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Sample records for laane ruth kullus

  1. Ruth Asawa: Sculptor with a Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Nancy

    1973-01-01

    Ruth Asawa is a sculptor who uses school workshops to bring more art into the lives of children by letting them work with the best professional artists and craftsmen in their respective communities. (Author/JA)

  2. A Conversation with Ruth Beall Heinig.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dynak, Dave

    1997-01-01

    Presents an interview with Ruth Beall Heinig, author of "Creative Drama for the Classroom Teacher," about her role as a teacher of creative drama and as a teacher-educator preparing teachers to use creative drama. Describes the development of her career in creative drama. Offers information on books about the subject written by other authors. (CR)

  3. Ivy's Changing Face: A Talk with Ruth Simmons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Presents a discussion with Ruth Simmons, the twelfth child of a Texas sharecropper and the first African American president of an Ivy League institution. Explores her life as an inspiring story of success against the odds. (EV)

  4. Rediscovering Ruth Faison Shaw and Her Finger-Painting Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Veronica

    2005-01-01

    Ruth Faison Shaw was an art educator who developed a nontraditional educational perspective of teaching and a different vision about children's art. As such, she is considered by some to be the initiator of finger-painting in America (The History of Art Education Timeline 1930-1939, 2002.) Shaw developed the technique of finger-painting and a…

  5. Did Babe Ruth Have a Comparative Advantage as a Pitcher?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scahill, Edward M.

    1990-01-01

    Advocates using baseball statistics to illustrate the advantages of specialization in production. Using Babe Ruth's record as an analogy, suggests a methodology for determining a player's comparative advantage as a teaching illustration. Includes the team's statistical profile in five tables to explain comparative advantage and profit maximizing.…

  6. "Go to Ruth's House": the social activism of Ruth Lubic and the family health and birth center.

    PubMed

    Fairman, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This case of the work of Ruth Watson Lubic, an internationally known nurse midwife and women's and children's health care activist, provides a modern-day example of the intersection of forceful individual personalities, nursing as a type of activism in itself, and grassroots and local actions that produce larger movement-based activist organizations. Her work as a nurse midwife, in partnership with other nurse midwives, physicians, and community members, illustrates how the efforts of individual actors at a grassroots community level can be as significant as larger traditionally situated activist movements on the lives of everyday citizens. PMID:20067094

  7. Lightcurve Analysis of Asteroids 3036 Krat, 3285 Ruth Wolfe and 5448 Siebold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Jacob; Postma, Angela; Sumter, George C.; Moore, Harold; Sweet, Samantha; Beaky, Matthew M.

    2008-10-01

    Main-belt asteroids 3036 Krat, 3285 Ruth Wolfe, and 5448 Siebold were observed by the authors. 3036 Krat, observed at Lowell Observatory in 2007 December, was found to have a period of 9.61 ± 0.01 h. For the other two asteroids, both observed at the Truman Observatory in 2007, we found 3285 Ruth Wolfe to have a period of 3.919 ± 0.001 h and 5448 Siebold was determined to have a period of 2.929 ± 0.001 h.

  8. The joint measuring campaign 1979 in Ruthe (West Germany) description and preliminary data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderploeg, R. R.; Tassone, G.; Vonhoyningen-Huene, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The measurements and observations performed as part of the TELLUS project on soil moisture and heat budget evaluations of selected areas in the vecinity of Ruthe, West Germany are presented and discussed. The main lines of investigation include evapotranspiration and moisture content in bare soils covered by vegetation, interactions between natural phenomena and mesoscale heat budget, and man made changes and their impact on regional heat budget.

  9. Review of samples of tailings, soils and stream sediment adjacent to and downstream from the Ruth Mine, Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    The Ruth Mine and mill are located in the western Mojave Desert in Inyo County, California (fig. 1). The mill processed gold-silver (Au-Ag) ores mined from the Ruth Au-Ag deposit, which is adjacent to the mill site. The Ruth Au-Ag deposit is hosted in Mesozoic intrusive rocks and is similar to other Au-Ag deposits in the western Mojave Desert that are associated with Miocene volcanic centers that formed on a basement of Mesozoic granitic rocks (Bateman, 1907; Gardner, 1954; Rytuba, 1996). The volcanic rocks consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions (fig. 2) that were emplaced into Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks (Troxel and Morton, 1962). The Ruth Mine is on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Tailings from the mine have been eroded and transported downstream into Homewood Canyon and then into Searles Valley (figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). The BLM provided recreational facilities at the mine site for day-use hikers and restored and maintained the original mine buildings in collaboration with local citizen groups for use by visitors (fig. 7). The BLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure arsenic (As) and other geochemical constituents in soils and tailings at the mine site and in stream sediments downstream from the mine in Homewood Canyon and in Searles Valley (fig. 3). The request was made because initial sampling of the site by BLM staff indicated high concentrations of As in tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine and stream sediments downstream from the mine on June 7, 2009. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

  10. 75 FR 51292 - Before Commissioners: Ruth Y. Goldway, Chairman; Tony L. Hammond, Vice Chairman; Mark Acton; Dan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners: Ruth Y. Goldway, Chairman; Tony L. Hammond, Vice Chairman; Mark Acton; Dan G. Blair; and Nanci E. Langley; Competitive Product Prices; Global Expedited Package Services 3...

  11. Ruth Flockart and Dr Wood: A Crucial Relationship in the Development of Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College Music Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Louise

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the notion that particular working relationships within school music programs can have a significant affect on the program's development and progress. To explore this notion the research focussed on the working relationship of a music teacher at Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College (MLC), Ruth Flockart (1891-1985) and the…

  12. CO(2), CO, and Hg emissions from the Truman Shepherd and Ruth Mullins coal fires, eastern Kentucky, USA.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Jennifer M K; Henke, Kevin R; Hower, James C; Engle, Mark A; Stracher, Glenn B; Stucker, J D; Drew, Jordan W; Staggs, Wayne D; Murray, Tiffany M; Hammond, Maxwell L; Adkins, Kenneth D; Mullins, Bailey J; Lemley, Edward W

    2010-03-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), and mercury (Hg) emissions were quantified for two eastern Kentucky coal-seam fires, the Truman Shepherd fire in Floyd County and the Ruth Mullins fire in Perry County. This study is one of the first to estimate gas emissions from coal fires using field measurements at gas vents. The Truman Shepherd fire emissions are nearly 1400t CO(2)/yr and 16kg Hg/yr resulting from a coal combustion rate of 450-550t/yr. The sum of CO(2) emissions from seven vents at the Ruth Mullins fire is 726+/-72t/yr, suggesting that the fire is consuming about 250-280t coal/yr. Total Ruth Mullins fire CO and Hg emissions are estimated at 21+/-1.8t/yr and >840+/-170g/yr, respectively. The CO(2) emissions are environmentally significant, but low compared to coal-fired power plants; for example, 3.9x10(6)t CO(2)/yr for a 514-MW boiler in Kentucky. Using simple calculations, CO(2) and Hg emissions from coal-fires in the U.S. are estimated at 1.4x10(7)-2.9x10(8)t/yr and 0.58-11.5t/yr, respectively. This initial work indicates that coal fires may be an important source of CO(2), CO, Hg and other atmospheric constituents. PMID:20071005

  13. Negotiating international bioethics: a response to Tom Beauchamp and Ruth Macklin.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert

    1998-12-01

    Can the bioethical theories that have served American bioethics so well, serve international bioethics as well? In two papers in the previous issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, I contend that the form of principlist fundamentalism endorsed by American bioethicists like Tom Beauchamp and Ruth Macklin will not play on an international stage. Deploying techniques of postmodern scholarship, I argue that principlist fundamentalism justifies neither the condemnation of the Nazi doctors at Nuremberg, nor, as the Report of the Advisory Committee on the Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) demonstrates, condemnation of Cold War radiation researchers. Principlist fundamentalism thus appears to be philosophy bankrupt. In this issue of the Journal, Beauchamp and Macklin reject this claim, arguing that I have misread the ACHRE report and misunderstood Nazism. They also argue that the form of post-postmodern negotiated human rights theory that I proffer is adequate only insofar as it is itself really fundamentalist; insofar as I take postmodernism seriously, however, I mire international bioethics in relativism. In this response, I reaffirm my anti-fundamentalism, provide further evidence in support of my reading of the ACHRE report, and defend my post-postmodern version of rights theory. I also develop criteria for a minimally adequate theoretical framework for international bioethics. PMID:11657321

  14. The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980…

  15. Thirteen new Costa Rican species belonging to the genus Triraphis Ruthe (Braconidae: Rogadinae) with their host records.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Alejandro A; Shaw, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    Thirteen new species belonging to the genus Triraphis Ruthe are described and illustrated: Triraphis baios sp. nov., T. balteus sp. nov., T. chinusi sp. nov., T. cortazari sp. nov., T. defectus sp. nov., T. guarusa sp. nov., T. huidobroi sp. nov., T. ikelosops sp. nov., T. melasops sp. nov., T. paraholos sp. nov., T. proxilus sp. nov., T. simphlex sp. nov. and T. willei sp. nov. The lepidopteran hosts were feeding on 17 genera of plants within 16 families. Two families of Lepidoptera are reported as new hosts for Triraphis: Acraga sp. (Dalceridae) parasitized by T. paraholos sp. nov. and Norape sp. (Megalopygidae) by T. guarusa sp. nov. Moreover, four Triraphis species are treated as new combinations under the genus Triraphis sensu van Achterberg: Triraphis areatus (Cresson) comb. n., T. fasciipennis (Cresson) comb. n., T. fusciceps (Cresson) comb. n. and T. ornatus (Cresson) comb. n..  PMID:25660797

  16. Phenolic compounds in berries and flowers of a natural hybrid between bilberry and lingonberry (Vaccinium × intermedium Ruthe).

    PubMed

    Lätti, Anja K; Riihinen, Kaisu R; Jaakola, Laura

    2011-06-01

    Hybridization between species plays an important role in the evolution of secondary metabolites and in the formation of combinations of existing secondary metabolites in plants. We have investigated the content of phenolic compounds in berries and flowers of Vaccinium×intermedium Ruthe, which is a rare natural hybrid between bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.). The berries and flowers of the hybrid showed characteristics inherited from both parent species in the distribution and contents of phenolic compounds. Bilberry is known as one of the richest sources of anthocyanins and to have a profile of 15 major forms combining cyanidin, delphinidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin with galactose, glucose and arabinose. Lingonberry contains only cyanidin glycosides. Hybrid berries contained all bilberry anthocyanins with pronounced cyanidin content. With regard to proanthocyanidins and flavonol glycosides, the hybrid inherited diverse profiles combining those of both parental species. The distribution of hydroxycinnamic acids was quite uniform in all studied berries. Of the identified compounds, 30 were detected in lingonberry, 46 in bilberry, 53 in hybrid berries and 38 in hybrid flowers. Hence, compared with the parent species, hybrid berries possess a more diverse profile of phenolic compounds and, therefore, can offer interesting material for breeding purposes. PMID:21382629

  17. Effects of Bedrock Lithology and Subglacial Till on the Motion of Ruth Glacier, Alaska, Deduced from Five Pulses from 1973-2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turrin, J.; Forster, R.; Sauber, Jeanne; Hall, Dorothy K.; Bruhn, R.

    2013-01-01

    A pulse is a type of unstable glacier flow intermediate between normal flow and surging. Using Landsat MSS, TM, and ETM+ imagery and feature tracking software, a time-series of mostly annual velocity maps from 1973 to 2012 was produced that reveals five pulses of Ruth Glacier, Alaska. Peaks in ice velocity were found in the 1981, 1989, 1997, 2003, and 2010; approximately every 7 years. During these peak years the ice velocity increased 300%, from approximately 40 m/yr to 160 m/yr, and occurred in an area of the glacier underlain by sedimentary bedrock. Based on the spatio-temporal behavior of Ruth Glacier during the pulse cycles, we suggest the pulses are due to enhanced basal motion via deformation of a subglacial till. The cyclical nature of the pulses is theorized to be due to a thin till, with low permeability, that causes incomplete drainage of the till between the pulses, followed by eventual recharge and dilation of the till. These findings suggest care is needed when attempting to correlate changes in regional climate with decadal-scale changes in velocity, because in some instances basal conditions may have a greater influence on ice dynamics than climate.

  18. "When Does It Stop Being Peanut Butter?": FDA Food Standards of Identity, Ruth Desmond, and the Shifting Politics of Consumer Activism, 1960s-1970s.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Angie M

    2016-01-01

    This article uses a historical controversy over the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's standard of identity for peanut butter as a site for investigating three topics of high importance for historians of technology, consumption, and food activism: how new industrial food-processing technologies have become regulatory problems; how government, industry, and consumer actors negotiate standards development; and how laypeople try to shape technological artifacts in spaces dominated by experts. It examines the trajectory of consumer activist Ruth Desmond, co-founder of the organization the Federation of Homemakers. By following Desmond's evolving strategies, the article shows how the broader currents of the 1960s-70s consumer movement played out in a particular case. Initially Desmond used a traditional style that heavily emphasized her gendered identity, working within a grassroots organization to promote legislative and regulatory reforms. Later, she moved to a more modern advocacy approach, using adversarial legal methods to fight for consumer protections. PMID:26971728

  19. Identification of phenolic compounds from lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.), bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) and hybrid bilberry (Vaccinium x intermedium Ruthe L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Hokkanen, Juho; Mattila, Sampo; Jaakola, Laura; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Tolonen, Ari

    2009-10-28

    Phenolic compounds from leaves of lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.), bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), and the natural hybrid of bilberry and lingonberry (Vaccinium x intermedium Ruthe L., hybrid bilberry) were identified using LC/TOF-MS and LC/MS/MS after extraction from the plant material in methanol in an ultrasonicator. The phenolic profiles in the plants were compared using the LC/TOF-MS responses. This is the first thorough report of phenolic compounds in hybrid bilberry. In total, 51 different phenolic compounds were identified, including flavan-3-ols, proanthocyanidins, flavonols and their glycosides, and various phenolic acid conjugates. Of the identified compounds, 35 were detected in bilberry, 36 in lingonberry, and 46 in the hybrid. To our knowledge, seven compounds were previously unreported in Vaccinium genus and many of the compounds are reported for the first time from bilberry and lingonberry. PMID:19788243

  20. Linking Ruth to Her Past

    PubMed Central

    Justin, Renate G.

    2004-01-01

    A family physician shares the story of her 3-decade-long relationship with a patient and the strong ties that they formed. Although she was taught to keep emotionally distant from her patients in order to maintain the best therapeutic milieu, this relationship enriched the author’s experience as a physician and ministered to her patient’s needs. PMID:15506591

  1. Ruth Moore Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Pingree, Chellie [D-ME-1

    2013-02-13

    06/06/2013 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Veterans' Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Properties of Cordonnier, Perrin and Van der Laan Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, A. G.; Anderson, P. G.; Horadam, A. F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to explore some properties of certain third-order linear sequences which have some properties analogous to the better known second-order sequences of Fibonacci and Lucas. Historical background issues are outlined. These, together with the number and combinatorial theoretical results, provide plenty of pedagogical opportunities for…

  3. LaaN: Convergence of Knowledge Management and Technology-Enhanced Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatti, M. A.; Schroeder, U.; Jarke, M.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) and Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL) have attracted attention over the past two decades and are meanwhile considered as important means to increase individual and organizational performance. There is, however, a wide agreement that traditional KM and TEL models have failed to cope with the fast-paced change and critical…

  4. Rational Management: Medical Authority and Ideological Conflict in Ruth Lawrence's "Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausman, Bernice L.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a close reading of one chapter of the only guidebook for physicians about breast feeding. Notes that the medical discussion of the psychological aspects of breast feeding articulates conflicting ideological views of women and their place in society. Suggests medicine reflects and contributes to a cultural context ambivalent about women's…

  5. Remarks of Ruth Bates Harris, Deputy Assistant Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration at summer institute closing activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Applications of experience and knowledge gained from aeronautical and space research and exploration are discussed briefly. Spinoffs are presented which improve the quality of life by contributing to advances in health, transportation, foods, communications, energy, safety, and manufacturing.

  6. Children’s Folk Songs of America: The Folk Music Legacies of John Langstaff and Ruth Crawford Seeger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Sarah H.; Bartolome, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers of general music are tasked with the challenge of locating high-quality repertoire for classroom use and to incorporate that repertoire into meaningful music learning encounters for children and youth. This task may become all the more difficult when seeking out repertoire of substance from traditional sources, finding songs of folk…

  7. One-Third of a Campus: Ruth Crawford Mitchell and Second-Generation Americans at the University of Pittsburgh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Harold S.

    2008-01-01

    Were colleges obliged to address the dilemmas faced by the many first- and second-generation Americans who enrolled after World War I? No, replied many administrators who espoused exclusion or assimilation, or who expressed indifference. These attitudes meant that many students would never learn to navigate the turbulent waters of campus social…

  8. 75 FR 20979 - Six Rivers National Forest, Mad River Ranger District, Ruth, CA, Beaverslide Timber Sale and Fuel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... national social and economic needs. The Six Rivers National Forest seeks to provide a sustainable... Forest's goal to provide a sustainable, predictable, long-term timber supply for local economies;...

  9. Volatiles from intact and Lygus-damaged Erigeron annuus (L.) Pers. are highly attractive to ovipositing Lygus and its parasitoid Peristenus relictus Ruthe.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Sean T; Mauck, Kerry E; Fleischer, Shelby J; Fleisher, Shelby F; Tumlinson, James H

    2013-08-01

    Trap cropping and biological control can provide a sustainable means of controlling insect pests. Insects in the genus Lygus (Hemiptera: Miridae) are major pests on cotton and horticultural crops throughout the United States, and pesticide resistance within Lygus populations necessitates more sustainable long-term management techniques. Here, we explore behavioral responses of Lygus bugs (L. rubrosignatus Knight) and an introduced parasitoid, Peristenus relictus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), to a common field edge plant, Erigeron annuus, which has the potential to serve as a trap host. Erigeron annuus is attractive to Lygus in the field, with Lygus preferentially moving to Erigeron patches compared to more abundant cotton plants. To determine the role of odor cues in mediating this attraction, we collected volatiles from E. annuus with and without Lygus damage, and then tested the attractiveness of these volatiles vs. those of cotton to Lygus females and female P. relictus wasps using Y-tube and wind tunnel bioassays. We found that undamaged E. annuus emits high concentrations of a complex volatile blend (60+ compounds), with novel compounds induced and constitutive compounds up-regulated in response to damage. Additionally, both female Lygus bugs and female P. relictus wasps are highly attracted to E. annuus volatiles over those of cotton in almost every combination of damage treatments. Our results suggest that Erigeron annuus would be an effective trap plant to control Lygus in cotton, since it is highly attractive to both the pest and its natural enemy. PMID:23982679

  10. Motivation, Personality, and Work-Related Characteristics of Women in Male Dominated Professions. Ruth Strang Research Award Monograph Series: No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashburn, Elizabeth A.

    This monograph reviews hypotheses about the motivations of women who choose male-dominated professions. Chapter 1 considers theory and empirical evidence regarding the personality and socialization patterns of those women who have chosen male-dominated professions. Discussion focuses on two types of internal motivation--achievement needs and need…

  11. [Marcus Barros talks about the environment and tropical diseases in the Amazon. Interview by Stella Oswaldo Cruz Penido. Introduction by Ruth B. Martins].

    PubMed

    Barros, Marcus

    2007-12-01

    Marcus Barros talks about how tropical diseases influenced his decision to study medicine. He tells a number of stories about his family, which moved from Alto Juruá to Manaus to escape malaria and other fevers. He says it is essential to adopt homeopathy, acupuncture, and other indigenous knowledge and practices in treating disease. Barros also talks about measures taken when he was president of Brazil's national environmental institute, Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renováveis (Ibama)--all part of an effort to prevent and combat these diseases and halt deforestation and burn-offs. PMID:18783153

  12. Creating a Successful Student-Athlete: Discipline, Focus and Hard Work Are Just a Few Attributes, Says Advising Expert Dr. Ruth Darling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2004-01-01

    Critics' of big-time college sports have been working for decades to control the rampant rise in commercialization on campus--and to hold the line on academic integrity. But the balancing act is a difficult one--as 2003, a year that saw academic scandals at St. Bonaventure University, University of Georgia, and Fresno State University, to name…

  13. From SEST to ALMA, from NTT to OWL: of vision, dreams and realities. Perspectives from the Directors General, past and present: Harry van der Laan, ESO Director General, 1988 - 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, Harry

    2002-09-01

    ESO has come a long way since in 1987 the first rocks were blasted at the NTT site on La Silla. Those were exciting days, when SEST came online and soon after the VLT programme was getting up to speed upon its approval in December 1987. It was not an easy time for staff or management: taking up the role of main contractor for its own design and construction programme rather than finding an industrial consultant to do so was an enormous challenge. It was not obvious that it could be done, for more than ninety per cent of ESO's staff capacity was occupied with running La Silla, operating Headquarter services and constructing the NTT. The VLT Blue Book and the bag of money Council had allocated to its realization were necessary but by no means sufficient. For the new, formidable task, manpower had to be found and trained, manpower both reassigned and newly recruited.

  14. Ten on Top from Down Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nist, Joan

    1988-01-01

    Discusses some works by the following Australian writers of young adult literature: Ivan Southall, Patricia Wrightson, Bill Scott, Ruth Manley, Allan Baillie, Colin Theile, Ruth Park, Lee Harding, Robin Klein, and Eleanor Spence. (MM)

  15. Comment on: "Crustal strength in central Tibet determined from Holocene shoreline deflection around Siling Co" by Xuhua Shi, Eric Kirby, Kevin P. Furlong, Kai Meng, Ruth Robinson and Erchie Wang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Philip C.; Walker, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Shi et al. (2015) analysed the distributions of elevation of palaeoshorelines around Siling Tso, central Tibet assuming a model in which surface loads are entirely supported by an elastic lid overlying an inviscid fluid. They concluded that the thickness of the elastic lid is 20-30 km and that, for the assumption of an inviscid substrate in this model to be valid, the viscosity of the crust below the elastic lid must be less than 1- 2 ×1019 Pas. Here we relax the assumption of an inviscid lower crust and show that the distribution of shoreline elevations may be explained either by a thick elastic lid or by high viscosity in the lower crust. In the limit of an inviscid lower crust, the thickness of the elastic lid must be greater than 25 to 39 km. If the elastic lid is thinner than this, then the viscosity of the crust beneath must be at least 5 ×1019 to 2 ×1020 Pas, depending on the time interval over which the lake was loaded.

  16. 77 FR 67020 - Performance Review Board Appointments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ..., Michael Black, Michael Black, Steven Blanchard, Mary Josie Bolton, Hannibal Burden, John Burzyk, Carla..., David Velasco, Janine Ward, Joseph Weber, Wendi Welch, Ruth Wells, Sandra Wenk, Daniel Wessels,...

  17. 78 FR 49550 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ...: Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, Laan van Nieuw Oost-Indi 300, The Hague, The Netherlands NL... Netherlands NL-2593 CE. This meeting will discuss applications for the Digging into Data Challenge grant... Hague, The Netherlands NL-2593 CE. This meeting will discuss applications for the Digging into...

  18. Family and Consumer Sciences Education. Subject Matters Volume 2, No. 2, Nov/Dec 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Includes "Addressing the Critical Shortage of FACS [Family and Consumer Sciences] Educators"; "Leaving Home Economics in the Past" (Ruth E. Thaler-Carter); "Cutting-Edge Training and Career Relevance" (Ruth E. Thaler-Carter); and "Meeting the Demands of a Growth Industry" (Laird Livingston). (JOW)

  19. 76 FR 66337 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Post Office Closing AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This document informs the public that an appeal of the closing of the Ruth, Mississippi, post office has been filed. It... received a petition for review of the Postal Service's determination to close the Ruth post office in...

  20. Ira C. Ritter and The Kroger Co., v. Jerry and Ruth Stanton. "Trial by Jury." Lesson Plans for Secondary Teachers on the Constitutional Protections of Trial by Jury. Courts in the Classroom: Curriculum Concepts and Other Information on Indiana's Courts for the K-12 Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Elizabeth

    In the case of Ritter v. Stanton, the attorneys for Ira Ritter and Kroger alleged that the amount of damages awarded by the jury were excessive and asked the Indiana Supreme Court to review the matter. This set of three lesson plans for secondary educators uses the Ritter v. Stanton case to examine the concept of the U.S. constitutional right to…

  1. 32 CFR 263.10 - Parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized by a posted traffic sign or directed by a uniformed guard, shall stand or park a motor vehicle: (1... posted signs and shall register their vehicles at the front desk of Erskine Hall, Ruth Building...

  2. Synergistic Man: Outcome Model for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseve, Ronald J.

    1973-01-01

    Drawing on the insights of Ruth Benedict and Abraham Maslow in their search for an ethical gauge by which to rate personal-social health, this article proposes synergistic man'' as the desired outcome model for counselors. (Author)

  3. 75 FR 81630 - National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Special... Person: Ruth Grossman, DDS, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging...

  4. The Role of Hispanic Women in the Making of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, Gloria

    1990-01-01

    Sketches the biographies of 12 Hispanic women who contributed to Texas history. Suggests 13 activities pertinent to instruction on the topic. Describes the compilation of 20,000 items for the Texas Women's History Project by historian Ruth Winegarten. (GG)

  5. Intimate Relationship of Sex and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... It’s important for parents to emphasize that they value more than physical perfection.” Your support can ensure ... 1995) and Sex for Dummies by Ruth Westheimer, Ph.D. (IDG Books Worldwide, 1995). For a comprehensive ...

  6. 78 FR 10692 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... ANTHONY BRIGGS THOMAS MARTIN BROWN LAVINA RUTH BUCHANAN ROBERT CHRISTIAN CHEUNG ALLISON CHO MICHAEL KIM DE... HIGHFIELD TUCKER M JONSSON N STEPHAN W LEUNG JANICE T L LEVY-LANG LAURENCE MARTINE MARC MICHAEL...

  7. NIH Loses a Friend

    MedlinePlus

    ... work as pathology researchers. They made a tremendous team, providing NIH with outstanding competence, integrity, and vision for over 50 years. She held the most important leadership posts in recent NIH history. Dr. Ruth Kirschstein ...

  8. Enhancement of acidogenic fermentation for volatile fatty acid production from food waste: Effect of redox potential and inoculum.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Yu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Yeer; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Meizhen; Long, Yuyang; Chen, Ting

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of redox potential (ORP) and inoculum on volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production from food waste by acidogenic fermentation. Four experimental conditions with two ORP levels were tested: limited aeration conditions with ORP level of -100 to -200mV inoculating anaerobic sludge (LA+AnS) or aerobic sludge (LA+AeS), and anaerobic conditions with ORP level of -200 to -300mV inoculating anaerobic sludge with 2-bromoethanosulfophate (AN+BES) and without BES (AN). The maximal VFA yield (0.79g COD/g VS) was attained in LA+AnS reactor due to enhanced hydrolysis of substrates, especially proteins (degradation efficiency 78.3%). A higher frequency of phylum Firmicutes under limited aeration conditions (42.2-48.2%) was observed than that under anaerobic conditions (21.1%). The microbial community was more diverse in LA+AnS reactors than LA+AeS. We conclude that appropriate ORP level (from -100 to -200mV) and inoculum play essential roles in VFA production. PMID:27343452

  9. Professional development through attending conferences: reflections of a health librarian.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    In this article, guest writer Ruth Jenkins from Berkshire Heathcare Foundation Trust reflects on two conferences she attended in 2014, LILAC and SLA. Through the process of reflection, she considers the benefits that attending conferences can have to library and information professionals in the health sector. In particular, she discusses the opportunities and areas for learning and professional development that conferences can offer including evidence-based practice and current awareness, gaining new knowledge and objectivity, and networking and the unexpected benefits of conferences. Ruth also offers some practical hints and tips on ways to facilitate your attendance at conferences, including through awards and funding. H.S. PMID:25943972

  10. Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkholder, Zoe

    2011-01-01

    Between the turn of the twentieth century and the "Brown v. Board of Education" decision in 1954, the way that American schools taught about "race" changed dramatically. This transformation was engineered by the nation's most prominent anthropologists, including Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and Margaret Mead, during World War II. Inspired by…

  11. Nontraditional Occupations for Women of the Hemisphere: The U.S. Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment Standards Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Women's Bureau.

    Edited versions of speeches presented at the conference are presented in the document. Section 1, Women in the Fields of Government, Education, Trade Unions, Business and Industry, presents personal accounts of women in nontraditional occupations. Speakers include Betty Southard Murphy, Lucille Maurer, Barbara G. Kilberg, Ruth Weyand, Julia M.…

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (80th, Chicago, Illinois, July 30-August 2, 1997): Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Public Relations section of the Proceedings contains the following 13 papers: "Pluralistic Ignorance and Educators in Public Relations: Underestimating Professionalism of Our Educator Peers and of Practitioners in the Field" (Lynne M. Sallot; Glen T. Cameron; Ruth Ann Weaver-Lariscy); "Critical Conflict Issues in Public Relations Agency-Client…

  13. Teaching Shakespeare Today: Practical Approaches and Productive Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James E., Ed.; Salomone, Ronald, E., Ed.

    This teaching guide for high school college instructors begins with an introduction on "Shakespeare and the American Landscape," by Samuel Crowl, and includes the following 32 essays: "Some 'Basics' in Shakespearean Study" (Gladys V. Veidemanis); "Teaching Shakespeare's Dramatic Dialogue" (Sharon A. Beehler); "Shakespearean Role Models" (Ruth Ann…

  14. PRODUCTIVITY BENEFITS OF INDUSTRIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY MEASURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A journal article by: Ernst Worrell1, John A. Laitner, Michael Ruth, and Hodayah Finman Abstract: We review the relationship between energy efficiency improvement measures and productivity in industry. We review over 70 industrial case studies from widely available published dat...

  15. Projects Submitted by Participants of the Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2000 (Poland and Hungary).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    These curriculum projects were developed by participants of the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program in Poland and Hungary during the summer of 2000. The following 11 projects are in the collection: "A Thematic Multicultural Interactive School Event on Poland and Hungary: Exploration and Learning for 6-to-9-Year-Olds" (Ruth Albert); "Once upon a…

  16. Empowering Our Students to Make a More Just World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Shari; Rosenberg, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Fifth-grade teachers Shari Dorfman and Ruth Rosenberg strive to help their students see the possibilities that exist within themselves, so that their students can begin to envision their own future. To this end, Dorfman and Rosenberg choose to celebrate the legacy of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by sharing the stories of lesser-known…

  17. The End of the E*LIT Era: Exploring Its Impact. Spotlight Feature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnone, Marilyn P.; Sullivan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    This article takes a retrospective look at a Center for Digital Literacy (CDL) program called E*LIT which stands for "Enriching Literacy through Information Technology." E*LIT was created by CDL director, Dr. Ruth V. Small. Every year for the past six years, the E*LIT Competition has inspired students in and around Central New York to create…

  18. Off to a Good Start: Launching the School Year. Excerpts from the Responsive Classroom Newsletter No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northeast Foundation for Children, Greenfield, MA.

    Comprised of excerpts from the Responsive Classroom Newsletter, this book details practices for use during the beginning of the elementary school year to build a foundation for a successful school year. Chapter 1, "The First Six Weeks of School: Building the Foundation for a Successful Year" (Ruth Charney and Marlynn Clayton) introduces the social…

  19. Facilitating University Education: A View from the North

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiewiura, Joachim S.

    2016-01-01

    In this small essay, I will reflect on Michael Bérubé and Jennifer Ruth's arguments on the decline of educational professionalism in the United States. The purpose is to consider this loss of professionalism, and I will consider it in light of the arts and humanities in the Danish educational debate. Two reflections are presented: first, the…

  20. Incoming Students: Are They Ready? FACTC Focus, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr, Mark, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "FACTC Focus" is a publication of Faculty Association of Community and Technical Colleges (FACTC) with the purpose of presenting diverse views on faculty issues. Included in this issue are: (1) Grade Forgiveness: A Good Idea? (Ruth Frickle); (2) Getting Pre-College Students Connected (Phil Venditti); (3) Abbreviations confusion: Are Banks Really…

  1. The Language and Politics of Exclusion: Others in Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Stephen Harold, Ed.

    A collection of essays on "the other" in discourse includes: "The Rhetoric of Othering" (Stephen Harold Riggins); "Political Discourse and Racism: Describing Others in Western Parliaments" (Teun A. van Dijk); "'Das Ausland' and Anti-Semitic Discourse: The Discursive Construction of the Other" (Ruth Wodak); "Who Are They? The Rhetoric of…

  2. Serials Management in the Electronic Era: Papers in Honor of Peter Gellatly, Founding Editor of "The Serials Librarian."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Jim, Ed.; Williams, James W., Ed.

    This book assesses progress and technical changes in the field of serials management and anticipates future directions and challenges for librarians. The book consists of 18 chapters: (1) "Introduction" (Jim Cole and James W. Williams); (2) "Peter Gellatly--Editor with a Deft Touch" (Ruth C. Carter); (3) "The "Deseret News" Web Edition" (Stewart…

  3. Smart Kids--Enhancing Science Learning with Pupil-Pupil Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Mick

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview between the author and two teachers, Ruth Birtles and Michelle Proctor, who are involved in "Smart Kids", an AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust (AZSTT) funded project for 2009-10 coordinated by the Centre for Science Education, Sheffield Hallam University. In this interview, Proctor and Birtles discuss the Smart…

  4. From Russia with Montessori

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selman, Ruth Corey

    2005-01-01

    As leader of a People-to-People tour to Russia, and one whose family history is linked to the cataclysmic history of 20th-century Russia, Ruth Corey, felt a special responsibility to introduce her traveling companions to Russia, and Russian Montessorians to her cohorts. Her traveling companions were a group of 15 Montessori teachers, committed to…

  5. Authors, Authors, Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Carl A., II; Kaplan, Allison G.

    2007-01-01

    This article features some of the programs offered in the Reno conference. Two of the preconferences at Reno will focus on children's literature. Judy Freeman will talk about some of the current and future trends for books for younger readers. She will share a plethora of some of the best picture books and chapter books. Ruth Cox Clark will take…

  6. After Brown U.'s Report on Slavery, Silence (So Far)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This article, discusses Brown University's slavery report, a 106-page narrative examination of the early connections between Brown University and slavery, that has been greeted--so far--with silence. The report, done at the behest of Ruth J. Simmons, Brown's president and herself a descendant of slaves, is an unsparing look at a shameful side of…

  7. International Symposium on Information Technology: Standards for Bibliographic Control (Bangkok, Thailand, September 4-8, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thammasat Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Univ. Libraries.

