Science.gov

Sample records for labeled nmr samples

  1. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  2. Preparation of uniformly labeled NMR samples in Escherichia coli under the tight control of the araBAD promoter: expression of an archaeal homolog of the RNase P Rpp29 protein.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, William P; Raj, M L Stephen; Gopalan, Venkat; Foster, Mark P

    2003-04-01

    We report the first use of the tightly regulated araBAD promoter for generating uniformly labeled samples for NMR. The araBAD promoter provides a distinct advantage over that of the most commonly used protein overexpression systems in bacteria (e.g., in pET vectors: T7lac), in that it provides much tighter control over basal expression. However, use of araBAD-regulated expression for preparation of uniformly labeled protein samples for NMR is complicated by the fact that glucose (the most commonly used carbon source in defined minimal media) indirectly represses transcription, and thus, cannot be used. After experimenting with alternative media, we found that uniformly labeled NMR samples can be prepared using the highly regulated arabinose-inducible promoter and that suitable yields can be obtained in defined minimal media containing glycerol, not glucose, as the carbon source. PMID:12699688

  3. Sensitivity of nonuniform sampling NMR.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Melissa R; Suiter, Christopher L; Henry, Geneive E; Rovnyak, James; Hoch, Jeffrey C; Polenova, Tatyana; Rovnyak, David

    2015-06-01

    Many information-rich multidimensional experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can benefit from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement of up to about 2-fold if a decaying signal in an indirect dimension is sampled with nonconsecutive increments, termed nonuniform sampling (NUS). This work provides formal theoretical results and applications to resolve major questions about the scope of the NUS enhancement. First, we introduce the NUS Sensitivity Theorem in which any decreasing sampling density applied to any exponentially decaying signal always results in higher sensitivity (SNR per square root of measurement time) than uniform sampling (US). Several cases will illustrate this theorem and show that even conservative applications of NUS improve sensitivity by useful amounts. Next, we turn to a serious limitation of uniform sampling: the SNR by US decreases for extending evolution times, and thus total experimental times, beyond 1.26T2 (T2 = signal decay constant). Thus, SNR and resolution cannot be simultaneously improved by extending US beyond 1.26T2. We find that NUS can eliminate this constraint, and we introduce the matched NUS SNR Theorem: an exponential sampling density matched to the signal decay always improves the SNR with additional evolution time. Though proved for a specific case, broader classes of NUS densities also improve SNR with evolution time. Applications of these theoretical results are given for a soluble plant natural product and a solid tripeptide (u-(13)C,(15)N-MLF). These formal results clearly demonstrate the inadequacies of applying US to decaying signals in indirect nD-NMR dimensions, supporting a broader adoption of NUS. PMID:25901905

  4. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  5. Algal autolysate medium to label proteins for NMR in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Carmelo; Luchinat, Enrico; Barbieri, Letizia; Neri, Sara; Fragai, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In-cell NMR provides structural and functional information on proteins directly inside living cells. At present, the high costs of the labeled media for mammalian cells represent a limiting factor for the development of this methodology. Here we report a protocol to prepare a homemade growth medium from Spirulina platensis autolysate, suitable to express uniformly labeled proteins inside mammalian cells at a reduced cost-per-sample. The human proteins SOD1 and Mia40 were overexpressed in human cells grown in (15)N-enriched S. platensis algal-derived medium, and high quality in-cell NMR spectra were obtained. PMID:27106902

  6. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  7. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  8. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  9. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  11. Efficient cellular solid-state NMR of membrane proteins by targeted protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay A; Daniëls, Mark; van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Folkers, Gert E; Baldus, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) has made significant progress towards the study of membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes. However, reduced spectroscopic sensitivity and high background signal levels can complicate these experiments. Here, we describe a method for ssNMR to specifically label a single protein by repressing endogenous protein expression with rifampicin. Our results demonstrate that treatment of E. coli with rifampicin during induction of recombinant membrane protein expression reduces background signals for different expression levels and improves sensitivity in cellular membrane samples. Further, the method reduces the amount of time and resources needed to produce membrane protein samples, enabling new strategies for studying challenging membrane proteins by ssNMR. PMID:25956570

