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Sample records for labeled anti-cd20 monoclonal

  1. [Advances in the research of anti-CD20 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Deng, Cheng-Lian; Zou, Jia; Song, Hai-Feng

    2013-10-01

    As targeted drugs to B-cell malignancies, anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies have been proved to be important in therapeutic antibody field. With three generations in more than ten years' development, the structures of these drugs have been improved, and many new indications have been found. Nowadays, these kinds of antibodies are not only used in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies, but also been proved to be useful in some autoimmune diseases treatment, and their new indications are still being expanded. With the optimization of their clinical dosage regimens, drug reaction has been increased, thus, therapeutic and side effects of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody have been further improved as well. However, the exact mechanism of action of their combination therapy with other chemical drugs is still unclear, which remains to be further studied. This article reviewed new development of anti-CD20 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies research in recent years. PMID:24417077

  2. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: from uncertainties to promises.

    PubMed

    Bagacean, Cristina; Zdrenghea, Mihnea; Tempescul, Adrian; Cristea, Victor; Renaudineau, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades, anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy has improved patient outcome in B-cell malignancies, and confirmed CD20 as an important target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Until recently, the gold standard was based on the utilization of rituximab combined with chemotherapy (fludarabine and cyclophosphamide), but patients often relapse. Next, with our better understanding of mAb engineering, anti-CD20 mAb therapy has evolved with the development of new mAb permitting significant clinical responses by improving pharmacokinetics, safety, activity and immunogenicity. Last but not least, the development of key tumoral tyrosine kinase inhibitors and their association with anti-CD20 mAb is a work in progress with promising results. PMID:27140410

  3. Safety of Repeated Open-Label Treatment Courses of Intravenous Ofatumumab, a Human Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody, in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from Three Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Taylor, Peter C.; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Chu, Myron; Mallett, Stephen; Perry, Hayley; Kurrasch, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the safety of ofatumumab retreatment in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Patients with active rheumatoid arthritis participating in two phase III trials (OFA110635 and OFA110634) and a phase II extension trial (OFA111752) received individualised open-label ofatumumab retreatment (700 mg X 2 intravenous infusions two weeks apart) ≥24 weeks following the first course and ≥16 weeks following further courses. Retreatment required evidence of clinical response followed by disease relapse. These studies were prematurely terminated by the sponsor to refocus development on subcutaneous delivery. Due to differences in study designs and populations, data are summarised separately for each study. Results 483 patients (243, 148 and 92 in OFA110635, OFA110634 and OFA111752 respectively) received up to 7 treatment courses of intravenous ofatumumab; cumulative duration of exposure was 463, 182 and 175 patient-years, respectively. Mean time between courses was 17–47 weeks. Ofatumumab induced a profound depletion of peripheral B-lymphocytes. Retreated patients derived benefit based on improvement in DAS28. Adverse events were reported for 93% (226/243), 91% (134/148) and 76% (70/92), serious adverse events for 18% (44/243), 20% (30/148) and 12% (11/92) and serious infections for 3% (8/243), 5% (7/148) and 1% (1/92) of patients in OFA110635, OFA110634 and OFA111752, respectively. The most common adverse events were infusion-related reactions during the first infusion of the first course (48–79%); serious infusion-related reactions were rare (<1% [1/243], 5% [8/148], and 1% [1/92] of patients). Two deaths occurred (fulminant hepatitis B virus infection and interstitial lung disease). Conclusions Ofatumumab was generally well tolerated with no evidence of increased safety risks with multiple retreatments. Serious infections were uncommon and did not increase over time. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov 110635 ClinicalTrials.gov 110634 Clinical

  4. NOTE: Monte Carlo microdosimetry of 188Re- and 131I-labelled anti-CD20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-García, E.; Garnica-Garza, H. M.; Ferro-Flores, G.

    2006-10-01

    The radiolabelled monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 has the property of binding to the CD20 antigen expressed on the cell surface of B-lymphocytes, thus making it a useful tool in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In this work, the event-by-event Monte Carlo code NOREC is used to calculate the single-event distribution function f1(z) in the cell nucleus using the beta spectra of the 188Re and 131I radionuclides. The simulated geometry consists of two concentric spheres representing the nucleus and the cell surface embedded in a semi-infinite water medium. An isotropic point source was placed on the cell surface to simulate the binding of the anti-CD20 labelled with either 188Re or 131I. The simulations were carried out for two combinations of cell surface and nucleus radii. A method was devised that allows one to calculate the contribution of betas of energy greater than 1 MeV, which cannot be simulated by the NOREC code, to the single-event distribution function. It is shown that disregarding this contribution leads to an overestimation of the frequency-mean specific energy of the order of 9 12%. In general, the antibody radiolabelled with 131I produces single-event distribution functions that yield higher frequency-mean specific energies.

  5. Inhibitors of SRC kinases impair antitumor activity of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Winiarska, Magdalena; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Pyrzynska, Beata; Bil, Jacek; Siernicka, Marta; Dwojak, Michal; Bobrowicz, Malgorzata; Miazek, Nina; Zapala, Piotr; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Krol, Magdalena; Syta, Aleksandra; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Pilch, Zofia; Dabrowska-Iwanicka, Anna; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Efremov, Dimitar G; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Zenz, Thorsten; Roy, Aude Le; Olive, Daniel; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Golab, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials with SRC family kinases (SFKs) inhibitors used alone or in a combination with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently underway in the treatment of B-cell tumors. However, molecular interactions between these therapeutics have not been studied so far. A transcriptional profiling of tumor cells incubated with SFKs inhibitors revealed strong downregulation of MS4A1 gene encoding CD20 antigen. In a panel of primary and established B-cell tumors we observed that SFKs inhibitors strongly affect CD20 expression at the transcriptional level, leading to inhibition of anti-CD20 mAbs binding and increased resistance of tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Activation of the AKT signaling pathway significantly protected cells from dasatinib-triggered CD20 downregulation. Additionally, SFKs inhibitors suppressed antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by direct inhibition of natural killer cells. Abrogation of antitumor activity of rituximab was also observed in vivo in a mouse model. Noteworthy, the effects of SFKs inhibitors on NK cell function are largely reversible. The results of our studies indicate that development of optimal combinations of novel treatment modalities with anti-CD20 mAbs should be preceded by detailed preclinical evaluation of their effects on target cells. PMID:25517315

  6. Characterization of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody produced by transgenic silkworms (Bombyx mori)

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Minoru; Tatematsu, Ken-Ichiro; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kawasaki, Nana

    2015-01-01

    In response to the successful use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of various diseases, systems for expressing recombinant mAbs using transgenic animals or plants have been widely developed. The silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a highly domesticated insect that has recently been used for the production of recombinant proteins. Because of their cost-effective breeding and relatively easy production scale-up, transgenic silkworms show great promise as a novel production system for mAbs. In this study, we established a transgenic silkworm stably expressing a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 mAb having the same amino acid sequence as rituximab, and compared its characteristics with rituximab produced by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (MabThera®). The anti-CD20 mAb produced in the transgenic silkworm showed a similar antigen-binding property, but stronger antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and weaker complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) compared to MabThera. Post-translational modification analysis was performed by peptide mapping using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. There was a significant difference in the N-glycosylation profile between the CHO− and the silkworm-derived mAbs, but not in other post-translational modifications including oxidation and deamidation. The mass spectra of the N-glycosylated peptide revealed that the observed biological properties were attributable to the characteristic N-glycan structures of the anti-CD20 mAbs produced in the transgenic silkworms, i.e., the lack of the core-fucose and galactose at the non-reducing terminal. These results suggest that the transgenic silkworm may be a promising expression system for the tumor-targeting mAbs with higher ADCC activity. PMID:26261057

  7. [Intravascular lymphoma treated with anti CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Jorge; Espinoza, Arturo; Manŕiquez, María; Moyano, Leonor; González, Néstor; Larrondo, Milton; Figueroa, Gastón

    2004-11-01

    We report a 78 year old male with prostatism, that was subjected to a prostate biopsy. The pathological study showed a microvascular lymphocytic infiltration. Four months later, the patients presented with reduced alertness, cough, dyspnea, fever and elevation of lactic dehydrogenase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Chest and abdominal CAT scans, bone marrow aspirate, protein electrophoresis and prostate specific antigen were normal. A re-evaluation of prostate biopsy showed an intravascular lymphoid infiltration, positive for CD45 and CD20, compatible with the diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma. Chemotherapy was started, but it was not tolerated by the patient and the response was partial. Therefore, treatment with monoclonal antibodies anti CD20 (Rituximab) was started. The tumor had a complete and prolonged (24 months) remission after the treatment PMID:15693204

  8. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani L.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sofia H. L.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Theodore A.; Laird, Kelly L.; Till, Brian G.; Bäck, Tom; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    α-Emitting radionuclides deposit a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD). To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At-labeled 1F5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At-labeled 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor-bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48 µCi of 211At-labeled anti-CD20 mAb ([211At]1F5-B10) experienced modest responses (0% cures but two- to threefold prolongation of survival compared with negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity was observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of [211At]1F5-B10. These findings suggest that α-emitters are highly efficacious in MRD settings, where isolated cells and small tumor clusters prevail. PMID:25628467

  9. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Green, Damian J; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C; Frayo, Shani L; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Hylarides, Mark D; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Balkan, Ethan R; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W; Frost, Sofia H L; Gopal, Ajay K; Orozco, Johnnie J; Gooley, Theodore A; Laird, Kelly L; Till, Brian G; Bäck, Tom; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Pagel, John M; Press, Oliver W

    2015-03-26

    α-Emitting radionuclides deposit a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD). To evaluate this hypothesis, (211)At-labeled 1F5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to (211)At-labeled 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor-bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48 µCi of (211)At-labeled anti-CD20 mAb ([(211)At]1F5-B10) experienced modest responses (0% cures but two- to threefold prolongation of survival compared with negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with (211)At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity was observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of [(211)At]1F5-B10. These findings suggest that α-emitters are highly efficacious in MRD settings, where isolated cells and small tumor clusters prevail. PMID:25628467

  10. A case of multicentric Castleman's disease associated with advanced systemic amyloidosis treated with chemotherapy and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Gholam, Dany; Vantelon, Jean-Marie; Al-Jijakli, Ahmad; Bourhis, Jean-Henri

    2003-12-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) is a rare systemic lymphoproliferative disorder with too few patient series reported in the literature to have a clear idea about the etiology, outcome and the best treatment available. Systemic reactive amyloidosis is a very rare complication of MCD and its presence worsens the prognosis. We report a case of a 28-year-old patient with plasma-cell type, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative and human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8)-negative MCD who responded to treatment with chemotherapy and the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab. Anti-CD20 therapy could be an interesting adjunctive treatment in MCD. PMID:12898190

  11. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab to treat acquired haemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Grandone, Elvira; Di Minno, Matteo N.D.; Musto, Pellegrino; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background Acquired haemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder caused by the development of specific autoantibodies against naturally occurring factor VIII (FVIII). Although about half of cases are idiopathic, AHA may be associated with several non-neoplastic conditions, autoimmune disorders, as well as haematological malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphoma. The long-term suppression of inhibitors is one of the mainstays of the treatment of AHA. Apart from standard immunosuppressive treatments, rituximab has been proven to be effective in AHA. Materials and methods The aim of this review is to provide a systematic description of data available in the literature on this topic. To do so, we performed a search using the indexed online database Medline/PubMed, without temporal limits, matching the words “rituximab” and “acquired h(a)emophilia”. Furthermore, additional published studies were identified in the reference list of the publications found in PubMed. Results The review of the literature confirms that rituximab may be a safe and useful treatment for AHA. Discussion Although rituximab is not a standard therapy for AHA, it may be useful in resistant cases. However, the definitive place of this monoclonal antibody in the therapeutic strategy for AHA (first or second-line, alone or in combination with other drugs) remains to be determined more precisely and warrants further investigation. PMID:26509821

  12. Intratumoral but not systemic delivery of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide augments the efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy against B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Betting, David J; Yamada, Reiko E; Kafi, Kamran; Said, Jonathan; van Rooijen, Nico; Timmerman, John M

    2009-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (Rituxan) has become a mainstay in the treatment of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The mechanisms of action for rituximab include antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and apoptosis induction. Combination of anti-CD20 antibodies with immunostimulatory agents may improve their efficacy via enhancement of one or more of these mechanisms. Toll-like receptor 9 agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotides administered systemically have been studied in clinical trials with and without rituximab. However, recent data suggest that intratumoral (IT) delivery of CpG has advantages in the treatment of tumors. Using a syngeneic murine B cell lymphoma line expressing human CD20, we found that IT, but not systemically administered CpG significantly improved the efficacy of rituximab against 7-day established tumors. Rituximab plus IT CpG could eradicate tumors from 42% of mice, whereas systemically administered CpG, with or without rituximab, did not achieve tumor eradication. Both natural killer cells and complement participated in the cure of tumors by rituximab plus IT CpG, apparently by increasing tumor cell sensitivity to complement and ADCC lysis, and by augmenting the cytotoxicity of ADCC effectors. No role for T cells in mediating tumor eradication was demonstrated in this model. These results suggest that previous clinical trials in B cell lymphoma combining systemic administration of CpG with rituximab may have employed suboptimal routes of CpG delivery. Future trials combining IT CpG with anti-CD20 antibodies or the antibody-mediated targeting of CpG directly to the sites of B cell lymphoma may thus be warranted. PMID:19483647

  13. Development of Novel Anti-Cd20 Monoclonal Antibodies and Modulation in Cd20 Levels on Cell Surface: Looking to Improve Immunotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay; Gupta, Damodar; Almasan, Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab has been revolutionized and validated CD20 targeting monoclonal antibody. Although, it is widely used for lymphoma therapy and many patients have been benefited. However significant numbers of patients are refractory or developed resistance to current therapies due to low level of CD20 expression and/or availability on cells surface. Thus development of novel anti-CD20 mAbs with great cell killing ability and enhance CD20 levels on cell surface can potentially exploit lymphoma therapy. In this scenario, we are summarizing the recently developed mAbs against CD20 and compounds that have ability to induce CD20 expression at significant level. We also are providing information regarding combination strategy for use of radiation and anti-CD20 mAbs in vitro. However, it will need to be determined by rigorous at pre-clinical and clinic testing. We hope this review will be beneficial for current research in the area of immunotherapy or radio-immunotherapy. PMID:27413424

  14. Phase I study of chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in Chinese patients with CD20-positive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Lin; Han, Xiaohong; He, Xiaohui; Song, Yuanyuan; Yao, Jiarui; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Weijing; Gai, Wenlin; Xie, Liangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to determine the safety, pharmacokinetics and biologic effects of a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (SCT400) in Chinese patients with CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (CD20+ B-cell NHL). SCT400 has an identical amino acid sequence as rituximab, with the exception of one amino acid in the CH1 domain of the heavy chain, which is common in Asians. Methods: Fifteen patients with CD20+ B-cell NHL received dose-escalating SCT400 infusions (250 mg/m2: n=3; 375 mg/m2: n=9; 500 mg/m2: n=3) once weekly for 4 consecutive weeks with a 24-week follow-up period. The data of all patients were collected for pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses. Results: No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Most drug-related adverse events were grade 1 or 2. Two patients had grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. Under premedication, the drug-related infusion reaction was mild. A rapid, profound and durable depletion of circulating B cells was observed in all dose groups without significant effects on T cell count, natural killer (NK) cell count or immunoglobulin levels. No patient developed anti-SCT400 antibodies during the course of the study. SCT400 serum half-life (T1/2), maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) generally increased between the first and fourth infusions (P<0.05). At the 375 mg/m2 dose, the T1/2 was 122.5±46.7 h vs. 197.0±75.0 h, respectively, and the Cmax was 200.6±20.2 g/mL vs. 339.1±71.0 g/mL, respectively. From 250 mg/m2 to 500 mg/m2, the Cmax and AUC increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). Patients with a high tumor burden had markedly lower serum SCT400 concentrations compared with those without or with a low tumor burden. Of the 9 assessable patients, 1 achieved complete response and 2 achieved partial responses. Conclusions: SCT400 is well-tolerated and has encouraging preliminary efficacy in Chinese patients with CD20+ B-cell NHL. PMID:27199517

  15. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Damian J.; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sophia; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Ted; Laird, Kelley L.; Till, B. G.; Back, Tom; Sandmaier, B. M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-26

    Alpha emitting radionuclides release a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD) conditions in which micrometastatic disease satellites are broadly distributed. To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48µCi of anti-CD20 211At-decaborate [211At-B10-1F5] experienced modest responses (0% cures but 2-3-fold prolongation of survival compared to negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity is observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of 211At-B10-1F5. These findings suggest that in a MRD lymphoma model, where isolated cells and tumor microclusters prevail, α-emitters may be uniquely efficacious.

  16. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6-9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8-1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97-0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  17. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6–9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8–1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97–0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  18. Efficacy and safety of an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Reditux™) for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis following the failure of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bhati, Manjeet; Bandyopadhyay, Syamasis

    2016-08-01

    Rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) has shown to improve symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with inadequate response to conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs). An anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Reditux™) developed by Dr. Reddy's Laboratories, India, is currently approved for use both in rheumatology and oncology patients. This retrospective report evaluates the efficacy and safety data from the real-world use of Reditux™ over a 6-month period in Indian patients with RA. All consecutive moderate to severe RA patients who failed therapy with at least two DMARDs including methotrexate (MTX) for 6 months, TNFα inhibitor naive, and willing to take Reditux™ were included. They were prescribed two doses of 1 g Reditux™, at least 15 days apart, with continued stable doses of methotrexate. Efficacy and safety after 24 weeks relative to baseline was assessed using various health assessment variables. A total of 39 patients (mean age of 46 years; 67.5 % females) treated with Reditux™ were evaluated. Statistically significant differences were observed in mean changes of DAS28-CRP, DAS28-ESR, SDAI, HAQ and Patient Global Assessment scores from baseline to 24 weeks (p < 0.0001 for all). Average steroid use per week also significantly reduced at 24 weeks (p = 0.0002). There was no significant gender difference. Mean changes in SDAI, HAQ and Patient Global Assessment scores for patients on steroids were significantly different from those not on steroids (p < 0.05 for all). At 24 weeks, 97 % of patients achieved ACR20 response demonstrating the efficacy of Reditux™ treatment. The treatment was well tolerated by patients without any clinically relevant serious adverse events over 24 weeks. Though limited by number of patients and retrospective in nature, this analysis serves as a real-world evidence of efficacy and safety of Dr. Reddy's rituximab (Reditux™) in the treatment of cs

  19. Synergistic anti-tumor activity of acadesine (AICAR) in combination with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in in vivo and in vitro models of mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Montraveta, Arnau; Xargay-Torrent, Sílvia; López-Guerra, Mónica; Rosich, Laia; Pérez-Galán, Patricia; Salaverria, Itziar; Beà, Silvia; Kalko, Susana G.; de Frias, Mercè; Campàs, Clara; Roué, Gaël; Colomer, Dolors

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is considered one of the most challenging lymphoma, with limited responses to current therapies. Acadesine, a nucleoside analogue has shown antitumoral effects in different preclinical cancer models as well as in a recent phase I/II clinical trial conducted in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Here we observed that acadesine exerted a selective antitumoral activity in the majority of MCL cell lines and primary MCL samples, independently of adverse cytogenetic factors. Moreover, acadesine was highly synergistic, both in vitro and in vivo, with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab, commonly used in combination therapy for MCL. Gene expression profiling analysis in harvested tumors suggested that acadesine modulates immune response, actin cytoskeleton organization and metal binding, pointing out a substantial impact on metabolic processes by the nucleoside analog. Rituximab also induced changes on metal binding and immune responses. The combination of both drugs enhanced the gene signature corresponding to each single agent, showing an enrichment of genes involved in inflammation, metabolic stress, apoptosis and proliferation. These effects could be important as aberrant apoptotic and proinflammatory pathways play a significant role in the pathogenesis of MCL. In summary, our results suggest that acadesine exerts a cytotoxic effect in MCL in combination with rituximab, by decreasing the proliferative and survival signatures of the disease, thus supporting the clinical examination of this strategy in MCL patients. PMID:24519895

  20. Recombinant anti-CD20 antibody fragments for microPET imaging of B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Tove; Betting, David; Kenanova, Vania E.; Salazar, Felix B.; Clarke, Pat; Said, Jonathan; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Timmerman, John M.; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    The CD20 cell surface antigen is expressed at high levels by over 90% of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), and is the target of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab. To provide more sensitive, tumor-specific positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of NHL, we sought to develop PET imaging agents targeting CD20. Methods Two recombinant anti-CD20 rituximab fragments, a minibody (scFv-CH3 dimer, 80 kDa) and a modified scFv-Fc fragment (105 kDa), designed to clear rapidly, were generated. Both fragments were radiolabeled with 124I, and the minibody was additionally radiometal labeled with 64Cu following conjugation to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N’,N’’,N’’’-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). The radioiodinated fragments and the radiometal labeled minibody were evaluated in mice as microPET imaging agents for in vivo imaging of human CD20-expressing lymphomas. Results Rapid and specific localization to CD20-positive tumors was observed with the radioiodinated fragments. However, their tumor uptakes and blood activities differed, resulting in different levels of contrast in the images. The best candidate was the minibody, with superior uptake (2-fold higher than the scFv-Fc) in CD20-positive tumor and low uptake in CD20-negative tumor. Positive tumor to negative tumor ratios were 7.0(±3.1) and 3.9(±0.7) for the minibody and scFv-Fc, respectively at 21 hours. About a 5-fold lower ratio was achieved with the 64Cu-DOTA-minibody at 19 hours due to higher residual background activity in CD20 negative tumor. Conclusion Radioiodinated minibody and scFv-Fc fragment produced excellent, high-contrast images in vivo. These new immunoPET agents may prove useful for the imaging CD20 positive lymphomas in preclinical models and in humans with NHL. PMID:19690034

  1. A new approach to comparing anti-CD20 antibodies: importance of the lipid rafts in their lytic efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hammadi, Mariam; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Berthou, Christian; Youinou, Pierre; Bordron, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The view that B lymphocytes are pathogenic in diverse pathological settings is supported by the efficacy of B-cell-ablative therapy in lymphoproliferative disorders, autoimmune diseases and graft rejection. Anti-B-cell antibodies (Abs) directed against CD20 have therefore been generated, and of these, rituximab was the first anti-CD20 monoclonal Ab (mAb) to be applied. Rituximab-mediated apoptosis, complement-dependent cytotoxicity and Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity differ from one disease to another, and, for the same disease, from one patient to another. This knowledge has prompted the development of new anti-CD20 mAbs in the hope of improving B-cell depletion. The inclusion of CD20/anti-CD20 complexes in large lipid rafts (LRs) enhances the results of some, but not all, anti-CD20 mAbs, and it may be possible to include smaller LRs. Lipid contents of membrane may be abnormal in malignant B-cells, and could explain resistance to treatment. The function of these mAbs and the importance of LRs warrant further investigation. A detailed understanding of them will increase results for B-cell depletion in lymphoproliferative diseases. PMID:20616960

  2. [One amino acid mutation in an anti-CD20 antibody fragment that affects the yield bacterial secretion and the affinity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin-Xing; Xiong, Dong-Sheng; Fan, Dong-Mei; Shao, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yuan-Fu; Zhu, Zhen-Ping; Yang, Chun-Zheng

    2003-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed against CD20, either unmodified or in radiolabeled forms, have been successfully exploited in clinic as effective therapeutic agents in the management of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. The antibody fragment is a potential agent in image and therapy of tumor. To further improve the soluble expression of anti-CD20 antibody Fab' fragment, PCR was used to mutate the anti-CD20 VL and VH genes and its biological activity was identified. The expression vector of chimeric antibody Fab' was constructed and expressed in E. coli. The data of mutant clone DNA sequence showed that the amino acid of light chain gene of the parent anti-CD20 antibody (H47) was successful mutated as Ser (GAG)-Asn (CAG). The soluble expression of mutated anti-CD20 Fab' (CD20-7) was 3.8 mg/g dry cell weight, while the parent (CD20-2) was 1.3 mg/g dry cell weight. The affinity constant Ka of CD20-7 was 2.2 x 10(9) L/mol. The primary results of competitive assays by FACS showed that CD20-7 could partially block the sites through which parent antibody (HI47) bind to Raji cells. There was difference in the Raji cells (CD20+)-binding activity between the mutant CD20-7 and parent CD20-2. The site mutation of anti-CD20 Fab' gene make it possible that the anti-CD20 antibody fragment was succeeded to obtain higher expression. In this thesis, we succeeded in completing mutation and expression of anti-CD20 Fab' genes, distinguishing its biological activity, and obtaining its highly expression. These period results will lay a foundation for development of other kind of anti-CD20 engineering antibody (for instance: Fab' Diabody and miniantibody), and make it possible for anti-CD20 antibody to be applied to tumor therapy in civil in the future. PMID:15969005

  3. Highly potent anti-CD20-RLI immunocytokine targeting established human B lymphoma in SCID mouse.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marie; Teppaz, Géraldine; Lajoie, Laurie; Solé, Véronique; Bessard, Anne; Maillasson, Mike; Loisel, Séverine; Béchard, David; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Thibault, Gilles; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Jacques, Yannick; Quéméner, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen, has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. Nevertheless, the relapsed/refractory rates are still high. One strategy to increase the clinical effectiveness of RTX is based on antibody-cytokine fusion protein (immunocytokine; ICK) vectorizing together at the tumor site the antibody effector activities and the cytokine co-signal required for the generation of cytotoxic cellular immunity. Such ICKs linking various antibody formats to interleukin (IL)-2 are currently being investigated in clinical trials and have shown promising results in cancer therapies. IL-15, a structurally-related cytokine, is now considered as having a better potential than IL-2 in antitumor immunotherapeutic strategies. We have previously engineered the fusion protein RLI, linking a soluble form of human IL-15Rα-sushi+ domain to human IL-15. Compared with IL-15, RLI displayed better biological activities in vitro and higher antitumor effects in vivo in murine and human cancer models. In this study, we investigated the advantages of fusing RLI to RTX. Anti-CD20-RLI kept its binding capacity to CD20, CD16 and IL-15 receptor and therefore fully retained both antibody effector functions (ADCC and CDC), and the cytokine potential of RLI. In a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model of disseminated residual lymphoma, anti-CD20-RLI was found to induce long-term survival of 90% of mice up to at least 120 days whereas RLI and RTX, alone or in combination, just delayed the disease onset (100% of death at 28, 40 and 51 days respectively). These findings suggest that such ICK could improve the clinical efficacy of RTX, particularly in patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25072059

  4. Targeted alpha-therapy using [Bi-213]anti-CD20 as novel treatment option for radio- and chemoresistant non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Leib, Oliver; Marx, Sebastian; Moreno, Josue; Miltner, Erich; Friesen, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is an emerging treatment option for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) producing higher overall response and complete remission rates compared with unlabelled antibodies. However, the majority of patients treated with conventional or myeloablative doses of radiolabelled antibodies relapse. The development of RIT with alpha-emitters is attractive for a variety of cancers because of the high linear energy transfer (LET) and short path length of alpha-radiation in human tissue, allowing higher tumour cell kill and lower toxicity to healthy tissues. In this study, we investigated the molecular effects of the alpha-emitter Bi-213 labelled to anti-CD20 antibodies ([Bi-213]anti-CD20) on cell cycle and cell death in sensitive and radio-/chemoresistant NHL cells. [Bi-213]anti-CD20 induced apoptosis, activated caspase-3, caspase-2 and caspase-9 and cleaved PARP specifically in CD20-expressing sensitive as well as in chemoresistant, beta-radiation resistant and gamma-radiation resistant NHL cells. CD20 negative cells were not affected by [Bi-213]anti-CD20 and unspecific antibodies labelled with Bi-213 could not kill NHL cells. Breaking radio-/chemoresistance in NHL cells using [Bi-213]anti-CD20 depends on caspase activation as demonstrated by complete inhibition of [Bi-213]anti-CD20-induced apoptosis with zVAD.fmk, a specific inhibitor of caspases activation. This suggests that deficient activation of caspases was reversed in radioresistant NHL cells using [Bi-213]anti-CD20. Activation of mitochondria, resulting in caspase-9 activation was restored and downregulation of Bcl-xL and XIAP, death-inhibiting proteins, was found after [Bi-213]anti-CD20 treatment in radio-/chemosensitive and radio-/chemoresistant NHL cells. [Bi-213]anti-CD20 seems to be a promising radioimmunoconjugate to improve therapeutic success by breaking radio- and chemoresistance selectively in CD20-expressing NHL cells via re-activating apoptotic pathways through reversing deficient

  5. Specific energy from Auger and conversion electrons of 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20 to a lymphocyte's nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-García, E.; Carrillo-Cazares, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The typical radionuclides used to label anti-CD20 in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are 90Y, 131I, and 188Re, with the emission of beta particles, Auger electrons, and conversion electrons for the latter two. The aim of the present work was to calculate the contribution of high linear energy transfer radiation as Auger electrons (AE) and conversion electrons (CE) of 131I and 188Re-anti-CD20 to mean specific energy into the cell nucleus by Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), so as to infer therapeutic effectiveness on a dosimetric basis. MCS was used to quantify the frequency-mean specific energy into the cell nucleus, where the cell was modeled by two concentric spheres, considering two cell models. The results showed that 10% and 33% of the mean-specific energies (z¯) per disintegration imparted to the cell nucleus for both geometries are due to AE and CE; on the other hand, if the hit of AE and CE occurs, the contribution to (z¯) is about 64% and 86% for 131I and 188Re, respectively. According to the amount of specific energy from AE and CE into the cell nucleus by positive event, they can cause catastrophic effects in the nuclear DNA in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20.

  6. Iodine-131 Tositumomab: (131)I-anti-B1 antibody, (131)I-tositumomab, anti-CD20 murine monoclonal antibody-I-131, B1, Bexxar, (131)I-anti-B1 antibody, iodine-131 tositumomab, iodine-131 anti-B1 antibody, tositumomab.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    combination with CHOP chemotherapy is underway in the US as first-line therapy in patients with intermediate-grade NHL. Corixa Corporation has initiated a phase II trial of iodine-131 tositumomab in combination with cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone for the treatment of previously untreated low-grade NHL. The trial was initiated while the company was preparing its BLA for Bexxar for use as a single agent for relapsed or refractory NHL. Corixa Corporation intends to pursue additional trials to expand the potential use of iodine-131 tositumomab to other indications, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. The agent is also in a clinical trial for preparation in autologous bone marrow transplant patients. The trial is designed to test the combination of iodine-131 tositumomab and chemotherapy. The trial began in 1995 and has so far enrolled 40 patients. In addition, a phase II dose-escalation trial has begun at the University of Nebraska for the combined use of iodine-131 tositumomab and chemotherapy as preparation for autologous bone marrow transplant. Corixa Corporation has received an issued US patent covering methods for administering and dosing radioimmunotherapy for the treatment of B-cell lymphomas. The patent covers iodine-131 tositumomab and other anti-CD20 antibodies used to aid in selective tumour targeting. Corixa Corporation has exclusive rights to the patent.A February 2000 media release from GlaxoSmithKline and Corixa Corporation stated that they had been issued a composition patent relating to radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies (including Bexxar) for the treatment of B-cell lymphomas. On 11 September 2001, IDEC announced that it had filed two separate lawsuits. The first lawsuit is against Corixa Corporation and the University of Michigan on six patents pertaining to products and processes related to radioimmunotherapy. They seek a declaration that Zevalin does not infringe Corixa Corporation's issued US patents. The second lawsuit involves two

  7. Improving therapeutic activity of anti-CD20 antibody therapy through immunomodulation in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lipowska-Bhalla, Grazyna; Fagnano, Ester; Illidge, Timothy M; Cheadle, Eleanor J

    2016-06-01

    Nearly two decades ago rituximab heralded a new era in management of B cell malignancies significantly increasing response rates and survival. However, despite clear therapeutic advantage, significant numbers of patients become refractory to anti-CD20 mAb therapy, suggesting urgent improvements are required. It is now well recognized that the suppressive tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the outcome of anti-CD20 mAb therapy and that manipulation of this environment may improve the efficacy and produce long-term tumor control. The past few years have seen a surge of interest in immunomodulatory agents capable of overwriting immune suppressive networks into favorable clinical outcome. Currently, a number of such combinations with anti-CD20 mAb is under evaluation and some have produced encouraging outcomes in rituximab refractory disease. In this review, we give an outline of anti-CD20 mAbs and explore the combinations with immunomodulatory agents that enhance antitumor immunity through targeting stimulatory or inhibitory pathways and have proven potential to synergize with anti-CD20 mAb therapy. These agents, primarily mAbs, target CTLA-4, PD-1/PD-L1, and CD40. PMID:27050042

  8. Comparability analysis of anti-CD20 commercial (rituximab) and RNAi-mediated fucosylated antibodies by two LC-MS approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Rossomando, Anthony; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry L.