    This document which covers the proceedings of the 1989 International Symposium on Information Technology, begins with several opening ceremony messages and includes the following papers: (1) "Reflections on International Bibliographic Standards" (Winston D. Roberts); (2) "Bibliographic Control from the User's Perspective" (Ruth A. Pagell); (3)…

  8. Conversations on Method: Deconstructing Policy through the Researcher Reflective Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slotnick, Ruth C.; Janesick, Valerie J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors argue that the researcher reflective journal is a critical interpretive tool for conducting educational policy analysis. The idea for this research grew from the experiences of a doctoral candidate (Ruth) in pursuit of a policy focused dissertation and a series of on-going conversations with her qualitative…

  9. Literature and Its Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This theme issue of the "Virginia English Bulletin" focuses on "Literature and Its Teaching." The 15 major articles are: "Response to Literature" (Robert C. Small and Ruth Fisher); "The Power of a Good Book" (Gayle Sterrett); "Some Plain Truths about Teaching English" (Coalition of English Associations); "Introducing High School Students to…

  10. K-12 Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N. Lopez

    2011-01-01

    The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth Lopez Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across…

  11. 77 FR 13132 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request; Revision “PHS Applications and Pre-Award Reporting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ...&R); PHS Fellowship Supplemental Form and agency specific instructions used in combination with the SF424 (R&R) forms/instructions for Fellowships ; PHS 416-1 Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Individual Fellowship Application Instructions and Forms used only for a change of...

  12. 77 FR 38842 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: PHS Applications and Pre-Award Reporting Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... component forms and agency-specific instructions used in combination with the SF424 (R&R); PHS Fellowship... for Fellowships ; PHS 416-1 Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Fellowship Application Instructions and Forms used only for a change of sponsoring institution...

  13. Distance Education in Southern Africa Conference, 1987. Papers 6: Systems and Strategies in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adey, David, Comp.; And Others

    Eighteen papers from the University of South Africa's Conference on Distance Education are presented. They include: "Effective Second Language Reading in a Cross-Cultural Society" (Irma Zaslansky); "A BA Degree in Social Sciences at the Israel Open University" (Ruth Beyth-Marom); "Establishing a Theological Education by Extension Programme in…

  14. Fulbright-Hayes Seminars Abroad Program, 1993. Morocco and Tunisia. Final Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    America-Mideast Educational and Training Services, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This collection of Fulbright seminar projects focuses on Morocco and Tunisia. The first project (Ruth Brent) gives a descriptive analysis of images from the perspective of an interior design educator. The second project (Eileen Burchell) explores the theme of continuity and change as it is reflected in the contemporary French literature of the…

  15. Developmental Education in Higher Education. Advanced Institutional Development Program (AIDP) Two-year College Consortium, Vol. II, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Johnnie Ruth; And Others

    This monograph, consisting of four sections, focuses on developmental education in the higher education setting. The first section, by Johnnie Ruth Clarke, provides an overall perspective on learning through developmental programs. Included are discussions of the developmental approach, developmental students and instructional activities, and…

  16. Marking Advanced Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donley, Michael

    1978-01-01

    A list of points to aid essay writers is suggested as the basis of a marking system for the teacher of English as a foreign language. The checklist, obtained from a book on higher education by Ruth Beard, can be adapted to the English as a foreign language situation. (SW)

  17. Creative Dramatics. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Julia; Sidlovskaya, Olga; Stotter, Ruth; Haugen, Kirsten; Leithold, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on using creative dramatics in early childhood education: (1) "Drama: A Rehearsal for Life" (Julia Gabriel); (2) "Fairy Tales Enhance Imagination and Creative Thinking" (Olga Sidlovskaya); (3) "Starting with a Story" (Ruth Stotter); (4) "Using Creative Dramatics to Include All Children" (Kirsten Haugen); and (5) "Helping…

  18. Coaching in the Library: A Management Strategy for Achieving Excellence. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Ruth F.

    2010-01-01

    Experienced librarian and coach Ruth Metz outlines a focused and results-oriented plan for achieving the best results from staff members through a coaching style of management. Real-world examples and coaching scenarios specific to library work will help librarians: (1) Be both a coach and a player by learning the terminology and techniques; (2)…

  19. "Never Knew Literacy Could Get at My Soul": On How Words Matter for Youth, or Notes toward Decolonizing Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ruth H.

    2013-01-01

    This article is organized as follows. First, the author introduces a few ways to consider and define spoken word in its current cultural and historical form. She then discusses spoken word literacy by bringing in the voices of youth spoken word artists to address further the question of relevance. In doing so, Ruth Kin connects how spoken word…

  20. Vocational Education for Youth and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugarman, Michael N., Ed.; Pautler, Albert J., Ed.

    The collected papers deal with issues, trends and concepts in vocational and technical education. Contributors are Charles H. Buzzell, Sophie S. Hollander, Angelo C. Gillie, Sr., Ruth Midjaas, Edwin L. Kurth, Jimmie C. Styles, Patrick A. O'Reilly, Thomas C. Cooke, Charles O. Whitehead, John W. Glenn, Jr., Michael N. Sugarman, C. Thomas Dean,…

  1. The Genesis of Language: A Psycholinguistic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frank, Ed.; Miller, George A., Ed.

    The fourteen papers are: "Developmental Psycholinguistics," by David McNeill; "Comments on 'Developmental Psycholinguistics'," by Dan I. Slobin; "How to Learn to Talk: Some Simple Ways," by Jerry A. Fodor; "The Acquisition of Russian as a Native Language, " by Dan I. Slobin; "Some Questions on the Child's Learning of Phonology," by Ruth H. Weir;…

  2. ADHD as Sequel to Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2016-02-01

    Investigators from Ruth Children's Hospital, Haifa, and Schneider Medical Center, Petah Tikuah, Israel, evaluated the long-term motor and neurocognitive outcome of 43 children hospitalized during 2002-2012 with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), and identified prognostic risk factors. PMID:27053911

  3. ESL Magazine, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beall, Kathleen R., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    The six issues in this volume include the following articles: "Preview of TESOL 2001" (Adelaide Heyde Parsons); "Six Internet Pioneers Teach English to the World" (Dennis Oliver, Randall Davis, Elaine Hoter, Charles Kelly, Dave Sperling, and Ruth Vilmi); "Integrated Skills in the ESL/EFL Classroom" (Rebecca Oxford); "English Language Education in…

  4. 75 FR 50748 - Marine Mammals; File No. 14514

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Federal Register (75 FR 23241) that a request for a permit to import and export marine mammal parts for..., Aquatic Animal Program, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610 (Ruth Francis-Floyd... histology database and atlas and marine mammal cell lines; and comparative morphology studies. The permit...

  5. 75 FR 23241 - Marine Mammals; File No. 14514

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ..., Aquatic Animal Program, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610 (Ruth Francis-Floyd... brevetoxin studies; develop a marine mammal histology database and atlas, marine mammal cell lines; and... excluding walruses), with unlimited sampling from each animal to maximize use. There would not be...

  6. The Developing Child: Tools for Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Micheline

    1991-01-01

    This document examines the use of measurement tools to evaluate children's psychological development. The first part of the document discusses the identification and quantification of developmental landmarks and the reasons for evaluation. The second part reviews several evaluation instruments. The Ruth Griffiths mental development scales are used…

  7. Standards and Certification. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on standards and certification in human resource development (HRD). "Implementing Management Standards in the UK" (Jonathan Winterton, Ruth Winterton) reports on a study that explored the implementation of management standards in 16 organizations and identified 36 key themes and strategic issues…

  8. Teaching Tolerance Magazine, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnes, Jim, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This magazine provides teachers with classroom learning materials to help children learn to be tolerant with others. Articles in the magazine are: "A Standard to Sustain" (Mary M. Harrison); "Let's Just Play" (Janet Schmidt); "Who's Helen Keller?" (Ruth Shagoury Hubbard); "Margins of Error" (Joe Parsons); "Out of the Shadows" (Elizabeth Hunt);…

  9. Modern American Agricultural Leaders: Four from Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbert, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    Profiles four Iowans who became agricultural leaders and committed themselves to addressing farmers' needs: Henry Wallace, James R. Howard, Milo Reno, and Ruth Buxton Sayre. Identifies farm organizations with which each was affiliated, such as the Farm Bureau and the Farmers' Union. Summarizes each leader's major accomplishments and political…

  10. Towards a Science of Motivated Learning in Technology-Supported Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    This commentary reviews seven papers that study motivation with new media, contained in this special issue of "Educational Technology Research & Development" edited by Ruth Small. For each paper, this commentary summarizes exemplary contributions, offers an assessment of what is exciting, and suggests directions for future research. Some exciting…

  11. 78 FR 57166 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meetings... of Committee: National Institute on Drug Abuse Special Emphasis Panel; Ruth L. Kirschstein National...-Wesley, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Extramural Affairs, National Institute on Drug...

  12. Even in Taxis, Kids Belong in Safety Seats

    MedlinePlus

    ... vehicle. But, many municipalities exempt taxis from this safety rule, the researchers said. Study senior investigator Dr. Ruth Milanaik is with Cohen Children's Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. "Given that car safety seats have been shown to significantly decrease the ...

  13. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 7: Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on professional development issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "Developing as Information Technology Professionals: Profiles and Practices" (Diane Balestri and Ruth Sabean), which discusses professional development…

  14. Competencies: Fuzzy Concepts to Context. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium titled "Competence: Fuzzy Concepts to Context.""Sales Superstars: Defining Competencies Needed for Sales Performance" (Darlene Russ-Eft, Edward Del Gaizo, Jeannie Moulton, Ruth Pangilinan) discusses a study in which an analysis of 1,688 critical incidents revealed 16 competencies that define the…

  15. Focus on World Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullican, James S., Ed.

    1974-01-01

    This issue of the "Indiana English Journal" contains four articles: "Value Clarification through World Literature" by R. Baird Shuman; "Polynesian Literature: Coming to Life in the Classroom" (with bibliography) by Barbara M. Elkington and Ruth P. Smith; "The Deirdre Legend in Three Irish Plays" by Ronald L. Baker; and "Teaching Asian Literature"…

  16. Studies in Public Library Government, Organization, and Support. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Guy

    This report consists of six individual reports that were done by staff members at the Library Research Center as part of the overall project. In Part I, "Financing Public Library Expansion: Case Studies of Three Defeated Bond Issue Referendums," Ruth G. Lindahl and William S. Berner analyze defeated library bond issue referendums in Champaign,…

  17. Does Neuroscience Matter for Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Francis

    2011-01-01

    In this review essay, Francis Schrag focuses on two recent anthologies dealing completely or in part with the role of neuroscience in learning and education: The "Jossey-Bass Reader on the Brain and Learning", edited by Jossey-Bass Publishers, and "New Philosophies of Learning", edited by Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis. Schrag argues that…

  18. Powerful Sisters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenoweth, Karin; Stephens, Angela; Evelyn, Jamilah

    1998-01-01

    Five black women presiding over college campuses with over 20,000 students are profiled: Del M. Anderson (City College of San Francisco, CA); Constance M. Carroll (San Diego Mesa College, CA); Ruth Burgos-Sasscer (Houston Community College System, TX); Jerry Sue Thornton (Cuyahoga Community College, OH); and Belle S. Wheelan (Northern Virginia…

  19. Writing Out of the Unexpected: Narrative Inquiry and the Weight of Small Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Erick; McKibbin, Kerry; Vasudevan, Lalitha; Vinz, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    In this tale of a single event told from the perspectives of multiple narrators, Erick Gordon, Kerry McKibbin, Lalitha Vasudevan, and Ruth Vinz write about their work together on a Student Press Initiative (SPI) writing project at Horizon Academy, the Department of Correction/Department of Education high school at Rikers Island Jail in New York…

  20. Creative Ventures: Women of Substance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flack, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    This article offers suggestions for using biographies of famous women aviators with gifted students. Aviators suggested include Ruth Law, Jacqueline Cochran, Bessie Coleman, Beryl Markham, and Amelia Earhart. Teaching suggestions include creative book sharing, integration with map work, and student projects based on these lives. (Contains…

  1. First Report of Aerial Blight of Ruth’s Golden Aster (Pityopsis ruthii) caused by Rhizoctonia solani in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruth's golden aster (Pityopsis ruthii) is an endangered, herbaceous perennial that occurs only at a few sites along small reaches of the Hiwassee and Ocoee rivers in Polk County, Tennessee. This species has ornamental potential. In 2012, we vegetatively propagated various genotypes and established p...

  2. Images of Women in High Fantasy for Children and Adults: A Comparative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Laura

    This paper presents a content analysis of 45 high fantasy novels randomly selected from the outstanding contemporary fantasy list in "Fantasy Literature for Children and Young Adults" (Ruth Nadelman Lynn), which divides high fantasy into three subgenres--travel to other worlds, alternate world/history, and myth. A comparison is made between male…

  3. Adult Learning and the New Austerity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adults Learning, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The spending review brought a promise to protect adult and community learning as well as swingeing cuts to further and higher education and local government. In this article, some of the key players--Lynne Sedgmore, Christopher Brooks, Graham Hoyle, Maggie Galliers, Louise Hazel, Richard Bolsin, Maggi Dawson, Ruth Bond, Stuart Etherington, Brendan…

  4. Images of Struggle and Triumph: Using Picture Books to Teach about the Civil Rights Movement in the Secondary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Karen H.; Sheffield, Caroline C.; Ford, Martha B.; Cruz, Barbara C.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes four picture books ("Mississippi Morning" written by Ruth Vander Zee, "Dad, Jackie, and Me" written by Myron Uhlberg, "Freedom on the Menu" written by Carole Boston Weatherford, and "A Sweet Smell of Roses" written by Angela Johnson) that provide a concise (yet nuanced) chronicle of the civil rights movement--from the Jim…

  5. Women and Men of the Manhattan Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jill; Herzenber, Caroline; Howes, Ruth; Weaver, Ellen; Gans, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1990s Ruth Howes, a nuclear physicist on the faculty at Ball State University, and Caroline Herzenberg, a nuclear physicist at Argonne National Laboratory, were asked to write a chapter on the Manhattan Project for a volume on women working on weapons development for the military. Realizing that they knew very little about the women…

  6. Justified Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristjansson, Kristjan

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops a thread of argument from previous contributions to this journal by Richard Smith and Ruth Cigman about the educational salience of self-esteem. It is argued--contra Smith and Cigman--that the social science conception of self-esteem does serve a useful educational function, most importantly in undermining the inflated…

  7. It's a Long Way to ... an International Social History of Education: In Search of Brian Simon's Legacy in Today's Educational Historiography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depaepe, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Appreciation, respect and perhaps even friendship for Brian Simon are not immediately the best conditions for a critical and detached investigation of his legacy. So we would do best to take account of this subjective element from the outset, all the more so because Gary McCulloch and Ruth Watts, in a recent special issue of "History of…

  8. Books and DVDs Offer Excellent Resources for Childbirth Education Classes

    PubMed Central

    Shilling, Teri

    2006-01-01

    In this column, reviewers offer perspectives and comments on the second edition of The Labor Progress Handbook, a book by Penny Simkin and Ruth Ancheta; What Babies Want, a documentary directed by Debby Takikawa; A Pleasing Birth, a book by Raymond De Vries; and Baby Tata, a DVD production by Baby Tata LLC.

  9. 75 FR 74736 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ....'' Mail to: Dr. Ruth MacDonald, Food Science and Human Nutrition, 2312 Food Sciences Building, Ames, IA... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and... workshop. Topics to be discussed at the workshop include: (1) Mandatory label elements, (2)...

  10. Delaware's Dream Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    To librarians at the Delaware Division of Libraries, Governor Ruth Ann Minner, Secretary of State Harriet Smith Windsor, and Assistant Secretary of State Rick Geisenberger are "the Delaware Dream Team." The governor and her team supported funding for the 2004 statewide effort that resulted in the Delaware Master Plan for Library Services and…

  11. Instructional Needs of the New Student. Proceedings of Workshops on Faculty and Staff Development, University of Kentucky Community College System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA. Inst. for Higher Educational Opportunity.

    Three conference papers comprise the bulk of this report on understanding "new students" and their academic needs. "The Promise of Learning Through Developmental Programs", by Johnnie Ruth Clarke, deals with the effectiveness of developmental studies while shattering misconceptions surrounding the labels typically assigned these students, such as…

  12. Book Review: The People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Reviews "The Micmac: How Their Ancestors Lived Five Hundred Years Ago" (Ruth Holmes and Harold McGee), an illustrated book that shows how Micmac Indians adapted so well to the world. Describes the Micmacs' knowledge of herbs for treating sicknesses and injuries. Explains that the demise of the Micmacs came with new diseases brought to them by…

  13. Living the Questions: A Guide for Teacher-Researchers. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shagoury, Ruth; Power, Brenda Miller

    2012-01-01

    Teacher research is an extension of good teaching, observing students closely, analyzing their needs, and adjusting the curriculum to fit the needs of all. In this completely updated second edition of their definitive work, Ruth Shagoury and Brenda Miller Power present a framework for teacher research along with an extensive collection of…

  14. Missing Chapters: Ten Pioneering Women in NCTE and English Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Jeanne Marcum, Ed.; Monseau, Virginia R., Ed.

    This book is a historical study showing how 10 key women in the English teaching profession earlier in this century helped to develop the concepts that shape the profession today. The 10 articles and their authors are (1) "Rewey Belle Inglis: A Crystal-Ball Gazer" (Jeanne Marcum Gerlach); (2) "Ruth Mary Weeks: Teaching the Art of Living" (Judy…

  15. 76 FR 19029 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... demonstration project-led assessments provide methodologically robust yet logistically practical examples of... Respondents: 4,717. Frequency of Responses: Reporting: On occasion. Total Burden Hours: 2,133. Ruth Brown... information unless the collection of information displays a currently valid OMB control number and the...

  16. 77 FR 62213 - Information Collection Request; Representations Regarding Felony Conviction and Tax Delinquent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ruth Brown, (202) 720-8958 or... of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the Agencies and Staff... Corporate Applicants and Awardees AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, USDA. ACTION:...

  17. The Medium and the Message: Oral History, New Media, and a Grassroots History of Working Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerowitz, Ruth; Zinni, Christine F.

    2009-01-01

    In the Spring of 2000, Ruth Meyerowitz and Christine Zinni began collaborative efforts--inside and outside of academia--to enhance a course on The History of Working Women at SUNY Buffalo. Videotaping the oral histories of women labor leaders, they later teamed up with Michael Frisch and Randforce Associates--a research group at SUNY at Buffalo's…

  18. 77 FR 1707 - National Toxicology Program (NTP) Final Process for Preparation of the Report on Carcinogens (RoC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... October 31, 2011, the NTP released its proposed process for preparation of the RoC (76 FR 67200 and 76 FR..., and presented a revised process at the NTP Board of Scientific Counselors public meeting (76 FR 68461... available on the NTP Web site ( http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/rocprocess ) or by contacting Dr. Ruth Lunn...

  19. 27. VIEW LOOKING AFT ON STARBOARD SIDE OF MAIN DECK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW LOOKING AFT ON STARBOARD SIDE OF MAIN DECK WITH TENDER ANNIE RUTH ALONGSIDE. COVER OF FORWARD COMPANIONWAY HAS BEEN PLACED ON MAIN DECK; SUN AWNING A TYPICAL FEATURE IN TROPICAL CLIMATES. CREW MEMBERS UNKNOWN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  20. English in the City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Several years ago, Ruth Vinz, other colleagues at the Teachers College and Greg Hamilton worked together on a book for English teachers "Becoming (Other)wise: Enhancing Critical Reading Perspectives" that challenged some of the more popular and mainstream conceptions of a multicultural literature education. Principles theorized by the team while…

  1. Books and Mortar & Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley-Mudie, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The library is a unique space in schools and in students' lives--a place to pursue both academic and personal interests, a place to meet and work with peers, but also a place to find quiet and a space for reflection. As Jake Carson and Ruth Kneale have noted, "Through embedded librarianship, librarians move from a supporting role into…

  2. Peer Learning in Higher Education: Learning from & with Each Other.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boud, David, Ed.; Cohen, Ruth, Ed.; Sampson, Jane, Ed.

    The essays in this collection explore how educators can formalize the use of peer learning to encourage more effective learning in higher education. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction: Making the Move to Peer Learning" (David Boud); (2) "Designing Peer Learning" (Jane Sampson and Ruth Cohen); (3) "Strategies for Peer Learning: Some Examples"…

  3. Health Issues in the Latino Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre-Molina, Marilyn, Ed.; Molina, Carlos W., Ed.; Zambrana, Ruth Enid, Ed.

    This collection of papers includes 6 parts. Part 1, "Latino Populations in the United States," includes: (1) "Latino Health Policy: Beyond Demographic Determinism" (Angelo Falcon, Marilyn Aguirre-Molina, and Carlos W. Molina); (2) "Latino Health Status" (Olivia Carter-Pokras and Ruth Enid Zambrana); and (3) "Latino Access To Health Care: The Role…

  4. "The Best Way for Students to Remember History Is to Experience It!": Transforming Historical Understanding through Scripted Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelson, Helen; Lingard, Ruth; Brennan, Kate

    2012-01-01

    An article on scripted drama might seem an unlikely choice for an edition devoted to getting students talking. Surely the point about a script is that the words used are chosen and prescribed by others. However, the examples presented here by Helen Snelson, Ruth Lingard and Kate Brennan demonstrate how effectively a well-crafted script can serve…

  5. 78 FR 64037 - Sunshine Act Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meetings FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: 78 FR 60334 (October 1, 2013...-789-6820. Ruth Ann Abrams, Acting Secretary. BILLING CODE 7710-FW-P...

  6. The Link: Connecting Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare. Volume 3, Number 3, Summer/Fall 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Welfare League of America (NJ-L1), 2004

    2004-01-01

    This issue of "The Link" newsletter contains the following articles: (1) "Youth in Foster Care Who Commit Delinquent Acts: Study Findings and Recommendations" (Leslee Morris); (2) "Director's Message" (Christy Sharp); (3) "Juvenile Justice News and Resources"; (4) "The Nurse-Family Partnership: Pennsylvania's Investment in Families (Ruth R.…

  7. TESOL Newsletter, Volume XIV, Numbers 1-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskell, John F., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Six 1980 issues of the TESOL Newsletter are presented. Topics include the following: preparing a written paper for oral presentation (Fraida Dubin); current trends in teaching English as a second language (TESL) (Ruth Crymes); ESL syllabuses (Carlos Yorio); teaching Black English (Lorraine Goldman); the state of certification and employment within…

  8. Testing Technology: A Sandia technology bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, B.; Floyd, H.L.; Doran, L.

    1994-08-01

    Inside this issue is a farewell to Testing Technology message from technical advisor, Ruth David. Also included are articles on: Testing the I-40 bridge over the Rio Grande, simulated reactor meltdown studies, an inexpensive monitor for testing integrated circuits, testing of antihelicoptor mines, and quality assurance on aircraft inspection.

  9. Alcohol on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACU-I Bulletin, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Alcohol use on campus and strategies colleges are using to educate students about alcohol are considered in two articles. In "When Alternatives Aren't," Ruth Bradford Burnham and Stephen J. Nelson explore the role alcoholic beverages play in young people's social lives and some of the implications for planning social events. They offer a balanced…

  10. Ivy League Trailblazer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Ruth Simmons made a big news splash a decade ago when she was named president of Brown University, making her the first Black president of an Ivy League institution. She made another splash three years later by naming a committee to investigate Brown's role in the slave trade and make recommendations on possible reparations. Reflecting on her…

  11. CEC's New Policy--Behind the Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2016

    2016-01-01

    CEC's new policy is a result of efforts begun in 2009 by members of CEC's Educators With Disabilities Policy Workgroup. The board-appointed workgroup was chaired by Jennifer Diliberto and included Mary Ruth Coleman, Marjorie Terhaar-Yonkers, Susan Osborne, and Stephanie Demayo. These CEC members' desire to create and support safe environments in…

  12. Proceedings of the Higher Education Colloquium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1973

    The Higher Education Colloquium is composed of individuals who have made significant contributions to American higher education as researchers, college or university administrators, foundation executives, or in other roles. These proceedings include the following: recognition of the efforts and excellence of Ruth E. Eckert; "New Tasks for New…

  13. Use of an In Vitro, Nuclear Receptor Assay Panel to Characterize the Endocrine-Disrupting Activity Load of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent Extracts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of an In Vitro, Nuclear Receptor Assay Panel to Characterize the Endocrine-Disrupting Activity Load of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent Extracts Katie B. Paul 1.2, Ruth Marfil-Vega 1 Marc A. Mills3, Steve 0. Simmons2, Vickie S. Wilson4, Kevin M. Crofton2 10ak Rid...

  14. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, R. Kay; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Tips for English-as-a-Second-Language classes include collecting passport stamps in an oral skills class (R. Kay Hart); turning process essays into treasure hunts (Margaret Moulton); using icebreakers (Beverly Williams, David Rutledge, Brent Green); and techniques for understanding course syllabi (Ruth Overman Fischer). (LB)

  15. Geo 600 - Research, Progress and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, J.; Authmuth, P.; Balasubramanian, R.; Barr, B. W.; Brozec, O. S.; Cagnoli, G.; Casey, M. M.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Churches, D.; Clubley, D.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cutler, C.; Danzmann, K.; Fallnich, C.; Freise, A.; Goßler, S.; Grado, A.; Grant, A.; Grote, H.; Husman, M.; Kawabe, K.; Kirchner, M.; Klövekorn, P.; Kötter, K.; Leonhardt, V.; Lück, H.; McNamara, P. W.; McIntosh, S. A.; Mossavi, K.; Nagano, S.; Newton, G. P.; Owen, B. J.; Palmer, D.; Papa, M. A.; Peterseim, M.; Plissi, M. V.; Quetschke, V.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Schilling, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Sintes, A. M.; Skeldon, K. D.; Sneddon, P.; Strain, K. A.; Taylor, I.; Torrie, C. I.; Vecchio, A.; Ward, H.; Weidner, A.; Welling, H.; Williams, P.; Willke, B.; Winkler, W.; Zawischa, I.

    2002-12-01

    GEO 600, the German/UK gravitational wave detector with 600m arm length, being built at Ruthe near Hannover, is proceeding well. The vacuum system is essentially complete, the modecleaners are in place, four main suspensions are installed and a cavity formed between the power recycling mirror and one arm of the interferometer is being resonated.

  16. The Gaias (Earth Mothers) of the Ecological/Conservation Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Rosa M.; Biermann, Carol A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the contributions of women who have served as role models in the fields of ecology and conservation. Women discussed include Ellen Richards, Maria Merian, Jane Colden, Mary Chase, Emma Braun, Ann Morgan, Rachel Carson, Eugenie Clark, Sylvia Earle, Wangari Maathai, Dian Fossey, Birute Galdikas, and Ruth Patrick. Contains 26 references.…

  17. Cleft Palate Habilitation; Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Cleft Palate Habilitation (5th, Syracuse University, New York, May 11-12, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencione, Ruth M., Ed.

    With emphasis on the growing interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of cleft palate, Ruth M. Lencione introduces the subject covering incidence, causes, and classification. Richard B. Stark discusses surgery of the primary pharyngeal flap and E. Harris Nober presents a review of the literature on hearing problems. Aubrey L. Ruess examined…

  18. Language and Music as Communication: A Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Roger Brown, Diana Deutsch, Warren Benson, and Ruth Day comment on the similarities and differences between verbal language and music as forms of communication. This discussion occurred at the first session of the National Symposium on the Applications of Psychology to the Teaching and Learning of Music, Ann Arbor. (SJL)

  19. Shaping a Cohesive Agenda: Next Steps. National Conference on Adult and External Degree Programs. (7th, Memphis, Tennessee, October 7-10, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance, an Association for Alternative Degree Programs.

    Proceedings of an international conference on adult and external degree programs are presented. Selected papers are drawn from the areas of distance learning, support services, intra-institutional, curriculum, and teaching. They include: "Uses of Distance Education for Graduate Professional Degrees" (Ruth J. Person and Raymond Vondran); "Library…

  20. Whose Idea Is This? Teaching Artists Reflect on Intellectual Property Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Jill

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with four seasoned Teaching Artists: Keith Terry, Kimberly de Caires, Ruth Bossieux, and Jeff Raz. The TAs reflect on the importance and complexity of intellectual property issues. They also shed new light on the views and experiences of TAs around this issue and encourages a broader dialog in the TA community.

  1. International Reports on Literacy Research: Reading and Writing Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallozzi, Christine A., Comp.; Malloy, Jacquelynn A., Comp.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the reports from the international research correspondents (IRCs) on the topic of reading and writing connections through an informal polling using a questionnaire in seven countries. The participating IRCs include: (1) Ruth Wong of the National Institute of Education in Singapore; (2) Anita Poon of Hong Kong Baptist…

  2. Capture and Recycling of Sortase A through Site-Specific Labeling with Lithocholic Acid.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Christian B; Kwant, Richard L; MacDonald, James I; Rao, Meera; Francis, Matthew B

    2016-07-18

    Enzyme-mediated protein modification often requires large amounts of biocatalyst, adding significant costs to the process and limiting industrial applications. Herein, we demonstrate a scalable and straightforward strategy for the efficient capture and recycling of enzymes using a small-molecule affinity tag. A proline variant of an evolved sortase A (SrtA 7M) was N-terminally labeled with lithocholic acid (LA)-an inexpensive bile acid that exhibits strong binding to β-cyclodextrin (βCD). Capture and recycling of the LA-Pro-SrtA 7M conjugate was achieved using βCD-modified sepharose resin. The LA-Pro-SrtA 7M conjugate retained full enzymatic activity, even after multiple rounds of recycling. PMID:27239057

  3. Small alcohols destabilize the KcsA tetramer via their effect on the membrane lateral pressure.

    PubMed

    van den Brink-van der Laan, Els; Chupin, Vladimir; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-05-25

    Previously, it was shown that the tetrameric potassium channel KcsA when present in a lipid bilayer can be dissociated by trifluoroethanol [van den Brink-van der Laan, E., et al. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 4240-4250]. Here, we demonstrate that this is a general property of small alcohols. We found that small alcohols dissociate the KcsA tetramer, at a concentration that depends on their membrane affinity. Importantly, the efficiency of the alcohol-induced tetramer dissociation was found to correlate with the efficiency of both alcohol-induced bilayer leakage and acyl chain disordering. Our data suggest that the ability of small alcohols to induce KcsA tetramer dissociation and to function as anesthetics depends on their effect on the membrane lateral pressure. PMID:15147177

  4. Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectrum of the T_1 (n,π^{*}) ← S_0 Transition of 2-CYCLOHEXEN-1-ONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabronsky, Katherine L.; McAnally, Michael O.; Stupca, Daniel J.; Pillsbury, Nathan R.; Drucker, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    The cavity ringdown (CRD) absorption spectrum of 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHO) was recorded over the range 401.5-410.5 nm in a room-temperature gas cell. The very weak band system (ɛ ≤ 0.02 dm^3 mol^{-1} {cm}^{-1}) in this region is due to the T_1(n, π*) ← S_0 electronic transition. The 0^0_0 origin band was assigned to the feature observed at {24,558.6 ± 0.3 {cm}^{-1}}. We have assigned about 25 vibronic transitions in a region extending from {-200 to +350 cm^{-1}} relative to the origin band. From these assignments we determined fundamental frequencies for several vibrational modes in the T_1 excited state. The table below compares their frequencies to corresponding values measured for CHO vapor in the S_0 electronic ground state (via far-IR spectroscopy) and the S_1(n, π*) excited state (via near-UV CRD spectroscopy). Low-frequency fundamentals (cm^{-1}) of CHO vapor Mode Description S_0 S_1(n,π^*) T_1(n,π^*) 39 ring twist 99.2 122.1 99.5 38 bend (inversion of C-5) 247 251.9 253.2 37 C=C twist 304.1 303.3 247.8 36 C=O wag 485 343.9 345.5 For ν_{39} and ν_{37}, the differences between S_1 and T_1 frequencies are noteworthy. These differences suggest that the electron delocalization associated with the π^* ← n chromophore in CHO is substantially different for singlet vs. triplet excitation. T. L. Smithson and H. Wieser, J. Chem. Phys. {73}, 2518 (1980) M. Z. M. Rishard and J. Laane, J. Molec. Struct. {976}, 56 (2010). M. Z. M. Rishard, E. A. Brown, L. K. Ausman, S. Drucker and J. Laane, J. Phys. Chem. A {112}, 38 (2008).

