides (NOx); volatile organic compounds, VOCs; ozone, O3; hydroxyl radical, HO·; sulfuric acid, H2SO4) and were made from the National Science Foundation's/National Center for Atmospheric Research's C-130 research aircraft. Mercury was measured using the University of Washington's Detector for Oxidized Hg Species. We derived Hg emission factors (EF) for several U.S. urban areas and large industrial point sources, including coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) in Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Texas, and West Virginia. We compared our measured Hg EFs with inventory-based values from two separate Hg emission inventories provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - the National Emissions Inventory (NEI) and the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI). We also performed an inter-comparison of the inventory-based Hg EFs. For the CFPPs sampled, we find that actual Hg emissions differed from inventoried values by more than a factor of two in some cases. Measured Hg EFs were weakly correlated with values reported in the NEI: m = 0.71; r2 = 0.47 (p = 0.06; n = 8), whereas EFs derived from the TRI were not meaningfully predictive of the measured values: m = -3.3; r2 = 0.61 (p < 0.05; n = 8). Median absolute differences between measured and inventory-based EFs were ≥50%, relative to the inventory values. The median absolute average difference between the Hg EFs reported in the two inventories was approximately 40%. Our results place quantitative constraints on uncertainties associated with the inventoried Hg emissions. Additionally, our results suggest that the

  11. Properties of K1-xLixTaO3 Solid Solutions; First-Principles Computations and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosandeev, Serguei A.; Cockayne, Eric; Burton, Benjamin; Trepakov, Vladimir; Kapphan, Siegmar; Savinov, Maxim; Jastrabik, Lubomir

    2002-11-01

    Experiments on K0.957Li0.043TaO3 samples indicate two different relaxation processes (π and π/2). First-principles computations clarify the natures of these relaxations, and yield good agreement with experiment.

  12. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

    2012-06-26

    This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet

  13. Calculation of infrared and Raman vibration modes of magnesite at high pressure by density-functional perturbation theory and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stewart J.; Jouanna, Paul; Haines, Julien; Mainprice, David

    2011-03-01

    We predict the IR-TO, IR-LO and Raman modes (wave numbers and intensities) of magnesite (MgCO3) up to 50 GPa, at T = 0 K, using the density-functional perturbation theory up to a third order perturbation, under the harmonic assumption. The predicted IR-TO and Raman mode wave numbers, the mode Grüneisen parameters and the Davydov splittings are systematically compared with experimental data for all modes up to the pressures of 10-30 GPa and for some modes up to 50 GPa. Existing experiments allow extending this comparison only to IR-LO wave numbers of the E u (ν3) asymmetric-stretch mode, confirming the odd experimental behavior of this mode at very high pressures. Predicted IR-TO, IR-LO and Raman intensities up to 50 GPa are just tabulated, but data are missing for their comparison with precise experiments. However, the generally good agreement observed between numerical results and experimental data, when their comparison is possible, suggests that first-principles methods are a major help to predict the entire spectrum up to very high pressures.

  14. The American Indian Family in Los Angeles: A Comparison of Premigration Experience, Postmigration Residence and Employment Mobility, and Coping Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weibel, Joan

    Urban adaptation patterns of male and female American Indians were investigated via comparison of premigration statistics (48 Navajo and 40 Oklahoma families) with postmigration statistics on a sample of 23 Navajo and 21 Oklahoma families now living in Los Angeles. The premigration variables were residence patterns; population density;…

  15. Meaning-making in memories: a comparison of memories of death-related and low point life experiences.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Michael M; Bluck, Susan

    2010-09-01

    Because of their extensive experience with death and dying, hospice volunteers may be more successful at engaging in meaning-making regarding their death-related experiences than their low point life experiences (e.g., job loss). Consequently, their memories of death-related experiences will manifest more meaning-making strategies (e.g., bendfit-finding) than their low point memories. Fifty-two hospice volunteers wrote memory narratives of death-related and low point experiences and provided ratings of their memories. Results show that death memory narratives exhibit more meaning-making strategies, are rated as more emotionally positive, and are more frequently rehearsed. The long-term significance of the use of meaning-making strategies is discussed. PMID:24482847

  16. Comparison of CFD simulations to non-rotating MEXICO blades experiment in the LTT wind tunnel of TUDelft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; van Zuijlen, Alexander; van Bussel, Gerard

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, three dimensional flow over non-rotating MEXICO blades is simulated by CFD methods. The numerical results are compared with the latest MEXICO wind turbine blades measurements obtained in the low speed low turbulence (LTT) wind tunnel of Delft University of Technology. This study aims to validate CFD codes by using these experimental data measured in well controlled conditions. In order to avoid use of wind tunnel corrections, both the blades and the wind tunnel test section are modelled in the simulations. The ability of Menter's k - ω shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model is investigated at both attached flow and massively separated flow cases. Steady state Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations are solved in these computations. The pressure distribution at three measured sections are compared under the conditions of different inflow velocities and a range of angles of attack. The comparison shows that at attached flow condition, good agreement can be obtained for all three airfoil sections. Even with massively separated flow, still fairly good pressure distribution comparison can be found for the DU and NACA airfoil sections, although the RISØ section shows poor comparison. At the near stall case, considerable deviations exists on the forward half part of the upper surface for all three sections.

  17. Cross-national comparison of prenatal methamphetamine exposure on infant and early child physical growth: A natural experiment

    PubMed Central

    Abar, Beau; LaGasse, Linda L.; Wouldes, Trecia; Derauf, Chris; Newman, Elana; Shah, Rizwan; Smith, Lynne M.; Arria, Amelia M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; DellaGrotta, Sheri; Dansereau, Lynne M.; Wilcox, Tara; Neal, Charles R.; Lester, Barry M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study seeks to compare the effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure (PME) on infant and child physical growth between the United States (US) and New Zealand (NZ). This cross-national comparison provides a unique opportunity to examine the potential impact of services provided to drug using mothers on child health. Methods The longitudinal Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle (IDEAL) study of PME from birth to 36 months was conducted in the US and NZ. The US cohort included 204 children with PME and 212 non-PME matched comparisons (NPME); the NZ cohort included 108 children with PME and 115 NPME matched comparisons. Latent growth curve models were used to examine effects of PME, country of origin, and the country × PME interaction on growth in length/height and weight. Results In regard to length/height, PME and country of origin were associated with initial length and growth over time. There was also a significant interaction effect, such that children with PME in the US were shorter at birth than children with PME in NZ after controlling for other prenatal exposures, infant set, socioeconomic status, and maternal height. In regard to weight, there was only an effect of country of origin. Conclusions Effects of PME on infant and child growth were shown to differ across countries, with exposed children in NZ faring better than exposed children in the US. Implications for prevention programs and public policy are discussed. PMID:23943149

  18. Impact of dynamic specimen shape evolution on the atom probe tomography results of doped epitaxial oxide multilayers: Comparison of experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Madaan, Nitesh; Nandasiri, Manjula; Devaraj, Arun; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2015-08-31

    The experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results from two different specimen orientations (top-down and sideways) of a high oxygen ion conducting Samaria-doped-ceria/Scandia-stabilized-zirconia multilayer thin film solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte was compared with level-set method based field evaporation simulations for the same specimen orientations. This experiment-simulation comparison explains the dynamic specimen shape evolution and ion trajectory aberrations that can induce density artifacts in final reconstruction, leading to inaccurate estimation of interfacial intermixing. This study highlights the importance of comparing experimental results with field evaporation simulations when using APT to study oxide heterostructure interfaces.

  19. XPS investigation on the structure of two dipeptides studied as models of self-assembling oligopeptides: comparison between experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, C.; Iucci, G.; Dettin, M.; Monti, S.; Carravetta, V.; Polzonetti, G.

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption on TiO2 surface of two dipeptides AE (L-alanine-L-glutamic acid) and AK (L-alanine-L-lysine), that are 'building blocks' of the more complex self-complementary amphiphilic oligopeptides and are therefore a good model in the interpretation of the complex peptide spectra, has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The chemical structure and composition of thin films of both dipeptides on TiO2 were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Theoretical ab-initio calculations (ΔSCF) were also performed to simulate the spectra allowing a direct comparison between experiment and theory.

  20. INTER-STORM COMPARISONS FROM THE OSCAR (OXIDATION AND SCAVENGING CHARACTERISTICS OF APRIL RAINS) HIGH DENSITY NETWORK EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The high density network component of the Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains (OSCAR) experiment combined aircraft, surface, and sequential precipitation chemistry measurements to characterize the physicochemical and dynamic features of four storms sampled dur...

  1. Assessment of Habitat Suitability Is Affected by Plant-Soil Feedback: Comparison of Field and Garden Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Hemrová, Lucie; Knappová, Jana; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Background Field translocation experiments (i.e., the introduction of seeds or seedlings of different species into different localities) are commonly used to study habitat associations of species, as well as factors limiting species distributions and local abundances. Species planted or sown in sites where they naturally occur are expected to perform better or equally well compared to sites at which they do not occur or are rare. This, however, contrasts with the predictions of the Janzen-Connell hypothesis and commonly reported intraspecific negative plant-soil feedback. The few previous studies indicating poorer performance of plants at sites where they naturally occur did not explore the mechanisms behind this pattern. Aims and Methods In this study, we used field translocation experiments established using both seeds and seedlings to study the determinants of local abundance of four dominant species in grasslands. To explore the possible effects of intraspecific negative plant-soil feedback on our results, we tested the effect of local species abundance on the performance of the plants in the field experiment. In addition, we set up a garden experiment to explore the intensity of intraspecific as well as interspecific feedback between the dominants used in the experiment. Key Results In some cases, the distribution and local abundances of the species were partly driven by habitat conditions at the sites, and species performed better at their own sites. However, the prevailing pattern was that the local dominants performed worse at sites where they naturally occur than at any other sites. Moreover, the success of plants in the field experiment was lower in the case of higher intraspecific abundance prior to experimental setup. In the garden feedback experiment, two of the species performed significantly worse in soils conditioned by their species than in soils conditioned by the other species. In addition, the performance of the plants was significantly

  2. A comparison of two differential methods for nutrition education in elementary school: lecture-and experience-based learning program

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Lan-Hee; Choi, Jeong-Hwa; Bang, Hyun-Mi; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This research was conducted to compare lecture-and experience-based methods of nutritional education as well as provide fundamental data for developing an effective nutritional education program in elementary schools. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 110 students in three elementary schools in Jeollanam-do were recruited and randomly distributed in lecture-and experience-based groups. The effects of education on students' dietary knowledge, dietary behaviors, and dietary habits were analyzed using a pre/post-test. RESULTS Lecture-and experience-based methods did not significantly alter total scores for dietary knowledge in any group, although lecture-based method led to improvement for some detailed questions. In the experience-based group, subjects showed significant alteration of dietary behaviors, whereas lecture-based method showed alteration of dietary habits. CONCLUSIONS These outcomes suggest that lecture-and experience-based methods led to differential improvement of students' dietary habits, behaviors, and knowledge. To obtain better nutritional education results, both lectures and experiential activities need to be considered. PMID:25671073

  3. Martian atmosphere modeling between 0.4 and 3.5 microns - Comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Fischbein, W. L.; Hilgeman, T.; Smith, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model of the lower atmosphere of Mars has been constructed that combines aerosol absorption and scattering with a line-by-line analysis of CO2 and H2O in a multilayer radiative transfer program. Aerosol composition previously inferred from the NASA Lear Jet Observatory data was used to measure the optical complex indices of refraction of appropriate Martian analogs from 0.4 to 2.5 microns. The aerosol vertical particle density scale was deduced using the Viking camera observations of the soil and sky intensities between 0.4 and 1.0 microns in comparison with those modeled using a multilayer Mie scattering program. A comparison of observed Mars atmospheric absorptions was made with those obtained using Lorentz, Voigt, and Doppler line profiles in a multilayer model of the CO2 and H2O. The Voigt line profile of CO2 absorption at approximately 4976 kaysers was then combined in a multilayer aerosol model of the Martian atmosphere. An evaluation of the effect on the line shape was made using several aerosol loadings.

  4. Are all ostracism experiences equal? A comparison of the autobiographical recall, Cyberball, and O-Cam paradigms.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Alexandra; MacNevin, Georgia; Zadro, Lisa; Iannuzzelli, Rose; Weston, Stephanie; Gonsalkorale, Karen; Devine, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, we aimed to compare the primary-need depletion elicited by three common ostracism paradigms: autobiographical recall (e.g., Zhong & Leonardelli in Psychological Science 19:838-842, 2008), Cyberball (Williams, Cheung, & Choi in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 79:748-762, 2000), and O-Cam (Goodacre & Zadro in Behavior Research Methods 42:768-774, 2010). A total of 152 participants (52 males) were randomly allocated to one of the three paradigms, and their subsequent primary needs were measured (belonging, control, self-esteem, and meaningful existence). O-Cam was found to induce greater total primary-need depletion than did Cyberball and recall, which did not differ significantly from each other. Moreover, when examining the pattern of individual need depletion elicited by each paradigm, O-Cam was found to induce significantly greater depletion of belonging, control, and meaningful existence than did the recall paradigm, and significantly greater depletion of control and self-esteem than did Cyberball. No other comparisons were found to be significant, including the comparisons between the recall and Cyberball paradigms for each individual primary need. Collectively, the findings will assist ostracism researchers in making informed choices regarding (a) which paradigm is appropriate to implement with respect to their research aims, and (b) whether the interchangeable use of paradigms within a program of research is appropriate practice. PMID:24163212

  5. Initial results from a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system and comparisons with the AVE-SESAME I data set. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms And Mesoscale Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Tuccillo, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is described in detail. The modeling system is designed for both research and real-time forecast applications. The 14-level numerical model, which has a 48 km grid mesh, can be run over most of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions. The model employs sixth-order accurate numerics, generalized similarity theory boundary-layer physics, a sophisticated cumulus parameterization scheme, and state of the art analysis and initialization techniques. Examples of model output on the synoptic and subsynoptic scales are presented for the AVE-SESAME I field experiment on 10-11 April 1979. The model output is subjectively compared to the observational analysis and the LFM II output on the synoptic scale. Subsynoptic model output is compared to analyses generated from the AVE-SESAME I data set.

  6. External validity of Concealed Information Test experiment: Comparison of respiration, skin conductance, and heart rate between experimental and field card tests.

    PubMed

    Zaitsu, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    The Concealed Information Test (CIT) is a memory detection method based on an examinee's physiological responses to crime-relevant items (critical items) in comparison with crime-irrelevant items (noncritical items). I examined the external validity of CIT laboratory experiments by comparing respiratory speed (RS), skin conductance response (SCR), and heart rate (HR) between a laboratory experiment (n = 30) and a field test (n = 30) in a card test. A linear mixed models analysis showed that the critical items in both CIT contexts elicited CIT effects: RS repression, SCR increase, and HR deceleration. Additionally, the critical items in the field elicited a larger RS suppression than those in the laboratory; however, SCR and HR on the critical items showed no statistical differences between the laboratory and field CITs. Moreover, the tonic HRs in the field tests were higher than in the CIT experiments, but there were no significant correlations between the tonic HR and each CIT effect in RS, SCR, and HR. These results suggested that CIT detection efficiency was not affected by arousal levels and may imply that the CIT effects observed with RS, SCR, and HR in the CIT laboratory experiments has adequate external validity and can be generalized to the CIT field. PMID:27031043

  7. Childhood Experiences of Sexual Abuse and Later Parenting Practices among Non-Offending Mothers of Sexually Abused and Comparison Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kihyun; Trickett, Penelope K.; Putnam, Frank W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The primary goal of this study was to explore the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and parenting practices among non-offending mothers of sexually abused girls. Guided by a developmental-ecological perspective of parenting, several models with different potential pathways starting from the mothers' childhood experiences of…

  8. Adolescents' Psychological Response to the Experience of Community Interpersonal Violence: A Cross-National and a Cross-Cultural Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Beth Spenciner; Wilson, W. Cody

    2006-01-01

    A comparative cross-national study investigating the level of experience with community interpersonal violence, level of psychological distress, and the relationship between exposure and distress among adolescents is presented. Participants were 617 first-year college students comprising African Americans and Jamaican Americans living in New York…

  9. Examining the Internal Validity and Statistical Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design by Comparison with a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St.Clair, Travis; Cook, Thomas D.; Hallberg, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Although evaluators often use an interrupted time series (ITS) design to test hypotheses about program effects, there are few empirical tests of the design's validity. We take a randomized experiment on an educational topic and compare its effects to those from a comparative ITS (CITS) design that uses the same treatment group as the…

  10. A Comparison of the Concepts of Democracy and Experience in a Sample of Major Works by Dewey and Freire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    While theorizing in distinctly different times, distinctly different cultures, and under distinctly different circumstances, notable philosophical similarities can be drawn between John Dewey and Paulo Freire. This article focuses on two major themes evident in a sample of each philosopher's major works, democracy and experience, and draws…

  11. Comparison of soil water content distributions between irrigated and non-irrigated cropland during the BEAREX08 experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote Sensing Experiment (BEAREX08) was conducted near Bushland, TX during the summer of 2008 in a pair of cotton fields, one irrigated and the other dryland. A large number of evaporative flux and meteorological sensors were installed within the st...

  12. Reconsidering the Local after a Transformative Global Experience: A Comparison of Two Study Abroad Programs for Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Alyssa Hadley; Dotson, Erica K.; Cross, Stephanie Behm; Kesner, John; Lundahl, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This comparative case study analyzes two study abroad experiences for preservice teachers--a 4-month student teaching placement in Sweden and a 3-week intensive intercultural course with school observations in France. Although they differed in duration and structure, both programs focused on developing preservice teachers' understandings of…

  13. A Comparison of Supervised Occupational Experience Programs Conducted by Males and Females in Wyoming. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Carl L.

    A study was conducted in Wyoming to determine the scope and economic value of supervised occupational experience programs (SOEPs) in vocational agriculture. The study tried to determine the level of participation and success realized by females engaged in SOEP activities, and to find out to what degree males and females engage in balanced SOEPs,…

  14. A Comparison of the First-Year Experience Programming to Enhance the Retention of Future Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Tina Forsythe

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods case study examined the effectiveness of a new first-year experience (FYE) curriculum for selected Choose Ohio First Scholars in the College of Allied Health Sciences (CAHS) and compared it with the effectiveness of the traditional FYE curriculum in CAHS. The quantitative phase of the study involved the collection and analysis…

  15. The Influence of Reasons for Attending University on University Experience: A Comparison between Students with and without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Maureen J.; Kennett, Deborah J.; Emond, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Students choose to go to university for many reasons. They include those with disabilities and those without. The reasons why students with disabilities go to university and how these reasons impact university experience, including coping (academic resourcefulness), adapting, academic ability beliefs (academic self-efficacy), and grades, are…

  16. Comparison of experimental data and 3D simulations of ion beam neutralization from the neutralized transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Eylon, S.; Gilson, E.P.

    2004-09-22

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been designed to study the final focus and neutralization of high perveance ion beams for applications in heavy ion fusion (HIF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. Pre-formed plasmas in the last meter before the target of the scaled experiment provide a source of electrons which neutralize the ion current and prevent the space-charge induced spreading of the beam spot. NTX physics issues are discussed and experimental data is analyzed and compared with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data of the NTX at the entrance of the neutralization region has been acquired. This data is used to provide a more accurate beam distribution with which to initialize the simulation. Previous treatments have used various idealized beam distributions which lack the detailed features of the experimental ion beam images. Simulation results are compared with NTX experimental measurements for 250 keV K{sup +} ion beams with dimensionless perveance of 1-7 x 10{sup -4}. In both simulation and experiment, the deduced beam charge neutralization is close to the predicted maximum value.

  17. A Comparison of Student-Designed-Circuit and Predesigned-Circuit Analysis Methods for College Students' Electricity Laboratory Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer, Herbert John

    For some time industrial educators have been concerned with effective methods of teaching electricity-electronics. This study compared the relative effectiveness of the predesigned-circuit method with a student-designed circuit method for students' laboratory experience. Using one unit of college-level industrial education…

  18. Investigation, comparison and design of chambers used in centrifugal partition chromatography on the basis of flow pattern and separation experiments.

    PubMed

    Schwienheer, C; Merz, J; Schembecker, G

    2015-04-17

    In centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) the separation efficiency is mainly influenced by the hydrodynamic of mobile and stationary phase in the chambers. Thus, the hydrodynamic has to be investigated and understood in order to enhance a CPC separation run. Different chamber geometries have been developed in the past and the influence of several phase systems and CPC operating conditions were investigated for these chambers. However, a direct comparison between the different chamber types has not been performed yet. In order to investigate the direct influence of the chamber design on the hydrodynamic, several chamber designs - partially similar in geometry to commercial available designs - are investigated under standardized conditions in the present study. The results show the influence of geometrical aspects of the chamber design on the hydrodynamic and therewith, on the separation efficiency. As a conclusion of the present study, some ideas for an optimal chamber design for laboratory and industrial purpose are proposed. PMID:25766495

  19. Prospective study on dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy and 3DCRT for craniospinal irradiation – A single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Bandurska-Luque, Anna; Piotrowski, Tomasz; Skrobała, Agnieszka; Ryczkowski, Adam; Adamska, Krystyna; Kaźmierska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Aim This prospective study aims to assess feasibility of helical tomotherapy (HT) for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and perform dosimetric comparison of treatment plans for both HT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Background CSI is a challenging procedure. Large PTV size requires field matching due to technical limitations of standard linear accelerators, which cannot irradiate such volumes as a single field. HT could help to avoid these limitations as irradiation of long fields is possible without field matching. Materials and methods Three adults were enrolled from 2009 to 2010. All patients received radiochemotherapy. Treatment plans in prone position for 3DCRT and in supine position for HT were generated. The superior plan was used for patients’ irradiation. Plans were compared with the application of DVH, Dx parameters – where x represents a percentage of the structure volume receiving a normalized dose and homogeneity index (HI). Results All patients received HT irradiation. The treatment was well tolerated. The HT plans resulted in a better dose coverage and uniformity in the PTV: HI were 5.4, 7.8, 6.8 for HT vs. 10.3, 6.6, 10.4 for 3DCRT. For most organs at risk (OARs), the D(V80) was higher for HT than for 3DCRT, whereas D(V5) was lower for HT. Conclusions HT is feasible for CSI, and in comparison with 3DCRT it improves PTV coverage. HT reduces high dose volumes of OARs, but larger volumes of normal tissue receive low radiation dose. HT requires further study to establish correlations between dosimetrical findings and clinical outcomes, especially with regard to late sequelae of treatment. PMID:25859405

  20. A comparison of cervical histopathology variability using whole slide digitized images versus glass slides: experience with a statewide registry.