    2013-01-01

    In developing biosimilar or biobetter products, comparability to the reference product is required to claim similar integrity or intended purpose. In this work, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody developed using RNA interference to decrease core fucosylation (RNAi-mediated) was comprehensively characterized by LC-MS and compared with the commercially-available anti-CD20 rituximab (MabThera®). As anticipated, < 30% core fucose was found within the RNAi-produced molecule (compared with > 90% in rituximab), and the reduction in fucose resulting in a significant improvement in FcγRΙΙΙa binding and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Two mutations, S258Y (fully mutated) and F174I/L (partially mutated), however, were detected in the production of the RNAi-mediated molecule. An alternative LC-MS approach using dimethyl labeling (i.e., 2CH2 for rituximab and 2CD2 for the RNAi-mediated molecule) was developed to additionally compare the two mAbs and confirm the full sequence with the two mutation sites. Furthermore, disulfide linkages were found to be the same for the two antibodies, with a small portion of unpaired cysteines in both products. Disulfides were correctly linked if the samples were prepared at low pH (i.e., enzymatic digestion by pepsin at pH 2); however, trace amounts of scrambling were found by trypsin digestion at pH 6.8, and this scrambling increased significantly at pH 8. Typical modifications, such as pyro-Glu formation at the N-terminus, K clipping at the C-terminus, oxidation at Met, and deamidation at Asn, were also detected with no significant differences between the two products. Using the LC-MS approaches for the comparability study, product integrity with critical structure information was revealed for confirmation of intended purpose (core fucosylation), identification of critical parameters (e.g., sample pH), and correction as needed (amino acid mutation). PMID:23751726

  9. Anti-CD20 inhibits T cell-mediated pathology and microgliosis in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Daniel C; Dickens, Alex M; Seneca, Nicholas; Couch, Yvonne; Campbell, Sandra; Checa, Begona; Kersemans, Veerle; Warren, Edward A; Tredwell, Matthew; Sibson, Nicola R; Gouverneur, Veronique; Leppert, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective The mechanism of action of anti-B cell therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS) is not fully understood. Here, we compared the effect of anti-CD20 therapy on microglial activation in two distinct focal rat models of MS. Methods The effect of anti-CD20 therapy on lesion formation and extralesional microglial activation was evaluated in the fDTH-EAE (experimental allergic encephalomyelitis) model, which is a focal demyelinating type-IV delayed-type hypersensitivity lesion. For comparison, effects were also assessed in the focal humoral MOG model induced by intracerebral injection of cytokine in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein immunized rats. Microglial activation was assessed in situ and in vivo using the TSPO SPECT ligand [125I]DPA-713, and by immunostaining for MHCII. The effect of treatment on demyelination and lymphocyte recruitment to the brain were evaluated. Results Anti-CD20 therapy reduced microglial activation, and lesion formation in the humoral model, but it was most effective in the antibody-independent fDTH-EAE. Immunohistochemistry for MHCII also demonstrated a reduced volume of microglial activation in the brains of anti-CD20-treated fDTH-EAE animals, which was accompanied by a reduction in T-cell recruitment and demyelination. The effect anti-CD20 therapy in the latter model was similarly strong as compared to the T-cell targeting MS compound FTY720. Interpretation The suppression of lesion development by anti-CD20 treatment in an antibody-independent model suggests that B-cells play an important role in lesion development, independent of auto-antibody production. Thus, CD20-positive B-cell depletion has the potential to be effective in a wider population of individuals with MS than might have been predicted from our knowledge of the underlying histopathology. PMID:25493280

  10. Veterans health administration hepatitis B testing and treatment with anti-CD20 antibody administration

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Christine M; Beste, Lauren A; Lowy, Elliott; Suzuki, Ayako; Moylan, Cynthia A; Tillmann, Hans L; Ioannou, George N; Lim, Joseph K; Kelley, Michael J; Provenzale, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pretreatment hepatitis B virus (HBV) testing, vaccination, and antiviral treatment rates in Veterans Affairs patients receiving anti-CD20 Ab for quality improvement. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study using a national repository of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) electronic health record data. We identified all patients receiving anti-CD20 Ab treatment (2002-2014). We ascertained patient demographics, laboratory results, HBV vaccination status (from vaccination records), pharmacy data, and vital status. The high risk period for HBV reactivation is during anti-CD20 Ab treatment and 12 mo follow up. Therefore, we analyzed those who were followed to death or for at least 12 mo after completing anti-CD20 Ab. Pretreatment serologic tests were used to categorize chronic HBV (hepatitis B surface antigen positive or HBsAg+), past HBV (HBsAg-, hepatitis B core antibody positive or HBcAb+), resolved HBV (HBsAg-, HBcAb+, hepatitis B surface antibody positive or HBsAb+), likely prior vaccination (isolated HBsAb+), HBV negative (HBsAg-, HBcAb-), or unknown. Acute hepatitis B was defined by the appearance of HBsAg+ in the high risk period in patients who were pretreatment HBV negative. We assessed HBV antiviral treatment and the incidence of hepatitis, liver failure, and death during the high risk period. Cumulative hepatitis, liver failure, and death after anti-CD20 Ab initiation were compared by HBV disease categories and differences compared using the χ2 test. Mean time to hepatitis peak alanine aminotransferase, liver failure, and death relative to anti-CD20 Ab administration and follow-up were also compared by HBV disease group. RESULTS: Among 19304 VHA patients who received anti-CD20 Ab, 10224 (53%) had pretreatment HBsAg testing during the study period, with 49% and 43% tested for HBsAg and HBcAb, respectively within 6 mo pretreatment in 2014. Of those tested, 2% (167/10224) had chronic HBV, 4% (326/7903) past HBV, 5% (427

  11. Construction and characterization of an anti-CD20 mAb nanocomb with exceptionally excellent lymphoma-suppressing activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua-Fei; Wu, Cong; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Ge; Zhao, He; Ke, Chang-Hong; Xu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The CD20-directed monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) established a new era in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); however, suboptimal response and/or resistance to RTX still limit its clinical merits. Although four effector mechanisms are validated to participate in CD20-based immunotherapy, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and lysosome-mediated programmed cell death (PCD), they could hardly be synchronously activated by any anti-CD20 mAb or mAb derivative until now. Herein, a novel mAb nanocomb (polyethylenimine polymer–RTX–tositumomab [PPRT nanocomb]) was firstly constructed through mass arming two different anti-CD20 mAbs (RTX and tositumomab) to one polymer by nanotechnology. Comparing with free mAbs, PPRT nanocomb possesses a comparable binding ability and reduced “off-rate” to surface CD20 of NHL cells. When treated by PPRT nanocomb, the caspase-dependent apoptosis was remarkably enhanced except for concurrently eliciting complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and lysosome-mediated PCD. Besides, “cross-cell link”-assisted homotypic adhesion by PPRT nanocomb further enhanced the susceptibility to PCD of lymphoma cells. Pharmacokinetic assays revealed that PPRT nanocomb experienced a relatively reduced clearance from peripheral blood compared with free antibodies. With the cooperation of all the abovementioned superiorities, PPRT nanocomb exhibits exceptionally excellent in vivo antitumor activities in both disseminated and localized human NHL xenotransplant models. PMID:26257518

  12. Production of an active anti-CD20-hIL-2 immunocytokine in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Carla; Novelli, Flavia; Salzano, Anna M; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Pioli, Claudio; Donini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 murine or chimeric antibodies (Abs) have been used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and other diseases characterized by overactive or dysfunctional B cells. Anti-CD20 Abs demonstrated to be effective in inducing regression of B-cell lymphomas, although in many cases patients relapse following treatment. A promising approach to improve the outcome of mAb therapy is the use of anti-CD20 antibodies to deliver cytokines to the tumour microenvironment. In particular, IL-2-based immunocytokines have shown enhanced antitumour activity in several preclinical studies. Here, we report on the engineering of an anti-CD20-human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) immunocytokine (2B8-Fc-hIL2) based on the C2B8 mAb (Rituximab) and the resulting ectopic expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The scFv-Fc-engineered immunocytokine is fully assembled in plants with minor degradation products as assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Purification yields using protein-A affinity chromatography were in the range of 15-20 mg/kg of fresh leaf weight (FW). Glycopeptide analysis confirmed the presence of a highly homogeneous plant-type glycosylation. 2B8-Fc-hIL2 and the cognate 2B8-Fc antibody, devoid of hIL-2, were assayed by flow cytometry on Daudi cells revealing a CD20 binding activity comparable to that of Rituximab and were effective in eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of human PBMC versus Daudi cells, demonstrating their functional integrity. In 2B8-Fc-hIL2, IL-2 accessibility and biological activity were verified by flow cytometry and cell proliferation assay. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a recombinant immunocytokine based on the therapeutic Rituximab antibody scaffold, whose expression in plants may be a valuable tool for NHLs treatment. PMID:25879373

  13. Anti-CD20 Therapy Acts via FcγRIIIA to Diminish Responsiveness of Human Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Cristina; Romanelli, Maddalena; Pighi, Chiara; Cimino, Giuseppe; Rago, Angela; Molfetta, Rosa; Paolini, Rossella; Santoni, Angela; Galandrini, Ricciarda

    2015-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) immune cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) by aggregating FcγRIIIA/CD16, contributing significantly to the therapeutic effect of CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In this study, we show that CD16 ligation on primary human NK cells by the anti-CD20 mAb rituximab or ofatumumab stably impairs the spontaneous cytotoxic response attributable to cross-tolerance of several unrelated NK-activating receptors (including NKG2D, DNAM-1, NKp46, and 2B4). Similar effects were obtained from NK cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in an autologous setting. NK cells rendered hyporesponsive in this manner were deficient in the ability of these cross-tolerized receptors to phosphorylate effector signaling molecules critical for NK cytotoxicity, including SLP-76, PLCγ2, and Vav1. These effects were associated with long-lasting recruitment of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 to the CD16 receptor complex. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of SHP-1 with sodium stibogluconate counteracted CD20 mAb-induced NK hyporesponsiveness, unveiling an unrecognized role for CD16 as a bifunctional receptor capable of engendering long-lasting NK cell inhibitory signals. Our work defines a novel mechanism of immune exhaustion induced by CD20 mAb in human NK cells, with potentially negative implications in CD20 mAb-treated patients where NK cells are partly responsible for clinical efficacy. PMID:26229120

  14. ImmunoPET imaging of B-cell lymphoma using 124I-anti-CD20 scFv dimers (diabodies).

    PubMed

    Olafsen, Tove; Sirk, Shannon J; Betting, David J; Kenanova, Vania E; Bauer, Karl B; Ladno, Waldemar; Raubitschek, Andrew A; Timmerman, John M; Wu, Anna M

    2010-04-01

    Rapid clearing engineered antibody fragments for immunoPET promise high sensitivity at early time points. Here, tumor targeting of anti-CD20 diabodies (scFv dimers) for detection of low-grade B-cell lymphomas were evaluated. In addition, the effect of linker length on oligomerization of the diabody was investigated. Four rituximab scFv variants in the V(L)-V(H) orientation with different linker lengths between the V domains (scFv-1, scFv-3, scFv-5, scFv-8), plus the scFv-5 with a C-terminal cysteine (Cys-Db) for site-specific modification were generated. The scFv-8 and Cys-Db were radioiodinated with (124)I for PET imaging, and biodistribution of (131)I-Cys-Db was carried out at 2, 4 10 and 20 h. The five anti-CD20 scFv variants were expressed as fully functional dimers. Shortening the linker to three or one residue did not produce higher order of multimers. Both (124)I-labeled scFv-8 and Cys-Db exhibited similar tumor targeting at 8 h post injection, with significantly higher uptakes than in control tumors (P < 0.05). At 20 h, less than 1% ID/g of (131)I-labeled Cys-Db was present in tumors and tissues. Specific tumor targeting and high contrast images were achieved with the anti-CD20 diabodies. These agents extend the repertoire of reagents that can potentially be used to improve detection of low-grade lymphomas. PMID:20053640

  15. ImmunoPET imaging of B-cell lymphoma using 124I-anti-CD20 scFv dimers (diabodies)

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Tove; Sirk, Shannon J.; Betting, David J.; Kenanova, Vania E.; Bauer, Karl B.; Ladno, Waldemar; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Timmerman, John M.; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid clearing engineered antibody fragments for immunoPET promise high sensitivity at early time points. Here, tumor targeting of anti-CD20 diabodies (scFv dimers) for detection of low-grade B-cell lymphomas were evaluated. In addition, the effect of linker length on oligomerization of the diabody was investigated. Four rituximab scFv variants in the VL–VH orientation with different linker lengths between the V domains (scFv-1, scFv-3, scFv-5, scFv-8), plus the scFv-5 with a C-terminal cysteine (Cys-Db) for site-specific modification were generated. The scFv-8 and Cys-Db were radioiodinated with 124I for PET imaging, and biodistribution of 131I-Cys-Db was carried out at 2, 4 10 and 20 h. The five anti-CD20 scFv variants were expressed as fully functional dimers. Shortening the linker to three or one residue did not produce higher order of multimers. Both 124I-labeled scFv-8 and Cys-Db exhibited similar tumor targeting at 8 h post injection, with significantly higher uptakes than in control tumors (P < 0.05). At 20 h, less than 1% ID/g of 131I-labeled Cys-Db was present in tumors and tissues. Specific tumor targeting and high contrast images were achieved with the anti-CD20 diabodies. These agents extend the repertoire of reagents that can potentially be used to improve detection of low-grade lymphomas. PMID:20053640

  16. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  17. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-04-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  18. Anti-CD20 Immunoglobulin G Radiolabeling with a 99mTc-Tricarbonyl Core: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Carpenet, Hélène; Cuvillier, Armelle; Monteil, Jacques; Quelven, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes have shown significant progress. Immunoglobulin (Ig) appears to be a promising tracer, particularly due to its ability to target selected antigens. The main objective of this study is to optimize and assess an Ig radiolabeling method with Technetium 99m (99mTc), an attractive radioelement used widely for diagnostic imaging. Monoclonal anti-CD20 IgG was retained to study in vitro and in vivo radiolabeling impact. After IgG derivatization with 2-iminothiolane, IgG-SH was radiolabeled by an indirect method, using a 99mTc-tricarbonyl core. Radiolabeling stability was evaluated over 24h by thin-layer chromatography. IgG integrity was checked by sodium dodecyl sulfate—polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with Western blot and autoradiography. The radiolabeled Ig’s immunoaffinity was assessed in vitro by a radioimmunoassay method and binding experiments with cells (EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT). Biodistribution studies were performed in normal BALB/c mice. Tumor uptake was assessed in mice bearing EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT subcutaneous xenografts. With optimized method, high radiolabeling yields were obtained (95.9 ± 3.5%). 99mTc-IgG-SH was stable in phosphate-buffered saline (4°C and 25°C) and in serum (37°C), even if important sensitivity to transchelation was observed. IgG was not degraded by derivatization and radiolabeling, as shown by Western blot and autoradiography results. 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH immunoaffinity was estimated with Kd = 35 nM by both methods. In vivo biodistribution studies for 48h showed significant accumulation of radioactivity in plasma, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys. Planar scintigraphy of mice bearing tumors showed a significant uptake of 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH in CD20+ tumor versus CD20- tumor. Radiolabeling of derivatized IgG with 99mTc-tricarbonyl was effective, stable and required few antibody amounts. This attractive radiolabeling method is “antibody safe” and

  19. Anti-CD20 Immunoglobulin G Radiolabeling with a 99mTc-Tricarbonyl Core: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Carpenet, Hélène; Cuvillier, Armelle; Monteil, Jacques; Quelven, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes have shown significant progress. Immunoglobulin (Ig) appears to be a promising tracer, particularly due to its ability to target selected antigens. The main objective of this study is to optimize and assess an Ig radiolabeling method with Technetium 99m (99mTc), an attractive radioelement used widely for diagnostic imaging. Monoclonal anti-CD20 IgG was retained to study in vitro and in vivo radiolabeling impact. After IgG derivatization with 2-iminothiolane, IgG-SH was radiolabeled by an indirect method, using a 99mTc-tricarbonyl core. Radiolabeling stability was evaluated over 24h by thin-layer chromatography. IgG integrity was checked by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with Western blot and autoradiography. The radiolabeled Ig's immunoaffinity was assessed in vitro by a radioimmunoassay method and binding experiments with cells (EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT). Biodistribution studies were performed in normal BALB/c mice. Tumor uptake was assessed in mice bearing EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT subcutaneous xenografts. With optimized method, high radiolabeling yields were obtained (95.9 ± 3.5%). 99mTc-IgG-SH was stable in phosphate-buffered saline (4°C and 25°C) and in serum (37°C), even if important sensitivity to transchelation was observed. IgG was not degraded by derivatization and radiolabeling, as shown by Western blot and autoradiography results. 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH immunoaffinity was estimated with Kd = 35 nM by both methods. In vivo biodistribution studies for 48h showed significant accumulation of radioactivity in plasma, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys. Planar scintigraphy of mice bearing tumors showed a significant uptake of 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH in CD20+ tumor versus CD20- tumor. Radiolabeling of derivatized IgG with 99mTc-tricarbonyl was effective, stable and required few antibody amounts. This attractive radiolabeling method is "antibody safe" and preserves

  20. Targeted tumor imaging of anti-CD20-polymeric nanoparticles developed for the diagnosis of B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Capolla, Sara; Garrovo, Chiara; Zorzet, Sonia; Lorenzon, Andrea; Rampazzo, Enrico; Spretz, Ruben; Pozzato, Gabriele; Núñez, Luis; Tripodo, Claudio; Macor, Paolo; Biffi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The expectations of nanoparticle (NP)-based targeted drug delivery systems in cancer, when compared with convectional therapeutic methods, are greater efficacy and reduced drug side effects due to specific cellular-level interactions. However, there are conflicting literature reports on enhanced tumor accumulation of targeted NPs, which is essential for translating their applications as improved drug-delivery systems and contrast agents in cancer imaging. In this study, we characterized biodegradable NPs conjugated with an anti-CD20 antibody for in vivo imaging and drug delivery onto tumor cells. NPs’ binding specificity mediated by anti-CD20 antibody was evaluated on MEC1 cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients’ cells. The whole-body distribution of untargeted NPs and anti-CD20 NPs were compared by time-domain optical imaging in a localized human/mouse model of B-cell malignancy. These studies provided evidence that NPs’ functionalization by an anti-CD20 antibody improves tumor pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo after systemic administration and increases in vivo imaging of tumor mass compared to non-targeted NPs. Together, drug delivery and imaging probe represents a promising theranostics tool for targeting B-cell malignancies. PMID:26124662

  1. Expression and biological characterization of an anti-CD20 biosimilar candidate antibody

    PubMed Central

    Dorvignit, Denise; Palacios, Julio L.; Merino, Maylin; Hernández, Tays; Sosa, Katya; Casacó, Angel; López-Requena, Alejandro; Mateo de Acosta, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The CD20 molecule is a non-glycosylated protein expressed mainly on the surface of B lymphocytes. In some pathogenic B cells, it shows an increased expression, thus becoming an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric antibody that specifically recognizes the human CD20 molecule. This antibody is indicated for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this work, we describe the stable expression and biological evaluation of an anti-CD20 biosimilar antibody. While rituximab is produced in fed-batch culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, our biosimilar antibody expression process consists of continuous culture of recombinant murine NS0 myeloma cells. The ability of the purified biosimilar antibody to recognize the CD20 molecule on human tumor cell lines, as well as on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from humans and primates, was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The biosimilar antibody induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis on human cell lines with high expression of CD20. In addition, this antibody depleted CD20-positive B lymphocytes from peripheral blood in monkeys. These results indicate that the biological properties of the biosimilar antibody compare favorably with those of the innovator product, and that it should be evaluated in future clinical trials. PMID:22647435

  2. Expression and biological characterization of an anti-CD20 biosimilar candidate antibody: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dorvignit, Denise; Palacios, Julio L; Merino, Maylin; Hernández, Tays; Sosa, Katya; Casaco, Angel; López-Requena, Alejandro; Mateo de Acosta, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The CD20 molecule is a non-glycosylated protein expressed mainly on the surface of B lymphocytes. In some pathogenic B cells, it shows an increased expression, thus becoming an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric antibody that specifically recognizes the human CD20 molecule. This antibody is indicated for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this work, we describe the stable expression and biological evaluation of an anti-CD20 biosimilar antibody. While rituximab is produced in fed-batch culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, our biosimilar antibody expression process consists of continuous culture of recombinant murine NS0 myeloma cells. The ability of the purified biosimilar antibody to recognize the CD20 molecule on human tumor cell lines, as well as on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from humans and primates, was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The biosimilar antibody induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis on human cell lines with high expression of CD20. In addition, this antibody depleted CD20-positive B lymphocytes from peripheral blood in monkeys. These results indicate that the biological properties of the biosimilar antibody compare favorably with those of the innovator product, and that it should be evaluated in future clinical trials. PMID:22647435

  3. Bispecific anti-CD20/22 antibodies inhibit B-cell lymphoma proliferation by a unique mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhengxing; Goldenberg, David M; Cardillo, Thomas M; Shi, Victoria; Hansen, Hans J; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2008-02-15

    Combination immunotherapy with anti-CD20 and anti-CD22 mAbs shows promising activity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Therefore, bispecific mAbs (bsAbs) were recombinantly constructed from veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20) and epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22) and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. While none of the parental mAbs alone or mixed had notable antiproliferative activity against Burkitt lymphoma cells when not cross-linked, the bsAbs [eg, anti-CD20 IgG-anti-CD22 (scFv)(2)] were inhibitory without cross-linking and synergistic with B-cell antigen (BCR)-mediated inhibition. The bsAbs demonstrated higher antibody-dependent cellulary cytoxicity (ADCC) activity than the parental mAbs, but not complement-dependent cytoxicity (CDC) of the parental CD20 mAb. Cross-linking both CD20 and CD22 with the bsAbs resulted in the prominent redistribution of not only CD20 but also CD22 and BCR into lipid rafts. Surprisingly, appreciable translocation of CD22 into lipid rafts was also observed after treatment with epratuzumab. Finally, the bsAbs inhibited Daudi lymphoma transplant growth, but showed a significant advantage over the parental anti-CD20 mAb only at the highest dose tested. These results suggest that recombinantly fused, complementary, bispecific, anti-CD20/22 antibodies exhibit functional features distinct from their parental antibodies, perhaps representing new candidate therapeutic molecules. PMID:18025153

  4. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore » either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT

  5. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in

  6. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  7. Anti-CD137 enhances anti-CD20 therapy of systemic B-cell lymphoma with altered immune homeostasis but negligible toxicity.

    PubMed

    Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Blake, Stephen J; Makkouk, Amani; Chester, Cariad; Kohrt, Holbrook E; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Studies of sequential anti-CD137/anti-CD20 therapy have previously shown that the efficacy of anti-CD20 was heavily reliant upon anti-CD137; however, the exact mechanism of the anti-B-cell lymphoma efficacy, and whether this correlates with enhanced adverse effects or toxicity, had not been elucidated. Here, we observed that sequential anti-CD137 administration with anti-CD20 resulted in a synergistic therapy, largely dependent upon Fc receptors (FcR), to prolong survival in an experimental B-cell lymphoma therapy model. Tumor suppression was accompanied by B cell depletion, which was not dependent on one activating FcR. Surprisingly, the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) was elevated in the plasma of mice receiving anti-CD137 alone or in combination with anti-CD20, while a selective increase in some plasma cytokines was also noted and triggered by anti-CD137. These effects were independent of activating FcR. Sustained treatment of advanced lymphoma revealed increased lymphocyte infiltrates into the liver and a significant decrease in the metabolic capability of the liver in mice receiving anti-CD137. Importantly, these effects were not exacerbated in mice receiving the anti-CD20/CD137 combination, and elevations in classical liver damage markers such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were less than that caused by the lymphoma itself. Thus, combined anti-CD20/anti-CD137 treatment increases the therapeutic index of anti-CD20 or anti-CD137 alone. These mouse data were corroborated by ongoing clinical development studies to assess safety, tolerability and pharmacodynamic activity of human patients treated by this approach. Together, these data support the use of this sequential antibody therapeutic strategy to improve the efficacy of rituximab in B-cell lymphoma patients. PMID:27622048

  8. Real Time Analysis of Binding between Rituximab (anti-CD20 antibody) and B Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Liang; Lin, Peiling; Chisti, Mohammad M.; Rehman, Abdul; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2013-01-01

    CD20, expressed on greater than 90% of B-lymphocytic lymphomas, is an attractive target for antibody therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric murine/human-engineered monoclonal antibody and can selectively deplete CD20-expressing cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues. The immobilization of B-lymphoblast-like Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells on the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) gold electrode surface using RGD tripeptide was electrochemically confirmed. The real-time processes of attachment of Raji cells on the gold electrode and the subsequent binding of Rituximab to the cells were studied using QCM biosensor. The interaction between Rituximab and Raji cells led to the increased resonant frequency shifts (Δf0) in the studied antibody concentration range from 5 to 250 µg mL−1 following the Langmuir adsorption model. From these observations, the apparent binding constant between a single-layer of Rituximab and Raji cells was calculated to be 1.6×106 M−1. Control experiments using other therapeutic antibodies (i.e., Trastuzumab and Bevacizumab) and different cells (i.e., T cells and endothelial cells) proved the specific interaction between Rituximab and B cells. The effects of Ca2+ and Mn2+ ions on the Rituximab-Raji cell interaction were also studied providing the enhanced QCM signals, in particular, further indicating that CD20 is a calcium ion channel that can transport these metal ions into the cells and accelerate the cell lysis induced by Rituximab. Thus the real time capability of QCM and its simplicity of operation are highly suitable for multipurpose studies on living cells including cell-immobilization, cytotoxicity of drugs, and the cell action mechanisms. PMID:23926879

  9. 90Y-labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Washburn, L C; Hwa Sun, T T; Crook, J E; Byrd, B L; Carlton, J E; Hung, Y W; Steplewski, Z S

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 17-1A, which has specificity for colorectal carcinoma, was labeled with 90Y (10-20% radiolabeling yield). Tissue distribution studies in tumor-bearing nude mice were carried out. 90Y-labeled 17-1A showed good uptake in the SW 948 colon carcinoma cell line. However, 90Y-labeled A5C3, a monoclonal antihepatitis virus antibody studied as a control, showed similar uptake in this tumor. Neither antibody was taken up well by a WM-9 melanoma. It is believed that the loss of specificity observed is due to the low specific activity of the 90Y-labeled monoclonal antibody preparations used. This hypothesis is supported by radioimmunoassay data. PMID:3793501

  10. Multiple signaling pathways induced by hexavalent, monospecific, anti-CD20 and hexavalent, bispecific, anti-CD20/CD22 humanized antibodies correlate with enhanced toxicity to B-cell lymphomas and leukemias.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pankaj; Goldenberg, David M; Rossi, Edmund A; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2010-10-28

    We have generated hexavalent antibodies (HexAbs) comprising 6 Fabs tethered to one Fc of human IgG1. Three such constructs, 20-20, a monospecific HexAb comprising 6 Fabs of veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20 immunoglobulin G1κ [IgG1κ]), 20-22, a bispecific HexAb comprising veltuzumab and 4 Fabs of epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22 IgG1κ), and 22-20, a bispecific HexAb comprising epratuzumab and 4 Fabs of veltuzumab, were previously shown to inhibit pro-liferation of several lymphoma cell lines at nanomolar concentrations in the absence of a crosslinking antibody. We now report an in-depth analysis of the apoptotic and survival signals induced by the 3 HexAbs in Burkitt lymphomas and provide in vitro cytotoxicity data for additional lymphoma cell lines and also chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient specimens. Among the key findings are the significant increase in the levels of phosphorylated p38 and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) by all 3 HexAbs and the notable differences in the signaling events triggered by the HexAbs from those incurred by crosslinking veltuzumab or rituximab with a secondary antibody. Thus, the greatly enhanced direct toxicity of these HexAbs correlates with their ability to alter the basal expression of various intracellular proteins involved in regulating cell growth, survival, and apoptosis, with the net outcome leading to cell death. PMID:20628151

  11. Subcutaneous injections of low doses of humanized anti-CD20 veltuzumab: a phase I study in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kalaycio, Matt E; George Negrea, O; Allen, Steven L; Rai, Kanti R; Abbasi, Rashid M; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of subcutaneous (SC) injections with anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 21 patients received 80, 160, or 320 mg injections every 2 weeks × 4 doses (n = 11) or 160 or 320 mg twice-weekly × 16 doses (n = 10). Treatment was well tolerated with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions. Lymphocytosis decreased in all patients (maximum decrease, 5-91%), with 12 patients obtaining >50% decreases. Of 14 patients with lymphadenopathy on CT imaging, 5 (36%) achieved 14-61% reductions (sum of perpendicular diameters). By NCI-WG criteria, two patients achieved partial responses (10%). SC veltuzumab appeared active in all dose groups, with no obvious exposure-response relationship, despite cumulative doses ranging from 320-5120 mg. Overall median progression-free survival was 7.7 months; three patients remained progression-free >1 year (2 ongoing at 2-year study completion). These data suggest further studies of SC veltuzumab in CLL are warranted. PMID:26389849

  12. Palladium-109 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    The invention consists of new monoclonal antibodies labelled with Palladium 109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, the method of preparing this material, and its use in the radiotherapy of melanoma. The antibodies are chelate-conjugated and demonstrate a high uptake in melanomas. (ACR)

  13. Expression of bioactive anti-CD20 antibody fragments and induction of ER stress response in Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dezhong; Ma, Jisheng; Sun, Difei; Li, Haiyan; Jiang, Chao; Li, Xiaokun

    2015-08-01

    Seed-based expression system is an attractive platform for the production of recombinant proteins in molecular farming. Despite the many advantages of molecular farming, little is known about the effect of the different subcellular accumulation of recombinant proteins on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control system in host plants. In this study, we analyzed the expression of anti-CD20 antibody fragments in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotype Columbia) and corresponding glycosylation mutants, and evaluated the influence of three different signal sequences on the expression levels of scFv-Fc of C2B8. The highest protein accumulation level, with a maximum of 6.12 % total soluble proteins, was observed upon fusing proteins to the signal peptide of Arabidopsis seed storage albumin 2. The ER stress responses in developing seeds at 13 days post-anthesis were also compared across different transgenic lines under normal and heat shock conditions. Based on the gene expression profiles of ER stress transducers, our results suggest that accumulation of antibody fragments in the ER exerts more stress on ER homeostasis. In addition, quantitative PCR results also implicate enhanced activation of ER-associated degradation in transgenic lines. Last but not the least, we also demonstrate the anti-tumor potency of plant-derived proteins by showing the anti-tumor activity of purified scFv-Fc proteins against Daudi cells. Together, our data implies that better understanding of the interaction between exogenous protein production and the cellular quality control system of the host plant is necessary for the development of an optimal expression strategy that will be especially beneficial to commercial protein manufacturing. PMID:25957150

  14. High-Dose [131I]Tositumomab (anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adults ≥ 60 Years Old with Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Ajay K.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Petersdorf, Stephen; Maloney, David G.; Eary, Janet F.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2007-04-10

    Purpose: The majority of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) are over 60 years of age, yet they are often denied potentially curative high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT) due to the risk of excessive treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Myeloablative anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) can deliver curative radiation doses to tumor sites while limiting exposure to normal organs and may be particularly suited for older adults requiring high-dose therapy. Methods: Patients over age 60 with relapsed B-NHL received infusions of tositumomab anti-CD20 antibody labeled with 5-10mCi I-131 tracer for dosimetry purposes followed 10 days later by individualized therapeutic infusions of I-131-tositumomab (median 525 mCi, range 328-1154 mCi) to deliver 25-27Gy to the critical normal organ receiving the highest radiation dose. ASCT was performed approximately 2 weeks after therapy. Results: Twenty-four patients with a median age of 64 (range 60-76) who had received a median of four prior regimens (range 2-14) were treated. Thirteen (54%) had chemotherapy-resistant disease. The estimated 3-year overall and progression-free survivals were 59% and 51%, respectively with a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 1-6 years). All patients experienced expected myeloablation with engraftment of platelets (≥20K/µL) and neutrophils (≥500/µL) occurring a median of 9 and 15 days, respectively following ASCT. There were no treatment-related deaths, and only two patients experienced grade 4 non-hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Myeloablative RIT and ASCT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for older adults with relapsed B-NHL.

  15. Efficient inhibition of B-cell lymphoma xenografts with a novel recombinant fusion protein: anti-CD20Fab-LDM.

    PubMed

    Xin, C; Ye, S; Ming, Y; Shenghua, Z; Qingfang, M; Hongxing, G; Xu, S; Yuanfu, X; Yuan, Z; Dongmei, F; Juanni, L; Yingdai, G; Lianfang, J; Rongguang, S; Zhenping, Z; Jianxiang, W; Tao, C; Chunzheng, Y; Dongsheng, X; Yongsu, Z

    2010-10-01

    Lidamycin (LDM) is a new member of enediyne antitumor antibiotics family that can be separated and reconstituted. It consists of a labile active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a noncovalently bound apoprotein (LDP). LDM is now in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we described the antitumor features of a fusion protein of LDM, anti-CD20Fab-LDM, targeted to CD20 expressed by B-lymphoid malignancies. Especially, LDM was prepared by a novel two-step method including DNA recombination and molecular reconstitution. Anti-CD20Fab-LDM exerted potent cytotoxicity against CD20+ B-cell lymphoma cell lines in vitro (IC50: 10-30 pM) and in the Raji xenograft model. Two Raji xenografts were allowed to grow to an initial mass of 80 and 500 mm³, respectively, and then anti-CD20Fab-LDM was administered intravenously with the highest dose of 4 nmol kg⁻¹ . The inhibition rates of tumor growth were 90.1 and 85%, which were saliently superior to those of nontargeted LDM. It is noteworthy that anti-CD20Fab-LDM can inhibit the growth of patient-derived cells, including rituximab-resistant patient-derived cells. Thus, CD20-targeted delivery of LDM is a specific and potent therapeutic strategy for B-lymphoid malignancies. In addition, the two-step approach could serve as a new technology platform for making a series of highly potent engineered antibody-based drugs. PMID:20463754

  16. Suppression of Rituximab-resistant B-cell lymphoma with a novel multi-component anti-CD20 mAb nanocluster

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Sun, Yun; Zhao, Mengxin; Chen, Di; Zhu, Xiandi; Zhang, Li; Li, Bohua; Dai, Jianxin; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab has revolutionized the treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL), resistance to treatment still existed. Thus, strategies for suppressing Rituximab-resistant NHLs are urgently needed. Here, an anti-CD20 nanocluster (ACNC) is successfully constructed from its type I and type II mAb (Rituximab and 11B8). These distinct anti-CD20 mAbs are mass grafted to a short chain polymer (polyethylenimine). Compared with parental Rituximab and 11B8, the ACNC had a reduced “off-rate”. Importantly, ACNC efficiently inhibited Rituximab-resistant lymphomas in both disseminated and localized human NHL xenograft models. Further results revealed that ACNC is significantly potent in inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis and lysosome-mediated programmed cell death (PCD). This may help explain why ACNC is effective in suppressing rituximab-resistant lymphoma while Rituximab and 11B8 are not. Additionally, ACNC experienced low clearance from peripheral blood and high intratumor accumulation. This improved pharmacokinetics is attributed to the antibody-antigen reaction (active targeting) and enhanced permeability and retention (ERP) effect (passive targeting). This study suggested that ACNC might be a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of rituximab-resistant lymphomas. PMID:26284588

  17. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0

  18. Bi20 (fBTA05), a novel trifunctional bispecific antibody (anti-CD20 x anti-CD3), mediates efficient killing of B-cell lymphoma cells even with very low CD20 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Stanglmaier, Michael; Faltin, Margot; Ruf, Peter; Bodenhausen, Annette; Schröder, Petra; Lindhofer, Horst

    2008-09-01

    Trifunctional bispecific antibodies can efficiently mediate tumor cell killing by redirecting T cells and immune accessory cells to the tumor cell. Here, we describe the new trifunctional antibody, Bi20 (FBTA05, anti-CD20 x anti-CD3), that connects B cells and T cells via its variable regions and recruits FcgammaRI(+) accessory immune cells via its Fc region. Bi20 mediated efficient and specific lysis of B-cell lines and of B cells with low CD20 expression levels that were derived from CLL patients. Remarkably, T-cell activation and tumor cell killing occurred in an entirely autologous setting without additional effector cells in 5 of 8 samples. In comparison, rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal CD20 antibody, demonstrated a significantly lower B-cell eradication rate. Additionally, Bi20, but not rituximab, upregulated the activation markers CD25 and CD69 on both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the presence of accessory immune cells. CD14(+) accessory cells and the monocyte cell line THP-1 were activated via binding of the Fc region of Bi20, given that T cells were simultaneously engaged by the antibody. Bi20 induced a strong Th1 cytokine pattern characterized by high IFN-gamma and very low IL-4 secretion. In conclusion, Bi20 may offer new immunotherapeutic options for the treatment of B-cell lymphomas. PMID:18546289

  19. Novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody BM-ca binds to a unique epitope and exerts stronger cellular activity than others

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Matsunaga, Yuka; Uchiyama, Yumiko; Nagura, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Cellular activity of BM-ca, a novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody, was quantitatively compared with that of two other anti-CD20 antibodies used for clinical practice, rituximab and ofatumumab. The results of a complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay revealed that the strongest antibody was ofatumumab, followed by BM-ca, with rituximab being the weakest. Ofatumumab and BM-ca were effective not only against rituximab-sensitive SU-DHL-4 cells but also against rituximab-resistant RC-K8 cells. In an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, although the effective concentrations against SU-DHL-4 cells were almost the same among these three antibodies, the maximum cytotoxic level was the highest for BM-ca. In an anti-cell proliferation assay using SU-DHL-4 cells, BM-ca was the most effective and ofatumumab, the weakest. Against RC-K8 cells, only BM-ca was effective. When combined with each of four cancer chemotherapeutics (prednisolone, vincristine, hydroxydaunorubicin, and cisplatin), BM-ca exerted the most effective combinatorial anti-cell proliferation activity. To assess the in vivo effect of BM-ca, we intravenously administered BM-ca into cynomolgus monkeys and found that the peripheral B-cell levels did not decrease in half of the animals. Sequencing of cDNA encoding CD20 of cynomolgus monkeys revealed that the responders and nonresponders had Leu/Pro (hetero) and Leu/Leu (homo) at amino acid (a.a.) position 160, respectively, suggesting that the epitope recognized by BM-ca was around this a.a. By analyzing reactivity to synthetic peptides, the epitope recognized by BM-ca was estimated to be a.a.'s 156–166, not shared with rituximab and ofatumumab. These results suggest BM-ca to be a promising anti-CD20 antibody having superior properties and recognizing a unique epitope. PMID:23634281

  20. Labeling of cerebral amyloid in vivo with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Walker, L C; Price, D L; Voytko, M L; Schenk, D B

    1994-07-01

    We assessed the ability of a murine monoclonal antibody to bind selectively to beta-amyloid in the brains of living nonhuman primates. To circumvent the blood-brain barrier, we injected unlabeled antibody 10D5 (murine whole IgG1 and/or Fab fragments) into the cerebrospinal fluid of the cisterna magna in three aged monkeys. A control animal was given an intracisternal injection of nonimmune mouse whole IgG plus Fab. Twenty-four hours later, the animals were perfused and prepared for immunohistochemical detection of bound murine immunoglobulin in brain. All three experimental animals showed selective binding of 10D5 to approximately 5-15% of amyloid deposits in cerebral cortex, primarily near the cortical surface. There was no labeling in the control animal. In vivo-labeled deposits were confirmed to be beta-amyloid by electron microscopy and by in vitro immunohistochemistry in adjacent sections. The animals tolerated the injection well, although some polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltrated portions of the subarachnoid space and superficial neocortex. These results provide the first demonstration that it may be feasible to selectively direct a tagged monoclonal antibody to beta-amyloid in the brain for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. With enhancement of labeling efficiency, the method also may be useful for studying the progression of beta-amyloidosis in experimental animals using emission tomography. PMID:8021711

  1. Anti-CD20 antibody promotes cancer escape via enrichment of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells expressing low levels of CD20 and CD137L.