  5. Origins of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, Ruth; Taylor, Allyn; Lariviere, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control originated in 1993 with a decision by Ruth Roemer and Allyn Taylor to apply to tobacco control Taylor’s idea that the WHO should utilize its constitutional authority to develop international conventions to advance global health. In 1995, Taylor and Ruth Roemer proposed various options to WHO, recommending the framework convention-protocol approach conceptualized by Taylor. Despite initial resistance by some WHO officials, this approach gained wide acceptance. In 1996, the World Health Assembly voted to proceed with its development. Negotiations by WHO member states led the World Health Assembly in May 2003 to adopt by consensus the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control—the first international treaty adopted under WHO auspices. The treaty formally entered into force for state parties on February 27, 2005. PMID:15914812

  6. Geological and geochemical studies in the Robinson Mining District, White Pine County, Nevada, using Skylab S190A imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, M. L. (Principal Investigator); Rogers, R. J.; Erickson, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In the Robinson mining district which included the Ruth porphyry copper mines, three large positive aeromagnetic anomalies exist over a Tertiary volcanic area north west of Ruth. Prior studies of this area have suggested that the volcanics may or may not be the cause of the anomalies. Skylab Sl90A imagery, however, indicates possible outcrops in the volcanic area of the Paleozoic sediments. Field studies or ground truth verify the existence of these inliers suggesting that the magnetic anomaly may be the result of a buried intrusive body for which potential mineralization has been covered by the post-ore blanket of volcanics. The area is being mapped in more detail and samples of mercury-bearing soil-gas area being collected within and outside the area.

  7. Pearl Harbor: A Failure for Baseball?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crepeau, Richard C.

    The history of sports is closely tied to the larger history of the society in which they are played. Baseball in the United States in the 1920's and l930's assumed a major role in spreading the ideals of fair play, sportsmanship, and democracy to the Far East, with tours by amateur athletes and professionals such as Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth. Even…

  8. Erratum to "Use of oysters to mitigate eutrophication in coastal waters" [Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci. 151 (2014) 156-168

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, M. Lisa; Smyth, Ashley R.; Luckenbach, Mark W.; Carmichael, Ruth H.; Brown, Bonnie L.; Cornwell, Jeffrey C.; Piehler, Michael F.; Owens, Michael S.; Dalrymple, D. Joseph; Higgins, Colleen B.

    2015-03-01

    The publisher regrets to inform that the article by Kellogg and colleagues (M. Lisa Kellogg, Ashley R. Smyth, Mark W. Luckenbach, Ruth H. Carmichael, Bonnie L. Brown, Jeffrey C. Cornwell, Michael F. Piehler, Michael S. Owens, D. Joseph Dalrymple, Colleen B. Higgins, Use of oysters to mitigate eutrophication in coastal waters, Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, Volume 151, Pages 156-168, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2014.09.025.

  9. k2photometry: Read, reduce and detrend K2 photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Nowak, Grzegorz; Albrecht, Simon; Palle, Enric; Ribas, Ignasi; Bruntt, Hans; Perger, Manuel; Gandolfi, Davide; Hirano, Teriyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Kiilerich, Amanda; Arranz, Jorge P.; Badenas, Mariona; Dai, Fei; Deeg, Hans J.; Guenther, Eike W.; Montanes-Rodriguez, Pilar; Narita, Norio; Rogers, Leslie A.; Bejar, Victor J. S.; Shrotriya, Tushar S.; Winn, Joshua N.; Sebastian, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    k2photometry reads, reduces and detrends K2 photometry and searches for transiting planets. MAST database pixel files are used as input; the output includes raw lightcurves, detrended lightcurves and a transit search can be performed as well. Stellar variability is not typically well-preserved but parameters can be tweaked to change that. The BLS algorithm used to detect periodic events is a Python implementation by Ruth Angus and Dan Foreman-Mackey (https://github.com/dfm/python-bls).

  10. More physics twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemilt, Jane; Hodge, Alison; White, Martin; Dewhurst, Samuel; Evans, Colin J.; Smith, Ron

    2008-02-01

    Your article about the two female physicists in Israel (pictured above) who are identical twins raised the question of whether any other such twins exist (January p3). My identical twin sister and I were both undergraduates at Imperial College, being in the first cohort of students to graduate in materials science in 1973. This was under our maiden names of Jane and Ruth Weston.

  11. Effect of nitrogen nutrition on endosperm protein synthesis in wild and cultivated barley grown in spike culture

    SciTech Connect

    Corke, H.; Atsmon, D. )

    1988-06-01

    In normal growth conditions, total protein percent, in the endosperm at maturity in barley cultivar Hordeum vulgare L. cv Ruth was about 14%, whereas in an accession of wild barley, Hordeum spontaneum Koch line 297, it was about 28%. Spike culture experiments were conducted to ascertain whether there were basic differences between the two genotypes under conditions of widely different nitrogen supply. Spikes of each genotype were grown from 8 to 25 days after flowering in in vitro culture in a growth medium containing 0 to 4 grams per liter nitrogen supplied as NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}. Spikes were pulse-labeled at intervals from 12 to 24 days after flowering with 3.7 megabecquerel of ({sup 3}H)leucine to determine relative rates of synthesis of hordein-1 and hordein-2 polypedtides. At low nitrogen levels Ruth had a lower protein content than 297, but at increasing nitrogen levels its protein content increased rapidly and reached a maximum (35%) higher than 297 (30%). The relative contribution of the hordein fraction to total protein increased mainly with time, and hordein-1 to total hordein increased mainly with nitrogen level, in both genotypes. There appeared to be no fundamental limitations in the capacity of Ruth to accumulate protein: 297 appears to have a greater basal level of nitrogen availability under normal conditions.

  12. Effect of Nitrogen Nutrition on Endosperm Protein Synthesis in Wild and Cultivated Barley Grown in Spike Culture

    PubMed Central

    Corke, Harold; Atsmon, Dan

    1988-01-01

    In normal growth conditions, total protein percent (salt soluble plus hordein fractions) in the endosperm at maturity in barley cultivar Hordeum vulgare L. cv `Ruth' was about 14%, whereas in an accession of wild barley, Hordeum spontaneum Koch line 297, it was about 28%. Spike culture experiments were conducted to ascertain whether there were basic differences between the two genotypes under conditions of widely different nitrogen supply. Spikes of each genotype were grown from 8 to 25 days after flowering in in vitro culture in a growth medium containing 0 to 4 grams per liter nitrogen supplied as NH4NO3. Spikes were pulse-labeled at intervals from 12 to 24 days after flowering with 3.7 megabecquerel of [3H]leucine to determine relative rates of synthesis of hordein-1 and hordein-2 polypeptides. At low nitrogen levels `Ruth' had a lower protein content than 297, but at increasing nitrogen levels its protein content increased rapidly and reached a maximum (35%) higher than 297 (30%). The relative contribution of the hordein fraction to total protein increased mainly with time, and hordein-1 to total hordein increased mainly with nitrogen level, in both genotypes. There appeared to be no fundamental limitations in the capacity of `Ruth' to accumulate protein; 297 appears to have a greater basal level of nitrogen availability under normal conditions. Images Fig. 6 PMID:16666176

  13. Kinetics of Slurry Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski; Lech Nowicki; Madhav Nayapati

    2006-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. Three STSR tests of the Ruhrchemie LP 33/81 catalyst were conducted to collect data on catalyst activity and selectivity under 25 different sets of process conditions. The observed decrease in 1-olefin content and increase in 2-olefin and n-paraffin contents with the increase in conversion are consistent with a concept that 1-olefins participate in secondary reactions (e.g. 1-olefin hydrogenation, isomerization and readsorption), whereas 2-olefins and n-paraffins are formed in these reactions. Carbon number product distribution showed an increase in chain growth probability with increase in chain length. Vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations were made to check validity of the assumption that the gas and liquid phases are in equilibrium during FTS in the STSR. Calculated vapor phase compositions were in excellent agreement with experimental values from the STSR under reaction conditions. Discrepancies between the calculated and experimental values for the liquid-phase composition (for some of the experimental data) are ascribed to experimental errors in the amount of wax collected from the reactor, and the relative amounts of hydrocarbon wax and Durasyn 164 oil (start-up fluid) in the liquid samples. Kinetic parameters of four kinetic models (Lox and Froment, 1993b; Yang et al., 2003; Van der Laan and Beenackers, 1998, 1999; and an extended kinetic model of Van der Laan and Beenackers) were estimated from experimental data in the STSR tests. Two of these kinetic models (Lox and Froment, 1993b; Yang et al., 2003) can predict a complete product distribution (inorganic species and hydrocarbons), whereas the kinetic model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) can

  14. Doubly Robust and Efficient Estimation of Marginal Structural Models for the Hazard Function.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjing; Petersen, Maya; van der Laan, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    In social and health sciences, many research questions involve understanding the causal effect of a longitudinal treatment on mortality (or time-to-event outcomes in general). Often, treatment status may change in response to past covariates that are risk factors for mortality, and in turn, treatment status may also affect such subsequent covariates. In these situations, Marginal Structural Models (MSMs), introduced by Robins (1997. Marginal structural models Proceedings of the American Statistical Association. Section on Bayesian Statistical Science, 1-10), are well-established and widely used tools to account for time-varying confounding. In particular, a MSM can be used to specify the intervention-specific counterfactual hazard function, i. e. the hazard for the outcome of a subject in an ideal experiment where he/she was assigned to follow a given intervention on their treatment variables. The parameters of this hazard MSM are traditionally estimated using the Inverse Probability Weighted estimation Robins (1999. Marginal structural models versus structural nested models as tools for causal inference. In: Statistical models in epidemiology: the environment and clinical trials. Springer-Verlag, 1999:95-134), Robins et al. (2000), (IPTW, van der Laan and Petersen (2007. Causal effect models for realistic individualized treatment and intention to treat rules. Int J Biostat 2007;3:Article 3), Robins et al. (2008. Estimaton and extrapolation of optimal treatment and testing strategies. Statistics in Medicine 2008;27(23):4678-721)). This estimator is easy to implement and admits Wald-type confidence intervals. However, its consistency hinges on the correct specification of the treatment allocation probabilities, and the estimates are generally sensitive to large treatment weights (especially in the presence of strong confounding), which are difficult to stabilize for dynamic treatment regimes. In this paper, we present a pooled targeted maximum likelihood

  15. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the fourth year of a research project conducted under the University Coal Research Program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (water, carbon dioxide, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the fourth year of the project, an analysis of experimental data collected during the second year of this project was performed. Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing product distributions from 27 mass balances. During the reporting period two kinetic models were employed: a comprehensive kinetic model of Dr. Li and co-workers (Yang et al., 2003) and a hydrocarbon selectivity model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) The kinetic model of Yang et al. (2003) has 24 parameters (20 parameters for hydrocarbon formation, and 4 parameters for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction). Kinetic parameters for the WGS reaction and FTS synthesis were estimated first separately, and then simultaneously. The estimation of these kinetic parameters employed the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method and the trust-region reflective Newton large-scale (LS) method. A genetic algorithm (GA) was incorporated into estimation of parameters for FTS reaction to provide initial estimates of model parameters. All reaction rate constants and activation energies were found to be positive, but at the 95% confidence level the intervals were large. Agreement between predicted and experimental reaction rates has been fair to good. Light hydrocarbons are predicted fairly accurately, whereas the model underpredicts values of higher molecular weight

  16. New Journal Editors Appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    New editors have been appointed for Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)-Solid Earth, Reviews of Geophysics, JGR-Space Physics, Paleoceanography, and Tectonics. At GRL, new editors Noah Diffenbaugh (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Paolo D’Odorico (University of Virginia, Charlottesville), Ruth Harris (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Menlo Park, Calif.), Wolfgang Knorr (University of Bristol, Bristol, UK), Geoffrey Tyndall (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.), and Michael Wysession (Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.) have joined Editor-in-Chief Eric Calais and other editors Margaret Chen, Fabio Florindo, Anne Müller, Nikolai Ostgaard, Eric Rignot, and Meric Srokosz.

  17. Keystone microbiome meeting 2012: a mountain top experience

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Aleksandar D; Garrett, Wendy S

    2012-01-01

    The joint Keystone Symposia on ‘Innate Immunity and the Microbiome' took place in March 2012 in Keystone, Colorado. Gabriel Nunez (U. Michigan, USA) and Akiko Iwasaki (Yale U., USA) organized sessions focused on innate immune sensing of microbe and damage signals, whilst Andrew Gewirtz (Georgia State U., USA), Fergus Shanahan (National U. Ireland, Ireland) and Ruth Ley (Cornell U., USA) organized the microbiome-focused session. Joint and concurrent talks, and poster sessions between the groups, made for a sensational meeting with active exchange between participants. This meeting point is focused on the microbiome meeting talks and joint sessions.

  18. Angel: post-implementation evaluation at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Amy J; Brahmi, Frances A

    2004-01-01

    With continued adoption of course management systems, librarians are assuming new roles and challenges with regard to providing information resources and library services in a digital environment. For approximately five years, the Indiana University School of Medicine has employed Angel as its online teaching environment, and the Ruth Lilly Medical Library has been actively involved in the adoption of Angel. As the implementation phase was completed, a post-implementation evaluation was due. The authors conducted an evaluation of the Angel system to evaluate utilization level, content types, and library resources/services integration. This article provides the findings of the post-implementation Angel Courses Evaluation. PMID:15364647

  19. People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    Featuring relationships, personalities, interactions, environments and reputations involved in physics and education STARTING OUT (81) DATA: Developing students' abilities to teach astronomy Ruth Jarman and Billy McClune PERSONALITY (82) Music, Creativity and Physics Wendy Sadler Correction: Printed copies of Physics Education contain an incorrect version of this Personality article. The PDF file here contains the correct version. The Editor and publishers apologise to Ms Sadler for the error. Further details will appear in the next issue. ON THE MAP (84) Spreading the resources: South Africa and India Charlie Milward

  20. 8. EARLY PHOTO OF THE CABIN WITH DOG TROT SECOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EARLY PHOTO OF THE CABIN WITH DOG TROT SECOND PEN AND CHIMNEY, PORCH, STEPS AND COMPOSITION ROOF. J. T. Young Jr., Annie Ruth Young, Bonnie Marie Young and Nadine Young, relatives of the photograph's donor, appear in the foreground. The structure in front of the house and to the right of the tree is a cage for pet squirrels. 2-1/4 x 2-1/4 copy negative, courtesy of former resident Preston Young. Photographer unknown, 1923. - Thomas Jefferson Walling Log Cabin, Henderson, Rusk County, TX

  1. Responsibilising managers and clinicians, neglecting system health? What kind of healthcare leadership development do we want?: Comment on "Leadership and leadership development in healthcare settings - a simplistic solution to complex problems?".

    PubMed

    Martin, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Responding to Ruth McDonald's editorial on the rise of leadership and leadership development programmes in healthcare, this paper offers three arguments. Firstly, care is needed in evaluating impact of leadership development, since achievement of organisational goals is not necessarily an appropriate measure of good leadership. Secondly, the proliferation of styles of leadership might be understood in part as a means of retaining control over public services while distributing responsibility for their success and failure. Thirdly, it makes a plea for the continued utility of good administrative skills for clinicians and managers, which are likely to become all-the-more important given recent developments in healthcare policy and governance. PMID:25584352

  2. Cloning, overexpression, and characterization of a novel thermostable penicillin G acylase from Achromobacter xylosoxidans: probing the molecular basis for its high thermostability.

    PubMed

    Cai, Gang; Zhu, Songcheng; Yang, Sheng; Zhao, Guoping; Jiang, Weihong

    2004-05-01

    The gene encoding a novel penicillin G acylase (PGA), designated pgaW, was cloned from Achromobacter xylosoxidans and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The pgaW gene contains an open reading frame of 2586 nucleotides. The deduced protein sequence encoded by pgaW has about 50% amino acid identity to several well-characterized PGAs, including those of Providencia rettgeri, Kluyvera cryocrescens, and Escherichia coli. Biochemical studies showed that the optimal temperature for this novel PGA (PGA650) activity is greater than 60 degrees C and its half-life of inactivation at 55 degrees C is four times longer than that of another previously reported thermostable PGA from Alcaligenes faecalis (R. M. D. Verhaert, A. M. Riemens, J. V. R. Laan, J. V. Duin, and W. J. Quax, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:3412-3418, 1997). To our knowledge, this is the most thermostable PGA ever characterized. To explore the molecular basis of the higher thermostability of PGA650, homology structural modeling and amino acid composition analyses were performed. The results suggested that the increased number of buried ion pair networks, lower N and Q contents, excessive arginine residues, and remarkably high content of proline residues in the structure of PGA650 could contribute to its high thermostability. The unique characteristic of higher thermostability of this novel PGA provides some advantages for its potential application in industry. PMID:15128530

  3. Positioning of microtubule organizing centers by cortical pushing and pulling forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavin, Nenad; Laan, Liedewij; Ma, Rui; Dogterom, Marileen; Jülicher, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Positioning of microtubule (MT) organizing centers with respect to the confining geometry of cells depends on pushing and/or pulling forces generated by MTs that interact with the cell cortex (Dogterom et al 2005 Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 17 67-74). How, in living cells, these forces lead to proper positioning is still largely an open question. Recently, it was shown by in vitro experiments using artificial microchambers that in a square geometry, MT asters center more reliably by a combination of pulling and pushing forces than by pushing forces alone (Laan et al 2012a Cell 148 502-14). These findings were explained by a physical description of aster mechanics that includes slipping of pushing MT ends along chamber boundaries. In this paper, we extend that theoretical work by studying the influence of the shape of the confining geometry on the positioning process. We find that pushing and pulling forces can have centering or off-centering behavior in different geometries. Pushing forces center in a one-dimensional and a square geometry, but lead to off-centering in a circle if slipping is sufficiently pronounced. Pulling forces, however, do not center in a one-dimensional geometry, but improve centering in a circle and a square. In an elongated stadium geometry, positioning along the short axis depends mainly on pulling forces, while positioning along the long axis depends mainly on pushing forces. Our theoretical results suggest that different positioning strategies could be used by different cell types.

  4. Double robust and efficient estimation of a prognostic model for events in the presence of dependent censoring.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, Mireille E; Lok, Judith J; Bosch, Ronald J

    2016-01-01

    In longitudinal data arising from observational or experimental studies, dependent subject drop-out is a common occurrence. If the goal is estimation of the parameters of a marginal complete-data model for the outcome, biased inference will result from fitting the model of interest with only uncensored subjects. For example, investigators are interested in estimating a prognostic model for clinical events in HIV-positive patients, under the counterfactual scenario in which everyone remained on ART (when in reality, only a subset had). Inverse probability of censoring weighting (IPCW) is a popular method that relies on correct estimation of the probability of censoring to produce consistent estimation, but is an inefficient estimator in its standard form. We introduce sequentially augmented regression (SAR), an adaptation of the Bang and Robins (2005. Doubly robust estimation in missing data and causal inference models. Biometrics 61, 962-972.) method to estimate a complete-data prediction model, adjusting for longitudinal missing at random censoring. In addition, we propose a closely related non-parametric approach using targeted maximum likelihood estimation (TMLE; van der Laan and Rubin, 2006. Targeted maximum likelihood learning. The International Journal of Biostatistics 2 (1), Article 11). We compare IPCW, SAR, and TMLE (implemented parametrically and with Super Learner) through simulation and the above-mentioned case study. PMID:26224070

  5. Regional flood reconstruction in Kullu District (Himachal Pradesh, India): implication for Disaster Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Cánovas, Juan Antonio; Stoffel, Markus; Trappmann, Daniel; Shekhar, Mayank; Bhattacharyya, Amalava

    2016-04-01

    simultaneously in more than two catchments, and that in 15% of the cases more than four catchments were affected. By contrast, 44% of event years were related with one specific catchment, corroborating the assumption that large-scale atmospheric conditions and specific weather and/or geomorphic conditions may operate as triggers of floods in Kullu district. The inclusion of peak discharge data related with these ungauged extreme flood events into the regional flood frequency evidenced that flood hazard was systematically underestimated. Our results allowed to highlight the potential causes of three paradigmatic cases of flood disaster incidents at Kullus district, suggesting that the lack of knowledge on past flood disaster could play an important role in Disaster Risk managment (DRM) at three actors-levels i.e. civil engineering, local authorities and inhabitants. These observations show that reliable DRM implementation is conditioned by lack of data to characterize the flood process, and therefore put in value the palaeohydrological approach used in this study.

  6. Photointerpretation of Skylab 2 multispectral camera (S-190A) data: Advance report of significant results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A significant and possible major economic example of the practical value of Skylab photographs was provided by locating on Skylab Camera Station Number 4, frame 010, SL-2, an area of exposures of limestone rocks which were thought to be completely covered by volcanic rocks based upon prior mapping. The area is located less than 12 miles north of the Ruth porphyry copper deposit, White Pine County, Nevada. This is a major copper producing open pit mine owned by Kennecott Copper Corporation. Geophysical maps consisting of gravity and aeromagnetic studies have been published indicating three large positive magnetic anomalies located at the Ruth ore deposits, the Ward Mountain, not a mineralized area, and in the area previously thought to be completely covered by post-ore volcanics. Skylab photos indicate, however, that erosion has removed volcanic cover in specific sites sufficient to expose the underlying older rocks suggesting, therefore, that the volcanic rocks may not be the cause of the aeromagnetic anomaly. Field studies have verified the initial interpretations made from the Skylab photos. The potential significance of this study is that the large positive aeromagnetic anomaly suggests the presence of cooled and solidified magma below the anomalies, in which ore-bearing solutions may have been derived forming possible large ore deposits.

  7. Report to the Nuclear energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) Subcommittee on "Long-Term Isotope Research and Productions Plan" - Responses to Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Ammoniums

    1999-07-01

    This report presents responses to two series of questions that were raised by a subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) that has been charged with producing a ''Long-Term Isotope Research and Production Plan.'' The NERAC subcommittee is chaired by Dr. Richard Reba, and the Hanford Site Visit team, which comprises a subset of the subcommittee members, is chaired by Dr. Thomas Ruth. The first set of questions raised by the subcommittee on isotope production at the Hanford Site was received from Dr. Ruth on May 10, 1999, and the second set was received from him on July 5, 1999. Responses to the first set of questions were prepared as part of a June 1999 report entitled ''Isotope Production at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington'' (PNNL 1999a). The responses to these questions are summarized in this document, with frequent references to the June 1999 report for additional details. Responses to the second set of questions from the NERAC subcommittee are presented in this document for the first time.

  8. Psychology and "the Babe".

    PubMed

    Fuchs, A H

    1998-01-01

    Psychologists and baseball players were among those Americans who formed professional associations in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Psychologists used laboratory tasks to quantify mental and behavioral processes while sportswriters and baseball organizers measured individual and team performance. The most popular baseball player of the 1920s, George Herman "Babe" Ruth, possessed superior batting skills that were evident in the statistical indices of baseball performance. In 1921, he was brought to the psychological laboratory at Columbia University to perform standard laboratory tasks in an effort to discover the basis for his success in hitting home runs and to suggest the potential of tests for identifying future baseball stars. Baseball's addiction to quantitative indices of performance was thus brought together with a new science devoted to quantitative assessment and a desire to make such assessments useful. The attempt to analyze the basis of Ruth's batting skills is part of the history of applied psychology, sport psychology, and popular interest in the science of psychology. PMID:9580977

  9. Variable selection for confounder control, flexible modeling and Collaborative Targeted Minimum Loss-based Estimation in causal inference

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, Mireille E.; Lok, Judith J.; Gruber, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the appropriateness of the integration of flexible propensity score modeling (nonparametric or machine learning approaches) in semiparametric models for the estimation of a causal quantity, such as the mean outcome under treatment. We begin with an overview of some of the issues involved in knowledge-based and statistical variable selection in causal inference and the potential pitfalls of automated selection based on the fit of the propensity score. Using a simple example, we directly show the consequences of adjusting for pure causes of the exposure when using inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Such variables are likely to be selected when using a naive approach to model selection for the propensity score. We describe how the method of Collaborative Targeted minimum loss-based estimation (C-TMLE; van der Laan and Gruber, 2010) capitalizes on the collaborative double robustness property of semiparametric efficient estimators to select covariates for the propensity score based on the error in the conditional outcome model. Finally, we compare several approaches to automated variable selection in low-and high-dimensional settings through a simulation study. From this simulation study, we conclude that using IPTW with flexible prediction for the propensity score can result in inferior estimation, while Targeted minimum loss-based estimation and C-TMLE may benefit from flexible prediction and remain robust to the presence of variables that are highly correlated with treatment. However, in our study, standard influence function-based methods for the variance underestimated the standard errors, resulting in poor coverage under certain data-generating scenarios. PMID:26226129

  10. A comparative assessment of endogenous water institutional change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Saket; Ersten, Maurits

    2013-04-01

    This paper builds the theory of endogenous institutional change, first proposed by Greif and Laitin (2004), for water scarce regions in context of water institutions. The current emphasis on environmental change, including hydrological change, largely ignores the adaptation of human societies to change. Humans have mostly been considered as boundary conditions or parameters of the dynamics of hydrological change and are not considered as conduits of feedbacks. Nonetheless, the dynamical representation of hydrological change with feedbacks between various components of a system is assuring since it is reminiscent of processual ecological anthropology(Orlove, 1980), except that individual decision making is absent. This paper proposes to consider selected dryland basins of the world, to conceptualize proxies of water relevant socio-economic organisation, such as spatial scales of upstream-downstream cooperation in water use, synthesized over time and then proposes a comparative assessment to test regularities predicted by an extension of river game theory (Ambec and Ehlers, 2008; van der Brink et al, 2012) to endogenous institutional change. References: Orlove, B. S. (1980). Ecological Anthropology. Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 9 (1980), pp. 235-273. Greif. A. and D. D. Laitin (2004). A Theory of Endogenous Institutional Change. American Political Science Review, Vol. 98, No. 4 November 2004. Ambec, S. and L. Ehlers (2008). Sharing a river amongst satiable agents. Games and Economic Behavior, 64, 35-50. Van der Brink, G. van der Laan and N. Moes (2012). Fair agreements for sharing international rivers with multiple springs and externalities. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 63, 388-403.

  11. Variable Selection for Confounder Control, Flexible Modeling and Collaborative Targeted Minimum Loss-Based Estimation in Causal Inference.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, Mireille E; Lok, Judith J; Gruber, Susan

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the appropriateness of the integration of flexible propensity score modeling (nonparametric or machine learning approaches) in semiparametric models for the estimation of a causal quantity, such as the mean outcome under treatment. We begin with an overview of some of the issues involved in knowledge-based and statistical variable selection in causal inference and the potential pitfalls of automated selection based on the fit of the propensity score. Using a simple example, we directly show the consequences of adjusting for pure causes of the exposure when using inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Such variables are likely to be selected when using a naive approach to model selection for the propensity score. We describe how the method of Collaborative Targeted minimum loss-based estimation (C-TMLE; van der Laan and Gruber, 2010 [27]) capitalizes on the collaborative double robustness property of semiparametric efficient estimators to select covariates for the propensity score based on the error in the conditional outcome model. Finally, we compare several approaches to automated variable selection in low- and high-dimensional settings through a simulation study. From this simulation study, we conclude that using IPTW with flexible prediction for the propensity score can result in inferior estimation, while Targeted minimum loss-based estimation and C-TMLE may benefit from flexible prediction and remain robust to the presence of variables that are highly correlated with treatment. However, in our study, standard influence function-based methods for the variance underestimated the standard errors, resulting in poor coverage under certain data-generating scenarios. PMID:26226129

  12. Statistical Learning of Origin-Specific Statically Optimal Individualized Treatment Rules

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Mark J.; Petersen, Maya L.

    2008-01-01

    Consider a longitudinal observational or controlled study in which one collects chronological data over time on a random sample of subjects. The time-dependent process one observes on each subject contains time-dependent covariates, time-dependent treatment actions, and an outcome process or single final outcome of interest. A statically optimal individualized treatment rule (as introduced in van der Laan et. al. (2005), Petersen et. al. (2007)) is a treatment rule which at any point in time conditions on a user-supplied subset of the past, computes the future static treatment regimen that maximizes a (conditional) mean future outcome of interest, and applies the first treatment action of the latter regimen. In particular, Petersen et. al. (2007) clarified that, in order to be statically optimal, an individualized treatment rule should not depend on the observed treatment mechanism. Petersen et. al. (2007) further developed estimators of statically optimal individualized treatment rules based on a past capturing all confounding of past treatment history on outcome. In practice, however, one typically wishes to find individualized treatment rules responding to a user-supplied subset of the complete observed history, which may not be sufficient to capture all confounding. The current article provides an important advance on Petersen et. al. (2007) by developing locally efficient double robust estimators of statically optimal individualized treatment rules responding to such a user-supplied subset of the past. However, failure to capture all confounding comes at a price; the static optimality of the resulting rules becomes origin-specific. We explain origin-specific static optimality, and discuss the practical importance of the proposed methodology. We further present the results of a data analysis in which we estimate a statically optimal rule for switching antiretroviral therapy among patients infected with resistant HIV virus. PMID:19122792

  13. Treatment with Trichuris suis soluble products during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation reduces inflammatory responses through epigenetic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hoeksema, Marten A; Laan, Lisa C; Postma, Juliette J; Cummings, Richard D; de Winther, Menno P J; Dijkstra, Christine D; van Die, Irma; Kooij, Gijs

    2016-08-01

    Helminths have strong immunoregulatory properties that may be exploited in treatment of chronic immune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease. Essential players in the pathogenesis of these diseases are proinflammatory macrophages. We present evidence that helminths modulate the function and phenotype of these innate immune cells. We found that soluble products derived from the Trichuris suis (TsSP) significantly affect the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages and their subsequent polarization. TsSPs reduce the expression and production of inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6 and TNF, in human proinflammatory M1 macrophages. TsSPs induce a concomitant anti-inflammatory M2 signature, with increased IL-10 production. Furthermore, they suppress CHIT activity and enhance secretion of matrix metalloproteinase 9. Short-term triggering of monocytes with TsSPs early during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation imprinted these phenotypic alterations, suggesting long-lasting epigenetic changes. The TsSP-induced effects in M1 macrophages were completely reversed by inhibiting histone deacetylases, which corresponded with decreased histone acetylation at the TNF and IL6 promoters. These results demonstrate that TsSPs have a potent and sustained immunomodulatory effect on human macrophage differentiation and polarization through epigenetic remodeling and provide new insights into the mechanisms by which helminths modulate human immune responses.-Hoeksema, M. A., Laan, L. C., Postma, J. J., Cummings, R. D., de Winther, M. P. J., Dijkstra, C. D., van Die, I., Kooij, G. Treatment with Trichuris suis soluble products during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation reduces inflammatory responses through epigenetic remodeling. PMID:27095802

  14. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2010-04-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  15. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2004-02-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  16. Extrapolated gradientlike algorithms for molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, I P

    2006-09-01

    A class of symplectic algorithms is introduced to integrate the equations of motion in many-body systems. The algorithms are derived on the basis of an advanced gradientlike decomposition approach. Its main advantage over the standard gradient scheme is the avoidance of time-consuming evaluations of force gradients by force extrapolation without any loss of precision. As a result, the efficiency of the integration improves significantly. The algorithms obtained are analyzed and optimized using an error-function theory. The best among them are tested in actual molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations for comparison with well-known nongradient and gradient algorithms such as the Störmer-Verlet, Runge-Kutta, Cowell-Numerov, Forest-Ruth, Suzuki-Chin, and others. It is demonstrated that for moderate and high accuracy, the extrapolated algorithms should be considered as the most efficient for the integration of motion in molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:17025782

  17. Use of Seasat synthetic aperture radar and Landsat multispectral scanner subsystem data for Alaskan glaciology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Ormsby, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Three Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and three Landsat multispectral scanner subsystem (MSS) scenes of three areas of Alaska were analyzed for hydrological information. The areas were: the Dease Inlet in northern Alaska and its oriented or thaw lakes, the Ruth and Tokositna valley glaciers in south central Alaska, and the Malaspina piedmont glacier on Alaska's southern coast. Results for the first area showed that the location and identification of some older remnant lake basins were more easily determined in the registered data using an MSS/SAR overlay than in either SAR or MSS data alone. Separately, both SAR and MSS data were useful for determination of surging glaciers based on their distinctive medial moraines, and Landsat data were useful for locating the glacier firn zone. For the Malaspina Glacier scenes, the SAR data were useful for locating heavily crevassed ice beneath glacial debris, and Landsat provided data concerning the extent of the debris overlying the glacier.

  18. Editorial: Of Past And Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1985-06-01

    To John Conant for six hard years of behind-the-scenes work, and To his staff (Barbara DeNapoli, Ann Lear, Ruth Azevedo, and Irene (Breen) for supporting him; To two successive managing editors (Marybeth Manning and Eric Pepper), who maintained the high standards of quality set by their predecessor, Elaine Cherry, Director of Publications 'for the Society; To my predecessor, John DeVelis, for continued encouragement; To my friend, Joe 'aver, Executive Director of SPIE, for his unfailing support; To Aerodyne Research, Inc., and especially to Chuck Kolb and Jim Draper, for six years of support not necessarily visible to anyone but me; To Joe Horner and Winn Gaynor for making "SPIE Reports" exciting and valuable; To the best executive secretary I have ever known, Shirley Fedukowski, for trying so valiantly to keep me organized; To the many contributors, special issue editors, reviewers, and readers of Optical Engineering-Thank you. I have truly appreciated your help.

  19. Direct estimation of diffuse gaseous emissions from coal fires: current methods and future directions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, Mark A.; Olea, Ricardo A.; O'Keefe, Jennifer M. K.; Hower, James C.; Geboy, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Coal fires occur in nature spontaneously, contribute to increases in greenhouse gases, and emit atmospheric toxicants. Increasing interest in quantifying coal fire emissions has resulted in the adaptation and development of specialized approaches and adoption of numerical modeling techniques. Overview of these methods for direct estimation of diffuse gas emissions from coal fires is presented in this paper. Here we take advantage of stochastic Gaussian simulation to interpolate CO2 fluxes measured using a dynamic closed chamber at the Ruth Mullins coal fire in Perry County, Kentucky. This approach allows for preparing a map of diffuse gas emissions, one of the two primary ways that gases emanate from coal fires, and establishing the reliability of the study both locally and for the entire fire. Future research directions include continuous and automated sampling to improve quantification of gaseous coal fire emissions.