    PubMed

    Gage, Julia C; Joste, Nancy; Ronnett, Brigette M; Stoler, Mark; Hunt, William C; Schiffman, Mark; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2013-11-01

    Whole slide imaging is increasingly used for primary and consultative diagnoses, teaching, telepathology, slide sharing, and archiving. We compared pathologist evaluations of glass slides and corresponding digitized images within the context of a statewide surveillance effort. Cervical specimens collected by the New Mexico HPV Pap Registry research program targeted cases diagnosed between 2006 and 2010. Two samples of 250 slides each were digitized with the ScanScope XT (Aperio, Vista, CA) microscope and reviewed with Aperio ImageScope reader. (1) A "random set" had a distribution of community diagnoses: 70% from cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or higher, 20% from cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 and 10% from negative cases. (2) A "discrepant set" was represented by difficult cases where 2 study pathologists initially disagreed. Within the regular workflow of the New Mexico HPV Pap Registry, 3 pathologists read the slides 2 to 3 times each without knowledge of clinical history, previous readings or sampling scheme. Pathologists also read each corresponding image twice. For within- and between-reader comparisons we calculated unweighted κ statistics and asymmetry χ(2) tests. Across all comparisons, slides and images yielded similar results. For the random set, almost all within-reader and between-reader Kappa values ranged between 0.7 and 0.8 and 0.6 and 0.7, respectively. For the discrepant set, most within- and between-reader κ values were 0.4 to 0.6. As cervical intraepithelial neoplasia diagnostic terminology changes, pathologists may need to re-read histopathology slides to compare disease trends over time, eg, before/after introduction of human papillomavirus vaccination. Diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia differed little between slides and corresponding digitized images. PMID:24075599

  1. Biodegradation of the surfactant linear alkylbenzenesulfonate in sewage- contaminated groundwater: A comparison of column experiments and field tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krueger, C.J.; Radakovich, K.M.; Sawyer, T.E.; Barber, L.B.; Smith, R.L.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Transport and biodegradation of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) in sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated for a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations. Both laboratory column and an 80-day continuous injection tracer test field experiments were conducted. The rates of LAS biodegradation increased with increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations and indicated the preferential biodegradation of the longer alkyl chain LAS homologues (i.e., C12 and C13) and external isomers (i.e., 2-and 3- phenyl). However, for similar dissolved oxygen concentrations, mass removal rates for LAS generally were 2-3 times greater in laboratory column experiments than in the field tracer test. Under low oxygen conditions (<1 mg/L) only a fraction of the LAS mixture biodegraded in both laboratory and field experiments. Biodegradation rate constants for the continuous injection field test (0.002-0.08 day-1) were comparable to those estimated for a 3-h injection (pulsed) tracer test conducted under similar biogeochemical conditions, indicating that increasing the exposure time of aquifer sediments to LAS did not increase biodegradation rates.Transport and biodegradation of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) in sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated for a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations. Both laboratory column and an 80-day continuous injection tracer test field experiments were conducted. The rates of LAS biodegradation increased with increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations and indicated the preferential biodegradation of the longer alkyl chain LAS homologues (i.e., C12 and C13) and external isomers (i.e., 2- and 3-phenyl). However, for similar dissolved oxygen concentrations, mass removal rates for LAS generally were 2-3 times greater in laboratory column experiments than in the field tracer test. Under low oxygen conditions (<1 mg/L) only a fraction of the LAS mixture biodegraded in both laboratory and field experiments. Biodegradation rate constants

  2. A comparison of InVivoStat with other statistical software packages for analysis of data generated from animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robin A; Shoaib, Mohammed; Hewitt, Katherine N; Stanford, S Clare; Bate, Simon T

    2012-08-01

    InVivoStat is a free-to-use statistical software package for analysis of data generated from animal experiments. The package is designed specifically for researchers in the behavioural sciences, where exploiting the experimental design is crucial for reliable statistical analyses. This paper compares the analysis of three experiments conducted using InVivoStat with other widely used statistical packages: SPSS (V19), PRISM (V5), UniStat (V5.6) and Statistica (V9). We show that InVivoStat provides results that are similar to those from the other packages and, in some cases, are more advanced. This investigation provides evidence of further validation of InVivoStat and should strengthen users' confidence in this new software package. PMID:22071578

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced mixing: initial conditions modeling, three-dimensional simulations and comparisons with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O; Andrews, M

    2007-01-09

    A spectral/compact finite-difference method with a third-order Adams-Bashforth-Moulton time-evolution scheme is used to perform a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of Rayleigh-Taylor flow. The initial conditions are modeled by parameterizing the multi-mode velocity and density perturbations measured just off of the splitter plate in water channel experiments. Parameters in the DNS are chosen to match the experiment as closely as possible. The early-time transition from a weakly-nonlinear to a strongly-nonlinear state, as well as the onset of turbulence, is examined by comparing the DNS and experimental results. The mixing layer width, molecular mixing parameter, vertical velocity variance, and density variance spectrum obtained from the DNS are shown to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values.

  4. Comparison of knowledge, attitudes, experience, and opinions between teachers and guardians regarding the emergency contraceptive pill in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sripichyakan, Kasara; Tangmunkongvorakul, Arunrat

    2006-03-01

    Teachers and guardians (parents or authorized persons) are expected to collaborate in educating female students about emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) but it is unknown whether they have similar perspectives on ECPs. This study aimed to compare their knowledge, attitudes, experience, and opinions regarding ECPs. Questionnaires were distributed to 720 female teachers and guardians of eight randomly selected high schools and vocational schools in Chiang Mai, Thailand. There were significantly more teachers who knew about the existence of ECPs than guardians. More guardians reported some accurate information regarding ECPs than did teachers. More teachers than guardians believed that the use of ECPs was not morally wrong. Both teachers and guardians had similar experience with ECP use and similar agreement in teaching female adolescents about ECPs. The teachers and guardians had some different opinions on teaching barriers. It is suggested that both teachers and guardians are suited to teach female adolescents about ECPs, but they need preparation in different aspects. PMID:16451426

  5. A comparison of two factorial designs, a complete 3 x 3 factorial and a central composite rotatable design, for use in binomial response experiments in aquatic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Edginton, Andrea N; Sheridan, Patrick M; Boermans, Herman J; Thompson, Dean G; Holt, John D; Stephenson, Gerald R

    2004-02-01

    Using an amphibian toxicity testing protocol, comparative studies were conducted to assess the predictive precision, degree of similarity of results and efficiency of a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) in relation to a conventional complete 3x3 factorial design. Data were treated with response surface analysis using generalized linear models (glm) and application of profile deviance to generate confidence intervals. Design comparisons were based on studies conducted using the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) protocol to examine the interaction of three toxicants at pH levels ranging from 4.5 to 8.5. Test substances included two commercial herbicide formulations based on glyphosate ([N-phosphonomethyl]glycine) isopropylamine salt (Vision, Rodeo) as well as a polyethoxylated tallow amine surfactant blend (MON 0818), which is a key component of the Vision formulation. The generated models from both the CCRD and the factorial designs produced toxicity estimates similar to each other and to previously published results. Trends were also similar to published results in that the surfactant, MON 0818, was comparatively more toxic than Vision, which was more toxic than Rodeo. Further, all toxicants induced higher mortality under alkaline as opposed to acidic conditions. The CCRD was between 66 and 124% more efficient in the Vision and Rodeo experiments in comparison to the complete 3x3 factorial. Thus, the factorial experiment would have required at least 66% more observations to obtain the same precision. There appeared to be no efficiency gain with the use of the CCRD for MON 0818. The CCRD had tighter confidence intervals in 9 of 12 cases across all test substances. Computer simulations using the experimental data for Vision demonstrated that the LCalpha estimates generated from the 1,000 simulated data sets were very close to the "true" value for both designs. This was based on small bias and mean squared error calculations. Coverage

  6. Cosmological results from the Planck space mission and their comparison with data from the WMAP and BICEP2 experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    We review basic results from the European Space Agency's Planck space mission, which are of crucial significance to understanding the origin and evolution of the Universe. The main stages of astrophysical and cosmological data processing pipelines are considered. The Planck results are compared with the data from the NASA WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) space mission and the BICEP2 (Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization 2) experiment.

  7. PHITS simulations of the Protective curtain experiment onboard the Service module of ISS: Comparison with absorbed doses measured with TLDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploc, Ondřej; Sihver, Lembit; Kartashov, Dmitry; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Tolochek, Raisa

    2013-12-01

    "Protective curtain" was the physical experiment onboard the International Space Station (ISS) aimed on radiation measurement of the dose - reducing effect of the additional shielding made of hygienic water-soaked wipes and towels placed on the wall in the crew cabin of the Service module Zvezda. The measurements were performed with 12 detector packages composed of thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) placed at the Protective curtain, so that they created pairs of shielded and unshielded detectors.

  8. Lessons learned with the Active Phasing Experiment: comparison of four optical phasing sensors on a segmented Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Surdej, I.

    The adaptive optics capabilities are strongly limited by the quality of the phasing of the primary mirror of the extremely large telescope. Up to date, the Keck telescopes are the only segmented telescope phased with a quality enabling the application of adaptive optics. The Active Phasing Experiment has been installed at the Namyth focus of the Very Large Telescope Melipal during the last 6 months. Its purpose is to understand and compare different technological concepts for an optical phasing sensor dedicated to the European Extremely Large Telescope. The pupil of the telescope is segmented in 61 hexagonal segments by projecting it on an Active Segmented Mirror. The ASM is controlled by a dual wavenlength interferometer made by Fogale Nanotech with a nanometric precision. The segmented pupil is distributed in parallel to four optical phasing sensors. They are a pyramid sensor, a curvature sensor, a phase filtering sensor and a ShackHartmann sensor. They have been developed respectively by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Florenze, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias in Tenerife, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. The global behaviour of the optical phasing sensors will be described and preliminary results of the Active Phasing Experiments obtained on sky will be explained. The extrapolation of the results to the EELT and the potential consequences for the adaptive optics will be given. The Active Phasing Experiment has been financed by the European Union and the European Southern Observatory via the Sixth European Union Framework Program for Research and Technological Development under the contract number 011863.

  9. Understanding how deployment experiences change over time: Comparison of female and male OEF/OIF and Gulf War veterans.

    PubMed

    Fox, Annie B; Walker, Brian E; Smith, Brian N; King, Daniel W; King, Lynda A; Vogt, Dawne

    2016-03-01

    Despite increased attention to the evolving nature of war, the unique challenges of contemporary deployment, and women's changing role in warfare, few studies have examined differences in deployment stressors across eras of service or evaluated how gender differences in deployment experiences have changed over time. Using data collected from two national survey studies, we examined war cohort and gender differences in veterans' reports of both mission-related and interpersonal stressors during deployment. Although Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans reported more combat experiences and greater preparedness for deployment compared to Gulf War veterans, Gulf War veterans reported higher levels of other mission-related stressors, including difficult living and working environment, perceived threat, and potential exposure to nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons. Gender differences also emerged, with men reporting greater exposure to mission-related stressors and women reporting higher levels of interpersonal stressors. However, the size and nature of gender differences did not differ significantly when comparing veterans of the two eras. By understanding how risk factors for PTSD differ based on war era and gender, veterans' experiences can be better contextualized. PMID:25866959

  10. Dynamics of Water and Ions near DNA: Comparison of Simulation to Time-Resolved Stokes-Shift Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sobhan; Andreatta, Daniele; Ponomarev, Sergei Y.; Beveridge, David L.; Berg, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved Stokes-shift experiments measure the dynamics of biomolecules and of the perturbed solvent near them on subnanosecond time scales, but molecular dynamics simulations are needed to provide a clear interpretation of the results. Here we show that simulations using standard methods quantitatively reproduce the main features of TRSS experiments in DNA and provide a molecular assignment for the dynamics. The simulations reproduce the magnitude and unusual power-law dynamics of the Stokes shift seen in recent experiments [D. Andreatta, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 7270 (2005)]. A polarization model is introduced to eliminate cross correlations between the different components contributing to the signal. Using this model, well-defined contributions of the DNA, water and counterion to the experimental signal are extracted. Water is found to have the largest contribution and to be responsible for the power-law dynamics. The counterions have a smaller, but non-negligible contribution with a time constant of 220 ps. The contribution to the signal of the DNA itself is minor and fits a 30 ps stretched exponential. Both time-averaged and dynamic distributions are calculated. They show a small subset of ions with a different coupling, but no other evidence of substates or dynamic heterogeneity. PMID:19191698

  11. Comparison of Laboratory and Modeling Results for High Strain Rates in Support of the Source Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, A.; Rougier, E.; Broome, S.; Knight, E.; Pfeifle, T.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment program, conducted in Climax Stock Granite at the Nevada Test Site, will provide ground truth data to create and improve strong ground motion and seismic S-wave generation and propagation models. Modeling using advanced simulation codes will be performed both a priori and after each experiment; a key component in the predictive capability and ultimate validation of the models is the full understanding of the intervening geology between the source and instrumented bore holes including the geomechanical behavior of the site rock/structural features. Mechanical properties determined via laboratory testing of site rocks leads to the parameterization of constitutive models used in the simulations. The combined finite-discrete element method by Munjiza is an excellent tool to address a wide range of problems involving fracturing and fragmentation of solids and has been applied to many complex rock mechanics problems such as block caving, deep mining techniques, rock blasting, and seismic wave propagation. Since most of the problems involving fracture and fragmentation of solids are three dimensional, an improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM capability has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In this paper, Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar experiments, performed on the Climax Stock Granite by Sandia National Laboratories, are simulated using this improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM approach, implemented on LANL's MUNROU (Munjiza-Rougier) code and show excellent agreement.

  12. Ultrafast Charge-Transfer Dynamics at the Boron Subphthalocyanine Chloride/C60 Heterojunction: Comparison between Experiment and Theory.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Daniel E; Lee, Myeong H; Sykes, Matthew E; Niedringhaus, Andrew; Geva, Eitan; Dunietz, Barry D; Shtein, Max; Ogilvie, Jennifer P

    2015-02-01

    Photoinduced charge-transfer (CT) processes play a key role in many systems, particularly those relevant to organic photovoltaics and photosynthesis. Advancing the understanding of CT processes calls for comparing their rates measured via state-of-the-art time-resolved interface-specific spectroscopic techniques with theoretical predictions based on first-principles molecular models. We measure charge-transfer rates across a boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/C60 heterojunction, commonly used in organic photovoltaics, via heterodyne-detected time-resolved second-harmonic generation. We compare these results to theoretical predictions based on a Fermi's golden rule approach, with input parameters obtained using first-principles calculations for two different equilibrium geometries of a molecular donor-acceptor in a dielectric continuum model. The calculated rates (∼2 ps(-1)) overestimate the measured rates (∼0.1 ps(-1)), which is consistent with the expectation that the calculated rates represent an upper bound over the experimental ones. The comparison provides valuable understanding of how the structure of the electron donor-acceptor interface affects the CT kinetics in organic photovoltaic systems. PMID:26261981

  13. Near-wall dynamics of concentrated hard-sphere suspensions: comparison of evanescent wave DLS experiments, virial approximation and simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Bławzdziewicz, Jerzy; Cichocki, Bogdan; Dhont, Jan K G; Lisicki, Maciej; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Young, Y-N; Lang, Peter R

    2015-10-01

    In this article we report on a study of the near-wall dynamics of suspended colloidal hard spheres over a broad range of volume fractions. We present a thorough comparison of experimental data with predictions based on a virial approximation and simulation results. We find that the virial approach describes the experimental data reasonably well up to a volume fraction of ϕ≈ 0.25 which provides us with a fast and non-costly tool for the analysis and prediction of evanescent wave DLS data. Based on this we propose a new method to assess the near-wall self-diffusion at elevated density. Here, we qualitatively confirm earlier results [Michailidou, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2009, 102, 068302], which indicate that many-particle hydrodynamic interactions are diminished by the presence of the wall at increasing volume fractions as compared to bulk dynamics. Beyond this finding we show that this diminishment is different for the particle motion normal and parallel to the wall. PMID:26264420

  14. The < ln A > study with the Muon tracking detector in the KASCADE-Grande experiment - comparison of hadronic interaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łuczak, P.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Curcio, C.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Fuchs, B.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schoo, S.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    2015-08-01

    With the KASCADE-Grande Muon Tracking Detector it was possible to measure with high accuracy directions of EAS muons with energy above 0.8 GeV and up to 700 m distance from the shower centre. Reconstructed muon tracks allow investigation of muon pseudorapidity (η) distributions. These distributions are nearly identical to the pseudorapidity distributions of their parent mesons produced in hadronic interactions. Comparison of the η distributions from measured and simulated showers can be used to test the quality of the high energy hadronic interaction models. The pseudorapidity distributions reflect the longitudinal development of EAS and, as such, are sensitive to the mass of the cosmic ray primary particles. With various parameters of the η distribution, obtained from the Muon Tracking Detector data, it is possible to calculate the average logarithm of mass of the primary cosmic ray particles. The results of the < ln A > analysis in the primary energy range 1016 eV-1017 eV with the 1st quartile and the mean value of the distributions will be presented for the QGSJet-II-2, QGSJet-II-4, EPOS 1.99 and EPOS LHC models in combination with the FLUKA model.

  15. Prospective Randomized Comparison of Open versus Transperitoneal Laparoscopic Ureterolithotomy: Experience of a Single Center from Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Manish; Singh, Vishwajeet; Sinha, Rahul J.; Sankhwar, Satya N.; Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Amit; Prakash, Jai; Kumar, Pradeep; Pandey, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Aim Prospective randomized study on transperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (TPLU) versus open ureterolithotomy (OU) for treatment of large impacted ureteric stones (≥ 1.5 cm) and assessment of overall results. Material & Methods In a prospective study between 2010 to 2012, 30 patients underwent TPLU and 30 OU based on 1:1 randomization. The operation was indicated primarily in 44 cases or after failed shock-wave lithotripsy/ureteroscopy in 16 cases. Two groups were compared for operative time, success rate, visual pain score, analgesic requirement, hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS® version 16.0 using Fisher exact or Mann-Whitney U tests with p < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results The difference in visual pain score (6.2 in TPLU group vs 3.1 in OU group on day 1; 4.8 vs. 2.4 on day 2) and tramadol requirements (184.32 mg in TPLU group vs. 150.87 mg in OU group on day 1; 97.34 mg vs. 65.56 mg on day 2) were statistically significant and more in OU. Hospital stay and convalescence were significantly lower in the TPLU. However, stone removal in one attempt was similar in both the groups. Conclusion Although successful stone removal rates are equal in both groups, TPLU is associated significantly with less postoperative pain, less analgesic requirement, shorter hospital stay and short convalescence in comparison to OU. PMID:24917764

  16. Deployment Experiences, Social Support, and Mental Health: Comparison of Black, White, and Hispanic U.S. Veterans Deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Anjana; Austern, David; Hack, Samantha; Vogt, Dawne

    2016-06-01

    Compared to their White counterparts, Black and Hispanic Vietnam-era, male, combat veterans in the United States have experienced discrimination and increased trauma exposure during deployment and exhibited higher rates of postdeployment mental health disorders. The present study examined differences in deployment experiences and postdeployment mental health among male and female Black, Hispanic, and White veterans deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq. Data were drawn from a national survey of veterans (N = 924) who had returned from deployment within the last 2 years. Ethnoracial minority veterans were compared to White veterans of the same gender on deployment experiences and postdeployment mental health. The majority of comparisons did not show significant differences; however, several small group differences did emerge (.02 < η(2) < .04). Ethnoracial minority veterans reported greater perceived threat in the warzone and more family-related concerns and stressors during deployment than White veterans of the same gender. Minority female veterans reported higher levels of postdeployment symptoms of anxiety than their White counterparts, which were accounted for by differences in deployment experience. These differences call for ongoing monitoring. PMID:27191777

  17. The Mechanics of Coulomb Wedges: Comparison Between a Numerical Model (Boundary Element Method) and a Sand-Box Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Castello, M.; Cooke, M.

    2006-12-01

    Fold and thrust belts have been successfully modelled using either physical or numerical methods in recent years. The two methods have well-known advantages and drawbacks for investigating contractional processes. In this work we have applied the Boundary Element Method code in order to closely reproduce successive snapshots of deformation accumulated within a sand-box experiment. Our numerical models provide a quantitative mechanical analysis of the deformation observed in analogue models of non-cohesive Coulomb wedges during an underthrusting/accretion transition. Model results show that the total work done by the contracting wedge increases during the underthrusting stage up to a critical value when the propagation of a frontal thrust significantly reduces the work required for further deformation. This transition occurs when the energetic cost of developing a new forethrust is less than the benefit of growing this new fault. The elastic numerical model predicts the location of the maximum shear stress on the basal dècollement just prior to the propagation of the sole thrust as well as the energetically most viable position for the nucleation of new forethrust ramp. These positions do not coincide. Furthermore, the forethrust within the sandbox experiment develops at the energetically favoured position rather than the location of greatest shear stress suggesting that the new thrust ramps develop first ahead and then link down and backward to the propagating basal dècollement. As a result, the most efficient location for a new thrust ramp is where gravitational, frictional, internal and propagation work terms are optimally combined. The trade-off between the dominant frictional and internal work terms is fuelled by overburden weight, which reduces slip on thrust ramps until the internal work stored in the surrounding deforming material reaches a critical value. The correlation of our numerical results with analogue experiments validates use of the principle of

  18. Investigation of coupling mechanisms in attosecond transient absorption of autoionizing states: comparison of theory and experiment in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Beck, Annelise R.; Warrick, Erika R.; Pfeiffer, Adrian N.; Justine Bell, M.; Haxton, Daniel J.; McCurdy, C. William; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2015-06-01

    Attosecond transient absorption spectra near the energies of autoionizing states are analyzed in terms of the photon coupling mechanisms to other states. In a recent experiment, the autoionization lifetimes of highly excited states of xenon were determined and compared to a simple expression based on a model of how quantum coherence determines the decay of a metastable state in the transient absorption spectrum. Here it is shown that this procedure for extracting lifetimes is more general and can be used in cases involving either resonant or nonresonant coupling of the attosecond-probed autoionizing state to either continua or discrete states by a time-delayed near infrared (NIR) pulse. The fits of theoretically simulated absorption signals for the 6p resonance in xenon (lifetime = 21.1 fs) to this expression yield the correct decay constant for all the coupling mechanisms considered, properly recovering the time signature of twice the autoionization lifetime due to the coherent nature of the transient absorption experiment. To distinguish between these two coupling cases, the characteristic dependencies of the transient absorption signals on both the photon energy and time delay are investigated. Additional oscillations versus delay-time in the measured spectrum are shown and quantum beat analysis is used to pinpoint the major photon-coupling mechanism induced by the NIR pulse in the current xenon experiment: the NIR pulse resonantly couples the attosecond-probed state, 6p, to an intermediate 8s (at 22.563 eV), and this 8s state is also coupled to a neighboring state (at 20.808 eV).