  12. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  13. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  14. Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels: NMR Imaging Methods, Preliminary Results, and New Optimized Coils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pratik

    1992-01-01

    The investigations focussed on in vivo NMR imaging studies of magnetic particles with and within neural cells. NMR imaging methods, both Fourier transform and projection reconstruction, were implemented and new protocols were developed to perform "Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels" on small animal brains. Having performed the preliminary experiments with neuronal tracing, new optimized coils and experimental set-up were devised. A novel gradient coil technology along with new rf-coils were implemented, and optimized for future use with small animals in them. A new magnetic labelling procedure was developed that allowed labelling of billions of cells with ultra -small magnetite particles in a short time. The relationships among the viability of such cells, the amount of label and the contrast in the images were studied as quantitatively as possible. Intracerebral grafting of magnetite labelled fetal rat brain cells made it possible for the first time to attempt monitoring in vivo the survival, differentiation, and possible migration of both host and grafted cells in the host rat brain. This constituted the early steps toward future experiments that may lead to the monitoring of human brain grafts of fetal brain cells. Preliminary experiments with direct injection of horse radish peroxidase-conjugated magnetite particles into neurons, followed by NMR imaging, revealed a possible non-invasive alternative, allowing serial study of the dynamic transport pattern of tracers in single living animals. New gradient coils were built by using parallel solid-conductor ribbon cables that could be wrapped easily and quickly. Rapid rise times provided by these coils allowed implementation of fast imaging methods. Optimized rf-coil circuit development made it possible to understand better the sample-coil properties and the associated trade -offs in cases of small but conducting samples.

  15. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  16. REDOR NMR of stable-isotope-labeled protein binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.

    1994-12-01

    Rotational-echo, double resonance (REDOR) NMR, a new analytical spectroscopic technique for solids spinning at the magic angle, has been developed over the last 5 years. REDOR provides a direct measure of heteronuclear dipolar coupling between isolated pairs of labeled nuclei. In a solid with a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N labeled pair, for example, the {sup 13}C rotational echoes that form each rotor period following a{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization transfer can be prevented from reaching full intensity by insertion of a {sup 15}N {pi} pulse each half rotor period. The REDOR difference (the difference between a {sup 13}C NMR spectrum obtained under these conditions and one obtained with no {sup 15}N {pi} pulses) has a strong dependence on the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar coupling, and hence, the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N internuclear distance. REDOR is described as double-resonance even though three radio frequencies (typically {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N) are used because the protons are removed from the important evolution part of the experiment by resonant decoupling. The dephasing of magnetization in REDOR arises from a local dipolar {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N field gradient and involves no polarization transfer. REDOR has no dependence on {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N chemical-shift tensors and does not require resolution of a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N coupling in the chemical-shift dimension.

  17. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  18. On electrophoretic NMR. Exploring high conductivity samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejewski, Michał; Giesecke, Marianne; Furó, István

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a new electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) method that uses a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train with repeated electric field reversal is investigated. We show that this pulse sequence, with acronym CPMGER, yields strongly reduced artifacts from convective flow effects caused by the simultaneous presence of electroosmotic and thermal driving forces. We demonstrate the achieved improvements in various aqueous solutions. Ultimately, the method can be used for obtaining electrophoretic mobilities by eNMR without relying on uncharged reference molecules, otherwise a significant limitation for electrophoretic experiments performed with nuclei other than 1H.

  19. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, A.; Samoson, A.

    1990-02-06

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero. 8 figs.

  20. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  1. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... Part 305—Sample Labels ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER29AU07.126 SAMPLE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.127 SAMPLE LABEL...