  20. The verbal portrait: Erik H. Erikson's contribution to psychoanalytic discourse.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2011-12-01

    This article makes the case that Erik H. Erikson developed a form of psychoanalytic discourse-the verbal portrait-which, although not unprecedented, became a focal feature of his work, and the testing ground for the cogency of his major contribution to psychoanalysis (the concept of identity). It suggests that Erikson was inspired to develop the verbal portrait because he came to psychoanalysis from art and was, in fact, a portrait artist. Drawing especially on the work of Richard Brilliant, it presents the view that a portrait is a portrayal of the subject's identity and goes on to show how Erikson's memorial to the cultural anthropologist Ruth Benedict is representative of the verbal portrait. PMID:21744027

  1. The five elements and Chinese-American mortality.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary

    2006-01-01

    D. P. Phillips, T. E. Ruth, and L. M. Wagner (1993) reported that 1969-1990 California mortality data show that Chinese Americans are particularly vulnerable to diseases that Chinese astrology and traditional Chinese medicine associate with their birth years. For example, because fire is associated with the heart, a Chinese person born in a fire year (such as 1937) is more likely to die of heart disease than is a Chinese person born in a nonfire year. However, many diseases were excluded from this study, some diseases that were included have ambiguous links to birth years, and the statistical tests were indirect. A more complete statistical analysis and independent California mortality data for the years 1960-1968 and 1991-2002 did not replicate the original results. PMID:16448306

  2. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Ley, Ruth [Cornell University

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  3. After Action Report - Kazakhstan NSDD July 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Caterina; Eppich, Gary; Kips, Ruth; Knight, Kim; Belian, Anthony; Gray, Paul; Canazaro, B.

    2015-07-25

    On Monday 20 July, Caterina Fox, Ruth Kips and Kim Knight were invited to participate in Kazakhstan's nuclear material inventory management working group meeting coordinated by Alexander Vasilliev as nuclear forensics subject matter experts. The meeting included participants from Kazakhstan's nuclear regulatory agency (CAESC, the Committee on Atomic and Energetic Supervision and Control) and 3 institutes 1. Institute of Nuclear Physics, INP (Almaty), 2. National Nuclear Center, NNC (Kurchatov), and 3. Ulba Metallurgical Plant, UMP (Oskemen). CAESC requested attendance of an MC&A expert, an IT Specialist, and a Physical Security Specialist from each site. The general meeting concerned considerations for creating unified or compatible systems for nuclear material inventory management. NSDD representatives provided an overview of nuclear forensics and presented considerations for developments of inventory management that might be synergistic with future consideration of development of a National Nuclear Forensics Library to support nuclear forensics investigations.

  4. Cornerstone Documents, Milestones, and Policies: Shaping the Direction of Public Health Nursing 1890-1950.

    PubMed

    Kub, Joan; Kulbok, Pamela A; Glick, Doris

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of policy, milestone events, and cornerstone documents was critical in the evolution of the specialty of public health nursing (PHN) from 1890-1950. Using our contemporary lens, this article examines PHN development from an historical perspective, including events and milestones driving growth in the early 20th century. Some of the challenges faced by our founding public health nursing leadership are not unlike challenges we face today. In 1950, Ruth Hubbard, a former leader in the National Organization of Public Health Nurses and Director of the Visiting Nurse Society of Philadelphia, spoke of the value of examining the past to forge a new future. This article calls for contemporary public health nurses to act upon the lessons learned from the past, to strengthen the renewed focus on prevention, to develop policies that impact population health, and to foster a vision that will guide us into the future. PMID:26882422

  5. Responsibilising managers and clinicians, neglecting system health? What kind of healthcare leadership development do we want?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    Responding to Ruth McDonald’s editorial on the rise of leadership and leadership development programmes in healthcare, this paper offers three arguments. Firstly, care is needed in evaluating impact of leadership development, since achievement of organisational goals is not necessarily an appropriate measure of good leadership. Secondly, the proliferation of styles of leadership might be understood in part as a means of retaining control over public services while distributing responsibility for their success and failure. Thirdly, it makes a plea for the continued utility of good administrative skills for clinicians and managers, which are likely to become all-the-more important given recent developments in healthcare policy and governance. PMID:25584352

  6. Testing the Simple Biosphere model (SiB) using point micrometeorological and biophysical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, P. J.; Dorman, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    The suitability of the Simple Biosphere (SiB) model of Sellers et al. (1986) for calculation of the surface fluxes for use within general circulation models is assessed. The structure of the SiB model is described, and its performance is evaluated in terms of its ability to realistically and accurately simulate biophysical processes over a number of test sites, including Ruthe (Germany), South Carolina (U.S.), and Central Wales (UK), for which point biophysical and micrometeorological data were available. The model produced simulations of the energy balances of barley, wheat, maize, and Norway Spruce sites over periods ranging from 1 to 40 days. Generally, it was found that the model reproduced time series of latent, sensible, and ground-heat fluxes and surface radiative temperature comparable with the available data.

  7. Local stability of a five dimensional food chain model in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumawinahyu, W. M.; Hidayatulloh, M. R.

    2014-02-01

    This paper discuss a food chain model on a microbiology ecosystem in the ocean, where predation process occurs. Four population growth rates are discussed, namely bacteria, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and protozoa growth rate. When the growth of nutrient density is also considered, the model is governed by a five dimensional dynamical system. The system considered in this paper is a modification of a model proposed by Hadley and Forbes [1], by taking Holling Type I as the functional response. For sake of simplicity, the model needs to be scaled. Dynamical behavior, such as existence condition of equilibrium points and their local stability are addressed. There are eight equilibrium points, where two of them exist under certain conditions. Three equilibrium points are unstable, while two points stable under certain conditions and the other three points are stable if the Ruth-Hurwitz criteria are satisfied. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate analytical findings.

  8. Growth Of Single Crystalline Copper Nanowhiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Matthias; Richter, Gunther

    2010-11-24

    Nanowhiskers are defect free single crystals with high aspect ratios and as result exhibit superior physical, e.g. mechanical properties. This paper sheds light on the kinetics of copper nanowhisker growth and thickening. Whisker growth was provoked by covering silicon wafers with a thin carbon film and subsequently coating them with copper by molecular beam epitaxy. The whiskers grown were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the length and diameter were measured as a function of the amount of copper deposited. The experiments show that nanowhisker growth follows Ruth and Hirth's growth model. A fit of the model parameters to the acquired data shows that adsorption of atoms on the substrate and on the whisker surface, with subsequent surface diffusion to the whisker tip, delivers by far the greatest portion of material for whisker growth. Additionally, the experiments demonstrate that the crystallographic orientation of the substrate surface greatly influences the growth rate in the early stage of whisker growth.

  9. Women of the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jill

    2009-10-01

    In the book Their Day in the Sun, Ruth Howes and Caroline Herzenberg documented more than 1000 women who worked on the Manhattan Project, preserving their legacy for generations to come. At the 2009 Chicago meeting, the AAPT Committee on Women in Physics celebrated the accomplishments of these women and the men who worked beside them. Howes presented an overview of the contributions of women to the development of the first nuclear weapon, and the session was honored with talks from two Manhattan project veterans, Ellen Cleminshaw Weaver, who worked at Oak Ridge, and Dorothy Marcus Gans, who worked as a technician in the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago. I will present a summary of the session, analyzing the effect of working on the project on the career trajectories of the women involved, and point listeners toward additional documentation of this history.

  10. Building public trust: Actions to respond to the report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Democratic government requires trust: people need to know and believe that the government is telling the truth. Without information about what the government is doing and why, citizens cannot exercise democratic control over government institutions. During his first year in office, President Clinton became concerned about reports that the government had conducted unethical secret human radiation experiments during the Cold War. To address this issue, in January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), chaired by bioethicist Dr. Ruth Faden of Johns Hopkins University. The President also directed all Federal agencies to search for records related to human subjects radiation research and provide them to the Advisory Committee. This report presents the Administration`s actions to respond to the ACHRE`s findings and recommendations.

  11. Black Holes in Higher Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Gary T.

    2012-04-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Black holes in four dimensions Gary Horowitz; Part II. Five Dimensional Kaluza-Klein Theory: 2. The Gregory-Laflamme instability Ruth Gregory; 3. Final state of Gregory-Laflamme instability Luis Lehner and Frans Pretorius; 4. General black holes in Kaluza-Klein theory Gary Horowitz and Toby Wiseman; Part III. Higher Dimensional Solutions: 5. Myers-Perry black holes Rob Myers; 6. Black rings Roberto Emparan and Harvey Reall; Part IV. General Properties: 7. Constraints on the topology of higher dimensional black holes Greg Galloway; 8. Blackfolds Roberto Emparan; 9. Algebraically special solutions in higher dimensions Harvey Reall; 10. Numerical construction of static and stationary black holes Toby Wiseman; Part V. Advanced Topics: 11. Black holes and branes in supergravity Don Marolf; 12. The gauge/gravity duality Juan Maldacena; 13. The fluid/gravity correspondence Veronika Hubeny, Mukund Rangamani and Shiraz Minwalla; 14. Horizons, holography and condensed matter Sean Hartnoll; Index.

  12. An annotated catalogue of the Iranian Euphorinae, Gnamptodontinae, Helconinae, Hormiinae and Rhysipolinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Gadallah, Neveen S; Ghahari, Hassan; Achterberg, Kees Van

    2016-01-01

    The Iranian species diversity of five braconid subfamilies, Euphorinae (54 species in 16 genera and 8 tribes), Gnamptodontinae (4 species in 1 genus and 1 tribe), Helconinae (9 species in 5 genera and 2 tribes), Hormiinae (8 species in 4 genera and 2 tribe) and Rhysipolinae (3 species in 2 genera) are summarized in this catalogue. A faunistic list is given comprising both local and global distribution of each species under study as well as host records. In the present study ten new records are added to the Iranian fauna: Centistes (Ancylocentrus) ater (Nees), Centistes cuspidatus (Haliday), Meteorus affinis (Wesmael), Meteorus rufus (DeGeer), Microctonus brevicollis (Haliday), Microctonus falciger Ruthe, Peristenus nitidus (Curtis) (Euphorinae), Aspicolpus carinator (Nees), Diospilus capito (Nees) and Diospilus productus Marshall (Helconinae s.l.). Euphorus pseudomitis Hedwig, 1957 is transferred to the subfamily Hormiinae and Hormisca pseudomitis (Hedwig, 1957) is a new combination. PMID:27395908

  13. Computer monitoring and control of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, M. M.; Ward, H.; Robertson, D. I.

    2000-10-01

    The GEO 600 gravitational wave detector is at an advanced stage of construction at Ruthe, near Hannover in Northern Germany. Successful long-term stable operation of long-baseline interferometers like GEO 600 will critically depend on continuous monitoring and control of the very large number of interdependent feedback systems involved. We present here a description of the control infrastructure developed for this task for GEO 600. Our solution is based on a combination of purpose-built interfacing hardware, standard local area network-connected personal computers, and control software written using LabVIEW. The software techniques developed allow monitoring of all detector systems and also provide the mechanisms for manual and automated control both locally and from remote internet-connected sites.

  14. Suspension design for GEO 600-an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, N. A.; Cagnoli, G.; Hough, J.; Husman, M. E.; McIntosh, S.; Palmer, D.; Plissi, M. V.; Robertson, D. I.; Rowan, S.; Sneddon, P.; Strain, K. A.; Torrie, C. I.; Ward, H.

    2000-06-01

    The GEO 600 gravitational wave detector (1) is currently under construction at Ruthe, near Hannover in Germany. The design of the suspension system for the main mirrors in the detector has been chosen such that thermal noise due to the internal modes of the mirrors is expected to set the sensitivity limit from 50 Hz to ~200 Hz. Thus the design must be such that the effects of seismic noise and thermal noise from the suspensions are lower than the ``internal'' thermal noise at and above 50 Hz. To achieve this, a triple pendulum suspension incorporating fused silica fibers in the lowest stage forms the major part of the overall suspension and isolation system. In this paper, recent work on developing several aspects of the triple pendulum design is discussed. .

  15. Assessment of phytoplankton diversity as an indicator of water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Yergeau, S.E.; Lang, A.; Teeters, R.

    1997-08-01

    For the measurement of water quality in freshwater systems, there are established indices using macroinvertebrate larvae. There is no such comparable measure for marine and estuarine environments. A phytoplankton diversity index (PDI), whose basic form was conceived by Dr. Ruth Gyure of Save the Sound, Inc., is being investigated as a possible candidate to rectify this situation. Phytoplankton were chosen as the indicators of water quality since algae have short generation times and respond quickly to changing water quality conditions. The methodologies involved in this initial assessment of the PDI are incorporated into the Adopt-a-Harbor water quality monitoring program and its associated laboratory. The virtues of the procedures are that they are simple and quick to use, suitable for trained volunteers to carry out, easily reproducible, and amenable to quality assurance checks.

  16. Vicarious Collecting: A Review of Some Notable Books about Books - and where to acquire them!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Jack

    Reviews on Milestones of Science, Ruth A. Sparrow, Buffalo Museum of Science, 1972, The Face of the Moon, from the Linda Hall Library, Out of this World - The Golden Age of the Celestial Atlas, Linda Hall Library, including Bayer's Uranometria, Schiller's Coelum Christianum, Hevelius' Firmamentum, Flamsteed's Atlas Coelestis, and Bode's Uranographia, as well as Argelander, Bode, Cellarius, Coronelli, Doppelmaier, Kepler, La Caille, Messier, Piccolomini, and Wollaston, Heavenly Library, Angus MacDonald and A.D. Morrison-Low from Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Library, 1994, Catalogue of the Rare Astronomical Books in the San Diego State University Library, Louis A. Kenney, 1988, and Vanity Fair, from 1869 to 1914, including caricatures of famous astronomers and scientists, such as Airy, Ball, Huggins, and Proctor.

  17. Writing a competitive individual National Research Service Award (F31) application.

    PubMed

    Rawl, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are committed to increasing the number of PhD-prepared persons to meet the demand for well-trained behavioral, biological, and biobehavioral scientists. The Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) individual Predoctoral Fellowship (F31) program provides financial support for full-time PhD students who are committed to research careers in scientific health-related fields relevant to the NIH. This article provides guidance for PhD nursing students who are preparing an individual NRSA application with emphasis on those being submitted to the National Institute of Nursing Research. The advantages of receiving this award are described along with the steps to complete the application. After careful self- and environmental assessments, the task of writing begins in close collaboration with research mentors. Essential components of NRSA applications are described along with strategies for making applications competitive and, ultimately, successful. PMID:23579476

  18. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, Ruth

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  19. Mercury in the Black Sea - results of the 2013 GEOTRACES MEDBlack cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbürger, L. E.; Sonke, J.; Rijkenberg, M. J. A.; Gerringa, L. J.; De Baar, H. J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Inorganic mercury (Hg), whether of natural or anthropogenic origin, can be converted into the neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg). Today we believe this conversion occurs during the bacterial remineralization of sinking organic matter in the oceanic water column. The Black Sea with its high organic matter inputs and anoxic deep waters is an excellent study site to investigate in more detail the processes yielding MeHg. To date only one vertical profile of Hg species near the Western shelf and one vertical profile in the Western Gyre are published (Lamborg et al. 2008). We will present new results of the 2013 Dutch-led GEOTRACES MEDBlack cruise in the Black Sea. Research vessel "Pelagia" occupied 12 full depth stations along an east-west transect from 13 to 25 July 2013. High resolution vertical profiles were sampled using a titanium ultraclean CTD frame (de Baar et al., 2008) equipped with 24 x 24L PVDF samplers. Samples were filtered (0.2µm, Sartobran 300), drawn into pre-cleaned 250mL Savillex PFA bottles and acidified to 0.4% (v:v) with double-distilled HCl. Dissolved MeHg, as the sum of monomethylHg and dimethylHg, was analyzed via isotope dilution gas chromatography sector field inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Total dissolved Hg was determined following the US EPA 1631 method. We will present high resolution vertical Hg species profiles, including one ultra-high resolution profile (1 sample every 5m-depth) to understand the dynamics along the chemocline (Luther et al., 1991). We will also present the results of the GEOTRACES international intercalibration exercise for dissolved MeHg and dissolved total Hg in surface seawater that we organized during the same cruise. References De Baar HJW, Timmermans KR, Laan P, De Porto HH, Ober S, Blom JJ, Bakker MC, Schilling J, Sarthou G, Smit MG, Klunder M. Titan: A new facility for ultraclean sampling of trace elements and isotopes in the deep oceans in the international Geotraces program. Mar. Chem. 2008, 111

  20. Computational Investigation of the T_1 (n,π^{*}) State of 2-CYCLOHEXEN-1-ONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAnally, Michael O.; Drucker, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    We have used several computational methods, including TDDFT and EOM-EE-CCSD, to determine the equilibrium geometry and harmonic vibrational frequencies of 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHO) in its T_1 (n,π^{*}) excited state. Atom displacement vectors for the normal modes indicate that the lowest-frequency vibration, ν_{39}, is best described as a ring-twisting motion, whereas ν_{38} is a ring-bending vibration consisting mainly of C-5 displacement toward and away from the plane in which the other heavy atoms lie. These updated descriptions are transposed with respect to those in the previous literature. The table below shows that the EOM-EE-CCSD harmonic frequencies generally agree well with fundamentals obtained spectroscopically.^b In particular, the ν_{3}9 frequency determined by EOM-EE-CCSD is more accurate than the TDB3LYP result, with errors of +2% and +20%, respectively. This outcome is traceable in part to a larger ν_{39} reduced mass calculated by EOM-EE-CCSD, stemming from a less planar O=C-C=C dihedral angle (170.4° via EOM-EE-CCSD vs. 177.4° via TDB3LYP). Low-frequency fundamentals (cm^{-1}) for CHO in its T_1 (n,π^{*}) state Mode Description TDB3LYP/cc-pVTZ EOM-EE-CCSD/cc-pVDZ Experiment 39 ring twist 119.6 101.4 99.5 38 bend (inversion of C-5) 255.9 272.0 253.2 37 C=C twist 306.9 223.0 247.8 36 C=O wag 359.0 340.2 345.5 The success of EOM-EE-CCSD in this application could be due to its ability to describe multiconfigurational wavefunctions within a single-reference formalism. T. L. Smithson and H. Wieser, J. Chem. Phys. {73}, 2518 (1980) M. Z. M. Rishard, E. A. Brown, L. K. Ausman, S. Drucker, J. Choo, and J. Laane, J. Phys. Chem. A {112}, 38 (2008).

  1. Citations Prize 2009 Citations Prize 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2009 Citations Prize winners Some of the winning authors with their certificates, and Christian Morel with the Rotblat Medal, at the award ceremony in Orsay, near Paris. From left to right are Corinne Groiselle, Lydia Maigne, David Brasse, Irène Buvat, Dimitris Visvikis, Giovanni Santin, Uwe Pietrzyk, Pierre-François Honore, Christian Morel, Sébastien Jan and Arion Chatziioannou. The winner of the 2009 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2004-2008) is GATE: a simulation toolkit for PET and SPECT Authors: S Jan, G Santin, D Strul, S Staelens, K Assié, D Autret, S Avner, R Barbier, M Bardiès, P M Bloomfield, D Brasse, V Breton, P Bruyndonckx, I Buvat, A F Chatziioannou, Y Choi, Y H Chung, C Comtat, D Donnarieix, L Ferrer, S J Glick, C J Groiselle, D Guez, P-F Honore, S Kerhoas-Cavata, A S Kirov, V Kohli, M Koole, M Krieguer, D J van der Laan, F Lamare, G Largeron, C Lartizien, D Lazaro, M C Maas, L Maigne, F Mayet, F Melot, C Merheb, E Pennacchio, J Perez, U Pietrzyk, F R Rannou, M Rey, D R Schaart, C R Schmidtlein, L~Simon, T Y Song, J-M Vieira, D Visvikis, R Van de Walle, E Wieörs and C Morel Reference: S Jan et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4543-61 Since its publication in 2004 this article has received over 200 citations. This extremely high figure is a testament to the great influence and usefulness of the work to the nuclear medicine community. More discussion of the winning paper can be found on

  2. Out of the Shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Nina; Williams, Gary

    2006-08-01

    Foreword Freeman J. Dyson; Introduction Nina Byers; 1. Hertha Aryton 1854-1923 Joan Mason; 2. Margaret Maltby 1860-1944 Peggy Kidwell; 3. Agnes Pockels 1862-1935 Gary A. Williams; 4. Marie Curie 1867-1934 A. Pais; 5. Henrietta Leavitt 1868-1921 Jean L. Turner; 6. Harriet Brooks 1876-1933 C. W. Wong; 7. Lise Meitner 1878-1968 Ruth Lewin Sime; 8. Emmy Noether 1882-1935 Nina Byers; 9. Inge Lehmann 1888-1993 Bruce A. Bolt; 10. Marietta Blau 1894-1970 Leopold Halpern and Maurice M. Shapiro; 11. Hertha Sponer 1895-1968 Helmut Rechenberg; 12. Irene Joliot-Curie 1897-1956 Hélène Langevin-Joliot and Pierre Radvanyi; 13. Katherine Burr Blodgett 1898-1979 Gary A. Williams; 14. Cecilia Payne Gaposchkin 1900-1979 Vera C. Rubin; 15. Mary Cartwright 1900-1998 Freeman J. Dyson; 16. Bertha Jeffreys 1903-1999 Ruth M. Williams; 17. Kathleen Yardley Lonsdale1903-1971 Judith Milledge; 18. Maria Goeppert Mayer 1906-1972 Steven A. Moszkowski; 19. Helen Megaw 1907-2002 A. Michael Glazer and Christine Kelsey; 20. Yvette Cauchois 1908-1999 Christiane Bonnelle; 21. Marguerite Perey 1909-1975 Jean-Pierre Adloff and George B. Kauffman; 22. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin 1910-1994 Jenny P. Glusker; 23. Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber 1911-1998 Alfred Scharff Goldhaber; 24. Chien Shiung Wu 1912-1997 Noemie Bencze-Koller; 25. Margaret E. Burbidge 1919 Virginia Trimble; 26. Phyllis Freier 1921-1992 Cecil J. Waddington; 27. Rosalyn S. Yalow 1921 M. S. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 28. Esther Conwell 1922 Lewis Rothberg; 29. Cecile Dewitt-Morette 1922 Bryce DeWitt; 30. Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat 1923 James W. York Jr.; 31. Vera Rubin 1928 Robert J. Rubin; 32. Mildred S. Dresselhaus 1930 G. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 33. Myriam Sarachik 1933 Jonathan R. Friedman; 34. Juliet Lee-Franzini 1933 Paolo Franzini; 35. Helen T. Edwards 1936 John Peoples; 36. Mary K. Gaillard 1939 Andreszej Buras; 37. Renata Kallosh 1943 Andrei Linde and Michael Gutperle; 38. Jocelyn Bell Burnell 1943 Ferdinand V. Coroniti and Gary A

  3. Out of the Shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Nina; Williams, Gary

    2010-12-01

    Foreword Freeman J. Dyson; Introduction Nina Byers; 1. Hertha Aryton 1854-1923 Joan Mason; 2. Margaret Maltby 1860-1944 Peggy Kidwell; 3. Agnes Pockels 1862-1935 Gary A. Williams; 4. Marie Curie 1867-1934 A. Pais; 5. Henrietta Leavitt 1868-1921 Jean L. Turner; 6. Harriet Brooks 1876-1933 C. W. Wong; 7. Lise Meitner 1878-1968 Ruth Lewin Sime; 8. Emmy Noether 1882-1935 Nina Byers; 9. Inge Lehmann 1888-1993 Bruce A. Bolt; 10. Marietta Blau 1894-1970 Leopold Halpern and Maurice M. Shapiro; 11. Hertha Sponer 1895-1968 Helmut Rechenberg; 12. Irene Joliot-Curie 1897-1956 Hélène Langevin-Joliot and Pierre Radvanyi; 13. Katherine Burr Blodgett 1898-1979 Gary A. Williams; 14. Cecilia Payne Gaposchkin 1900-1979 Vera C. Rubin; 15. Mary Cartwright 1900-1998 Freeman J. Dyson; 16. Bertha Jeffreys 1903-1999 Ruth M. Williams; 17. Kathleen Yardley Lonsdale1903-1971 Judith Milledge; 18. Maria Goeppert Mayer 1906-1972 Steven A. Moszkowski; 19. Helen Megaw 1907-2002 A. Michael Glazer and Christine Kelsey; 20. Yvette Cauchois 1908-1999 Christiane Bonnelle; 21. Marguerite Perey 1909-1975 Jean-Pierre Adloff and George B. Kauffman; 22. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin 1910-1994 Jenny P. Glusker; 23. Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber 1911-1998 Alfred Scharff Goldhaber; 24. Chien Shiung Wu 1912-1997 Noemie Bencze-Koller; 25. Margaret E. Burbidge 1919 Virginia Trimble; 26. Phyllis Freier 1921-1992 Cecil J. Waddington; 27. Rosalyn S. Yalow 1921 M. S. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 28. Esther Conwell 1922 Lewis Rothberg; 29. Cecile Dewitt-Morette 1922 Bryce DeWitt; 30. Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat 1923 James W. York Jr.; 31. Vera Rubin 1928 Robert J. Rubin; 32. Mildred S. Dresselhaus 1930 G. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 33. Myriam Sarachik 1933 Jonathan R. Friedman; 34. Juliet Lee-Franzini 1933 Paolo Franzini; 35. Helen T. Edwards 1936 John Peoples; 36. Mary K. Gaillard 1939 Andreszej Buras; 37. Renata Kallosh 1943 Andrei Linde and Michael Gutperle; 38. Jocelyn Bell Burnell 1943 Ferdinand V. Coroniti and Gary A

  4. The time-dependent emission of molecular iodine from Laminaria Digitata measured with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixneuf, S.

    2009-04-01

    evidence for coastal iodine particles from Laminaria macroalgae - linkage to emissions of molecular iodine. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 4, 701-713 (2004). [3] Fiedler, S. E., Hese, A., Ruth, A. A. Incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. Chem. Phys. Lett. 371, 284-294 (2003). [4] Vaughan, S., Gherman, T., Ruth, A. A., Orphal, J. Incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy of the marine boundary layer species I2, IO and OIO. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 4471-4477 (2008).

  5. Women and Men of the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jill; Herzenberg, Caroline; Howes, Ruth; Weaver, Ellen; Gans, Dorothy

    2010-04-01

    In the early 1990s Ruth Howes, a nuclear physicist on the faculty at Ball State University, and Caroline Herzenberg, a nuclear physicist at Argonne National Laboratory, were asked to write a chapter on the Manhattan Project for a volume on women working on weapons development for the military. Realizing that they knew very little about the women who had been involved in that effort, they embarked on a mission to find out more. Howes and Herzenberg were able to document the wartime contributions of more than 1000 women in Their Day in the Sun,2 preserving this legacy for generations to come. At the 2009 AAPT Winter Meeting in Chicago, the AAPT Committee on Women in Physics celebrated the accomplishments of these women and the men who worked beside them in a session co-sponsored with the History and Philosophy of Physics and the Concerns of Senior Physicists committees. Howes presented an overview of the contributions of women to the development of the first nuclear weapon, and the session was honored with the presence of Manhattan Project veterans Ellen Cleminshaw Weaver, who worked at Oak Ridge, and Dorothy Marcus Gans, who worked as a technician in the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago.

  6. Spatial density and movement of the Lygus spp. parasitoid Peristenus relictus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in organic strawberries with alfalfa trap crops.

    PubMed

    Swezey, Sean L; Nieto, Diego J; Pickett, Charles H; Hagler, James R; Bryer, Janet A; Machtley, Scott A

    2014-04-01

    Alfalfa trap crops are currently used to manage Lygus spp. in organic strawberry fields on the California Central Coast. The retention of Lygus spp. in alfalfa creates aggregated distributions that provide improved opportunities for biological control by the introduced parasitoid Peristenus relictus (Ruthe). The abundance and distribution of P. relictus between two trap crops separated by 50 strawberry rows were analyzed in 2008 and 2010. Parasitism of Lygus spp. nymphs by P. relictus (measured by larval abundance and % parasitism) was greatest in alfalfa trap crops compared with strawberry rows. A significantly positive correlation between host nymphs and P. relictus larvae in and between trap crops was found. Movement of P. relictus adults from a marked alfalfa trap crop into adjacent strawberry rows or trap crops was also studied in 2008 and 2009 using a chicken egg-albumin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay mark-capture technique. In 2008 and 2009, 85 and 49% of protein-marked wasps were captured from central trap crops, respectively, indicating that alfalfa trap crops act as a concentrated "host-density anchor" in organic strawberry fields. PMID:24763093

  7. Takin' the Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Langley Research Center has licensed a new high-temperature polyimide with versatile applications to Unitech LLC, of Hampton, Virginia, and J. D. Lincoln, Inc., of Costa Mesa, California. Through a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) and its license, Unitech, a client of the NASA Hampton Roads Technology Incubator (HRTI), is now selling the new polyimide, better known as RP46. Dr. Ruth Pater, of NASA Langley, developed RP46 for aerospace applications. The material was designed for re-entry vehicles and high-temperature engine components; however, its versatile nature makes it applicable as a molding, adhesive, coating, composite matrix resin, foam, or film. Available in liquid and powder forms, RP46 can also be fabricated over mesh for use in molds. RP46 presents a profitable option to manufacturers, because the ease of manufacturing the resin and the reduction in curing time saves money. Consumers save money because RP46 is more durable than similar products that are susceptible to microcracking when used as a coating or adhesive in high-temperature situations and often required reapplication. The chances of microcracking are significantly reduced with RP46 because of its unsurpased ability to resist heat and corrosion.

  8. If he can do it, so can they: exposure to counterstereotypically successful exemplars prompts automatic inferences.

    PubMed

    Critcher, Clayton R; Risen, Jane L

    2014-03-01

    After incidental exposure to Blacks who succeeded in counterstereotypical domains (e.g., Brown University President Ruth Simmons, Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison), participants drew an automatic inference that race was not a success-inhibiting factor in modern society. Of note, participants' automatic inferences were not simply guided by their explicit reasoning (i.e., their beliefs about what these exemplars signify about the state of race relations). Studies 1-3 demonstrated the basic automatic inference effect and provided evidence that such effects unfolded automatically, without intention or awareness. Study 4 replicated the effect in non-race-related domains. Subsequent studies examined what features of exemplars (Studies 5 and 6) and inference makers (Studies 7 and 8) prompt automatic inferences. Study 5 suggested that counterstereotypically successful exemplars prompt racism-denying inferences because they signal what is possible, even if not typical. Study 6 demonstrated that when these exemplars succeed in a stereotypical domain (e.g., Blacks in athletics), similar automatic inferences are not drawn. Those most likely to draw automatic inferences are people predisposed to approach the world with inferential thinking: participants dispositionally high in need for cognition (Study 7) or experimentally primed to think inferentially (Study 8). PMID:24588089

  9. A four-fold humanity: Margaret Mead and psychological types.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    Beginning in 1933, while working in New Guinea, Margaret Mead developed her so-called squares hypothesis. Mead never published its terms, though she made a brief comment on it in her autobiography, Blackberry Winter (1972), and the arguments found in Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies (1935) and the research leading to Balinese Character (Bateson & Mead, 1942) bore its imprint. Beginning with William McDougall's distinction between temperament (innate predispositions) and character (learned organization of habit), Mead articulated a morphological approach to the interplay between biology and culture that yielded four primary and four intermediary personality types. Under specified but not inevitable circumstances, the conscious choices of a given people could render one or another of these types characteristic or predominantly stable within their population, giving each of the other types a definite relation to the dominant type and thereby the cultural ethos of its society. Persons of each type followed a developmental path specific to their type different both from that of other types and in its manifestations given the various relations of the individual's type to the dominant type. Mead's hypothesis was, therefore, a vision of the unity and diversity of a single human species as well as an approach to the differing psychological positioning of individuals in cultures. In examining Mead's hypothesis, this essay also takes up Mead's debts to several leading psychologists (McDougall, C. G. Jung, and Erik Erikson), and (provisionally) how her vision differed from that of Ruth Benedict. PMID:15048668

  10. Attachment and caregiver-infant interaction: a review of observational-assessment tools.

    PubMed

    Tryphonopoulos, Panagiota D; Letourneau, Nicole; Ditommaso, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between maternal-infant interaction and attachment quality to infant developmental outcomes has long been established. As children mature, problems stemming from troubled caregiver-infant relations may result in referral to mental health or child protection services. The accurate and appropriate assessment of attachment is critical for early recognition of problematic relations and for informing suitable treatment modalities. Evaluating the quality of attachment poses a challenge for researchers and clinicians seeking to explore the association between infant development and the quality of early caregiving experiences. Although providing a definitive answer to the question of which of these assessment procedures is the single universal standard for measuring attachment quantity is beyond the scope of this article, readers will be provided with a description and comparison of strengths and limitations of the most commonly used measures of attachment, including the Strange Situation Procedure (M.D.S. Ainsworth, M.C. Blehar, E. Waters, & S. Wall, 1978), Attachment Q-Sort (E. Waters & K.E. Deane, 1985), Toddler Attachment Sort (TAS-45; J. Kirkland, D. Bimler, A. Drawneek, M. McKim, & A. Scholmerich, 2004), CARE-Index (P. Crittenden, 1985), Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification (AMBIANCE; E. Bronfman, E. Parsons, & K. Lyons-Ruth, 1999), Massie-Campbell Scale of Mother-Infant Attachment Indicators During Stress Scale (Attachment During Stress Scale; H.N. Massie & B.K. Campbell, 1983), and the Risky Situation Procedure (D. Paquette & M. Bigras, 2010). PMID:25798513

  11. What is so important about completing lives? A critique of the modified youngest first principle of scarce resource allocation.