  19. Comparison of entrainment rates from a tank experiment with results using the one-dimensional turbulence model.

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, Alan R.; Sayler, B. J.; Wunsch, S.; Schmidt, H.; Nedelec, R.

    2010-05-01

    Recent work suggests that cloud effects remain one of the largest sources of uncertainty in model-based estimates of climate sensitivity. In particular, the entrainment rate in stratocumulus-topped mixed layers needs better models. More than thirty years ago a clever laboratory experiment was conducted by McEwan and Paltridge to examine an analog of the entrainment process at the top of stratiform clouds. Sayler and Breidenthal extended this pioneering work and determined the effect of the Richardson number on the dimensionless entrainment rate. The experiments gave hints that the interaction between molecular effects and the one-sided turbulence seems to be crucial for understanding entrainment. From the numerical point of view large-eddy simulation (LES) does not allow explicitly resolving all the fine scale processes at the entrainment interface. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is limited due to the Reynolds number and is not the tool of choice for parameter studies. Therefore it is useful to investigate new modeling strategies, such as stochastic turbulence models which allow sufficient resolution at least in one dimension while having acceptable run times. We will present results of the One-Dimensional Turbulence stochastic simulation model applied to the experimental setup of Sayler and Breidenthal. The results on radiatively induced entrainment follow quite well the scaling of the entrainment rate with the Richardson number that was experimentally found for a set of trials. Moreover, we investigate the influence of molecular effects, the fluids optical properties, and the artifact of parasitic turbulence experimentally observed in the laminar layer. In the simulations the parameters are varied systematically for even larger ranges than in the experiment. Based on the obtained results a more complex parameterization of the entrainment rate than currently discussed in the literature seems to be necessary.

  20. Spin-density correlations in the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory: Comparison with polarized neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, N. B.; Reser, B. I.; Paradezhenko, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    To study the spin-density correlations in the ferromagnetic metals above the Curie temperature, we relate the spin correlator and neutron scattering cross-section. In the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory, we obtain explicit expressions for the effective and local magnetic moments and spatial spin-density correlator. Our theoretical results are demonstrated by the example of bcc Fe. The effective and local moments are found in good agreement with results of polarized neutron scattering experiment over a wide temperature range. The calculated short-range order is small (up to 4 Å) and slowly decreases with temperature.

  1. Seismic results from DOE`s non-proliferation experiment: A comparison of chemical and nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, M.; Goldstein, P.; Mayeda, K.; Walter, W.

    1995-01-01

    The basic results from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) NonProliferation Experiment (NPE) for seismic signal generation are that the source function for a chemical explosion is equivalent to that of a nuclear explosion of about twice the yield and that the seismic moment measurements are consistent between freefield, local, and regional measurements. In addition, evidence was found that Pn in the Basin and Range province of the western United States is a turning ray and is simply proportional to the source function while the transfer functions for Pg and Lg are low-pass in nature.

  2. Comparison of fission neutron and pulsed spallation neutron sources for radiation effects experiments on Cu/sub 3/Au

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.

    1983-10-01

    Through our recent experimental work on the neutron irradiation effects in Cu/sub 3/Au, we will compare fission and pulsed spallation neutron sources. Neutron characteristics of irradiation facilities at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) and the CP-5 reactor (now closed down), are briefly described. Defect cascade size distributions from irradiations of Cu/sub 3/Au at both neutron sources illustrated by transmission electron micrographs of disordered zones. Radiation-enhanced diffusion experiments in Cu/sub 3/Au are discussed along with the effect of pulsed neutron irradiations.

  3. Comparison of velocity and temperature time series data analysis in experiments on the thermally driven rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Larcher, Thomas; Harlander, Uwe; Alexandrov, Kiril; Wang, Yongtai

    2010-05-01

    The model of the differentially heated, rotating cylindrical gap filled with a fluid is since more than four decades extensively used for laboratory experiments of baroclinic wave interactions, and a number of data acquisition techniques are applied e.g. to unhide regular waves of different zonal wave number, to better understand the transition to the quasi-chaotic regime, and to reveal the underlying dynamical processes of complex wave flows. In our experiments presented here, we make use of non-intrusive measurement techniques of a quite different nature. While the high accurate Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry (LDV ) is used for measurements of the radial velocity component at equidistant azimuthal positions, a high sensitive thermographic camera, which resolution allows for resolving fine scale structures, measures the surface temperature field. Both sets of time series data are analyzed by using multivariate statistical techniques. While the LDV data sets are studied by applying the Multi-Channel Singular Spectrum Analysis (M - SSA), the temperature data sets are analyzed by applying the Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF ). In addition, the temperature data are processed in a way to become comparable to the LDV data, i.e. reducing the size of the data set in such a manner that the temperature measurements would imaginary be performed at equidistant azimuthal positions only. This approach initially results in a great loss of information. But applying the M - SSA to the reduced temperature data sets enable us not only to compare the data analysis methods but also to reclassify the results yielded with the LDV data analysis. The measurements are performed at particular parameter points, where our former studies show that kinds of complex wave patterns occur [1, 2]. For example, we found a dominant and a weak mode in the 3-4 wave transition region. This finding confirms earlier ideas on wave dispersion in transition regions between regular waves. Increasing the annulus

  4. Simulation of large particle transport near the surface under stable conditions: comparison with the Hanford tracer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Larson, Timothy

    A plume model is presented describing the downwind transport of large particles (1-100 μm) under stable conditions. The model includes both vertical variations in wind speed and turbulence intensity as well as an algorithm for particle deposition at the surface. Model predictions compare favorably with the Hanford single and dual tracer experiments of crosswind integrated concentration (for particles: relative bias=-0.02 and 0.16, normalized mean square error=0.61 and 0.14, for the single and dual tracer experiments, respectively), whereas the US EPA's fugitive dust model consistently overestimates the observed concentrations at downwind distances beyond several hundred meters (for particles: relative bias=0.31 and 2.26, mean square error=0.42 and 1.71, respectively). For either plume model, the measured ratio of particle to gas concentration is consistently overestimated when using the deposition velocity algorithm of Sehmel and Hodgson (1978. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA). In contrast, these same ratios are predicted with relatively little bias when using the algorithm of Kim et al. (2000. Atmospheric Environment 34 (15), 2387-2397).

  5. Comparison between numerical simulation and visualization experiment on water behavior in single straight flow channel polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Hiromitsu; Ito, Kohei; Oshima, Toshihiro; Sasaki, Kazunari

    A relationship between a flooding and a cell voltage drop for polymer electrolyte fuel cell was investigated experimentally and numerically. A visualization cell, which has single straight gas flow channel (GFC) and observation window, was fabricated to visualize the flooding in GFC. We ran the cell with changing operation condition, and measured the time evolution of cell voltage and took the images of cathode GFC. Considering the operation condition, we executed a developed numerical simulation, which is based on multiphase mixture model with a formulation on water transport through the surface of polymer electrolyte membrane and the interface of gas diffusion layer/GFC. As a result in experiment, we found that the cell voltage decreased with time and this decrease was accelerated by larger current and smaller air flow rate. Our simulation succeeded to demonstrate this trend of cell voltage. In experiment, we also found that the water flushing in GFC caused an immediate voltage change, resulting in voltage recovery or electricity generation stop. Although our simulation could not replicate this immediate voltage change, the supersaturated area obtained by our simulation well corresponded to fogging area appeared on the window surface in the GFC.

  6. Comparison of measured soft x-ray drive with shock and capsule implosion velocity for ignition tuning experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J.; Callahan, D.; Meezan, N.; Glenzer, S.; MacKinnon, A.; Dixit, S.; Kyrala, G.; Widmann, K.; Robey, H.; Clark, D.; Jones, O.; Hicks, D.; Celliers, P.; Farley, D.; Town, R.; Kalantar, D.; Dewald, E.; Moore, A.; Olson, R.; Doeppner, T.; Moody, J.; Ralph, J.; Thomas, C.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M.

    2011-10-01

    Indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments use high-Z hohlraums to convert laser energy to soft x-ray energy. The soft x-rays then drive the capsule via material ablation to compress the fuel payload and heat the central hot spot to initiate ignition. To achieve the highest fuel compression, a shaped radiation drive is used launching multiple shocks timed minimizes fuel entropy. The strength and velocity of these shocks depend directly on the radiation drive. The main laser pulse is then used to drive the implosion such that the PdV work can heat the central core to fusion conditions. To diagnose the soft x-ray drive in the hohlraum, Dante, an 18 channel soft x-ray spectrometer, measures the flux escaping the laser entrance hole. Measurements of this flux are used to assess the conditions for the capsule implosion. In this presentation, we will examine correlations between the soft x-ray measurements and shock velocity, as well as implosion velocity for recent ignition tuning experiments on NIF.

  7. Comparison of the predictions of universal scaling of the saturation dependence of the air permeability with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, Behzad; Hunt, Allen G.

    2012-08-01

    We compare predictions of the saturation dependence of air permeability from percolation theory with experimental results taken from the last 60 years. We selected experiments with sufficient density of data points to verify a functional dependence. The typical number of such data points was about 10, but actual values ranged from 4 to 31. The predicted saturation dependence is a universal power law in the air-filled porosity (less a threshold value) with an exponent of 2.00. Our investigation showed that the experimental power was 2.028 ± 0.028 with an R2 value, averaged across all the experiments, of greater than 0.96 for database 1 (including 16 samples from the literature) and 1.814 ± 0.386 with an R2value of larger than 0.90 for database 2 (including 23 samples from Tang et al. (2011)). The threshold value of the air-filled porosity could be predicted reasonably from the wet end of the soil water retention curves. The threshold varied systematically with soil texture. We also compare the proposed model with three other methods, e.g., Millington and Quirk, Burdine-Brooks-Corey, and Kawamoto et al., in estimation of air permeability. The results indicate that the universal scaling approach estimates air permeability more accurately than other methods. Thus, we believe that we have confirmed the universal scaling predicted as well as demonstrated its usefulness in predicting the air permeability.

  8. The issue of multiple univariate comparisons in the context of neuroelectric brain mapping: an application in a neuromarketing experiment.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, G; De Vico Fallani, F; Astolfi, L; Toppi, J; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D; Salinari, S; Babiloni, F

    2010-08-30

    This paper presents some considerations about the use of adequate statistical techniques in the framework of the neuroelectromagnetic brain mapping. With the use of advanced EEG/MEG recording setup involving hundred of sensors, the issue of the protection against the type I errors that could occur during the execution of hundred of univariate statistical tests, has gained interest. In the present experiment, we investigated the EEG signals from a mannequin acting as an experimental subject. Data have been collected while performing a neuromarketing experiment and analyzed with state of the art computational tools adopted in specialized literature. Results showed that electric data from the mannequin's head presents statistical significant differences in power spectra during the visualization of a commercial advertising when compared to the power spectra gathered during a documentary, when no adjustments were made on the alpha level of the multiple univariate tests performed. The use of the Bonferroni or Bonferroni-Holm adjustments returned correctly no differences between the signals gathered from the mannequin in the two experimental conditions. An partial sample of recently published literature on different neuroscience journals suggested that at least the 30% of the papers do not use statistical protection for the type I errors. While the occurrence of type I errors could be easily managed with appropriate statistical techniques, the use of such techniques is still not so largely adopted in the literature. PMID:20637802

  9. An accurate {ital ab initio} HOCl potential energy surface, vibrational and rotational calculations, and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Skokov, S.; Peterson, K.A.; Bowman, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    Accurate {ital ab initio} multireference configuration interaction (CI) calculations with large correlation-consistent basis sets are performed for HOCl. After extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, the {ital ab initio} data are precisely fit to give a semiglobal three-dimensional potential energy surface to describe HOCl{r_arrow}Cl+OH from high overtone excitation of the OH-stretch. The average absolute deviation between the {ital ab initio} and fitted energies is 4.2thinspcm{sup {minus}1} for energies up to 60 kcal/mol relative to the HOCl minimum. Vibrational energies of HOCl including the six overtones of the OH-stretch are computed using a vibrational-Cl method on the fitted potential and also on a slightly adjusted potential. Near-spectroscopic accuracy is obtained using the adjusted potential; the average absolute deviation between theory and experiment for 19 experimentally reported states is 4.8thinspcm{sup {minus}1}. Very good agreement with experiment is also obtained for numerous rotational energies for the ground vibrational state, the ClO-stretch fundamental, and the fifth overtone of the OH-stretch. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Scaling Heights for Volcanic Plumes Rising Under Wind Stress: Inter-comparison Using Analogue Laboratory Experiments and Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellinek, M.; Aubry, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The maximum height of volcanic plumes rising into Earth's atmosphere is governed mostly by the atmospheric stratification, the rate of turbulent entrainment of atmospheric air into the plume, the buoyancy flux at the vent and wind. Turbulent entrainment is commonly assumed to increase proportionally with the average plume rise velocity and the wind stress. There exist multiple scalings linking eruption source conditions to plume height. However, most scalings are empirical and/or incompletely verified with: i) analogue experiments that do not capture the full range of dynamical conditions under which explosive eruption occur; ii) direct observations of a restricted number of eruptions; or iii) numerical models with parameterized turbulent entrainment physics.In this study, we produce a self-consistent intercomparison of scalings commonly used in the literature. We use extensive analogue laboratory experiments on buoyant jets rising into a uniform wind field and a set of observations from 27 explosive eruptions (Mastin, 2014) to test each scaling. We show that predictions for the heights of natural eruptions under various though average wind stress conditions are unsurprisingly similar. On the other hand, existing scalings for plume height vary widely in their predictions for the heights of analog plumes spanning a broader though realist range of wind forcing. Using new analytical scaling that best predict the heights of analog plumes, we improve calibration of turbulent entrainment rates, in turn.

  11. Operational experience of electronic active personal dosemeter and comparison with CaSo4:Dy TL dosemeter in Indian PHWR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishwanath P; Managanvi, S S; Bihari, R R; Bhat, H R

    2013-01-01

    Direct reading dosemeter has been used for day-to-day radiation exposure control and management for last four decades in Indian nuclear power plants (NPPs). Recently new real time, alarm and pre-alarm on equivalent dose/dose rate, storage of dose/dose rate and maximum dose rate, user-friendly electronic active personal dosemeter (APD) has been implemented into practice for the first time at Kaiga Atomic Power Station-3&4,  of Indian NPPs. The dosemeter showed tolerance level (L) 0.1085±0.0450 compared with 0.1869±0.0729 (average±SD) for CaSO4:Dy, TL dosemeter, having narrow range trumpet curve, nil electromagnetic interference. Records of >29 000 for APD and TL dosemeter were analysed for comparasion of the measurement of the individual dose. APD followed general acceptance rule of ±25 % for dose >1 mSv. Monthly Station collective dose by TL dosemeters and APD for normal reactor operation as well as outage are found in good agreement. Operational experiences and statistical analysis support that an APD dosemeter is reasonably equivalent to CaSO4:Dy TL dosemeter. The accuracy, reproducibility and repeatability of the measurement of radiation for (137)Cs are comparable with CaSO4:Dy, TL dosemeter. Operational experience of APD during the normal operation as well as outage showed as one of the best ALARA tool for occupational dose monitoring, control, management and future outage planning. PMID:23528326

  12. Comparison of a RELAP5/MOD2 posttest calculation to the data during the recovery portion of a semiscale single-tube steam generator tube rupture experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.C.

    1986-09-01

    This report discusses the comparisons of a RELAP5 posttest calculation of the recovery portion of the Semiscale Mod-2B test S-SG-1 to the test data. The posttest calculation was performed with the RELAP5/MOD2 cycle 36.02 code without updates. The recovery procedure that was calculated mainly consisted of secondary feed and steam using auxiliary feedwater injection and the atmospheric dump valve of the unaffected steam generator (the steam generator without the tube rupture). A second procedure was initiated after the trends of the secondary feed and steam procedure had been established, and this was to stop the safety injection that had been provided by two trains of both the charging and high pressure injection systems. The Semiscale Mod-2B configuration is a small scale (1/1705), nonnuclear, instrumented, model of a Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactor power plant. S-SG-1 was a single-tube, cold-side, steam generator tube rupture experiment. The comparison of the posttest calculation and data included comparing the general trends and the driving mechanisms of the responses, the phenomena, and the individual responses of the main parameters.

  13. Steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces from the SOUSSA surface-panel method for a fighter wing with tip missile and comparison with experiment and PANAIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Herbert J.

    1987-01-01

    The body surface-panel method SOUSSA is applied to calculate steady and unsteady lift and pitching moment coefficients on a thin fighter-type wing model with and without a tip-mounted missile. Comparisons are presented with experimental results and with PANAIR and PANAIR-related calculations for Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.9. In general the SOUSSA program, the experiments, and the PANAIR (and related) programs give lift and pitching-moment results which agree at least fairly well, except for the unsteady clean-wing experimental moment and the unsteady moment on the wing tip body calculated by a PANAIR-predecessor program at a Mach number of 0.8.

  14. Variation of the resonance width of HOCl(6{nu}{sub OH}) with total angular momentum: Comparison between {ital ab initio} theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Skokov, S.; Bowman, J.M.

    1999-05-01

    Complex L{sup 2} calculations of the variation of (very narrow) resonance widths of the 6{nu}{sub OH} state of HOCl with total angular momentum are reported, using a recently developed, accurate {ital ab initio} potential energy surface [S. Skokov, J. M. Bowman, and K. A. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys. {bold 109}, 2662 (1998)]. The calculations are carried out within the adiabatic rotation approximation for the overall rotation and a truncation/recoupling method for the vibrational states. Comparisons with recent double-resonance experiments of the Rizzo and Sinha groups are made. The variation of resonance width with {ital J} for {ital K}=0 is shown to be due to rotation-induced coupling of the 6{nu}{sub OH} state with a dense set of states with large excitation in the dissociative coordinate. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Lava-snow interactions at Tolbachik 2012-13 eruption: comparison to recent field observations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. R.; Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.; Izbekov, P. E.; Bindeman, I. N.; Gardeev, E.; Muravyev, Y. D.; Melnikov, D.

    2013-12-01

    More than a dozen volcanic eruptions in the past twenty years have produced lava interaction with snow or ice, some of which have produced damaging floods/lahars. However, the factors controlling melting during lava-snow/ice interactions is not well understood. Recent observations from the presently ongoing eruption at Tolbachik, Kamchatka confirm some general observations from large-scale experiments, and recent eruptions (2010 Fimmvorduhals; Edwards et al, 2012), but also show new types of behavior not before described. The new observations provide further constraints on heat transfer between ice/snow and three different lava morphologies: ';a'a, pahoehoe, and toothpaste. ';A'a flows at Tolbachik commonly were able to travel over seasonal snow cover (up to 4 m thick), especially where the snow was covered by tephra within 1.5 km of the vent area. Locally, heated meltwater discharge events issued from beneath the front of advancing lava, even though snow observation pits dug in front of advancing ';a'a flows also showed that in some areas melting was not as extensive. Once, an ';a'a flow was seen to collapse through snow, generating short-lived phreatomagmatic/phreatic activity. Closer to the vent, pahoehoe flow lobes and sheet flows occasionally spilled over onto snow and were able to rapidly transit snow with few obvious signs of melting/steam generation. Most of these flows did melt through basal snow layers within 24 hours however. We were also able to closely observe ';toothpaste' lava flows ';intruding' into snow in several locations, including snow-pits, and to watch it pushing up through snow forming temporary snow domes. Toothpaste lava caused the most rapid melting and most significant volumes of steam, as the meltwater drained down into the intruding lava. Behaviour seen at Tolbachik is similar to historic (e.g., Hekla 1947; Einarrson, 1949) and recent observations (e.g. Fimmvorduhals), as well as large-scale experiments (Edwards et al., 2013). While

  16. Mantle Convection in a Spherical Shell: Comparison of Numerical Simulations with the GeoFlow Experiment on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, F.; Plesa, A.; Egbers, C.; Breuer, D.

    2012-04-01

    Convection in not directly observable fluids or objects with a central symmetry buoyancy field in spherical shells plays an important role in geophysical and astrophysical research. The main focus of this study is to compare two different numerical approaches based on two Navier-Stokes solvers (RESPECT code and GAIA code) with the 'on orbit' experiments called GeoFlowI and GeoFlowII. The numerical simulation of flows in the spherical gap geometry is challenging and requests high accuracy to resolve all relevant scales. Beside isoviscous Rayleigh-B'enard convection the influence of temperature dependent viscosity on the temperature field is investigated. The Simulation of Geophysical Fluid Flow under Microgravity (Geoflow) is an ESA investigation running inside the Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL) on the International Space Station ISS and has the goal to better understand the interior dynamics of our planet [1]. The GeoFlowI mission focused on the simulation of iso-viscous flows, whereas in the GeoFlowII mission the effects of temperature-dependent viscosity are investigated - the latter is more relevant for mantle material. The GAIA software package, developed at DLR, solves the conservation equations of thermal convection for an incompressible Boussinesq fluid with infinite Prandtl number. The discretization of the governing equations is based on the finite-volume method with the advantage of using fully irregular grids [2, 3]. The code can handle viscosity variations of up to 8 orders of magnitude from cell-to-cell and up to 45 orders of magnitude system wide. We further use the pseudo spectral method based code RESPECT modified after [4] to be able to handle viscosity contrast up to 10. The main property of the underlying algorithm is the implicitly treatment of the linear parts and the pseudo spectral calculation of the non-linearities. While the spectral method based code is fast and accurate for small viscosity ratios, the GAIA suite provides stable

  17. Liver cirrhosis grading Child-Pugh class B: a Goliath to challenge in laparoscopic liver resection?—prior experience and matched comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiao; Yu, Tunan; Liang, Yuelong; Jing, Renan; Jiang, Wenbing; Li, Jianbo; Ying, Hanning

    2015-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic hepatectomy (LH) is highly difficult in the background of liver cirrhosis. In this case series, we aimed to summarize our prior experience of LH in liver cirrhosis grading Child-Pugh class B. Methods In the LH database of Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital in Zhejiang, China, patients who were pathologically diagnosed with cirrhosis and graded as Child-Pugh class B or C were reviewed. Results Five patients grading Child B were included. There was no Child C case in our LH database. For included cases, median blood loss (BL) was 800 (range, 240-1,000) mL, median operative time was 135 (range, 80-170) minutes, and median length of hospital stay was 9 (range, 7-15) days. Forty percent (2/5) of patients was converted to open. The postoperative complication (PC) rate was 20.0% (1/5). When these Child B cases were compared with Child A cases undergoing LH, there was no statistical significance in BL, complication rate, operative time, open rate and hospital stay (HS) (P>0.05). This finding was confirmed by two ways of matched comparisons (a 1:2 comparison based on age and gender, and a 1:1 propensity score matching). Conclusions Although relevant literatures had suggested feasibility of LH in cirrhotic cases grading Child A, this study was the first one to discuss the value of LH in Child B cases. Our prior experience showed that in selected patients, LH in Child B patients had the potential to be as safe as in Child A cases. The efficacy of LH in Child C patients needs further exploration. PMID:26734623

  18. Pump-induced wavefront distortion in prototypical NIF/LMJ amplifiers-modeling and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, A; Jancaitis, K; LeTouze, G; Marshall, C; Rotter, M; Seznec, S; Zapata, L

    1998-09-01

    In large-aperture laser amplifiers such as those envisioned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Laser Megajoules (LMJ) lasers, the geometry is such that the front and back faces of the laser slab are heated unevenly by the pump process. This uneven heating results in a mechanical deformation of the laser slab and consequent internal stresses. The deformation and stresses, along with a temperature-dependent refractive index variation, result in phase variations across the laser beam (so-called pump-induced wavefront distortions). These phase variations lead to beam steering which may affect frequency conversion as well as energy-on-target. We have developed a model which allows us to estimate the pump-induced wavefront distortion for a given amplifier configuration as well as the spatially-resolved depolarization. The model is compared with experiments taken in our amplifier development laboratory, AMPLAB

  19. A comparison of theory and experiment for coupled rotor-body stability of a hingeless rotor model in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1988-01-01

    Three cases were selected for correlation from an experiment that examined the aeromechanical stability of a small-scale model of a hingeless rotor and fuselage in hover. The first case examined the stability of a configuration with 0 degree blade pitch so that coupling between dynamic modes was minimized. The second case was identical to the first except the blade pitch was set to 9 degrees which provides flap-lag coupling of the rotor modes. The third case had 9 degrees of blade pitch and also included negative pitch-lag coupling, and therefore was the most highly coupled configuration. Analytical calculations were made by Bell Helicopter Textron, Boeing Vertol, Hughes Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory, and NASA Ames Research Center and compared to some or all of the experimental cases. Overall, the correlation ranged from very poor-to-poor to good.