    PubMed

    Bodogai, Monica; Lee Chang, Catalina; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Lai, Jinping; Merino, Maria; Wersto, Robert P; Gress, Ronald E; Chan, Andrew C; Hesdorffer, Charles; Biragyn, Arya

    2013-04-01

    The possible therapeutic benefits of B-cell depletion in combating tumoral immune escape have been debated. In support of this concept, metastasis of highly aggressive 4T1 breast cancer cells in mice can be abrogated by inactivation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells (tBreg). Here, we report the unexpected finding that B-cell depletion by CD20 antibody will greatly enhance cancer progression and metastasis. Both murine and human tBregs express low levels of CD20 and, as such, anti-CD20 mostly enriches for these cells. In the 4T1 model of murine breast cancer, this effect of enriching for tBregs suggests that B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 may not be beneficial at all in some cancers. In contrast, we show that in vivo-targeted stimulation of B cells with CXCL13-coupled CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN) can block cancer metastasis by inhibiting CD20(Low) tBregs. Mechanistic investigations suggested that CpG-ODN upregulates low surface levels of 4-1BBL on tBregs to elicit granzyme B-expressing cytolytic CD8(+) T cells, offering some explanative power for the effect. These findings underscore the immunotherapeutic importance of tBreg inactivation as a strategy to enhance cancer therapy by targeting both the regulatory and activating arms of the immune system in vivo. PMID:23365136

  2. Veltuzumab, an anti-CD20 mAb for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Milani, Cannon; Castillo, Jorge

    2009-04-01

    Veltuzumab is a humanized, second-generation anti-CD20 mAb currently under development by Immunomedics Inc for the potential treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Licensee Nycomed is developing veltuzumab for the potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Veltuzumab contains 90 to 95% human antibody sequences with identical antigen framework regions to epratuzumab (a humanized anti-CD22 mAb) and similar antigen-binding determinants to rituximab (chimeric, anti-CD20 mAb and the first-line treatment of aggressive and indolent NHL). In vitro studies have demonstrated that veltuzumab has enhanced binding avidities and a stronger effect on complement-dependent cytotoxicity compared with rituximab in selected cell lines. In dose-finding phase I/II clinical trials in patients with low-grade NHL, intravenous veltuzumab demonstrated a substantial rate of complete responses in concurrence with shorter and more tolerable infusions compared with rituximab. Currently there has been no evidence of an immune response to repeated administrations, and no serious adverse events related to veltuzumab treatment in patients with NHL. Veltuzumab is undergoing clinical trials using a low-dose subcutaneous formulation in patients with NHL, CLL and ITP. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to clarify the role veltuzumab will play in a market where the therapy of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is dominated by rituximab. PMID:19330725

  3. Specific Conjugation of the Hinge Region for Homogeneous Preparation of Antibody Fragment-Drug Conjugate: A Case Study for Doxorubicin-PEG-anti-CD20 Fab' Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhan; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2016-01-20

    Conventional preparation strategies for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) result in heterogeneous products with various molecular sizes and species. In this study, we developed a homogeneous preparation strategy by site-specific conjugation of the anticancer drug with an antibody fragment. The model drug doxorubicin (DOX) was coupled to the Fab' fragment of anti-CD20 IgG at its permissive sites through a heterotelechelic PEG linker, generating an antibody fragment-drug conjugate (AFDC). Anti-CD20 IgG was digested and reduced specifically with β-mercaptoethylamine to generate the Fab' fragment with two free mercapto groups in its hinge region. Meanwhile, DOX was conjugated with α-succinimidylsuccinate ω-maleimide polyethylene glycol (NHS-PEG-MAL) to form MAL-PEG-DOX, which was subsequently linked to the free mercapto containing Fab' fragment to form a Fab'-PEG-DOX conjugate. The dual site-specific bioconjugation was achieved through the combination of highly selective reduction of IgG and introduction of heterotelechelic PEG linker. The resulting AFDC provides an utterly homogeneous product, with a definite ratio of one fragment to two drugs. Laser confocal microscopy and cell ELISA revealed that the AFDC could accumulate in the antigen-positive Daudi tumor cell. In addition, the Fab'-PEG-DOX retained appreciable targeting ability and improved antitumor activity, demonstrating an excellent therapeutic effect on the lymphoma mice model for better cure rate and significantly reduced side effects. PMID:26700095

  4. Membrane microdomain sphingolipids are required for anti-CD20-induced death of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammadi, Mariam; Youinou, Pierre; Tempescul, Adrian; Tobón, Gabriel; Berthou, Christian; Bordron, Anne; Pers, Jacques-Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia remains incurable, despite the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy as an available means of treatment. The resistance of certain patients to this monoclonal antibody prompted us to set up in vitro studies of another CD20-specific monoclonal antibody, B1 (later termed tositumomab). We hypothesized that the membrane lipid organization of leukemic B cells might be instrumental in the cells’ sensitivity to the B1 monoclonal antibody. Design and Methods B lymphocytes from 36 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and 13 patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma were investigated for B1-triggered cell death. Membrane components, such as sphingomyelin and ganglioside M1, were investigated by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation, together with the Csk-binding protein. Results Chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients segregated into two groups: B cells from one group were sensitive to B1, whereas those from the second group were not. Further results ascribed the resistance of these latter cases to a defective recruitment of Csk-binding protein, resulting in a lack of sphingomyelin and ganglioside M1 at the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of their malignant B cells. Sphingolipids were indeed retained in the cytoplasm, because of lowered activity of P-glycoprotein. Supporting this mechanism, rifampicin, an inducer of P-glycoprotein, improved the activity of this transmembrane efflux pump, normalized the quantity of sphingomyelin within the membrane, and thereby restored the efficacy of the B1 monoclonal antibody in the formerly B1-resistant cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Conclusions The lipid organization of membranes of B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia differs from one patient to another. In practice, given the relevance of the membrane lipid distribution to the efficacy of biotherapies, this observation is of potential importance. PMID:22058197

  5. Hexavalent bispecific antibodies represent a new class of anticancer therapeutics: 1. Properties of anti-CD20/CD22 antibodies in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cardillo, Thomas M.; Stein, Rhona; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    The dock and lock (DNL) method is a new technology for generating multivalent antibodies. Here, we report in vitro and in vivo characterizations of 20-22 and 22-20, a pair of humanized hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) derived from veltuzumab (v-mab) and epratuzumab (e-mab). The 22-20 was made by site-specific conjugation of e-mab to 4 Fabs of v-mab; 20-22 is of the opposite configuration, composing v-mab and 4 Fabs of e-mab. Each bsAb translocates both CD22 and CD20 into lipid rafts, induces apoptosis and growth inhibition without second-antibody crosslinking, and is significantly more potent in killing lymphoma cells in vitro than their parental antibodies. Although both bsAbs triggered antibody-dependent cellular toxicity, neither displayed complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, 22-20 and 20-22 killed human lymphoma cells in preference to normal B cells ex vivo, whereas the parental v-mab depleted malignant and normal B cells equally. In vivo studies in Daudi tumors revealed 20-22, despite having a shorter serum half-life, had antitumor efficacy comparable with equimolar v-mab; 22-20 was less potent than 20-22 but more effective than e-mab and control bsAbs. These results indicate multiple advantages of hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bsAbs over the individual parental antibodies and suggest that these may represent a new class of cancer therapeutics. PMID:19372261

  6. Hexavalent bispecific antibodies represent a new class of anticancer therapeutics: 1. Properties of anti-CD20/CD22 antibodies in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Edmund A; Goldenberg, David M; Cardillo, Thomas M; Stein, Rhona; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2009-06-11

    The dock and lock (DNL) method is a new technology for generating multivalent antibodies. Here, we report in vitro and in vivo characterizations of 20-22 and 22-20, a pair of humanized hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) derived from veltuzumab (v-mab) and epratuzumab (e-mab). The 22-20 was made by site-specific conjugation of e-mab to 4 Fabs of v-mab; 20-22 is of the opposite configuration, composing v-mab and 4 Fabs of e-mab. Each bsAb translocates both CD22 and CD20 into lipid rafts, induces apoptosis and growth inhibition without second-antibody crosslinking, and is significantly more potent in killing lymphoma cells in vitro than their parental antibodies. Although both bsAbs triggered antibody-dependent cellular toxicity, neither displayed complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, 22-20 and 20-22 killed human lymphoma cells in preference to normal B cells ex vivo, whereas the parental v-mab depleted malignant and normal B cells equally. In vivo studies in Daudi tumors revealed 20-22, despite having a shorter serum half-life, had antitumor efficacy comparable with equimolar v-mab; 22-20 was less potent than 20-22 but more effective than e-mab and control bsAbs. These results indicate multiple advantages of hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bsAbs over the individual parental antibodies and suggest that these may represent a new class of cancer therapeutics. PMID:19372261

  7. The role of Gr1+ cells after anti-CD20 treatment in type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Changyun; Du, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F. Susan; Wen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest that Gr1+CD11b+ cells have immunoregulatory function and these cells may play an important role in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we investigated the regulatory role of Gr1+CD11b+ cells in protecting against type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. Here we showed that temporary B cell depletion induced the expansion of Gr1+CD11b+ cells. Gr1+CD11b+ cells not only directly suppress diabetogenic T cell function, but can also induce Treg differentiation in a TGF-β-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that Gr1+CD11b+ cells could suppress diabetogenic CD4 and CD8 T cell function in an IL-10-, nitric oxide- and cell contact- dependent manner. Interestingly, single anti-Gr1 monoclonal antibody treatment can also induce a transient expansion of Gr1+CD11b+ cells that delayed diabetes development in NOD mice. Our data suggest that Gr1+CD11b+ cells contribute to the establishment of immune tolerance to pancreatic islet autoimmunity. Manipulation of Gr1+CD11b+ cells could be considered as a novel immunotherapy for the prevention of type 1 diabetes. PMID:22140261

  8. Production of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody conjugates by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Kuntz, R.R.; Holmes, R.A.; Mitchell, E.P. ); Feldbush, T.L. )

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses activities and progress that has occurred since initiation of this project on September 1, 1989. We have synthesized ethyl N,N{prime}-bis(benzoylmercaptoacetyl)-2,3-diaminopropanoate, a ligand to be used as a bifunctional chelating agent (BFCA), to form {sup 186}Re or {sup 188}Re ({sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) complexes. {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, in reducing media, reacts with this ligand to form {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re-CO{sub 2}DADS chelates that will be used to formulate new radiolabeled photoaffinity labels (RPALs). Initial steps have been taken to synthesize R-As-dithiol compounds. This approach will be used to produce {sup 77}As-RPALs or covalently link {sup 77}As directly to monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The R group will contain a group that can be used for conjugation reactions. Spectral and photochemical properties of various types of photoaffinity labels (PALs) have been studied. Acrylo-azido compounds and 9-azido acridine have been studied as well as several other photoprobes. The binding characteristics of the azido-based PALs to HSA have been studied and progress has been made on developing techniques for efficiently separating of non-covalently sound PALs. The Nd-YAG laser was purchased and arrived in 1990. It has been assembled and tested and is now operational.

  9. Dual-targeting immunotherapy of lymphoma: potent cytotoxicity of anti-CD20/CD74 bispecific antibodies in mantle cell and other lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pankaj; Goldenberg, David M; Rossi, Edmund A; Cardillo, Thomas M; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Furman, Richard R; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2012-04-19

    We describe the use of novel bispecific hexavalent Abs (HexAbs) to enhance anticancer immunotherapy. Two bispecific HexAbs [IgG-(Fab)(4) constructed from veltuzumab (anti-CD20 IgG) and milatuzumab (anti-CD74 IgG)] show enhanced cytotoxicity in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and other lymphoma/leukemia cell lines, as well as patient tumor samples, without a crosslinking Ab, compared with their parental mAb counterparts, alone or in combination. The bispecific HexAbs have different properties from and are more potent than their parental mAbs in vitro. The juxtaposition of CD20 and CD74 on MCL cells by the HexAbs resulted in homotypic adhesion and triggered intracellular changes that include loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, production of reactive oxygen species, rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERKs and JNK, down-regulation of pAkt and Bcl-xL, actin reorganization, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization, culminating in cell death. They also displayed different potencies in depleting lymphoma cells and normal B cells from whole blood ex vivo and significantly extended the survival of nude mice bearing MCL xenografts in a dose-dependent manner, thus indicating stability and antitumor activity in vivo. Such bispecific HexAbs may constitute a new class of therapeutic agents for improved cancer immunotherapy, as shown here for MCL and other CD20(+)/CD74(+) malignancies. PMID:22271448

  10. Antitumor effects of an engineered and energized fusion protein consisting of an anti-CD20 scFv fragment and lidamycin.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hong; Miao, Qingfang; Zhang, Shenghua; Cheng, Xin; Xiong, Dongsheng; Zhen, Yongsu

    2011-03-01

    Antibody-based fusion proteins are the next generation of antibody therapies for cancer and other diseases. CD20 antigen, which is overexpressed on cell membranes in nearly 95% of cases of B-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, is an attractive target for the therapy of B-lymphoid malignancies. Lidamycin (LDM) is a potent enediyne-containing antitumor antibiotic that now has entered phase II clinical trials. In this study, we prepared an engineered fusion protein, scFv-LDP, consisting of an anti-CD20 scFv fragment and the apoprotein LDP of LDM using DNA recombination. After purification and refolding, scFv-LDP was found to bind specifically to CD20-positive lymphoma cells using ELISA and indirect immunofluorescent cytochemical staining assays. The energized fusion protein scFv-LDP-AE was obtained using molecular reconstitution of the active chromophore AE of LDM and scFv-LDP. MTT assay revealed potent cytotoxicity of scFv-LDP-AE to CD20-positive Raji and Daudi cells, with IC(50) values of 1.21×10(-11) and 6.24×10(-11) mol L(-1), respectively. An in vivo subcutaneous xenograft model of CD20-positive B cell lymphoma in BALB/c (nu/nu) mice was also utilized. Drugs were given intravenously on day 14 and 21 after tumor transplantation. In terms of maximal tolerated doses, scFv-LDP-AE at 0.3 mg kg(-1) suppressed tumor growth by 79.3%, and LDM at 0.05 mg kg(-1) by 68.6% (P<0.05). Results suggested scFv-LDP-AE could be a potential candidate for tumor-targeting therapy. PMID:21416325

  11. Potential of palladium-109-labeled antimelanoma monoclonal antibody for tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Wang, T.S.T.; Srivastava, S.C.; Rosen, J.M.; Ferrone, S.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-07-01

    Palladium-109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, was chelated to the monoclonal antibody 225.28S to the high molecular weight antigen associated with human melanoma. Injection of the radiolabeled monoclonal antibody into nude mice bearing human melanoma resulted in significant accumulation of the radiolabel in the tumors: 19% injected dose/g; 38:1 and 61:1 tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 and 48 hr, respectively. The localization of the radiolabeled antibody in liver and kidney also was high, but appreciably lower than that achieved in tumor. These results suggest Pd-109-labeled monoclonal antibody to tumor-associated antigens may have potential applications in tumor immunotherapy.

  12. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  13. Ofatumumab plus chlorambucil as a first-line therapy in less fit patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: analysis of COMPLEMENT1 and other monoclonal antibodies association data

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, Anna Maria; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Picardi, Paola; Mazzucchelli, Maddalena; Cairoli, Roberto; Montillo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has radically improved over the last few years with the addition of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to chemotherapy. Chlorambucil has been considered for decades as a suitable therapeutic option for frail patients. Taking into account the advantage offered by the addition of MoAbs to chemotherapy, different studies up to now have explored the feasibility of chlorambucil-based chemoimmunotherapies in treatment-naïve CLL. COMPLEMENT1 is a prospective, randomized, open-label trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of ofatumumab added to chlorambucil, compared with chlorambucil in monotherapy, in the setting of untreated patients with CLL considered unsuitable for a fludarabine-based approach. Progression-free survival was significantly longer in the chemoimmunotherapy arm when compared with the single-agent chlorambucil (22.4 months versus 13.1 months). Response rate and quality were also improved in the combination arm. Furthermore, the addition of ofatumumab did not lead to an unmanageable toxicity. While the employment of anti-CD20 antibodies represents an advantage in the treatment of the CLL symptomatic population, at present different patient selection and treatment schedules do not allow a reliable comparison between chlorambucil-based regimens. The addition of ofatumumab to chlorambucil represents a further therapeutic gain in CLL. Longer follow up and direct comparison with other MoAbs are warranted to establish the preferred first-line treatment in elderly and unfit patients. PMID:27493712

  14. Preparation of Ga-67 labeled monoclonal antibodies using deferoxamine as a bifunctional chelating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, K.; Furukawa, T.; Ohmomo, Y.; Sakahara, H.; Ohta, H.; Nakashima, T.; Okada, K.; Yoshida, O.; Yokoyama, A.; Torizuka, K.

    1984-01-01

    Ga-67 labeled monoclonal IgG or F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments against ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein and ..beta..-subunit of human choriogonadotropin (HCG), were prepared using Deferoxamine (DFO) as a bifunctional chelating agent. DFO, a well-known iron chelating agent, was conjugated with monoclonal antibodies (Ab) by a glutaraldehyde two step method and the effect of conjugation on the Ab activities was examined by RIA and Scatchard plot analysis. In both monoclonal Ab preparations, the conjugation reaction was favored as the pH increased. However, Ab-binding activities decreased as the molecular ratios of DFO to Ab increased. Preserved Ab activities were observed when Ab contained DFO per Ab molecule less than 2.1. At a ratio of over 3.3 DFO molecules per Ab, the maximal binding capacity rather than the affinity constant decreased. The inter-molecular cross linkage seemed to be responsible for the deactivation of binding activities. The obtained DFO-Ab conjugates, were then easily labeled with high efficiency and reproducibility and Ga-67 DFO-Ab complexes were highly stable both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, biodistribution of Ga-67 labeled F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments of monoclonal Ab to HCG ..beta..-subunit was attempted in nude mice transplanted with HCG-producing human teratocarcinoma. Tumor could be visualized, in spite of relatively high background imaging of liver, kidney and spleen. The use of DFO as a bifunctional chelating agent provided good evidence for its applicability to labeling monoclonal Ab with almost full retention of Ab activities. Further, availability of Ga-68 will make Ga-68 DFO-monoclonal Ab a very useful tool for positron tomography imaging of various tumors.

  15. Evaluation of monoclonal immune complexes and microaggregated albumin as inhibitors of uptake and labeled monoclonal antibody by hepatic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Blend, M.; Mermall, H.; Pinsky, S.; Frinke, J.; David, G.; Carlo, D.

    1985-05-01

    Hepatic uptake of labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) remains a persistent problem. Human hepatoma tumors were transplanted into adult rats and successfully imaged following the injection of In-111-antiferritin MoAb. Biodistribution studies revealed that the livers in both tumor and non-tumor bearing rats accumulate and retain labeled MoAb. Two biodegradable agents thought capable of inhibiting the uptake of MoAb by blocking the liver RES were studied. Immune complexes of human spleen ferritin and antiferritin-MoAb were prepared in vitro and tested as liver RES blocking agent to the same labeled/MoAb and labeled MoAb-ferritin complex. A preparation of microaggregated albumin with an average sphere diameter of 0.4 microns (range 0.1-5.0) was tested. These compounds were injected 30 minutes prior to the injection of labeled MoAb or MoAb:Ag complex; 2-4 rats per treatment group. All agents failed to inhibit or alter the uptake of labeled MoAb and MoAb:Ag complex at concentrations of 500 ..mu..g/rat of cold complex and 250 and 500 ..mu..g/rat of microaggregated albumin. Rats with no pretreatment showed a 38% uptake. Pretreatment with complex showed 45% uptake Microlite 43% uptake, and cold complex 46% uptake. Pretreatment with 12 mg of microaggregated albumin also failed to inhibit hepatic uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-Microlite and /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid. These data indicate that hepatic uptake of labeled MoAB is not the result of macrophage activity in the hepatic sinusoids.

  16. Anti-CD20 IgA can protect mice against lymphoma development: evaluation of the direct impact of IgA and cytotoxic effector recruitment on CD20 target cells

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Virginie; Laffleur, Brice; Debin, Arnaud; Cuvillier, Armelle; van Egmond, Marjolein; Drocourt, Daniel; Imbertie, Laurent; Pangault, Céline; Tarte, Karin; Tiraby, Gérard; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Background While most antibody-based therapies use IgG because of their well-known biological properties, some functional limitations of these antibodies call for the development of derivatives with other therapeutic functions. Although less abundant than IgG in serum, IgA is the most abundantly produced Ig class in humans. Besides the specific targeting of its dimeric form to mucosal areas, IgA was shown to recruit polymorphonuclear neutrophils against certain targets more efficiently than does IgG1. Design and Methods In this study, we investigated the various pathways by which anti-tumor effects can be mediated by anti-CD20 IgA against lymphoma cells. Results We found that polymeric human IgA was significantly more effective than human IgG1 in mediating direct killing or growth inhibition of target cells in the absence of complement. We also demonstrated that this direct killing was able to indirectly induce the classical pathway of the complement cascade although to a lesser extent than direct recruitment of complement by IgG. Recruitment of the alternative complement pathway by specific IgA was also observed. In addition to activating complement for lysis of lymphoma cell lines or primary cells from patients with lymphoma, we showed that monomeric anti-CD20 IgA can effectively protect mice against tumor development in a passive immunization strategy and we demonstrated that this protective effect may be enhanced in mice expressing the human FcαRI receptor on their neutrophils. Conclusions We show that anti-CD20 IgA antibodies have original therapeutic properties against lymphoma cells, with strong direct effects, ability to recruit neutrophils for cell cytotoxicity and even recruitment of complement, although largely through an indirect way. PMID:22689689

  17. Anti-CD22 90Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan combined with anti-CD20 veltuzumab: a phase I study in patients with relapsed/refractory, aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Witzig, Thomas E; Tomblyn, Michael B; Misleh, Jamal G; Kio, Ebenezer A; Sharkey, Robert M; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2014-11-01

    A lingering criticism of radioimmunotherapy in non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the use of cold anti-CD20 antibody along with the radiolabeled anti-CD20 antibody. We instead combined radioimmunotherapy with immunotherapy targeting different B-cell antigens. We evaluated the anti-CD22 (90)Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan with the anti-CD20 veltuzumab in patients with aggressive lymphoma in whom at least one prior standard treatment had failed, but who had not undergone stem cell transplantation. Eighteen patients (median age 73 years, median of 3 prior treatments) received 200 mg/m(2) veltuzumab once-weekly for 4 weeks, with (90)Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan at planned doses in weeks 3 and 4, and (111)In-epratuzumab tetraxetan in week 2 for imaging and dosimetry. Veltuzumab effectively lowered levels of B cells in the blood prior to the radioimmunotherapy doses. No significant immunogenicity or change in pharmacokinetics of either agent occurred in combination. (111)In imaging showed tumor targeting with acceptable radiation dosimetry to normal organs. For (90)Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan, transient myelosuppression was dose-limiting with 6 mCi/m(2) (222 MBq/m(2)) × 2 being the maximal tolerated dose. Of 17 assessable patients, nine (53%) had objective responses according to the 2007 revised treatment response criteria, including three (18%) complete responses (2 relapsing after 11 and 13 months, 1 continuing to be clinically disease-free at 19 months), and six (35%) partial responses (1 relapsing after 14 months, 5 at 3 - 7 months). Responses occurred in patients with different lymphoma histologies, treated at different (90)Y dose levels, and with a predicted risk of poor outcome, most importantly including five of the six patients treated with the maximal tolerated dose (2 of whom achieved durable complete responses). In conclusion, the combination of (90)Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan and veltuzumab was well-tolerated with encouraging therapeutic activity in this difficult-to-treat population

  18. Tumor immunotherapy in the mouse with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalcberg, J.R.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in two experimental models for tumor immunotherapy. In vitro treatment of the radiation-induced murine thymoma ITT-1-75NS with radiolabeled anti-Ly-2.1 significantly impaired subsequent tumor growth in vivo. However, in vivo treatment of this tumor, which previously had been injected into C57BL/6 mice, was unsuccessful. By contrast, in vitro treatment of a human colorectal tumor cell line (COLO 205) with 131I-labeled 250-30.6--a monoclonal antibody directed against a secretory component of normal and malignant gastrointestinal epithelium--completely inhibited subsequent tumor growth in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of preexisting human colorectal tumor xenografts significantly impaired progressive tumor growth. Although some tumor inhibition was also produced by unlabeled 250-30.6 antibody, this response was considerably amplified by treatment with (131I)-labeled 250-30.6 (P less than .05), suggesting that in vivo treatment of human tumors with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies may be clinically beneficial. The antithyroid drug propylthiouracil was used to reduce dehalogenation of the radiolabeled immunoglobulins in an attempt to improve their therapeutic efficacy.

  19. Technetium-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody with preserved immunoreactivity and high in vivo stability

    SciTech Connect

    Arano, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Furukawa, T.; Horiuchi, K.; Yahata, T.; Saji, H.; Sakahara, H.; Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.

    1987-06-01

    Recent availability of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) and their radiolabeling through the use of the bifunctional chelating agents (BCA) have become an alternative procedure for in vivo radioimmunodetection. Using a newly synthesized BCA, a p-carboxyethylphenylglyoxal-di(N-methylthiosemicarbazone) (CE-DTS), the coupling and technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc) labeling of monoclonal IgG against hCG were carried out. In the system presented, factors affecting stability and immunoreactivity were examined. Immunoreactivity of the original IgG (56C) was preserved by conjugating one CE-DTS molecule per molecule of IgG (56C) using the phosphorylazide method, however, /sup 99m/Tc labeling pH affected the immunoreactivity and limited the /sup 99m/Tc labeling reaction between pH 4.5 and 6.2. A screening of labeling conditions, such as pH, reaction time, and reducing agent system were then carried out. Technetium-99m-labeled IgG (56C), (/sup 99m/Tc)CE-DTS-IgG (56C), showed good stability upon incubation with mice sera and comparable mice biodistribution to that of indium-111 (/sup 111/In) DTPA-IgG (56C). Thus, these results indicate the excellent potential of CE-DTS as a BCA for labeling MoAb with /sup 99m/Tc.

  20. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  1. A technetium-labeled monoclonal antibody for imaging metastatic melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Frytak, S.; Creagan, E.T.; Brown, M.L.; Salk, D.; Nelp, W. )

    1991-04-01

    Twenty patients with histologically proven metastatic melanoma were scanned with a 99mtechnetium ({sup 99}mTc)-labeled melanoma antibody to determine the detection rate of known malignant lesions and to evaluate the antibody's ability to discover occult metastases. Isotope localization in different organs was as follows: liver 100%, bone 100%, subcutaneous lesions 80%, lymph nodes 54%, and lung 33%. Four unsuspected bone lesions and 16 occult subcutaneous lesions were found. False positive lesions were noted in two instances--one benign thyroid adenoma, and one arthritic bone lesion. One patient developed an atypical serum sickness reaction with a rash and arthralgias that responded rapidly to treatment. The {sup 99}mTc antimelanoma antibody is a safe and effective method to detect metastatic melanoma. It has potential use for screening newly diagnosed melanomas that carry an increased risk of recurrence.

  2. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies in lymphoma: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, revolutionized the treatment of lymphoma. Although newer generation anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are being examined, patent expiries and patient demand have fueled the development of rituximab biosimilars. The development of such agents is both an important and difficult undertaking. By definition, although they aim to have safety and efficacy comparable with their reference agents, biosimilars are not exact replicas of those agents, and small changes in nonclinical and preclinical properties may ultimately affect in vivo activity. Consideration must be given to the complex mechanisms of action, sensitive patient populations that may be treated, and appropriate clinical trial endpoints. Furthermore, extrapolation of indications is multifaceted, deserving close examination. This review represents a critical look at biosimilars in lymphoma and their safety, efficacy and long-term effects on patient outcomes. PMID:25818308

  3. Pharmacokinetics of internally labeled monoclonal antibodies as a gold standard: comparison of biodistribution of /sup 75/Se-, /sup 111/In-, and /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Konishi, J.; Yamamuro, T.; Toyama, S.

    1989-04-01

    In order to know the true biodistribution of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies, three monoclonal antibodies (OST6, OST7, and OST15) against human osteosarcoma and control antibody were internally labeled with 75Se by incubating (75Se)methionine and hybridoma cells. 75Se-labeled monoclonal antibodies were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line KT005, and the results were compared with those of 125I- and 111In-labeled antibodies. 75Se-, 125I- and 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies had identical binding activities to KT005 cells, and the immunoreactivity was in the decreasing order of OST6, OST7, and OST15. On the contrary, in vivo tumor uptake (% injected dose/g) of 75Se- and 125I-labeled antibodies assessed using nude mice bearing human osteosarcoma KT005 was in the order of OST7, OST6, and OST15. In the case of 111In, the order was OST6, OST7, and OST15. High liver uptake was similarly seen with 75Se- and 111In-labeled antibodies, whereas 125I-labeled antibodies showed the lowest tumor and liver uptake. These data indicate that tumor targeting of antibody conjugates are not always predictable from cell binding studies due to the difference of blood clearance of labeled antibodies. Furthermore, biodistribution of both 111In- and 125I-labeled antibodies are not identical with internally labeled antibody. Admitting that internally labeled antibody is a ''gold standard'' of biodistribution of monoclonal antibody, high liver uptake of 111In-radiolabeled antibodies may be inherent to antibodies. Little, if any, increase in tumor-to-normal tissue ratios of antibody conjugates will be expected compared to those of 111In-labeled antibodies if stably coupled conjugates are administered i.v.

  4. Anti-CD22 90Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan combined with anti-CD20 veltuzumab: a phase I study in patients with relapsed/refractory, aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Witzig, Thomas E.; Tomblyn, Michael B.; Misleh, Jamal G.; Kio, Ebenezer A.; Sharkey, Robert M.; Wegener, William A.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    A lingering criticism of radioimmunotherapy in non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the use of cold anti-CD20 antibody along with the radiolabeled anti-CD20 antibody. We instead combined radioimmunotherapy with immunotherapy targeting different B-cell antigens. We evaluated the anti-CD22 90Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan with the anti-CD20 veltuzumab in patients with aggressive lymphoma in whom at least one prior standard treatment had failed, but who had not undergone stem cell transplantation. Eighteen patients (median age 73 years, median of 3 prior treatments) received 200 mg/m2 veltuzumab once-weekly for 4 weeks, with 90Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan at planned doses in weeks 3 and 4, and 111In-epratuzumab tetraxetan in week 2 for imaging and dosimetry. Veltuzumab effectively lowered levels of B cells in the blood prior to the radioimmunotherapy doses. No significant immunogenicity or change in pharmacokinetics of either agent occurred in combination. 111In imaging showed tumor targeting with acceptable radiation dosimetry to normal organs. For 90Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan, transient myelosuppression was dose-limiting with 6 mCi/m2 (222 MBq/m2) × 2 being the maximal tolerated dose. Of 17 assessable patients, nine (53%) had objective responses according to the 2007 revised treatment response criteria, including three (18%) complete responses (2 relapsing after 11 and 13 months, 1 continuing to be clinically disease-free at 19 months), and six (35%) partial responses (1 relapsing after 14 months, 5 at 3 – 7 months). Responses occurred in patients with different lymphoma histologies, treated at different 90Y dose levels, and with a predicted risk of poor outcome, most importantly including five of the six patients treated with the maximal tolerated dose (2 of whom achieved durable complete responses). In conclusion, the combination of 90Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan and veltuzumab was well-tolerated with encouraging therapeutic activity in this difficult-to-treat population. PMID:25150258

  5. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

  6. Developing a Noninvasive Procedure Using Labeled Monoclonal Antibody Anti-VEGF (Bevacizumab) for Detection of Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Orlando, Margarida Maria Camoes; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The off-label use of bevacizumab labeled with 99mTc as a new radiopharmaceutical for imaging of endometriosis is a promising noninvasive, new clinical procedure. The bevacizumab in monoclonal antibodies targeted at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is superexpressed in cases of endometriosis. In this study we evaluate the imaging of endometriosis lesion in rats (induced to endometriosis) using bevacizumab-99mTc. The results showed that bevacizumab-99mTc imaged the lesion and support his use for Nuclear Medicine applied to gynecology. Also the results appointed that this radiopharmaceutical has a hepatobiliary excretion. It is important to notice that the dose used was almost 0,01% of the usual dose for the bevacizumab. PMID:26240826

  7. Developing a Noninvasive Procedure Using Labeled Monoclonal Antibody Anti-VEGF (Bevacizumab) for Detection of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Orlando, Margarida Maria Camoes; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The off-label use of bevacizumab labeled with 99mTc as a new radiopharmaceutical for imaging of endometriosis is a promising noninvasive, new clinical procedure. The bevacizumab in monoclonal antibodies targeted at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is superexpressed in cases of endometriosis. In this study we evaluate the imaging of endometriosis lesion in rats (induced to endometriosis) using bevacizumab-99mTc. The results showed that bevacizumab-99mTc imaged the lesion and support his use for Nuclear Medicine applied to gynecology. Also the results appointed that this radiopharmaceutical has a hepatobiliary excretion. It is important to notice that the dose used was almost 0,01% of the usual dose for the bevacizumab. PMID:26240826

  8. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  9. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment–apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Natasha M.; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A.; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B.; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I.; Forte, Trudy M.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  10. PET imaging of osteosarcoma in dogs using a fluorine-18-labeled monoclonal antibody fab fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.L.; Garg, P.K.; Gard, S. ||

    1994-09-01

    Four dogs with histologically confirmed osteogenic sarcoma were studied with PET following intravenous injection of the {sup 18}F-labeled Fab fragment of TP-3, a monoclonal antibody specific for human and canine osteosarcomas. The antibody fragment was labeled using the N-succinimidyl (8-(4{prime}-({sup 18}F)fluorobenzyl)amino)suberate acylation agent. Blood clearance of activity was biphasic in all dogs but half-times were variable (T{sub 1/2{beta}} = 2-13 hr). Catabolism of labeled Fab was reflected by the decrease in protein-associated activity in serum from more than 90% at 1 min to 60%-80% at 4 hr. PET images demonstrated increased accumulation of {sup 18}F at the primary tumor site relative to normal contralateral bone in one dog as early as 15 min after injection. Biopsies obtained after euthanasia indicated higher uptake at the edges of the tumor as observed on the PET scans. Tumor uptake was 1-3 x 10{sup -3}% injected dose/g, a level similar to that reported for other Fab fragments in human tumors. In the three dogs with metastatic disease, early PET images reflected activity in the blood pool but later uptake was observed in suspected metastatic sites. These results, although preliminary, suggest that PET imaging of {sup 18}F-labeled antibody fragments is feasible and that dogs with spontaneous tumors could be a valuable model for preclinical research with radioimmunoconjugates. 34 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of labeled monoclonal antibodies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Kuroki, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Konishi, J.