    PubMed

    Gamlund, Espen

    2016-04-01

    Ruth Tallman has recently offered a defense of the modified youngest first principle of scarce resource allocation [1]. According to Tallman, this principle calls for prioritizing adolescents and young adults between 15-40 years of age. In this article, I argue that Tallman's defense of the modified youngest first principle is vulnerable to important objections, and that it is thus unsuitable as a basis for allocating resources. Moreover, Tallman makes claims about the badness of death for individuals at different ages, but she lacks an account of the loss involved in dying to support her claims. To fill this gap in Tallman's account, I propose a view on the badness of death that I call 'Deprivationism'. I argue that this view explains why death is bad for those who die, and that it has some advantages over Tallman's complete lives view in the context of scarce resource allocation. Finally, I consider some objections to the relevance of Deprivationism to resource allocation, and offer my responses. PMID:27059376

  12. Reporting AIDS in Kenya: a personal report. Guidelines for journalists have been issued in the UK. What about Africa?

    PubMed

    Hanssen, N

    1993-01-01

    A Norwegian journalist reports on his experiences covering the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in Kenya. Denial by the government has resulted in reduced figures. President Daniel Arap Moi refuses to admit that the epidemic has become national in scope. The public broadcasting services carry little information about the epidemic. A study indicating that 25/1700 prostitutes in Nairobi were positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been met with skepticism by the public, who question the survey (what was the relationship between researchers and prostitutes, were the prostitutes paid to risk their lives, why was the study carried out in Africa). Some believe the 25 positive women are 'immune' because of a similar gene pattern. There are 750,000 HIV positive adults and 30,000 AIDS cases in Kenya, including a large number of cases among street urchins. Most AIDS cases are sent home to die because of the short supply of hospital beds (45,000). One of these was Ruth Kasuki, a 36-year-old mother of three and AIDS educator and counselor in Kenya, who is now deceased. In an interview conducted shortly before her death, she criticizes the government for its denial and predicts disastrous results. Ms. Kasuki also blamed the extramarital affairs of men for the spread of AIDS among Kenyan women. 8% of women receiving antenatal care are estimated to have HIV; in Nyanza Coast and Nairobi the estimate reaches 12%. Ms. Kasuki also cited the negative attitude of the clergy. PMID:12287718

  13. Studying populations without molecular biology: Aster Models and a new argument against reductionism.

    PubMed

    Grosholz, Emily

    2011-06-01

    During the past few decades, philosophers of biology have debated the issue of reductionism versus anti-reductionism, with both sides often claiming a 'pluralist' position. However, both sides also tend to focus on a single research paradigm, which analyzes living things in terms of certain macromolecular components. I offer a case study where biologists pursue other analytic pathways, in a tradition of quantitative genetics that originates with the initially purely mathematical theories of R. A. Fisher, J. B. S. Haldane, and Sewall Wright in the 1930s. Aster Models (developed by Ruth Shaw and Charles Geyer) offers a class of statistical models designed for studying the fitness of plant and animal populations, by integrating the measurements of separate, sequential, non-normally distributed fitness components in novel ways. Their work generates important theoretical and practical results that do not require elaboration by molecular biology, and thus serves as a counterexample to the claims of philosophers whose 'pluralism' still harbors reductionist assumptions. PMID:21486663

  14. Nomenclature of Toso, Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule 3, and IgM FcR.

    PubMed

    Kubagawa, Hiromi; Carroll, Michael C; Jacob, Chaim O; Lang, Karl S; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Mak, Tak; McAndrews, Monica; Morse, Herbert C; Nolan, Garry P; Ohno, Hiroshi; Richter, Günther H; Seal, Ruth; Wang, Ji-Yang; Wiestner, Adrian; Coligan, John E

    2015-05-01

    Hiromi Kubagawa and John E. Coligan coordinated an online meeting to define an appropriate nomenclature for the cell surface glycoprotein presently designated by different names: Toso, Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule 3 (FAIM3), and IgM FcR (FcμR). FAIM3 and Faim3 are the currently approved symbols for the human and mouse genes, respectively, in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, Ensembl, and other databases. However, recent functional results reported by several groups of investigators strongly support a recommendation for renaming FAIM3/Faim3 as FCMR/Fcmr, a name better reflecting its physiological function as the FcR for IgM. Participants included 12 investigators involved in studying Toso/FAIM3(Faim3)/FμR, representatives from the Human Genome Nomenclature Committee (Ruth Seal) and the Mouse Genome Nomenclature Committee (Monica McAndrews), and an observer from the IgM research field (Michael Carroll). In this article, we provide a brief background of the key research on the Toso/FAIM3(Faim3)/FcμR proteins, focusing on the ligand specificity and functional activity, followed by a brief summary of discussion about adopting a single name for this molecule and its gene and a resulting recommendation for genome nomenclature committees. PMID:25888699

  15. Does host plant influence parasitism and parasitoid species composition in Lygus rugulipennis? A molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Gariepy, T D; Kuhlmann, U; Gillott, C; Erlandson, M

    2008-06-01

    Lygus Hahn plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae) are serious pests of a wide variety of economically important crops in North America. European Peristenus digoneutis Loan and P. relictus Ruthe (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are being considered for release in Canada as part of a classical biological control program for Lygus. The attractiveness of different host plants to European Peristenus has not been addressed, but may be an important consideration prior to parasitoid release. Lygus rugulipennis Poppius nymphs were collected in the Northern Temperate Atlantic (NTA) ecoregion on red clover (Trifolium pratense L.; Fabaceae) and chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.; Asteraceae), and in the Western European Broadleaf Forest (WEBF) ecoregion on red clover and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.; Fabaceae). Parasitism levels and parasitoid species were determined using a multiplex PCR assay for P. digoneutis, P. relictus, and P. pallipes Curtis. Mean parasitism levels in L. rugulipennis were 45-49% in the NTA ecoregion and 25-32% in the WEBF ecoregion. However, in neither ecoregion were parasitism levels and parasitoid species compositions significantly different in nymphs from different host plant species. Furthermore, multiparasitism was low despite the fact that P. digoneutis and P. relictus share the same host species. PMID:18439339

  16. Safety of Popular Herbal Supplements in Lactating Women.

    PubMed

    Amer, Marwa R; Cipriano, Gabriela C; Venci, Jineane V; Gandhi, Mona A

    2015-08-01

    The increasing popularity and use of dietary supplements has required health care professionals to become more knowledgeable of their properties, interactions, and adverse effects. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the safety of popular dietary supplements in breastfeeding mothers and the effects on the infants. Nine of the most popular herbal dietary supplements were identified based on the 2011 US market report of the top 10 selling botanicals and the most frequently received inquiries by the Ruth A. Lawrence Lactation Study Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Relevant publications were identified through June 2014 using PubMed and EMBASE; tertiary references, including the Drugs and Lactation Database and Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database, were also reviewed. These herbals include black cohosh, cranberry, echinacea, evening primrose, garlic, ginseng, melatonin, milk thistle, and St John's wort. Studies varied greatly with regard to study design, herbal intervention, and outcome measures. Findings suggested that dietary/herbal supplements have not been evaluated in high-quality clinical trials, and there is limited evidence supporting safety of use, particularly among lactating women. Therefore, it is essential for physicians to provide counseling for nursing mothers seeking information on dietary supplements, highlighting reliable safety profiles, inquiring about the potential benefits the patient is seeking, and assessing the patient's perception of this supplement during breastfeeding. More research and clinical trials are required in this area to guide the recommendations and expand our current knowledge of these products. PMID:25881578

  17. Health care law versus constitutional law.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the Supreme Court's ruling on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, is a landmark decision - both for constitutional law and for health care law and policy. Others will study its implications for constitutional limits on a range of federal powers beyond health care. This article considers to what extent the decision is also about health care law, properly conceived. Under one view, health care law is the subdiscipline that inquires how courts and government actors take account of the special features of medicine that make legal or policy issues especially problematic - rather than regarding health care delivery and finance more generically, like most any other economic or social enterprise. Viewed this way, the opinions from the Court's conservative justices are mainly about general constitutional law principles. In contrast, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dissenting opinion for the four more liberal justices is just as much about health care law as it is about constitutional law. Her opinion gives detailed attention to the unique features of health care finance and delivery in order to inform her analysis of constitutional precedents and principles. Thus, the Court's multiple opinions give a vivid depiction of the compelling contrasts between communal versus individualistic conceptions of caring for those in need, and between health care and health insurance as ordinary commodities versus ones that merit special economic, social, and legal status. PMID:23262771

  18. Seasonal use of red-cockaded woodpecker cavities by southern flying squirrels.

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Susan C.; Ruth, Deanna L.

    2004-12-31

    Loeb, Susan C., and Deanna L. Ruth. 2004. Seasonal use of red-cockaded woodpecker cavities by southern flying squirrels. In: Red-cockaded woodpecker; Road to Recovery. Proceedings of the 4th Red-cockaded woodpecker Symposium. Ralph Costa and Susan J. Daniels, eds. Savannah, Georgia. January, 2003. Chapter 8. Cavities, Cavity Trees, and Cavity Communities. Pp 501-502. Abstract: Southern flying squirrels can significantly impact red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success (Laves and Loeb 1999). Thus exclusion or removal of flying squirrels from red-cockaded woodpecker cavities and clusters may be warranted in small woodpecker populations (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2003). However, development of effective and efficient protocols for southern flying squirrel control requires an understanding of the seasonal dynamics of southern flying squirrel cavity use. Most studies of southern flying squirrel use of red-cockaded woodpecker cavities have been conducted during spring (e.g., Harlow and Lennartz 1983, Rudolph et al. 1990a, Loeb 1993) and no studies have examined the effects of long term flying squirrel control on subsequent cavity use. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) whether flying squirrel use of red-cockaded woodpecker cavities varies with season or cavity type, and (2) the long term effect of continuous squirrel removal.

  19. Improving Cancer Care Through Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Nursing research and nurse researchers have been an integral and significant part of the Oncology Nursing Society's (ONS's) history, as evidenced by the development of the Nursing Research Committee within a few years of ONS's establishment. Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, was the committee's first chairperson in 1979. This was followed by the creation of the Advanced Nursing Research Special Interest Group in 1989 under the leadership of Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN. ONS also began to recognize nurse researchers in 1994 by creating the annual ONS Distinguished Researcher Award to recognize the contributions of a member who has conducted or promoted research that has enhanced the science and practice of oncology nursing. The list of recipients and of their work is impressive and reflects the wide range of our practice areas (see http://bit.ly/1MTC5cp for the recipient list). In addition, the ONS Foundation began funding research in 1981 and has distributed more than $24 million in research grants, research fellowships, and other scholarships, lectures, public education projects, and career development awards (ONS Foundation, 2015). And, in 2006, the Putting Evidence Into Practice resource was unveiled, which provides evidence-based intervention reviews for the 20 most common problems experienced by patients with cancer and their caregivers (www.ons
.org/practice-resources/pep)
. PMID:26302272

  20. Dignity: not such a useless concept.

    PubMed

    Killmister, Suzy

    2010-03-01

    In her 2003 article in the British Medical Journal, Ruth Macklin provocatively declared dignity to be a useless concept: either a vague restatement of other more precise values, such as autonomy or respect for persons, or an empty slogan. A recent response to Macklin has challenged this claim. Doris Schroeder attempts to rescue dignity by positing four distinct concepts that fall under the one umbrella term. She argues that much of the confusion surrounding dignity is due to the lack of disambiguation among these four concepts, but that once we understand the different values in question dignity becomes a powerful tool in the fields of human rights and bioethics. It is the goal of this paper to build upon Schroeder's insights by reconnecting the multiple strands of dignity she identifies. It will be argued that the usefulness of dignity as a guiding principle in medical ethics can be much improved by identifying the single conceptual link that ties together the various values flying under its banner. That conceptual link is provided by understanding dignity as the capacity to live by one's standards and principles. PMID:20211996

  1. Verifax: Biometric instruments measuring neuromuscular disorders/performance impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Shrairman, Ruth; Landau, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    VeriFax, founded in 1990 by Dr. Ruth Shrairman and Mr. Alex Landau, began operations with the aim of developing a biometric tool for the verification of signatures from a distance. In the course of developing this VeriFax Autograph technology, two other related applications for the technologies under development at VeriFax became apparent. The first application was in the use of biometric measurements as clinical monitoring tools for physicians investigating neuromuscular diseases (embodied in VeriFax's Neuroskill technology). The second application was to evaluate persons with critical skills (e.g., airline pilots, bus drivers) for physical and mental performance impairments caused by stress, physiological disorders, alcohol, drug abuse, etc. (represented by VeriFax's Impairoscope prototype instrument). This last application raised the possibility of using a space-qualified Impairoscope variant to evaluate astronaut performance with respect to the impacts of stress, fatigue, excessive workload, build-up of toxic chemicals within the space habitat, etc. The three applications of VeriFax's patented technology are accomplished by application-specific modifications of the customized VeriFax software. Strong commercial market potentials exist for all three VeriFax technology applications, and market progress will be presented in more detail below.

  2. Self-Evaporation Phenornenon of Water Accornpanied by a Circulation Flow in a Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogoshi, Hidemasa; Aizawa, Kazuo

    Characteristics of the self-evaporation of hot water in a vertical vessel with internal baffles were investigated experimentally by using a visual hot model. The experiment apparatus was designed by modeling Ruths' varying pressure steam accumulator, and consisted of a vertical straight vessel (100mm in diameter and 1500mm in height) and internal baffles such as a straight pipe (60mm in diameter) and tapered tubes which were installed concentric to the vessel. Self-evaporation experiments were executed under vacuum pressure conditions. It was found that a permanent circulation of hot water was naturally induced in the vessel macroscopically, and nucleation took place within the upper part of the internal baffles near the water surface along this water circulation. Self-evaporation could go on steadily and the temperature uniformity in hot water layer could be improved remarkably in comparison with the case with no internal baffles. In this case, large portion of the self-evaporation of hot water resulted from the hydraulic pressure loss during the upward flow motion in the inner pipe.

  3. Systematics-insensitive Periodic Signal Search with K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Ruth; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Johnson, John A.

    2016-02-01

    From pulsating stars to transiting exoplanets, the search for periodic signals in K2 data, Kepler’s two-wheeled extension, is relevant to a long list of scientific goals. Systematics affecting K2 light curves due to the decreased spacecraft pointing precision inhibit the easy extraction of periodic signals from the data. We here develop a method for producing periodograms of K2 light curves that are insensitive to pointing-induced systematics; the Systematics-insensitive Periodogram (SIP). Traditional sine-fitting periodograms use a generative model to find the frequency of a sinusoid that best describes the data. We extend this principle by including systematic trends, based on a set of “eigen light curves,” following Foreman-Mackey et al., in our generative model as well as a sum of sine and cosine functions over a grid of frequencies. Using this method we are able to produce periodograms with vastly reduced systematic features. The quality of the resulting periodograms are such that we can recover acoustic oscillations in giant stars and measure stellar rotation periods without the need for any detrending. The algorithm is also applicable to the detection of other periodic phenomena such as variable stars, eclipsing binaries and short-period exoplanet candidates. The SIP code is available at https://github.com/RuthAngus/SIPK2.

  4. Use of NEXRAD to study shorebird migration in the Prairie Pothole region: A feasibility study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.; Randall, Lori

    2006-01-01

    An essential component of shorebird conservation is identifying, protecting, and managing high-priority stopover sites and migration habitats crucial to the long-term persistence of migrating shorebirds. Because of the tremendous variability in migrant shorebird occurrence patterns in the Prairie Pothole Region of the U.S. (Skagen 1997), it is labor- and cost-intensive to locate the majority of sites used heavily by shorebirds in any one migration period. Because WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar – 1988 Doppler) or NEXRAD (NEXt generation weather RADar) has been useful for locating migrating birds and revealing migration patterns and important roosting sites of some species (e.g., Diehl and others 2003, Gauthreaux and Belser 2003), we undertook a pilot field study to determine wheTHER it also might be feasible to use NEXRAD for locating important stopover sites used by migrating shorebirds in the prairie potholes landscape. Coordinated efforts to advance the applicability of radar technology to bird conservation are underway (Ruth and others 2005).

  5. Inverse modeling of GOSAT-retrieved ratios of total column CH4 and CO2 for 2009 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sudhanshu; Houweling, Sander; Krol, Maarten; Aben, Ilse; Chevallier, Frédéric; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Gatti, Luciana V.; Gloor, Emanuel; Miller, John B.; Detmers, Rob; Machida, Toshinobu; Röckmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    ratio method stays closer to the a priori CH4 flux in these regions, because it is capable of simultaneously adjusting the CO2 fluxes. Over tropical South America, comparison to independent measurements shows that CO2 fields derived from the ratio method are less realistic than those used in the proxy method. However, the CH4 fluxes are more realistic, because the impact of unaccounted systematic uncertainties is more evenly distributed between CO2 and CH4. The ratio inversion estimates an enhanced CO2 release from tropical South America during the dry season of 2010, which is in accordance with the findings of Gatti et al. (2014) and Van der Laan et al. (2015). The performance of the ratio method is encouraging, because despite the added nonlinearity due to the assimilation of Xratio and the significant increase in the degree of freedom by optimizing CO2 fluxes, still consistent results are obtained with respect to other CH4 inversions.

  6. Collaborative double robust targeted maximum likelihood estimation.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Mark J; Gruber, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative double robust targeted maximum likelihood estimators represent a fundamental further advance over standard targeted maximum likelihood estimators of a pathwise differentiable parameter of a data generating distribution in a semiparametric model, introduced in van der Laan, Rubin (2006). The targeted maximum likelihood approach involves fluctuating an initial estimate of a relevant factor (Q) of the density of the observed data, in order to make a bias/variance tradeoff targeted towards the parameter of interest. The fluctuation involves estimation of a nuisance parameter portion of the likelihood, g. TMLE has been shown to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed (CAN) under regularity conditions, when either one of these two factors of the likelihood of the data is correctly specified, and it is semiparametric efficient if both are correctly specified. In this article we provide a template for applying collaborative targeted maximum likelihood estimation (C-TMLE) to the estimation of pathwise differentiable parameters in semi-parametric models. The procedure creates a sequence of candidate targeted maximum likelihood estimators based on an initial estimate for Q coupled with a succession of increasingly non-parametric estimates for g. In a departure from current state of the art nuisance parameter estimation, C-TMLE estimates of g are constructed based on a loss function for the targeted maximum likelihood estimator of the relevant factor Q that uses the nuisance parameter to carry out the fluctuation, instead of a loss function for the nuisance parameter itself. Likelihood-based cross-validation is used to select the best estimator among all candidate TMLE estimators of Q(0) in this sequence. A penalized-likelihood loss function for Q is suggested when the parameter of interest is borderline-identifiable. We present theoretical results for "collaborative double robustness," demonstrating that the collaborative targeted maximum

  7. Collaborative Double Robust Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation*

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Mark J.; Gruber, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative double robust targeted maximum likelihood estimators represent a fundamental further advance over standard targeted maximum likelihood estimators of a pathwise differentiable parameter of a data generating distribution in a semiparametric model, introduced in van der Laan, Rubin (2006). The targeted maximum likelihood approach involves fluctuating an initial estimate of a relevant factor (Q) of the density of the observed data, in order to make a bias/variance tradeoff targeted towards the parameter of interest. The fluctuation involves estimation of a nuisance parameter portion of the likelihood, g. TMLE has been shown to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed (CAN) under regularity conditions, when either one of these two factors of the likelihood of the data is correctly specified, and it is semiparametric efficient if both are correctly specified. In this article we provide a template for applying collaborative targeted maximum likelihood estimation (C-TMLE) to the estimation of pathwise differentiable parameters in semi-parametric models. The procedure creates a sequence of candidate targeted maximum likelihood estimators based on an initial estimate for Q coupled with a succession of increasingly non-parametric estimates for g. In a departure from current state of the art nuisance parameter estimation, C-TMLE estimates of g are constructed based on a loss function for the targeted maximum likelihood estimator of the relevant factor Q that uses the nuisance parameter to carry out the fluctuation, instead of a loss function for the nuisance parameter itself. Likelihood-based cross-validation is used to select the best estimator among all candidate TMLE estimators of Q0 in this sequence. A penalized-likelihood loss function for Q is suggested when the parameter of interest is borderline-identifiable. We present theoretical results for “collaborative double robustness,” demonstrating that the collaborative targeted maximum

  8. Evidence for the formation of boninitic melt in the base of the Salahi mantle section, the northern Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Y.; Takazawa, E.

    2013-12-01

    The boninites in the Oman ophiolite occur as lavas and dikes of the Alley volcanic sequence (Ishikawa et al., 2002). Moreover, Yamazaki and Miyashita (2008) reported about boninitic dike swarms in the Fizh crustal section. The boninitic melt generation requires hydrous melting of refractory mantle peridotite under an extremely high temperature and low pressure condition. This condition is generally explained by the addition of slab-derived fluids into a hot young oceanic lithosphere, which previously experienced MORB melt extraction. In this study, we report an ultramafic complex mainly composed of dunite which is in equilibrium with chemical composition of boninites in the southwestern part of the Salahi mantle section in the northern Oman ophiolite. Based on the study by Nomoto and Takazawa (2013) the complex consists mainly of massive dunite associated with minor amounts of harzburgite, pyroxenites and wehrlite. We use spinel Cr# (=Cr/[Cr+Al] atomic ratio) as an indicator of extent of melt extraction in harzburgites. For dunites spinel Cr# varies as a function of extent of reaction and of melt composition (Dick and Bullen, 1984; Arai, 1994; Ozawa, 2008). The spinels in the dunites from the complex have Cr# greater than 0.7 indicating highly refractory signature. The range of spinel Cr# is similar to those of spinels in boninites reported worldwide (Umino, 1986; van der Laan et al., 1992; Sobolev and Danyushevsky, 1994; Ishikawa et al., 2002). The complex might be a section of dunite channel that formed by flux melting of harzburgites as a result of infiltration of a voluminous fluid from the basal thrust. We determined the abundances of rare earth elements (REE) in the peridotite clinopyroxenes (cpxs) by LA-ICP-MS to estimate the compositions of the melts in equilibrium with these clinopyroxenes. The chondrite-normalized patterns for clinopyroxenes in the dunites are characterized by enrichments in light REE (LREE) relative to those of the harzburgite

  9. PREFACE: VII Brazilian Congress on Metrology (Metrologia 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Félix, Rodrigo; Bernardes, Americo; Valente de Oliveira, José Carlos; Mauro Granjeiro, José; Epsztejn, Ruth; Ihlenfeld, Waldemar; Smarçaro da Cunha, Valnei

    2015-01-01

    ) Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology jcoliveira@inmetro.gov.br José Mauro Granjeiro (Editor on Biotechnology) Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology jmgranjeiro@inmetro.gov.br Ruth Epsztejn (Editor on Conformity Assessment) Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology repsztejn@inmetro.gov.br Waldemar Ihlenfeld (Editor on Electrical Metrology) Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology wgihlenfeld-pronametro@inmetro.gov.br Valnei Smarçaro da Cunha (Editor on Chemistry Metrology) Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology vscunha@inmetro.gov.br Technical and Scientific Committee for Metrologia 2013 Ado Jório (UFMG) Carlos Achete (UFRJ, Inmetro) Flávio Vasconcelos (UFMG) Giorgio Moscati (USP) Hans Peter Grieneisen (Inmetro) Humberto Brandi (Inmetro) José Carlos Valente de Oliveira (Inmetro) José Guilherme Pereira Peixoto (IRD) José Mauro Granjeiro (Inmetro) Luiz Claudio Moreira Paschoal (Petrobras) Luis Fernado Rust (Inmetro) Luiz Silva Mello (PUC RJ) Marcos Nogueira Eberlin (Unicamp) Oleksii Kuznetsov (Inmetro) Regis Landim (Inmetro) Ricardo Carvalho (ON) Rodrigo Costa-Felix (Inmetro) Romeu José Daroda (Inmetro) Ruth Epsztejn (Inmetro) Valnei Smarçaro da Cunha (Inmetro) Valter Aibe (Inmetro) Waldemar Guilherme Kürten Ihlenfeld (PTB) Wanderley de Souza (UFRJ, Inmetro)

  10. [AIDS in Tanzania].

    PubMed

    Barstad, S

    1993-04-20

    The World Health Organization has announced that within 3 years 10% of Tanzania's population of 26 million will be infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). But there is some faint hope in the research of Tanzanian traditional medicine. An almost 90-year-man, Waziri Mrisho, is credited with having treated AIDS patients successfully with herbs that strengthen the immune system. Margaret Nakamya was stricken by the symptoms of AIDs in March 1990. She was referred to Waziri and started using his herbs. 3 years later she weighs 49 kg compared to 40 kg before. The old man's son set up a little factory where he pulverizes herbs and sells them at the price he can command The 3 types of trees that the herbal medicine is taken from grow in the wild, but some have also been planted around the factory. Even if these herbs are effective, it will take years before the AIDS epidemic is over, when people have changed their lifestyles. The means of communication (TV, cinema, radio, telephone) are missing or inadequate. In the Kagera region, with 1.2 million inhabitants, 25% of pregnant women are HIV-infected and 65,000 children lost their parents to AIDS. There are 2000 children in Dar Es Salaam living in the streets. The Anglican St. Albans Church runs a center for street kids where they get meals 3 times a week. The nurse Ruth Nesje enlisted a Norwegian physician and homeopath in a research project involving 30 AIDS patients in Norway. The University in Bergen will do in vitro testing. One group of patients will receive both AZT and the herbs, another group will get only AZT, and the 3rd group will obtain only the herbs. The Norwegian Nursing Association, NORAD, and DANIDA also plan various projects in the Tanga region. PMID:8499187

  11. Environmental Stewardship at the Savannah River Site: Generations of Success - 13212

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, Brian B.; Bergren, Christopher L.; Gaughan, Thomas F.; Aylward, Robert S.; Guevara, Karen C.; Whitaker, Wade C.; Hennessey, Brian T.; Mills, Gary L.; Blake, John I.

    2013-07-01

    Approximately sixty years ago, the Savannah River Site (SRS) was built to produce nuclear materials. SRS production operations impacted air, soil, groundwater, ecology, and the local environment. Throughout its history, SRS has addressed these contamination issues directly and has maintained a commitment to environmental stewardship. The Site boasts many environmental firsts. Notably, SRS was the first major Department of Energy (DOE) facility to perform a baseline ecological assessment. This pioneering effort, by Ruth Patrick and the Philadelphia Academy of Sciences, was performed during SRS planning and construction in the early 1950's. This unique early generation of work set the stage for subsequent efforts. Since that time, the scientists and engineers at SRS pro-actively identified environmental problems and developed and implemented effective and efficient environmental management and remediation solutions. This second generation, spanning the 1980's through the 2000's, is exemplified by numerous large and small cleanup actions to address metals and radionuclides, solvents and hydrocarbons, facility and area decommissioning, and ecological restoration. Recently, a third generation of environmental management was initiated as part of Enterprise SRS. This initiative to 'Develop and Deploy Next Generation Cleanup Technologies' formalizes and organizes the major technology matching, development, and implementation processes associated with historical SRS cleanup success as a resource to support future environmental management missions throughout DOE. The four elements of the current, third generation, effort relate to: 1) transition from active to passive cleanup, 2) in situ decommissioning of large nuclear facilities, 3) new long term monitoring paradigms, and 4) a major case study related to support for recovery and restoration of the Japanese Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant and surrounding environment. (authors)

  12. Report on the 5‘th scientific meeting of the “Verein zur Förderung des Wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses in der Neurologie” (NEUROWIND e.V.) held in Motzen, Germany, Oct. 25th – Oct. 27th, 2013

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    From october 25th - 27th 2013, the 5th NEUROWIND e.V. meeting was held in Motzen, Brandenburg, Germany. This year more than 60 doctoral students and postdocs from over 25 different groups working in German university hospitals or research institutes attended the meeting to discuss their latest findings in the fields of neuroimmunology, neurodegeneration and neurovascular research. All participants appreciated the stimulating environment in Motzen, Brandenburg, and people took the opportunity for scientific exchange, discussion about ongoing projects and already started further collaborations. Like in the previous years, the symposium was regarded as a very well organized platform to support research of young investigators in Germany. According to the major aim of NEUROWIND e.V. to support younger researchers in Germany the 3rd NEUROWIND YOUNG SCIENTIST AWARD for experimental neurology was awarded to Ruth Stassart working in the group of Klaus Armin Nave and Wolfgang Brück (MPI Göttingen and Department of Neuropathology, Göttingen Germany). The successful work was published in Nature Neuroscience entitled “A role for Swann cell-derived neuregulin-1 in remyelination”. This outstanding paper deals with the function of Schwann cell neuregulin as an endogenous factor for myelin repair. The award is endowed with 20.000 Euro sponsored by Merck Serono GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany (unrestricted educational grant). This year’s keynote lecture was given by Albert Ludolph, Head of the Department of Neurology at the University Clinic of Ulm. Dr. Ludolph highlighted the particular role of individual scientists for the development of research concepts in Alzheimer´s disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). PMID:24330587

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-10-01

    CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

  14. New cation-exchange material based on a sulfonated 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene monomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphan, O.; Schottland, P.; Le Gall, P.-Y.; Chevrot, C.

    1998-06-01

    The electrochemical oxidation, in aqueous medium, of a 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene monomer functionalized by a sulfonate group exhibiting cation-exchange properties, allows the synthesis of a new type of water-soluble material. In order to synthesize in water, by oxidative electropolymerization, polymer films of controlled thickness containing attached sulfonate groups, we have investigated the polymerization of the functionalized monomer in the presence of the unsubstituted one without supporting electrolyte. Using an equimolar mixture (0.01 mol/l) of both monomers, copolymers exhibiting cation exchange abilities have been synthesized. As an example, th easy incorporation of hexaamine-ruthenium(III) into one of these copolymers is briefly reported. L'oxydation électrochimique en milieu aqueux d'un monomère de type 3,4- éthylènedioxythiophène fonctionnalisé par un groupement sulfonate permet d'envisager la synthèse d'un nouveau type de polymère hydrosoluble. Afin d'obtenir électrochimiquement en milieu aqueux, un film de polymère d'épaisseur contrôlée contenant des groupements sulfonates, nous avons evisagé de polymériser ce monomère en présence de son homologue non substitué. En partant d'un mélange équimolaire (0.01 mol/l) des deux monomères et en l'absence d'électrolyte support, nous avons synthétisé un matériau possédant des propriétés d'échange de cations. A titre d'exemple, nous présentons brièvement l'incorporation d'un complexe hexaaminé du ruthénium(III) dans un de ces copolymères.