  20. A comparison of theory and experiment for the aeroelastic stability of a bearingless model rotor in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Seth

    1988-01-01

    Three cases were selected for correlation from an experiment that examined the aeroelastic stability of a small-scale bearingless motor rotor in hover. The 1.8 m diameter model rotor included flap, lead-lag, and torsional degrees of freedom, but no body degrees of freedom. The first case looked at a configuration with a single pitch link on the leading edge, the second case examined a configuration with a single pitch link on the trailing edge, and the third case examined a configuration with pitch links on the leading and trailing edges to simulate a pitch link with shear restraint. Analyses from Bell Helicopter Textron, Boeing Vertol, Hughes Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, and the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory were compared with the data, and the correlation ranged from poor to fair.

  1. A study of small systems containing H and O atoms using nonlocal functionals: Comparison with ab initio and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Seminario, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    Structures and energies have been calculated for HO, H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, HO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and O{sub 3} molecules using the nonlocal functionals PW 86, PW 91, B-P86, and B-LYP with the goal of obtaining their atomization energies. Results were compared with those form highly correlated methods and experiment. It was found that all nonlocal functionals perform similarly to or better than correlated methods MP4 and QCI (using relatively equivalent basis sets). All nonlocal energies were self-consistently calculated using the optimized geometries for each functional. None of the results contain any empirical correction except those inherent to some of the functionals. Increasing the size of the basis set when using the nonlocal functionals does not lead to any significant improvement of the energies and surprisingly it worsens the results for one of the functionals.

  2. Shock recovery experiments in the range of 10 to 45 GPa - comparison of results of synthetic magnetite and terrestrial diabase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, T.; Pesonen, L.; Deutsch, A.; Honnermann, U.; Heikinheimo, E.

    2008-12-01

    Shock-induced changes in magnetic properties of rocks, minerals and meteorites play an important role in modelling the magnetic anomalies of impact structures (e.g. Vredefort), in interpretation of the magnetic anomalies of planetary bodies (e.g. Mars) and in understanding the paleomagnetic data of meteorites. To shed further light on these problems we report results of experimentally shocked samples of synthetic fine grained magnetite. We used cylindrical surface-polished discs (d 10 mm, h 4 mm) of the well characterized magnetite with SD-PSD grain size range. The magnetite powder was mixed with Al2O3 and sintered into disktype pellets. A series of shock recovery experiments from 10 to 45 GPa (nominal pressure) using a conventional high-explosive set-up with a steel (ARMCO) sample container, surrounded by a momentum trap of the identical material. As the samples were shocked inside the highly magnetic containers, the prevailing magnetic field was roughly five times higher than the ambient field. After the shock, the containers cooled down slowly to ambient temperatures. The estimated post-shock temperatures of the samples range from nearly ambient temperature (10 GPa) up to about 1400 K (45 GPa). Evaluating the "real" pressures reached in these experiments requires a model to account for the high porosity of the pellets. The porosity also affects significantly the post-shock temperature. Independent of the fact that pressure, shock- and post- shock tmperatures are not sufficiently constrained yet, the experiments form a well-characterized series of shocks with systematically increasing pressure. Surprisingly enough, the sample discs were not friable and could be removed by retaining shape largely unchanged. The shock induced changes in sample properties show, with the exception of the 45 GPa sample, with increasing shock pressure: 1. Reduction of bulk density and significant increase in porosity 2. Minor increase in magnetic susceptibility (10 GPa, 15 GPa and 45

  3. The MATROSHKA experiment: results and comparison from extravehicular activity (MTR-1) and intravehicular activity (MTR-2A/2B) exposure.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas; Bilski, Paweł; Hajek, Michael; Puchalska, Monika; Reitz, Günther

    2013-12-01

    Astronauts working and living in space are exposed to considerably higher doses and different qualities of ionizing radiation than people on Earth. The multilateral MATROSHKA (MTR) experiment, coordinated by the German Aerospace Center, represents the most comprehensive effort to date in radiation protection dosimetry in space using an anthropomorphic upper-torso phantom used for radiotherapy treatment planning. The anthropomorphic upper-torso phantom maps the radiation distribution as a simulated human body installed outside (MTR-1) and inside different compartments (MTR-2A: Pirs; MTR-2B: Zvezda) of the Russian Segment of the International Space Station. Thermoluminescence dosimeters arranged in a 2.54 cm orthogonal grid, at the site of vital organs and on the surface of the phantom allow for visualization of the absorbed dose distribution with superior spatial resolution. These results should help improve the estimation of radiation risks for long-term human space exploration and support benchmarking of radiation transport codes. PMID:24252101

  4. Collision-induced rotational excitation in N2 (+)((2)Σg (+),v=0)-Ar: Comparison of computations and experiment.

    PubMed

    Unke, Oliver T; Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Bemish, Raymond J; Meuwly, Markus

    2016-06-14

    The collisional dynamics of N2 (+)((2)Σg (+)) cations with Ar atoms is studied using quasi-classical simulations. N2 (+)-Ar is a proxy to study cooling of molecular ions and interesting in its own right for molecule-to-atom charge transfer reactions. An accurate potential energy surface (PES) is constructed from a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) interpolation based on high-level ab initio data. The global PES including the asymptotics is fully treated within the realm of RKHS. From several ten thousand trajectories, the final state distribution of the rotational quantum number of N2 (+) after collision with Ar is determined. Contrary to the interpretation of previous experiments which indicate that up to 98% of collisions are elastic and conserve the quantum state, the present simulations find a considerably larger number of inelastic collisions which supports more recent findings. PMID:27306007

  5. Large amplitude flutter of a low aspect ratio panel at low supersonic speeds comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Kang, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    Flutter boundaries, as well as flutter limit cycle amplitudes, frequencies and stresses were computed for a panel of length-width ratio 4.48 exposed to applied in-plane and transverse loads. The Mach number range was 1.1 to 1.4. The method used involved direct numerical integration of modal equations of motion derived from the nonlinear plate equations of von Karman, coupled with linearized potential flow aerodynamic theory. The flutter boundaries agreed reasonably well with experiment, except when the in-plane loading approached the buckling load. Structural damping had to be introduced, to produce frequencies comparable to the experimental values. Attempts to compute panel deflections or stress at a given point met with limited success. There is some evidence, however, that deflection and stress maxima can be estimated with somewhat greater accuracy.

  6. Comparison of wind tunnel and field experiments to measure potential deposition of fenpropimorph following volatilisation from treated crops.

    PubMed

    Hassink, Jan; Platz, Klaus; Stadler, Reinhold; Zangmeister, Werner; Fent, Gunnar; Möndel, Martin; Kubiak, Roland

    2007-02-01

    The potential for short-range transport via air, i.e. volatilisation from the area of application and subsequent deposition on adjacent non-target areas, was investigated for the fungicide fenpropimorph in a wind tunnel system and under outdoor conditions in a higher-tier field study. Fenpropimorph 750 g L(-1) EC was applied post-emergence to cereal along with a reference standard lindane EC. Stainless steel containers of water were placed at different distances downwind of the application area to trap volatile residues during a study period of 24 h following application. Meteorological conditions in the wind tunnel as well as on the field were constantly monitored during the study period. The wind tunnel system was a partly standardised system on a semi-field scale, i.e. wind direction and wind speed (2 m s(-1)) were constant, but temperature and humidity varied according to the conditions outside. In the field experiment, the average wind speed over the 24 h study period was 3 m s(-1) and no rainfall occurred. Three different measuring lines were installed on the non-target area beside the treated field to cover potential variations in the wind direction. However, no significant differences were observed since the wind direction was generally constant. Fenpropimorph was detected in minor amounts of 0.01-0.05% of the applied material in the wind tunnel experiment. Even at a distance of 1 m beside the treated field, no significant deposition occurred (0.04% of applied material after 24 h). In the field, less than 0.1% of the applied fenpropimorph was detected at 0 m directly beside the treated field. At 5 m distance the deposition values were below 0.04%, and at 20 m distance about 0.01%. In general, the amounts of deposited fenpropimorph detected in the partly standardised wind tunnel system and the higher-tier field study were in good agreement. PMID:17154244

  7. Comparison between the electron cyclotron current drive experiments on DIII-D and predictions for T-10

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Matsuda, Kyoko; Moeller, C.P.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R. ); James, R.A. ); Giruzzi, G. ); Gorelov, Y. ); DeHaas, J. (Joint European Torus Un

    1990-11-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak in an experiment in which {approximately}1 MW of microwave power generated {approximately}50 kA of non-inductive current. The rf-generated portion was about 15% of the total current. On the T-10 tokamak, more than 3 MW of microwave power will be available for current generation, providing the possibility that all the plasma current could be maintained by this method. Fokker-Planck calculations using the code CQL3D and ray tracing calculations using TORAY have been performed to model both experiments. For DIII-D the agreement between the calculations and measurements is good, producing confidence in the validity of the computational models. The same calculations using the T-10 geometry predict that for n{sub e}(0) {approximately} 1.8 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}, and T{sub e}(0) {approximately} 7 keV, 1.2 MW, that is, the power available from only three gyrotrons, could generate as much as 150 kA of non-inductive current. Parameter space scans in which temperature, density and resonance location were varied have been performed to indicate the current drive expected under different experimental conditions. The residual dc electric field was considered in the DIII-D analysis because of its nonlinear effect on the electron distribution, which complicates the interpretation of the results. A 110 GHz ECH system is being installed on DIII-D. Initial operations, planned for late 1991, will use four gyrotrons with 500 kW each and 10 second output pulses. Injection will be from the low field side from launchers which can be steered to heat at the desired location. These launchers, two of which are presently installed, are set at 20 degrees to the radial and rf current drive studies are planned for the initial operation. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  8. TRAC PF1/MOD1 calculations and data comparisons for mist feed and bleed and steam generator tube rupture experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Siebe, D.A.; Boyack, B.E.; Steiner, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the Integral System Test (IST) program initiated in June 1983 for the purpose of providing integral system test data on specific issues/phenomena relevant to post-small-break loss-of-coolant accidents, loss of feedwater and other transients in Babcock and Wilcox (BandW) plant designs. The Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) facility is the largest single component in the IST program. MIST is a 2 /times/ 4 (two hot legs and steam generators (SGs), four cold legs and reactor coolant pumps) representation of lowered-loop reactor system of the BandW design. It is a full-height, full-pressure facility with 1/817 power and volume scaling. Two other integral experimental facilities are included in the IST program: test loops at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at SRI International (SRI-2). The objective of the IST tests is to generate high-quality experimental data to be used for assessing thermal-hydraulic safety computer codes. Efforts are under way at Los Alamos to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 against data from each of the IST facilities. Calculations and data comparisons for TRAC-PF1/MOD1 assessment are presented for two transients run in the MIST facility. These are MIST Test 330302, a feed and bleed test with delayed high-pressure injection; and Test 3404AA, an SG tube-rupture test with the affected SG isolated. Only MIST assessment results are presented in this paper. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculations completed to date for MIST tests are in reasonable agreement with the data from these tests. Reasonable agreement is defined as meaning that major trends are predicted correctly, although TRAC values are frequently outside the range of data uncertainty. We believe that correct conclusions will be reached if the code is used in similar applications despite minor code/model deficiencies. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Comparison of Aromatic Hydrocarbon Measurements made by PTR-MS, DOAS and GC-FID during the MCMA 2003 Field Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jobson, Bertram T.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Velasco, E.; Allwine, Gene; Westberg, Halvor H.; Lamb, Brian K.; Alexander, M. L.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Molina, Luisa T.

    2010-02-15

    A comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements is reported for the CENICA upersite in the district of Iztapalapa during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field experiment in April 2003 (MCMA 2003). Data from three different measurement methods were compared: a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), long path measurements using a UV Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (DOAS), and Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization analysis (GC-FID) of canister samples. The principle focus was on the comparison between PTR-MS and DOAS data. Lab tests established that the PTR-MS and DOAS calibrations were consistent for a suite of aromatic compounds including benzene, toluene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, phenol and styrene. The point sampling measurements by the PTR-MS and GC-FID showed good correlations (r=0.6), and were in reasonable agreement for toluene, C₂-alkylbenzenes and C3-alkylbenzenes. The PTR-MS benzene data were consistently high, indicating interference from ethylbenzene fragmentation for the 145 Td drift field intensity used in the experiment. Correlations between the open-path data measured at 16-m height over a 860-m path length (retroreflector in 430m distance), and the point measurements collected at 37-m sampling height were best for benzene (r=0.61), and reasonably good for toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes, naphthalene, styrene, cresols and phenol (r>0.5). There was good agreement between DOAS and PTR-MS measurements of benzene after correction for the PTR-MS ethylbenzene interference. Mixing ratios easured by DOAS were on average a factor of 1.7 times greater than the PTR-MS data for toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes, naphthalene and styrene. The level of agreement for the toluene data displayed a modest dependence on wind direction, establishing that spatial gradients - horizontal, vertical, or both – in toluene mixing ratios were significant, and up to a factor of 2 despite the fact that all measurements were conducted above

  10. Comparison of morphology of active cyclic steps created by turbidity currents on Squamish Delta, British Columbia, Canada with flume experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, Miwa; Yamamoto, Shinya; Higuchi, Hiroyuki; Hughes Clarke, John E.; Izumi, Norihiro

    2015-04-01

    Upper-flow-regime bedforms, such as cyclic steps and antidunes, have been reported to be formed by turbidity currents. Their formative conditions are, however, not fully understood because of the difficulty of field surveys in the deep sea. Field observations of turbidity currents and seabed topography on the Squamish delta in Howe Sound, British Columbia, Canada have been undertaken which found bedwaves actively migrating in the upstream direction in channels formed on the prodelta slope. Their topography and behavior suggest that they are cyclic steps formed by turbidity currents. Because Squamish delta is as shallow as around 150 m, and easy to access compared with general submarine canyons, it is thought to be one of the best places for studying characteristics of cyclic steps formed by turbidity currents through field observations. In this study, we have analyzed configurations of cyclic steps with the use of data obtained in the field observation of 2011, and compare them with the data from the flume experiments. On the prodelta slope, three major active channels are clearly developed. In addition to the sonar survey, a 600 kHz ADCP was installed in 150m of water just seaward of the termination of the North Channel. In addition, 1200kHz ADCP and 500kHz M3s are suspended from the research vessel in 60 m of water and 300 m distance from the delta edge. We selected images showing large daily differences. The steps move vigorously at the upper 600m parts of the prodelta slope, so that we measured the steps in this area. From the profiles perpendicular to the bedwave crest lines through the center of channels, wavelength and wave height for each step, mean slope were measured on the software for quantitative image analyses manually. Wave steepness for each step was calculated using the wavelength and wave height measured as above. The mean slope ranges from 6.8° ~ 2.7° (more proximal, steeper), mean wavelength and wave heights of steps range from 24.5 to 87.6m

  11. Statics and dynamics of halide sub-monolayer electrosorption on silver: Computer simulations with comparison to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Hamad, Ibrahim

    This dissertation investigates equilibrium and dynamical properties of sub-monolayer chemical adsorption of Br and Cl on single-crystal Ag(100) electrodes. Computational methods, such as Monte Carlo simulations with First-order Reversal Curve analysis, are used along with experimental data in this study. Monte Carlo simulations of a two-dimensional lattice-gas approximation for the adlayer are used to explore equilibrium properties of the system. Lateral interaction energies between adsorbates, as well other system parameters like the electrosorption valency, are determined by fitting simulations to experimental chronocoulometry isotherms. While neither the electrosorption valency nor the lateral interactions show any dependence on the adsorbate coverage for the Br/Ag(100) system, a model in which both are coverage dependent is required to adequately describe the Cl/Ag(100) system. A self-consistent, entirely electrostatic picture of the lateral interactions with coverage dependence is developed, and a relationship between the lateral interactions and the electrosorption valency is investigated for Cl on Ag(100). The adsorbates form a disordered adlayer at low electrochemical potentials. At a more positive elctrochemical potential the adlayer undergoes a disorder-order phase transition at to an ordered c(2 x 2) phase. This phase transition produces a peak in the current density observed in cyclic-voltammetry experiments. Kinetic Monte Carlo of the lattice-gas model are used to simulate cyclic-voltammetry experiments. The scan-rate dependence of the separation between positive- and negative-going peaks in cyclic voltammetry simulations are compared to experimental peak separations. This dynamics study identifies the inverse Monte Carlo attempt frequency with a physical timescale. Although kinetic Monte Carlo simulations can provide long-time simulations of the dynamics of physical and chemical systems, this identification is not yet possible in general. To further

  12. Low-speed impact simulations into regolith in support of asteroid sampling mechanism design I: Comparison with 1-g experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Stephen R.; Michel, Patrick; Richardson, Derek C.; Yano, Hajime

    2014-11-01

    This study is carried out in the framework of sample-return missions to asteroids that use a low-speed projectile as the primary component of its sampling mechanism (e.g., JAXA's Hayabusa and Hayabusa2 missions). We perform numerical simulations of such impacts into granular materials using different projectile shapes under Earth's gravity. We then compare the amounts of ejected mass obtained in our simulations against what was found in experiments that used similar setups, which allows us to validate our numerical approach. We then investigate the sensitivity of various parameters involved in the contacts between grains on the amount of mass that is ejected. For the targets, we consider 2 different monodisperse grain-diameter sizes: 5 mm and 3 mm. The impact speed of the projectile is 11 m s-1, and is directed downward, perpendicular to the surface of the targets. Using an implementation of the soft-sphere discrete element method (SSDEM) in the N-body gravity tree code pkdgrav, previously validated in the context of low-speed impacts into sintered glass bead agglomerates, we find a noticeable dependence of the amount of ejected mass on the projectile shape. As found in experiments, in the case of the larger target grain size (5 mm), a conically shaped projectile ejects a greater amount of mass than do projectiles of other shapes, including disks and spheres. We then find that numerically the results are sensitive to the normal coefficient of restitution of the grains, especially for impacts into targets comprising smaller grains (3 mm). We also find that static friction plays a more important role for impacts into targets comprising the larger grains. As a preliminary demonstration, one of these considered setups is simulated in a microgravity environment. As expected, a reduction in gravity increases both the amount of ejected mass and the timescale of the impact process. A dedicated quantitative study in microgravity is the subject of future work. We also plan

  13. Comparison of beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging edge fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Smith, D.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the close physical proximity of the Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) is leveraged to directly compare fluctuation measurements, and to study the local effects of the GPI neutral deuterium puff during H-mode plasmas without large Edge Localized Modes. The GPI and BES views on NSTX provide partially overlapping coverage of the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) regions above the outboard midplane. The separation in the toroidal direction is 16°, and field lines passing through diagnostic views are separated by ∼20 cm in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Strong cross-correlation is observed, and strong cross-coherence is seen for frequencies between 5 and 15 kHz. Also, probability distribution functions of fluctuations measured ∼3 cm inside the separatrix exhibit only minor deviations from a normal distribution for both diagnostics, and good agreement between correlation length estimates, decorrelation times, and structure velocities is found at the ±40% level. While the two instruments agree closely in many respects, some discrepancies are observed. Most notably, GPI normalized fluctuation levels exceed BES fluctuations by a factor of ∼9. BES mean intensity is found to be sensitive to the GPI neutral gas puff, and BES normalized fluctuation levels for frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz are observed to increase during the GPI puff.

  14. Interface Shape and Speed of a Surfactant Monolayer Spreading on a Thin Liquid Film: Comparison Between Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troian, Sandra M.; Dussaud, Anne D.; Matar, Omar K.

    1998-11-01

    Marangoni convection of a surfactant monolayer at a free surface produces significant deformation in thin films. Numerical solutions of the film thickness predict significant thinning near the surfactant source and an elevated rim at the monolayer leading edge. While previous experimental studies have sought the relation governing the speed of the surfactant film, we focus instead on the evolution of the film thickness, whose interface shape provides an even more stringent test of the model equations. Using refracted image Moiré topography, we obtain the time variant shape and speed of an insoluble surfactant monolayer spreading on a thin viscous liquid. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained when the surfactant reservoir is modelled as a finite source (despite an excess of surfactant at the origin) and when a small level of pre-existing surface contamination is introduced (Troian, Dussaud and Matar, submitted to Phys. Fluids (1998)). Our studies reveal that perhaps more than any other features, the degree of film thinning (which determines the efflux of material from the source) and the presence of pre-existing surface contamination ultimately determine the optimal conditions for rapid and efficient transport of surfactant.