    1989-06-01

    The effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of 111In- and 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) was studied using F(ab')2 fragments of three representative anti-tumor MoAbs and SW1116 human colorectal carcinoma grown in nude mice. The 19-9, F33-104 anti-CEA, and 17-1A MoAbs showed specific binding to SW1116 cells. The former two MoAbs recognize circulating CA 19-9 with molecular weights of more than 5,000,000 and CEA of Mr 170,000-180,000, respectively, whereas 17-1A reacts with a nonshedding antigen. Both percentage injected dose per gram tumor and tumor-to-blood ratios were inversely proportional to the tumor mass in nude mice administered 111In- and 125I-labeled 19-9, but liver uptake increased as tumor size increased. Analysis of serum samples and tumor homogenates demonstrated the presence of a high-molecular-weight species, probably due to the antibody binding to CA 19-9. In the case of 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, tumor uptake also decreased and liver uptake increased with tumor size, but this effect was less obvious than that of 19-9. In contrast, tumor and liver uptake of 125I-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, 111In- and 125I-labeled 17-1A and control antibodies were independent of tumor mass. The absolute tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratios of all 125I-labeled antibodies were lower than those of the 111In-labeled ones. And the effect of tumor mass was also weaker with 125I-labeled antibodies, probably due to in vivo dehalogenation. These results indicate that the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of labeled MoAb into tumors is dependent on the antigenic nature to be targeted and/or radionuclides used for labeling and that high concentrations of circulating high molecular weight antigens may limit in vivo use of MoAb conjugates.

  12. High-Dose 131I-Tositumomab (Anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Adjusting Radiation Absorbed Dose to Actual Organ Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, A K.; Durack, L. D.; Press, O. W.; Eary, Janet F.

    2004-06-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-tositumomab has been used successfully to treat relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgin's lymphoma (NHL). Our approach to treatment planning has been to determine limits on radiation absorbed close to critical nonhematopoietic organs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using CT to adjust for actual organ volumes in calculating organ-specific absorbed dose estimates. Methods: Records of 84 patients who underwent biodistribution studies after a trace-labeled infusion of 131I-tositumomab for RIT (January 1990 and April 2003) were reviewed. Serial planar -camera images and whole-body Nal probe counts were obtained to estimate 131I-antibody source-organ residence times as recommended by the MIRD Committee. The source-organ residence times for standard man or woman were adjusted by the ratio of the MIRD phantom organ mass to the CT-derived organ mass. Results: The mean radiation absorbed doses (in mGy/MBq) for our data using the MIRD model were lungs= 1.67; liver= 1.03; kidneys= 1.08; spleen= 2.67; and whole body= 0.3; and for CT volume-adjusted organ volumes (in mGy/MBq) were lungs= 1.30; liver= 0.92; kidneys= 0.76; spleen= 1.40; and whole body= 0.22. We determined the following correlation coefficients between the 2 methods for the various organs; lungs, 0.49; (P= 0.0001); liver, 0.64 (P= 0.004); kidneys, 0.45 (P= 0.0001), for the residence times. For therapy, patients received mean 131I administered activities of 19.2 GBq (520 mCi) after adjustment for CT-derived organ mass compared with 16.0 GBq (433 mCi) that would otherwise have been given had therapy been based only using standard MIRD organ volumes--a statistically significant difference (P= 0.0001). Conclusion: We observed large variations in organ masses among our patients. Our treatments were planned to deliver the maximally tolerated radiation dose to the dose-limiting normal organ. This work provides a simplified method for calculating patient-specific radiation

  13. Phase I study of radioimmunotherapy with an anti-CD20 murine radioimmunoconjugate ((90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan) in relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Terui, Shoji; Itoh, Kuniaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Igarashi, Tadahiko; Usubuchi, Noriko; Nakata, Masanobu; Nawano, Shigeru; Sekiguchi, Naohiro; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Tanimoto, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Yukio; Endo, Keigo; Seriu, Taku; Hayashi, Masaki; Tobinai, Kensei

    2005-12-01

    We conducted a phase I study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy with yttrium-90-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Y2B8) in Japanese patients with relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell lymphoma. Indium-111-labeled ibritumomab tiuxetan (In2B8; 3.5 or 5 mCi [129.5 or 185 MBq]) was administered on day 1, followed by serial gamma-camera imaging to investigate the distribution of In2B8 in the whole body of patients and to judge the feasibility of Y2B8 administration. Y2B8 with a dose of 0.3 mCi/kg (11.1 MBq/kg) or 0.4 mCi/kg (14.8 MBq/kg) was administered on day 8. Grade 4 neutropenia and grade 3 thrombocytopenia were observed in three of nine of the patients evaluated for safety. Critical toxicities (prolonged thrombocytopenia or severe non-hematological toxicities) were observed in two of six patients in the 0.4 mCi/kg (14.8 MBq/kg) dose group but were not seen in any of the three patients in the 0.3 mCi/kg (11.1 MBq/kg) dose group. The non-hematological toxicities of the nine patients were of grade 2 or less, except in two patients who had been heavily treated previously. They experienced critical toxicities such as infection, diarrhea, hyponatremia and prolonged thrombocytopenia, as well as other frequent grade 2 non-hematological toxicities. Although the pharmacokinetic profiles were similar to those in the US study, one of the two patients was clarified retrospectively as showing abnormal biodistribution of In2B8 in the bone marrow, as judged by an independent third party panel of radiologists. Five of the 10 participants achieved complete responses or unconfirmed complete responses and two partial responses. In conclusion, the recommended dose of Y2B8 for the subsequent phase II study for Japanese patients is 0.4 mCi/kg (14.8 MBq/kg). This dose of radioimmunotherapy was feasible when patients with altered biodistribution of In2B8 were excluded, and it was highly effective. (Cancer Sci 2005; 96: 903-910). PMID:16367911

  14. Fragmentation, labeling and biodistribution studies of KS1/4, a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, an IgG2a (KS1/4), a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) specific against a human lung adenocarcinoma (UCLA P-3) was successfully fragmented enzymatically to yield F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab by using pepsin and papain, respectively. The kinetic of fragmentation of the MoAb was compared to that of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). A similar pattern of fragmentation was observed with both antibodies with a higher percentage yield of the F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab obtained upon the fragmentation of the IgG by the enzymes. The KS1/4 and the two fragments were labeled with three different radionuclides, namely iodine-131, indium-111 and selenium-75. The radioiodination of the MoAb and the fragments was carried out by using a modified chloramine-T method. Radiometal labeling of the MoAb and the fragments with indium-111 was performed by using DTPA as a bifunctional chelating agent, while intrinsic labeling of the MoAb was done by culturing the hybridoma in the presence of /sup 75/Se-methionine. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled MoAb, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab fragments were performed by injecting the preparations intravenously into nude mice bearing human lung adenocarcinoma.

  15. Preoperative clinical radioimmunodetection of pancreatic cancer by 111 In-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody Nd2.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Nishihara, T; Yamamoto, A; Teraoka, H; Yamashita, Y; Okamura, T; Ochi, H; Ho, J J; Kim, Y S; Hirakawa, K

    1999-10-01

    The present study was carried out with the purpose of evaluating the clinical usefulness of radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 111In-labeled murine/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, Nd2 (c-Nd2) in patients with pancreatic cancer. Nineteen patients suspected to have pancreatic cancer were administered intravenously 74 MBq/2 mg 111In-labeled c-Nd2 in 100 ml of saline containing 2% albumin over 30 min. A scintigram was obtained on the 3rd day after infusion by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Of the 14 patients finally diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer on the basis of surgical specimens or progress of disease, specific focal uptake at the site of the tumor was detected in 12 (true positive cases), representing a sensitivity of 85.7% (12/14), and liver metastasis was found in one case with metastasis. Of the 5 patients diagnosed with tumor-forming pancreatitis (TFP), 4 patients demonstrated true negative imaging, but one patient whose tumor demonstrated interesting findings in histology and immunostaining, showed false positive imaging. Of patients investigated for human anti-chimeric antibody (HACA) response, none showed HACA response, and no allergic reaction was seen in any of the patients administered c-Nd2. These results suggest that RAID with 11In-labeled c-Nd2 is useful for differential preoperative diagnosis between invasive pancreatic cancer and TFP. PMID:10595748

  16. Sequences of 12 monoclonal anti-dinitrophenyl spin-label antibodies for NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D.J.; Rule, G.S.; Whittaker, M.M.; McConnell, H.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies specific for a spin-labeled dinitrophenyl hapten (DNP-SL) have been produces for use in NMR studies. They have been named AN01 and ANO3-AN12. The stability constants for the association of these antibodies with DNP-SL and related haptens were measured by fluorescence quenching. cDNA clones coding for the heavy and light chains of each antibody and of an additional anti-DNP-SL monoclonal antibody, ANO2, have been isolated. The nucleic acid sequence of the 5{prime} end of each clone has been determined, and the amino acid sequence of the variable regions of each antibody has been deduced from the cDNA sequence. The sequences are relatively heterogeneous, but both the heavy and the light chains of ANO1 and ANO3 are derived from the same variable-region gene families as those of the ANO2 antibody. ANO7 has a heavy chain that is related to that of ANO2, and ANO9 has a related light chain. ANO5 and ANO6 are unrelated to ANO2 but share virtually identical heavy and light chains. Preliminary NMR difference spectra comparing related antibodies show that sequence-specific assignment of resonances is possible. Such spectra also provide a measure of structural relatedness.

  17. Efficacy of astatine-211-labeled monoclonal antibody in treatment of murine T-cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.; Royle, L.

    1987-01-01

    The short-lived isotope /sup 211/At (half-life, 7.2 hr), an alpha particle-emitting halogen, has been attached to a monoclonal antibody (anti-thy 1.1, IgG1, OX7) and used in mice in the treatment of a thy 1.1 T-cell lymphoma (A120). Forty-eight hours after receiving an iv injection of 10(3) or 10(5) A120 cells, mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline, /sup 211/At-, antibody alone, or /sup 211/At conjugated to OX7. Treatment with the /sup 211/At-labeled OX7 conjugate increased the median survival time of mice and probably cured (survival at 200 days) 6 of the 15 mice given 10(5) cells and 21 of the 27 mice given 10(3) cells.

  18. SPECT imaging of neuropilin receptor type-1 expression with 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaofeng; Yan, Jianghua; Zhang, Yafei; Liu, Peng; Jiang, Yizhen; Lv, Sha; Zeng, Fanwei; Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Shengyu; Zhang, Haipeng; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Lin; Su, Xinhui

    2016-09-01

    As a novel co-receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), neuropilin receptor type-1 (NRP-1) is overexpressed in several cancers and metastases, and serves as an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Previous single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies demonstrated that the small NRP-1-targeting peptides 99mTc-MA-ATWLPPR and 99mTc-CK3 showed poor tumor imaging quality, because of their rapid blood clearance and very low tumor uptake. Compared with small peptides, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can improve imaging of NRP-1-expression, due to their high affinity, specificity and slow extraction. A6-11-26 is a novel monoclonal antibody against NRP-1 b1b2 domain that exhibits inhibition of tumor growth in NPR-1-expressing preclinical models. The aim of the present study was to develop the 131I-labeled anti-NRP-1 monoclonal antibody A6-11-26 as a SPECT probe for imaging of NRP-1-positive tumor. An anti-NRP-1 monoclonal antibody (A6-11-26) was produced by hybridomas and was labeled with iodine-131 by the iodogen method. In vitro, the radiolabeling efficiency, radiochemical purity, immunoreactive fraction and stability were assessed. Binding affinity and specificity of 131I‑A6-11-26 to NRP-1 were evaluated using human glioblastoma U87MG cells. In vivo, biodistribution and SPECT/CT studies were conducted on mice bearing U87MG xenografts after the injection of 131I-A6-11-26 with or without co-injection of unlabeled A6-11-26 antibody. A6-11-26 was generated successfully by hybridoma with high purity (>95%) and was labeled with iodine-131 within 60 min with high labelling efficiency (95.46±3.34%), radiochemical purity (98.23±1.41%). 131I-A6-11-26 retained its immunoreactivity and also displayed excellent stability in mouse serum and PBS solution during 1 to 96 h. Cell uptake assays showed high NRP-1-specific uptake (15.80±1.30% applied activity at 6 h) in U87MG cells. 131I-A6-11-26 bound to NRP-1 with low nanomolar

  19. Immunotherapy with the trifunctional anti-CD20 x anti-CD3 antibody FBTA05 (Lymphomun) in paediatric high-risk patients with recurrent CD20-positive B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Friedhelm R; Stanglmaier, Michael; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Winkler, Beate; Siepermann, Meinolf; Meisel, Roland; Schlegel, Paul G; Hess, Jürgen; Lindhofer, Horst; Borkhardt, Arndt; Buhmann, Raymund

    2015-04-01

    Children with B cell malignancies refractory to standard therapy are known to have a poor prognosis and very limited treatment options. Here, we report on the treatment and follow-up of ten patients diagnosed with relapsed or refractory mature B-cell Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL), Burkitt leukaemia (B-AL) or pre B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (pre B-ALL). All children were treated with FBTA05 (now designated Lymphomun), an anti-CD3 x anti-CD20 trifunctional bispecific antibody (trAb) in compassionate use. Within individual treatment schedules, Lymphomun was applied (a) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT, n = 6) to induce sustained long-term remission, or (b) stand alone prior to subsequent chemotherapy to eradicate residual disease before allo-SCT (n = 4). Nine of ten children displayed a clinical response: three stable diseases (SD), one partial remission (PR) and five induced or sustained complete remissions (CR). Five of these nine responders died during follow-up. The other patients still maintain CR with a current overall survival of 874-1424 days (median: 1150 days). In conclusion, despite the dismal clinical prognosis of children refractory to standard therapy, immunotherapy with Lymphomun resulted in a favourable clinical outcome in this cohort of refractory paediatric patients. PMID:25495919

  20. The combination of milatuzumab, a humanized anti-CD74 antibody, and veltuzumab, a humanized anti-CD20 antibody, demonstrates activity in patients with relapsed and refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Christian, Beth A; Poi, Ming; Jones, Jeffrey A; Porcu, Pierluigi; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph M; Benson, Don M; Phelps, Mitch A; Wei, Lai; Byrd, John C; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M; Baiocchi, Robert A; Blum, Kristie A

    2015-06-01

    As a result of the anti-tumour activity observed in vitro and in vivo with combined anti-CD20 and anti-CD74 antibodies, we initiated a phase I/II trial of veltuzumab and milatuzumab in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients received an induction of veltuzumab 200 mg/m(2) weekly combined with escalating doses of milatuzumab at 8, 16 and 20 mg/kg weekly for 4 weeks. Patients without disease progression could receive an extended induction with treatment on weeks 12, 20, 28 and 36. A total of 35 patients enrolled on the study. Median age was 63 years, median number of prior therapies was 3, and 63% of patients were rituximab refractory. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in the phase I study. Related grade 3-4 toxicities included lymphopenia, leucopenia, neutropenia, anaemia, infusion reactions, hyperglycaemia, fatigue and atrial tachycardia. Median weeks of therapy was 12 and 29% of patients completed all 36 weeks of therapy. The overall response rate was 24%, median duration of response was 12 months, and responses were observed at all dose levels and in 50% of patients refractory to rituximab. Combination therapy with veltuzumab and milatuzumab demonstrated activity in a population of heavily pre-treated patients with relapsed or refractory indolent NHL. PMID:25847298

  1. (Investigations into the use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for selective cell labeling in whole blood):

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 7 specific for human platelets and 10 specific for human polumorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) have been evaluated. One MAb has been identified as the antibody most suitable for canine platelets and another has been evaluted as the best among the group, for human neutrophil studies. Indium-111, Tc-99m, and I-125 have been used as the tracers. Six bifunctional chelating agents (BFCAs) were evaluated in order to determine the most efficient agent for maximal cell labeling efficiency. Among these, the DTPA has given us the best results. (4) To botain maximum In-111 chelation and minimum loss of the MAb affinity, the optimal BFCA to MAb ratios for both IgG and IgM type of MAbs were determined. Four different substances, stannous chloride, ascorbic acid, sodium dithionite and sodium borohydride, were evaluated as reducing agents for Tc-99m reduction and its optimal binding to MAbs. Dithionite at the concentration of 200 ug/ml DTPA-MAb solution provides greater than 50% Tc-99m labeling efficiency and maintains its immunospecificity equal to that of In-111-DTPA-MAb. The ability of radiolabeled MAb to interact with blood cells selectively in whole blood and with isolated blood cells was assessed and compared.

  2. Colorectal carcinoma metastases: Detection with In-111-labeled monoclonal antibody CCR 086

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.H.; Levine, G.; Lamki, L.M.; Murray, J.L.; Tauxe, W.N.; Shah, A.N.; Patt, Y.Z.; Doerr, R.J.; Klein, H.A.; Gona, J. )

    1990-07-01

    A phase I/II clinical trial with indium-111-labeled antimucin murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CCR 086 was conducted. Seventeen patients with histologically proved colorectal carcinoma and known metastatic disease underwent external scintigraphy after administration of 5.5 mCi (203.5 MBq) of In-111 CCR 086 at doses of 5 and 20 mg. Of 25 known lesions, 17 were detected (sensitivity, 68%). The smallest detected lesion in the lung was 1 cm and in the liver was 1.5 cm. The serum half-life of In-111-labeled CCR 086 MoAb was approximately 64 hours. The formation of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) was detected in the serum of four of five patients who received 20 mg of MoAb. No HAMAs were detected in four patients receiving 5 mg of MoAb. No side effects were encountered. Because of effective detection of liver and lung metastases with lower doses (5-20 mg) of CCR 086 conjugated with In-111, further investigations are warranted to assess clinical and therapeutic potentials of CCR 086 in the management of colorectal cancer.

  3. In-111-labeled monoclonal antibody immunoscintigraphy in colorectal carcinoma: Safety, sensitivity, and preliminary clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.; Doerr, R.J.; Chan, H.W.; Balu, D.; Schmelter, R.F.; Maguire, R.T. )

    1990-04-01

    A phase I/II prospective clinical trial was performed with indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) conjugate B72.3-glycyl-tyrosyl N-epsilon-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (CYT-103) in 28 preoperative patients with biopsy-proved or suspected colorectal carcinomas. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 2-7 days after infusion of 4.1 mCi (152 MBq) of In-111 labeled to CYT-103 at doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 20.0 mg. Surgical and histologic confirmation was available in all cases. Use of In-111 CYT-103 made possible detection of 75% of colorectal carcinomas at doses of 1.0 mg and higher, compared with only 20% detection at the 0.5-mg MoAb dose. Immunohistochemical staining for tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 in resected carcinoma tissues demonstrated a positive correlation between MoAb imaging and the percentage of cells that expressed TAG-72. One patient suffered an adverse reaction after MoAb infusion. Human antimouse response to CYT-103 developed in 16% of patients.

  4. Cellular processing of copper-67-labeled monoclonal antibody chCE7 by human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Novak-Hofer, I; Amstutz, H P; Mäcke, H R; Schwarzbach, R; Zimmermann, K; Morgenthaler, J J; Schubiger, P A

    1995-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody chCE7, an internalizing neuroblastoma-specific chimeric antibody, was derivatized with the macrocyclic amine ligand 4-[(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradec-1-yl)-methyl] benzoic acid tetrahydrochloride and labeled with the potential therapeutic nuclide 67Cu. Using pulse labeling and an acid elution endocytosis assay, 67Cu-chCE7 was found to be internalized into human neuroblastoma (SKN-AS) cells at a similar rate and to a similar extent as 125I-labeled chCE7. Uptake of 67Cu-chCE7 and 125I-chCE7 into the acid stable (intracellular) pool proceeded with similar kinetics during the first 2 h of internalization. However, in contrast to 125I-chCE7-loaded cells, at later times intracellular radioactivity kept increasing in the case of 67Cu-chCE7-loaded cells. It was shown that this effect is due to the intracellular accumulation of a low M(r) degradation product consisting of the 67Cu-4[(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradec-1-yl)-methyl] benzoic acid complex, possibly with a short peptide attached to it. Degradation of both 125I-chCE7 and 67Cu-chCE7 was inhibited by chloroquine, indicating endosomal or lysosomal degradation, and a 43,000 M(r) fragment was found to be the major high M(r) degradation product in both cases. Although at times between 4 and 6 h of internalization intracellular breakdown of 67Cu-chCE7 was found to proceed more slowly, the major difference between the two immunoconjugates resides in the prolonged cellular retention of the 67Cu-chCE7 metabolite. PMID:7805039

  5. Effect of metabolism on retention of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody in liver and blood

    SciTech Connect

    Kinuyfa, S.; Jeong, J.M.; Garmestani, K.

    1994-11-01

    The effect of a chelator structure on the metabolic fate of the {sup 111}In-labeled monoclonal antibody (Mab) T101 was investigated in normal Balb/c mice to assess the importance of this chemical parameter in the reduction of the background radioactivity in blood and liver. Mab T101 was conjugated with either 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-6-methyl-diethylaminetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) (1B4M), 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl) cyclohexyl-DTPA (CHX-B) or cyclic DTPA dianhydride (cDTPA) and then radiolabeled with {sup 111}In-labeled T101 conjugates and sacrificed in groups of five up to 5 days postinjection for comparative biodistribution studies and analyses of liver, blood and urine samples for radioindium products. The biodistribution of {sup 111}In-1B4M-T101 and {sup 111}In-CHX-B-T101 were similar to each other but significantly different from that of {sup 111}In-cDTPA-T101, particularly in the blood and liver. Size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that the concentration of the intact {sup 111}In-immunoglobulin (Ig)G in liver decreased with similar rates for the three conjugates. Meanwhile, the concentration of a small DTPA-like metabolite in liver increased to a different peak value (4.6% 1D/g for the cDTPA conjugate and 1.6% lD/g for the 1B4M and CHX-B conjugates) approximately at 24 hr and maintained a steady-state concentration up to 5 days. The thiourea linkage between T101 and the {sup 111}In-labeled chelates and a higher complex stability and higher lipophilicity of {sup 111}In-1B4M and {sup 111}In-CHX-B appear to be responsible for lower liver and higher blood radioactivity for the 1B4M and CHX conjugates. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with a 66Ga-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Myklejord, Duane V.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Theuer, Charles P.; Nickles, Robert J.; Cai, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a 66Ga-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for non-invasive imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer. 66Ga was produced using a cyclotron with natZn or isotopically enriched 66Zn targets. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 2-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1, 4, 7-triazacyclononane-1, 4, 7-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) and labeled with 66Ga. No difference in CD105 binding affinity or specificity was observed between TRC105 and NOTATRC105 based on flow cytometry analysis. Reactivity of 66Ga for NOTA, corrected to the end of bombardment, was between 74 and 222 GBq/μmol for both target enrichments with < 2 ppb of cold gallium. 66Ga-labeling was achieved with > 80% radiochemical yield. Serial PET imaging revealed that the murine breast cancer 4T1 tumor uptake of 66Ga-NOTA-TRC105 was 5.9 ± 1.6, 8.5 ± 0.6, and 9.0 ± 0.6 %ID/g at 4, 20, and 36 h post-injection, respectively (n = 4). At the last time point, tumor uptake was higher than all organs which gave excellent tumor contrast with a tumor/muscle ratio of 10.1 ± 1.1. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiment, control studies with 66Ga-NOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of 66Ga-NOTA-TRC105. Successful PET imaging with high specific activity 66Ga (> 700 GBq/μmol has been achieved) as the radiolabel opens many new possibilities for future PET research with antibodies or other targeting ligands. PMID:22519890

  7. Positron emission tomography imaging of tumor angiogenesis with a 66Ga-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan W; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Valdovinos, Hector F; Myklejord, Duane V; Barnhart, Todd E; Theuer, Charles P; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a (66)Ga-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for noninvasive imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer. (66)Ga was produced using a cyclotron with (nat)Zn or isotopically enriched (66)Zn targets. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 2-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) and labeled with (66)Ga. No difference in CD105 binding affinity or specificity was observed between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105 based on flow cytometry analysis. Reactivity of (66)Ga for NOTA, corrected to the end of bombardment, was between 74 and 222 GBq/μmol for both target enrichments with <2 ppb of cold gallium. (66)Ga-labeling was achieved with >80% radiochemical yield. Serial PET imaging revealed that the murine breast cancer 4T1 tumor uptake of (66)Ga-NOTA-TRC105 was 5.9 ± 1.6, 8.5 ± 0.6, and 9.0 ± 0.6% ID/g at 4, 20, and 36 h postinjection, respectively (n = 4). At the last time point, tumor uptake was higher than that of all organs, which gave excellent tumor contrast with a tumor/muscle ratio of 10.1 ± 1.1. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiment, control studies with (66)Ga-NOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of (66)Ga-NOTA-TRC105. Successful PET imaging with high specific activity (66)Ga (>700 GBq/μmol has been achieved) as the radiolabel opens many new possibilities for future PET research with antibodies or other targeting ligands. PMID:22519890

  8. Primary lung cancer: Biodistribution and dosimetry of two In-111-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.H.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.; Turner, F.E.; Denney, R.K.; Gilbert, S.A.; Slauson, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    This study was undertaken to measure the biokinetics and organ dosimetry of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) with a whole-body gamma camera imaging technique. Twenty patients with primary lung cancer were studied with two different MoAb agents (anti-carcinoembryonic antigen ZCEO25 and antiadenocarcinoma LA20207). Imaging was performed at 1, 24, 72, and 144 hours after injection. Scintigraphic whole-body retention was verified by means of comparison with the results from in vitro counting of excreta. Organ retention was verified in an abdominal phantom. The MoAb cleared slowly from the heart and lungs, the brain and spleen showed no clearance, and the liver showed increased activity over the 6-day period. Dosimetry for ZCE025 showed a dose to the liver of 1.3 rad/mCi (0.36 mGy/MBq); heart, 1.5 rad/mCi (0.40 mGy/MBq); spleen, 1.1 rad/mCi (0.29 mGy/MBq); total body, 0.49 rad/mCi (0.13 mGy/MBq); and testes, 0.39 rad/mCi (0.11 mGy/MBq). The dosimetry for LA20207 was similar.

  9. Immunoscintigraphy with indium-111 labeled monoclonal antibodies: The importance of a good display method

    SciTech Connect

    Liehn, J.C.; Hannequin, P.; Nasca, S.; Lebrun, D.; Fernandez-Valoni, A.; Valeyre, J. )

    1989-03-01

    A major drawback of In-111-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) is the presence of intense liver, renal, and bone marrow nonspecific activity. This makes the display of the images hardly optimal and their visual interpretation difficult. In this study, the intrinsic color scale (which consists of selecting the limits of the color scale as the highest and the lowest pixel value of the image) was compared to a new, simple algorithm for the determination of the limits of the color scale. This algorithm was based on the count density in the iliac crest areas. OC-125 or anti-CEA In-111 MoAb F(ab')2 fragments were used in 32 patients with suspected recurrence of ovarian (19 patients) or colorectal cancer (13 patients). Final diagnosis was assessed by surgery (21 patients), biopsy (five patients), or followup (six patients). A 10-minute abdomino-pelvic anterior view was recorded two days after injection. These views are displayed using the two methods and interpreted by two observers. Using their responses in each quadrant of the pelvis, the authors calculated two ROC curves. The comparison of the ROC curves showed better performances for the new method. For example, for the same specificity (73%), the sensitivity of the new method was significantly better (78% versus 68%). This result confirmed the importance of a good methodology for displaying immunoscintigraphic images.

  10. The in vivo fate of a /sup 211/At labelled monoclonal antibody with known specificity in a murine system

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, A.T.M.; Bateman, W.J.; Fisher, D.R.

    1982-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody reactive against the human transferrin receptor has been labelled with the alpha and X ray emitting isotope Astatine 211. The labelling procedure does not affect the ability of the product to bind to the transferrin receptor on the human leukemic cell line HL60. Using a direct binding assay, /sup 211/At labelled antibody can be specifically inhibited from binding to its target cells by excess unlabelled antibody. Furthermore, the binding inhibition demonstrated in this system correlates to enhanced clonogenic survival of these cells, indicating that very few atoms of /sup 211/At/cell are required for cell death. Data obtained from labelled antibody injected into mice show that the labelled product in serum retains the ability to bind to HL60 cells in vitro, although tissue distributions of the injected activity implies that some of the radiolabel is lost from the protein. Despite this loss of label, preliminary experiments on the localization of labelled antibody to HL60 cells growing s/c in nude mice show that tumor tissue has a higher specific activity than all other tissues, other than blood, after 12 hours. This suggests that further work on the nature of label degradation in vivo is warranted in the context of potential therapeutic and diagnostic studies.

  11. Biodistribution of 211At-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Ylva; Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Lundqvist, Hans; Jensen, Holger; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Sundin, Anders

    2007-08-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) could be a possible adjuvant treatment method for patients with colorectal carcinoma. The A33 antigen is a promising RIT target, as it is highly and homogenously expressed in 95% of all colorectal carcinomas. In this study, the humanized monoclonal antibody A33 (huA33), targeting the A33 antigen, was labeled with the therapeutic nuclide 211At, and the biodistribution and in vivo targeting ability of the conjugate was investigated in an athymic mouse xenograft model. There was an accumulation of 211At in tumor tissue over time, but no substantial accumulation was seen in any organ apart from the skin and thyroid, indicating no major release of free 211At in vivo. At all time points, the uptake of 211At-huA33 was higher in tumor tissue than in most organs, and at 8 hours postinjection (p.i.), no organ had a higher uptake than tumor tissue. The tumor-to-blood ratio of 211At-huA33 increased with time, reaching 2.5 after 21 hours p.i. The highest absorbed dose was found in the blood, but the tumor received a higher dose than any organ other than the thyroid. An in vivo blocking experiment showed that 211At-huA33 binds specifically to human tumor xenografts in athymic mice. In conclusion, the favorable biodistribution and specific in vivo targeting ability of 211At-huA33 makes it a potential therapeutic agent for the RIT of metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:17803442

  12. Curative radioimmunotherapy of human mammary carcinoma xenografts with iodine-131-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Senekowitsch, R.; Reidel, G.; Moellenstaedt, S.Kr.; Kriegel, H.; Pabst, H.W. )

    1989-04-01

    The radioiodinated monoclonal antibody BW 495/36 showed an exceptionally high uptake and long residence time in human ductal mammary carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. There was a mean tumor uptake of 82%/g 24 hr p.i., decreasing with a biologic half-life of approximately 6 days, to 15%/g by Day 16. The tumor-to-blood ratio increased from 2.8 to 21.4 and the percentage of the whole-body retention recovered in the tumor from 47% to 80% during the same time interval. The therapeutic efficiency of two injections of 7.4 MBq {sup 131}I-BW 495/36 was evaluated by comparing the tumor size with that in mice injected with either the same amount of the unlabeled MoAb, the same radioactivity of an {sup 131}I-labeled nonspecific MoAb, or with saline only. The high tumor accumulation of {sup 131}I-BW 495/36 led to a total tumor dose of 77 Gy resulting in a mean reduction in tumor diameter of 50%, corresponding to a reduction in tumor volume of 88% within 42 days p.i. Unlabeled MoAb had no effect on tumor growth compared with controls, whereas {sup 131}I nonspecific antibody caused a slight inhibition of tumor growth. Histologic tumor sections showed large areas of necrosis and a pronounced vacuolation of the tumor cell cytoplasm between Days 7 and 30 p.i. By Day 42 all remaining tissue in the tumor was identified as mouse connective tissue.

  13. Microdistribution of fluorescently-labeled monoclonal antibody in a peritoneal dissemination model of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Mikako; Paik, David S.; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2010-02-01

    The microdistribution of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies within a tumor is important for determining clinical response. Nonuniform microdistribution predicts therapy failure. Herein, we developed a semiquantitative method for measuring microdistribution of an antibody within a tumor using in situ fluorescence microscopy and sought to modulate the microdistribution by altering the route and timing of antibody dosing. The microdistribution of a fluorescently-labeled antibody, trastuzumab (50-μg and 150-μg intraperitoneal injection (i.p.), and 100-μg intravenous injection (i.v.)) was evaluated in a peritoneal dissemination mouse model of ovarian cancer. In addition, we evaluated the microdistribution of concurrently-injected (30-μg i.p. and 100-μg i.v.) or serial (two doses of 30-μg i.p.) trastuzumab using in situ multicolor fluorescence microscopy. After the administration of 50-μg i.p. and 100-μg i.v. trastuzumab fluorescence imaging showed no significant difference in the central to peripheral signal ratio (C/P ratio) and demonstrated a peripheral-dominant accumulation, whereas administration of 150-μg i.p. trastuzumab showed relatively uniform, central dominant accumulation. With concurrent-i.p.-i.v. injections trastuzumab showed slightly higher C/P ratio than concurrently-injected i.p. trastuzumab. Moreover, in the serial injection study, the second injection of trastuzumab distributed more centrally than the first injection, while no difference was observed in the control group. Our results suggest that injection routes do not affect the microdistribution pattern of antibody in small peritoneal disseminations. However, increasing the dose results in a more uniform antibody distribution within peritoneal nodules. Furthermore, the serial i.p. injection of antibody can modify the microdistribution within tumor nodules. This work has implications for the optimal delivery of antibody based cancer therapies.

  14. Structural modifications of monoclonal antibodies following direct versus indirect labelling with 99Tcm: does fragmentation really occur?

    PubMed

    Behr, T; Becker, W; Hannappel, E; Wolf, F

    1994-11-01

    In this study, the influence of direct and indirect 99Tcm-labelling on the molecular structural integrity of monoclonal antibodies and other immunoglobulin preparations was investigated. Molecular composition of antibody preparations [two IgG monoclonal antibodies, one F(ab')2 fragment (all directly labelled), one indirectly labelled polyclonal human immunoglobulin preparation] and of serum samples after antibody injection were studied using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE; non-reducing and reducing conditions) and gel filtration chromatography. With PAGE, depending on the conditions used, a variety of lower molecular weight products could be detected. When analysing the same antibody preparations by gel filtration chromatography, all complete antibody preparations appeared as homogenous proteins of IgG molecular weight (150 kD). In F(ab')2 fragments, some further fragmentation to Fab' was noticed. Neither in vitro nor in vivo (serum) evidence of smaller fragments could be detected by gel filtration, despite their presence in PAGE. We therefore conclude that through the reductive step of direct 99Tcm-labelling, interchain disulphide linkages are broken but the polypeptide chains of complete IgG remain associated by non-covalent linkages, whereas (F(ab')2 is fragmented further to form essentially Fab'. The protein-denaturating conditions of PAGE (even if performed non-reducingly) seem to produce artifacts, not representing the real in vivo condition. PAGE results should therefore be interpreted only with great care. PMID:7870392

  15. Radioimmunoimaging of lung vessels: An approach using indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, S.M.; Martynov, A.V.; Klibanov, A.L.; Slinkin, M.A.; Sakharov, I.Yu.; Malov, A.G.; Sergienko, V.B.; Vedernikov, A.Yu.; Muzykantov, V.R.; Torchilin, V.P.

    1989-10-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody against human angiotensin-converting enzyme was radiolabeled with {sup 111}In via diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid without substantial loss of antigen-binding capacity. This monoclonal antibody designated 9B9 cross-reacted with rat and monkey angiotensin-converting enzyme. Indium-111-labeled 9B9 selectively accumulated 10-20 times greater in the lung than in blood or other organs following intravenous administration in rats. Kinetics of lung accumulation and blood clearance were studied for {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody and compared to that of {sup 125}I-labeled 9B9 in rat. Highly specific accumulation of {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody in the lung of Macaca Rhesus monkeys after intravenous injection was monitored by gamma-imaging. Images of {sup 111}In-labeled antibody 9B9 biodistribution in monkey lung noticeably differ from the images of biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled albumin microspheres. This difference may provide information concerning the state of the endothelium of lung capillaries, which is different from the blood flow characteristics determined with routine microsphere technique.