  15. Plasma and Liver Lipid Profiles in Rats Exposed to Chronic Hypobaric Hypoxia: Changes in Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Julio; Naveas, Nelson; Pulido, Ruth; De la Cruz, Juan José; Mamani, Maribel; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Siques, Patricia, Julio Brito, Nelson Naveas, Ruth Pulido, Juan José De la Cruz, Maribel Mamani, and Fabiola León-Velarde. Plasma and liver lipid profiles in rats exposed to chronic hypobaric hypoxia: Changes in metabolic pathways. High Alt Med Biol 15:388–395, 2014.—Lipid metabolism under chronic hypoxia (CH) has not received equal attention as intermittent hypoxia (IH). To determine the CH-induced changes in plasma and liver, as well as the mRNA and protein expression of two key enzymes in the triglyceride and cholesterol biosynthesis pathways, SREBP-1 (HMG-CoA reductase) and SREBP-2 (SCD-1), we exposed adult male Wistar rats to CH (4600 m; n=15) for 30 days compared to normoxic rats (n=15). The CH rats exhibited weight loss (p<0.001), higher hematocrit (%), and higher hemoglobin (g/dL) (p<0.01). In the plasma of CH rats, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol increased at day 15. VLDL-cholesterol and triglycerides (p<0.01) greatly increased (35%), while HDL-cholesterol decreased (p<0.01). Triglycerides and VLDL-cholesterol remained elevated by 28% at day 30 (p<0.01). Hepatic triglycerides increased two-fold, while total cholesterol increased by 51% (p<0.001; p<0.05). Upregulation of SCD-1 mRNA and protein was observed in the CH rats (p<0.01); however, no differences were observed in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA or protein expression in both groups. In conclusion, CH, like IH, alters lipid profiles by increasing triglycerides in the plasma and liver and upregulating triglyceride biosynthesis without affecting the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. Additional involved mechanisms require further study because of the importance of lipids in cardiovascular risk. PMID:25185022

  16. Hemoglobin and the origins of the concept of allosterism.

    PubMed

    Edsall, J T

    1980-02-01

    Bohr, Hasselbalch, and Krogh (1904) observed both what we now call the cooperative homotropic character of the binding of oxygen by hemoglobin and the heterotropic control exerted by CO2 in diminishing the oxygen affinity. Ten years later Christiansen, Douglas, and Haldane discovered the converse effect of oxygenation in diminishing CO2 uptake. It was then generally believed that hemoglobin contains only a single heme: A. V. Hill, to explain cooperative phenomena, postulated reversible aggregation of these monomer units (1910). After 1924, Adair and Svedberg independently showed that the molecule contained four hemes, and Adair's intermediate compound hypothesis, with four binding constants suitably chosen, could formally explain cooperative binding. Pauling proposed a simple model, involving only two constants, that fitted available data well. Haurowitz's demonstration that crystal structure changed on oxygenation (1938) gave the first evidence clearly pointing to a conformation change; in 1951 Wyman and Allen elaborated the idea in thermodynamic terms, and Perutz's crystallographic studies later revealed in molecular detail the nature of the change associated with ligand binding. The important heterotropic interactions that influence the binding of oxygen, necessarily with reciprocal interactions between oxygen binding and the uptake of the heterotropic ligands, are of three kinds: 1) proton binding by the "Bohr groups," 2) direct binding of CO2 as carbamate, and 3) binding of organic phosphate anions, such as diphosphoglycerate. The last of these, although fully as important as the first two, was not discovered for about half a century after the early work. Some major discoverers in the unraveling of these complicated relations were D. D. Van Slyke, F. J. W. Roughton, Linus Pauling, J. Wyman, and later Ruth and Reinhold Benesch, L. Rossi-Bernardi, and J. V. Kilmartin. All these, and numerous others, contributed to our understanding of both homogropic and

  17. The 7th International Workshop on Chiral Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 7th International Workshop Chiral Dynamics: Theory and Experiment (CD12) took place at Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia, USA, from August 6 to 10, 2012. Following in the tradition of this triennial series of Conferences, it attracted theorists and experimentalists, who were brought together to highlight the recent progress in the field of low energy QCD, and to discuss and explore the direction for future development. The conference consisted of plenary talks and three working groups. We would like to thank the working group organizers for their dedicated effort, namely: Goldstone Bosons: Mario Antonelli, Liping Gan, Jorge Portoles and Urs Wenger; Hadron Structure: Alessandro Bacchetta, Bastian Kubis, Kostas Orginos and Karl Slifer and Few Body Physics: Andreas Nogga, Assumpta Parreno, Michele Viviani and Henry Weller. We would like to express our special thanks to our co-organizers, Patricia Solvignon, Harald Griesshammer, Rocco Schiavilla, Dinko Pocanic, Robert Edwards, and Alexandre Deur for their hard work and advice. Last but not least, we thank the International Advisory Committee for their very useful inputs to the CD12 program. The organizers thank the excellent logistic and administrative support provided by the Jefferson Lab Conference Staff, Ruth Bizot, Cynthia Lockwood, Stephanie Vermeire, Marti Hightower and MeLaina Evans, and the Conference Secretary Mary Fox, which was instrumental for the success of the organization of CD12. We thank Joanna Griffin for the poster design. CD12 was primarily sponsored by Jefferson Lab, along with generous supports from Old Dominion University and the European Physics Journal. The CD12 homepage is located at http://www.jlab.org/conference/CD12 The upcoming Chiral Dynamics Workshop will take place in Pisa, Italy, in 2015. We thank Laura Marcucci and Michele Viviani for graciously taking the baton from us. Jose Goity and Jianping Chen

  18. Multiverse: Increasing Diversity in Earth and Space Science Through Multicultural Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Raftery, C. L.; Mendez, B.; Paglierani, R.; Ali, N. A.; Zevin, D.; Frappier, R.; Hauck, K.; Shackelford, R. L., III; Yan, D.; Thrall, L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiverse at the University of California, Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory provides earth and space science educational opportunities and resources for a variety of audiences, especially for those who are underrepresented in the sciences. By way of carefully crafted space and earth science educational opportunities and resources, we seek to connect with people's sense of wonder and facilitate making personal ties to science and the learning process in order to, ultimately, bring the richness of diversity to science and make science discovery accessible for all. Our audiences include teachers, students, education and outreach professionals, and the public. We partner with NASA, the National Science Foundation, scientists, teachers, science center and museum educators, park interpreters, and others with expertise in reaching particular audiences. With these partners, we develop resources and communities of practice, offer educator workshops, and run events for the public. We will will present on our pedagogical techniques, our metrics for success, and our evaluation findings of our education and outreach projects that help us towards reaching our vision: We envision a world filled with science literate societies capable of thriving with today's technology, while maintaining a sustainable balance with the natural world; a world where people develop and sustain the ability to think critically using observation and evidence and participate authentically in scientific endeavors; a world where people see themselves and their culture within the scientific enterprise, and understand science within the context that we are all under one sky and on one Earth. Photo Caption: Multiverse Team Members at our Space Sciences Laboratory from left to right: Leitha Thrall, Daniel Zevin, Bryan Mendez, Nancy Ali, Igor Ruderman, Laura Peticolas, Ruth Paglierani, Renee Frappier, Rikki Shackelford, Claire Raftery, Karin Hauck, and Darlene Yan.

  19. An Introduction to Rotorcraft Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Robert T. N.; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA is the NASA lead Center for rotorcraft research. Rotorcraft research at Ames includes system analysis and configuration optimization, aeromechanics, and flight control and cockpit integration. Research in other areas such as composite structure and material, and rotor acoustics are conducted mainly at Langley Research Center, and rotorcraft propulsion and drivetrain are conducted at Lewis Research Center. This seminar will discuss Ames' rotorcraft research goals and some sample research projects and results. The talk will also briefly describe the newly fanned Army/NASA Rotorcraft Division, which combines the resources of rotorcraft branches in NASA Ames Aeronautics Directorate with Army's Aeroflightdynamics Directorate to better achieve the missions of the two previous rotorcraft research organizations at Ames. Rotorcraft research activities at NASA Ames are funded by two main program categories: Research and Technology (RUTH Base program and the Short Haul (Civil Tiltrotor) program. Work in the R&T program is carried out by the research staff in the Army/NASA Rotorcraft Division, and the work on SH(CT) program is carried out jointly by the SH(CT) program office and the Army/NASA Rotorcraft Division. Sample research projects and results in REST base program, such as conceptual assessment of several high-speed rotorcraft, rotorcraft CFD, individual blade control for reduction of external noise and vibration, noise-abatement flight procedures, engine inoperative procedures, handling qualities, and advanced flight control laws are broadly reviewed. High-speed rotorcraft research related to SH(CT) technology development conducted at Ames in the areas of low-noise proprotor, and low-noise terminal-area operations is also discussed.

  20. America's energy famine: its cause and cure

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    In this book Ruth Sheldon Knowles, an internationally recognized petroleum specialist, clarifies the domestic and foreign issues which underlie the current oil famine and spells out the hard choices the American public faces on energy priorities in the near future. She explains how we came to be so dependent on foreign, including Arab, oil and discusses the corporate, national, and international policies that lie behind our current energy crisis. Although the decisions are not simple, Ms. Knowles firmly believes that self-sufficiency is not a dim hope but a clear possibility, as alternate sources of energy are developed and discovered. But she makes equally clear that, until the end of this century, the economy of the US requires an adequate supply of oil and gas and that such a supply cannot be achieved unless further oil discovery is encouraged. Geologists estimate that, with present technology, as much oil and gas remains to be discovered in the US both on- and offshore, as has been found in the last hundred years. Its discovery depends upon economic incentive and access to these resources, since half of our energy potential lies under federal and state lands. The immediate development of coal reserves, nuclear technology, and synthetic fuels involves controversial public policy. This book details the way new technology can reconcile essential energy resource development with the maintenance and improvement of the quality of our environment. It examines the roles of conservation and of solar energy, the timetable for America's energy self-sufficiency, and the politics and economics of today's energy problems.

  1. Where are you sucking from? Using Stable Isotopes to understand Host Specificity in two Hemiparasitic plants above the tree line in Northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias Sevde, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    By Alejandro Macias, Erik Hobbie, Ruth Varner, Kaitlyn Steele Hemiparasites are known to suck nutrients from nearby plants but their host specificity is not well understood. Hemiparasites are ecosystem engineers, limiting surrounding plant's growth, and decreasing local biodiversity. To better understand this phenomenon, the host specificities of two hemiparasitic angiosperms, Bartsia alpina , and Pedicularis lapponica were studied above the tree line along an elevational gradient in Sweden. B. alpina specialized in wetter environments, as indicated by their higher δ13C signature, and their growth among Salixsp.Betula nana, Bistorta vivipara, Viola biflora, Geranium sp., and Trollious europaeus. P. lapponica was common in drier, less species rich environments, known as heaths, where B. nana, Empetrum negrum, Phyllodoce coeruela, Vaccinium myrtillus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea are the most common species. P. lapponica had higher foliage δ13C due to its better water-use efficiency in a dry environment. Field survey data and δN15 values of both the foliage of the parasitic plants and their potential hosts were used to determine host specificity. Since the δN15 value of the hemiparasitic plant and its host are similar due to parasitism, it was determined that P. lapponica had a preference for plants with an ericoid mycorrhizal association, such as Vaccinium sp, and E. negrum, but not for the common P. coeruela. This does not support the idea found in the literature that P. lapponica has a preference for grasses. B. alpina was less host specific, associating with non-mycorrhizal, ericoid, and ectomycorhizal plants, such as Carex sp, Vaccinium sp., and S. lapponum. The ectomycorrhizal species, Salix sp., and B. nana, were both potential hosts for B. alpina and P. lapponica due to their presence among them. However, the isotopic data revealed that B. alpina had a preference for Salix sp., and P. lapponica had a preference for B. nana.

  2. The June surprises: balls, strikes, and the fog of war.

    PubMed

    Fried, Charles

    2013-04-01

    At first, few constitutional experts took seriously the argument that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act exceeded Congress's power under the commerce clause. The highly political opinions of two federal district judges - carefully chosen by challenging plaintiffs - of no particular distinction did not shake that confidence that the act was constitutional. This disdain for the challengers' arguments was only confirmed when the act was upheld by two highly respected conservative court of appeals judges in two separate circuits. But after the hostile, even mocking questioning of the government's advocate in the Supreme Court by the five Republican-appointed justices, the expectation was that the act would indeed be struck down on that ground. So it came as no surprise when the five opined the act did indeed exceed Congress's commerce clause power. But it came as a great surprise when Chief Justice John Roberts, joined by the four Democrat-appointed justices, ruled that the act could be sustained as an exercise of Congress's taxing power - a ground urged by the government almost as an afterthought. It was further surprising, even shocking, that Justices Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel Alito not only wrote a joint opinion on the commerce clause virtually identical to that of their chief, but that in writing it they did not refer to or even acknowledge his opinion. Finally surprising was the fact that Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer joined the chief in holding that aspects of the act's Medicaid expansion were unconstitutional. This essay ponders and tries to unravel some of these puzzles. PMID:23262769

  3. Assessing the use of HIV surveillance data to help gauge patient retention-in-care

    PubMed Central

    Lubelchek, Ronald J.; Finnegan, Katelynne J.; Hotton, Anna L.; Hazen, Ronald; Murphy, Patricia; Prachand, Nikhil G.; Benbow, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Background Improved retention-in-care may enhance health outcomes for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). While laboratory surveillance data may be used to gauge retention, no previous reports have compared surveillance lab vs. clinic visit-based measures of retention-in-care. We compared lab surveillance vs. clinic visit-based approaches for identifying retention status for PLWHA. Methods We examined 2011 patient visit data from the Ruth M. Rothstein CORE Center, Cook County's HIV clinic. We defined retained patients as those with visits every 6 months over 2 years and matched patients classified via visit data against HIV surveillance labs reported to the Chicago Department of Health. We determined the sensitivity, specificity and receiver operator characteristics of varying lab surveillance vs. clinic visit measures of retention. Results Of patients classified via clinic visit data, 91% of 1,714 in-care vs. 22% of 200 out-of-care patients met our most stringent surveillance based retention definition – having ≥ 2 viral load/CD4s performed 90 days apart reported by the same laboratory in 2011. Of surveillance lab-based definitions for retention, having ≥ 2 HIV viral load and/or CD4 values at least 3 months apart reported from the same facility possessed the best receiver operator parameters and the receiver operator characteristics curve comparing several surveillance lab vs. clinic-visit based retention measures had an area under the curve of 0.95. Discussion Our findings demonstrate that surveillance laboratory data can be used to assess retention-in-care for PLWHA. These data suggest that bi-directional data sharing between public health entities and care providers could advance re-engagement efforts. PMID:25867775

  4. [Discussion of actual legal minimum requirements for feeder space and perch length in laying hen husbandry in the light of the body widths measured in Lohmann Selected Leghorn and Lohmann Brown laying hens].

    PubMed

    Briese, Andreas; Spindler, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Legal requirements on space and dimensions regarding furnished cages and alternative systems in laying hen husbandry are subject of constant discussion. Further knowledge about basic measures of the hens might help to come to reasonable results in the future. Digital images of Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) and Lohmann Brown (LB) laying hens, housed at the Lehr- und Forschungsgut Ruthe, University for Veterinary Medicine Hanover, Foundation, in Big Dutchman Eurovent laying hen cages, were made at three stages (19th, 36th and 58th week) of production. All hens had been taken out of their cages by night and set on a perch in a special cage used to photograph the hens frontally under controlled conditions. Body widths were calculated by a python application Cdisto.py0 2009 Andreas Briese) to mark and measure the body width in the digital images of a total of 156 hens. Mean body widths of 133.77 mm in Lohmann-LSL hens (SD = 9.71; N = 64; mean weight: 1.73 kg) and of 152.55 mm in Lohmann-LB hens (SD = 10.31; N = 92; mean weight: 1.93 kg) respectively were found. Even slight changes in body weights had no effect on the body width. Nonetheless the differences between both hybrids were always statistically significant (Mann-Whitney p < 0,001). Using these preliminary results on body width in a mathematical model simultanious feeding behaviour becomes only possible if the number of animals is reduced by 10.3% to 89.7% in LSL and by 21.3% to 78.7% in LB breeds in relation to a calculated maximum on base of the minimum space requirements for furnished cages in the EU-Dir 74/1999/EC. PMID:23540200

  5. Looking for Life in Extreme Environments on Earth and Beyond: Professional Development Workshop for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droppo, R.; Pratt, L.; Suchecki, P. C.

    2010-08-01

    The Looking for Life in Extreme Environments workshop held at Indiana University Bloomington in July of 2009 was the first in a series of workshops for high-school teachers that are currently in development. The workshops' modules are based on the research of faculty members in the Departments of Geological Sciences, Biology, and Astronomy, the School of Education, and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University Bloomington; the modules use lessons from Exploring Deep-Subsurface Life. Earth Analogues for Possible Life on Mars: Lessons and Activities, curricular materials that were produced and edited by Lisa Pratt and Ruth Droppo and published by NASA in 2008. Exploring Deep-Subsurface Life is a workbook, a DVD (with closed-captioning), and a CD with the lessons in digital text format for adaptation to classroom needs and printing. Each lesson includes the National Education Standards that apply to the materials. The workbook's lessons are written with three considerations: Life Domains, Cellular Metabolism, and Extreme Environments and Microbes. Students are challenged to build, draw, measure, discuss, and participate in laboratory processes and experiments that help them understand and describe microbes and their environments. In the Capstone, the students write a grant proposal based on the three lessons' analogues. The DVD is collection of videotaped interviews with scientists in laboratories at Michigan State, Princeton, and Indiana University, who are working on water and gas samples they collected from deep gold mines in South Africa and the Canadian Arctic. The interview materials and some animated graphics are compiled into four video pieces that support and compliment the accompanying workbook lessons and activities, and offer students insight into the excitement of scientific discovery.

  6. Student performance in computer modeling and problem solving in a modern introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlmyer, Matthew Adam

    Matter & Interactions, an innovative introductory physics curriculum developed by Ruth Chabay and Bruce Sherwood, emphasizes computer modeling and fundamental physical principles. Two think-aloud protocol studies were conducted to investigate the performance of students from this curriculum in solving physics problems that require computer modeling. Experiment 1 examined whether Matter & Interactions students would, given the choice, use computer modeling to solve difficult problems that required predicting motion, and how their solution approaches differed from those of students from a traditional introductory physics course. Though they did not overwhelmingly choose computer modeling, some M&I students did write computer models successfully or apply the iterative algorithm by hand. The solution approaches of M&I students and traditional course students differed qualitatively in their use of the momentum principle and pre-derived special case formulas. In experiment 2, Matter & Interactions students were observed while they wrote programs in the VPython language in order to examine their difficulties with computer modeling. Areas of difficulty included determining initial conditions, distinguishing between simulated time and the time step, and updating momentum and position. Especially troublesome for students was the multistep procedure for calculating a force that changes with time. Students' understanding of the structure of a computer model improved by the end of the semester as shown by their performance on a line sorting task. Students with fewer difficulties proceeded through the computer model in a more linear, straightforward fashion. Instruction was revised based on initial findings from the first phase of the experiment. Students in the second phase of the experiment, who had used the revised instruction, had fewer difficulties on the same tasks, though other factors may have been involved in the improvement.

  7. Abuse and Resilience in Relation to HAART Medication Adherence and HIV Viral Load Among Women with HIV in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mardge; Weber, Kathleen; Cruise, Ruth; Kelso, Gwendolyn

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Abuse is highly prevalent among HIV+ women, leading to behaviors, including lower adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) that result in poor health outcomes. Resilience (functioning competently despite adversity) may buffer the negative effects of abuse. This study investigated how resilience interacted with abuse history in relation to HAART adherence, HIV viral load (VL), and CD4+ cell count among a convenience sample of 138 HIV+ women from the Ruth M. Rothstein CORE Center/Cook County Health and Hospital Systems site of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Resilience was measured by the 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). HAART adherence (≥95% vs. <95% self reported usage of prescribed medication) and current or prior sexual, physical, or emotional/domestic abuse, were reported during structured interviews. HIV viral load (≥20 vs. <20 copies/mL) and CD4+ count (200 vs. <200 cells/mm) were measured with blood specimens. Multiple logistic regressions, controlling for age, race, income, enrollment wave, substance use, and depressive symptoms, indicated that each unit increase in resilience was significantly associated with an increase in the odds of having ≥95% HAART adherence and a decrease in the odds of having a detectable viral load. Resilience-Abuse interactions showed that only among HIV+ women with sexual abuse or multiple abuses did resilience significantly relate to an increase in the odds of ≥95% HAART adherence. Interventions to improve coping strategies that promote resilience among HIV+ women may be beneficial for achieving higher HAART adherence and viral suppression. PMID:24568654

  8. Who Pioneered the Use of Antipsychotics in North America?

    PubMed Central

    Stip, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Neuroleptics were introduced into North America 60 years ago. The credit for this advance is generally accorded to Heinz Lehmann. I sought to explore whether Lehmann really was the first North American psychiatrist to study the effects of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and to provide a more balanced view of its application in a clinical context. Method: I searched for historical documents and published articles in several libraries and interviewed psychiatrists active from 1952–1970. Results: The first article in English was published in the July volume of the Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry in 1954 (n = 71). Another article, written in French by Roland Saucier and published in a journal called Le Saguenay Médical, also described the effects of CPZ on a Canadian psychiatric population in August 1954 (n > 200). However, the first prescription for CPZ was written by Roland Saucier, who brought the product back from Paris after a fellowship there. Ruth Kajander, in Ontario, was also one of the first prescribers of this drug, following her study of its use in anesthesia and a publication in the proceedings of a symposium. Conclusion: The contents of the 2 naturalistic studies were compared. Lehmann’s study started 1 month before that of Saucier. Lehmann was the first North American psychiatrist to publish an article on CPZ, but Roland Saucier nevertheless made an important contribution, being the first to prescribe this drug in North America and reporting results for a study with a sample size 3 times that of Lehmann’s study. PMID:25886681

  9. SFB 754 - Managing a large interdisciplinary collaborative research centre: what matters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelten, Christiane; Antia, Avan; Braker, Gesche; Kamm, Ruth; Mehrtens, Hela

    2016-04-01

    ) and a postdoctoral network (Integrated Marine Postdoc Network) both set up by 'The Future Ocean', a project funded within the German Excellence Initiative • gender measures (close cooperation with the Central Office for Gender Equality, Diversity & Family at Kiel University) • data management (part of a joint GEOMAR data management group) Thus, a motivated and also creative coordination team interested in pioneer work is essential to manage a large interdisciplinary research community. Overall, networking, transparent management tools linked to active communication as well as fairness in processes such as the distribution of funds are basic prerequisites of trustful cooperation in large scientific consortia. (This presentation is linked to posters by Dr. Nina Bergmann, Dr. Gesche Braker, Dr. Ruth Kamm and Dr. Hela Mehrtens.)

  10. Risk of HIV-1 acquisition among women who use different types of injectable progestin contraception in South Africa: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Lisa M.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Baeten, Jared M.; Hillier, Sharon L.; Balkus, Jennifer E.; Chirenje, Z. Mike; Bunge, Katherine; Ramjee, Gita; Nair, Gonasagrie; Palanee-Phillips, Thesla; Selepe, Pearl; van der Straten, Ariane; Parikh, Urvi M.; Gomez, Kailazarid; Piper, Jeanna M.; Watts, D. Heather; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ). Interpretation Although moderate associations in observational analyses should be interpreted with caution, these findings suggest that NET-EN might be an alternative injectable drug with a lower HIV risk than DMPA in high HIV-1 incidence settings where NET-EN is available. Funding National Institutes of Health, Mary Meyer Scholars Fund, and the Ruth Freeman Memorial Fund. PMID:26155597

  11. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-27

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 104, Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 104 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 104 consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 7 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C · CAS 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 · CAS 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site · CAS 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a · CAS 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) · CAS 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) · CAS 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) · CAS 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) · CAS 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) · CAS 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth · CAS 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 · CAS 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b · CAS 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax Closure activities began in October 2012 and were completed in April 2013. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for CAU 104. The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste, mixed waste, and recyclable material. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite landfills. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office

  12. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  13. Initiation of methane turbulent flux measurements over a grazed grassland in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumortier, Pierre; Aubinet, Marc; Chopin, Henri; Debacq, Alain; Jérome, Elisabeth; Beckers, Yves; Heinesch, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Methane fluxes emitted by a grazed meadow were measured continuously during the 2012 grazing season at the Dorinne Terrestrial Observatory (50° 18' 44" N; 4° 58' 07" E; 248 m asl.) in Belgium. Measurements were made with the eddy covariance technique, using a fast CH4 analyzer (Picarro G2311-f). Carbon dioxide fluxes (LI-7000) and various micro-meteorological and soil variables, biomass growth and stocking rate evolution were also measured at the site. The site is an intensively pastured meadow of 4.2 ha managed according to the regional usual practices where up to 30 cows are grazing simultaneously. N2O emissions are currently measured through dynamic closed chambers (Beekkerk van Ruth et al., Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 15, EGU2013-3211, 2013) and the carbon budget of the site has already been investigated (Jerome et al. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, EGU2013-6989, 2013). As no CH4 measurements were available, CH4 fluxes were estimated on the basis of dry matter intake by the cows and a conversion factor obtained from a literature review. We want to improve this estimation by measuring CH4 fluxes, identifying their main environmental drivers and understanding diurnal and annual exchange patterns. Methane emissions were found strongly related with cattle stocking rate with a slope of 7.34±0.78 mol CH4 day-1 LSU-1. Up to now, no methane absorption has been observed, the meadow behaving as a methane emitter, even in the absence of cows. In the absence of cows, no significant relation can be established up to now between methane emissions and environmental parameters. No clear diurnal evolution is observed, neither during grazing periods nor during cow free periods. During cow presence periods, fluxes are highly variable, probably due to cow movements in and out the measurement footprint and cow digestion rhythm. Further developments are ongoing in order to improve cattle geo-localization through individual home-made GPS devices and infra

  14. Utrecht Radiative Transfer Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Utrecht course ``The Generation and Transport of Radiation'' teaches basic radiative transfer to second-year students. It is a much-expanded version of the first chapter of Rybicki & Lightman's ``Radiative Processes in Astrophysics''. After this course, students understand why intensity is measured per steradian, have an Eddington-Barbier feel for optically thick line formation, and know that scattering upsets LTE. The text is a computer-aided translation by Ruth Peterson of my 1992 Dutch-language course. My aim is to rewrite this course in non-computer English and make it web-available at some time. In the meantime, copies of the Peterson translation are made yearly at Uppsala -- ask them, not me. Eventually it should become a textbook. The Utrecht course ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' is a 30-hour course for third-year students. It treats NLTE line formation in plane-parallel stellar atmospheres at a level intermediate between the books by Novotny and Boehm-Vitense, and Mihalas' ``Stellar Atmospheres''. After this course, students appreciate that epsilon is small, that radiation can heat or cool, and that computers have changed the field. This course is web-available since 1995 and is regularly improved -- but remains incomplete. Eventually it should become a textbook. The three Utrecht exercise sets ``Stellar Spectra A: Basic Line Formation'', ``Stellar Spectra B: LTE Line Formation'', and ``Stellar Spectra C: NLTE Line Formation'' are IDL-based computer exercises for first-year, second-year, and third-year students, respectively. They treat spectral classification, Saha-Boltzmann population statistics, the curve of growth, the FAL-C solar atmosphere model, the role of H-minus in the solar continuum, LTE formation of Fraunhofer lines, inversion tactics, the Feautrier method, classical lambda iteration, and ALI computation. The first two sets are web-available since 1998; the third will follow. Acknowledgement. Both courses owe much to previous

  15. Obituary: Preston F. Gott, 1919-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Charles Wesley

    2003-12-01

    Scholarship Award in Physics and also endowed a scholarship in the Women's Studies Program, in memory of his first wife, long time TTU Economics Professor Edna Gott. He was a true gentleman and a friend to all who knew him. He will be sorely missed. He is survived by his wife, Orene, and his children, Eugene and Suzanne. His stepchildren are Ruth, Benita, and Diana (who pre-deceased him).

  16. Taking centre stage...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    HAMLET (Highly Automated Multimedia Light Enhanced Theatre) was the star performance at the recent finals of the `Young Engineer for Britain' competition, held at the Commonwealth Institute in London. This state-of-the-art computer-controlled theatre lighting system won the title `Young Engineers for Britain 1998' for David Kelnar, Jonathan Scott, Ramsay Waller and John Wyllie (all aged 16) from Merchiston Castle School, Edinburgh. HAMLET replaces conventional manually-operated controls with a special computer program, and should find use in the thousands of small theatres, schools and amateur drama productions that operate with limited resources and without specialist expertise. The four students received a £2500 prize between them, along with £2500 for their school, and in addition they were invited to spend a special day with the Royal Engineers. A project designed to improve car locking systems enabled Ian Robinson of Durham University to take the `Working in industry award' worth £1000. He was also given the opportunity of a day at sea with the Royal Navy. Other prizewinners with their projects included: Jun Baba of Bloxham School, Banbury (a cardboard armchair which converts into a desk and chair); Kobika Sritharan and Gemma Hancock, Bancroft's School, Essex (a rain warning system for a washing line); and Alistair Clarke, Sam James and Ruth Jenkins, Bishop of Llandaff High School, Cardiff (a mechanism to open and close the retractable roof of the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff). The two principal national sponsors of the competition, which is organized by the Engineering Council, are Lloyd's Register and GEC. Industrial companies, professional engineering institutions and educational bodies also provided national and regional prizes and support. During this year's finals, various additional activities took place, allowing the students to surf the Internet and navigate individual engineering websites on a network of computers. They also visited the

  17. Automated multi-parametric sorting of micron-sized particles via multi-trap laser tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaputa, Daniel S.

    the player in the card, one can start collecting Babe Ruth rookie cards instead of mint condition cards of bench warmers. In the future, even better multi-parametric laser tweezer particle sorting systems will be developed that make use of pulsed radiation in order to stimulate nonlinear optical phenomena. This dissertation discusses the feasibility of combining a rapid, non-invasive chemical imaging technology called coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with a laser tweezer sorting system. This would allow for the birth of a laser tweezer particle sorting system of unprecedented speed and chemical specificity the likes of which the world has not yet seen.

  18. Atlantic Warm Pool Trigger for the Younger Dryas Climate Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul, N. A.; Mortlock, R. A.; Wright, J. D.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Teneva, L. T.

    2011-12-01

    There is growing evidence that variability in the size and heat content of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool impacts circum-North Atlantic climate via the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation mode (Wang et al., 2008). The Atlantic Warm Pool spans the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and the western tropical North Atlantic. Barbados is located near the center of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool and coupled ocean models suggest that Barbados remains near the center of the tropical Atlantic Warm Pool under varying wind stress simulations. Measurements of the oxygen isotope paleothermometer in Acropora palmata coral species recovered from cores offshore Barbados, show a 3oC monotonic decrease in sea surface temperature from 13106 ± 83 to 12744 ± 61 years before present (errors given as 2 sigma). This interval corresponds to a sea level rise from 71.4 meters to 67.1 meters below present levels at Barbados. The 3oC temperature decrease is captured in eight A. palmata specimens that are in stratigraphic sequence, 230Th/234U dated, and analyzed for oxygen isotopes. All measurements are replicated. We are confident that this is the warm pool equivalent of the Younger Dryas climate event. The initiation of this temperature drop in the Atlantic Warm Pool predates the Younger Dryas start in Greenland ice cores, reported to start at 12896 ± 138 years (relative to AD 2000) (Rasmussen et al., 2006), while few other Younger Dryas climate records are dated with similar accuracy to make the comparison. Rasmussen, S.O., Andersen, K.K., Svensson, A.M., Steffensen, J.P., Vinther, B.M., Clausen, H.B., Siggaard-Andersen, M.L., Johnsen, S.J., Larsen, L.B., Dahl-Jensen, D., Bigler, M., Röthlisberger, R., Fischer, H., Goto-Azuma, K., Hansson, M.E., and Ruth, U., 2006, A new Greenland ice core chronology for the last glacial termination: J. Geophys. Res., v. 111, p. D06102. Wang, C., Lee, S.-K., and Enfield, D.B., 2008, Atlantic Warm Pool acting as a link between Atlantic Multidecadal

  19. Corporate social responsibility motives and theories evidenced among oilwell drilling firms in Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altvater, Norbert

    This dissertation is a study in conceptual CSR motives and theories prompted by the knowledge that socially active NGOs have tried to influence the CSP of companies in Alberta's oil patch by using media pressure. The focus of the study was narrowed to changing CSP among Alberta's oilwell drilling firms. This permits intensive interviews with the firms' informants. The examination of changing CSP implies a consideration of the pressures that prompt and influence its change, and points this study to firm motives for behaving responsibly. The firms were firstly categorized according to their primary and secondary CSP using 5 dimensions of CSR previously used by The Conference Board of Canada. The study uses CSR motives conceptualized by Ruth Aguilera and her collaborators to assess the firms' CSP using self-assessed CSR motives and observed CSP. At the onset 3 working hypotheses were posited as starting points from which substantiated propositions were developed. Lance Moir's and Elisabet Garriga and Domènec Meld's classifications of CSR theories were used to organize and evaluate the data. A mapping of the motives and theories in respect of the firms' primary and secondary CSR dimensions appears to display correlations between the CSR theories and the conceptualized motives. Nevertheless, for some of the firms none of the motives conceptualized by Aguilera and her collaborators seem to apply. By re-visiting the motives, and examining them more closely, it seems possible refine the conceptualized motives relying more on perceived conceptions, which are at the basis of legitimacy theories, rather than on relational factors to better explain the normative expectations raised. A similar analysis also indicates that the firms' seem to seek economic benefits, social benefits, or a combination of both. The CSP that results is within the same continuum; the resulting CSP for the firms seems to mediate towards a blend of both, regardless of the original CSR motives. These

  20. Bubble snap-off and capillary-back pressure during counter-current spontaneous imbibition into model pores.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Evren; Mason, Geoffrey; Morrow, Norman R; Ruth, Douglas W

    2009-04-01

    A previous paper (Unsal, E.; Mason, G.; Ruth, D. W.; Morrow, N. R. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 2007, 315, 200-209) reported experiments involving counter-current spontaneous imbibition into a model pore system consisting of a rod in an angled slot covered by a glass plate. Such an arrangement gives two tubes with different cross-sections (both size and shape) with an interconnection through the gap between the rod and the plate. In the previous experiments, the wetting phase advanced in the small tube and nonwetting phase retreated in the large tube. No bubbles were formed. In this paper, we study experimentally and theoretically the formation of bubbles at the open end of the large tube and their subsequent snap-off. Such bubbles reduce the capillary back pressure produced by the larger tube and can thus have an effect on the local rate of imbibition. In the model pore system, the rod was either in contact with the glass, forming two independent tubes, or the rod was spaced from the glass to allow cross-flow between the tubes. For small gaps, there were three distinct menisci. The one with the highest curvature was between the rod and the plate. The next most highly curved was in the smaller tube, and the least highly curved meniscus was in the large tube and this was the tube from which the bubbles developed. The pressure in the dead end of the system was recorded during imbibition. Once the bubble starts to form outside of the tube, the pressure drops rapidly and then steadies. After the bubble snaps off, the pressure rises to almost the initial value and stays essentially constant until the next bubble starts to form. After snap-off, the meniscus in the large tube appears to invade the large tube for some distance. The snap-off is the result of capillary instability; it takes place significantly inside the large tube with flow of wetting phase moving in the angular corners. As imbibition into the small tube progresses, the rate of imbibition decreases and the

  1. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake in relation to semen quality and reproductive hormone levels in young men

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Y.H.; Afeiche, M.C.; Gaskins, A.J.; Williams, P.L.; Mendiola, J.; Jørgensen, N.; Swan, S.H.; Chavarro, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    , more studies are required to draw conclusions on the relation of SSB with semen quality or male infertility. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) Supported by the European Union Seventh Framework Program (Environment), ‘Developmental Effects of Environment on Reproductive Health’ (DEER) grant 212844. Grant P30 DK046200 and Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award T32 DK007703-16 and T32HD060454 from the National Institutes of Health. None of the authors has any conflicts of interest to declare. PMID:24812311

  2. CMA Announces the 1996 Responsible Care Catalyst Awards Winners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-06-01

    Eighteen exceptional teachers of science, chemical technology, chemistry, and chemical engineering have been selected to receive a Responsible Care Chemical Manufacturers Association's 1996 Catalyst Award. The Responsible Care Catalyst Awards Program honors individuals who have the ability to inspire students toward careers in chemistry and science-related fields through their excellent teaching ability in and out of the classroom. The program also seeks to draw public attention to the importance of quality chemistry and science teaching at the undergraduate level. Since the award was established in 1957, 502 teachers of science, chemistry, and chemical engineering have been honored. Winners are selected from a wide range of nominations submitted by colleagues, friends, and administrators. All pre-high school, high school, two and four-year college, or university teachers in the United States and Canada are eligible. Each award winner will be presented with a medal and citation. National award winners receive 5,000; regional award winners receive 2,500. National Winners. Martin N. Ackermann, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH Kenneth R. Jolls, Iowa State University, Ames, IA Suzanne Zobrist Kelly, Warren H. Meeker Elementary School, Ames, IA John V. Kenkel, Southeast Community College, Lincoln, NE George C. Lisensky, Beloit College, Beloit, WI James M. McBride, Yale University, New Haven, CT Marie C. Sherman, Ursuline Academy, St. Louis, MO Dwight D. Sieggreen, Cooke Middle School, Northville, MI Regional Winners Two-Year College. East-Georgianna Whipple-VanPatter, Central Community College, Hastings, NE West-David N. Barkan, Northwest College, Powell, WY High School. East-John Hnatow, Jr., Emmaus High School, Northampton, PA South-Carole Bennett, Gaither High School, Tampa, FL Midwest-Kenneth J. Spengler, Palatine High School, Palatine, IL West-Ruth Rand, Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM Middle School. East-Thomas P. Kelly, Grandville Public Schools, Grandville, NH

  3. Quantum Structure of Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.; Isham, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Foreword Abdus Salam; Preface; List of participants; Part I. Quantum Gravity, Fields and Topology: 1. Some remarks on gravity and quantum mechanics Roger Penrose; 2. An experimental test of quantum gravity Don N. Page and C. D. Geilker; 3. Quantum mechanical origin of the sandwich theorem in classical gravitation theory Claudio Teitelboim; 4. θ-States induced by the diffeomorphism group in canonically quantized gravity C. J. Isham; 5. Strong coupling quantum gravity: an introduction Martin Pilati; 6. Quantizing fourth order gravity theories S. M. Christensen; 7. Green's functions, states and renormalisation M. R. Brown and A. C. Ottewill; 8. Introduction to quantum regge calculus Martin Roček and Ruth Williams; 9. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in curved space-time D. J. Toms; 10. Spontaneous symmetry breaking near a black hole M. S. Fawcett and B. F. Whiting; 11. Yang-Mills vacua in a general three-space G. Kunstatter; 12. Fermion fractionization in physics R. Jackiw; Part II. Supergravity: 13. The new minimal formulation of N=1 supergravity and its tensor calculus M. F. Sohnius and P. C. West; 14. A new deteriorated energy-momentum tensor M. J. Duff and P. K. Townsend; 15. Off-shell N=2 and N=4 supergravity in five dimensions P. Howe; 16. Supergravity in high dimensions P. van Niewenhuizen; 17. Building linearised extended supergravities J. G. Taylor; 18. (Super)gravity in the complex angular momentum plane M. T. Grisaru; 19. The multiplet structure of solitons in the O(2) supergravity theory G. W. Gibbons; 20. Ultra-violet properties of supersymmetric gauge theory S. Ferrara; 21. Extended supercurrents and the ultra-violet finiteness of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories K. S. Stelle; 22. Duality rotations B. Zumino; Part III. Cosmology and the Early Universe: 23. Energy, stability and cosmological constant S. Deser; 24. Phase transitions in the early universe T. W. B. Kibble; 25. Complete cosmological theories L. P. Grishchuk and Ya. B. Zeldovich; 26. The

  4. Kinematics of an oblique deformation front using paleomagnetic data; the Altomira-Loranca structures (Iberian Chain, Central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valcarcel, M.