  15. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Lundberg, D. P.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Boedo, J.; Umansky, M.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.

  16. Comparison of two types of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ashes with different alkaline reagents in washing experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fenfen; Takaoka, Masaki; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we propose a "washing-calcination-conversion of washed fly ash into cement material with bottom ash" (WCCB) system to reduce the amount of fly ash that must be specially treated so it can be used as raw cement material. Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) is widely used in air-pollution control devices of incinerators while sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is not. We conducted single-, double-, and triple-washing experiments to compare the washing characteristics of two types of fly ash. Unlike NaHCO3 fly ash, Ca(OH)2 fly ash has almost twice as much washed residue and almost 2.5 times more chlorine after the same washing procedure. After washing once, the washing frequency is also important for NaHCO3 fly ash, while the mixing time and liquid/solid ratio are more critical for Ca(OH)2 fly ash. The use of NaHCO3 is more suitable for the WCCB system. PMID:18539449

  17. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Lundberg, D. P.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Boedo, J.; et al

    2011-01-01

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from themore » simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.« less

  18. Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: a comparison of observations obtained during the INCA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, J.; Seifert, M.; Kärcher, B.; Ovarlez, J.; Minikin, A.; Gayet, J.-F.; Krejci, R.; Petzold, A.; Auriol, F.; Haag, W.; Busen, R.; Schumann, U.; Hansson, H. C.

    2003-10-01

    Based on in-situ observations performed during the Interhemispheric differences in cirrus properties from anthropogenic emissions (INCA) experiment, we introduce and discuss the cloud presence fraction (CPF) defined as the ratio between the number of data points determined to represent cloud at a given ambient relative humidity over ice (RHI) divided by the total number of data points at that value of RHI. The CPFs are measured with four different cloud probes. Within similar ranges of detected particle sizes and concentrations, it is shown that different cloud probes yield results that are in good agreement with each other. The CPFs taken at Southern Hemisphere (SH) and Northern Hemisphere (NH) midlatitudes differ from each other. Above ice saturation, clouds occurred more frequently during the NH campaign. Local minima in the CPF as a function of RHI are interpreted as a systematic underestimation of cloud presence when cloud particles become invisible to cloud probes. Based on this interpretation, we find that clouds during the SH campaign formed preferentially at RHIs between 140 and 155%, whereas clouds in the NH campaign formed at RHIs somewhat below 130%. The data show that interstitial aerosol and ice particles coexist down to RHIs of 70-90%, demonstrating that the ability to distinguish between different particle types in cirrus conditions depends on the sensors used to probe the aerosol/cirrus system. Observed distributions of cloud water content differ only slightly between the NH and SH campaigns and seem to be only weakly, if at all, affected by the freezing aerosols.

  19. Space and time distribution of HF excited Langmuir turbulence in the ionosphere: Comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, D. F.; Hanssen, Alfred; Rose, Harvey A.; Russell, David

    1993-10-01

    The predictions of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) theory are compared with radar observations of HF induced turbulence at Arecibo and Tromsø. The altitude distribution of turbulence observed in the cold start experiments of Fejer et al. (1991) imply that the ionospheric electron density profile is modified by the induced turbulence. The preconditioned observations at Arecibo and the Tromsø observations also appear to require a ``disturbed'' profile with several percent density fluctuations. With such density modifications postulated we conclude that SLT theory is in, at least, qualitative agreement with a large body of observations. Specifically SLT theory predicts, as part of a unified theory, and in distinction to the weak turbulence approximation, at least four unique physical signatures which can be compared to observations: (1) A caviton continuum plus free mode peak in the plasma line power spectrum near reflection altitude for Arecibo conditions. (2) A truncated decay-cascade spectrum at lower altitudes (or densities). (3) A continuous spectrum underlying the decay-cascade spectrum. (4) A zero frequency feature in the ion line power spectrum directly related to caviton dynamics. We find that there is sufficient ponderomotive pressure due to the Airy-layered, induced Langmuir turbulence, to modify the electron density profile in a manner consistent with the time behavior of unpreconditioned Arecibo observations.

  20. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision. PMID:25406110

  1. A comparison of vertical velocity in cirrus obtained from aircraft and lidar divergence measurements during FIRE. [First ISCCP Regional Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, A. J.; Lenschow, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are presented to obtain vertical velocity in cirrus clouds from in situ aircraft lateral wind measurements and from ground-based remote Doppler lidar measurements. The approach used is to calculate w from the integral of the divergence of the horizontal velocity around a closed path. Divergence measurements from both aircraft and Doppler lidar are discussed. The principal errors in the calculation of w from aircraft lateral wind measurements are bias in the lateral wind, ground speed errors, and error due to vertical shear of the horizontal wind. For Doppler lidar measurements the principal errors are in the estimate of mean terminal velocity and the zeroth order coefficients of the Fourier series that is fitted to the data. The technique is applied to a cirrus cloud investigated during the FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) Cirrus Intensive Field Observation Program. The results indicate that the error in w is about + or - 14 cm/s from the aircraft technique; this can be reduced to about + or - 2 to 3 cm/s with technical improvements in both ground speed and lateral velocity measurements. The error in w from Doppler lidar measurements, which is about + or - 8 cm/s, can be reduced to about + or - 5 cm/s by improvements in the Doppler velocity measurements with technology that is currently available.

  2. Two fluid effects on three-dimensional reconnection in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment with comparisons to space data

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.; Cothran, C.D.; Fung, J.

    2006-05-15

    Several new experimental results are reported from spheromak merging studies at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment [M. R. Brown, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1717 (1999)] with relevance to three-dimensional (3D) reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas. First, recent velocity measurements of impurity ions using ion Doppler spectroscopy are reported. Bidirectional outflow at nearly the Alfven speed is clearly observed. Second, experimental measurements of the out-of-plane magnetic field in a reconnection volume showing a quadrupolar structure at the ion inertial scale are discussed. Third, a measurement of in-plane Hall electric field and nonideal terms of the generalized Ohm's law in a reconnection volume of a weakly collisional laboratory plasma is presented. Time resolved vector magnetic field measurements on a 3D lattice [B(r,t)] enables evaluation of the various terms. Results show that the Hall electric field dominates everywhere (JxB/ne) and also exhibits a quadrupolar structure at the ion inertial scale; resistive and electron inertia terms are small. Each of these is related to and compared with similar measurements in a solar or space context.

  3. Ionization of small molecules induced by H+, H e+ , and N+ projectiles: Comparison of experiment with quantum and classical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, S. T. S.; Herczku, P.; Juhász, Z.; Sarkadi, L.; Gulyás, L.; Sulik, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report the energy and angular distribution of ejected electrons from C H4 and H2O molecules impacted by 1 MeV H+, H e+ , and 650 keV N+ ions. Spectra were measured at different observation angles, from 2 to 2000 eV. The obtained absolute double-differential electron-emission cross sections (DDCSs) were compared with the results of classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) and continuum distorted wave, eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) calculations. For the bare H+ projectile both theories show remarkable agreement with the experiment at all observed angles and energies. The CTMC results are in similarly good agreement with the DDCS spectra obtained for impact by dressed H e+ and N+ ions, where screening effects and electron loss from the projectile gain importance. The CDW-EIS calculations slightly overestimate the electron loss for 1 MeV H e+ impact, and overestimate both the target and projectile ionization at low emitted electron energies for 650 keV N+ impact. The contribution of multiple electron scattering by the projectile and target centers (Fermi shuttle) dominates the N+-impact spectra at higher electron energies, and it is well reproduced by the nonperturbative CTMC calculations. The contributions of different processes in medium-velocity collisions of dressed ions with molecules are determined.

  4. The initial magnetic susceptibility of polydisperse ferrofluids: A comparison between experiment and theory over a wide range of concentration.

    PubMed

    Solovyova, Anna Y; Goldina, Olga A; Ivanov, Alexey O; Lebedev, Aleksandr V; Elfimova, Ekaterina A

    2016-08-28

    Temperature dependencies of the static initial magnetic susceptibility for ferrofluids at various concentrations are studied using experiment and statistical-mechanical theories. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are carried out for twelve samples of magnetite-based fluids stabilized with oleic acid over a wide range of temperatures (210 K ≲T ≲ 390 K); all samples have the same granulometric composition but different volume ferroparticle concentrations (0.2 ≲ φ ≲ 0.5). Experimental results are analyzed using three theories: the second-order modified mean-field theory (MMF2) [A. O. Ivanov and O. B. Kuznetsova, Phys. Rev. E 64, 41405 (2001)]; its correction for polydisperse ferrofluids arising from Mayer-type cluster expansion and taking into account the first terms of the polydisperse second virial coefficient [A. O. Ivanov and E. A. Elfimova, J. Magn. Magn. Mater 374, 327 (2015)]; and a new theory based on MMF2 combined with the first terms of the polydisperse second and third virial contributions to susceptibility. It turns out that the applicability of each theory depends on the experimental sample density. If twelve ferrofluid samples are split into three groups of strong, moderate, and low concentrated fluids, the temperature dependences of the initial magnetic susceptibility in each group are very precisely described by one of the three theories mentioned above. The determination of a universal formula predicting a ferrofluid susceptibility over a broad range of concentrations and temperatures remains as a challenge. PMID:27586948

  5. Search for Spin-Dependent Short-Range Interaction with an 3He/129Xe Clock Comparison Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tullney, Kathlynne; Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Sobolev, Yuri; Allmendinger, Fabian; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    We performed an experiment to search for a new spin-dependent P- and T-violating nucleon-nucleon interaction σ→ ṡr̂ which is mediated by light pseudoscalar bosons such as axions or axionlike particles. This interaction causes a shift Δν in the precession frequency of nuclear spin polarized gases in the presence of an unpolarized mass. In order to measure this frequency shift a 3He/129Xe comagnetometer was used which is based on the detection of free precession of 3He and 129Xe nuclear spins using SQUIDs as detectors. For the upper limit of Δνsp we obtained 7.1nHz. With this value, an upper limit of the scalar-pseudoscalar coupling of the axion to the spin of a bound neutron could be deduced within the axion mass window. For axion masses between 2 and 500μeV, the laboratory upper bounds were improved by up to 4 orders of magnitude.

  6. Comparison of experiment and models of geodesic acoustic mode frequency and amplitude geometric scaling in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, P.; Conway, G. D.; Stroth, U.; Biancalani, A.; Palermo, F.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-04-01

    In a set of dedicated ASDEX Upgrade shape-scan experiments, the influence of plasma geometry on the frequency and amplitude behaviour of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), measured by Doppler reflectometry, is studied. In both limiter and divertor configurations, the plasma elongation was varied between circular and highly elongated states (1.1<κ <1.8 ). Also, the edge safety factor was scanned between 3  <  q  <  5. The GAM frequency {ω\\text{GAM}} and amplitude are used to test several models (heuristic, fluid and gyrokinetic based), which incorporate various plasma geometry effects. The experimentally observed effect of decreasing {ω\\text{GAM}} with increasing κ is predicted by most models. Other geometric factors, such as inverse aspect ratio ε and Shafranov shift gradient {Δ\\prime} are also seen to be influential in determining a reliable lower {ω\\text{GAM}} boundary. The GAM amplitude is found to vary with boundary elongation {κ\\text{b}} and safety factor q. The collisional damping is compared to multiple models for the collisionless damping. Collisional damping appears to play a stronger role in the divertor configuration, while collisional and collisionless damping both may contribute to the GAM amplitude in the limiter configuration.

  7. Analysis of Radiation from Implosions of Stainless Steel Wire Arrays on Zebra and Comparison with Laser Plasma Experiments on Leopard at UNR*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Osborne, G. C.; Williamson, K. M.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Esaulov, A. A.; Wiewior, P.; Legalloudec, N.; Paudel, Y.; Coverdale, C. A.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2011-10-01

    The implosions of Stainless Steel (SS) Wire Arrays are extensively studied at SNL and also have applications in astrophysics. The analysis of radiation from low-number-wire SS Single and Nested Cylindrical, and Planar Wire Array experiments on the 1 MA Zebra is presented. The major focus is on x-ray imaging and spectra, total radiation yields, and fast, filtered x-ray detector data. The results of Leopard laser experiments with a flat 25 μm Fe target in the nanosecond (ns) and 350 femtosecond (fs) pulse regimes are discussed and compared with Z-pinch data. This comparison focuses mainly on L-shell Fe radiation and provides an excellent benchmark to the Z-pinch results. Good agreement with laser data is demonstrated in the ns regime, but a substantial difference is observed for the fs pulse. This work was supported by NNSA under DOE Coop. Agreements DE-FC52-06NA27588, 27586, and 27616. SNL is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Co., for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Dew Incidence: a Field Study (related to Corn) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia with Comparisons to a Similar Experiment in Texas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amodi, Ahmad Osman

    An experiment was designed, assembled and carried out at the Hada Al-Sham Experimental station in the dry western part of Saudi Arabia, to procure dew duration data at two different heights in a corn canopy, from the time of emergence (average plant heights about 30 cm) until harvest time (average height about 230 cm). Micrometeorological, together with canopy and additional environmental measurements, were taken to deduce the latent heat flux involved in dew onset and dry-off. The micrometeorological measurements included leaf and air temperatures, relative humidity, net radiation, wind speeds and direction, while other observations included canopy heights, leaf width, leaf area index (LAI), soil temperature, soil moisture, and dew duration. The energy balance approach (Penman-Monteith), along with boundary layer resistance theory around the leaf surface, were used to estimate the latent heat flux involved in the dew process. It was found that at the beginning of the season dew usually started to form on the lower part of the canopy at an average of three hours before it started to form in the upper part. On the other hand, as the canopy reached the mature stage, dew formation on the upper part of the canopy started an average of two hours before it started to form on the lower part. It took averages of one hour and an hour and half after sunrise, for the lower and upper part of the canopy to dry-off respectively. A linear regression analysis of the latent heat and environmental variables showed high correlations with net radiation, leaf and air temperatures, relative humidity, soil temperature at 2cm depth from top of the furrow at both canopy heights for the whole growing season, whereas wind speed showed high correlation for the upper part of the canopy only. It is suggested that many more studies are necessary to increase understanding of the dew process but less comprehensive instrumentation would probably be adequate.

  9. Impact of dilution on microbial community structure and functional potential: comparison of numerical simulations and batch culture experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, R. B.; Garland, J. L.; Bolster, C. H.; Mills, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    A series of microcosm experiments was performed using serial dilutions of a sewage microbial community to inoculate a set of batch cultures in sterile sewage. After inoculation, the dilution-defined communities were allowed to regrow for several days and a number of community attributes were measured in the regrown assemblages. Based upon a set of numerical simulations, community structure was expected to differ along the dilution gradient; the greatest differences in structure were anticipated between the undiluted-low-dilution communities and the communities regrown from the very dilute (more than 10(-4)) inocula. Furthermore, some differences were expected among the lower-dilution treatments (e.g., between undiluted and 10(-1)) depending upon the evenness of the original community. In general, each of the procedures used to examine the experimental community structures separated the communities into at least two, often three, distinct groups. The groupings were consistent with the simulated dilution of a mixture of organisms with a very uneven distribution. Significant differences in community structure were detected with genetic (amplified fragment length polymorphism and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism), physiological (community level physiological profiling), and culture-based (colony morphology on R2A agar) measurements. Along with differences in community structure, differences in community size (acridine orange direct counting), composition (ratio of sewage medium counts to R2A counts, monitoring of each colony morphology across the treatments), and metabolic redundancy (i.e., generalist versus specialist) were also observed, suggesting that the differences in structure and diversity of communities maintained in the same environment can be manifested as differences in community organization and function.

  10. Injustice Experience Questionnaire, Japanese Version: Cross-Cultural Factor-Structure Comparison and Demographics Associated with Perceived Injustice

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Tomonori; Mibu, Akira; Nishigami, Tomohiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hironobu; Matsuda, Yoichi; Sato, Hitoaki; Hayashi, Kenichi; Cui, Renzhe; Takao, Yumiko; Shibata, Masahiko; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Injustice Experience Questionnaire (IEQ) assesses injury-related perceived injustice. This study aimed to (1) develop a Japanese version (IEQ-J), (2) examine its factor structure, validity, and reliability, and (3) discover which demographic variable(s) positively contributed to prediction of IEQ-J scores. Methods Data from 71 patients (33 male, 38 female; age = 20+) with injury pain were employed to investigate factor structure by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Concurrent validity was examined by Pearson correlation coefficients among the IEQ-J, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Internal consistency was investigated by Cronbach’s alpha, and test-retest reliability was indicated with intra-class correlations (ICCs) in 42 of 71 patients within four weeks. Relations between demographic variables and IEQ-J scores were examined by covariance analysis and linear regression models. Results IEQ-J factor structure differed from the original two-factor model. A three-factor model with Severity/irreparability, Blame/unfairness, and Perceived lack of empathy was extracted. The three-factor model showed goodness-of-fit with the data and sufficient reliability (Cronbach’s alpha of 0.90 for total IEQ-J; ICCs = 0.96). Pearson correlation coefficients among IEQ-J, BPI, and PCS ranged from 0.38 to 0.73. Pain duration over a year (regression coefficient, 11.92, 95%CI; 5.95–17.89) and liability for injury on another (regression coefficient, 12.17, 95%CI; 6.38–17.96) predicted IEQ-J total scores. Conclusions This study evidenced the IEQ-J’s sound psychometric properties. The three-factor model was the latter distinctive in the Japanese version. Pain duration over a year and injury liability by another statistically significantly increased IEQ-J scores. PMID:27487288

  11. Investigation of capillary nanosecond discharges in air at moderate pressure: comparison of experiments and 2D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, Andrei V.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-01

    Nanosecond electrical discharges in the form of ionization waves are of interest for rapidly ionizing and exciting complex gas mixtures to initiate chemical reactions. Operating with a small discharge tube diameter can significantly increase the specific energy deposition and so enable optimization of the initiation process. Analysis of the uniformity of energy release in small diameter capillary tubes will aid in this optimization. In this paper, results for the experimentally derived characteristics of nanosecond capillary discharges in air at moderate pressure are presented and compared with results from a two-dimensional model. The quartz capillary tube, having inner and outer diameters of 1.5 and 3.4 mm, is about 80 mm long and filled with synthetic dry air at 27 mbar. The capillary tube with two electrodes at the ends is inserted into a break of the central wire of a long coaxial cable. A metal screen around the tube is connected to the cable ground shield. The discharge is driven by a 19 kV 35 ns voltage pulse applied to the powered electrode. The experimental measurements are conducted primarily by using a calibrated capacitive probe and back current shunts. The numerical modelling focuses on the fast ionization wave (FIW) and the plasma properties in the immediate afterglow after the conductive plasma channel has been established between the two electrodes. The FIW produces a highly focused region of electric field on the tube axis that sustains the ionization wave that eventually bridges the electrode gap. Results from the model predict FIW propagation speed and current rise time that agree with the experiment.

  12. Aspect ratio effects on neoclassical tearing modes from comparison between DIII-D and National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.; Buttery, R. J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Brennan, D. P.

    2012-06-01

    Neoclassical tearing mode islands are sustained by helically perturbed bootstrap currents arising at finite beta from toroidal effects that trap a fraction of the particles in non-circulating orbits. DIII-D and NSTX are here operated with similar shape and cross-sectional area but almost a factor of two difference in inverse aspect ratio a /R. In these experiments, destabilized n =1 tearing modes were self-stabilized (reached the "marginal point") by reducing neutral-beam power and thus beta. The measure of the marginal island gives information on the small-island stabilizing physics that in part (with seeding) governs onset. The marginal island width on NSTX is found to be about three times the ion banana width and agrees with that measured in DIII-D, except for DIII-D modes closer to the magnetic axis, which are about two times the ion banana width. There is a balance of the helically perturbed bootstrap term with small island effects with the sum of the classical and curvature terms in the modified Rutherford equation for tearing-mode stability at the experimental marginal point. Empirical evaluation of this sum indicates that while the stabilizing effect of the curvature term is negligible in DIII-D, it is important in NSTX. The mode temporal behavior from the start of neutral-beam injection reduction also suggests that NSTX operates closer to marginal classical tearing stability; this explains why there is little hysteresis in beta between mode onset, saturation, and self-stabilization (while DIII-D has large hysteresis in beta). NIMROD code module component calculations based on DIII-D and NSTX reconstructed experimental equilibria are used to diagnose and confirm the relative importance of the stabilizing curvature effect, an advantage for low aspect ratio; the relatively greater curvature effect makes for less susceptibility to NTM onset even if the classical tearing stability index is near marginal.

  13. Aspect ratio effects on neoclassical tearing modes from comparison between DIII-D and National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.; Buttery, R. J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Brennan, D. P.

    2012-06-15

    Neoclassical tearing mode islands are sustained by helically perturbed bootstrap currents arising at finite beta from toroidal effects that trap a fraction of the particles in non-circulating orbits. DIII-D and NSTX are here operated with similar shape and cross-sectional area but almost a factor of two difference in inverse aspect ratio a/R. In these experiments, destabilized n=1 tearing modes were self-stabilized (reached the 'marginal point') by reducing neutral-beam power and thus beta. The measure of the marginal island gives information on the small-island stabilizing physics that in part (with seeding) governs onset. The marginal island width on NSTX is found to be about three times the ion banana width and agrees with that measured in DIII-D, except for DIII-D modes closer to the magnetic axis, which are about two times the ion banana width. There is a balance of the helically perturbed bootstrap term with small island effects with the sum of the classical and curvature terms in the modified Rutherford equation for tearing-mode stability at the experimental marginal point. Empirical evaluation of this sum indicates that while the stabilizing effect of the curvature term is negligible in DIII-D, it is important in NSTX. The mode temporal behavior from the start of neutral-beam injection reduction also suggests that NSTX operates closer to marginal classical tearing stability; this explains why there is little hysteresis in beta between mode onset, saturation, and self-stabilization (while DIII-D has large hysteresis in beta). NIMROD code module component calculations based on DIII-D and NSTX reconstructed experimental equilibria are used to diagnose and confirm the relative importance of the stabilizing curvature effect, an advantage for low aspect ratio; the relatively greater curvature effect makes for less susceptibility to NTM onset even if the classical tearing stability index is near marginal.

  14. Polycapillary lenses for Soft-X-ray transmission: Model, comparison with experiments and potential application for tomographic measurements in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazon, D.; Abadie, Q.; Dorchies, F.; Lecherbourg, L.; Mollard, A.; Malard, P.; Dabagov, S.