  16. Radioimmunoimaging of metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland using an indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to CEA

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Watson, C.G.; Levine, G.; Tauxe, W.N.; Yousem, S.A.; Unger, M.; Kowal, C.D.

    1988-12-01

    Elevated levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) or calcitonin after surgical therapy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MCT) indicate the presence of residual or metastatic disease. CEA elevations appear to be prognostically more reliable in patients with metastatic disease and suggest a more virulent tumor. Attempts to stage the disease with use of conventional imaging techniques are usually inadequate, as is the therapy for disseminated or recurrent MCT. An indium-111-labeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (ZCE-025) was used to image metastases in a patient with MCT. Potential applications of monoclonal antibody technology in the management of MCT would include (1) preoperative differentiation of unicentric from multicentric thyroid gland involvement, (2) detection of regional or distant metastases or both, (3) measurement of response to systemic therapy, and (4) the facilitation of radionuclide immunoconjugate therapy.

  17. Tumor necrosis treatment of ME-180 human cervical carcinoma model with sup 131 I-labeled TNT-1 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.M.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1989-08-15

    In contrast to normal tissues, many malignant tumors contain a high proportion of dead and dying cells. The loss of membrane integrity that accompanies cellular degeneration permits macromolecules, including antibodies, to freely enter the cell cytoplasm. Based upon these observations, it was hypothesized that monoclonal antibodies to intracellular antigens, which are integral structural components and are retained by degenerating cells, may be used to target a wide range of human malignancies. Previous studies by our laboratory utilizing these principles have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging four different histological types of human cancer in a nude mouse model, using monoclonal antibodies directed against insoluble intranuclear antigens. The present study describes the application of this approach, designated tumor necrosis treatment, for the radioimmunotherapy of transplantable ME-180 human cervical carcinomas in the nude mouse. Groups of tumor-bearing nude mice received three weekly treatments of 150 or 300 microCi of 131I-labeled experimental (TNT-1) or control (Lym-1) monoclonal antibodies. Detailed biodistribution data, dosimetric evaluations, and therapeutic results are presented to demonstrate the effective and preferential targeting of 131I-labeled TNT-1 monoclonal antibody within the tumor. In the experimental groups, the dose delivered to the tumor was sufficient to induce clinical regressions in 88% of treated animals, without evidence of toxicity to normal tissues. Complete regressions were obtained in 25% of the mice treated with high dose TNT-1. Microscopic examination of the implantation sites of these mice demonstrated the presence of acute radiation damage and residual keratin-positive tumor cells showing marked evidence of degeneration.

  18. 125I-labeled anti-bFGF monoclonal antibody inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng-Hui; Pan, Lan-Hong; Wong, Patrick Ting-Yat; Chen, Wen-Hui; Yang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Hong; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Xu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory efficacy of 125I-labeled anti-basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) monoclonal antibody (mAb) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: bFGF mAb was prepared by using the 1G9B9 hybridoma cell line with hybridization technology and extracted from ascites fluid through a Protein G Sepharose affinity column. After labeling with 125I through the chloramine-T method, bFGF mAb was further purified by a Sephadex G-25 column. Gamma radiation counter GC-1200 detected radioactivity of 125I-bFGF mAb. The murine H22 HCC xenograft model was established and randomized to interventions with control (phosphate-buffered saline), 125I-bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, bFGF mAb, or 125I. The ratios of tumor inhibition were then calculated. Expression of bFGF, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), platelet-derived growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The purified bFGF mAb solution was 8.145 mg/mL with a titer of 1:2560000 and was stored at -20 °C. After coupling, 125I-bFGF mAb was used at a 1: 1280000 dilution, stored at 4 °C, and its specific radioactivity was 37 MBq/mg. The corresponding tumor weight in the control, 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 1.88 ± 0.25, 1.625 ± 0.21, 1.5 ± 0.18, 1.41 ± 0.16, and 0.98 ± 0.11 g, respectively. The tumor inhibition ratio in the 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 13.6%, 20.2%, 25.1%, and 47.9%, respectively. Growth of HCC xenografts was inhibited significantly more in the 125I-bFGF mAb group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). Expression of bFGF and FGFR mRNA in the 125I-bFGF mAb group was significantly decreased in comparison with other groups (P < 0.05). Groups under interventions revealed increased expression of VEGF mRNA (except for 125I group) compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: 125I-bFGF m

  19. Conformational changes of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Kita, Adriana; Cheng, Guilong; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-15

    Limited proteolytic digestion is a method with a long history that has been used to study protein domain structures and conformational changes. A method of combining limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry was established in the current study to investigate protein conformational changes. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies with or without the conserved oligosaccharides, and with or without oxidation of the conserved methionine residues, were used to test the newly proposed method. All of the samples were digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in normal water. The oxidized deglycosylated sample was also digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in (18)O-labeled water. The sample from the digestion in (18)O-water was spiked into each sample digested in normal water. Each mixed sample was subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The molecular weight differences between the peptides digested in normal water versus (18)O-water were used to differentiate peaks from the samples. The relative peak intensities of peptides with or without the C-terminal incorporation of (18)O atoms were used to determine susceptibility of different samples to trypsin and chymotrypsin. The results demonstrated that the method was capable of detecting local conformational changes of the recombinant monoclonal antibodies caused by deglycosylation and oxidation. PMID:26747642

  20. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with rhenium-186 using the MAG3 chelate for radioimmunotherapy of cancer: a technical protocol.

    PubMed

    Visser, G W; Gerretsen, M; Herscheid, J D; Snow, G B; van Dongen, G

    1993-11-01

    A detailed technical protocol is provided for reproducible and aseptical production of stable 186Re-monoclonal antibody conjugates. Labeled Mab E48 IgG and its F(ab')2 fragment which are promising candidates for radioimmunotherapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were used for evaluation. S-benzoylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (S-benzoyl-MAG3) was used as a precursor. Rhenium-186-MAG3 was prepared via a unique solid-phase synthesis, after which known strategies for esterification and conjugation to Mab IgG/F(ab')2 were applied. The biodistribution of 186Re-E48 F(ab')2 in tumor-bearing nude mice was found to be comparable to that of analogously labeled 99mTc-E48 F(ab')2 or 131I-E48 F(ab')2, indicating that the intrinsic behavior of the antibody remains preserved when using this labeling technique. Radiolytic decomposition of 186Re-E48 IgG/F(ab')2 solutions of 10 mCi.ml-1 was effectively reduced by the antioxidant ascorbic acid. Upon increase of the Re-MAG3 molar amount, a conjugation of seven to eight Re-MAG3 molecules per Mab molecule was generally the maximum ratio that could chemically be obtained. Such a ratio did not impair the immunoreactivity or alter the in vivo biodistribution characteristics of the immunoconjugate, making this labeling procedure suitable for general clinical application. PMID:8229241

  1. A Novel PET Imaging Using 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody against Mesothelin Commonly Expressed on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuko; Sasaki, Takanori; Takenaka, Fumiaki; Yakushiji, Hiromasa; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Kishi, Yoshiro; Kita, Shoichi; Shen, Lianhua; Kumon, Hiromi; Matsuura, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin (MSLN) is a 40-kDa cell differentiation-associated glycoprotein appearing with carcinogenesis and is highly expressed in many human cancers, including the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas, ovarian cancers, and mesotheliomas, while its expression in normal tissue is limited to mesothelial cells lining the pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum. Clone 11-25 is a murine hybridoma secreting monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human MSLN. In this study, we applied the 11-25 mAb to in vivo imaging to detect MSLN-expressing tumors. In in vitro and ex vivo immunochemical studies, we demonstrated specificity of 11-25 mAb to membranous MSLN expressed on several pancreatic cancer cells. We showed the accumulation of Alexa Fluor 750-labeled 11-25 mAb in MSLN-expressing tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Then, 11-25 mAb was labeled with 64Cu via a chelating agent DOTA and was used in both in vitro cell binding assay and in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the tumor-bearing mice. We confirmed that 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb highly accumulated in MSLN-expressing tumors as compared to MSLN-negative ones. The 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb is potentially useful as a PET probe capable of being used for wide range of tumors, rather than 18F-FDG that occasionally provides nonspecific accumulation into the inflammatory lesions. PMID:25883990

  2. 90Y-Labeled Anti-ROBO1 Monoclonal Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity against Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kentaro; Koyama, Keitaro; Suga, Kosuke; Ikemura, Masako; Saito, Yasutaka; Hino, Akihiro; Iwanari, Hiroko; Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Mitsui, Kenichi; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ROBO1 is a membrane protein that contributes to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. We previously reported that 90Y-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG) showed an antitumor effect against ROBO1-positive tumors. In this study, we performed a biodistribution study and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) against ROBO1-positive small cell lung cancer (SCLC) models. Methods For the biodistribution study, 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG) was injected into ROBO1-positive SCLC xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate antitumor effects, an RIT study was performed, and SCLC xenograft mice were treated with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG. Tumor volume and body weight were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumors and organs of mice were then collected, and a pathological analysis was carried out. Results As a result of the biodistribution study, we observed tumor uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG. The liver, kidney, spleen, and lung showed comparably high accumulation of 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1. In the RIT study, 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG significantly reduced tumor volume compared with baseline. Pathological analyses of tumors revealed coagulation necrosis and fatal degeneration of tumor cells, significant reduction in the number of Ki-67-positive cells, and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. A transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen, sternum, and femur. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive SCLC. PMID:26017283

  3. Bismuth-212-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody: alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides as modalities for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.W.; Atcher, R.W.; Gansow, O.A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.; Waldmann, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody directed to the human interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, has been successfully conjugated to the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-212 by use of a bifunctional ligand, the isobutylcarboxycarbonic anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The physical properties of 212Bi are appropriate for radioimmunotherapy in that it has a short half-life, deposits its high energy over a short distance, and can be obtained in large quantities from a radium generator. Antibody specific activities of 1-40 microCi/microgram (1 Ci = 37 GBq) were achieved. Specificity of the 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac was demonstrated for the IL-2 receptor-positive adult T-cell leukemia line HUT-102B2 by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays. Activity levels of 0.5 microCi or the equivalent of 12 rad/ml of alpha radiation targeted by anti-Tac eliminated greater than 98% the proliferative capabilities of HUT-102B2 cells with more modest effects on IL-2 receptor-negative cell lines. Specific cytotoxicity was blocked by excess unlabeled anti-Tac but not by human IgG. In addition, an irrelevant control monoclonal antibody of the same isotype labeled with 212Bi was unable to target alpha radiation to cell lines. Therefore, 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac is a potentially effective and specific immunocytotoxic reagent for the elimination of IL-2 receptor-positive cells. These experiments thus provide the scientific basis for use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in immunotherapy.

  4. Uptake of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody ZME-018 as a function of tumor size in a patient with melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, D.J.; Denardo, S.J.; Denardo, G.L.; Goodnight, J.K.; Unger, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of an Indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb), ZME-018, in melanoma tumors in a patient was determined by sequential, quantitative gamma camera imaging. The amount and concentration of In-111 in each tumor changed in a characteristic pattern with time, reaching a peak at day 3 followed by a steady clearance. The concentration of In-111 in the tumor and the ratios of tumor to whole-body or blood decreased as the size of the tumor increased. These results were interpreted to indicate that the fraction of active, perfused tumor decreased as the melanoma lesions increased in size. The maximum number of MoAb molecules bound per melanoma cell was calculated to be abut 35,000. The implications of these observations for radioimmunoimaging and therapy are significant.

  5. Imaging of pharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas with indium-111-labeled monoclonal anti-CEA antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Kairemo, K.J.; Hopsu, E.V. )

    1990-10-01

    Localization of primary tumors, metastases, or recurrences in 13 consecutive patients with histological verification of squamous cell or adenocarcinoma was made with radioimmunodetection using monoclonal radiolabeled anti-CEA antibody. All surgical specimens stained immunohistochemically, except one, were positive for CEA. Of the known 19 tumor sites 17 were visualized in antibody scans. There were two positive findings that did not prove to be positive during 12 month follow-up. The scintigram findings did not correlate with CEA serum concentrations that, with one exception, were normal in all patients.

  6. Biodistribution Analyses of a Near-Infrared, Fluorescently Labeled, Bispecific Monoclonal Antibody Using Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Norman C; Wilson, George G; Huang, Qihui; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Sachsenmeier, Kris F

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, biodistribution analyses of pharmaceutical compounds in preclinical animal models have become an integral part of drug development. Here we report on the use of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in a mouse xenograft model to identify tissues that nonspecifically retained a bispecific antibody under development. Although our bispecific antibody bound both the epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin growth factor 1 receptor are expressed on H358, nonsmall-cell lung carcinoma cells, the fluorescence from labeled bispecific antibody was less intense than expected in xenografted tumors. Imaging analyses of live mice and major organs revealed that the majority of the Alexa Fluor 750 labeled bispecific antibody was sequestered in the liver within 2 h of injection. However, results varied depending on which near-infrared fluorophore was used, and fluorescence from the livers of mice injected with bispecific antibody labeled with Alexa Fluor 680 was less pronounced than those labeled with Alexa Fluor 750. The tissue distribution of control antibodies remained unaffected by label and suggests that the retention of fluorophores in the liver may differ. Given these precautions, these results support the incorporation of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in biotherapeutic development strategies. PMID:27053562

  7. Rapid diagnosis of occult abscesses using sup 99m Tc-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Coons, T.A.; Rhodes, B.A. ); Thakur, M.L. ); Marcus, C.S. ); Ballou, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Acute infections, such as appendicitis and occult infections in AIDS patients, can be diagnosed within two hours by gamma scintigraphy after i.v. administration of {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibodies reactive with human granulocytes. The antibody, murine IgM anti-SSEA-1, is partially reduced using Sn(II) to expose and protect reactive sulfide groups. The antibody is then purified, stannous tartrate and stabilizers are added, and the mixture is lyophilized. To label, sodium pertechnetate is added. After a 15 minute incubation the tracer drug is injected. The rate of accumulation and degree of concentration at the site of infection is presumptively determinative of the severity of the infection. Acceptance criteria and tests for the {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibody product have been established and validated. Greater than 93% of the {sup 99m}Tc is firmly bound to the protein as determined by quantitative HPLC. Radiochemical impurities, colloidal {sup 99m}Tc and free pertechnetate are together less than 4% as determined by thin layer chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction, measured by binding to solid phase antigen, and affinity measured be ELISA, are unchanged by the {sup 99m}Tc-direct labeling process. Two hour blood clearance in rats is within 90% of the value of the {sup 125}I labeled analog. The immunoreactive fraction decreases less than 10% when incubated in human plasma for 24 hours. This method has been compared to other direct labeling methods, and found to give higher radiochemical yields. 5 figs.

  8. Adverse Events of Monoclonal Antibodies Used for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  9. Adverse events of monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  10. PEGylated gold nanoparticles conjugated to monoclonal F19 antibodies as targeted labeling agents for human pancreatic carcinoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Eck, Wolfgang; Craig, Gary; Sigdel, Aruna; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Tang, Laura; Brennan, Murray F; Allen, Peter J; Mason, Michael D

    2008-11-25

    In this study, we describe optical detection of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to surgically resected human pancreatic cancer tissue. Gold nanoparticles stabilized by heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) were prepared using approximately 15 nm spherical gold cores and covalently coupled to F19 monoclonal antibodies. The heterobifunctional PEG ligands contain a dithiol group for stable anchoring onto the gold surface and a terminal carboxy group for coupling of antibodies to the outside of the PEG shell. The nanoparticle-antibody bioconjugates form highly stable dispersions and exhibit long-term resistance to agglomeration. This has been demonstrated by dynamic light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, and transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticle bioconjugates were used to label tumor stroma in approximately 5 mum thick sections of resected human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. After rinsing away nonbound nanoparticles and fixation, the tissue samples were imaged by darkfield microscopy near the nanoparticle resonance scattering maximum (approximately 560 nm). The images display pronounced tissue features and suggest that this novel labeling method could provide for facile identification of cancer tissue. Tumor samples treated with gold nanoparticles conjugated to nonspecific control antibodies and noncancerous pancreatic tissue treated with mAb-F19-conjugated gold nanoparticles both exhibited correctly negative results and showed no tissue staining. PMID:19206392

  11. Radiobromination of humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate, a potential label for immunoPET.

    PubMed

    Mume, Eskender; Orlova, Anna; Malmström, Per-Uno; Lundqvist, Hans; Sjöberg, Stefan; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2005-08-01

    Combining the specificity of radioimmunoscintigraphy and the high sensitivity of PET in an in vivo detection technique could improve the quality of nuclear diagnostics. Positron-emitting nuclide (76)Br (T(1/2)=16.2 h) might be a possible candidate for labeling monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and their fragments, provided that the appropriate labeling chemistry has been established. For internalizing antibodies, such as the humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, radiobromine label should be residualizing, i.e., ensuring that radiocatabolites are trapped intracellularly after the proteolytic degradation of antibody. This study evaluated the chemistry of indirect radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-(tributylstannyl)-3-pyridinecarboxylate. Literature data indicated that the use of this method provided residualizing properties for iodine and astatine labels on some antibodies. An optimized "one-pot" procedure produced an overall labeling efficiency of 45.5+/-1.2% over 15 min. The bromine label was stable under physiological and denaturing conditions. The labeled trastuzumab retained its capacity to bind specifically to HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro (immunoreactivity more than 75%). However, in vitro cell test did not demonstrate that the radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate improves cellular retention of radioactivity in comparison with the use of N-succinimidyl 4-bromobenzoate. PMID:16026708

  12. Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Tumor CD105 Expression with a Dual-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Engle, Jonathan W.; Yang, Yunan; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    CD105 (endoglin) is an independent prognostic marker for poor prognosis in > 10 solid tumor types, including breast cancer. The goal of this study was to develop a CD105-specific agent for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, which can have potential clinical applications in diagnosis and imaged-guided surgery of breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e. 800CW) and 64Cu to yield 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 murine breast tumor uptake of 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW was 5.2 ± 2.7, 11.0 ± 1.4, and 13.0 ± 0.4 %ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection respectively. Tumor uptake as measured by ex vivo NIRF imaging exhibited a good linear correlation with the %ID/g values obtained from PET (R = 0.74). Biodistribution data were consistent with the PET/NIRF findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with dual-labeled cetuximab (an isotype-matched control antibody), and histology confirmed the CD105 specificity of 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Successful PET/NIRF imaging of CD105 expression warrants further investigation and clinical translation of dual-labeled TRC105-based imaging agents. PMID:22292418

  13. Positron emission tomography and optical imaging of tumor CD105 expression with a dual-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Engle, Jonathan W; Yang, Yunan; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2012-03-01

    CD105 (endoglin) is an independent prognostic marker for poor prognosis in >10 solid tumor types, including breast cancer. The goal of this study was to develop a CD105-specific agent for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, which can have potential clinical applications in diagnosis and imaged-guided surgery of breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e., 800CW) and (64)Cu to yield (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 murine breast tumor uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW was 5.2 ± 2.7, 11.0 ± 1.4, and 13.0 ± 0.4% ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h postinjection respectively. Tumor uptake as measured by ex vivo NIRF imaging exhibited a good linear correlation with the % ID/g values obtained from PET (R = 0.74). Biodistribution data were consistent with the PET/NIRF findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with dual-labeled cetuximab (an isotype-matched control antibody), and histology confirmed the CD105 specificity of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Successful PET/NIRF imaging of CD105 expression warrants further investigation and clinical translation of dual-labeled TRC105-based imaging agents. PMID:22292418

  14. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of colon cancer with iodine-131-labeled B72. 3 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasquillo, J.A.; Sugarbaker, P.; Colcher, D.; Reynolds, J.C.; Esteban, J.; Bryant, G.; Keenan, A.M.; Perentesis, P.; Yokoyama, K.; Simpson, D.E.

    1988-06-01

    The monoclonal antibody B72.3 is a murine IgG1 that is reactive with a wide range of carcinomas while demonstrating little or no reactivity to normal adult tissues. We have shown quantitative analyses demonstrating selective targeting of (/sup 131/I)B72.3 IgG to metastatic colorectal cancer. We have also shown that (a) B72.3 localization in metastases correlated with the percentage of tumor cells in the biopsy specimen; (b) B72.3 could localize in carcinomas of various degrees of differentiation with best localization in well-differentiated tumors and (c) (/sup 131/I)B72.3 could penetrate tumor masses, as determined by autoradiographic studies. We report here the various parameters effecting radioimmunoscintigraphy with (/sup 131/I)B72.3 IgG. Sixteen of 35 patients with colorectal carcinoma had positive scans (without blood-pool subtraction). High circulating TAG-72 antigen levels correlated with positive scans. No dose dependent differences were seen in biodistribution or tumor imaging. The plasma clearance and urinary excretion of (/sup 131/I)B72.3 and (/sup 125/I)BL-3 (nonspecific control) were not significantly different. No toxicity was noted. Approximately one-half of patients developed human anti-mouse immune response.

  15. Evaluation of indium-111-labeled antifibrin monoclonal antibody for the diagnosis of venous thrombotic disease

    SciTech Connect

    De Faucal, P.; Peltier, P.; Planchon, B.; Dupas, B.; Touze, M.D.; Baron, D.; Scaible, T.; Berger, H.J.; Chatal, J.F. )

    1991-05-01

    The potential advantage of using {sup 111}In-antifibrin ({sup 111}In-AF) monoclonal antibody for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in 44 patients with suspected DVT (27 underwent heparin therapy before {sup 111}In-AF injection). All patients had contrast venography (considered as the gold standard) and {sup 111}In-AF scintigraphy within 24 hr. Two to 3 mCi of {sup 111}In-AF were injected intravenously, and planar scintigraphy of the limbs was recorded within 10 min (17 times), 3 hr (44 times), and 18 hr (39 times). Indium-111-AF images were then interpreted without knowledge of the results of the other examinations. The DVT diagnostic accuracy of {sup 111}In-AF was greater when interpretation was based on images recorded at different time periods after injection. Indium-111-AF sensitivity for diagnosis of DVT was 85% (29/34) and was not apparently decreased by heparin therapy. None of the 10 patients with negative contrast venography had a positive {sup 111}In-AF scan. The results demonstrate the importance of recording serial images and the excellent accuracy of {sup 111}In-AF for diagnosing DVT.

  16. Acute myocardial infarct imaging with indium-111-labeled monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, B.A.; Yasuda, T.; Gold, H.K.; Leinbach, R.C.; Johns, J.A.; Kanke, M.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Strauss, H.W.; Haber, E.

    1987-11-01

    Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab scintigraphy was used to detect myocardial necrosis in 52 of 54 patients (96.3%) with acute myocardial infarction. Infarcts were visualized when coronary arteries were persistently occluded (n = 10), became patent after thrombolysis (n = 33), or became patent after spontaneous reperfusion (n = 7). Posteroinferolateral visualizations were obtained in two patients with clinical and enzymatic evidence of infarction but normal electrocardiograms. Of the two patients in whom no infarcts were visualized, one had an anterior myocardial infarct. This patient underwent successful thrombolytic therapy, with attendant minimization of creatine kinase release. The other patient had a small, nonreperfused inferior myocardial infarct. Five patients with a history of remote infarction and acute necrosis showed antimyosin uptake only in regions concordant with the acute episodes of infarction, and radiolabeled antimyosin Fab localized in neither old infarcts nor normal, noninfarcted myocardium. Antimyosin Fab scintigraphy, thus, appears to be a highly specific means of delineating necrotic myocardium, at least in this limited and selected group of patients.

  17. Increasing the efficacy of CD20 antibody therapy through the engineering of a new type II anti-CD20 antibody with enhanced direct and immune effector cell–mediated B-cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mössner, Ekkehard; Brünker, Peter; Moser, Samuel; Püntener, Ursula; Schmidt, Carla; Herter, Sylvia; Grau, Roger; Gerdes, Christian; Nopora, Adam; van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Ferrara, Claudia; Sondermann, Peter; Jäger, Christiane; Strein, Pamela; Fertig, Georg; Friess, Thomas; Schüll, Christine; Bauer, Sabine; Dal Porto, Joseph; Del Nagro, Christopher; Dabbagh, Karim; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Poppema, Sibrand; Klein, Christian

    2010-01-01

    CD20 is an important target for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma as well as autoimmune disorders. B-cell depletion therapy using monoclonal antibodies against CD20, such as rituximab, has revolutionized the treatment of these disorders, greatly improving overall survival in patients. Here, we report the development of GA101 as the first Fc-engineered, type II humanized IgG1 antibody against CD20. Relative to rituximab, GA101 has increased direct and immune effector cell-mediated cytotoxicity and exhibits superior activity in cellular assays and whole blood B-cell depletion assays. In human lymphoma xenograft models, GA101 exhibits superior antitumor activity, resulting in the induction of complete tumor remission and increased overall survival. In nonhuman primates, GA101 demonstrates superior B cell–depleting activity in lymphoid tissue, including in lymph nodes and spleen. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence for the development of GA101 as a promising new therapy for the treatment of B-cell disorders. PMID:20194898

  18. Clinical parameters related to optimal tumor localization of indium-111-labeled mouse antimelanoma monoclonal antibody ZME-018

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Lamki, L.; Glenn, H.J.; Krizan, Z.; Hersh, E.M.; Plager, C.E.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Unger, M.W.; Carlo, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Radioimmunolocalization of an /sup 111/In-labeled mouse antimelanoma monoclonal antibody (MoAb), ZME-018, was examined in 21 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma. Each patient received a single. i.v. infusion of MoAb at concentrations ranging from 1 mg to 20 mg, coupled to 5 mCi /sup 111/In by the chelating agent DPTA. No toxicity was observed in any patient. Total-body and regions of interest scans performed at 4, 24, and 72 hr following MoAb administration revealed uptake in 63 out of 105 previously diagnosed metastases for an overall sensitivity of 60%. Uptake was consistently observed in liver/spleen, and less frequently in bowel, testes, axillae and bone. Sensitivity of detection increased significantly at doses of MoAb above 2.5 mg, with 74% of lesions imaging at 20 mg/5 mCi compared with 29% at 2.5 mg/5 mCi (p less than 0.005). A significant correlation was observed between tumor uptake of /sup 111/In-MoAb conjugate and increasing tumor size. Soft-tissue lesions such as skin and lymph node metastases were imaged to a greater extent (76%) than visceral metastases (19%). In five of six patients, biopsies obtained from 3 days to 14 days after MoAb administration showed antibody present on tumor cells as demonstrated by flow cytometry and/or radioimmunoassay. Human anti-murine immunoglobulin responses were observed in seven of 17 patients studied. Mean plasma clearance of ZME-018 was prolonged with a T1/2 of 24.7 hr and increased slightly with increasing MoAb dose. Urinary excretion of /sup 111/In averaged 12.4% of the injected dose over 48 hours. Radioimmunolocalization of melanoma with /sup 111/In-labeled ZME-018 appears feasible. The sensitivity of the technique was related to dose, tumor size, and disease site.

  19. Label Free QCM Immunobiosensor for AFB1 Detection Using Monoclonal IgA Antibody as Recognition Element.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Özlem; Öztürk, Selma; Öztürk, Zafer Ziya

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces the use of an IgA isotype aflatoxin (AF) specific monoclonal antibody for the development of a highly sensitive Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) immunobiosensor for the detection of AF in inhibitory immunoassay format. The higher molecular weight of IgA antibodies proved an advantage over commonly used IgG antibodies in label free immunobiosensor measurements. IgA and IgG antibodies with similar affinity for AF were used in the comparative studies. Sensor surface was prepared by covalent immobilization of AFB1, using self assembled monolayer (SAM) formed on gold coated Quartz Crystal, with 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxy succinimide (EDC/NHS) method using a diamine linker. Nonspecific binding to the surface was decreased by minimizing the duration of EDC/NHS activation. Sensor surface was chemically blocked after AF immobilization without any need for protein blocking. This protein free sensor chip endured harsh solutions with strong ionic detergent at high pH, which is required for the regeneration of the high affinity antibody-antigen interaction. According to the obtained results, the detection range with IgA antibodies was higher than IgG antibodies in QCM immunosensor developed for AFB1. PMID:27529243

  20. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of colorectal carcinoma using technetium-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2.

    PubMed

    Gulec, S A; Serafini, A N; Moffat, F L; Vargas-Cuba, R D; Sfakianakis, G N; Franceschi, D; Crichton, V Z; Subramanian, R; Klein, J L; De Jager, R L

    1995-12-01

    Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) using human monoclonal antibodies offers the important clinical advantage of repeated imaging over murine monoclonal antibodies by eliminating the cross-species antibody response. This article reports a Phase I-II clinical trial with Tc-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 in patients with colorectal carcinoma. The study population consisted of 34 patients with colorectal cancer (20 men and 14 women; age range, 44-81 years). Patients were administered 5-10 mg antibody labeled with 21-41 mCi Tc-99m by the i.v. route and imaged at 3-10 and 16-24 h after infusion using planar and single-photon emission computed tomographic (CT) techniques. Pathological confirmation was obtained in 25 patients who underwent surgery. Human antihuman antibody (HAHA) titers were checked prior to and 1 and 3 months after the infusion. RIS with Tc-99m-labeled 88BV59H21-2 revealed a better detection rate in the abdomen-pelvis region compared with axial CT. The combined use of both modalities increased the sensitivity in both the liver and abdomen-pelvis regions. Ten patients developed mild adverse reactions (chills and fever). No HAHA response was detected in this series. Tc-99m-labeled human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 RIS shows promise as a useful diagnostic modality in patients with colorectal cancer. RIS alone or in combination with CT is more sensitive than CT in detecting tumor within the abdomen and pelvis. Repeated RIS studies may be possible, due to the lack of a HAHA response. PMID:7493345

  1. Development and Characterization of a New Antipeptide Monoclonal Antibody Directed to Human CD20 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Behdani, Mahdi; Hajizadeh-Saffar, Ensiyeh; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    The rapid expansion of immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of various diseases, including cancers, has been greatly facilitated by the invention of new generation of antibodies. Clinical studies have indicated that anti-CD20 mAb-based therapies represent an effective treatment for various diseases with overexpression of CD20 on their cell surface, such as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, hemolytic anemia, as well as autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. Technically, due to a short extra membrane domain, the recombinant CD20 protein is a difficult antigen to raise immune responses. In search for new monoclonal antibodies, the authors used an antigenic polypeptide, which yielded numbers of new binders that may lead to production of anti-CD20 antibodies, with improved diagnostic or clinical attributes. Mice were immunized with extra membrane loop of human CD20 (exCD20) polypeptide. The exCD20 antigen showed a desired immune response and was able to develop a monoclonal antibody, 3B4C10, which reacted well with peptide antigen as well as native antigen on the surface of Raji B-cell line. The antibody 3B4C10 with a balanced K(on) and K(off) may be applicable in the construction of affinity columns or beads for isolation and purification of CD20-positive cells and cancer stem cells. PMID:26352927

  2. Radioimmunotherapy with a 64Cu-labeled monoclonal antibody: a comparison with 67Cu.

    PubMed Central

    Connett, J M; Anderson, C J; Guo, L W; Schwarz, S W; Zinn, K R; Rogers, B E; Siegel, B A; Philpott, G W; Welch, M J

    1996-01-01

    67Cu (t1/2 = 62 h) has demonstrated potential as a radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy, but limited availability severely restricts its widespread use. 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.8 h) has been shown to have comparable effectiveness in vitro and in vivo. The present study was undertaken to examine the therapeutic potential of 64Cu- and 67Cu-bromoacetamidobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca ne-N, N',N",N"'-tetraacetic acid (BAT)-2-iminothiolane (2IT)-1A3 (1A3 is a mouse anti-human colorectal cancer mAb) for treatment of GW39 human colon carcinoma carried in hamster thighs. Hamsters were injected with 64Cu- or 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 or Cu-labeled nonspecific IgG (MOPC) or saline. Hamsters were killed 6-7 months after therapy or when tumors were > or = 10 g. Of the hamsters with small tumors (mean weight 0.43 +/- 0.25 g), 87.5% were disease-free 7 months after treatment with 2 mCi (1 Ci = 37 GBq) of 64Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 or 0.4 MCi of 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3. The mean tumor doses at these activities of 64Cu- and 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 were 586 and 1269 rad (1 rad = 0.01 Gy), respectively. In contrast, 76% of hamsters treated with 2 mCi of 64Cu-BAT-2IT-MOPC or 0.4 mCi of 67Cu-BAT-2IT-MOPC had to be killed before 6 months because of tumor regrowth. When hamsters with larger tumors (mean weight 0.66 +/- 0.11 g) were treated with 64Cu- or 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3, survival was extended compared with controls, but only one animal remained tumor-free to 6 months. These results demonstrate that 64Cu- and 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 given in a single administered dose can eradicate small tumors without significant host toxicity, but additional strategies to deliver higher tumor doses will be needed for larger tumors. PMID:8692901

  3. Contribution of tryptophan residues to the combining site of a monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl spin-label antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Anglister, J.; Bond, M.W.; Frey, T.; Leahy, D.; Levitt, M.; McConnell, H.M.; Rule, G.S.; Tomasello, J.; Whittaker, M.

    1987-09-22

    Two Fab fragments of the monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl (DNP) spin-label antibody AN02 were prepared by recombination of specifically deuterated heavy and light chains. In the recombinant H(I)L(II) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the heavy chain. In the recombinant H(II)L(I) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the light chain. Saturation of three resonances of H(I)L(II), assigned to tryptophan protons of the light chain, resulted in magnetization transfer to the aromatic proton at position 6 of the DNP ring and to the CH2 protons of the glycines linked to the DNP in a diamagnetic hapten (DNP-DG). Saturation of three resonances of H(II)L(I) assigned to tryptophan protons of the heavy chain resulted in magnetization transfer to the CH2 protons of the glycines in DNP-DG. From the dependence of the magnetization transfer on the irradiation time, the cross relaxation rates between the involved protons were estimated. The inferred distances between these protons of the hapten and certain tryptophan protons are 3-4 A. It is concluded that in the combining site of AN02 there is one tryptophan from the light chain and one tryptophan from the heavy chain that are very near the hapten. When all tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated and all tryptophan aromatic protons were deuterated except for the protons at positions 2 and 5, titration of the Fab fragments with variable amounts of paramagnetic hapten showed that one proton from the light chain tryptophan is near (less than 7 A) the unpaired electron and that three other protons are significantly closer than 15 A.