  2. Labeling strategy and signal broadening mechanism of Protein NMR spectroscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yansheng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Yanhua; Xu, Guohua; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Zeting; Yao, Chendie; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2015-06-01

    We used Xenopus laevis oocytes, a paradigm for a variety of biological studies, as a eukaryotic model system for in-cell protein NMR spectroscopy. The small globular protein GB1 was one of the first studied in Xenopus oocytes, but there have been few reports since then of high-resolution spectra in oocytes. The scarcity of data is at least partly due to the lack of good labeling strategies and the paucity of information on resonance broadening mechanisms. Here, we systematically evaluate isotope enrichment and labeling methods in oocytes injected with five different proteins with molecular masses of 6 to 54 kDa. (19) F labeling is more promising than (15) N, (13) C, and (2) H enrichment. We also used (19) F NMR spectroscopy to quantify the contribution of viscosity, weak interactions, and sample inhomogeneity to resonance broadening in cells. We found that the viscosity in oocytes is only about 1.2 times that of water, and that inhomogeneous broadening is a major factor in determining line width in these cells. PMID:25965532

  3. 19 CFR 12.22 - Labels; samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labels; samples. 12.22 Section 12.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Antitoxins, and Analogous Products for...

  4. 19 CFR 12.22 - Labels; samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labels; samples. 12.22 Section 12.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Antitoxins, and Analogous Products for...

  5. 19 CFR 12.22 - Labels; samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labels; samples. 12.22 Section 12.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Antitoxins, and Analogous Products for...

  6. NMR conformational properties of an Anthrax Lethal Factor domain studied by multiple amino acid-selective labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vourtsis, Dionysios J.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Pairas, George; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A polypeptide, N-ALF{sub 233}, was overexpressed in E. coli and successfully isolated. • We produced {sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C labeled protein samples. • Amino acid selective approaches were applied. • We acquired several heteronuclear NMR spectra, to complete the backbone assignment. • Prediction of the secondary structure was performed. - Abstract: NMR-based structural biology urgently needs cost- and time-effective methods to assist both in the process of acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra and their subsequent analysis. Especially for bigger proteins (>20 kDa) selective labeling is a frequently used means of sequence-specific assignment. In this work we present the successful overexpression of a polypeptide of 233 residues, corresponding to the structured part of the N-terminal domain of Anthrax Lethal Factor, using Escherichia coli expression system. The polypeptide was subsequently isolated in pure, soluble form and analyzed structurally by solution NMR spectroscopy. Due to the non-satisfying quality and resolution of the spectra of this 27 kDa protein, an almost complete backbone assignment became feasible only by the combination of uniform and novel amino acid-selective labeling schemes. Moreover, amino acid-type selective triple-resonance NMR experiments proved to be very helpful.

  7. Preparation of isotopically labeled ribonucleotides for multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Batey, R T; Inada, M; Kujawinski, E; Puglisi, J D; Williamson, J R

    1992-01-01

    A general method for large scale preparation of uniformly isotopically labeled ribonucleotides and RNAs is described. Bacteria are grown on isotopic growth medium, and their nucleic acids are harvested and degraded to mononucleotides. These are enzymatically converted into ribonucleoside triphosphates, which are used in transcription reactions in vitro to prepare RNAs for NMR studies. For 15N-labeling, E.coli is grown on 15N-ammonium sulfate, whereas for 13C-labeling, Methylophilus methylotrophus is grown on 13C-methanol, which is more economical than 13C-glucose. To demonstrate the feasibility and utility of this method, uniformly 13C-labeled ribonucleotides were used to synthesize a 31 nucleotide HIV TAR RNA that was analyzed by 3D-NMR. This method should find widespread use in the structural analysis of RNA by NMR. Images PMID:1383928

  8. Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

  9. Simple, efficient protocol for enzymatic synthesis of uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled DNA for heteronuclear NMR studies.