    2015-07-01

    In tokamaks, plasma emits as a volumetric Soft-X-ray (SXR) source. Emitted X-rays can give very useful information about plasma stability, shape and impurity content. Measuring the Soft X-ray (SXR) radiation ([0.1-20 keV]) of magnetic fusion plasmas is a standard way of accessing valuable information on particle transport and MagnetoHydroDynamic. Generally, like at Tore Supra in France, the analysis is performed with a 2D tomographic system composed of several cameras equipped with detectors like Silicon Barrier Diodes spread in periphery of the tokamak. Unfortunately, the strong constraints imposed by the environment of a tokamak reactor (high neutron fluxes, gamma and hard X-ray emission, high magnetic field and high radiofrequency powers) do not authorize to install in a close vicinity of the machine such detectors. We have thus investigated the possibility of using polycapillary lenses to transport the SXR information to several meters from the plasma, not necessarily in a straight line. The idea is to protect the SXR detector from the entire environment by a proper shielding. Different polycapillary lenses could be used for that purpose and have been tested in collaboration with CELIA (CEA-CNRS) of Bordeaux. Transmission of the order of 20% where observed for the low energetic part of the spectrum (down to 3 keV) while still 10% were observed for the remaining part (from 3 to 10 keV). In parallel a model of polycapillary transmission has been developed and validated against experiment. Results are presented confirming the great potential of polycapillary lenses for SXR transmission in tokamak plasma. Studies of the influence of geometrical parameters like diameter and curvature of the channels, on the photons transmission is also presented.

  15. Use the superconducting proximity effect to investigate alkali metal films and the comparison between the experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Manjiang

    Bilayers of Pb and the alkali metals Cs, Rb, K and Na were quench condensed on the quartz plate. The transition temperature measurement provides information about interface barriers between the Pb and the alkali metals. Such a barrier, which is not due to impurities or oxidation, is particularly large in Pb/Cs sandwiches. The thin K film is forced into an insulating state by being covered with sub-monolayers of Pb. The SPE is used to investigate the electronic change in the alkali film. The K film behaves as if its electrons are unable to carry a current in the x-y-plane but can easily move in the z-direction. This shows on the length scale of the K film thickness, the electronic properties of the film do not change noticeably during the metal-insulator transition. The superconducting proximity effect is investigated for SN-double layers in the thin film limit. In this regime, the normalized initial slope Ssn = (ds=Ts )|dTc=ddn| is independent of the thickness of the superconductor, the mean free path of the films and the transparency of the interface if it is not too small. The transition temperature Tc is compared with a numerical calculation developed in our group. The deviation between the experiment and theory decreases from the normal metal to the superconductor with a relative high transition temperature. The deviation factor decreases from 2.5 for Cu, Ag, Au, Mg to 1.5 for Cd, Zn, Al and finally no disagreement for In and Sn. A weak perpendicular magnetic field is applied on the super- and normal conductor double layers. The difference of the transition temperature dTc measured with and without magnetic field increases with increasing the normal metal thickness. A quantitative explanation is given based on the increased dephasing of the electrons in the magnetic field. Numerical calculation of the transition temperature based on the strong coupling theory is also given and compared with the experimental results.

  16. Comparison of upconing under vertical and horizontal wells in freshwater lenses: sand-box experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, Leonard; Stefan, Loeffler; Houben, Georg

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater lenses on islands and in inland areas are often the primary freshwater resource there. The fragile equilibrium between saline and fresh groundwater can be disrupted by excessive pumping, leading to an upward migration of the saline water underneath the well. Sand-box experiments were conducted to compare the upconing at vertical and horizontal wells pumping from a freshwater lens. Results were then compared to numerical simulations. To simulate the cross-section of an "infinite strip island", an acrylic box with a spacing of 5 cm was filled with coarse sand. After saturating the model with degassed saltwater from bottom to top, freshwater recharge was applied from above. By coloring the infiltrating freshwater with different tracer colors using uranine and indigotine we were able to visualize flow paths during pumping. A horizontal and a vertical well were placed at the left and right side of the symmetric island. Both had equal diameter, screen length, depth of placement, and distance to shore. Three increasing pumping rates were applied to each well successively and the electrical conductivity of the abstracted water was continuously measured using a through-flow cell. Results show that no saltwater entered the wells when pumping at the lowest rate. Still, slight saltwater upconing and a shift of the freshwater divide in the island were observed. At the second rate a clear saltwater breakthrough into the vertical well occurred, while the electrical conductivity remained nearly unchanged in the horizontal well. Applying the third (highest) abstraction rate to each of the wells saltwater entered both wells, exceeding drinking water standards in the vertical well. The described behavior indicates the advantage of horizontal over vertical wells on islands and in coastal zones prone to saltwater up-coning. Numerical simulations show similar patterns, even though deviations exist between the second and the third pumping rate, which are under and

  17. Comparison and analysis of 2-D simulation results with two implosion radiation experiments on the Los Alamos Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Lebeda, C.F.; Matuska, W.; Benage, J.; Idzorek, G.; Oona, H.; Stokes, J.; Roderick, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    Two experiments, PegI-41, conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus I capacitor bank, and PegII-25, on the Pegasus II bank, consisted of the implosions of 13 mg (nominal), 5 cm radius, 2 cm high thin cylindrical aluminum foils resulting in soft x-ray radiation pulses from the plasma thermalization on axis. The implosions were conducted in direct-drive (no intermediate switching) mode with peak currents of about 4 MA and 5 MA respectively, and implosion times of about 2.5 {micro}s and 2.0 {micro}s. A radiation yield of about 250 kJ was measured for PegII-25. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the physics of the implosion and relate this physics to the production of the radiation pulse and to provide detailed experimental data which could be compared with 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. Included in the experimental diagnostic suites were faraday rotation and dB/dt current measurements, a visible framing camera, an x-ray stripline camera, time-dependent spectroscopy, bolometers and XRD`S. A comparison of the results from these experiments shows agreement with 2-D simulation results in the instability development, current, and radiation pulse data, including the pulsewidth, shape, peak power and total radiation yield as measured by bolometry. Instabilities dominate the behavior of the implosion and largely determine the properties of the resulting radiation pulse. The 2-D simulations can be seen to be an important tool in understanding the implosion physics.

  18. Subsonic and Supersonic Flutter Analysis of a Highly Tapered Swept-Wing Planform, Including Effects of Density Variation and Finite Wing Thickness, and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Carson, Jr.

    1967-01-01

    The flutter characteristics of several wings with an aspect-ratio of 4.0, a taper ratio of 0.2, and a quarter-chord sweepback of 45 deg. have been investigated analytically for Mach numbers up to 2.0. The calculations were based on the modified-strip-analysis method, the subsonic-kernel-function method, piston theory, and quasi-steady second-order theory. Results of t h e analysis and comparisons with experiment indicated that: (1) Flutter speeds were accurately predicted by the modified strip analysis, although accuracy at t h e highest Mach numbers required the use of nonlinear aerodynamic theory (which accounts for effects of wing thickness) for the calculation of the aerodynamic parameters. (2) An abrupt increase of flutter-speed coefficient with increasing Mach number, observed experimentally in the transonic range, was also indicated by the modified strip analysis. (3) In the low supersonic range for some densities, a discontinuous variation of flutter frequency with Mach number was indicated by the modified strip analysis. An abrupt change of frequency appeared experimentally in the transonic range. (4) Differences in flutter-speed-coefficient levels obtained from tests at low supersonic Mach numbers in two wind tunnels were also predicted by the modified strip analysis and were shown to be caused primarily by differences in mass ratio. (5) Flutter speeds calculated by the subsonic-kernel-function method were in good agreement with experiment and with the results of the modified strip analysis. (6) Flutter speed obtained from piston theory and from quasi-steady second-order theory were higher than experimental values by at least 38 percent.

  19. Simulations of the quart (101-bar1)/water interface: A comparison of classical force fields, ab initi molecular dynamics, and x-ray reflectivity experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Adam; Fenter, Paul; Kubicki, James D.; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the (1011) surface of quartz interacting with bulk liquid water are performed using three different classical force fields, Lopes et al., ClayFF, and CHARMM water contact angle (CWCA), and compared to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and X-ray reflectivity (XR) results. The axial densities of the water and surface atoms normal to the surface are calculated and compared to previous XR experiments. Favorable agreement is shown for all the force fields with respect to the position of the water atoms. Analyses such as the radial distribution functions between water and hydroxyl atoms and the average cosine of the angle between the water dipole vector and the normal of the surface are also calculated for each force field. Significant differences are found between the different force fields from such analyses, indicating differing descriptions of the structured water in the near vicinity of the surface. AIMD simulations are also performed to obtain the water and hydroxyl structure for comparison among the predictions of the three classical force fields to better understand which force field is most accurate. It is shown that ClayFF exhibits the best agreement with the AIMD simulations for water hydroxyl radial distribution functions, suggesting that ClayFF treats the hydrogen bonding more accurately.

  20. Comparison of experiment with calculations using curvature-corrected zero and two equation turbulence models for a two-dimensional U-duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.; Seegmiller, H. L.; Mcconnaughey, P. K.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper experimental measurements are compared with Navier-Stokes calculations using seven different turbulence models for the internal flow in a two-dimensional U-duct. The configuration is representative of many internal flows of engineering interst that experience strong curvature. In an effort to improve agreement, this paper tests several versions of the two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model including the standard version, an extended version with a production range time scale, and a version that includes curvature time scales. Each is tested in its high and low Reynolds number formulations. Calculations using these new models and the original mixing length model are compared here with measurements of mean and turbulence velocities, static pressure and skin friction in the U-duct at two Reynolds numbers. The comparisons show that only the low Reynolds number version of the extended k-epsilon model does a reasonable job of predicting the important features of this flow at both Reynolds numbers tested.

  1. Flutter of a uniform wing with an arbitrarily placed mass according to a differential-equation analysis and a comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, Harry L; Watkins, Charles E

    1950-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of the flutter speed of a uniform wing carrying an arbitrarily placed concentrated mass. The method, an extension of recently published work by Goland and Luke, involves the solution of the differential equations of motion of the wing at flutter speed and therefore does not require the assumption of specific normal modes of vibration. The order of the flutter determinant to be solved by this method depends upon the order of the system of differential equations and not upon the number of modes of vibration involved. The differential equations are solved by operational methods, and a brief discussion of operational methods as applied to boundary-value problems is included in one of two appendixes. A comparison is made with experiment for a wing with a large eccentrically mounted weight and good agreement is obtained. Sample calculations are presented to illustrate the method; and curves of amplitudes of displacement, torque, and shear for a particular case are compared with corresponding curves computed from the first uncoupled normal modes.

  2. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) × 106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK (20 ppbv) and toluene (90 ppbv) had been added. However, this discrepancy has a

  3. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-03-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) ×106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2=0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK and toluene had been added. However, this discrepancy has a large uncertainty and

  4. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, and Comparison with Land, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Reid, Jeffrey; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Allen, Duane A.; Torres, Omar; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent N.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements obtained with the six-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) mounted on a twin-engine aircraft during the summer 2000 Puerto Rico Dust Experiment are presented. In general, aerosol extinction values calculated from AATS-6 AOD measurements acquired during aircraft profiles up to 5 km ASL reproduce the vertical structure measured by coincident aircraft in-situ measurements of total aerosol number and surface area concentration. Calculations show that the spectral dependence of AOD was small (mean Angstrom wavelength exponents of approximately 0.20) within three atmospheric layers defined as the total column beneath the top of each aircraft profile, the region beneath the trade wind inversion, and the region within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) above the trade inversion. This spectral behavior is consistent with attenuation of incoming solar radiation by large dust particles or by dust plus sea salt. Values of CWV calculated from profile measurements by AATS-6 at 941.9 nm and from aircraft in-situ measurements by a chilled mirror dewpoint hygrometer agree to within approximately 4% (0.13 g/sq cm). AATS-6 AOD values measured on the ground at Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station and during low altitude aircraft runs over the adjacent Cabras Island aerosol/radiation ground site agree to within 0.004 to 0.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/sky Cimel radiometer located at Cabras Island. For the same observation times, AERONET retrievals of CWV exceed AATS-6 values by a mean of 0.74 g/sq cm (approximately 21 %) for the 2.9-3.9 g/sq cm measured by AATS-6. Comparison of AATS-6 aerosol extinction values obtained during four aircraft ascents over Cabras Island with corresponding values calculated from coincident aerosol backscatter measurements by a ground-based micro-pulse lidar (MPL-Net) located at Cabras yields a similar vertical structure above the trade

  5. Comparison of first dimension IPG and NEPHGE techniques in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis experiment with cytosolic unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) is one of the most popular methods in proteomics. Currently, most 2DE experiments are performed using immobilized pH gradient (IPG) in the first dimension; however, some laboratories still use carrier ampholytes-based isoelectric focusing technique. The aim of this study was to directly compare IPG-based and non-equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis (NEPHGE)-based 2DE techniques by using the same samples and identical second dimension procedures. We have used commercially available Invitrogen ZOOM IPGRunner and WITAvision systems for IPG and NEPHGE, respectively. The effectiveness of IPG-based and NEPHGE-based 2DE methods was compared by analysing differential protein expression during cytosolic unfolded protein response (UPR-Cyto) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results Protein loss during 2DE procedure was higher in IPG-based method, especially for basic (pI > 7) proteins. Overall reproducibility of spots was slightly better in NEPHGE-based method; however, there was a marked difference when evaluating basic and acidic protein spots. Using Coomassie staining, about half of detected basic protein spots were not reproducible by IPG-based 2DE, whereas NEPHGE-based method showed excellent reproducibility in the basic gel zone. The reproducibility of acidic proteins was similar in both methods. Absolute and relative volume variability of separate protein spots was comparable in both 2DE techniques. Regarding proteomic analysis of UPR-Cyto, the results exemplified parameters of general comparison of the methods. New highly basic protein Sis1p, overexpressed during UPR-Cyto stress, was identified by NEPHGE-based 2DE method, whereas IPG-based method showed unreliable results in the basic pI range and did not provide any new information on basic UPR-Cyto proteins. In the acidic range, the main UPR-Cyto proteins were detected and quantified by both methods. The drawback of NEPHGE-based 2DE method is its failure to

  6. Extruder scale-up assessment in the process of extrusion-spheronization: comparison of radial and axial systems by a design of experiments approach.

    PubMed

    Désiré, Amélie; Paillard, Bruno; Bougaret, Joël; Baron, Michel; Couarraze, Guy

    2013-02-01

    Scaling-up the extrusion-spheronization process involves the separate scale-up of each of the five process steps: dry mixing, granulation, extrusion, spheronization, and drying. The aim of the study was to compare two screw extrusion systems regarding their suitability for scaling-up. Two drug substances of high- and low-solubility in water were retained at different concentrations as formulation variables. Different spheronization times were tested. The productivity of the process was followed up using the extrusion rate and yield. Pellets were characterized by their size and shape, and by their structural and mechanical properties. A response surface design of experiments was built to evaluate the influence of the different variables and their interactions on each response, and to select the type of extrusion which provides the best results in terms of product quality, the one which shows less influence on the product after scale-up ("scalability") and when the formula used changes ("robustness"), and the one which allows the possibility to adjust pellet properties with spheronization variables ("flexibility"). Axial system showed the best characteristics in terms of product quality at lab and industrial scales, the best robustness at industrial scale, and the best scalability, by comparison with radial system. Axial system thus appeared as the easiest scaled-up system. Compared to lab scale, the conclusions observed at industrial scale were the same in terms of product quality, but different for robustness and flexibility, which confirmed the importance to test the systems at industrial scale before acquiring the equipment. PMID:23216219

  7. A comparison between constant volume induction times and results from spatially resolved simulation of ignition behind reflected shocks: implications for shock tube experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melguizo-Gavilanes, J.; Bauwens, L.

    2013-05-01

    The induction time measured in shock tube experiments is typically converted into kinetic data assuming that the reaction takes place in a constant volume process, thus neglecting spatial gradients. The actual process of shock ignition is, however, both time- and space-dependent; ignition takes place at a well-defined location, and subsequently a front travels, which may couple with the pressure wave that it created and forms a detonation wave behind the shock that reflects off the wall. To assess how different the actual processes are compared with the constant volume assumption, a numerical study was performed using a simplified three step chain-branching kinetic scheme. To overcome the difficulties that arise when simulating shock-induced ignition due to the initial absence of a domain filled with shocked reactive mixture, the problem is solved in a transformed frame of reference. Furthermore, initial conditions are derived from short-time asymptotics, which resolves the initial singularity. The induction times obtained using the full unsteady formulation with those of the homogeneous explosion are compared for various values of the heat release. Results for the spatially dependent formulation show that the evolution of the post-shock flow is complex, and that it leads to a gradient in induction times, after the passage of the reflected shock. For all cases simulated, thermal explosion initially occurs very close to the wall, and the corresponding induction time is found to be larger than that predicted under the constant volume assumption. As the measurement is made further away however, the actual time interval between passage of the reflected shock, and the specified pressure increase denoting ignition, decreases to a value close to zero, corresponding to that obtained along a Rayleigh line matching that of a steady ZND process (assuming a long enough tube). In situations where the constant volume assumption is expected to be weak, more accurate kinetic data

  8. Comparison of Global Model Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) with Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Manipulation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Forrest M; Randerson, Jim; Fung, Inez; Thornton, Peter E; Covey, Curtis; Bonan, Gordon; Running, Steven; Norby, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulation experiments have been carried out at a handful of sites to gauge the response of the biosphere to significant increases in atmospheric [CO{sub 2}]. Early synthesis results from four temperate forest sites suggest that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) is conserved across a broad range of productivity with a stimulation at the median of 23 {+-} 2% when the surrounding air [CO{sub 2}] was raised to 550{approx}ppm. As a part of the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), a community-based model-data comparison activity, the authors have performed a global FACE modeling experiment using two terrestrial biogeochemistry modules, CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN, coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The two models were forced with an improved NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set and reconstructed atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] and N deposition data through 1997. At the beginning of 1997 in the transient simulations, global atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] was abruptly raised to 550{approx}ppm, the target value used at the FACE sites. In the control runs, [CO{sub 2}] continued to rise following observations until 2004, after which it was held constant out to year 2100. In both simulations, the last 25 years of reanalysis forcing and a constant N deposition were applied after year 2004. Across all forest biomes, the NPP responses from both models are weaker than those reported for the four FACE sites. Moreover, model responses vary widely geographically with a decreasing trend of NPP increases from 40{sup o}N to 70{sup o}N. For CLM3-CASA, the largest responses occur in arid regions of western North America and central Asia, suggesting that responses are most strongly influenced by increased water use efficiency for this model. CLM3-CN exhibits consistently weaker responses than CLM3-CASA' with the strongest responses in central Asia, but significantly constrained by N

  9. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration. Volume 1: Experimental data report, base configuration and effects of wing twist and leading-edge configuration. [wind tunnel tests, aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.; Manning, K. J. R.; Hallstaff, T. H.; Rogers, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.1 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using current state-of-the-art attached and separated flow methods. The purpose of these comparisons was to delineate conditions under which these theories are valid for both flat and twisted wings and to explore the use of empirical methods to correct the theoretical methods where theory is deficient.

  10. Petrophysical characterization of first ever drilled core samples from an active CO2 storage site, the German Ketzin Pilot Site - Comparison with long term experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemke, Kornelia; Liebscher, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Petrophysical properties like porosity and permeability are key parameters for a safe long-term storage of CO2 but also for the injection operation itself. These parameters may change during and/or after the CO2 injection due to geochemical reactions in the reservoir system that are triggered by the injected CO2. Here we present petrophysical data of first ever drilled cores from a newly drilled well at the active CO2 storage site - the Ketzin pilot site in the Federal State of Brandenburg, Germany. By comparison with pre-injection baseline data from core samples recovered prior to injection, the new samples provide the unique opportunity to evaluate the impact of CO2 on pore size related properties of reservoir and cap rocks at a real injection site under in-situ reservoir conditions. After injection of 61 000 tons CO2, an additional well was drilled and new rock cores were recovered. In total 100 core samples from the reservoir and the overlaying caprock were investigated by NMR relaxation. Permeability of 20 core samples was estimated by nitrogen and porosity by helium pycnometry. The determined data are comparable between pre-injection and post-injection core samples. The lower part of the reservoir sandstone is unaffected by the injected CO2. The upper part of the reservoir sandstone shows consistently slightly lower NMR porosity and permeability values in the post-injection samples when compared to the pre-injection data. This upper sandstone part is above the fluid level and CO2 present as a free gas phase and a possible residual gas saturation of the cores distorted the NMR results. The potash-containing drilling fluid can also influence these results: NMR investigation of twin samples from inner and outer parts of the cores show a reduced fraction of larger pores for the outer core samples together with lower porosities and T2 times. The drill mud penetration depth can be controlled by the added fluorescent tracer. Due to the heterogeneous character of the

  11. A comparison between Nimbus 5 THIR and ITPR temperatures and derived winds with rawinsonde data obtained in the AVE II experiment. [Temperature-Humidity Infrared Radiometer and Infrared Temperature Profile Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. E.; Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    During the second Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II), atmospheric temperature profiles were computed from Nimbus 5 data, which comprised ITPR, NEMS, and SCR measurements. Rawinsonde data were obtained from NWS stations in the AVE II network and processed for each pressure contact; the soundings closest in space and time were interpolated to the Nimbus 5 sounding points for comparison purposes. Cross sections of thermal and geostrophic winds were computed from satellite-derived cross sections of temperature along the Nimbus orbital track.

  12. Latino College Students at Highly Selective Institutions: A Comparison of Their College Experiences and Outcomes to Other Racial/Ethnic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young K.; Rennick, Liz A.; Franco, Marla A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines unique patterns of college engagement and outcomes among Latino undergraduate students attending highly selective institutions in comparison with those from other racial/ethnic groups. The study also identifies predictors of select college outcomes--that is, cognitive, affective, and civic outcomes--for this population.…

  13. Ab initio analytical Raman intensities for periodic systems through a coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham method in an atomic orbital basis. II. Validation and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Kirtman, Bernard; Rérat, Michel; Orlando, Roberto; Dovesi, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we validate a new, fully analytical method for calculating Raman intensities of periodic systems, developed and presented in Paper I [L. Maschio, B. Kirtman, M. Rérat, R. Orlando, and R. Dovesi, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 164101 (2013)]. Our validation of this method and its implementation in the CRYSTAL code is done through several internal checks as well as comparison with experiment. The internal checks include consistency of results when increasing the number of periodic directions (from 0D to 1D, 2D, 3D), comparison with numerical differentiation, and a test of the sum rule for derivatives of the polarizability tensor. The choice of basis set as well as the Hamiltonian is also studied. Simulated Raman spectra of α-quartz and of the UiO-66 Metal-Organic Framework are compared with the experimental data.