  4. Comparison of the therapeutic efficacy of 211At- and 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody MOv18 in nude mice with intraperitoneal growth of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Andersson, H; Palm, S; Lindegren, S; Bäck, T; Jacobsson, L; Leser, G; Horvath, G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the therapeutic efficacy of the alpha-emitter Astatine-211 with the beta-emitter Iodine-131 bound to the specific monoclonal antibody MOv18. The measurements were performed in an ovarian cancer cell line (NIH:OVCAR 3) growing intraperitoneally in nude mice. Two weeks after the intraperitoneal inoculation of 1 x 10(7) cells of the human ovarian cancer cell line NIH:OVCAR-3 twenty mice were treated intraperitoneally with the specific monoclonal antibody MOv-18 labelled with either 211At (310-400 kBq) or 131I (5100-6200 kBq). The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of labelled antibody in tumour-free animals were studied and the resulting bone marrow dose was estimated. When the mice were treated with 211At-labelled antibody 9 out of 10 mice were free of macro- and microscopic tumour compared to 3 out of 10 when Iodine-131 was used. The equivalent dose to the bone marrow was 2.4-3.1 Sv from 211At- and 3.4-4.1 Sv from 131I-irradiation. The therapeutic efficacy of 211At-labelled specific antibody is very good and, at approximately equivalent bone marrow doses, better than that of 131I. PMID:11299770

  5. Monoclonal antibody-based therapy of a human tumor xenograft with a 177lutetium-labeled immunoconjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Schlom, J.; Siler, K.; Milenic, D.E.; Eggensperger, D.; Colcher, D.; Miller, L.S.; Houchens, D.; Cheng, R.; Kaplan, D.; Goeckeler, W. )

    1991-06-01

    {sup 177}Lutetium ({sup 177}Lu) is a member of the family of elements known as lanthanides or rare earths. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) CC49, a murine IgG1, which is reactive with the tumor-associated antigen, TAG-72, has been shown previously to react with a wide range of human carcinomas; CC49 reacts to a different epitope on the TAG-72 molecule than MAb B72.3 and has a higher binding affinity. We report here the first use of a {sup 177}Lu-labeled immunoconjugate, {sup 177}Lu-CC49, in an experimental therapy model for human carcinoma. {sup 177}Lu-CC49 was shown to delay the growth of established LS-174T human colon carcinomas in athymic mice at a single dose of 50 microCi. Overt toxicity was observed with the administration of approximately 500 microCi of {sup 177}Lu-CC49 in which 5 of 9 mice died of apparent marrow toxicity. A single administration of 200 or 350 microCi of {sup 177}Lu-CC49, however, was shown to eliminate established tumors through the 77-day observation period after MAb administration. Dose fractionation experiments revealed that at least 750 microCi of {sup 177}Lu-CC49 (250 microCi/week for 3 consecutive weeks) was well tolerated in that 9 of 10 mice survived. Moreover, this dose schedule was able to eliminate the growth of relatively large (300 mm3) human colon tumor xenografts in 90% of the animals treated. Single-dose and dose fractionation studies were also carried out with an isotype-matched control MAb, {sup 177}Lu-MOPC-21. In all dose schedules, a large differential was seen between the therapeutic effects of the {sup 177}Lu-CC49 versus that of the {sup 177}Lu-control MAb. The merits and limitations of the use of {sup 177}Lu-labeled immunoconjugates (in particular, {sup 177}Lu-CC49) are discussed in terms of potential novel therapeutics for human carcinoma.

  6. Immunospecific saturable clearance mechanisms for indium-111-labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibody 96. 5 in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Lamki, L.M.; Shanken, L.J.; Blake, M.E.; Plager, C.E.; Benjamin, R.S.; Schweighardt, S.; Unger, M.W.; Rosenblum, M.G.

    1988-08-01

    Liver uptake of 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) remains a significant problem in radioimaging studies to date. To determine if the observed liver uptake of an 111In-labeled anti-melanoma antibody 96.5 (111In-96.5) was dependent on the presence of hepatic antigen or on recognition of circulating murine antibody, escalating doses of an unlabeled nonimmunoreactive MoAb (NIR-MoAb) were administered to 18 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma either 1 or 24 h prior to an infusion of 1 mg of 111In-96.5. The number of metastases imaged, pharmacokinetics, and the ratio of radioactivity (expressed as average counts/pixel) in liver (L), spleen (S), bone (B), and kidney (K) compared to blood pool (heart = H) were examined. Results were prospectively compared with data from six patients who received immunoreactive unlabeled 96.5 prior to 111In-96.5. Increasing dose or changes in the preinfusion time of NIR-MoAb had no significant effect on the biodistribution of 111In-96.5. In contrast, patients who received unlabeled, immunoreactive 96.5 prior to 111In-96.5 infusion demonstrated a significant drop (P less than 0.001) in the liver/heart ratio of radioactivity (2.81 +/- 0.35 (SEM)) compared to patients receiving the identical dose of NIR-MoAb (10.35 +/- 1.33). Significant decreases in spleen/heart and bone/heart ratios were also observed. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the volume of distribution (Vd) and the plasma t1/2 both decreased when 96.5 was administered compared to NIR-MoAb. In addition, a 4-fold increase in concentration X time was obtained after 96.5 antibody was administered compared to NIR-MoAb. More metastases were imaged in patients receiving preinfusions of 96.5 (23 of 28) than in patients receiving NIR-MoAb (10 of 18; P less than 0.05).

  7. CD146-targeted immunoPET and NIRF Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with a Dual-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Reinier; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Yang, Yunan; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of CD146 has been correlated with aggressiveness, recurrence rate, and poor overall survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, we set out to develop a CD146-targeting probe for high-contrast noninvasive in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of HCCs. YY146, an anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody, was employed as a targeting molecule to which we conjugated the zwitterionic near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye ZW800-1 and the chelator deferoxamine (Df). This enabled labeling of Df-YY146-ZW800 with 89Zr and its subsequent detection using PET and NIRF imaging, all without compromising antibody binding properties. Two HCC cell lines expressing high (HepG2) and low (Huh7) levels of CD146 were employed to generate subcutaneous (s.c.) and orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Sequential PET and NIRF imaging performed after intravenous injection of 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 into tumor-bearing mice unveiled prominent and persistent uptake of the tracer in HepG2 tumors that peaked at 31.65 ± 7.15 percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID/g; n=4) 72 h post-injection. Owing to such marked accumulation, tumor delineation was successful by both PET and NIRF, which facilitated the fluorescence image-guided resection of orthotopic HepG2 tumors, despite the relatively high liver background. CD146-negative Huh7 and CD146-blocked HepG2 tumors exhibited significantly lower 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 accretion (6.1 ± 0.5 and 8.1 ± 1.0 %ID/g at 72 h p.i., respectively; n=4), demonstrating the CD146-specificity of the tracer in vivo. Ex vivo biodistribution and immunofluorescent staining corroborated the accuracy of the imaging data and correlated tracer uptake with in situ CD146 expression. Overall, 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 showed excellent properties as a PET/NIRF imaging agent, including high in vivo affinity and specificity for CD146-expressing HCC. CD146-targeted molecular imaging using dual-labeled YY146

  8. CD146-targeted immunoPET and NIRF Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with a Dual-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Reinier; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G; Valdovinos, Hector F; Ehlerding, Emily B; Barnhart, Todd E; Yang, Yunan; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of CD146 has been correlated with aggressiveness, recurrence rate, and poor overall survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, we set out to develop a CD146-targeting probe for high-contrast noninvasive in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of HCCs. YY146, an anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody, was employed as a targeting molecule to which we conjugated the zwitterionic near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye ZW800-1 and the chelator deferoxamine (Df). This enabled labeling of Df-YY146-ZW800 with (89)Zr and its subsequent detection using PET and NIRF imaging, all without compromising antibody binding properties. Two HCC cell lines expressing high (HepG2) and low (Huh7) levels of CD146 were employed to generate subcutaneous (s.c.) and orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Sequential PET and NIRF imaging performed after intravenous injection of (89)Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 into tumor-bearing mice unveiled prominent and persistent uptake of the tracer in HepG2 tumors that peaked at 31.65 ± 7.15 percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID/g; n=4) 72 h post-injection. Owing to such marked accumulation, tumor delineation was successful by both PET and NIRF, which facilitated the fluorescence image-guided resection of orthotopic HepG2 tumors, despite the relatively high liver background. CD146-negative Huh7 and CD146-blocked HepG2 tumors exhibited significantly lower (89)Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 accretion (6.1 ± 0.5 and 8.1 ± 1.0 %ID/g at 72 h p.i., respectively; n=4), demonstrating the CD146-specificity of the tracer in vivo. Ex vivo biodistribution and immunofluorescent staining corroborated the accuracy of the imaging data and correlated tracer uptake with in situ CD146 expression. Overall, (89)Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 showed excellent properties as a PET/NIRF imaging agent, including high in vivo affinity and specificity for CD146-expressing HCC. CD146-targeted molecular imaging using dual-labeled

  9. Micrometastatic cancer cells in bone marrow: in vitro detection with anti-cytokeratin and in vivo labeling with anti-17-1A monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schlimok, G.; Funke, I.; Holzmann, B.; Goettlinger, G.; Schmidt, G.; Haeser, H.; Swierkot, S.; Warnecke, H.H.; Schneider, B.; Koprowski, H.; Riethmueller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The detection of early micrometastasis or disseminated single tumor cells poses a problem for conventional diagnosis procedures. Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratin and the 17-1A epithelial antigen the authors identified immunocytochemically tumor cells in bone marrow of patients with breast cancer and colorectal cancer at the time of surgery of the primary tumor. Monoclonal antibody CK2, recognizing the human cytokeratin component 18 in simple epithelia, appeared to be the most suitable reagent because of its negative reaction with bone marrow samples of the noncarcinoma patients. Its specificity was further demonstrated in a double-marker staining procedure using an anti-leukocyte common antigen monoclonal antibody (T200) as counterstain. A comparative analysis showed that immunocytology was clearly superior to conventional cytology and histology. In 9.5-20.5% of patients without distant metastasis, tumor cells could be detected in bone marrow. They found a significant correlation between tumor cells in bone marrow and conventional risk factors, such as distant metastasis or lymph node involvement. In a first approach toward immunotherapy they demonstrated in 3 patients that infused monoclonal antibody 17-1A can label single tumor cells in bone marrow in vivo. They then used this single approach to follow up on 7 patients undergoing 17-1A therapy in an adjuvant clinical trial.

  10. A review of monoclonal antibody therapies in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Teo, Esmeralda Chi-yuan; Chew, Yveline; Phipps, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (moAb) represent a novel way of delivering therapy through specific target antigens expressed on lymphoma cells and minimizes the collateral damage that is common with conventional chemotherapy. The paradigm of this approach is the targeting of CD20 by rituximab. Since its FDA approval in 1997, rituximab has become the standard of care in almost every line of therapy in most B-cell lymphomas. This review will briefly highlight some of the key rituximab trials while looking more closely at the evidence that is bringing other antibodies, including next generation anti-CD20 moAbs, and anti-CD30 moAbs, among others to the forefront of lymphoma therapy. PMID:26318093

  11. Anti-CEA monoclonal antibody: technetium-99m labeling and the validation process of a scintigraphic animal model with a non-cellular antigenic implant.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Marques, Fabio Luiz Navarro; Okamoto, Miriam Roseli Yoshie; Hironaka, Fausto Haruki; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2002-07-01

    Animal models are currently used to verify the biodistribution of different radiopharmaceuticals before its clinical application in Nuclear Medicine; however, there may be some limitations. The utilization of labelled anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) in experimental models often requires implant of human antigens (usually a cellular implant), which cannot be achieved in immunocompetent animals. Our purpose was to label an anti-CEA MoAb with technetium-99m (99Tc) and to validate a simplified animal model using a noncellular antigenic implant. MoAb was directly labelled with 99mTc, after reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol. Labeling efficiency was checked by ascending chromatography and immunoreactive fraction was measured in plastic wells sensitized with the antigen. Radiopharmaceutical biodistribution was evaluated by dissection and scintigraphy in 5 mice groups; following the subcutaneous administration of Al(OH)3, CEA adsorbed Al(OH)2 and a control group evaluation. Labeling efficiency was 94+/-3%, which showed to be stable for 24 hr, with immunoreactive fraction above 50%. Invasive biodistribution evaluation showed prolonged blood retention, hepatic and renal uptake. A significant increase in uptake was observed in scintigraphic studies of animals with CEA-adsorbed Al(OH)3 implants compared with the other groups (p<0.05). The non-cellular antigenic implant model simplifies the pre-clinical evaluation of labelled MoAb. PMID:12146705

  12. p-carboxyethyl-phenylglyoxal bis(n-methylthiosemicarbazone) (CE-DTS), a bifunctional chelating agent for Tc-99m labeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Arano, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Furukawa, T.; Saji, H.; Endo, K.; Torizaka, K.

    1985-05-01

    In the search for bifunctional chelating agents (BCA) with better affinity, selectivity and stability as for Tc-99m, synthesis of a novel BCA containing di-thio-semicarbazone as for Tc-99m chelating site has offered interesting characteristics for the labeling of macromolecules. In the present paper, monoclonal IgG (MoAb) against human thyroglobulin was selected as a model and conditions for coupling, labeling reactions were tested along with immunological reactivity. CE-DTS was coupled to MoAb by the azido method and effect of conjugation on the MoAb immunoreactivity was followed by RIA. When CE-DTS was coupled to MoAb at the molar ratio of 1:1, no loss of its original immunoreactivity was observed. Tc-99m labeling, using the stannous ion reducing method, indicated the reaction pH as being a determinant parameter. The reducing agent prepared in tartrate buffer (pH 3) offered high yield and stable Tc-99m-CE-DTS-MoAb, as evidence by HPLC. In vivo studies in mice indicated percent of injected dose and blood clearance alike the I-131-MoAb. This good labeled state of Tc-99m-CE-DTS-MoAb was also demonstrated by using second antibody reaction in serum of mice. The newly synthesized CE-DTS offered good basis for the Tc-99m labeling of monclonal antibodies with preserved immunological properties, as desirable for the radioimmunodetection. Work with tumor related monoclonal antibodies is under progress.

  13. SIB-DOTA: A trifunctional prosthetic group potentially amenable for multi-modal labeling that enhances tumor uptake of internalizing monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, G.; White, B. J.; Affleck, D.J.; Zhao, X.G.; Welsh, P.C.; McDougald, D.; Choi, J.; Zalutsky, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    A major drawback of internalizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) radioiodinated with direct electrophilic approaches is that tumor retention of radioactivity is compromised by the rapid washout of iodo-tyrosine, the primary labeled catabolite for mAbs labeled via this strategy. In our continuing efforts to develop more versatile residualizing labels that could overcome this problem, we have designed SIB-DOTA, a prosthetic labeling template that combines the features of the prototypical, dehalogenation resistant N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate (SIB) with DOTA, a useful macrocyclic chelator for labeling with radiometals. Herein we describe the synthesis of the unlabeled standard of this prosthetic moiety, its protected tin precursor, and radioiodinated SIB-DOTA. An anti-EGFRvIII-reactive mAb, L8A4 was radiolabeled with [131I]SIB-DOTA in 27.1 ± 6.2% (n = 2) conjugation yields and its targeting properties to the same mAb labeled with [125I]SGMIB both in vitro and in vivo using U87MG·ΔEGFR cells and xenografts were compared. In vitro paired-label internalization assays showed that the intracellular radioactivity from [131I]SIB-DOTA-L8A4 was 21.4 ± 0.5% and 26.2 ± 1.1% of initially bound radioactivity at 16 and 24 h, respectively. In comparison, these values for [125I]SGMIB-L8A4 were 16.7 ± 0.5% and 14.9 ± 1.1%. Similarly, the SIB-DOTA prosthetic group provided better tumor targeting in vivo than SGMIB over 8 d period. These results suggest that SIB-DOTA warrants further evaluation as a residualizing agent for labeling internalizing mAbs including those targeted to EGFRvIII. PMID:23159039

  14. Pharmacokinetics of the monoclonal antibody B72. 3 and its fragments labeled with either /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.A.; Comeau, R.D.; Jones, P.L.; Liberatore, F.A.; Neacy, W.P.; Sands, H.; Gallagher, B.M.

    1987-02-15

    A comparison of the pharmacokinetics of intact B72.3 (a murine monoclonal antibody specific for human breast and colon carcinoma) with F(ab')2 and Fab fragments labeled with /sup 111/In and /sup 125/I was done in athymic mice bearing target (LS174T) and non-target (HCT-15) tumors. IgG B72.3 labeled with either isotype imaged LS174T. Biodistributions of both labels were similar in all organs except liver. F(ab')2 also imaged the LS174T tumor, while Fab bearing either isotype did not. The blood clearance was Fab greater than F(ab')2 greater than immunoglobulin G B72.3 for both isotopes. /sup 111/In-labeled fragments yielded large accumulations in the kidneys which persisted for 2 days. The different patterns of biodistribution for the various forms of B72.3 labeled with the two isotopes suggest that the most desirable combination of fragment and isotope will depend on the intended use.

  15. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model. PMID:2476813

  16. Detection of Semliki Forest virus in cell culture by use of an enzyme immunoassay with peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibodies specific for glycoproteins E1 and E2.

    PubMed Central

    van Tiel, F H; Boere, W A; Vinjé, J; Harmsen, T; Benaissa-Trouw, B J; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1984-01-01

    Four noncompeting monoclonal antibodies (MA) directed against either the E1 (UM 8.64 and 8.139) or E2 (UM 8.55 and 8.73) glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus were purified and labeled with horseradish peroxidase. Each enzyme-labeled MA was tested alone and in combination with others for its sensitivity to detect virus-infected cells. Semliki Forest virus-infected L cells seeded as monolayers in 96-well plates were screened for the virus after incubation with enzyme-labeled MA and a substrate. In this system single enzyme-labeled MA even at high dilution (10(3.0) to 10(4.5] were able to detect virus-infected cells. The sensitivity of the test could be enhanced by combining two noncompeting MA (10(4.5) to 10(5.0]. Combinations of three and four MA were less effective, due to high absorbance values for noninfected cells. The threshold of virus defection was between 10(5) and 10(6) PFU/ml. This test is sensitive and specific and therefore may be useful for diagnostic purposes. PMID:6386855

  17. [3H]Azidodantrolene photoaffinity labeling, synthetic domain peptides and monoclonal antibody reactivity identify the dantrolene binding sequence on RyR1

    SciTech Connect

    Paul-Pletzer, Kalanethee; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Bhat, Manju B.; Ma, Jianjie; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Jimenez, Leslie S.; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Parness, Jerome

    2002-06-14

    Dantrolene is a drug that suppresses intracellular Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in normal skeletal muscle and is used as a therapeutic agent in individuals susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. Though its precise mechanism of action has not been elucidated, we have identified the N-terminal region (amino acids 1-1400) of the skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the primary Ca2+ release channel in sarcoplasmic reticulum, as a molecular target for dantrolene using the photoaffinity analog [3H]azidodantrolene(1). Here, we demonstrate that heterologously expressed RyR1 retains its capacity to be specifically labeled with [3H]azidodantrolene,indicating that muscle specific factors are not required for this ligand-receptor interaction. Synthetic domain peptides of RyR1, previously shown to affect RyR1 function in vitro and in vivo, were exploited as potential drug binding site mimics and used in photoaffinity labeling experiments. Only DP1 and DP1-2, peptide s containing the amino acid sequence corresponding to RyR1 residues 590-609, were specifically labeled by [3H]azidodantrolene. A monoclonal anti-RyR1 antibody which recognizes RyR1 and its 1400 amino acid N-terminal fragment, recognizes DP1 and DP1-2 in both Western blots and immunoprecipitation assays, and specifically inhibits [3H]azidodantrolene photolabeling of RyR1 and its N-terminal fragment in sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results indicate that synthetic domain peptides can mimic a native, ligand binding conformation in vitro, and that the dantrolene binding site and the epitope for the monoclonal antibody on RyR1 are equivalent and composed of amino-acids 590-609.

  18. Sulfhydryl site-specific cross-linking and labeling of monoclonal antibodies by a fluorescent equilibrium transfer alkylation cross-link reagent.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, R B; Wahl, R L; Brocchini, S J; Lawton, R G; Smith, R H

    1990-01-01

    The site-specific intramolecular cross-linking of sulfhydryls of monoclonal antibodies via a new class of "equilibrium transfer alkylation cross-link (ETAC) reagents" is described. Following complete or partial reduction of interchain disulfides with dithiothreitol (DTT), two murine IgG2a monoclonal antibodies, 225.28S and 5G6.4, were reacted with alpha,alpha-bis[(p-tolylsulfonyl)methyl]-m-aminoacetophenone (ETAC 1a) and a fluorescent conjugated derivative, sulforhodamine B m-(alpha,alpha-bis(p-tolysulfonylmethyl)acetyl)anilide derivative (ETAC 1b). Reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the products from 1b indicated the formation of S-ETAC-S interchain heavy and light chain cross-links (approximately 23-34% overall yield by video-camera densitometry) which do not undergo disulfide-thiol exchange with DTT at 100 degrees C. In contrast, no interchain cross-links were observed upon reaction of unreduced or reduced antibody wherein the thiols have been previously alkylated with iodoacetamide. These results indicated site-specific cross-linking of interchain sulfhydryls and places their distance within 3-4 A. Flow cytometry of the ETAC 1b 5G6.4 cross-linked product using 77 IP3 human ovarian carcinoma target cells showed positive binding and retention of immunoreactivity. The in vivo biodistributions of 131I-labeled intact 5G6.4 and 125I-labeled reduced 5G6.4 + ETAC 1a product in rats were essentially identical over a period of 24 h. The present study illustrates the potential applications of labelable ETAC reagents as thiol-specific probes for a wide variety of immunological studies. PMID:2128870

  19. Label-free detection and characterization of the binding of hemagglutinin protein and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiwen; Zhong, Junlan; Zhang, Cunlin; Zuo, Jian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-03-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the main surface glycoprotein of the influenza A virus. The H9N2 subtype influenza A virus is recognized as the most possible pandemic strain as it has crossed the species barrier, infecting swine and humans. We use terahertz spectroscopy to study the hydration shell formation around H9 subtype influenza A virus's HA protein (H9 HA) as well as the detection of antigen binding of H9 HA with the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody. We observe a remarkable concentration dependent nonlinear response of the H9 HA, which reveals the formation process of the hydration shell around H9 HA molecules. Furthermore, we show that terahertz dielectric properties of the H9 HA are strongly affected by the presence of the monoclonal antibody F10 and that the terahertz dielectric loss tangent can be used to detect the antibody binding at lower concentrations than the standard ELISA test.

  20. Labeling Internalizing Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III Monoclonal Antibody with 177Lu: In Vitro Comparison of Acyclic and Macrocyclic Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hens, Marc; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Welsh, Phil; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The monoclonal antibody (mAb) L8A4, reactive with the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII), internalizes rapidly in glioma cells after receptor binding. Combining this tumor specific mAb with the low energy β-emitter 177Lu would be an attractive approach for brain tumor radioimmunotherapy, provided that trapping of the radionuclide in tumor cells after mAb intracellular processing could be maximized. Materials and Methods L8A4 mAb was labeled with 177Lu using the acyclic ligands [(R)-2-Amino-3-(4-isothiocyanatophenyl)propyl]-trans-(S,S)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine-pentaacetic acid (CHX-A″-DTPA), 2-(4-Isothiocyanatobenzyl)-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (pSCN-Bz-DTPA), and 2-(4-Isothiocyanatobenzyl)-6-methyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (1B4M-DTPA) and the macrocyclic ligands S-2-(4-Isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-tetraacetic acid (C-DOTA) and α-(5-isothiocyanato-2-methoxyphenyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (MeO-DOTA). Paired-label internalization and cellular processing assays were performed on EGFRvIII-expressing U87.ΔEGFR glioma cells over 24-h to directly compare 177Lu-labeled L8A4 to L8A4 labeled with 125I using either Iodogen or N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl-3-[125I]iodobenzoate ([125I]SGMIB). In order to facilitate comparison of labeling methods, the primary parameter evaluated was the ratio of 177Lu to 125I activity retained in U87.ΔEGFR cells. Results All chelates demonstrated higher retention of internalized activity compared with mAb labeled using Iodogen, with 177Lu/125I ratios of >20 observed for the 3 DTPA chelates at 24 h. When compared to L8A4 labeled using SGMIB, except for MeO-DOTA, internalized activity for 125I was higher than 177Lu from 1–8 h with the opposite behavior observed thereafter. At 24 h, 177Lu/125I ratios were between 1.5 and 3, with higher values observed for the 3 DTPA chelates. Conclusions The nature of the chelate used to label this

  1. Measurement of cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood: HPLC and radioimmunoassay with a specific monoclonal antibody and /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled ligand compared

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, B.A.; Daft, M.C.; Koenig, J.W.; Flye, M.W.; Turk, J.W.; Scott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We compared cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood as measured by HPLC and by RIA with a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine with /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine ligand. The /sup 3/H-RIA kit slightly underestimated cyclosporine concentrations (greater than 600 micrograms/L) in comparison with HPLC. Over a wide range of concentrations, cyclosporine measured with the /sup 125/I-RIA kit correlated well with HPLC (slope = 0.99, n = 301, r = 0.98), observed for samples from recipients of kidney, heart, or liver allografts (respective slopes: 1.01, 0.93, and 1.00). The /sup 125/I-RIA standard curve was linear to 1000 micrograms of cyclosporine per liter. Inter- and intra-assay CVs for /sup 125/I-RIA measurements of cyclosporine were less than or equal to 7%. Evidently, the /sup 125/I-RIA kit involving a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine is equivalent to the HPLC assay and can replace it for therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine therapy.

  2. Development of a new radiolabel (lead-203) and new chelating agents for labeling monoclonal anntibodies for imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Steplewski, Z.

    1988-01-01

    High liver uptake and slow body clearance presently limit the usefulness of /sup 111/In labeled antibodies for tumor imaging. We have investigated /sup 203/Pb as an alternate and better antibody label. The DTPA and cyclohexyl EDTA (CDTA) conjugates of an anticolon carcinoma antibody, 17-1A were labeled (bicyclic anhydride method) with /sup 203/Pb and /sup 111/In with 60 and 90% labeling yields, respectively. The biodistribution of /sup 203/Pb-17-1A conjugates was compared with the corresponding /sup 111/In-labeled preparations and with /sup 203/Pb-DTPA, /sup 203/Pb-nitrate and nonrelevant antibody controls in normal and human tumor (SW948) xenografted nude mice at 24, and 96 hr. Lead-203-labeled CDTA and DTPA antibody conjugates gave similar in vivo distributions. Even though the lead bound to these chelate-antibody conjugates was more labile in serum and in vivo, compared to indium, it cleared much faster from the liver and the whole body. A new series of chelating agents based on the incorporation of a trans-1,2- diaminocyclohexane moiety into the carbon backbone of polyaminocarboxylates is being synthesized. These are expected to provide stronger complexing ability for lead and produce greater in vivo stability. These ligands are also expected to be superior to EDTA and DTPA for labeling antibodies with other radiometals, including indium. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of cancer using indocyanine green-labeled monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kohei; Ohashi, Manami; Kanazaki, Kengo; Ding, Ning; Deguchi, Jun; Kanada, Yuko; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2015-08-28

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an attractive imaging modality for sensitive and depth imaging of biomolecules with high resolution in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (panitumumab; Pan) labeled with indocyanine green derivative (ICG-EG4-Sulfo-OSu), Pan-EG4-ICG, as a PA imaging probe to target cancer-associated EGFR. In vitro PA imaging studies demonstrated that Pan-EG4-ICG yielded high EGFR-specific PA signals in EGFR-positive cells. To determine the optimal injection dose and scan timing, we investigated the biodistribution of radiolabeled Pan-EG4-ICG (200-400 μg) in A431 tumor (EGFR++)-bearing mice. The highest tumor accumulation (29.4% injected dose/g) and high tumor-to-blood ratio (2.1) was observed 7 days after injection of Pan-EG4-ICG (400 μg). In in vivo PA imaging studies using Pan-EG4-ICG (400 μg), the increase in PA signal (114%) was observed in A431 tumors inoculated in the mammary glands 7 days post-injection. Co-injection of excess Pan resulted in a 35% inhibition of this PA signal, indicating the EGFR-specific accumulation. In conclusion, the ICG-labeled monoclonal antibody (i.e., panitumumab) has the potential to enhance target-specific PA signal, leading to the discrimination of aggressiveness and metastatic potential of tumors and the selection of effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:26168727

  4. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex. PMID:24857756

  5. Immuno-Positron Emission Tomography with Zirconium-89-Labeled Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology: What Can We Learn from Initial Clinical Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Jauw, Yvonne W. S.; Menke-van der Houven van Oordt, C. Willemien; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Hendrikse, N. Harry; Vugts, Danielle J.; Zijlstra, Josée M.; Huisman, Marc C.; van Dongen, Guus A. M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Selection of the right drug for the right patient is a promising approach to increase clinical benefit of targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Assessment of in vivo biodistribution and tumor targeting of mAbs to predict toxicity and efficacy is expected to guide individualized treatment and drug development. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) using zirconium-89 (89Zr)-labeled monoclonal antibodies also known as 89Zr-immuno-PET, visualizes and quantifies uptake of radiolabeled mAbs. This technique provides a potential imaging biomarker to assess target expression, as well as tumor targeting of mAbs. In this review we summarize results from initial clinical trials with 89Zr-immuno-PET in oncology and discuss technical aspects of trial design. In clinical trials with 89Zr-immuno-PET two requirements should be met for each 89Zr-labeled mAb to realize its full potential. One requirement is that the biodistribution of the 89Zr-labeled mAb (imaging dose) reflects the biodistribution of the drug during treatment (therapeutic dose). Another requirement is that tumor uptake of 89Zr-mAb on PET is primarily driven by specific, antigen-mediated, tumor targeting. Initial trials have contributed toward the development of 89Zr-immuno-PET as an imaging biomarker by showing correlation between uptake of 89Zr-labeled mAbs on PET and target expression levels in biopsies. These results indicate that 89Zr-immuno-PET reflects specific, antigen-mediated binding. 89Zr-immuno-PET was shown to predict toxicity of RIT, but thus far results indicating that toxicity of mAbs or mAb-drug conjugate treatment can be predicted are lacking. So far, one study has shown that molecular imaging combined with early response assessment is able to predict response to treatment with the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab-emtansine, in patients with human epithelial growth factor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. Future studies would benefit from a standardized criterion

  6. Immuno-Positron Emission Tomography with Zirconium-89-Labeled Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology: What Can We Learn from Initial Clinical Trials?

    PubMed

    Jauw, Yvonne W S; Menke-van der Houven van Oordt, C Willemien; Hoekstra, Otto S; Hendrikse, N Harry; Vugts, Danielle J; Zijlstra, Josée M; Huisman, Marc C; van Dongen, Guus A M S

    2016-01-01

    Selection of the right drug for the right patient is a promising approach to increase clinical benefit of targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Assessment of in vivo biodistribution and tumor targeting of mAbs to predict toxicity and efficacy is expected to guide individualized treatment and drug development. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) using zirconium-89 ((89)Zr)-labeled monoclonal antibodies also known as (89)Zr-immuno-PET, visualizes and quantifies uptake of radiolabeled mAbs. This technique provides a potential imaging biomarker to assess target expression, as well as tumor targeting of mAbs. In this review we summarize results from initial clinical trials with (89)Zr-immuno-PET in oncology and discuss technical aspects of trial design. In clinical trials with (89)Zr-immuno-PET two requirements should be met for each (89)Zr-labeled mAb to realize its full potential. One requirement is that the biodistribution of the (89)Zr-labeled mAb (imaging dose) reflects the biodistribution of the drug during treatment (therapeutic dose). Another requirement is that tumor uptake of (89)Zr-mAb on PET is primarily driven by specific, antigen-mediated, tumor targeting. Initial trials have contributed toward the development of (89)Zr-immuno-PET as an imaging biomarker by showing correlation between uptake of (89)Zr-labeled mAbs on PET and target expression levels in biopsies. These results indicate that (89)Zr-immuno-PET reflects specific, antigen-mediated binding. (89)Zr-immuno-PET was shown to predict toxicity of RIT, but thus far results indicating that toxicity of mAbs or mAb-drug conjugate treatment can be predicted are lacking. So far, one study has shown that molecular imaging combined with early response assessment is able to predict response to treatment with the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab-emtansine, in patients with human epithelial growth factor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. Future studies would benefit from a

  7. An immunocytochemical method for localization of estrogen receptors in rat tissues using a dinitrophenyl (DNP)-labeled rat monoclonal primary antibody.

    PubMed

    Gee, J M; Nicholson, R I; Jasani, B; Newman, G R; Amselgruber, W M

    1990-01-01

    We have developed an immunocytochemical method to demonstrate estrogen receptor in hormone-sensitive tissues of the rat using a dinitrophenyl (DNP) hapten-labeled rat antihuman estrogen receptor monoclonal antibody (MAb), H222. Mouse IgM anti-DNP was used secondarily, followed by a DNP/peroxidase conjugate, diaminobenzidine/hydrogen peroxide chromogen, and silver intensification. This method was applied to tissues from intact female rats and showed that estrogen receptor was localized in the nuclei of the stromal and glandular components of the uterine endometrium. Reduced receptor staining was observed in the luminal epithelium, with minimal myometrial staining. Anterior pituitary glands showed heterogeneous immunostaining and ovaries expressed the receptor predominantly in the interstitial cells; fallopian tubes demonstrated substantial epithelial staining. Uteri from chemically castrated rats showed reduced estrogen receptor immunostaining in both stromal and luminal cells, whereas staining was enhanced in the glandular elements. Classical estrogen-unresponsive tissues (heart, lung, and spleen) were unstained. Antibody controls involved pre-blocking antibody recognition sites on the receptor with unlabeled antibodies to estrogen receptor (H222, H226, and D547), as well as use of an inappropriate DNP-labeled antibody to metallothionein. These controls illustrated the specific nature of the DNP-H222 binding. PMID:1688451

  8. In Vivo Amyloid-β Imaging in the APPPS1–21 Transgenic Mouse Model with a 89Zr-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Ann-Marie; Fissers, Jens; Van Eetveldt, Annemie; Van Broeck, Bianca; Mercken, Marc; Pemberton, Darrel J.; Van Der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Joossens, Jurgen; Stroobants, Sigrid; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Wyffels, Leonie; Staelens, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The accumulation of amyloid-β is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and is a target for molecular imaging probes to aid in diagnosis and disease monitoring. This study evaluated the feasibility of using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid-β antibody (JRF/AβN/25) to non-invasively assess amyloid-β burden in aged transgenic mice (APPPS1–21) with μPET imaging. Methods: We investigated the antibody JRF/AβN/25 that binds to full-length Aβ. JRF/AβN/25 was radiolabeled with a [89Zr]-desferal chelate and intravenously injected into 12–13 month aged APPPS1–21 mice and their wild-type (WT) controls. Mice underwent in vivo μPET imaging at 2, 4, and 7 days post injection and were sacrificed at the end of each time point to assess brain penetrance, plaque labeling, biodistribution, and tracer stability. To confirm imaging specificity we also evaluated brain uptake of a non-amyloid targeting [89Zr]-labeled antibody (trastuzumab) as a negative control, additionally we performed a competitive blocking study with non-radiolabeled Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 and finally we assessed the possible confounding effects of blood retention. Results: Voxel-wise analysis of μPET data demonstrated significant [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 retention in APPPS1–21 mice at all time points investigated. With ex vivo measures of radioactivity, significantly higher retention of [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 was found at 4 and 7 days pi in APPPS1–21 mice. Despite the observed genotypic differences, comparisons with immunohistochemistry revealed that in vivo plaque labeling was low. Furthermore, pre-treatment with Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 only partially blocked [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 uptake indicative of a high contribution of non-specific binding. Conclusion: Amyloid plaques were detected in vivo with a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid antibody. The low brain penetrance of the antibody in addition to non-specific binding prevented an accurate estimation of plaque burden

  9. Improved tumor localization with increasing dose of indium-111-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 in metastatic colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P.; Unger, M.W.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Shirkhoda, A.; Murray, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) react with human colorectal cancer cells, and when labeled with a gamma-emitting radioisotope, may help to localize known and occult metastatic disease. We tested ZCE-025, a high-affinity immune gamma globulin1 (IgG1) MoAb anti-CEA that does not react with normal granulocyte glycoproteins in a phase I/II trial to determine the reagent's toxicity and its maximum efficacy in detecting metastatic colorectal cancer. Increasing doses of unlabeled ZCE-025 were mixed with 1 mg of Indium-111 (111In)-radiolabeled MoAb and administered intravenously (IV) to 34 patients who had metastatic colorectal cancer. Planar nuclear or single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans were performed 48 to 72 and 120 to 144 hours later. Total dose of MoAb and scanning sensitivity (number of imaged lesions/number of known lesions) were correlated up to 80 mg. At doses of 2.5 to 20 mg, a mean of 22% of the lesions were imaged; at 40 mg, 77% were imaged (P less than .01). Liver metastases were detected as areas of increased activity (hot) at the 40 mg dose but showed decreased MoAb uptake at lower doses. At the 40 mg dose normal liver parenchymal uptake of the labeled MoAb was lower with respect to blood pool compared with the other doses. At 80 mg, however, sensitivity of detection declined to 21%. One milligram of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 antibody coinfused with 39 mg of unlabeled antibody appeared optimal for detecting metastatic colorectal cancer, particularly in the liver. Although the exact mechanism(s) for this dose effect is currently unknown, a partial blocking effect of unlabeled antibody with a change in MoAb biodistribution may be occurring.