    PubMed Central

    Masse, J E; Bortmann, P; Dieckmann, T; Feigon, J

    1998-01-01

    The use of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled RNA has greatly facilitated structural studies of RNA oligonucleotides by NMR. Application of similar methodologies for the study of DNA has been limited, primarily due to the lack of adequate methods for sample preparation. Methods for both chemical and enzymatic synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides uniformly labeled with 13C and/or 15N have been published, but have not yet been widely used. We have developed a modified procedure for preparing uniformly 13C,15N-labeled DNA based on enzymatic synthesis using Taq DNA polymerase. The highly efficient protocol results in quantitative polymerization of the template and approximately 80% incorporation of the labeled dNTPs. Procedures for avoiding non-templated addition of nucleotides or for their removal are given. The method has been used to synthesize several DNA oligonucleotides, including two complementary 15 base strands, a 32 base DNA oligonucleotide that folds to form an intramolecular triplex and a 12 base oligonucleotide that dimerizes and folds to form a quadruplex. Heteronuclear NMR spectra of the samples illustrate the quality of the labeled DNA obtained by these procedures. PMID:9592146

  10. Multiplexed NMR: An Automated CapNMR Dual-Sample Probe

    PubMed Central

    Norcross, James A.; Milling, Craig T.; Olson, Dean L.; Xu, Duanxiang; Audrieth, Anthony; Albrecht, Robert; Ruan, Ke; Likos, John; Jones, Claude; Peck, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    A new generation of micro-scale, nuclear magnetic resonance (CapNMR™) probe technology employs two independent detection elements to accommodate two samples simultaneously. Each detection element in the Dual-Sample CapNMR Probe (DSP) delivers the same spectral resolution and S/N as in a CapNMR probe configured to accommodate one sample at a time. A high degree of electrical isolation allows the DSP to be used in a variety of data acquisition modes. Both samples are shimmed simultaneously to achieve high spectral resolution for simultaneous data acquisition, or alternatively, a flowcell-specific shim set is readily called via spectrometer subroutines to enable acquisition from one sample while the other is being loaded. An automation system accommodates loading of two samples via dual injection ports on an autosampler and two completely independent flowpaths leading to dedicated flowcells in the DSP probe. PMID:20681560

  11. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling of samples. 301.33 Section 301.33 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are...

  12. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling of samples. 301.33 Section 301.33 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are...

  13. Methyl-specific isotopic labeling: a molecular tool box for solution NMR studies of large proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerfah, Rime; Plevin, Michael J; Sounier, Remy; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jerome

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a uniquely powerful tool for studying the structure, dynamics and interactions of biomolecules at atomic resolution. In the past 15 years, the development of new isotopic labeling strategies has opened the possibility of exploiting NMR spectroscopy in the study of supra-molecular complexes with molecular weights of up to 1MDa. At the core of these isotopic labeling developments is the specific introduction of [(1)H,(13)C]-labeled methyl probes into perdeuterated proteins. Here, we describe the evolution of these approaches and discuss their impact on structural and biological studies. The relevant protocols are succinctly reviewed for single and combinatorial isotopic-labeling of methyl-containing residues, and examples of applications on challenging biological systems, including high molecular weight and membrane proteins, are presented. PMID:25881211

  14. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... amendment published at 75 FR 49819, Aug. 16, 2010. ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER29AU07.126 SAMPLE LABEL...

  15. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... For Federal Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... Part 305—Sample Labels ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER21DE11.065 ER21DE11.066 ER21DE11.067...

  16. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and... Part 305—Sample Labels ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER21DE11.065 ER21DE11.066 ER21DE11.067...

  17. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  18. Assignment of Oriented Sample NMR Resonances from a Three Transmembrane Helix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. T.; Hung, I.; Cross, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientation in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  19. Assignment of oriented sample NMR resonances from a three transmembrane helix protein.

    PubMed

    Murray, D T; Hung, I; Cross, T A

    2014-03-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientations in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  20. 27 CFR 20.253 - Labels for samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labels for samples. 20.253 Section 20.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Denatured Spirits § 20.253 Labels for samples. When a sample of specially denatured spirits is...

  1. 27 CFR 20.253 - Labels for samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labels for samples. 20.253 Section 20.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Denatured Spirits § 20.253 Labels for samples. When a sample of specially denatured spirits is...