  14. Detection of the "cp4 epsps" Gene in Maize Line NK603 and Comparison of Related Protein Structures: An Advanced Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swope, Nicole K.; Fryfogle, Patrick J.; Sivy, Tami L.

    2015-01-01

    A flexible, rigorous laboratory experiment for upper-level biochemistry undergraduates is described that focuses on the Roundup Ready maize line. The work is appropriate for undergraduate laboratory courses that integrate biochemistry, molecular biology, or bioinformatics. In this experiment, DNA is extracted and purified from maize kernel and…

  15. The Forgotten and Uninformed College Band Student: A Comparison of Activities, Experiences, and Musical Independence among Non-Music Majors and Music Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbett, Gordon C.; And Others

    This study examines college course work, instrumental speciality activities, and artistic activities associated with music majors' and non-music majors' musical independence. A second purpose is to examine whether or not these experiences and activities influence musical independence. Postsecondary musical experiences and activities have been…

  16. Excitation functions of deuteron induced reactions on natOs up to 50 MeV: Experiments and comparison with theoretical codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam Rebeles, R.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Takács, M. P.; Ignatyuk, A.; Uddin, M. S.

    2013-02-01

    Activation of thin electrodeposited natural Os targets was investigated in a stacked foil irradiation with a 50 MeV deuteron beam. Assessments of the produced radionuclides by high resolution gamma spectroscopy yielded excitation functions for production of 184,185,186m1,g,187m1+g,188m1+g,189m2+m1+g,190m2,190m2,m1+g,192m1+gIr and 185Os. Reduced uncertainty on cross sections is obtained by simultaneous remeasurement of the 27Al(d,x)24Na monitor reaction over the whole energy range. Thick target yield for deuteron induced production route of 192m1+gIr and comparison with the natIr(n,γ) route are reviewed. A comparison with updated theoretical codes (ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and the TENDL2011 on-line library) is discussed.

  17. Excitation functions of proton induced reactions on natOs up to 65 MeV: Experiments and comparison with results from theoretical codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam Rebeles, R.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2015-02-01

    Activation of thin natOs targets, electrodeposited on Ni backings, was investigated for the first time in stacked foil irradiations with 65 MeV and 34 MeV proton beams. Assessments of the produced radionuclides by high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy yielded excitation functions for formation of 184, 185, 186m,m+g, 187m+g, 188m+g, 189m2+m1+g, 190m2,m1+g, 192m1+gIr and 185cum, 191m+gOs, 183m+gRe. Where available comparisons with the reaction cross sections obtained in 2 earlier studies on enriched 192Os were made. Reduced uncertainty on cross sections is obtained by simultaneous remeasurement of the 27Al(p,x)22,24Na, natNi(p,x)57Ni and natTi(p,x)48V monitor reactions over wide relevant energy ranges. Confirmation of monitoring took place by assessment of excitation functions of 61Cu, 56Ni, 55,56,57,58Co and 52Mn induced in the Ni backings and comparison with a recent compilation for most of these radionuclides. Contributing reactions and overall cross sections are discussed and were evaluated in comparison with the results of the theoretical code TALYS 1.6 (values from the on-line library TENDL-2013).

  18. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  19. The STD/MHD codes - Comparison of analyses with experiments at AEDC/HPDE, Reynolds Metal Co., and Hercules, Inc. [for MHD generator flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, A. A.; Maxwell, C. D.; Swean, T. F., Jr.; Demetriades, S. T.; Oliver, D. A.; Bangerter, C. D.

    1981-01-01

    Data from sufficiently well-instrumented, short-duration experiments at AEDC/HPDE, Reynolds Metal Co., and Hercules, Inc., are compared to analyses with multidimensional and time-dependent simulations with the STD/MHD computer codes. These analyses reveal detailed features of major transient events, severe loss mechanisms, and anomalous MHD behavior. In particular, these analyses predicted higher-than-design voltage drops, Hall voltage overshoots, and asymmetric voltage drops before the experimental data were available. The predictions obtained with these analyses are in excellent agreement with the experimental data and the failure predictions are consistent with the experiments. The design of large, high-interaction or advanced MHD experiments will require application of sophisticated, detailed and comprehensive computational procedures in order to account for the critical mechanisms which led to the observed behavior in these experiments.

  20. Control law parameterization for an aeroelastic wind-tunnel model equipped with an active roll control system and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III; Dunn, H. J.; Sandford, Maynard C.

    1988-01-01

    Nominal roll control laws were designed, implemented, and tested on an aeroelastically-scaled free-to-roll wind-tunnel model of an advanced fighter configuration. The tests were performed in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. A parametric study of the nominal roll control system was conducted. This parametric study determined possible control system gain variations which yielded identical closed-loop stability (roll mode pole location) and identical roll response but different maximum control-surface deflections. Comparison of analytical predictions with wind-tunnel results was generally very good.

  1. Experiments with powdered CMN thermometers between 10 mK and 4K, and a comparison with an NBS SRM 768 fixed-point device

    SciTech Connect

    Fogle, W.E.; Hornung, E.W.; Mayberry, M.C.; Phillips, N.E.

    1981-08-01

    Comparison of a powdered CMN thermometer with an NBS fixed point device demonstrates an internal inconsistency in the T/sub c/'s assigned to the fixed point device. T/sub c/'s between 100 and 200 mK are in excellent agreement with a temperature scale interpolated between He vapor pressure temperatures and nuclear orientation temperatures, but there is a discrepancy of 8% at the 15 mK point. Evidence for different susceptibility-temperature relations for superficially similar CMN thermometers is also presented.

  2. Comparison of Real World Side Impact/Rollover Collisions With and Without Thorax Airbag/Head Protection System: A First Field Experience Study

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Peter; Lange, Wolfgang; Messner, Georg; Rauscher, Stefan; Pieske, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    After the introduction of the Thorax Airbag (TA) and the Head Protection System (HPS) by BMW there has been a significant reduction of injuries in real-world collisions. Comparison of similar collisions (in-depth collision analyses) of vehicles with and without HPS/TA indicates that the effectiveness of the system was credible. Minor injuries (AIS 1) increase while serious injuries (AIS 3+) are reduced. Based on the limited cases available, a proper statistical sampling could not be achieved at this time, however the results are to be understood as indicative of a trend. PMID:11558083

  3. Dissociative disorders and possession experiences in Israel: a comparison of opiate use disorder patients, Arab women subjected to domestic violence, and a nonclinical group.

    PubMed

    Somer, Eli; Ross, Colin; Kirshberg, Revital; Bakri, Rana Shawahdy; Ismail, Shefa

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the association between exposure to domestic violence and dissociative symptoms. A sample of 68 Israeli opiate use disorder patients in recovery, 80 battered Arab Israeli women, and 103 respondents from a community sample participated in structured interviews that included the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS), the Dissociative Trance Disorder Interview Schedule (DTDIS), and the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). As predicted, community participants reported significantly less exposure to traumatizing events and lower levels of dissociative psychopathology than individuals sampled from specialized treatment centers. In all, 91% of battered female participants were taxon-positive for dissociative disorder with 1 of every 2 respondents reporting symptoms corresponding to dissociative amnesia and depersonalization disorder, suggesting that this group may be particularly vulnerable to dissociative psychopathology. Extrasensory and paranormal experiences (ESP) and dissociative trance disorder experiences were strongly related to dissociative experiences and features of dissociative identity disorder (DID). These statistical associations suggest that dissociative disorders and ESP/trance experiences may share an underlying construct. Further research is needed on trauma and dissociation among female victims of domestic abuse in patriarchal, collectivist societies, particularly in the Arab world. PMID:25300648

  4. Effect of porosity on shock wave propagation in the low shock pressure range using mesoscale modelling in comparison to laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güldemeister, N.; Kowitz, A.; Wünnemann, K.; Reimold, W. U.; Schmitt, R. T.

    2012-09-01

    Porosity plays an important role in impact crater formation and shock wave propagation. Where present, it causes fast attenuation of shock pressure. In the framework of the "MEMIN" (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact crater research Network) project, the effect of porosity in dry and water-saturated sandstone on shock wave loading is investigated [1]. We are focusing on shock recovery experiments that have been carried out within one sub-project of MEMIN. The experiments are subject to investigate shock effects in experimentally shocked quartz at low shock pressure (5 - 12.5 GPa) where diagnostic shock features and calibration data are lacking at the moment. The influence of porosity on progressive shock metamorphism is investigated. The laboratory impact experiments were accompanied by meso-scale numerical modeling in order to quantify processes beyond the optical and electron optical observational capabilities. The model enables a detailed description and quantification of thermo-dynamic parameters during single pore collapse.

  5. Comparison of the PARET/ANL and RELAP5/MOD3 codes for the analysis of IAEA benchmark transients and the SPERT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.L.; Hanan, N.A.; Smith, R.S.; Matos, J.E.

    1997-12-01

    The RELAP5/MOD3 code is a coupled kinetics-hydrodynamics code for modelling all components of pressurized water reactor systems. To our knowledge, RELAP5 has not been tested against the SPERT reactivity insertion experiments or more conventional research reactor models such as the 10-MW low-enriched uranium (LEU) benchmark reactor in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Guidebook, where loss-of-flow (LOF) and reactivity insertion transients were computed by laboratories in four countries, including Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The ANL computations used the PARET/ANL code, which has been used extensively for research reactor analysis and compared with the SPERT-I and SPERT-II experiments. RELAP5/MOD3 and PARET/ANL results are compared in this paper. Attempts to compare RELAP/MOD3 with the SPERT experiments are included.

  6. A Comparison of the Employment Experiences of Childcare Workers in Non-Profit and Privately-Owned Childcare Centres: Some Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Jocelyn Grace

    A comparative study of the employment experiences of staff at nonprofit and privately owned childcare centers was conducted in the Christchurch, New Zealand, area. A total of 23 staff members at 3 nonprofit centers and 9 staff members at 2 privately owned centers responded to a survey concerning their qualifications, work history, current working…

  7. Comparisons of Internet-Based and Face-to-Face Learning Systems Based on "Equivalency of Experiences" According to Students' Academic Achievements and Satisfactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karatas, Sercin; Simsek, Nurettin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether "equivalent learning experiences" ensure equivalency, in the Internet-based and face-to-face interaction methods on learning results and student satisfaction. In the experimental process of this study, the effect of the Internet-based and face-to-face learning on the equivalency in learning…

  8. Comparison of airborne passive and active L-band System (PALS) brightness temperature measurements to SMOS observations during the SMAP validation experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) campaign was to collect data for the pre-launch development and validation of SMAP soil moisture algorithms. SMAP is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) satellite mission designed for the m...

  9. A Comparison of the Developmental Experiences of Elite and Sub-Elite Swimmers: Similar Developmental Histories Can Lead to Differences in Performance Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Michael B.; Tenenbaum, Gershon; Edmonds, William A.; Castillo, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    The current study fills a void in the literature that investigates the factors required for elite athlete development. Previous studies have (a) illustrated psychological and physiological differences between elites and non-elites; "or" (b) described the psychological and physiological developmental experiences of elite performers. The current…

  10. Teachers' and Parents' Roles in the Sexuality Education of Primary School Children: A Comparison of Experiences in Leeds, UK and in Sydney, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Joy; Milton, Jan

    2006-01-01

    There is little international research focusing on parents' and teachers' roles in sexuality education during children's primary school years. This paper focuses on teachers' and parents' key experiences as sexuality educators of primary-school-age children in both Leeds, UK and in Sydney, Australia. Based on research findings from both the United…

  11. Study Abroad in a Developing and a Developed Country: A Comparison of American Undergraduate Students' Experiences in Ghana and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the differences among the experiences of 7 American undergraduate students; 4 who studied for a semester in Ghana, a developing country, and 3 who studied for a semester in England, a developed country. Using phenomenology as its guiding framework, transcribed interviews were analyzed and the focal phenomenon of the…

  12. Comparison of Environmental Attitudes and Experiences of Five-Year-Old Children Receiving Preschool Education in the Village and City Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkan, Nazmi; Güngör, Hande; Fetihi, Leyla; Erol, Ahmet; Gülay Ogelman, Hülya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare environmental attitudes and experiences of five-year-old children receiving preschool education in the village and city centre. The first group comprised 54 five-year-old children who received preschool education and attended kindergartens of two primary schools in the Karateke and Kocabas villages of Honaz…

  13. A comparison of traditional physical laboratory and computer-simulated laboratory experiences in relation to engineering undergraduate students' conceptual understandings of a communication systems topic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidi, Giti

    2005-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate an alternative to the use of traditional physical laboratory activities in a communication systems course. Specifically, this study examined whether as an alternative, computer simulation is as effective as physical laboratory activities in teaching college-level electronics engineering education students about the concepts of signal transmission, modulation and demodulation. Eighty undergraduate engineering students participated in the study, which was conducted at a southeastern four-year university. The students were randomly assigned to two groups. The groups were compared on understanding the concepts, remembering the concepts, completion time of the lab experiments and perception toward the laboratory experiments. The physical group's (n = 40) treatment was to conduct laboratory experiments in a physical laboratory. The students in this group used equipment in a controlled electronics laboratory. The Simulation group's (n = 40) treatment was to conduct similar experiments in a PC laboratory. The students in this group used a simulation program in a controlled PC lab. At the completion of the treatment, scores on a validated conceptual test were collected once after the treatment and again three weeks after the treatment. Attitude surveys and qualitative study were administered at the completion of the treatment. The findings revealed significant differences, in favor of the simulation group, between the two groups on both the conceptual post-test and the follow-up test. The findings also revealed significant correlation between simulation groups' attitude toward the simulation program and their post-test scores. Moreover, there was a significant difference between the two groups on their attitude toward their laboratory experience in favor of the simulation group. In addition, there was significant difference between the two groups on their lab completion time in favor of the simulation group. At the same time, the

  14. Spectral shapes of Ar-broadened HCl lines in the fundamental band by classical molecular dynamics simulations and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H.; Domenech, J.-L.

    2014-08-14

    Spectral shapes of isolated lines of HCl perturbed by Ar are investigated for the first time using classical molecular dynamics simulations (CMDS). Using reliable intermolecular potentials taken from the literature, these CMDS provide the time evolution of the auto-correlation function of the dipole moment, whose Fourier-Laplace transform leads to the absorption spectrum. In order to test these calculations, room temperature spectra of various lines in the fundamental band of HCl diluted in Ar are measured, in a large pressure range, with a difference-frequency laser spectrometer. Comparisons between measured and calculated spectra show that the CMDS are able to predict the large Dicke narrowing effect on the shape of HCl lines and to satisfactorily reproduce the shapes of HCl spectra at different pressures and for various rotational quantum numbers.

  15. Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows: Comparison of Computation and Experiment, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, September 14-18, 1981, Proceedings. Volume 2 - Taxonomies, reporters' summaries, evaluation, and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, S. J. (Editor); Cantwell, B. J. (Editor); Lilley, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    Computational techniques for simulating turbulent flows were explored, together with the results of experimental investigations. Particular attention was devoted to the possibility of defining a universal closure model, applicable for all turbulence situations; however, conclusions were drawn that zonal models, describing localized structures, were the most promising techniques to date. The taxonomy of turbulent flows was summarized, as were algebraic, differential, integral, and partial differential methods for numerical depiction of turbulent flows. Numerous comparisons of theoretically predicted and experimentally obtained data for wall pressure distributions, velocity profiles, turbulent kinetic energy profiles, Reynolds shear stress profiles, and flows around transonic airfoils were presented. Simplifying techniques for reducing the necessary computational time for modeling complex flowfields were surveyed, together with the industrial requirements and applications of computational fluid dynamics techniques.

  16. Recruiting Injection Drug Users: A Three-Site Comparison of Results and Experiences with Respondent-Driven and Targeted Sampling Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Risser, Jan M. H.; McGoy, Shanell; Becker, Adam B.; Rehman, Hafeez; Jefferson, Mary; Griffin, Vivian; Wolverton, Marcia; Tortu, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    Several recent studies have utilized respondent-driven sampling (RDS) methods to survey hidden populations such as commercial sex-workers, men who have sex with men (MSM) and injection drug users (IDU). Few studies, however, have provided a direct comparison between RDS and other more traditional sampling methods such as venue-based, targeted or time/space sampling. The current study sampled injection drug users in three U.S. cities using RDS and targeted sampling (TS) methods and compared their effectiveness in terms of recruitment efficiency, logistics, and sample demographics. Both methods performed satisfactorily. The targeted method required more staff time per-recruited respondent and had a lower proportion of screened respondents who were eligible than RDS, while RDS respondents were offered higher incentives for participation. PMID:16933101

  17. Monitoring the interaction of hydraulic fracturing fluid with Marcellus Shale using Sr isotopes: a comparison of laboratory experiments with field scale observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, A. J.; Hakala, A.; Marcon, V.; Joseph, C.

    2013-12-01

    Strontium isotopes have the potential to be an effective tool for differentiating Marcellus Shale derived-fluids from other sources in surface and ground waters (Chapman et al. 2012, doi: 10.1021/es204005g). Water that is co-produced during gas extraction is likely influenced by fluid/rock interactions during hydraulic fracturing (HF) and monitoring changes in Sr isotope ratios can provide insight into reactions occurring within the shale formation. However, questions persist as to what controls the Sr isotopic composition of Marcellus Shale fluids, especially during HF. Here we compare laboratory experiments, simulating the dissolution of the Marcellus Shale during HF, with a time-series of water samples taken from a Marcellus Shale gas wells after HF has occurred. For the laboratory experiments, a core sample of Marcellus Shale from Greene County, PA was crushed and placed into a high P and T reaction vessel. Solutions were added in two different experiments: one with synthetic brine, and another using brine+HF fluid. The HF fluid was made up of components listed on fracfocus.org. Experiments were run for ~16 days at 27.5 MPa and 130oC. Aqueous samples were periodically removed for analysis and Sr isotope ratios were measured by MC-ICP-MS. Using just brine, the pH of the solution decreased from 7.6 to 5.3 after 24 hrs, then reached a steady state at ~6.1. Sr/Ca molar ratios in the fluid started at 2.3 after 24 hours and decreased to 1.8 over ~16 days. During this time only 6% of the total inorganic carbon (TIC) dissolved from the shale. The ɛSr values started at +43.2 and decreased to +42.4. In the experiment using brine+HF fluid, the pH started at 1.8 and rose slowly to a steady value of 5.6 by day 6. The Sr and Ca concentrations were higher than the brine experiment, but the Sr/Ca ratios remained lower at ~0.3 through the experiment. The increased Ca release, as well as the dissolution of over 60% of the TIC, suggests the dissolution of a carbonate mineral

  18. [THE AGE AND WORK EXPERIENCE DYNAMICS OF INDICES OF HEALTH OF EMPLOYEES--CRITERIA FOR COMPARISON OF OCCUPATIONAL AND NONOCCUPATIONAL RISKS].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, G A

    2016-01-01

    There are reported data of the analysis of parameters of the general morbidity (hypertension, chronic diseases, organs of respiratory and digestive system, adiposity, vertebral osteochondrosis) in dependence on age and work experience of dockers-mechanizators in seaport at various working conditions. Morbidity rate indices were calculated on results of the profound medical examination at annual periodic surveys of workers. There were analyzed ecological and ergonomic indices of working conditions, including an estimation of physiological intensity of the work. The general hygienic assessment of working conditions was executed on the basis of the measurement of rates of gains in the risk of diseases depending on age and the experience of work (an annual gain of risk). The divergence of these rates was used for the determination of occupational and nonoccupational fractions of the general morbidity in employees working in harmful conditions. PMID:27430067

  19. A comparison of on-campus first year undergraduate nursing students' experiences with face-to-face and on-line discussions.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Hilary E

    2006-08-01

    Only limited pedagogical use has been made of information and communications technology (ICT) in nursing education in Norway. In this study the use of ICT was linked to assignments in the first year undergraduate nursing program and included four on-line discussions. There is evidence to suggest that on-line discussions can enhance the learning environment. The students' experiences of the on-line discussions are compared to those of the students participating in traditional group discussions. The results show little difference between the two groups' opinions of the discussions' fruitfulness and the ease in which they expressed their feelings, thoughts and ideas. However, there is a marked difference between the two groups regarding their experience of how the discussions affected the amount of contact between group members outside the discussions. Possible reasons for these findings are discussed. PMID:16519969

  20. On the features of dislocation-obstacle interactions in thin films: direct comparison between in situ experiments and large scale computer modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Matsukawa, Yoshitaka; Stoller, Roger E; Zinkle, Steven J

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale atomistic modelling has demonstrated that the dynamic interactions of dislocations in thin films have a number of remarkable features. A particular example is the interaction between a screw dislocation and a stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT) in Cu, which can be directly compared with in situ observations of quenched or irradiated fcc metals. If the specimen is thin, the dislocation velocity is slow, and the temperature is high enough, a segment of the original SFT can be transported towards the surface via a double cross-slip mechanism and fast glide of an edge dislocation segment formed during the interaction. The mechanisms observed in the simulations provide an explanation for the results of in situ straining experiments and the differences between bulk and thin film experiments.

  1. Comparison of Subjective Experiences and Effectiveness of First-Generation Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics and Risperidone Long-Acting Injectables in Patients With Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Yin; Lin, Shih-Ku

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to compare the subjective experiences and clinical effects of first-generation long-acting injectable (FGA-LAI) antipsychotics with those of risperidone long-acting injectables (RIS-LAIs) in 434 schizophrenia patients. Compared with the RIS-LAI group, the patients treated with FGA-LAIs had a significantly longer duration of illness and LAI treatment and were older. Our results suggest that patients treated with FGA-LAI have more satisfactory subjective experiences compared with patients treated with RIS-LAI and that both FGA-LAI and RIS-LAI treatments can prevent relapses and hospitalization. Additional longitudinal studies determining the long-term benefits of RIS-LAI are warranted. PMID:27580495

  2. A comparison of theory and experiment for coupled rotor-body stability of a hingeless rotor model in hover under simulated vacuum conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1988-01-01

    Two cases were selected for correlation from an experiment that examined the aeromechanical stability of a small-scale model rotor that used tantalum rods instead of blades to simulate vacuum conditions. The first case involved body roll freedom only while the second case included body pitch and roll degrees of freedom together. Analyses from Hughes Helicopters and the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory were compared with the data and the correlations ranged from poor to good.

  3. Reactive scattering of H2 from Cu(100): Comparison of dynamics calculations based on the specific reaction parameter approach to density functional theory with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sementa, L.; Wijzenbroek, M.; van Kolck, B. J.; Somers, M. F.; Al-Halabi, A.; Busnengo, H. F.; Olsen, R. A.; Kroes, G. J.; Rutkowski, M.; Thewes, C.; Kleimeier, N. F.; Zacharias, H.