  10. Expression profile of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD106) in inflammatory foci using rhenium-188 labelled monoclonal antibody in mice.

    PubMed

    Kairemo, K J; Strömberg, S; Nikula, T K; Karonen, S L

    1998-06-01

    Rhenium (Re)-188 is a generator (W-188/Re-188) produced high energy beta-emitter suitable for radionuclide therapy (T1/2 is 16.9 hrs and Emax 2.1 MeV (range 11 mm)). We have labelled monoclonal antibody (MAb) raised against vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) with Re-188 using glucoheptonate chelation technique and SnCl2 as reducing agent. The labelling efficiency, free perrhenate and reduced Re were controlled with thin layer chromatography and the purification of Re-188-MoAbs was performed using gel filtration. Our results indicate that Re-188-labelled antibodies remain in vitro stable and the labelling purity is > 90%. We also have applied these Re-188-MoAbs for detection of inflammatory disease in a mouse. The effective half-lives of organs of interest after an injection of Re-188-anti-VCAM1 were as follows: blood 5.2 hr, kidney 4.7 hr, and liver 9.6 hr. Re-188-anti-VCAM-1 was found to accumulate mainly in kidney and liver. One hour after the injection, the kidney contained in average as high as 12.5% and the liver 2.8 ID/g tissue. After 6 hr, the kidney contained 5.5% ID/g and the liver 2.6% ID/g. At 24 hr, the kidney uptake was 0.5% ID/g and the liver uptake 0.8% ID/g, respectively. The inflamed foci, subcutaneous lesions in the footpad skin, were visualized using gamma camera. From the distribution data the uptakes in the inflamed foci as follows: at 1 hr 2.18 (inflammation) and 1.72% ID/g (control), at 6 hr 1.42 (inflammation) and 0.85% ID/g (control), and at 24 hr 0.17 (inflammation) and 0.084% ID/g (control), respectively. Anti-VCAM-1 MAb showed better targeting as compared to control MoAbs in inflammation (caused by E.coli lipoplysaccaride). In conclusion, Re-188 is suitable for MAb labelling, and MAb against VCAM-1 may be used for detection of local inflammatory disease. PMID:9762472

  11. [Polyneuropathy associated with monoclonal gammapathy: treatment perspectives].

    PubMed

    Leger, Jean-Marc; Chassande, Bénédicte; Bombelli, Francesco; Viala, Karine; Musset, Lucile; Neil, Jean

    2009-05-01

    Since the first report of a high prevalence of monoclonal gammapathy (MG) in patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN), some 25 years ago, a large number of such associations have been described. Neuropathies associated with MG have heterogeneous clinical, neurophysiological, neuropathological, and hematological features. The most pertinent relationship seems to be that between distal acquired demyelinating sensory (DADS) neuropathy associated with IgM MG of unknown significance (MGUS) and the presence of serum autoantibodies reacting with myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Other interesting correlations were recently reported in CANOMAD (chronic ataxic neuropathy with ophthalmoplegia, M-protein and anti-disialosyl antibodies). Patients with demyelinating neuropathy (DNP) associated with MG should be screened for malignant plasma cell dyscrasia. MG is more likely to be responsible for the neuropathy if it consists of IgM, if autoantibodies (mainly directed to MAG) are found in serum or on nerve biopsy, and if the clinical manifestations correspond to chronic distal sensory neuropathy. DNP associated with IgM MGUS sometimes responds to immunotherapy but the potential benefits must be considered in view of possible adverse effects. Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has shown promise in this setting. DNP associated with IgG or IgA MGUS may be indistinguishable from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), in terms of clinical and electrophysiological features and the treatment response. In the POEMS syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, and skin changes), appropriate treatment can lead to a drastic improvement in the neuropathy. Patients with chronic axonal polyneuropathy associated with IgG MG should be screened for Al amyloidosis. However, most axonal polyneuropathies associated with IgG or IgM MGUS are indistinguishable from chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathies. PMID:20120390

  12. Preparation and immunoreactivity of high specific activity indium-111-DTPA labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) using ultrapure indium-111

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, S.S.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.

    1986-10-01

    The preparation of high-specific activity /sup 111/In-DTPA-MoAb without increasing the number of DTPA molecules per Ab was investigated. Instant thin layer chromatography was used to assay the relationship between labeling efficiencies and specific activities. With ultrapurified /sup 111/In, the specific activity of the radiolabeled MoAb approached the expected theoretic maximum of 100 muCi/microgram. The bioactivity of such high-specific activity preparation showed no degradation as measured by in vitro cell binding assay.

  13. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using ⁸⁹Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hongguang; Sun, Chris K; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Allegretta, Mark; Guttmann, Ronald D; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Chua, Mei-Sze; Cheng, Zhen; So, Samuel K

    2014-08-01

    Imaging probes for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are highly desired to overcome current diagnostic limitations which lead to poor prognosis. The membrane protein glypican-3 (GPC3) is a potential molecular target for early HCC detection as it is over-expressed in >50% of HCCs, and is associated with early hepatocarcinogenesis. We synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) probe (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 by bioconjugating and radiolabeling the anti-GPC3 monoclonal antibody (clone 1G12) with (89)Zr, and evaluated its tumor-targeting capacity. In vitro, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 was specifically taken up into GPC3-positive HCC cells only, but not in the GPC3-negative prostate cancer cell line (PC3). In vivo, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 specifically accumulated in subcutaneous GPC3-positive HCC xenografts only, but not in PC3 xenografts. Importantly, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 delineated orthotopic HCC xenografts from surrounding normal liver, with tumor/liver (T/L) ratios of 6.65 ± 1.33 for HepG2, and 4.29 ± 0.52 for Hep3B xenografts. It also delineated orthotopic xenografts derived from three GPC3-positive HCC patient specimens, with T/L ratios of 4.21 ± 0.64, 2.78 ± 0.26, and 2.31 ± 0.38 at 168 h p.i. Thus, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention. PMID:24836949

  14. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using 89Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hongguang; Sun, Chris K.; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Allegretta, Mark; Guttmann, Ronald D.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Chua, Mei-Sze; Cheng, Zhen; So, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging probes for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are highly desired to overcome current diagnostic limitations which lead to poor prognosis. The membrane protein glypican-3 (GPC3) is a potential molecular target for early HCC detection as it is over-expressed in >50% of HCCs, and is associated with early hepatocarcinogenesis. We synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) probe 89Zr-DFO-1G12 by bioconjugating and radiolabeling the anti-GPC3 monoclonal antibody (clone 1G12) with 89Zr, and evaluated its tumor-targeting capacity. In vitro, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 was specifically taken up into GPC3-positive HCC cells only, but not in the GPC3-negative prostate cancer cell line (PC3). In vivo, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 specifically accumulated in subcutaneous GPC3-positive HCC xenografts only, but not in PC3 xenografts. Importantly, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 delineated orthotopic HCC xenografts from surrounding normal liver, with tumor/liver (T/L) ratios of 6.65 ± 1.33 for HepG2, and 4.29 ± 0.52 for Hep3B xenografts. It also delineated orthotopic xenografts derived from three GPC3-positive HCC patient specimens, with T/L ratios of 4.21 ± 0.64, 2.78 ± 0.26, and 2.31 ± 0.38 at 168 h p.i. Thus, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention. PMID:24836949

  15. Radiolanthanide-labeled monoclonal antibody CC49 for radioimmunotherapy of cancer: biological comparison of DOTA conjugates and 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Huma; Jia, Fang; Sivaguru, Geethapriya; Hudson, Michael J; Shelton, Tiffani D; Hoffman, Timothy J; Cutler, Cathy S; Ketring, Alan R; Athey, Phillip S; Simón, Jaime; Frank, R Keith; Jurisson, Silvia S; Lewis, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    The radiolanthanides 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu have decay characteristics suitable for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of cancer. N-Hydroxysulfosuccinimidyl DOTA (DOTA-OSSu) and methoxy-DOTA (MeO-DOTA) were conjugated to the anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibody CC49 for radiolabeling with 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu. While both DOTA conjugates could be labeled to high specific activity with 177Lu, MeO-DOTA afforded superior conjugate stability, radiolabeling, and radiochemical purity. Pilot biodistributions in nude mice bearing LS174T human colon carcinoma xenografts demonstrated that MeO-DOTA afforded higher tumor uptake and lower kidney retention of 177Lu than DOTA-OSSu. The in vitro stability of 149Pm-, 166Ho-, and 177Lu-MeO-DOTA-CC49 was evaluated using serum and hydroxyapatite assays. Serum stability of radiolanthanide-labeled MeO-DOTA-CC49 followed a trend based on the coordination energies of the radiometals, with 177Lu showing the highest stability after 96 to 168 h at 37 C. In contrast, MeO-DOTA-CC49 labeled with all three radiolanthanides was >92% stable to hydroxyapatite challenge for 168 h at 37 C. Comprehensive biodistributions of 149Pm-, 166Ho-, and 177Lu-MeO-DOTA-CC49 were obtained in LS174T-bearing nude mice. Maximum tumor uptakes were 100.0% ID/g for 149Pm at 96 h, 69.5% ID/g for 166Ho at 96 h, and 132.4% ID/g for 177Lu at 168 h. Normal organ uptakes were generally low, except in the liver, spleen, and kidney at early time points. By 96 to 168 h postinjection, nontarget organ uptake decreased to approximately 7% ID/g (kidney), 12% ID/g (spleen), and 20% ID/g (liver) for each radiolanthanide. When labeled with 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu, MeO-DOTA-CC49 has potential for RIT of colorectal cancer and other carcinomas. PMID:16536481

  16. Radioimmunodetection studies of prostate and T-cell lymphoma tumors using In-111 labeled monoclonal anti-tumor antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Dillman, R.O.; Hagan, P.L.; Dillman, J.B.; Clutter, M.L.; Amox, D.G.; Frincke, J.M.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.; Carlo, D.J.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine if prostate carcinoma (PC) and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) could be detected using the In-lll- MoAbs described in this paper. Murine IgG MoAbs were developed against prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and to an antigen present on human T-cells. The MoAbs were labeled with In-lll by a bifunctional chelation technique and administered (ad) intravenously to patients (PT) with PC and CTCL respectively. One mg or less of each MoAb was labeled with 1.5-5.0 mCi of In-111. Normal prostate tissue was visualized in 3 of 5 PT and 5 of 12 bone metastases were detected in a PT with PC. Outstanding definitions of lymph nodes was achieved in CTCL. The sequence of administration markedly altered the invivo kinetics of the IN-111-MoAb. Some toxicity was observed in CTCL patients but not in PT with PC. The authors conclude that the above MoAbs will target tumor and that the sequence and to some extent quantities of MoAb has an affect on the pharmacokinetics and tumor uptake of these two MoAbs.

  17. Stability, characterization, and kinetics of /sup 111/In-labeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies in normal animals and nude mouse-human tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.L.; Garver, P.R.; Koziol, J.A.; Chen, A.W.; Frincke, J.M.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.; Adams, T.H.

    1983-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen were successfully radiolabeled with /sup 111/In, and the radiopharmaceutical was characterized in vitro and in normal and tumor-bearing mice. The /sup 111/In-MoAb proved to be stable in vitro and in vivo under normal conditions, although instability could be induced in vitro with large quantities of iron-free transferrin. Animal distribution studies with /sup 111/In-MoAb demonstrated tumor localization superior to /sup 67/Ga and pharmacokinetics that were highly similar to those of endogenously labeled /sup 75/Se-MoAb. The /sup 111/In-MoAb followed first-order kinetics and fit a two-compartmental model when studied in nude mice bearing human colon tumors known to express carcinoembryonic antigen. Significant quantities of radiolabel appeared in tissues other than tumor, with liver and skin having the highest concentrations. Sufficient tumor/background ratios were formed for scanning purposes. The data indicate that /sup 111/In-MoAb may prove to be effective as a radiopharmaceutical for tumor imaging.

  18. Dynamic interaction of /sup 111/indium-labeled monoclonal antibodies with surface antigens of solid tumors visualized in vivo by external scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.M.; Keenan, A.M.; Frincke, J.; David, G.; Pearson, J.; Oldham, R.K.; Morgan, A.C. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Two /sup 111/indium-labeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), D3 and 9.2.27, directed to tumor antigens of L-10 hepatocarcinoma and human melanoma, respectively, selectively localized antigen-positive target cells in guinea pigs and nude mice. The fate of MoAb differed in the two antigen-antibody systems after reacting with their corresponding tumor antigens in vivo as reflected by patterns of distribution and turnover in vivo. The 9.2.27 localized in melanoma xenograft in nude mice after intravenous administration with slow loss from tumor but more rapid loss from normal tissues and thus demonstrated optimal imaging of small tumors (approximately equal to 5 mm) between 3 and 6 days after injection of the radiolabeled antibody. In contrast, D3 demonstrated a biphasic localization in guinea pig L-10 hepatocarcinoma with a maximal activity on the 2d day after administration and showed rapid loss from both tumor and normal tissues. Nonspecific localization of antibodies in liver and in kidney was found both in syngeneic (nude mice) and xenogeneic (guinea pig) hosts but was more pronounced in the xenogeneic species. These results indicate that the nature of the antigen-antibody interaction may be of importance in selecting MoAb for both diagnosis and therapy of malignant diseases.

  19. FG-3019 anti-connective tissue growth factor monoclonal antibody: results of an open-label clinical trial in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ganesh; Scholand, Mary Beth; de Andrade, João; Lancaster, Lisa; Mageto, Yolanda; Goldin, Jonathan; Brown, Kevin K; Flaherty, Kevin R; Wencel, Mark; Wanger, Jack; Neff, Thomas; Valone, Frank; Stauffer, John; Porter, Seth

    2016-05-01

    FG-3019 is a fully human monoclonal antibody that interferes with the action of connective tissue growth factor, a central mediator in the pathogenesis of fibrosis.This open-label phase 2 trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of two doses of FG-3019 administered by intravenous infusion every 3 weeks for 45 weeks in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Subjects had a diagnosis of IPF within the prior 5 years defined by either usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern on a recent high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan, or a possible UIP pattern on HRCT scan and a recent surgical lung biopsy showing UIP pattern. Pulmonary function tests were performed every 12 weeks, and changes in the extent of pulmonary fibrosis were measured by quantitative HRCT scans performed at baseline and every 24 weeks.FG-3019 was safe and well-tolerated in IPF patients participating in the study. Changes in fibrosis were correlated with changes in pulmonary function.Further investigation of FG-3019 in IPF with a placebo-controlled clinical trial is warranted and is underway. PMID:26965296

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  1. Radioimmunotherapy of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts with 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody E48 IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Gerretsen, M.; Schrijvers, A. H.; van Walsum, M.; Braakhuis, B. J.; Quak, J. J.; Meijer, C. J.; Snow, G. B.; van Dongen, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) E48 reacts with a 22 kD antigen exclusively expressed in squamous and transitional epithelia and their neoplastic counterparts. Radiolabelled with 99mTc, MAb E48 is capable of targeting metastatic and recurrent disease in patients with head and neck cancer. In this study, the capacity of 131I-labelled MAb E48 to eradicate xenografts of human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) in nude mice was examined. Experimental groups received a single i.v. bolus injection of 400 microCi MAb E48 IgG (number of mice (n = 6, number of tumours (t) = 9) or 800 microCi MAb E48 IgG (n) = 5,t = 7), whereas control groups received either diluent (n = 3,t = 5), unlabelled MAb E48 IgG (n = 4,t = 5) or 800 microCi 131I-labelled isotype-matched control MAb (n = 6,t = 9). A 4.1-fold increase in the median tumour volume doubling time and regression of two out of ten tumours (20%) was observed in mice treated with 400 microCi. In mice treated with 800 microCi. In mice treated with 800 microCi, two out of seven tumours (29%) showed complete remission without regrowth during follow-up (greater than 3 months). Median tumour volume doubling time in the remaining five tumours was increased 7.8-fold. No antitumour effects were observed in mice injected with diluent, unlabelled MAb E48 or 131I-labelled control MAb. In the same xenograft model, chemotherapy with doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, bleomycin, methotrexate or 2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine yielded a less profound effect on tumour volume doubling time. Increases in tumour volume doubling time with these chemotherapeutic agents were 4, 2.2, 2.1, 1.7, 0, and 2.6 respectively. Moreover, no cures were observed with any of these chemotherapeutic agents. From the tissue distribution of 800 microCi MAb E48, the absorbed cumulative radiation doses of tumour and various organs were calculated using the trapezoid integration method for the area under the curve. To tumour xenografts, 12,170 cGy was

  2. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A.; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R.

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  3. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  4. Identification of seven surface-exposed Brucella outer membrane proteins by use of monoclonal antibodies: immunogold labeling for electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, A; de Wergifosse, P; Dubray, G; Limet, J N

    1990-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to seven Brucella outer membrane proteins were characterized. These antibodies were obtained by immunizing mice with sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble (SDS-I) fractions, cell walls, or whole bacterial cells of Brucella abortus or B. melitensis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to screen the hybridoma supernatants and to determine their binding at the surface of rough and smooth B. abortus and B. melitensis cells. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) recognized by these antibodies were the proteins with molecular masses of 25 to 27 kDa and 36 to 38 kDa (porin) (major proteins) and the proteins with molecular masses of 10, 16.5, 19, 31 to 34, and 89 kDa (minor proteins). Surface exposure of these OMPs was visualized by electron microscopy by using the MAbs and immunogold labeling. Binding of the MAbs on whole rough bacterial cells indicates that the 10-, 16.5-, 19-, 25- to 27-, 31- to 34-, 36- to 38-, and 89-kDa OMPs are exposed at the cell surface. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results indicate a much better binding of the anti-OMP MAbs on rough strains than on the corresponding smooth strains except for the anti-19-kDa MAb. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that on smooth B. abortus cells only the 89- and 31- to 34-kDa OMPs were not accessible to the MAbs tested. Binding of the anti-31- to 34-kDa MAb at the cell surface was observed for the rough B. abortus cells and for the rough and smooth B. melitensis cells. These results indicate the importance of steric hindrance due to the presence of the long lipopolysaccharide O side chains in the accessibility of OMPs on smooth Brucella strains and should be considered when undertaking vaccine development. Images PMID:1701417

  5. Immunoscintigraphic detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities by means of human antifibrin monoclonal antibodies labeled with sup 111 In

    SciTech Connect

    Lusiani, L.; Zanco, P.; Visona, A.; Breggion, G.; Pagnan, A.; Ferlin, G. )

    1989-07-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for the beta-chain of human fibrin (C22A) and labeled with 111In has been obtained and successfully used in rabbits and dogs for the in vivo detection of venous thrombosis. Studies in humans are currently ongoing. In order to assess the diagnostic value of 111In-antifibrin for the detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, the authors investigated 25 consecutive patients. Ten patients had clinical and instrumental (contrast phlebography and duplex scanning) evidence of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 3 had a long-standing DVT with relapsing episodes of swelling and pain, 5 had superficial venous thrombosis, and the remaining 7 had no signs of thrombosis at all. Twenty patients were being treated with heparin. All patients received 111In-antifibrin at the dose of 74 MBq IV and were scanned with a large field of view gamma camera coupled with a high-energy, parallel-hole collimator at 30 minutes and three, six, and twenty-four hours postinjection. Only the persistence of an abnormal uptake at twenty-four hours confirmed by two observers at visual inspection was considered as positive. A positive result was obtained in 9 of 10 DVT patients (90% sensitivity) and in all SVT patients. The single DVT patient with a negative 111In-antifibrin test had the longest interval between scintigraphy and onset of symptoms (fifty-five days). Thus, the age of thrombi represented a substantial limitation for the test. A false-positive result was obtained in a single SVT patient, in whom also a deep involvement, unconfirmed by phlebography, was suspected (91.6% specificity).

  6. Evaluation of 89Zr-Labeled Human Anti-CD147 Monoclonal Antibody as a Positron Emission Tomography Probe in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Sudo, Hitomi; Nagatsu, Kotaro; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Ukai, Yoshinori; Kurosawa, Gene; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer and its prognosis remains poor. Therefore, additional effective therapy is required to augment and/or complement current therapy. CD147, high expression in pancreatic cancer, is involved in the metastatic process and is considered a good candidate for targeted therapy. CD147-specfic imaging could be useful for selection of appropriate patients. Therefore, we evaluated the potential of a fully human anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody 059-053 as a new positron emission tomography (PET) probe for pancreatic cancer. Methods CD147 expression was evaluated in four pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA Paca-2, PANC-1, BxPC-3, and AsPC-1) and a mouse cell line A4 as a negative control. Cell binding, competitive inhibition and internalization assays were conducted with 125I-, 67Ga-, or 89Zr-labeled 059-053. In vivo biodistribution of 125I- or 89Zr-labeled 059-053 was conducted in mice bearing MIA Paca-2 and A4 tumors. PET imaging with [89Zr]059-053 was conducted in subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor mouse models. Results Among four pancreatic cancer cell lines, MIA Paca-2 cells showed the highest expression of CD147, while A4 cells had no expression. Immunohistochemical staining showed that MIA Paca-2 xenografts also highly expressed CD147 in vivo. Radiolabeled 059-053 specifically bound to MIA Paca-2 cells with high affinity, but not to A4. [89Zr]059-053 uptake in MIA Paca-2 tumors increased with time from 11.0±1.3% injected dose per gram (ID/g) at day 1 to 16.9±3.2% ID/g at day 6, while [125I]059-053 uptake was relatively low and decreased with time, suggesting that 059-053 was internalized into tumor cells in vivo and 125I was released from the cells. PET with [89Zr]059-053 clearly visualized subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors. Conclusion [89Zr]059-053 is a promising PET probe for imaging CD147 expression in pancreatic cancer and has the potential to select appropriate patients with CD147-expressing tumors who could gain

  7. A 90Y-labelled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody exhibits antitumour activity against hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts during ROBO1-targeted radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background ROBO1 is a membrane protein that functions in axon guidance. ROBO1 contributes to tumour metastasis and angiogenesis and may have potential as a target protein of immunotherapy because ROBO1 is specifically expressed at high levels in hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we examined biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using a radioisotope-labelled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) against hepatocellular carcinoma models. Methods ROBO1-positive HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft nude mice were used in this study. We conjugated anti-ROBO1 MAb with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), and the conjugates were labelled with 111In and 90Y. To study biodistribution, the 111In-DOTA-anti-ROBO1 MAb was injected into HepG2 xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate any antitumour effect, a RIT study was performed, and the 90Y-DOTA-anti-ROBO1 MAb was injected via the tail vein. Tumour volume, mouse weight, and blood cell count were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumours and organs of mice were collected, and a histopathological analysis was carried out. Results The tumour uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 MAb in HepG2 xenograft mice was 15.0% ± 0.69% injected dose per gram at 48 h after injection. Immunotherapy with cold-anti-ROBO1 MAb (70 μg) did not cause a significant antitumour effect. RIT with 6.7 MBq of 90Y-anti-ROBO1 MAb caused significant tumour growth suppression. Transient body weight loss and bone-marrow suppression were observed. Histopathological analyses of tumours revealed the fatal degeneration of tumour cells, significant reduction of the Ki-67 index, and an increase of the apoptosis index. Normal organs showed no significant injury, but a transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen and in the sternal bone marrow. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 MAb is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive hepatocellular

  8. PET Imaging of Dll4 Expression in Glioblastoma and Colorectal Cancer Xenografts Using (64)Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody 61B.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Hui; Liu, Ren; Wang, Mengzhe; Deng, Huaifu; Giglio, Benjamin C; Gill, Parkash S; Shan, Hong; Li, Zibo

    2015-10-01

    Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) expressed in tumor cells plays a key role to promote tumor growth of numerous cancer types. Based on a novel antihuman Dll4 monoclonal antibody (61B), we developed a (64)Cu-labeled probe for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor Dll4 expression. In this study, 61B was conjugated with the (64)Cu-chelator DOTA through lysine on the antibody. Human IgG (hIgG)-DOTA, which did not bind to Dll4, was also prepared as a control. The Dll4 binding activity of the probes was evaluated through the bead-based binding assay with Dll4-alkaline phosphatase. The resulting PET probes were evaluated in U87MG glioblastoma and HT29 colorectal cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice. Our results demonstrated that the 61B-DOTA retained (77.2 ± 3.7) % Dll4 binding activity of the unmodified 61B, which is significantly higher than that of hIgG-DOTA (0.06 ± 0.03) %. Confocal microscopy analysis confirmed that 61B-Cy5.5, but not IgG-Cy5.5, predominantly located within the U87MG and HT29 cells cytoplasm. U87MG cells showed higher 61B-Cy5.5 binding as compared to HT29 cells. In U87MG xenografts, 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu demonstrated remarkable tumor accumulation (10.5 ± 1.7 and 10.2 ± 1.2%ID/g at 24 and 48 h postinjection, respectively). In HT29 xenografts, tumor accumulation of 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu was significantly lower than that of U87MG (7.3 ± 1.3 and 6.6 ± 1.3%ID/g at 24 and 48 h postinjection, respectively). The tumor accumulation of 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu was significantly higher than that of hIgG-DOTA-(64)Cu in both xenografts models. Immunofluorescence staining of the tumor tissues further confirmed that tumor accumulation of 61B-Cy5.5 was correlated well with in vivo PET imaging data using 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu. In conclusion, 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu PET probe was successfully synthesized and demonstrated prominent tumor uptake by targeting Dll4. 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu has great potential to be used for noninvasive Dll4 imaging, which could be valuable for tumor detection, Dll4

  9. The curative and palliative potential of the monoclonal antibody MOv18 labelled with 211At in nude mice with intraperitoneally growing ovarian cancer xenografts--a long-term study.

    PubMed

    Andersson, H; Lindegren, S; Bäck, T; Jacobsson, L; Leser, G; Horvath, G

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of 211At-labelled specific monoclonal antibody MOv18 in nude mice with intraperitoneal growth of the human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR3. In the first part of the study the antibody was injected intraperitoneally when the cancer growth was microscopic. The injected activity was 485-555 kBq. The median survival for treated mice was 213 days compared to 138 days for untreated mice (p < 0.014, log-rank test). No obvious toxicity was seen. Thirty-three percent of the mice were apparently free of cancer after 7 months and were probably cured. In the second part of the study mice with macroscopic cancer and signs of ascites were injected intraperitoneally with the same 211At-labelled antibody (377-389 kBq). This treatment possibly delayed the production of ascites. Hopefully radioimmunotherapy with regionally administered 211At-labelled antibody will be of value in women with ovarian cancer as well. PMID:11130014

  10. Single-cell irradiation from [211At] astatine-labeled C215 monoclonal antibody: improved estimates of radiosensitivity from measurements on cellular uptake and retention.

    PubMed

    Palm, Stig; Bäck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Delle, Ulla; Hultborn, Ragnar; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2003-01-01

    New data on the biological effect of 211At-C215 monoclonal antibody in a slowly rotating, widely dispersed single-cell suspension of the human cancer cell line Colo-205 is presented. Cell growth curves of each experiment were used to calculate an apparent cell survival after irradiation. Uptake measurements provided the data needed to calculate the average number of 211At decays per cell in the cell suspension. The results from each experiment were then fit to a mono-exponential function. From the exponential fit, an average of 35 +/- 2 (SD) astatine-211 decays per cell are required for 37% apparent cell survival (D0). PMID:12820374

  11. Imaging with indium111-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 of recurrent colorectal or carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cancer in patients with rising serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels and occult metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Shanken, J.; Jessup, J.M.; Charnsangavej, C.; Ajani, J.A.; Levin, B.; Merchant, B.; Halverson, C.; Murray, J.L. )

    1990-07-01

    We tested whether nuclear imaging with indium111 (111In)-labeled murine monoclonal (MoAb) anticarcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) ZCE-025 antibody could detect recurrent disease in patients with a rising serum CEA level but negative findings for computed tomographic (CT) scans of the abdomen and pelvis, chest radiograph, and colonoscopy or barium enema. Twenty patients with a history of completely resected CEA-producing adenocarcinoma and a rising serum CEA level were given an intravenous infusion of 2 mg of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 mixed with 38 mg of unlabeled ZCE-025. Planar and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) scans were acquired at 72 and 144 hours, and in 19 of the 20 patients these were positive. Of those 19, 13 underwent exploratory surgery, and cancer was found in 10, and two had a diagnostic biopsy, which confirmed cancer. Three patients who had negative laparotomies and all four patients who did not undergo surgery or biopsy were followed radiologically. In all seven, cancer was subsequently detected at the sites suggested by the ZCE-025 scan. Thus, tumor was confirmed in all 19 patients with positive scans. Five of 13 patients who were explored benefited from the study and the exploratory laparotomy, as disease was entirely resected in four or was subjected to definitive radiation therapy to the pelvis in the fifth. In two additional patients who were not explored, MoAb imaging resulted in definitive therapy to regionally confined recurrent disease. 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb ZCE-025 scanning in patients with rising CEA successfully imaged metastatic colorectal cancer that eluded detection by other methods and affected the care given to some. These results suggest an important role for 111In-labeled ZCE-025 scanning among patients with rising CEA and otherwise occult metastatic cancer.

  12. Localization of /sup 111/In- and /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibody in guinea pigs bearing line 10 hepatocarcinoma tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, M.I.; Hwang, K.M.; Foon, K.A.; Keenan, A.M.; Kessler, R.M.; Frincke, J.M.; Tallam, D.J.; Hanna, M.G. Jr.; Peters, L.; Oldham, R.K.

    1983-09-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (D3) with demonstrated specificity for the guinea pig line 10 hepatocarcinoma (L10) was radiolabeled with either /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In and used to image dermal tumors in vivo. In one set of experiments, L10 tumors were established middorsally in one group of animals, and the similarly derived, antigenically distinct line 1 tumor was established in another group of animals. In spite of background imaging of liver, kidney, and spleen, L10 tumors were visualized clearly. Incorporation of radiolabel was demonstrated to predominate in the L10 tumor. In a separate set of experiments, L10 and line 1 tumors were established in contralateral thighs in the same animals. L10 tumors were visualized clearly, and tissue uptake of radiolabel was demonstrated to reside predominantly in the L10 tumor.

  13. Comparative tissue distribution in mice of the alpha-emitter 211At and 131I as labels of a monoclonal antibody and F(ab')2 fragment.

    PubMed

    Garg, P K; Harrison, C L; Zalutsky, M R

    1990-06-15

    Because it decays by the emission of short-range, high-energy alpha-particles, the radiohalogen 211At might be a particularly useful nuclide for some types of radioimmunotherapy. However, no suitable gamma-emitting nuclide of astatine exists which would permit either imaging prior to therapy to obtain radiation dosimetry estimates or performing experiments in paired-label format. Since iodine is the halogen above astatine in the periodic table, we investigated whether the in vivo distribution of 131I could be used to mimic the biodistribution of 211At. In this study, the N-succinimidyl 3-(trialkylstannyl)benzoate method was used to label C110 IgG, an antibody directed against carcinoembryonic antigen, and its (Fab')2 fragment with 211At and 131I. Paired-label experiments were performed in normal mice comparing the tissue distribution of 211At- versus 131I-labeled C110 IgG and F(ab')2 as well as [211At]astatide versus [131I]iodide and m-[211At]astatobenzoic acid versus m-[131I]iodobenzoic acid, potential catabolites of proteins radiohalogenated via the N-succinimidyl 3-(trialkylstannyl)benzoate method. With the exception of thyroid, retention of astatide in tissues was higher than that of iodide; and, with the halobenzoic acids, uptake of 211At was higher than 135I in thyroid, stomach, and spleen. Use of the N-succinimidyl 3-(trialkylstannyl)benzoate method to label C110 IgG with 211At and 131I resulted in similar distributions of the two nuclides. In contrast, loss of 211At from the F(ab')2 fragment was considerably more rapid than 131I, suggesting that different astatination methods may be required for use with F(ab')2 fragments. PMID:2340501

  14. Development of a novel anti-canine CD20 monoclonal antibody with diagnostic and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Brewer, Susan; Modiano, Jaime F.; Beall, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, passive immunotherapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has created immeasurable improvements in outcomes of patients with B-cell malignancies. However, the lack of comparable reagents has precluded development of this approach in dogs. We developed a novel anti-canine CD20 mAb designated as 6C8. 6C8 recognized the extracellular domain of canine CD20 and showed high-affinity binding to canine CD20 in solution, as well as in its native conformation on canine B-cells. The 6C8 target was expressed invariably in B-cell lineage cells, but not in T-cells or in myeloid cells. 6C8 promoted phagocytosis of B-cell lymphoma cells by macrophages, but in its current framework, it did not induce direct cytotoxicity or complement dependent cytotoxicity. In summary, we have established a novel anti-canine CD20 mAb that is useful as a diagnostic tool to phenotype B-cells, and which could be integrated as a tool for passive immunotherapy to treat dogs with B-cell disorders. PMID:24724777

  15. Nepsilon-(3-[*I]Iodobenzoyl)-Lys5-Nalpha-maleimido-Gly1-GEEEK ([*I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK): a radioiodinated prosthetic group containing negatively charged D-glutamates for labeling internalizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Alston, Kevin L; Bigner, Darrel D; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Novel methods are needed for the radiohalogenation of cell-internalizing proteins and peptides because rapid loss of label occurs after lysosomal processing when these molecules are labeled using conventional radioiodination methodologies. We have developed a radiolabeled prosthetic group that contains multiple negatively charged D-amino acids to facilitate trapping of the radioactivity in the cell after proteolysis of the labeled protein. N(epsilon)-(3-[(125)I]iodobenzoyl)-Lys(5)-N(alpha)-maleimido-Gly(1)-GEEEK ([(125)I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK) was synthesized via iododestannylation in 90.3 +/- 3.9% radiochemical yields. This radioiodinated agent was conjugated to iminothiolane-treated L8A4, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) in 54.3 +/- 17.7% conjugation yields. In vitro assays with the EGFRvIII-expressing U87MGDeltaEGFR glioma cell line demonstrated that the internalized radioactivity for the [(125)I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK-L8A4 conjugate increased from 14.1% at 1 h to 44.7% at 24 h and was about 15-fold higher than that of directly radioiodinated L8A4 at 24 h. A commensurately increased tumor uptake in vivo in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous U87MGDeltaEGFR xenografts (52.6 +/- 14.3% injected dose per gram versus 17.4 +/- 3.5% ID/g at 72 h) also was observed. These results suggest that [(125)I]IB-Mal-d-GEEEK is a promising reagent for the radioiodination of internalizing mAbs. PMID:16848419

  16. Preparation and near-quantitative Y-90 labelings of monoclonal antibody-macrocylic chelator (MAb-DOTA) conjugates for radioimmunotherapy (RAIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Govindan, S.V.; Griffiths, G.L.; Losman, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    The importance of kinetically inert Y-90-DOTA chelate for RAIT is well recognized. The aim of this study was to adapt a published procedure to overcome long-standing problems related to practical preparation of DOTA-MAb conjugates and poor Y-90 incorporation, and further improve upon labeling efficiencies. Using monoactivated DOTA, we have prepared conjugates of a CEA MAb (MN-14), a lymphoma MAb (LL2), their humanized versions (hMN-14 and hLL2), and the respective divalent fragments, and systematically examined the Y-90-labeling parameters. The DOTA/Mab ratios in conjugates were in the 3.0-6.8 range. In competitive CEA-binding assays, unmodified MN-14, MN-14-DOTA (6.8 chelators) and hMN-14-DOTA (4.4 chelators) exhibited very similar binding patterns. Y-90 labeling yields of >90% were obtained using a labeling time of 2 h at 40-45{degrees}C, pH {approximately}5.5, and DOTA/MAb ratio >3. Incorporations (specific activities):>99%for hMN-14-DOTA (103-170 MBa/mg), 94-97% for hLL2-DOTA (107-185 MBa/mg), 93-98%for hLL2F(ab`){sub 2}-DOTA (111 MBa/mg), and >90% for MN14-DOTA (37-185 MBq/mg). Aggregate content was usually less than 5%. Observed high incorporations are due both to the higher temperature used and DOTA/Y-90 molar ratios which readily exceeded a threshold requirement of three. Labeling efficiencies also depended upon the level of trace metal contaminants in the Y-90 shipment. Incubations of Y-90 labeled DOTA conjugates of hMN-14 and hLL2 in serum and in 1 mM DTPA at 37{degrees}C showed no detectable loss of metal over a 10-day period. These results should allow us to routinely use Y-90-DOTA-MAb conjugates in future preclinical and clinical RAIT studies.