    2013-05-01

    Manoel Valcárcel1, 5, Ruth Soto2, Elisabet Beamud3, Belén Oliva-Urcia4 and Josep Anton Muñoz5 1 IGME, Departamento de Investigación y Prospección Geocientífica. C/ La Calera, 1, 28760 Tres Cantos; m.valcarcel@igme.es 2 IGME, Unidad de Zaragoza, C/ Manuel Lasala 44, 9 B, 50006 Zaragoza, Spain 3 Lab. Paleomagnetisme (CCiT UB-CSIC). ICT "Jaume Almera", Solé i Sabarís, s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Spain. 4 IPE-CSIC, Avda. Montañana 1005, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain 5 Grup Geodinàmica i Anàlisi de Conques, Universitat de Barcelona, Zona Universitària Pedralbes, 08028 Barcelona, Spain The Altomira and Loranca structures consist of a fold-and-thrust system detached on Triassic evaporites. They are oriented N-S to NNE-SSW and NNW-SSE at its northern and southern end, respectively, forming a subtle arc, oblique with respect to the general NW-SE trend of the Iberian Chain. The aim of this work is to characterize with paleomagnetic data the kinematic evolution of the the Altomira Range, located at the southwestern deformation front of the Iberian Chain, and of the structures within its associated piggy-back basin, the Loranca basin. This approach will also give clues regarding the primary and/or secondary origin of these structures to better characterize them in further studies (3D reconstruction and restoration, fault pattern). A total of 180 samples were obtained from 19 sites in Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene rocks (including clays, fine sandstones and limestones). They were analyzed by means of stepwise thermal demagnetization and subsequent measurement of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM). Although fold tests are not statistically significant, a primary origin of the magnetization is deduced by samples showing either normal or reverse polarity after bedding correction of the calculated characteristic components. Declinations of the site mean directions appear scattered after bedding correction suggesting differential vertical-axis rotations. Sites located at the

  5. Flow instabilities of Alaskan glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, James Bradley

    Over 300 of the largest glaciers in southern Alaska have been identified as either surge-type or pulse-type, making glaciers with flow instabilities the norm among large glaciers in that region. Consequently, the bulk of mass loss due to climate change will come from these unstable glaciers in the future, yet their response to future climate warming is unknown because their dynamics are still poorly understood. To help broaden our understanding of unstable glacier flow, the decadal-scale ice dynamics of 1 surging and 9 pulsing glaciers are investigated. Bering Glacier had a kinematic wave moving down its ablation zone at 4.4 +/- 2.0 km/yr from 2002 to 2009, which then accelerated to 13.9 +/- 2.0 km/yr as it traversed the piedmont lobe. The wave first appeared in 2001 near the confluence with Bagley Ice Valley and it took 10 years to travel ~64 km. A surge was triggered in 2008 after the wave activated an ice reservoir in the midablation zone, and it climaxed in 2011 while the terminus advanced several km into Vitus Lake. Ruth Glacier pulsed five times between 1973 and 2012, with peak velocities in 1981, 1989, 1997, 2003, and 2010; approximately every 7 years. A typical pulse increased ice velocity 300%, from roughly 40 m/yr to 160 m/yr in the midablation zone, and involved acceleration and deceleration of the ice en masse; no kinematic wave was evident. The pulses are theorized to be due to deformation of a subglacial till causing enhanced basal motion. Eight additional pulsing glaciers are identified based on the spatiotemporal pattern of their velocity fields. These glaciers pulsed where they were either constricted laterally or joined by a tributary, and their surface slopes are 1-2°. These traits are consistent with an overdeepening. This observation leads to a theory of ice motion in overdeepenings that explains the cyclical behavior of pulsing glaciers. It is based on the concept of glaciohydraulic supercooling, and includes sediment transport and erosion

  6. K-12 educational outcomes of immigrant youth.

    PubMed

    Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N López

    2011-01-01

    The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth López Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across segments of the immigrant population defined by generational status, race and ethnicity, and national origin. A good deal of evidence points to an immigrant advantage in multiple indicators of academic progress, meaning that many youths from immigrant families outperform their peers in school. This apparent advantage is often referred to as the immigrant paradox, in that it occurs despite higher-than-average rates of social and economic disadvantages in this population as a whole. The immigrant paradox, however, is more pronounced among the children of Asian and African immigrants than other groups, and it is stronger for boys than for girls. Furthermore, evidence for the paradox is far more consistent in secondary school than in elementary school. Indeed, school readiness appears to be one area of potential risk for children from immigrant families, especially those of Mexican origin. For many groups, including those from Latin America, any evidence of the immigrant paradox usually emerges after researchers control for family socioeconomic circumstances and youths' English language skills. For others, including those from Asian countries, it is at least partially explained by the tendency for more socioeconomically advantaged residents of those regions to leave their home country for the United States. Bilingualism and strong family ties help to explain immigrant advantages in schooling; school, community, and other contextual disadvantages may suppress these advantages or lead to immigrant risks. Crosnoe and Turley also discuss several policy efforts targeting young people from immigrant families, especially those of Latin

  7. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  8. Outcomes From AAS Hack Day at the 227th AAS Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    will be a huge first step.Gender in Astronomy Conferences: Jim Davenport (WWU), Ben Nelson (Northwestern), Mehmet Alpsalan (NASA Ames), and Erin Maier (University of Iowa) analyzed data collected during the conference on the gender breakdown of who asks questions after oral presentations. Now in its third year, one new finding from the study is that women dont ask questions as much as men do, but they tend to ask questions more when the speaker is a woman or the first question-asker is a woman.More from #hackaas at #aas227: Gender of speaker vs. 1st to ask a question for all 3 years of Gender in Astro survey pic.twitter.com/l74D3rSUOD Erin Maier (@fallelujah) January 9, 2016The Early Reference Project: Many pre-1950 publications lack up-to-date citation information because the text is digitally archived as an image. Brendan Wells (UC Santa Cruz) worked with representatives from ADS and Zooniverse to set up a crowd-sourced platform to identify references in these old papers.Glassdome: Ellie Schwab (CUNY) and colleagues Paige Godfrey, Munazza Alam, and Cam Buzzard began work on a website modeled after glassdoor for safely sharing experiences throughout their astronomy careers. Glassdome will feature career path stories, department reviews, and salaries, all optionally anonymous. The site is hosted by ScienceBetter and is under development.Observing Run Sharing: Sometimes near the end of a long night at the telescope you have observed everything you need but still have time left. Short of choosing randomly or hoping a colleague is online in the middle of the night, there is currently no good solution. To address this, Brooke Simmons (UC San Diego) designed a web app that would allow astronomers to submit their favorite night sky targets. The project is still a work in progress.ArXiv Podcast: Ruth Angus (Oxford) started a podcast featuring astronomers summarizing their new papers submitted to astro-ph in one minute. Its like audio astrobites! If youve recently published a

  9. Coeval dust accumulation minima in Greenland and East Central Europe over 31-23 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Varga, György; Kovács, János; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    synchronized Greenland ice-core records: refining and extending the INTIMATE event stratigraphy. Quaternary Science Reviews 106, 14-28. [4] Fuhrer, K. et al. (1999). Timescales for dust variability in the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) ice core in the last 100,000 years. Journal of Geophysical Research 104, 31,043-31,052. [5] Ruth, U., et al. (2003). Continuous record of microparticle concentration and size distribution in the central Greenland NGRIP ice core during the last glacial period. Journal of Geophysical Research 108, 4098. [6] Ruth, U., et al. (2007). Ice core evidence for a very tight link between North Atlantic and east Asian glacial climate. Geophysical Research Letters 34, L03706. [7] Újvári, G., et al. (2015). Two possible source regions for central Greenland last glacial dust. Geophysical Research Letters 42, 10,399-10,408.

  10. Real time tracing of the kinetic process of NO3, N2O5 and NO2 with VOCs by long optical pathlength absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YI, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Lauraguais, Amélie; Semenov, Vladimir; Coeur-Tourneur, Cecile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Chen, Weidong

    2014-05-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5, formed through the reaction of NO3 with NO2 and is a large reservoir for NO3) are two key intermediates components in atmospheric nitrogen chemistry [1]. They affect directly the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere through reaction of NO3 with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). It's highly desirable to be able to perform in-situ, simultaneous and continuous monitoring of NO3 and N2O5 concentrations with high selectivity and fast response time. N2O5 is usually indirectly measured via optical measurement of NO3 after thermal dissociation of N2O5 to NO3 [2]. In this paper, we report on the recent development and application of optical method for in situ direct concentration measurements of NO3 and N2O5 in smog chamber. NO3 (as well as NO2) were simultaneously measured by open-path incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) [3] based on a light emitted diode operating in the range of 635-675 nm, and N2O5 was monitored by means of open-path multi-pass absorption spectroscopy of an external cavity quantum cascade laser tunable from 1223 to 1263 cm-1 (~8 µm). Reaction of NO3 with VOCs (such as isoprene, formaldehyde, 2-methoxyphenal) as well as the equilibrium between NO3 and N2O5 during the VOCs oxidation by NO3 radical have been on-line traced with high temporal resolution: 1 s for NO3-NO2 and 25 s for N2O5. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Our present work demonstrated that modern photonic technologies can provide a direct and highly selective means for chemical kinetic study, for instance, bringing insight into reactive uptake for NO3 and N2O5 on the organic particles [4], which remain still unexplored with few exceptions. References [1] Paul S. Monks, "Gas-phase radical chemistry in the troposphere", Chem. Soc. Rev. 34 (2005) 376-395. [2] R.M. Varma, S.M. Ball, T. Brauers, H.-P. Dorn, U. Heitmann, R.L. Jones, U. Platt, D. Pöhler, A.A. Ruth, A

  11. Obituary: Kenneth L. Franklin, 1923-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Joe; Degrasse Tyson, Neil

    2007-12-01

    Renowned astronomer and astronomy popularizer Kenneth L. Franklin died early Monday morning, June 18, 2007, in Boulder, Colorado, two weeks after undergoing heart surgery. He was 84 years old. Kenneth Linn Franklin, the only child of Myles and Ruth (Houston) Franklin, was born March 25, 1923 in Alemeda, California. Ken obtained his Ph.D. in astronomy in 1953 at the University of California, Berkeley. From 1954 to 1956 he was a research fellow in radio astronomy at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC. While there, he and Bernard F. Burke discovered radio emissions from the planet Jupiter. They announced their find on April 6, 1955, at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS). In 1956 Ken joined the staff of the American Museum-Hayden Planetarium, where he later served as chairman and chief scientist. Over the course of thirty years he wrote and/or presented innumerable sky shows for the planetarium sky theater, taught popular and technical courses in astronomy, and answered questions from the public. Ken was frequently consulted by local industries engaged in the space program, as well as by the news media and publishers. He was often interviewed on local and national radio and television, especially when a celestial event of special interest was due to occur. On the first page of the November 1966 issue of Sky & Telescope, in comments about the upcoming Leonid meteor shower, Franklin stuck his neck out. Based on some calculations that he'd made, he said he felt we were going to be in for a "interesting display." His was one of the few forecasts that suggested the '66 Leonids might be memorable. As it turned out, he was right — that year observers experienced the now-legendary Leonid meteor storm. From 1973 to 1979, Ken was the AAS's public-affairs officer. For two decades he also served in the society's Harlow Shapley Visiting Lecturer Program, speaking at one or two colleges each year. Ken was an active

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01

    CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison

  13. Chandra Discovers Elusive "Hot Bubble" in Planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    bubble gas was dredged up from the deepest layers of the central star, where nuclear fusion altered the chemical composition of the gas prior to its being ejected. Thus the Chandra data may offer new insight into the process whereby dying stars enrich the Milky Way in fusion products. The observation was made in March 2000 using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). Kastner's collaborators on the project are Prof. Noam Soker of the University of Haifa, Israel; Prof. Saul Rappaport of MIT; Dr. Ruth Knill-Dgani of the University of Texas, Austin; and Dr. Saeqa Vrtilek of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The ACIS instrument was built for NASA by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and Pennsylvania State University, University Park. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass. High resolution digital versions of the X-ray image (JPG, 300 dpi TIFF ) and other information associated with this release are available on the Internet at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov

  14. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    quite fruitful, enjoyable 'Mediterranean' atmosphere for the exchange of ideas and discussion. It is a pleasure to thank our administrative and technical staff Georgia Angelopoulou, Athina Pouri, Mando Zambeli and Manolis Zoulias for their untiring assistance. We also thank the staff of the OAC for the enthusiastic support and their hospitality. We are grateful to the Academy of Athens and the Tomalla Foundation for their generous financial support which made MCCQG possible. Finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting. The success of the MCCQG is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors March 2010 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Spyros Basilakos (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Mariano Cadoni (University and INFN Cagliari, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Elias Vagenas (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Advisory Committee Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Switzerland) Orfeu Bertolami (IST, Lisbon, Portugal) Loriano Bonora (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) George Contopoulos (Academy of Athens, Greece) Ruth Durrer (Geneva University, Switzerland) Enrique Gaztanaga (IEEC, Barcelona, Spain) Gabriela Gonzalez (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA) Marc Henneaux (Brussels University, Belgium) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Claus Kiefer (Cologne University, Germany) Stefano Liberati (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) Ofer Lahav (University College London, UK) Roy Maartens (University of Portsmouth, UK) Don Marolf (UC Santa Barbara, USA) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Augusto Sagnotti (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy) Mairi Sakellariadou (King's College London, UK) Jorge Zanelli (CECS, Valdivia, Chile) SPONSORS Academy of Athens The Tomalla Foundation Università di Cagliari University of Mississippi University of Athens LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Abdalla, Elcio (Instituto de

  15. Impact of grazing on carbon balance of a Belgian grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jérôme, Elisabeth; Beckers, Yves; Bodson, Bernard; Moureaux, Christine; Dumortier, Pierre; Beekkerk van Ruth, Joran; Aubinet, Marc

    2013-04-01

    This work analyzes the impact of grazing on the carbon balance of a grassland grazed by the Belgian Blue breed of cattle. The research was run at the Dorinne terrestrial observatory (DTO). The experimental site is a permanent grassland of ca. 4.2 ha located in the Belgian Condroz (50° 18' 44" N; 4° 58' 07" E; 248 m asl.). Other studies are conducted at the DTO including measurements of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide fluxes (Dumortier et al., Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, EGU2013-2083-1, 2013; Beekkerk van Ruth et al., Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, EGU2013-3211, 2013, respectively). Grassland carbon budget (Net Biome Productivity, NBP) was calculated from Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) measured by eddy covariance by taking imports and exports of organic C and losses of carbon as CH4 into account. After 2 years of measurements (May 2010 - May 2012), the grassland behaved on average as a CO2 source (NEE = 73 ±31 g C m-2 y-1). After inclusion of all the C inputs and outputs the site was closed to equilibrium (NBP = 23 ±34 g C m-2 y-1). To analyze the impact of grazing on CO2 fluxes, we studied the temporal evolution of gross maximal photosynthetic capacity GPPmax and dark respiration Rd (deduced from the response of daytime fluxes to radiation over 5-day windows). We calculated GPPmax and Rd variation between the end and the beginning of grazing or non-grazing periods (ΔGPPmax and ΔRd, respectively). We observed a significant decrease of GPPmax during grazing periods and measured a ΔGPPmax dependence on the average stocking rate. This allows us to quantify the assimilation reduction due to grass consumption by cattle. On the contrary, no Rd decrease was observed during grazing periods. Moreover, we found that cumulated monthly NEE increased significantly with the average stocking rate. In addition, a confinement experiment was carried out in order to analyze livestock contribution to Total Ecosystem Respiration. Each experiment extended over

  16. Investigating a Hierarchy of Eulerian Closure Models for Scalar Transfer Inside Forested Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juang, Jehn-Yih; Katul, Gabriel G.; Siqueira, Mario B.; Stoy, Paul C.; McCarthy, Heather R.

    2008-07-01

    concentration (and temperature) profiles inside the canopy as well as scalar fluxes above the canopy, (iv) there are no clear gains in predictive skills when using third-order closure schemes over their second-order closure counterparts. At inter-annual time scales, biases in modelled scalar fluxes incurred by using the WMA exceed those incurred when correcting for the seasonal amplitude in the maximum carboxylation capacity ( V cmax, 25) provided its mean value is unbiased. The role of local thermal stratification inside the canopy and possible computational simplifications in decoupling scalar transfer from the generation of the flow statistics are also discussed. “The tree, tilting its leaves to capture bullets of light; inhaling, exhaling; its many thousand stomata breathing, creating the air”. Ruth Stone, 2002, In the Next Galaxy

  17. PREFACE: International Conference on Dynamics of Systems on the Nanoscale (DySoN 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2013-06-01

    and medicine. Although mesoscopic, nano- and biomolecular systems differ in their nature and origin, a number of fundamental problems are common to all of them: what are the underlying principles of self-organization and self-assembly of matter on the micro- and nanoscale? Are these principles classical or quantum? How does function emerge on the nano- and the mesoscale in systems of different origin? What criteria govern the stability of these systems? How do their properties change as a function of size and composition? How are their properties altered by their environment? Seeking answers to these questions is at the core of a new interdisciplinary field that lies at the intersection of physics, chemistry and biology, a field called Meso-Bio-Nano (MBN) Science. Both experimental and theoretical aspects of the mentioned problems were discussed at the DySoN 2012 Conference. Particular attention was devoted to dynamical phenomena and many-body effects taking place in various MBN systems, which include problems of structure formation, fusion and fission, collision and fragmentation, collective electron excitations, reactivity, nanoscale phase transitions, nanoscale insights into biodamage, channeling phenomena and many more. This volume is a collection of the contributions received from the participants of the DySoN 2012 Conference. It provides an overview of the topics, new results and ideas that have been discussed at the conference. I would like to thank all the authors of these proceedings, as well as all the participants of the conference for making it so successful. The third DySoN Conference will be held in Edinburgh in May 2014. A V Solov'yov Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang Str. 1, 60438, Frankfurt am Main, Germany On leave from A F Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Polytechnicheskaya 26, 194021, St. Petersburg, Russia E-mail: solovyov@fias.uni-frankfurt.de The PDF contains further information about the conference. Conference photograph

  18. Obituary: Helen Dodson Prince, 1905-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi Paul

    2009-01-01

    result of a number of summers spent, during her Wellesley years, at the solar observatory at Meudon, near Paris. When she returned to Michigan, Dodson became involved in the study of solar flares, based upon the long series of daily observations made with the tower telescopes at Lake Angelus and the improved spectroscopic equipment developed by Robert McMath, Orren Mohler, Leo Goldberg, Keith Pierce, and others. Her colleague during most of these years was Emma Ruth Hedeman, who co-authored many articles with her. Among her great accomplishments was the Comprehensive Flare Index, a widely used measure of flare activity. A "real live wire" and "a marvelous woman," in the words of students and colleagues, Dodson was also a kind and effective teacher, not at all vain about her accomplishments: She held that solar behavior has a way of making people humble. Dodoson was married to Edmund L. Prince and lived across Lake Angelus from the McMath-Hulbert Observatory; often she sailed to work, a joy denied to almost all other astronomers. During her years at McMath-Hulbert, The University of Michigan was the sole major American research university to have two women holding professorial positions in astronomy: Helen Dodson Prince and Hazel Marie Losh. One of the founding members of the Solar Physics Division, Professor Prince was a major factor in the rise and success of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, even when, after the 1950s, urban growth and upper Midwestern weather conditions conspired to cripple the advantages the observatory's technologies had once conferred. Her colleagues and students recall her with great respect and affection.

  19. Obituary: Lloyd V. Wallace (1927 - 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born in 1927 in Detroit, Michigan, in humble circumstances, Lloyd developed an early interest in solar and planetary astronomy and was a protégé of Ralph Nichols, a physics professor at the University of Western Ontario. Later he moved back to the United States and obtained his Ph.D in Astronomy at the University of Michigan in 1957 under Leo Goldberg. It was while he was at the University of Michigan that he met and married his wife, Ruth. At various times in his early career, and as the result of a complex series of events, he held Canadian, British, and United States citizenships and even found time to become an expert professional electrician. On acquiring his degree he obtained a position with Joe Chamberlain at the Yerkes Observatory and began a lifetime association with Chamberlain and Don Hunten (then a visitor to Yerkes) in atmospheric and spectroscopic research. In 1962 they moved to Tucson where Chamberlain became the head of the Space Division at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, a unit set up by the first director, Aden Meinel, to apply advances in technology to astronomical research. Lloyd was hired as the principal experimenter in the observatory's sounding rocket program, which was set up by the National Science Foundation to provide staff and visitor access to the upper atmosphere for research purposes. With this program he supervised a series of 39 Aerobee rocket flights from the White Sands Missile range to investigate upper atmosphere emissions, aeronomic processes, and make astronomical observations over a period of about 10 years. He was also involved in the first attempts to establish a remotely controlled 50&rdquo telescope on Kitt Peak and efforts within the Division to create an Earth orbiting astronomical telescope. In parallel with these activities Lloyd conducted research which was largely focused on spectroscopic investigations. In the early days these included measurement of upper atmospheric emissions, particularly visual dayglow

  20. Dairy food intake in relation to semen quality and reproductive hormone levels among physically active young men

    PubMed Central

    Afeiche, M.; Williams, P.L.; Mendiola, J.; Gaskins, A.J.; Jørgensen, N.; Swan, S.H.; Chavarro, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    FOR CAUTION As it was a cross-sectional study, causal inference is limited. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Further research is needed to prove a causal link between a high consumption of full-fat dairy foods and detrimental effects on semen quality. If verified our findings would mean that intake of full-fat dairy foods should be considered in attempts to explain secular trends in semen quality and that men trying to have children should restrict their intake. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) European Union Seventh Framework Program (Environment), ‘Developmental Effects of Environment on Reproductive Health’ (DEER) grant 212844. Grant P30 DK046200 and Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award T32 DK007703-16 from the National Institutes of Health. None of the authors has any conflicts of interest to declare. PMID:23670169

  1. Modeling high resolution space-time variations in energy demand/CO2 emissions of human inhabited landscapes in the United States under a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, A. V.; Gurney, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    With urban and exurban areas now accounting for more than 50% of the world's population, projected to increase 20% by 2050 (UN World Urbanization Prospects, 2009), urban-climate interactions are of renewed interest to the climate change scientific community (Karl et. al, 1988; Kalnay and Cai, 2003; Seto and Shepherd, 2009). Until recently, climate modeling efforts treated urban-human systems as independent of the earth system. With studies pointing to the disproportionately large influence of urban areas on their surrounding environment (Small et. al, 2010), modeling efforts have begun to explicitly account for urban processes in land models, like the CLM 4.0 urban layer, for example (Oleson.et. al, 2008, 2010). A significant portion of the urban energy demand comes from the space heating and cooling requirement of the residential and commercial sectors - as much as 51% (DOE, RECS 2005) and 11% (Belzer, D. 2006) respectively, in the United States. Thus, these sectors are both responsible for a significant fraction of fossil fuel CO2 emissions and will be influenced by a changing climate through changes in energy use and energy supply planning. This points to the possibility of interactive processes and feedbacks with the climate system. Space conditioning energy demand is strongly driven by external air temperature (Ruth, M. et.al, 2006) in addition to other socio-economic variables such as building characteristics (age of structure, activity cycle, weekend/weekday usage profile), occupant characteristics (age of householder, household income) and energy prices (Huang, 2006; Santin et. al, 2009; Isaac and van Vuuren, 2009). All of these variables vary both in space and time. Projections of climate change have begun to simulate changes in temperature at much higher resolution than in the past (Diffenbaugh et. al, 2005). Hence, in order to understand how climate change and variability will potentially impact energy use/emissions and energy planning, these two

  2. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    quite fruitful, enjoyable 'Mediterranean' atmosphere for the exchange of ideas and discussion. It is a pleasure to thank our administrative and technical staff Georgia Angelopoulou, Athina Pouri, Mando Zambeli and Manolis Zoulias for their untiring assistance. We also thank the staff of the OAC for the enthusiastic support and their hospitality. We are grateful to the Academy of Athens and the Tomalla Foundation for their generous financial support which made MCCQG possible. Finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting. The success of the MCCQG is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors March 2010 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Spyros Basilakos (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Mariano Cadoni (University and INFN Cagliari, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Elias Vagenas (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Advisory Committee Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Switzerland) Orfeu Bertolami (IST, Lisbon, Portugal) Loriano Bonora (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) George Contopoulos (Academy of Athens, Greece) Ruth Durrer (Geneva University, Switzerland) Enrique Gaztanaga (IEEC, Barcelona, Spain) Gabriela Gonzalez (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA) Marc Henneaux (Brussels University, Belgium) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Claus Kiefer (Cologne University, Germany) Stefano Liberati (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) Ofer Lahav (University College London, UK) Roy Maartens (University of Portsmouth, UK) Don Marolf (UC Santa Barbara, USA) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Augusto Sagnotti (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy) Mairi Sakellariadou (King's College London, UK) Jorge Zanelli (CECS, Valdivia, Chile) SPONSORS Academy of Athens The Tomalla Foundation Università di Cagliari University of Mississippi University of Athens LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Abdalla, Elcio (Instituto de

  3. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors FOCUS ON DILUTE MAGNETIC SEMICONDUCTORS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Scott A.; Gallagher, Bryan

    2008-05-01

    Chisholm, J D Budai and D P Norton Role of charge carriers for ferromagnetism in cobalt-doped rutile TiO2 T Fukumura, H Toyosaki, K Ueno, M Nakano and M Kawasaki Ab-initio study of exchange constants and electronic structure in diluted magnetic group-IV semiconductors Silvia Picozzi and Marjana Ležaić Phase coherent transport in (Ga,Mn)As D Neumaier, K Wagner, U Wurstbauer, M Reinwald, W Wegscheider and D Weiss Hydrogen interstitials-mediated ferromagnetism in MnxGe1-x magnetic semiconductors Xin-Xin Yao, Shi-Shen Yan, Shu-Jun Hu, Xue-Ling Lin, Chong Han, Yan-Xue Chen, Guo-Lei Liu and Liang-Mo Mei Electronic structures of magnetic semiconductors FeCr2Se4 and Fe0.5Cu0.5Cr2Se4 B I Min, Seung Su Baik, H C Choi, S K Kwon and J-S Kang Investigation of pure and Co2+-doped ZnO quantum dot electronic structures using the density functional theory: choosing the right functional Ekaterina Badaeva, Yong Feng, Daniel R Gamelin and Xiaosong Li Magnetic properties of sol-gel-derived doped ZnO as a potential ferromagnetic semiconductor: a synchrotron-based study N R S Farley, K W Edmonds, A A Freeman, G van der Laan, C R Staddon, D H Gregory and B L Gallagher Local electronic structure of Cr in the II-VI diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor Zn1-xCrxTe M Kobayashi, Y Ishida, J I Hwang, G S Song, A Fujimori, C S Yang, L Lee, H-J Lin, D J Huang, C T Chen, Y Takeda, K Terai, S-I Fujimori, T Okane, Y Saitoh, H Yamagami, K Kobayashi, A Tanaka, H Saito and K Ando Lack of ferromagnetism in n-type cobalt-doped ZnO epitaxial thin films T C Kaspar, T Droubay, S M Heald, P Nachimuthu, C M Wang, V Shutthanandan, C A Johnson, D R Gamelin and S A Chambers XMCD studies on Co and Li doped ZnO magnetic semiconductors Thomas Tietze, Milan Gacic, Gisela Schütz, Gerhard Jakob, Sebastian Brück and Eberhard Goering Ferromagnetic semiconductors and the role of disorder B W Wessels An extensive comparison of anisotropies in MBE grown (Ga,Mn)As material C Gould, S Mark, K Pappert, R G Dengel, J Wenisch, R P

  4. PREFACE: Fourth Meeting on Constrained Dynamics and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Nelson, Jeanette E.

    2006-04-01

    ) Georgi Dvali (NYU, USA) Sergio Ferrara (CERN) Gian Francesco Giudice (CERN) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Edward W. Kolb (Fermilab, USA) Luca Lusanna (INFN Firenze, Italy) Roy Maartens (Univ. Portsmouth, UK) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Tullio Regge (Politecnico di Torino, Italy) Augusto Sagnotti (Univ. Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Kellogg S. Stelle (Imperial College London, UK) Ruth Williams (DAMTP, Cambridge, UK) SPONSORS Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Università di Cagliari Università di Torino University of Mississippi Università di Pisa Regione autonoma della Sardegna Tiscali LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Eun-Joo Ahn (University of Chicago, USA) David Alba (Università di Firenze, Italy) Stanislav Alexeyev (Lomonosov Moscow State U., Russia) Damiano Anselmi (Università di Pisa, Italy) Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Geneva, Switzerland) Maria Da Conceicao Bento (Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal) Orfeu Bertolami (Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal) Massimo Bianchi (Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Mariam Bouhmadi-Lopez (University of Portsmouth, UK) Raphael Bousso (University of California at Berkeley, USA) Mariano Cadoni (Università di Cagliari, Italy) Steven Carlip (University of California at Davis, USA) Roberto Casadio (Università di Bologna, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Demian Cho (Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, India) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Chryssomalis Chryssomalakos (Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares - UNAM, Mexico) Diego Julio Cirilo-Lombardo (JINR, Dubna, Russia) Denis Comelli INFN, Sezione di Ferrara, Italy ) Ruben Cordero-Elizalde (Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico) Lorenzo Cornalba (Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Branislav Cvetkovic (Institute of Physics, Belgrade, Serbia ) Maro Cvitan (University of Zagreb, Croatia) Alessandro D'Adda (Università di Torino, Italy) Claudio Dappiaggi (Università di Pavia, Italy) Roberto De Leo (Università di

  5. Obituary: Wulff-Dieter Heintz, 1930-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augensen, Harry John; Geyer, Edward Heinrich

    2006-12-01

    the time of the 1956 opposition. His sketches of the Red Planet were quite detailed, and showed then unknown surface features which spacecraft visiting the planet years later revealed to be large volcanoes. In 1960, Wulff published an early but substantial paper, "Die Doppelsterne im FK4," which was very important in the construction of the FK4 and was still used in 1988 for the FK5. Subsequently, in 1961, he was invited to attend the IAU Symposium on Visual Double Stars at the University of California, Berkeley. The experience was inspirational and solidified Wulff's devotion to double star research. By the end of the decade, in 1969, he published the results of an extensive statistical study of binary stars in a classic paper which became a much referenced contribution to the field. On 14 June 1957, Wulff married Dietlind (Linde) Laschek, and the couple spent their honeymoon at the Royal Greenwich Observatory at Herstmonceux Castle in England. The marriage produced two children, a daughter Ruth, born in 1965, and a son Robert, in 1967. Wulff earned a Privatdozent (advanced postdoctoral degree) at Technological University Munich in 1967. Shortly thereafter, he accepted an invitation from Professor Peter Van de Kamp to come to the United States as a visiting astronomer at Swarthmore College, located outside Philadelphia. Wulff joined the Department of Astronomy permanently as an Associate Professor in 1969, and moved his family from Germany to the United States the following year. Wulff became Chairman of the Department in 1972 and served in that capacity until 1982. Wulff was promoted to the rank of Professor in 1973, and was a full-time faculty member at Swarthmore until his retirement in 1998. Wulff continued to teach introductory astronomy courses as an adjunct professor at nearby Widener University until 2005. Over his long and distinguished career, Wulff Heintz pursued numerous research interests, including fundamental astrometry, stellar statistics, planetary

  6. PREFACE: Eighth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination (DR2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Orel, Ann E.