  2. 27 CFR 20.253 - Labels for samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labels for samples. 20.253 Section 20.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Denatured Spirits § 20.253 Labels for samples. When a sample of specially denatured spirits is...

  3. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples,...

  4. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples,...

  5. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples,...

  6. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t = 0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t = 0 to - tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory

  7. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t=0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t=0 to -tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory enables

  8. Classification of commercial Catuaba samples by NMR, HPLC and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Daolio, Cristina; Beltrame, Flávio L; Ferreira, Antonio G; Cass, Quezia B; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Ferreira, Márcia M C

    2008-01-01

    For over a century, Catuaba has been used in Brazilian folk medicine as an aphrodisiac even though the identity of the plant material employed is often uncertain. The species recommended by the Brazilian Pharmacopeia is Anemopaegma arvense (Bignoniaceae), but many other plants, regionally known as Catuaba, are commercialised. Frequently, the quality control of such a complex system is based on chemical markers that do not supply a general idea of the system. With the advent of the metabolomics approach, a global analysis of samples becomes possible. It appears that (1)H-NMR is the most useful method for such application, since it can be used as a wide-spectrum chemical analysis technique. Unfortunately, the generated spectra is complex so a possible approach is to look at the metabolite profile as a whole using multivariate methods, for example, by application of principal component analysis (PCA). In the present paper, we describe for the first time a proton high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-HR-MAS NMR) method coupled with PCA for the metabolomic analysis of some commercial Catuaba samples, which provided a reduction in the time required for such analysis. A comparative study of HPLC, HR-MAS and liquid-NMR techniques is also reported. PMID:17890569

  9. Elucidation of the Cross-Link Structure of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides Using NMR of C-13-Labeled Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Solid NMR of C-13 isotope-labeled samples of PMR-15 was used to follow the cross-linking reaction of the nadic end cap. Some samples were labeled on one of the carbon atoms of the nadic end cap, and others on the methylene carbon atom of the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer. NMR spectra were run on these samples both before and after cross-linking. In this way, direct evidence of the major products of cross-linking under normal cure conditions is provided. The majority (approximately 85%) of the cross-linking derives from olefin polymerization through the double bond of the end cap. Approximately 15% of the products could come from a pathway involving a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. However, all of the products could be explained by a biradical intermediate without a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. Evidence is also presented that the methylene moiety in the methylenedianiline part of the polymer chain also participates in the cross-linking, albeit to a small extent, by a radical transfer reaction. Different cure conditions (higher temperatures, longer times) could change the relative distribution of the products.

  10. Optimization of protein samples for NMR using thermal shift assays.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Sandra; Lercher, Lukas; Karanth, Megha N; Meijers, Rob; Carlomagno, Teresa; Boivin, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    Maintaining a stable fold for recombinant proteins is challenging, especially when working with highly purified and concentrated samples at temperatures >20 °C. Therefore, it is worthwhile to screen for different buffer components that can stabilize protein samples. Thermal shift assays or ThermoFluor(®) provide a high-throughput screening method to assess the thermal stability of a sample under several conditions simultaneously. Here, we describe a thermal shift assay that is designed to optimize conditions for nuclear magnetic resonance studies, which typically require stable samples at high concentration and ambient (or higher) temperature. We demonstrate that for two challenging proteins, the multicomponent screen helped to identify ingredients that increased protein stability, leading to clear improvements in the quality of the spectra. Thermal shift assays provide an economic and time-efficient method to find optimal conditions for NMR structural studies. PMID:26984476

  11. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sample Labels L Appendix L to Part 305... RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. L Appendix L to Part 305—Sample Labels Link to a correction published at 78...