    2013-01-01

    We present new experimental and theoretical results for reactive scattering of dihydrogen from Cu(100). In the new experiments, the associative desorption of H2 is studied in a velocity resolved and final rovibrational state selected manner, using time-of-flight techniques in combination with resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization laser detection. Average desorption energies and rotational quadrupole alignment parameters were obtained in this way for a number of (v = 0, 1) rotational states, v being the vibrational quantum number. Results of quantum dynamics calculations based on a potential energy surface computed with a specific reaction parameter (SRP) density functional, which was derived earlier for dihydrogen interacting with Cu(111), are compared with the results of the new experiments and with the results of previous molecular beam experiments on sticking of H2 and on rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of H2 and D2 from Cu(100). The calculations use the Born-Oppenheimer and static surface approximations. With the functional derived semi-empirically for dihydrogen + Cu(111), a chemically accurate description is obtained of the molecular beam experiments on sticking of H2 on Cu(100), and a highly accurate description is obtained of rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of D2 from Cu(100) and of the orientational dependence of the reaction of (v = 1, j = 2 - 4) H2 on Cu(100). This suggests that a SRP density functional derived for H2 interacting with a specific low index face of a metal will yield accurate results for H2 reactively scattering from another low index face of the same metal, and that it may also yield accurate results for H2 interacting with a defected (e.g., stepped) surface of that same metal, in a system of catalytic interest. However, the description that was obtained of the average desorption energies, of rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of H2 from Cu(100), and of the orientational dependence of

  4. The Clinical and Pathological Presentation of Thyroid Nodules in Children and the Comparison with Adult Population: Experience of a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Solymosi, Tamas; Lukacs Toth, Gyula; Budai, Laszlo; Gal, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and pathological presentation of thyroid nodules among younger and adult patients was compared in an iodine-deficient (ID) region. Data of 3,010 consecutive patients younger than 20 years and 3,010 patients older than 20 years were compared. The proportion of nodular goiters (22.8% versus 39.3%), the ratio of surgically treated nodules (33.2% versus 15.2%), and the proportion of malignant nodules (4.3% versus 2.1%) among diseased patients differed significantly between the two groups (younger versus adult). Nine papillary and 1 medullary carcinoma were found among children, while 15 papillary, 2 follicular, 1 insular, 1 anaplastic, and 1 medullary carcinomas occurred among adults. The ratio of follicular adenoma to hyperplastic nodules (3 : 1 to 1 : 1.67), the proportion of follicular variant (77.8% versus 26.7%), T4 tumors (77.8% versus 33.3%), and tumors with lymph node metastasis (88.9% versus 66.7%) were significantly higher among younger papillary carcinoma patients. No malignancies occurred among spongiform and central type cysts. Similarly to iodine-sufficient regions, more nodules are malignant and carcinomas have a clinically more aggressive presentation in children in comparison with adult patients in ID. Taking the significantly greater proportion of adenomas and the lack of follicular carcinoma into account, a conservative approach has to be considered in follicular tumors among children. PMID:27087807

  5. Thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cattle manure with agro-wastes and energy crops: comparison of pilot and full scale experiences.

    PubMed

    Cavinato, C; Fatone, F; Bolzonella, D; Pavan, P

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the benefits coming from the application of a proper process temperature (55 degrees C) instead of a 'reduced' thermophilic range (47 degrees C), that is often applied in European anaerobic co-digestion plants. The experimental work has pointed out that biogas production improve from 0.45 to 0.62 m(3)/kg VS operating at proper thermophilic conditions. Moreover, also methane content was higher: from 52% to 61%. A general improvement in digester behaviour was clear also considering the stability parameters comparison (pH, ammonia, VFA content). The second part of the study takes into account the economic aspects related to the capital cost of anaerobic digestion treatment with a 1 MW co-generation unit fro heat and power production (CHP). Moreover, the economic balance was also carried out considering the anaerobic supernatants treatment for nitrogen removal. The simulation showed how a pay-back-time of 2.5 yr and between 3 and 5 yr respectively could be determined when the two options of anaerobic digestion only and together with the application of a nitrogen removal process were considered. PMID:19747821

  6. Experiments for a systematic comparison between stable-isotope-(deuterium) labeling and radio-((14)C) labeling for the elucidation of the in vitro metabolic pattern of pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Helge; Hargreaves, Patrick; Gebhardt, Klaus; Klauer, Dominique; Serafyn, Arnaud; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne; Schleimer, Michael; Schlotterbeck, Goetz; Wind, Mathias

    2013-11-01

    A systematic comparison between two labeling approaches for the investigation of the in vitro metabolic pattern of pharmaceutical drugs was performed by examining the use of (i) radiolabeled drugs analyzed with LC-MS-offline radiodetection and (ii) stable-isotope labeled drugs, used in a defined mixture with the unlabeled drug and analyzed by LC-MS with recognition of the specific isotopic pattern. (14)C was used for the radioisotope-approach and deuterium for the stable-isotope approach. Olanzapine, diclofenac and ketoconazole were chosen as model drugs, as they are commercially available in their non-, radio- and stable-isotope labeled forms. For all three model drugs, liver microsome- and hepatocyte-incubations (both from rat) were performed with various concentrations and incubation times for both, the radio- and the stable-isotope approaches. The metabolic pattern, including structure elucidation of all detected metabolites, was performed independently for all individual compounds and incubations. Subsequently, the metabolic patterns of the radio-, and the stable-isotope approaches were compared. In conclusion, all metabolites found with the radioisotope approach could also be found with the stable-isotope approach. Although the stable-isotope approach does not provide a quantitative result, it can be considered to be a highly suited analytical alternative for early in vitro metabolism investigations, especially when radiolabeled drug analogues are not yet available and quantitative results are not yet necessary. PMID:23933567

  7. Experience with exchange and archiving of raw data: comparison of data from two diffractometers and four software packages on a series of lysozyme crystals

    PubMed Central

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Helliwell, John R.; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.

    2013-01-01

    The International Union of Crystallography has for many years been advocating archiving of raw data to accompany structural papers. Recently, it initiated the formation of the Diffraction Data Deposition Working Group with the aim of developing standards for the representation of these data. A means of studying this issue is to submit exemplar publications with associated raw data and metadata. A recent study on the effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on the binding of cisplatin and carboplatin to histidine in 11 different lysozyme crystals from two diffractometers led to an investigation of the possible effects of the equipment and X-ray diffraction data processing software on the calculated occupancies and B factors of the bound Pt compounds. 35.3 Gb of data were transferred from Manchester to Utrecht to be processed with EVAL. A systematic comparison shows that the largest differences in the occupancies and B factors of the bound Pt compounds are due to the software, but the equipment also has a noticeable effect. A detailed description of and discussion on the availability of metadata is given. By making these raw diffraction data sets available via a local depository, it is possible for the diffraction community to make their own evaluation as they may wish. PMID:23396873

  8. Comparison of toxicity following different conditioning regimens (busulfan/melphalan and carboplatin/etoposide/melphalan) for advanced stage neuroblastoma: Experience of two transplant centers.

    PubMed

    Elborai, Yasser; Hafez, Hanafy; Moussa, Emad A; Hammad, Mahmoud; Hussein, Hany; Lehmann, Leslie; Elhaddad, Alaa

    2016-03-01

    The outcome for advanced neuroblastoma has improved with combined modality therapy: induction chemotherapy, surgery, and consolidation with high-dose chemotherapy/autologous HSCT, followed by local radiation, cisretinoic acid, and recently antibody therapy. In the United States, the most common conditioning regimen is CEM, while in Europe/Middle East, Bu/Mel has been widely used; it remains unclear which regimen has the best outcome. Assess renal, hepatic, and infectious toxicity through Day+100 in 2 different regimens. Retrospective comparison between CEM-DFCHCC Boston and Bu/Mel- CCHE-57357. Thirty-five patients, median age 4, in Boston (2007-2011) and 38 patients, median age 3, in Cairo (2009-2011). Renal toxicity; creatinine was significantly higher in CEM than Bu/Mel: 57% (median day+90) vs. 29% (median>day+100), p = 0.004. One CEM patient died from renal dialysis at day+19. Hepatic toxicity was significantly higher in CEM than Bu/Mel: 80% (median day+26) vs. 58% (median day+60), p = 0.04. In infectious complications with CEM 14%, bacteremia (n = 4) and fungemia (n = 1), 3 had culture-negative sepsis requiring vasopressors. With Bu/Mel 18%, bacteremia (n = 7), none required pressors, p = 0.4. Bu/Mel was associated with less acute hepatic and renal toxicity and thus may be preferable for preserving organ functions. PMID:26614402

  9. Self-Consistent Theory of Elastic Properties of Strongly Anharmonic Crystals I:. General Treatment and Comparison with Computer Simulations and Experiment for Fcc Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, V. I.; Sanchez, J. F.; Tretiakov, N. P.; Yusef, A. E.

    Based on the correlative method of an unsymmetrized self-consistent field,16-23 we have derived expressions for elastic constant tensors of strongly anharmonic crystals of cubic symmetry. Each isothermal elastic constant consists of four terms. The first one is the zeroth approximation containing the main anharmonicity (up to the fourth order). The second term is the quantum correction. It is important at temperatures below the De-bye characteristic temperature. Finally, the third and fourth terms are the perturbation theory corrections which take into account the influence of the correlations in atomic displacements from the lattice points and that of the high-order anharmonicity respectively. These corrections appear to be small up to the melting temperatures. It is sufficient for a personal computer to perform all our calculations with just a little computer time. A comparison with certain Monte Carlo simulations and with experimental data for Ar and Kr is made. For the most part, our results are between. The quasi-harmonic approximation fails at high temperatures, confirming once again the crucial role of strong anharmonicity.

  10. Simulation studies of the Cl{sup -}+ CH{sub 3}I S{sub N}2 nucleophilic substitution reaction: Comparison with ion imaging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiaxu; Lourderaj, Upakarasamy; Sun Rui; Hase, William L.; Mikosch, Jochen; Wester, Roland

    2013-03-21

    In the previous work of Mikosch et al.[Science 319, 183 (2008)], ion imaging experiments were used to study the Cl{sup -}+ CH{sub 3}I {yields} ClCH{sub 3}+ I{sup -} reaction at collision energies E{sub rel} of 0.39, 0.76, 1.07, and 1.9 eV. For the work reported here MP2(fc)/ECP/d direct dynamics simulations were performed to obtain an atomistic understanding of the experiments. There is good agreement with the experimental product energy and scattering angle distributions for the highest three E{sub rel}, and at these energies 80% or more of the reaction is direct, primarily occurring by a rebound mechanism with backward scattering. At 0.76 eV there is a small indirect component, with isotropic scattering, involving formation of the pre- and post-reaction complexes. All of the reaction is direct at 1.07 eV. Increasing E{sub rel} to 1.9 eV opens up a new indirect pathway, the roundabout mechanism. The product energy is primarily partitioned into relative translation for the direct reactions, but to CH{sub 3}Cl internal energy for the indirect reactions. The roundabout mechanism transfers substantial energy to CH{sub 3}Cl rotation. At E{sub rel}= 0.39 eV both the experimental product energy partitioning and scattering are statistical, suggesting the reaction is primarily indirect with formation of the pre- and post-reaction complexes. However, neither MP2 nor BhandH/ECP/d simulations agree with experiment and, instead, give reaction dominated by direct processes as found for the higher collision energies. Decreasing the simulation E{sub rel} to 0.20 eV results in product energy partitioning and scattering which agree with the 0.39 eV experiment. The sharp transition from a dominant direct to indirect reaction as E{sub rel} is lowered from 0.39 to 0.20 eV is striking. The lack of agreement between the simulations and experiment for E{sub rel}= 0.39 eV may result from a distribution of collision energies in the experiment and/or a shortcoming in both the MP2 and Bhand

  11. Breakthrough of two pesticides into tile drain and shallow groundwater: comparison of tile drain reaction and soil profiles within a field scale irrigation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Julian; Zehe, Erwin; Elsner, Martin; Palm, Juliane; Schneider, Dorothee; Schröder, Boris; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; West, Stephanie

    2010-05-01

    Preferential flow in macropores is a key process which strongly affects infiltration and may cause rapid transport of pesticides into depths of 80 to 150 cm. At these depths they experience a much slower degradation, may leach into shallow groundwater or enter a tile-drain and are transported into surface water bodies. Therefore, preferential transport might be an environmental problem, if the topsoil is bypassed, which has been originally thought to act as a filter to protect the subsoil and shallow groundwater. To investigate the behaviour of two pesticides with different chemical characteristics and to compare their transport behaviour in soil and into the tile drain an irrigation experiment was performed on a 400 m² field site. The experimental plot is located in the Weiherbach valley, south-west Germany, which basic geology consists of Loess and Keuper layers, the soil at the test site is a gleyic Colluvisol. The distance of the irrigation site to the Weiherbach brook is approximately 12 m, the field is drained with a tile-drain in about 1.2 m depth and shows discharge over the entire year. Three hours before the irrigation started, the farmer applied a pesticide solution consisting of Isoproturon (80 g) and Flufenacet (20 g) (IPU and FLU) according to conventional agricultural practice on the field plot. The irrigation took place in three time blocks (80 min, 60 min, 80 min) with in total 33.6 mm of precipitation. During the first block 1600 g of Bromide were mixed in the irrigation water. The drainage outlet was instrumented with a pressure probe. About 50 water samples ware taken during the experimental day, and several samples more the days after the experiment. They were analysed for the pesticides, bromide and water isotopes. In the two days after the experiment three soil profiles were excavated and soil samples were taken on a 10x10 cm² scheme. One week after the experiment two additional profiles were excavated. The soil was analysed for IPU, FLU

  12. Consumer preferences for food labels on tomatoes in Germany - A comparison of a quasi-experiment and two stated preference approaches.

    PubMed

    Meyerding, Stephan G H

    2016-08-01

    In many studies, consumer preferences are determined by using direct surveys. For this method social desirability is problematic. This leads to the effect that participants answer in a way that they perceive as desired by society. This leads to the stated importance of certain features in these studies not being reflected in real purchasing decisions. Therefore, the aim of the study is to compare consumer preferences measured by a quasi-experiment to those quantified by direct questions. Another objective is to quantify the part-worth utilities of product characteristics such as origin, price and food labels. Part-worth utilities are estimated on an interval scale with an arbitrary origin and are a measure for preferences. The real purchasing situation was simulated in a quasi-experiment using a choice-based conjoint analysis. The part-worth utilities were then compared with the results of a conventional preference assessment (Likert scale). For this purpose, 645 consumers from all over Germany were surveyed in 2014. The participants were on average 44 years old and 63% were women. The results of the conjoint analysis report the highest part-worth utility (2.853) for the lowest price (1.49€), followed by the characteristic "grown locally" (2.157). For the labels, the German organic label shows the highest part-worth utility (0.785) followed by Fairtrade/"A heart for the producer" (0.200). It is noticeable that the carbon footprint labels have negative part-worth utilities compared to tomatoes without a label (-0.130 with CO2 indication, -0.186 without CO2 indication). The price is ranked 12th in the importance of the characteristics of purchasing tomatoes in the survey with a Likert scale, whereas it is first in the evaluation of the quasi-experiment (conjoint analysis), which supports the assumption of a social desirability bias. PMID:27037221

  13. Comparisons of Cn2 measurements and power-in-fiber data from two long-path free-space optical communication experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, Ronald R.; Michael, Steven; Roth, Jeffrey M.; Yarnall, Timothy M.

    2010-08-01

    Over a two-year period beginning in early 2008, MIT Lincoln Laboratory conducted two free-space optical communication experiments designed to test the ability of spatial beam diversity, symbol encoding, and interleaving to reduce the effects of turbulence-induced scintillation. The first of these exercises demonstrated a 2.7 Gb/s link over a ground-level 5.4 km horizontal path. Signal detection was accomplished through the use of four spatially-separated 12 mm apertures that coupled the received light into pre-amplified single-mode fiber detectors. Similar equipment was used in a second experiment performed in the fall of 2009, which demonstrated an error-free air-to-ground link at propagation ranges up to 60 km. In both of these tests power levels at all fiber outputs were sampled at 1 msec intervals, which enabled a high-rate characterization of the received signal fluctuations. The database developed from these experiments encompasses a wide range of propagation geometries and turbulence conditions. This information has subsequently been analyzed in an attempt to correlate estimates of the turbulence profile with measurements of the scintillation index, characteristic fading time constant, scintillation patch size, and the shape parameters of the statistical distributions of the received signals. Significant findings include observations of rapid changes in the scintillation index driven by solar flux variations, consistent similarities in the values of the alpha and beta shape parameters of the gamma-gamma distribution function, and strong evidence of channel reciprocity. This work was sponsored by the Department of Defense, RRCO DDR&E, under Air Force Contract FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government.

  14. Outcomes of adult living donor liver transplantation: comparison of the Adult-to-adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study and the national experience.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, Kim M; Abecassis, Michael M; Emond, Jean C; Kam, Igal; Merion, Robert M; Gillespie, Brenda W; Tong, Lan

    2011-07-01

    The study objectives were to determine whether the findings of the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL) reflect the U.S. national experience and to define risk factors for patient mortality and graft loss in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). A2ALL previously identified risk factors for mortality after LDLT, which included early center experience, older recipient age, and longer cold ischemia time. LDLT procedures at 9 A2ALL centers (n = 702) and 67 non-A2ALL centers (n = 1664) from January 1998 through December 2007 in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database were analyzed. Potential predictors of time from transplantation to death or graft failure were tested using Cox regression. No significant difference in overall mortality between A2ALL and non-A2ALL centers was found. Higher hazard ratios (HRs) were associated with donor age (HR = 1.13 per 10 years, P = 0.0002), recipient age (HR = 1.20 per 10 years, P = 0.0003), serum creatinine levels (HR = 1.52 per loge unit increase, P < 0.0001), hepatocellular carcinoma (HR = 2.12, P<0.0001) or hepatitis C virus (HR = 1.18, P = 0.026), intensive care unit stay (HR = 2.52, P< 0.0001) or hospitalization (HR = 1.62, P < 0.0001) versus home, earlier center experience (LDLT case number 15: HR = 1.61, P < 0.0001, and a cold ischemia time >4.5 hours (HR = 1.79, P = 0.0006). Except for center experience, risk factor effects between A2ALL and non-A2ALL centers were not significantly different. Variables associated with graft loss were identified and showed similar trends. In conclusion, mortality and graft loss risk factors were similar in A2ALL and non-A2ALL centers. These analyses demonstrate that findings from the A2ALL consortium are relevant to other centers in the U.S. performing LDLT, and conclusions and recommendations from A2ALL may help to guide clinical decision making. PMID:21360649

  15. Comparison of the Adler-Nussinov-Paschos model with the data for neutrino induced single pion production from the MiniBooNE and MINER ν A experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. Y.; Paschos, E. A.; Schienbein, I.

    2015-03-01

    We present theoretical predictions in the framework of the ANP model for single pion production (π+,π0) in νμ and ν¯μ scattering off mineral oil and plastic. Our results for the integrated cross sections and flux-averaged differential distributions are compared to all available data of the MiniBooNE and MINER ν A experiments. While our predictions slightly undershoot the MiniBooNE data, they reproduce the normalization of the MINER ν A data for the kinetic energy distribution. For the dependence on the polar angle, we reproduce the shape of the arbitrarily normalized data.

  16. Impact of Dynamic Specimen Shape Evolution on the Atom Probe Tomography Results of Doped Epitaxial Oxide Multilayers: Comparison of Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Madaan, Nitesh; Bao, Jie; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Xu, Zhijie; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Devaraj, Arun

    2015-08-31

    The experimental atom probe tomography results from two different specimen orientations (top-down and side-ways) of a high oxygen ion conducting Samaria-doped-ceria/Scandia-stabilized-zirconia multilayer thin film solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte was correlated with level-set method based field evaporation simulations for the same specimen orientations. This experiment-theory correlation explains the dynamic specimen shape evolution and ion trajectory aberrations that can induce density artifacts in final reconstruction leading to inaccurate estimation of interfacial intermixing. This study highlights the need and importance of correlating experimental results with field evaporation simulations when using atom probe tomography for studying oxide heterostructure interfaces.

  17. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  18. A comparison between Nimbus 5 THIR and ITPR temperatures and derived winds with rawinsonde data obtained in the AVE 2 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. E.; Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    During the period of May 11 and 12, 1974, NASA conducted its second Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II) over the eastern United States. In this time interval, two Nimbus 5 orbits crossed the AVE II area, providing a series of ITPR soundings as well as THIR data. Horizontal temperature mapping of the AVE II cloud field is examined using two grid print map scales. Implied cloud top heights are compared with maximum radar-echo top reports. In addition, shelter temperatures in areas of clear sky are compared with the surface temperatures as determined from 11.5 micrometer radiometer data of the THIR experiment. The ITPR sounding accuracy is evaluated using interpolated radiosonde temperatures at times nearly coincident with the ITPR soundings. It was found that mean differences between the two data sets were as small as 1.3 C near 500 mb and as large as 2.9 C near the tropopause. The differences between ITPR and radiosonde temperatures at constant pressure levels were sufficient to induce significant differences in the horizontal temperature gradient. Cross sections of geostrophic wind along the orbital tracks were developed using a thermal wind buildup based on the ITPR temperature data and the radiosonde temperature data. Differences between the radiosonde and ITPR geostrophic winds could be explained on the basis of differences in the ITPR and radiosonde temperature gradients.

  19. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff.

    PubMed

    Stephens, D L; Townsend, L W; Miller, J; Zeitlin, C; Heilbronn, L

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R2 respectively. PMID:12539754

  20. Polarization-dependent force driving the Eg mode in bismuth under optical excitation: comparison of first-principles theory with ultra-fast x-ray experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahy, Stephen; Murray, Eamonn

    2015-03-01

    Using first principles electronic structure methods, we calculate the induced force on the Eg (zone centre transverse optical) phonon mode in bismuth immediately after absorption of a ultrafast pulse of polarized light. To compare the results with recent ultra-fast, time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments, we include the decay of the force due to carrier scattering, as measured in optical Raman scattering experiments, and simulate the optical absorption process, depth-dependent atomic driving forces, and x-ray diffraction in the experimental geometry. We find excellent agreement between the theoretical predictions and the observed oscillations of the x-ray diffraction signal, indicating that first-principles theory of optical absorption is well suited to the calculation of initial atomic driving forces in photo-excited materials following ultrafast excitation. This work is supported by Science Foundation Ireland (Grant No. 12/IA/1601) and EU Commission under the Marie Curie Incoming International Fellowships (Grant No. PIIF-GA-2012-329695).