    2011-07-01

    Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada in May, 1988 [2] and was followed in May 1992 [3] at L'Abbaye de Saint Jacut de la Mer, Brittany, France, in May, 1995 [4] at Ein Gedi, Israel, in June 1999 [5] on the island of Nässlingen in the Stockholm archipelago, Sweden, in August, 2001 [6] at Chicago, USA, in July, 2004 [7] at the Alte Mälzerei, Mosbach, Germany and in July, 2007 [8] at the Resort d'Amelander Kaap on the island of Ameland, The Netherlands. All papers from the last two conferences and this conference are freely available at http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596. In keeping with the tradition of prior DR conferences, all papers in this volume have been refereed. Our thanks go to the referees for their efforts. Travel support for conference participants was provided by NSF grant ATM-0838061 and NASA grant NNX09AQ73G to SLG. We thank Priscilla Kujawski for proofreading the Dedication. Steven L GubermanAnn E OrelEditors Conference photograph Participants of the 8th International Conference on Dissociative Recombination: Theory, Experiments and Applications. 1. Stephen Pratt18. Randy Vane35. Robert Continetti 2. Chris Greene19. Claude Krantz36. Henrik Buhr 3. Bastiaan Braams20. Xavier Urbain37. Mats Larsson 4. Ed Grant21. Hidekazu Takagi38. Dirk Schwalm 5. Christian Nordhorn22. Brian Mitchell39. Evelyne Roueff 6. Steen Brønsted Nielsen23. Andreas Wolf40. Pascal Pernot 7. Dermot Madden24. Daren Stotler41. Stefan Rosén 8. Radek Plašil25. Slava Kokoouline42. Rainer Johnsen 9. Daniel Savin26. David Schultz43. Xiaohong Cai 10. Jonathan Tennyson27. Mourad Telmini44. Dan Haxton 11. Peet Hickman28. Ruth Malenda45. Åsa Larson 12. Michael Fogle29. Slim Chourou46. Dahbia Talbi 13. Waffeu Tamo Francois Oliver30. Petr Dohnal47. Ann Orel 14. Christian Jungen31. Julia Stützel48. Steven Guberman 15. Ilya Fabrikant32. Ioan Schneider49. Jane Fox 16. Wolf Geppert33. Nicholas Shuman50. Richard Thomas 17. Oldřich Novotný34. Holger Kreckel51. Fangfang Ruan

  7. PREFACE: Spanish Relativity Meeting/ERE2009Gravitation in the Large

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazkoz, Ruth; Vera, Raül

    2010-04-01

    interaction between the participants and promote collaborative links, as scientific interaction is one of the main purposes of the meeting. The 10th was devoted to an emotional homage to Prof. Jesús Martín, with special talks to honour his scientific and academic careers. And last but not least, there was a quite plenty programme of social events, as has become customary in the ERE meetings; the programme started on the 6th with a friendly reception at the ''Ein Prosit'' bar, on the 7th we had a reception at the ''Salón Árabe'' of the Bilbao Town Hall hosted by the Deputy Mayor, the SEGRE public lecture in the Main Library of Bilbao on the 8th, a guided visit to the ''Ría de Bilbao'' on the Txinbito boat, and a closing dinner at the Aspaldiko restaurant in Loiu. As editors of these proceedings and members of the Organizing Committee we want to take advantage of this opportunity to thank warmly everyone who made this conference possible and make the wish that in future editions to be held in Bilbao we will have again such a splendid support from the institutions and the scientific community. Ruth Lazkoz and Raül Vera Invited Speakers Roberto Emparan (Universitat de Barcelona) Frans Pretorius (Princeton University) Joseph Silk (University of Oxford) Robert M. Wald (University of Chicago) Scientific Committee M. Alcubierre (ICN, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) R. Beig (Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Viena) C. Cutler (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Inst. of Technology) T. Damour (Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques) R. Maartens (Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth) F. Quevedo (DAMTP, University of Cambridge) Local Organising Committee J. Ibáñez R. Lazkoz J. M. M. Senovilla (Chair) R. Vera (Secretary and webmaster) Conference photograph MICINN_logo EJ_logo UPV_logo SEGRE_logo BILBAO_logo FISIKA_logo GRG_logo

  8. Endometrial stromal fibroblasts from women with polycystic ovary syndrome have impaired progesterone-mediated decidualization, aberrant cytokine profiles and promote enhanced immune cell migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Piltonen, T.T.; Chen, J.C.; Khatun, M.; Kangasniemi, M.; Liakka, A.; Spitzer, T.; Tran, N.; Huddleston, H.; Irwin, J.C.; Giudice, L.C.

    2015-01-01

    results emphasize the importance of understanding immune responses related to the implantation process and normal endometrial homeostasis in women with PCOS. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) Sigrid Juselius Foundation, Academy of Finland, Finnish Medical Foundation, Orion-Farmos Research Foundation (to T.T.P.), the NIH Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) U54HD 055764-07 Specialized Cooperative Centers Program in Reproduction and Infertility Research (to L.C.G.), the NICHD the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards grant 1F32HD074423-03 (to J.C.C.). The authors have no competing interests. PMID:25750105

  9. Obituary: Maurice M. Shapiro, 1915-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodh, Gaurang B.

    2009-01-01

    detailed analysis of the so- called Slab-model, and re-acceleration of cosmic rays (Shapiro, Silberberg, and Tsao in Cosmology, Fusion and other Matters, edited by Fred Reines, 1972). When he became emeritus, Maury was still very active both in research and in running the Erice School of Cosmic Ray Astrophysics (after 1982). He was interested in having a base of operations for the school. He approached me asking whether Maryland would be a possibility. I was delighted and suggested a Visiting professorship to be able to continue his work (without having to move out of the Washington, DC, area). Thus started Maury's association with Maryland which continued until his death. Maury was not only an outstanding scientist, but he was a true gentleman and a good friend. He was an ambassador for the field of Cosmic Rays. His friendly personality, always warm and kind to students and colleagues, was quite infectious. Maury contributed to both experimental and theoretical investigations of cosmic rays and their central role in connecting many diverse disciplines in particle physics, astrophysics, geophysics, acoustical physics. He was outstanding scientist and was greatly concerned about world peace and human affairs. Maury passed away on 27 February 2008, at the age of 92, in Alexandria, Virginia. Four years prior to his death he was still swimming in the Mediterranean during the Cosmic Ray School sessions at Erice. He is survived by his wife, Ruth Auslander, and children Joel N. Shapiro, Elana Ashley, Raquel T. Kislinger, Mark and Bonnie Auslander, Beth Kessler, Lionel Ames, and Naomi Mirvis and grand children.

  10. Obituary: Ronald Eugene Pitts, 1949-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacConnell, D. Jack

    2009-01-01

    Ronald Pitts, systems engineer in the Commanding Branch of the Space Telescope Science Institute and long-time Computer Sciences Corporation employee, died suddenly of a stroke on 4 May 2008 at his home in Laurel, Maryland. He was a dedicated scientist-engineer, husband, father, volunteer, and cherished friend to many. Ron was born on 19 January 1949 in Tucson, Arizona, and was raised, along with his sister Suzanne, on his parents' turkey farm outside Tucson. He picked up practical knowledge from his father, Vernon, and became a competent amateur electrician and plumber, skills he kept honed and used throughout his life. His mother, Ruth (Stephens), was a nurse and taught him compassion and patience and encouraged his inquisitive mind. Ron attended public schools and enrolled at the University of Arizona, graduating with a B. S. in Astronomy in 1971. Being from a family of modest means, he put himself through school working summers and part-time at a large copper mine south of town. Ron enrolled in the graduate astronomy program at the Ohio State University [OSU] in the fall of 1971 where he was a first-year fellowship student. During his second and third years, he was the Perkins Assistant, taking spectra for the very exacting but appreciative Philip Keenan who once remarked to another faculty member that Ron was the best observer he ever had. Later, in 1980, Ron was co-author with Keenan on "Revised MK Spectral Types for G, K, and M stars" and again in 1985 in a study of supergiants in open clusters. He met his future wife, Patricia Moore, also a graduate student in the department, and they were wed in 1973. Ron was also partially supported during his early OSU years by an NSF grant to Robert Wing, writing parts of Wing's photometric reduction code and observing on the program at Kitt Peak and Flagstaff in the summer of 1974. Wing remembers him as being very competent and pleasant to work with. Ron's thesis topic was "Oscillator Strengths for Neutral Iron and

  11. BOOK REVIEW: The Physics of the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Douglas

    2007-11-01

    about perturbations, and so we get a summary of cosmological perturbation theory by Ruth Durrer—more background and physical explanations would have been helpful, but this is a nice compact summary. The cosmic microwave background has been the cornerstone for making experimental progress, and we get an excellent overview from Anthony Challinor—although again there are several sections where more explanation would have been useful for the novice. Next comes a broad survey of other aspects of observational cosmology by Robert Sanders, which is clear and succinct. The only slight blemishes are caused by the author desperately seeking discord, and only apparently finding it in places where it isn't made clear that his views are unconventional. Dark energy, i.e. the generalization of the cosmological constant to a dynamic fluid, is a huge area of current theoretical study, where one can uncharitably say that there are no well-motivated theories! It is therefore crucial to have the views of a clear-thinking expert to help us navigate this topic, and Varun Sahni does an excellent job here. We then find ourselves in the territory of string and brane cosmology, where there are 2 reviews, presented in the wrong order. Roy Maartens (whose article comes second) does a reasonable job of building on the ideas of inflation and cosmological perturbations to describe brane-world views of the early universe, perhaps just becoming slightly too heavy on technical detail and light on physical discussion in the middle part. But the string cosmology review by André Lukas (which comes first), is unfortunately nothing like an introduction to that topic, since much of the jargon and even some of the symbols will be quite unfamiliar to anyone who hasn't already taken graduate level courses on string theory. The book ends with 2 competent (and fairly short) summaries relevant to gravitational wave astronomy, which are really quite unconnected with the main topic of the book—it would have

  12. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-04-01

    at 90° relative to each other, nitrogen contained three hooks at 120°, etc. The wires were sufficiently long and flexible that multiple bonding could be represented. Each player was dealt several game pieces and the first player received an extra carbon. The objective was to hook pieces together to make an acceptable molecule. Players took turns and the first player to use all his or her pieces was declared the winner. The first crossword puzzle to appear in JCE was written by a high school teacher from Hollywood, California (2). Ruth Van Vleet had observed that her students were caught up in the popularity of crossword puzzles of the time (1925) and used that interest to help students learn chemical facts. The puzzle published in the article was submitted by one of her students after completing one year of chemistry. The first article which carried the term "humor" in the title was published in 1974 (3). To meet the requirements of a class assignment to compare two elements, one student wrote an imaginary dialog between ytterbium and lutetium. Word play and puns were used to described similar and differing properties of the two elements. This article, however, was not the first account of using humor as a vehicle for stimulating student interest. Games, puzzles, and humor certainly can be overused. Usually they do not lead to the development of conceptual understanding. However, appropriate use, as many JCE readers have discovered, can stimulate student interest and reinforce factual knowledge. Some strategy games may help develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. The games, humor, and puzzles published in JCE are peer-reviewed so that inaccuracies and errors are not perpetuated. So why not take advantage of this resource? And look forward to next April, or whenever, for more games, puzzles, and humor. Feedback Requested for View from My Classroom Feature David Byrum, editor of the View From My Classroom feature, requests the assistance of readers

  13. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-04-01

    at 90° relative to each other, nitrogen contained three hooks at 120°, etc. The wires were sufficiently long and flexible that multiple bonding could be represented. Each player was dealt several game pieces and the first player received an extra carbon. The objective was to hook pieces together to make an acceptable molecule. Players took turns and the first player to use all his or her pieces was declared the winner. The first crossword puzzle to appear in JCE was written by a high school teacher from Hollywood, California (2). Ruth Van Vleet had observed that her students were caught up in the popularity of crossword puzzles of the time (1925) and used that interest to help students learn chemical facts. The puzzle published in the article was submitted by one of her students after completing one year of chemistry. The first article which carried the term "humor" in the title was published in 1974 (3). To meet the requirements of a class assignment to compare two elements, one student wrote an imaginary dialog between ytterbium and lutetium. Word play and puns were used to described similar and differing properties of the two elements. This article, however, was not the first account of using humor as a vehicle for stimulating student interest. Games, puzzles, and humor certainly can be overused. Usually they do not lead to the development of conceptual understanding. However, appropriate use, as many JCE readers have discovered, can stimulate student interest and reinforce factual knowledge. Some strategy games may help develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. The games, humor, and puzzles published in JCE are peer-reviewed so that inaccuracies and errors are not perpetuated. So why not take advantage of this resource? And look forward to next April, or whenever, for more games, puzzles, and humor. Feedback Requested for View from My Classroom Feature David Byrum, editor of the View From My Classroom feature, requests the assistance of readers

  14. Obituary: Malcolm Raff (1940-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuch, H.

    2011-12-01

    In his seventy years, Malcolm Raff never did figure out exactly what he wanted to be when he grew up. The only son of lawyer Henry Raff and music teacher Ruth Raff (nee Marshak), Mal's interests vacillated between the analytical and the artistic. Early skill as a pianist and trombone player competed for his youthful attention with amateur radio and astronomy, leading him to pursue a liberal arts education at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania, from which institution he earned BS degrees in math and physics in 1961. Mal's lifelong passion for flying, leading to his becoming not only a licensed commercial pilot but also a certified flight instructor (airplane, instruments, and helicopter) was kindled in graduate school at the University of Illinois (MS astronomy 1963), and refined during his years at the University of California, Berkeley (PhD astrophysics, 1976). Mal's love of aviation derived in part from his viewing birds as kin. He told his wife Connie to watch birds land if she wanted to understand how an airplane should land. Following a devastating Bay Area oil spill in 1971, he not only assisted with cleanup, but began banding birds, cataloguing their blood samples, and tracking their health. This interest in ornithology continued throughout his life, toward the end of which Mal was a lead technical volunteer for the Mickaboo Bird Rescue Organization, and guardian to a large family of rescued birds, including: QT, an eight year old Lessor Sulpher Crested Cockatoo, adopted four years ago Pique, a 32 year old Red-Vented Cockatoo, adopted two years ago Cabernet, a Crimson Rosella from Australia, age unknown, adopted 2 1/2 years ago Bruno, a ten year old Brown Headed Cow Bird, rescued when found out of its nest Noe, Protrero, Duboce, and Taraval, four Cherry Head Conures of San Francisco's Telegraph Hill, raised by Mal from age two weeks, and all named after streets of San Francisco. After flirting with an academic career for a couple of years in the Berkeley

  15. Quadrupole Alignment and Trajectory Correction for Future Linear Colliders: SLC Tests of a Dispersion-Free Steering Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R

    2004-06-08

    and the fiducials. Beam-based alignment methods ideally only depend upon the BPM resolution and generally provide much better precision. Many of those techniques are described in other contributions to this workshop. In this paper we describe our experiences with a dispersion-free steering algorithm for linacs. This algorithm was first suggested by Raubenheimer and Ruth in 1990 [5]. It h as been studied in simulations for NLC [5], TESLA [6], the S-BAND proposal [7] and CLIC [8]. The dispersion-free steering technique can be applied to the whole linac at once and returns the alignment (or trajectory) that minimizes the dispersive emittance growth of the beam. Thus it allows an extremely fast alignment of the beam-line. As we will show dispersion-free steering is only sensitive to quadrupole misalignments. Wakefield-free steering [3] as mentioned before is a closely related technique that minimizes the emittance growth caused by both dispersion and wakefields. Due to hardware limitations (i.e. insufficient relative range of power supplies) we could not study this method experimentally in the SLC. However, its systematics are very similar to those of dispersion-free steering. The studies of dispersion-free steering which are presented made extensive use of the unique potential of the SLC as the only operating linear collider. We used it to study the performance and problems of advanced beam-based optimization tools in a real beam-line environment and on a large scale. We should mention that the SLC has utilized beam-based alignment for years [9], using the difference of electron and positron trajectories. This method, however, cannot be used in future linear colliders. The goal of our work is to demonstrate the performance of advanced beam-based alignment techniques in linear colliders and to anticipate possible reality-related problems. Those can then be solved in the design state for the next generation of linear colliders.

  16. Obituary: Ronald Eugene Pitts, 1949-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacConnell, D. Jack

    2009-01-01

    Ronald Pitts, systems engineer in the Commanding Branch of the Space Telescope Science Institute and long-time Computer Sciences Corporation employee, died suddenly of a stroke on 4 May 2008 at his home in Laurel, Maryland. He was a dedicated scientist-engineer, husband, father, volunteer, and cherished friend to many. Ron was born on 19 January 1949 in Tucson, Arizona, and was raised, along with his sister Suzanne, on his parents' turkey farm outside Tucson. He picked up practical knowledge from his father, Vernon, and became a competent amateur electrician and plumber, skills he kept honed and used throughout his life. His mother, Ruth (Stephens), was a nurse and taught him compassion and patience and encouraged his inquisitive mind. Ron attended public schools and enrolled at the University of Arizona, graduating with a B. S. in Astronomy in 1971. Being from a family of modest means, he put himself through school working summers and part-time at a large copper mine south of town. Ron enrolled in the graduate astronomy program at the Ohio State University [OSU] in the fall of 1971 where he was a first-year fellowship student. During his second and third years, he was the Perkins Assistant, taking spectra for the very exacting but appreciative Philip Keenan who once remarked to another faculty member that Ron was the best observer he ever had. Later, in 1980, Ron was co-author with Keenan on "Revised MK Spectral Types for G, K, and M stars" and again in 1985 in a study of supergiants in open clusters. He met his future wife, Patricia Moore, also a graduate student in the department, and they were wed in 1973. Ron was also partially supported during his early OSU years by an NSF grant to Robert Wing, writing parts of Wing's photometric reduction code and observing on the program at Kitt Peak and Flagstaff in the summer of 1974. Wing remembers him as being very competent and pleasant to work with. Ron's thesis topic was "Oscillator Strengths for Neutral Iron and

  17. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Michael; Düllmann, Dirk; Rind, Ofer; Wong, Tony

    2012-12-01

    Wisconsin-Madison, United States Günter Duckeck, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany Richard Dubois, SLAC, United States Michael Ernst, BNL, United States Ian Fisk, Fermilab, United States Gonzalo Merino, PIC, Spain John Gordon, STFC-RAL, United Kingdom Volker Gülzow, DESY, Germany Frederic Hemmer, CERN, Switzerland Viatcheslav Ilyin, Moscow State University, Russia Nobuhiko Katayama, KEK, Japan Alexei Klimentov, BNL, United States Simon C. Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Milos Lokajícek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic David Malon, ANL, United States Pere Mato Vila, CERN, Switzerland Mauro Morandin, INFN CNAF, Italy Harvey Newman, Caltech, United States Farid Ould-Saada, University of Oslo, Norway Ruth Pordes, Fermilab, United States Hiroshi Sakamoto, University of Tokyo, Japan Alberto Santoro, UERJ, Brazil Jim Shank, Boston University, United States Dongchul Son, Kyungpook National University, South Korea Reda Tafirout, TRIUMF, Canada Stephen Wolbers, Fermilab, United States Frank Wuerthwein, UCSD, United States

  18. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    & Genoa University/INFN, Switzerland Lothar Bauerdick, Fermilab, USA Ian Bird, CERN, Switzerland Amber Boehnlein, US Department of Energy, USA Kors Bos, CERN, Switzerland Federico Carminati, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Charpentier, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Institute of High Energy Physics, China Peter Clarke, University of Edinburgh, UK Michael Ernst, Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA David Foster, CERN, Switzerland Merino Gonzalo, CIEMAT, Spain John Gordon, STFC-RAL, UK Volker Guelzow, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg, Germany John Harvey, CERN, Switzerland Frederic Hemmer, CERN, Switzerland Hafeez Hoorani, NCP, Pakistan Viatcheslav Ilyin, Moscow State University, Russia Matthias Kasemann, DESY, Germany Nobuhiko Katayama, KEK, Japan Milos Lokajícek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic David Malon, ANL, USA Pere Mato Vila, CERN, Switzerland Mirco Mazzucato, INFN CNAF, Italy Richard Mount, SLAC, USA Harvey Newman, Caltech, USA Mitsuaki Nozaki, KEK, Japan Farid Ould-Saada, University of Oslo, Norway Ruth Pordes, Fermilab, USA Hiroshi Sakamoto, The University of Tokyo, Japan Alberto Santoro, UERJ, Brazil Jim Shank, Boston University, USA Alan Silverman, CERN, Switzerland Randy Sobie , University of Victoria, Canada Dongchul Son, Kyungpook National University, South Korea Reda Tafirout , TRIUMF, Canada Victoria White, Fermilab, USA Guy Wormser, LAL, France Frank Wuerthwein, UCSD, USA Charles Young, SLAC, USA

  19. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS

    SciTech Connect

    de O Buanafina, Marcia Maria

    2013-10-16

    Biologists (ASPB). July 18-22, 2009 Honolulu, Hawaii at the ?Bioenergy Crops and Biofuels? section Identifying genes controlling feruloylation in grass cell walls. Plant & Animal Genome Conference XVIII and Plant Feedstock Genomics for Bioenergy Workshop January 9-13, 2010. Town & Country Hotel - San Diego, CA. Poster Identifying genes controlling feruloylation in grass cell walls. Genomic Sciences Contractor-grantee Meeting IX USDA-DOE Plant Feedstock Genomics for Bioenergy Awardee Meeting April 10-13, 2011.Cryatal City, Virginia. Brachypodium distachyon-pathogen interactions: exploring the cell wall barrier and defense-related compounds?. ASPB July 20-24, 2012, Austin TX. Presentation and Poster Expression of putative arabinoxylan feruloyl transferase genes in Brachypodium distachyon. Genomic Sciences Contractor-Grantee Meeting XI USDA-DOE Plant Feedstock Genomics for Bioenergy Awardee Meeting 2013 February 24-27, 2013 Bethesda, MD. Poster Differential responses of Brachypodium distachyon genotypes to fungal pathogens: exploring the cell wall barrier and defense-related compounds. First International Brachypodium Conference. June 19-21, 2013. Modena, Italy. Presentation Ferulates in Cell Walls of Forage Grasses: Their Significance for Wall Degradability and Resistance to Insects and Pathogens. Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology Fall Seminar Series 13 October 2013, The Pennsylvania State University. Invited Presentation. Training Technical personnel: Sharon Hoover; Ruth Haldeman (replaced Sharon Hoover who resigned for illness); Erica Sheere (replaced Ruth Haldeman whose performance was well bellow expectation): Students: Andrea Hendershot; Nil Dhanani:, Anthony Rosario; Kathleen Tanner; David Apont; Brandon Armsted; Maria Frrnanda Buanafina Maia; Vishakha Mahajan Postdoctoral Fellow: Mandeep Sharma:

  20. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  1. Outcomes From AAS Hack Day at the 227th AAS Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    will be a huge first step.Gender in Astronomy Conferences: Jim Davenport (WWU), Ben Nelson (Northwestern), Mehmet Alpsalan (NASA Ames), and Erin Maier (University of Iowa) analyzed data collected during the conference on the gender breakdown of who asks questions after oral presentations. Now in its third year, one new finding from the study is that women dont ask questions as much as men do, but they tend to ask questions more when the speaker is a woman or the first question-asker is a woman.More from #hackaas at #aas227: Gender of speaker vs. 1st to ask a question for all 3 years of Gender in Astro survey pic.twitter.com/l74D3rSUOD Erin Maier (@fallelujah) January 9, 2016The Early Reference Project: Many pre-1950 publications lack up-to-date citation information because the text is digitally archived as an image. Brendan Wells (UC Santa Cruz) worked with representatives from ADS and Zooniverse to set up a crowd-sourced platform to identify references in these old papers.Glassdome: Ellie Schwab (CUNY) and colleagues Paige Godfrey, Munazza Alam, and Cam Buzzard began work on a website modeled after glassdoor for safely sharing experiences throughout their astronomy careers. Glassdome will feature career path stories, department reviews, and salaries, all optionally anonymous. The site is hosted by ScienceBetter and is under development.Observing Run Sharing: Sometimes near the end of a long night at the telescope you have observed everything you need but still have time left. Short of choosing randomly or hoping a colleague is online in the middle of the night, there is currently no good solution. To address this, Brooke Simmons (UC San Diego) designed a web app that would allow astronomers to submit their favorite night sky targets. The project is still a work in progress.ArXiv Podcast: Ruth Angus (Oxford) started a podcast featuring astronomers summarizing their new papers submitted to astro-ph in one minute. Its like audio astrobites! If youve recently published a

  2. Preface: SciDAC 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Horst

    2009-07-01

    and posters goes to the teams of researchers, the success of this year's conference is due to the strong efforts and support from members of the 2009 SciDAC Program Committee and Organizing Committee, and I would like to extend my heartfelt thanks to them for helping to make the 2009 meeting the largest and most successful to date. Program Committee members were: David Bader, LLNL; Pete Beckman, ANL; John Bell, LBNL; John Boisseau, University of Texas; Paul Bonoli, MIT; Hank Childs, LBNL; Bill Collins, LBNL; Jim Davenport, BNL; David Dean, ORNL; Thom Dunning, NCSA; Peg Folta, LLNL; Glenn Hammond, PNNL; Maciej Haranczyk, LBNL; Robert Harrison, ORNL; Paul Hovland, ANL; Paul Kent, ORNL; Aram Kevorkian, SPAWAR; David Keyes, Columbia University; Kwok Ko, SLAC; Felice Lightstone, LLNL; Bob Lucas, ISI/USC; Paul Mackenzie, Fermilab; Tony Mezzacappa, ORNL; John Negele, MIT; Jeff Nichols, ORNL; Mike Norman, UCSD; Joe Oefelein, SNL; Jeanie Osburn, NRL; Peter Ostroumov, ANL; Valerio Pascucci, University of Utah; Ruth Pordes, Fermilab; Rob Ross, ANL; Nagiza Samatova, ORNL; Martin Savage, University of Washington; Tim Scheibe, PNNL; Ed Seidel, NSF; Arie Shoshani, LBNL; Rick Stevens, ANL; Bob Sugar, UCSB; Bill Tang, PPPL; Bob Wilhelmson, NCSA; Kathy Yelick, NERSC/LBNL; Dave Zachmann, Vista Computational Technology LLC. Organizing Committee members were: Communications: Jon Bashor, LBNL. Contracts/Logistics: Mary Spada and Cheryl Zidel, ANL. Posters: David Bailey, LBNL. Proceedings: John Hules, LBNL. Proceedings Database Developer: Beth Cerny Patino, ANL. Program Committee Liaison/Conference Web Site: Yeen Mankin, LBNL. Tutorials: David Skinner, NERSC/LBNL. Visualization Night: Hank Childs, LBNL; Valerio Pascucci, Chems Touati, Nathan Galli, and Erik Jorgensen, University of Utah. Again, my thanks to all. Horst Simon San Diego, California June 18, 2009

  3. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    and thought-provoking. Often these presentations have evolved, and at each stage their goal is to be able to accomplish the same demonstration with ever-simpler equipment. Given that we all live under financial constraints, the `third eye' refers to the ability to look around and find a useful piece of a demonstration apparatus amongst what others might perceive to be junk. All in all, it was a very stimulating and interesting presentation, and one can easily see why this group tours China to the rave reviews of the students there. As is true every year, the wealth of interesting and valuable work shared in the parallel sessions of contributed papers was astounding. As always, I found myself running from building to building in an attempt to hear as many talks as I could possibly attend. Often a colleague and I would split up to hear different talks, and then share what we'd learned over a meal later in the day. What follows are a few highlights of what we heard and saw in some of those sessions. As one would expect given the trend of recent years, there were many interesting talks about the incorporation of computers and instructional media in introductory physics teaching. Paris Naik from the University of Illinois presented a paper on their web-based Interactive Examples. These are very well thought-out homework problems that provide interactive help in the spirit of a Socratic dialogue. They can be viewed at webug.physics.uiuc.edu/courses/ie.html. Mario Belloni and Wolfgang Christian, both from Davidson College, each gave a talk on the use of Physlets, scriptable Java-based interactive physics problems. These can be sampled at webphysics.davidson.edu/physletprob. Ruth Chabay from Carnegie Mellon University presented the Visual Python real-time, three-dimensional graphics environment in which their first-year students are programming their own visualization of physical phenomena. Its power, ease of use and freeware usage make it a must-see at cil

  4. Obituary: Malcolm Raff (1940-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuch, H.

    2011-12-01

    In his seventy years, Malcolm Raff never did figure out exactly what he wanted to be when he grew up. The only son of lawyer Henry Raff and music teacher Ruth Raff (nee Marshak), Mal's interests vacillated between the analytical and the artistic. Early skill as a pianist and trombone player competed for his youthful attention with amateur radio and astronomy, leading him to pursue a liberal arts education at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania, from which institution he earned BS degrees in math and physics in 1961. Mal's lifelong passion for flying, leading to his becoming not only a licensed commercial pilot but also a certified flight instructor (airplane, instruments, and helicopter) was kindled in graduate school at the University of Illinois (MS astronomy 1963), and refined during his years at the University of California, Berkeley (PhD astrophysics, 1976). Mal's love of aviation derived in part from his viewing birds as kin. He told his wife Connie to watch birds land if she wanted to understand how an airplane should land. Following a devastating Bay Area oil spill in 1971, he not only assisted with cleanup, but began banding birds, cataloguing their blood samples, and tracking their health. This interest in ornithology continued throughout his life, toward the end of which Mal was a lead technical volunteer for the Mickaboo Bird Rescue Organization, and guardian to a large family of rescued birds, including: QT, an eight year old Lessor Sulpher Crested Cockatoo, adopted four years ago Pique, a 32 year old Red-Vented Cockatoo, adopted two years ago Cabernet, a Crimson Rosella from Australia, age unknown, adopted 2 1/2 years ago Bruno, a ten year old Brown Headed Cow Bird, rescued when found out of its nest Noe, Protrero, Duboce, and Taraval, four Cherry Head Conures of San Francisco's Telegraph Hill, raised by Mal from age two weeks, and all named after streets of San Francisco. After flirting with an academic career for a couple of years in the Berkeley

  5. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    . Improved beam quality of a high power Yb: YAG laser (oral paper) / Dennis G. Harris ... [et al.]. Intracavity adaptive optics optimization of an end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser (oral paper) / Petra Welp, Ulrich Wittrock. New results in high power lasers beam correction (oral paper) / Alexis Kudryashov ... [et al.]. Adaptive optical systems for the Shenguang-III prototype facility (oral paper) / Zeping Yang ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics control of solid-state lasers (poster paper) / Walter Lubeigt ... [et al.]. Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for multimode beam reshaping (poster paper) / Inna V. Ilyina, Tatyana Yu. Cherezova. New algorithm of combining for spatial coherent beams (poster paper) / Ruofu Yang ... [et al.]. Intracavity mode control of a solid-state laser using a 19-element deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ping Yang ... [et al.] -- pt. 6. Adaptive optics in communication and atmospheric compensation. Fourier image sharpness sensor for laser communications (oral paper) / Kristin N. Walker and Robert K. Tyson. Fast closed-loop adaptive optics system for imaging through strong turbulence layers (oral paper) / Ivo Buske and Wolfgang Riede. Correction of wavefront aberrations and optical communication using aperture synthesis (oral paper) / R. J. Eastwood ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics system for a small telescope (oral paper) / G. Vdovin, M. Loktev and O. Soloviev. Fast correction of atmospheric turbulence using a membrane deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ivan Capraro, Stefano Bonora, Paolo Villoresi. Atmospheric turbulence measurements over a 3km horizontal path with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Ruth Mackey, K. Murphy and Chris Dainty. Field-oriented wavefront sensor for laser guide stars (poster paper) / Lidija Bolbasova, Alexander Goncharov and Vladimir Lukin.

  6. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    Princeton University (USA), drew attention to very important objects, namely Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) bodies. These are non-membrane-bound macromolecular assemblies that form from the dynamic interactions of RNA and proteins. The assembly of RNP bodies may sensitively depend on the biophysical features of the surrounding cytoplasm, including the degree of crowding, transport coefficients and mechanical properties. This dependency may have important implications for the RNA processing reactions involved in fundamental biological processes such as developmental cell growth. Remarkably, Brangwynne showed how RNPs behave in the cell as liquid droplets, pointing to a possible entirely new means that the cell could use to control and fine-tune its internal processes, in fact, more than that, a completely unexplored, new state of organization of living matter, and a functional one. Giuseppe Zaccai, from Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France), showed that protein dynamics is more sensitive than structure to environmental factors such as crowding, solvent, temperature or pressure. Furthermore, he convincingly explained how neutron scattering provides unique experimental data to underpin MD calculations in this context. Following up on environment-induced modulations of protein functional dynamics, Ruth Nussinov, from Tel Aviv University (Israel), addressed the important problem of whether cellular signals can travel long distances in a crowded environment. She proposed a model based on the evolution of at least three properties: a modular functional organization of the cellular network, sequences in some key regions of proteins, such as linkers or loops, and compact interactions between proteins, possibly favoured by a crowded environment. The workshop ended on a keynote lecture by Jean-Marie Lehn, from the Université de Strasbourg (France). Lehn, 1987 Nobel Laureate in chemistry, offered a 'supramolecular view' of the field of molecular interactions. Supramolecular chemistry