  17. B-Lymphocyte Depletion in Myalgic Encephalopathy/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. An Open-Label Phase II Study with Rituximab Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fluge, Øystein; Risa, Kristin; Lunde, Sigrid; Alme, Kine; Rekeland, Ingrid Gurvin; Sapkota, Dipak; Kristoffersen, Einar Kleboe; Sørland, Kari; Bruland, Ove; Dahl, Olav; Mella, Olav

    2015-01-01

    Background Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We previously reported a pilot case series followed by a small, randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study, suggesting that B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab can yield clinical benefit in ME/CFS. Methods In this single-center, open-label, one-armed phase II study (NCT01156909), 29 patients were included for treatment with rituximab (500 mg/m2) two infusions two weeks apart, followed by maintenance rituximab infusions after 3, 6, 10 and 15 months, and with follow-up for 36 months. Findings Major or moderate responses, predefined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score, were detected in 18 out of 29 patients (intention to treat). Clinically significant responses were seen in 18 out of 28 patients (64%) receiving rituximab maintenance treatment. For these 18 patients, the mean response durations within the 156 weeks study period were 105 weeks in 14 major responders, and 69 weeks in four moderate responders. At end of follow-up (36 months), 11 out of 18 responding patients were still in ongoing clinical remission. For major responders, the mean lag time from first rituximab infusion until start of clinical response was 23 weeks (range 8–66). Among the nine patients from the placebo group in the previous randomized study with no significant improvement during 12 months follow-up after saline infusions, six achieved a clinical response before 12 months after rituximab maintenance infusions in the present study. Two patients had an allergic reaction to rituximab and two had an episode of uncomplicated late-onset neutropenia. Eight patients experienced one or more transient symptom flares after rituximab infusions. There was no unexpected toxicity. Conclusion In a subgroup of ME/CFS patients, prolonged B-cell depletion with rituximab maintenance infusions was associated with sustained clinical responses. The observed

  18. Simultaneous immunofluorescent labeling using anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and a melanocyte-specific marker in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human skin samples.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Morea; Davids, Lester M; Kidson, Susan H

    2012-12-01

    Immunolabeling of tissue sections requires careful optimization of protocols in order to achieve accurate and consistent data. Multiple immunolabeling is desirable when determining the exact location and phenotype of cell populations in the same cellular compartment. 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-immunolabeling is commonly used to assess cellular proliferation in vitro. However, the technical limitations of standard methods preclude multiple antigen immunolabeling. The aim was therefore to develop a robust protocol for simultaneous labeling using anti-BrdU and a melanocyte-specific marker in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skin samples. Human skin samples were obtained from patients undergoing elective plastic surgery. The tissue was incubated with BrdU, and a standard sample procedure for FFPE tissue was used. Heat-induced antigen retrieval was performed in a conventional pressure cooker, followed by immunolabeling with anti-BrdU and anti-Melan A/MART-1 antibodies. Fluorescent-conjugated secondary antibodies were used for signal detection. We have demonstrated both proliferating cells (BrdU-immunopositive) and melanocytes (Melan A/MART-1-immunopositive) in the basal compartment of the epidermis in our skin samples. Successful double labeling requires heat-induced epitope retrieval to replace the harsh pretreatment protocols of standard BrdU immunolabeling methods. We have optimized a robust protocol for the double labeling of proliferating cells and cells bearing melanocyte-specific antigens (melanocytes and/or melanoblasts) in FFPE human skin samples. PMID:22531682

  19. Phase II study of lutetium-177 labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) monoclonal antibody J591 for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Scott T.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Morris, Michael; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Christos, Paul; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Osborne, Joseph; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Larson, Steve; Taskar, Neeta Pandit; Scher, Howard I.; Bander, Neil H.; Nanus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy of a single infusion of radiolabeled anti-prostate specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 (177Lu-J591) by PSA decline, measurable disease response, and survival. Experimental Design In this dual-center phase II study, 2 cohorts with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received one dose of 177Lu-J591 (15 patients at 65 mCi/m2, 17 at 70 mCi/m2) with radionuclide imaging. Expansion cohort (n=15) received 70 mCi/m2 to verify response rate and examine biomarkers. Results 47 patients who progressed after hormonal therapies (55.3% also received prior chemotherapy) received 177Lu-J591. 10.6% experienced ≥ 50% decline in PSA, 36.2% experienced ≥ 30% decline, and 59.6% experienced any PSA decline following their single treatment. One of 12 with measurable disease experienced a partial radiographic response (8 with stable disease). Sites of prostate cancer metastases were targeted in 44 of 47 (93.6%) as determined by planar imaging. All experienced reversible hematologic toxicity with grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurring in 46.8% (29.8% received platelet transfusions) without significant hemorrhage. 25.5% experienced grade 4 neutropenia with 1 episode of febrile neutropenia. The phase I maximum tolerated dose (70 mCi/m2) resulted in more 30% PSA declines (46.9% vs 13.3%, p=0.048) and longer survival (21.8 vs 11.9 months, p=0.03), but also more grade 4 hematologic toxicity and platelet transfusions. No serious non-hematologic toxicity occurred. Those with poor PSMA imaging were less likely to respond. Conclusion A single dose of 177Lu-J591 was well-tolerated with reversible myelosuppression. Accurate tumor targeting and PSA responses were seen with evidence of dose-response. Imaging biomarkers appear promising. PMID:23714732

  20. Tetravalent anti-CD20/CD3 bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Gregory J; Tai, Pei-Han; Yang, Yu-Chen; Hsu, Yu-Shen; Chang, Mingi; Hsu, Chuan-Lung

    2016-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are second generation antibodies for therapeutic application in immunotherapy. One of the major strategies of the bsAb platform is the recruitment of immune effector T cells by incorporating an anti-CD3 domain. A bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE), with one end having an affinity for CD3 and the other end with affinity for CD19, has been approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, due to their small size and lack of Fc region, these single-chain variable fragment (scFv) bsAbs have short half-lives in vivo. Additionally, poor solubility, structural instability, and low production yields have also become major challenges in the bulk production process. To overcome these challenges, we have engineered a tetravalent bsAb with bivalent binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigen in an immunoglobulin G (IgG) format. The fusion of the anti-CD3 scFvs to the CD20 antibody via a linker-hinge domain (LHD) results in improved antibody stabilization and properties. Here we demonstrate this antibody's highly efficient cancer cell elimination in a dose-dependent manner in a CD20-expressing B lymphoblastoid cell line in vitro. Our data suggest the potential clinical application of this bsAb for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. PMID:27040766

  1. Long-term efficacy of anti-CD20 antibodies in refractory lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Rodríguez-García, Felipe; Gómez-Vargas, J Iván

    2012-05-01

    Eight patients with refractory lupus nephritis received rituximab after failing standard sequential therapy and were followed for 104 weeks after the infusion. One patient died secondary to a complicated pregnancy but had stable renal function. Three patients received a re-infusion of rituximab approximately 12 months apart due to a renal flare; during the second year of follow-up, those patients progressed toward ESRD. The four remaining patients demonstrated improvements in SLEDAI score, CrCl, and proteinuria with maintenance of their standard immunosuppressive therapy and did not require a re-infusion of rituximab. Although rituximab as induction therapy for refractory lupus nephritis has been shown to have a good response, its efficacy in long-term assessments demonstrates disappointing results. PMID:21258801

  2. Cell-cycle-related staining patterns of anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoclonal antibodies. Comparison with BrdUrd labeling and Ki-67 staining.

    PubMed Central

    van Dierendonck, J. H.; Wijsman, J. H.; Keijzer, R.; van de Velde, C. J.; Cornelisse, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to nuclear antigens are increasingly used as tools to obtain valuable information concerning the proliferative characteristics of various types of cancer. Prerequisite for the application of these MAbs in surgical pathology is establishment of the level of expression and/or cellular distribution of the antigens in relation to distinct cell-cycle compartments. In this study the topologic distribution of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an auxiliary protein of DNA polymerase delta, as recognized by human autoantiserum (AK) and two recently developed MAbs (19A2 and 19F4), was evaluated. Using cultured human cancer cells as a model system, and providing optimal fixation/permeation procedures are applied, these antibodies display a high affinity for PCNA bound to nuclear replicon clusters, resulting in distinct granular staining patterns. A more diffuse nucleoplasmic PCNA staining was mainly restricted to non-S-phase cells; in methanol-fixed cells, staining intensity of this form relative to the replicon-bound form appeared higher after staining with 19A2 than with 19F4 or AK. Comparing PCNA expression (detected with 19A2) with the expression of the Ki-67 antigen, PCNA-negative cells are also Ki-67 negative. In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells treated with 10(-6) mol/l (molar) tamoxifen, the fraction of nuclei showing replication patterns decreased from 42% to 8% within 8 days, but PCNA and Ki-67 antigens remained detectable in most cells during this interval, indicating a relatively slow decrease of antigen expression in cells that have entered a quiescent state. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 10(-6) mol/l methotrexate resulted in a rapid accumulation of cells with an early S-phase DNA content; PCNA replication patterns showing a frequency distribution reflecting this DNA content were observed up to 48 hours after treatment. This indicates that the presence of replication patterns as visualized with anti-PCNAs is not a measure of

  3. Immunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with hLL2 (epratuzumab, an anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody) and Hu1D10 (apolizumab).

    PubMed

    Leonard, John P; Link, Brian K

    2002-02-01

    Clinical activity of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies both in the unlabeled (rituximab [Rituxan; Genentech, Inc, South San Francisco, CA, and IDEC Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA]) and radiolabeled forms, as well as radioimmunoconjugates targeting other antigens, has resulted in the exploration of alternative targets for immunotherapeutic strategies in lymphoma. We report on the rationale for and initial efforts in the development of two unlabeled, humanized monoclonal antibodies directed against molecules commonly expressed in B-cell malignancies. hLL2 (epratuzumab; Immunomedics, Inc, Morris Plains, NJ) binds to the CD22 antigen, while Hu1D10 (apolizumab; Protein Design Labs, Inc, Fremont, CA) reacts with a polymorphism on the HLA-DR beta chain. Preclinical studies and early clinical evaluations suggest that these agents have a potential role as novel therapeutic targets for lymphoma with acceptable toxicity profiles. Further efforts will explore optimal clinical settings for their use, as well as define treatment regimens either as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy or other biologics. PMID:11842393

  4. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  5. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    PubMed

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades. PMID:15640788

  6. A phase 2, open-label, multicenter study of the long-term safety of siltuximab (an anti-interleukin-6 monoclonal antibody) in patients with multicentric Castleman disease

    PubMed Central

    van Rhee, Frits; Casper, Corey; Voorhees, Peter M.; Fayad, Luis E.; van de Velde, Helgi; Vermeulen, Jessica; Qin, Xiang; Qi, Ming; Tromp, Brenda; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a rare, systemic lymphoproliferative disorder driven by interleukin (IL)-6 overproduction. Siltuximab, an anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody, has demonstrated durable tumor and symptomatic responses in a multinational, randomized, placebo-controlled study of MCD. Methods This preplanned safety analysis was conducted to evaluate the long-term safety of siltuximab treatment among 19 patients with MCD who had stable disease or better and were enrolled in a phase-1 study and subsequent ongoing, open-label, phase-2 extension study. Dosing was 11 mg/kg administered intravenously every 3 weeks, per protocol, or every 6 weeks at the investigator's discretion. Safety monitoring focused on potential risks associated with the anti-IL-6 mechanism of action. Investigator-assessed disease control status was also documented. Results Median treatment duration for the 19 patients was 5.1 (range 3.4, 7.2) years, with 14 (74%) patients treated for >4 years. Grade-≥3 adverse events (AEs) reported in >1 patient included hypertension (n = 3) and nausea, cellulitis, and fatigue (n = 2 each). Grade-≥3 AEs at least possibly attributed to siltuximab were leukopenia, lymphopenia, and a serious AE of polycythemia (n = 1 each). Hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol) were reported in 8 and 9 patients, respectively. No disease relapses were observed, and 8 of 19 patients were able to switch to an every-6-week dosing schedule. Conclusions All MCD patients in this extension study have received siltuximab for a prolonged duration (up to 7 years) without evidence of cumulative toxicity or treatment discontinuations and with few serious infections. All patients are alive, demonstrate sustained disease control, and continue to receive siltuximab. PMID:26327301

  7. High-throughput epitope binning assays on label-free array-based biosensors can yield exquisite epitope discrimination that facilitates the selection of monoclonal antibodies with functional activity.

    PubMed

    Abdiche, Yasmina Noubia; Miles, Adam; Eckman, Josh; Foletti, Davide; Van Blarcom, Thomas J; Yeung, Yik Andy; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate how array-based label-free biosensors can be applied to the multiplexed interaction analysis of large panels of analyte/ligand pairs, such as the epitope binning of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). In this application, the larger the number of mAbs that are analyzed for cross-blocking in a pairwise and combinatorial manner against their specific antigen, the higher the probability of discriminating their epitopes. Since cross-blocking of two mAbs is necessary but not sufficient for them to bind an identical epitope, high-resolution epitope binning analysis determined by high-throughput experiments can enable the identification of mAbs with similar but unique epitopes. We demonstrate that a mAb's epitope and functional activity are correlated, thereby strengthening the relevance of epitope binning data to the discovery of therapeutic mAbs. We evaluated two state-of-the-art label-free biosensors that enable the parallel analysis of 96 unique analyte/ligand interactions and nearly ten thousand total interactions per unattended run. The IBIS-MX96 is a microarray-based surface plasmon resonance imager (SPRi) integrated with continuous flow microspotting technology whereas the Octet-HTX is equipped with disposable fiber optic sensors that use biolayer interferometry (BLI) detection. We compared their throughput, versatility, ease of sample preparation, and sample consumption in the context of epitope binning assays. We conclude that the main advantages of the SPRi technology are its exceptionally low sample consumption, facile sample preparation, and unparalleled unattended throughput. In contrast, the BLI technology is highly flexible because it allows for the simultaneous interaction analysis of 96 independent analyte/ligand pairs, ad hoc sensor replacement and on-line reloading of an analyte- or ligand-array. Thus, the complementary use of these two platforms can expedite applications that are relevant to the discovery of therapeutic mAbs, depending

  8. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  9. A monoclonal antibody against hinge-cleaved IgG restores effector function to proteolytically-inactivated IgGs in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brezski, Randall J; Kinder, Michelle; Grugan, Katharine D; Soring, Keri L; Carton, Jill; Greenplate, Allison R; Petley, Theodore; Capaldi, Dorie; Brosnan, Kerry; Emmell, Eva; Watson, Sharon; Jordan, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    We report a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed to a neo-epitope that is exposed in the IgG lower hinge following proteolytic cleavage. The mAb, designated 2095–2, displays specificity for IdeS-generated F(ab’)2 fragments, but not for full-length IgG or for closely-related F(ab’)2 fragments generated with other proteases. A critical component of the specificity is provided by the C-terminal amino acid of the epitope corresponding to gly-236 in the IgG1 (also IgG4) hinge. By its ability to bind to IdeS-cleaved anti-CD20 mAb, mAb 2095–2 fully restored antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against WIL2-S cells to the otherwise inactive anti-CD20 IgG1 F(ab’)2 fragment. Similarly, 2095–2 reinstated ADCC against MDA-MB-231 cells to an anti-CD142 IgG1 F(ab’)2 fragment. mAb 2095–2 was also capable of eliciting both CDC and ADCC to IgG4 F(ab’)2 fragments, an IgG subclass that has weaker ADCC and CDC when intact relative to intact IgG1. The in vitro cell-based efficacy of 2095–2 was extended to the in vivo setting using platelets as a cell clearance surrogate. In a canine model, the co-administration of 2095–2 together with IdeS-generated, platelet-targeting anti-CD41/61 F(ab’)2 fragment not only restored platelet clearance, but did so at a rate and extent of clearance that exceeded that of intact anti-CD41/61 IgG at comparable concentrations. To further explore this unexpected amplification effect, we conducted a rat study in which 2095–2 was administered at a series of doses in combination with a fixed dose of anti-CD41/61 F(ab’)2 fragments. Again, the combination, at ratios as low as 1:10 (w/w) 2095–2 to F(ab’)2, proved more effective than the anti-CD41/61 IgG1 alone. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing antibody-mediated cell-killing effector functions with potential applications in pathologic settings such as tumors and acute infections where protease

  10. A monoclonal antibody against hinge-cleaved IgG restores effector function to proteolytically-inactivated IgGs in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brezski, Randall J; Kinder, Michelle; Grugan, Katharine D; Soring, Keri L; Carton, Jill; Greenplate, Allison R; Petley, Theodore; Capaldi, Dorie; Brosnan, Kerry; Emmell, Eva; Watson, Sharon; Jordan, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    We report a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed to a neo-epitope that is exposed in the IgG lower hinge following proteolytic cleavage. The mAb, designated 2095-2, displays specificity for IdeS-generated F(ab')₂ fragments, but not for full-length IgG or for closely-related F(ab')₂ fragments generated with other proteases. A critical component of the specificity is provided by the C-terminal amino acid of the epitope corresponding to gly-236 in the IgG1 (also IgG4) hinge. By its ability to bind to IdeS-cleaved anti-CD20 mAb, mAb 2095-2 fully restored antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against WIL2-S cells to the otherwise inactive anti-CD20 IgG1 F(ab')₂ fragment. Similarly, 2095-2 reinstated ADCC against MDA-MB-231 cells to an anti-CD142 IgG1 F(ab')₂ fragment. mAb 2095-2 was also capable of eliciting both CDC and ADCC to IgG4 F(ab')₂ fragments, an IgG subclass that has weaker ADCC and CDC when intact relative to intact IgG1. The in vitro cell-based efficacy of 2095-2 was extended to the in vivo setting using platelets as a cell clearance surrogate. In a canine model, the co-administration of 2095-2 together with IdeS-generated, platelet-targeting anti-CD41/61 F(ab')₂ fragment not only restored platelet clearance, but did so at a rate and extent of clearance that exceeded that of intact anti-CD41/61 IgG at comparable concentrations. To further explore this unexpected amplification effect, we conducted a rat study in which 2095-2 was administered at a series of doses in combination with a fixed dose of anti-CD41/61 F(ab')₂ fragments. Again, the combination, at ratios as low as 1:10 (w/w) 2095-2 to F(ab')₂, proved more effective than the anti-CD41/61 IgG1 alone. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing antibody-mediated cell-killing effector functions with potential applications in pathologic settings such as tumors and acute infections where protease activity is

  11. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa ferripyochelin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, P A; Woods, D E

    1986-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa ferripyochelin-binding protein (FBP) were isolated. These monoclonal antibodies reacted with FBP in immunoblots of outer membrane preparations from all serotypes of P. aeruginosa. Two of the monoclonal antibodies also reacted with FBP in strains of P. putida, P. fluorescens, and P. stutzeri. These antibodies did not react with outer membranes of P. cepacia, "P. multivorans," P. maltophilia, or other gram-negative organisms. The monoclonal antibodies were opsonophagocytic and blocked the binding of [59Fe]ferripyochelin to isolated outer membranes of strain PAO. By indirect immunofluorescence techniques, the monoclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate that FBP is present on the cell surface of P. aeruginosa cells grown in low-iron but not high-iron medium. These observations were confirmed by using 125I in surface-labeling techniques. Images PMID:3091506

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  14. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush. PMID:17691940

  15. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sophia; Frayo, Shani; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Back, Tom; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice.

  17. Novel antisense therapeutics delivery systems: In vitro and in vivo studies of liposomes targeted with anti-CD20 antibody.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Justyna M; Toporkiewicz, Monika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Matusewicz, Lucyna; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-12-28

    Antisense gene therapy using molecules such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, siRNA or miRNA is a very promising strategy for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. It can be combined with other treatment strategies to enhance therapeutic effect. In acute leukemias, overexpression of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 is observed in more than 70% of cases. Therefore, reduction of the Bcl-2 protein level could, in itself, prevent the development of cancer or could possibly help sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducers. The main objective of our work is to develop therapeutic liposome formulations characterized by high transfection efficiency, stability in the presence of serum, as well as specificity and toxicity for target (leukemic) cells. Each of our liposomal formulations consists of a core composed of antisense oligonucleotides complexed by either cationic lipid, DOTAP, or a synthetic polycation, polyethyleneimine, encapsulated within liposomes modified with polyethylenoglycol. In addition, the liposomal shells are enriched with covalently-bound antibodies recognizing a well characterized bio-marker, CD20, exposed on the surface of leukemia cells. The resulting immunoliposomes selectively and effectively reduced the expression of BCL2 in target cells. Model animal experiments carried out on mice-engrafted tumors expressing the specific marker showed high efficiency of the liposome formulations against specific tumor development. In conclusion, we show that lipid formulations based on a polyplex or lipoplex backbone additionally equipped with antibodies are promising non-viral vectors for specific oligonucleotide transfer into human tumor cells. PMID:26585505

  18. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  19. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  20. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  2. Phase 2, multicenter, open-label study of tigatuzumab (CS-1008), a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting death receptor 5, in combination with gemcitabine in chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forero-Torres, Andres; Infante, Jeffrey R; Waterhouse, David; Wong, Lucas; Vickers, Selwyn; Arrowsmith, Edward; He, Aiwu Ruth; Hart, Lowell; Trent, David; Wade, James; Jin, Xiaoping; Wang, Qiang; Austin, TaShara; Rosen, Michael; Beckman, Robert; von Roemeling, Reinhard; Greenberg, Jonathan; Saleh, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Tigatuzumab is the humanized version of the agonistic murine monoclonal antibody TRA-8 that binds to the death receptor 5 and induces apoptosis of human cancer cell lines via the caspase cascade. The combination of tigatuzumab and gemcitabine inhibits tumor growth in murine pancreatic xenografts. This phase 2 trial evaluated the efficacy of tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine in 62 chemotherapy-naive patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients received intravenous tigatuzumab (8 mg/kg loading dose followed by 3 mg/kg weekly) and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 once weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week of rest) until progressive disease (PD) or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) at 16 weeks. Secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR) (complete responses plus partial responses), duration of response, and overall survival (OS). Safety of the combination was also evaluated. Mean duration of treatment was 18.48 weeks for tigatuzumab and 17.73 weeks for gemcitabine. The PFS rate at 16 weeks was 52.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.3–64.1%). The ORR was 13.1%; 28 (45.9%) patients had stable disease and 14 (23%) patients had PD. Median PFS was 3.9 months (95% CI, 2.2–5.4 months). Median OS was 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.1–9.6 months). The most common adverse events related to tigatuzumab were nausea (35.5%), fatigue (32.3%), and peripheral edema (19.4%). Tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine was well tolerated and may be clinically active for the treatment of chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:24403266

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  4. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Two monoclonal antibodies raised against different epitopes of chloroplast fructose-1. 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Hermoso, R.; Fonolla, J.; Lopez-Gorge, J. ); Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (GR-BP5 and GR-BP8) were obtained by fusion of spleen cells of mice immunized against pea photosynthetic FBPase with cells of myeloma NSI. Both mAbs showed by double immunodiffusion a {chi} light chain, and the GR-BP8 secreted an IgM. By Western-blotting and immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled pea FBPase, GR-BP5 and GR-BP8 showed specificity for the chloroplast enzyme. Competition binding of the {sup 125}I-labelled mAbs against pea FBPase showed specific binding sites to different epitopes of the enzyme molecule. Cross reaction assays between both monoclonal antibodies and pea and spinach chloroplast FBPases showed a 90-100% homology in the corresponding epitopes of both enzymes. Preliminary assays showed a moderate inhibition of FBPase by GR-BP5 monoclonal antibody, but a weak enhancement by the GR-BP8 monoclonal one.

  6. [Skin manifestations of monoclonal gammopathies].

    PubMed

    Hello, M; Barbarot, S; Néel, A; Connault, J; Graveleau, J; Durant, C; Decaux, O; Hamidou, M

    2014-01-01

    Whatever their aetiology, monoclonal gammopathies can be associated to several clinical features. Mechanisms are various and sometimes unknown. Skin is frequently involved and may represent a challenging diagnosis. Indeed, skin manifestations are either the presenting features and isolated, or at the background of a systemic syndrome. Our objective was to review the various skin manifestations that have been associated with monoclonal gammopathies. PMID:24070793

  7. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:20954327

  8. Improved iodine radiolabels for monoclonal antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Rhona; Govindan, Serengulam V; Mattes, M Jules; Chen, Susan; Reed, Linda; Newsome, Guy; McBride, Bill J; Griffiths, Gary L; Hansen, Hans J; Goldenberg, David M

    2003-01-01

    A major disadvantage of (131)iodine (I)-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for radioimmunotherapy has been the rapid diffusion of iodotyrosine from target cells after internalization and catabolism of the radioiodinated MAbs. We recently reported that a radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide, designated immunomedics' residualizing peptide 1 (IMP-R1), was a residualizing iodine label that overcame many of the limitations that had impeded the development of residualizing iodine for clinical use. To determine the factors governing the therapeutic index of the labeled MAb, as well as the factors required for production of radioiodinated MAb in high yield and with high specific activity, variations in the peptide structure of IMP-R1 were evaluated. A series of radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide moieties (IMP-R1 through IMP-R8) that differed in overall hydrophilicity and charge were compared. Radioiodinations of the peptides followed by conjugations to disulfide-reduced RS7 (an anti-epithelial glycoprotein-1 MAb) furnished radioimmunoconjugates in good overall incorporations, with immunoreactivities comparable to that of directly radioiodinated RS7. Specific activities of up to 8 mCi/mg and yields > 80% have been achieved. In vitro processing experiments showed marked increases in radioiodine retention with all of the adducts; radioiodine retention at 45 h was up to 86% greater in cells than with directly iodinated RS7. Each of the (125)I-peptide-RS7 conjugates was compared with (131)I-RS7 (labeled by the chloramine-T method) in paired-label biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing human lung tumor xenografts. All of the residualizing substrates exhibited significantly enhanced retention in tumor in comparison to directly radioiodinated RS7, but the nontarget uptakes differed significantly among the residualizing labels. The best labels were IMP-R4 and IMP-R8, showing superior tumor-to-non-tumor ratios

  9. Monoclonal platelet antigen capture assays (MAIPA) and reagents: a statement.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, C; Freedman, J; Foxcroft, Z; Husebekk, A; Metcalfe, P; Muniz-Diaz, E; Ouwehand, W; Panzer, S; Rozman, P; Skogen, B

    2007-11-01

    This statement concerning the monoclonal-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) has been written on behalf of the International Society of Blood Transfusion--Working Party on Platelet Immunology. The MAIPA technique is considered as the gold standard reference technique in platelet immunology. The assay performed with reagents labelled for 'research only' is acceptable as long as it is regularly evaluated by participation of laboratories in national or international workshops held with reference laboratories. PMID:18070272

  10. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  11. Boronated monoclonal antibody conjugates for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Elmore, J.J. Jr.; Ferrone, S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the effectiveness of /sup 10/B-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Colo-38 human melanoma in vitro. The authors obtained high boron to antibody ratios while maintaining antibody activity by using dextran intermediate carriers to link /sup 10/B to the antibody. They developed a double cell quasi-competitive binding bioassay to minimize the effects of nonspecific binding of boronated complexes to cells. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-12-01

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of labeled MAbs could be improved as a result of knowledge obtained through the exploitation of the advantageous imaging characteristics associated with PET. By labeling MAbs with positron-emitting nuclides, it should be possible to quantitate the dynamics of their three-dimensional distribution in vivo. Our long-term goals are to apply this approach. 3 tabs.

  13. Production of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Freysd'ottir, J

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced by "hybridoma technology" by George Köhler and Cesar Milstein in 1975 has had a great impact both on basic biological research and on clinical medicine. However, this impact was not immediately recognized. It took around 10 years to appreciate the importance of using these mAbs in various fields of science other than immunology, such as cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, para-sitology, physiology, genetics, and molecular biology; and also in areas of clinical medicine, such as pathology, hematology, oncology, and infectious disease. The contribution of mAbs to science and clinical medicine was recognized in 1984 by the award of the Nobel Prize for Medicine to Köhler and Milstein. PMID:21337095

  14. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sondergeld, Pia; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Richardson, Paul G; Plesner, Torben

    2015-09-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting addition to the therapeutic armamentarium. The incorporation of mAbs into current treatment strategies is hoped to enable more effective and targeted treatment, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. A number of targets have been identified, including molecules on the surface of the myeloma cell and components of the bone marrow microenvironment. Our review focuses on a small number of promising mAbs directed against molecules on the surface of myeloma cells, including CS1 (elotuzumab), CD38 (daratumumab, SAR650984, MOR03087), CD56 (lorvotuzumab mertansine), and CD138/syndecan-1 (BT062/indatuximab ravtansine). PMID:26452191

  15. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  16. Kinetics of intralymphatically delivered monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Geatti, O.; Liebert, M.; Beers, B.; Jackson, G.; Laino, L.; Kronberg, S.; Wilson, B.S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) administration subcutaneously (sq), so that preferential uptake is to the lymphatics, holds significant promise for the detection of lymph node metastases. Only limited information is available about clearance rates of intralymphatically administered MoAbs. I-131 labeled intact IgG (225.28S), F(ab's)2 (225.28S) or IgM (FT162) were administered sq to anesthetized Balb/C mice. Eight mice were studied with each MoAb, 4 with a foot-pad injection, 4 with an anterior abdominal injection. Gamma camera images were collected into a computer, over the first 6 hrs after injection with the animals anesthetized and immobile. Animals were then allowed to move about freely. Additional images were then acquired out to 48 hrs. Regions of interest wre selected over the injection site and the kinetics of antibody egress determined. Clearance rates from local sq injection sites are influenced by motion and somewhat by location. The class and fragment status of the MoAb appear relatively less important in determining clearance rates from sq injections than they are in determining whole-body clearance after iv injections. Additional studies using Fab fragments and additional monoclonals will be useful in extending these observations.

  17. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  18. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  20. Monitoring therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Belkacem, Rima; Berenguer, Caroline; Villard, Claude; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Beck, Alain; Chinot, Olivier; Lafitte, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Bevacizumab induces normalization of abnormal blood vessels, making them less leaky. By binding to vascular endothelial growth factor, it indirectly attacks the vascular tumor mass. The optimal delivery of targeted therapies including monoclonal antibodies or anti-angiogenesis drugs to the target tissue highly depends on the blood-brain barrier permeability. It is therefore critical to investigate how drugs effectively reach the tumor. In situ investigation of drug distribution could provide a better understanding of pharmacological agent action and optimize chemotherapies for solid tumors. We developed an imaging method coupled to protein identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This approach monitored bevacizumab distribution within the brain structures, and especially within the tumor, without any labeling. PMID:25484065

  1. A Monoclonal Antibody Toolkit for C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Gayla; Dour, Scott; Arur, Swathi; Fox, Paul; Nonet, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1), a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10), a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1), a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4), which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2), a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5); to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1); to EHD1 (RME-1) a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1), a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1), a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8) that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60) targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1), a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7) of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1) and to the α-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2) as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1) and cadherin (HMR-1), both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1), which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413) which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7) which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to working

  2. Immunotoxicity of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are large molecules intended to bind to specific targets often expressed on the immune system, and to treat various immunopathological conditions. Therefore, mAbs can be considered to have a high potential for immunotoxicity, which is reflected in the clinical experience accumulated on mAbs-induced adverse effects related to immunosuppression, immunostimulation and hypersensitivity (immunogenicity). So far, non clinical immunotoxicity studies have been inadequate to address all safety issues in relation to the possible immunotoxicity of mAbs, because they are fraught with limitations and pitfalls primarily related to the lack of relevant animal species. In addition, clinical studies rarely include validated end-points dedicated to the prediction of immunotoxicity. With the ongoing development of mAbs as novel therapeutic strategies for a wide variety of diseases, efforts should be paid to improve our understanding of mAbs-induced immunotoxic effects and design dedicated strategies to assess their immunological safety, both non clinically and clinically. PMID:20061816

  3. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  4. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  5. Unusual monoclonal DNA binding immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sawada, S; Iijima, S; Kuwana, K; Nishinarita, S; Takeuchi, J; Shida, M; Karasaki, M; Amaki, I

    1983-03-01

    The monoclonal antibodies directed against DNA were produced by somatic cell hybridization with parental cells (SP-2) and spleen cells from nonimmunized autoimmune MRL/lpr mice. The immunoglobulins were recovered from the culture supernatant from hybridoma by a solid immunoadsorbent and antibody immunoprecipitation. The results from the specificities of DNA binding monoclonal immunoglobulins suggest that the antibodies to DNA have the antibody combining sites for both epitope of double stranded helix and base of DNA and support the concept of the multiple antigen binding potentials of the hybridoma autoantibodies. PMID:6857646

  6. Human antiglioma monoclonal antibodies from patients with astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Dan, M D; Schlachta, C M; Guy, J; McKenzie, R G; Dorscheid, D R; Sandor, V A; Villemure, J G; Price, G B

    1992-04-01

    The current management of malignant gliomas is unsatisfactory compared to that of other solid tumors; the expected median survival period is less than 1 year with the patient undergoing conventional surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy treatment. Immunological reagents could be a useful adjunct. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from patients with astrocytic tumors might recognize subtle antigenic specificities that would differ from those recognized by xenogeneic (murine) systems. Five hybridomas, designated as BT27/1A2, BT27/2A3, BT32/A6, BT34/A5, and BT54/B8, were produced from the fusion of peripheral blood lymphocytes of four patients with astrocytic tumors to the human myeloma-like cell line TM-H2-SP2. This cell line has a 46, XX karyotype and is negative for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. All five human monoclonal antibodies produced 2.4 to 44 micrograms/ml of immunoglobulin M, had a similar but not identical pattern of reactivity against a panel of human tumor cell lines, and failed to react with normal human astrocytes. Labeling of four neuroectodermal tumor explant cultures by BT27/2A3 was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Karyotyping of three of the five hybridomas demonstrated that two were pseudodiploid (2-3n) and one hypodiploid (less than 2n). The monoclonality of the hybridomas was evaluated by Southern blot analysis of JH gene rearrangements, revealing two types of rearrangements for each hybridoma, both consistent with monoclonality. Preliminary antigen characterization indicated that at least four of the five human monoclonal antibodies were directed to cell-surface glycolipids. PMID:1545260

  7. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  8. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  9. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  10. Iodine-131 labeled anti-CEA antibodies uptake by Huerthle cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.; Hinkle, G.H.; Falko, J.M.; Kelly, D.; Olsen, J.O.; Martin, E.W. Jr.

    1985-10-01

    Localization of Huerthle cell cancer deposits in the lung with I-131 labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody is described. This technique may prove useful if conventional scanning with I-131 sodium iodide for distant metastases is negative.