  12. Biomolecular DNP-Supported NMR Spectroscopy using Site-Directed Spin Labeling.

    PubMed

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Koers, Eline J; Sauvée, Claire; Hulse, Raymond E; Weingarth, Markus; Ouari, Olivier; Perozo, Eduardo; Tordo, Paul; Baldus, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has been shown to greatly enhance spectroscopic sensitivity, creating novel opportunities for NMR studies on complex and large molecular assemblies in life and material sciences. In such applications, however, site-specificity and spectroscopic resolution become critical factors that are usually difficult to control by current DNP-based approaches. We have examined in detail the effect of directly attaching mono- or biradicals to induce local paramagnetic relaxation effects and, at the same time, to produce sizable DNP enhancements. Using a membrane-embedded ion channel as an example, we varied the degree of paramagnetic labeling and the location of the DNP probes. Our results show that the creation of local spin clusters can generate sizable DNP enhancements while preserving the intrinsic benefits of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)-based NMR approaches. DNP using chemical labeling may hence provide an attractive route to introduce molecular specificity into DNP studies in life science applications and beyond. PMID:26315337

  13. A mutagenesis-free approach to assignment of (19)F NMR resonances in biosynthetically labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kitevski-LeBlanc, Julianne L; Al-Abdul-Wahid, M Sameer; Prosser, R Scott

    2009-02-18

    Solution NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics using fluorinated amino acid probes are a valuable addition to the repertoire of existing (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H experiments. Despite the numerous advantages of the (19)F nucleus in NMR, protein studies are complicated by the dependence of resonance assignments on site-directed mutagenesis methods which are laborious and often problematic. Here we report an NMR-based route to the assignment of fluorine resonances in (13)C,(15)N-3-fluoro-l-tyrosine labeled calmodulin. The assignment begins with the correlation of the fluorine nucleus to the delta proton in the novel (13)C,(15)N-enriched probe which is achieved using a CT-HCCF-COSY experiment. Connection to the backbone is made through two additional solution NMR experiments, namely the (H(beta))C(beta)(C(gamma)C(delta))H(delta) and HNCACB. Assignments are completed using either previously published backbone chemical shift data or obtained experimentally provided uniform (13)C,(15)N labeling procedures are employed during protein expression. Additional benefits of the (13)C,(15)N-3-fluoro-l-tyrosine probe include the reduction of spectral overlap through ((13)C(19)F) CT-HSQCs, as well as the ability to monitor side chain dynamics using (19)F T(1), T(2), and the (13)C-(19)F NOE. PMID:19173647

  14. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of (13)C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our (13)C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the (13)C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the (13)C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in (13)C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  15. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of 13C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our 13C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the 13C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the 13C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in 13C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  16. Mixing apparatus for preparing NMR samples under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Jin; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Mooberry, Ed S.; Westler, William M.; Markley, John L.

    2003-09-01

    The size limit for protein NMR spectroscopy in solution arises in large part from line broadening caused by slow molecular tumbling. One way to alleviate this problem is to increase the effective tumbling rate by reducing the viscosity of the solvent. Because proteins generally require an aqueous environment to remain folded, one approach has been to encapsulate hydrated proteins in reverse micelles formed by a detergent and to dissolve the encapsulated protein in a low-viscosity fluid. The high volatility of suitable low-viscosity fluids requires that the samples be prepared and maintained under pressure. We describe a novel apparatus used for the preparation of such samples. The apparatus includes a chamber for mixing the detergent with the low-viscosity solvent, a second chamber for mixing this with hydrated protein, and a 5-mm (o.d.) zirconium oxide NMR sample tube with shut-off valves designed to contain pressures on the order of 10 bar, sufficient for liquid propane. Liquids are moved from one location to another by introducing minor pressure differentials between two pressurization vessels. We discuss the operation of this apparatus and illustrate this with data on a 30-kDa protein complex (chymotrypsin:turkey ovomucoid third domain) encapsulated in reverse micelles of the detergent, sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, aerosol-ot (AOT), dissolved in liquid propane.

  17. Preparation of 13C and 15N labelled RNAs for heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Nikonowicz, E P; Sirr, A; Legault, P; Jucker, F M; Baer, L M; Pardi, A

    1992-09-11

    A procedure is described for the efficient preparation of isotopically enriched RNAs of defined sequence. Uniformly labelled nucleotide 5'triphosphates (NTPs) were prepared from E.coli grown on 13C and/or 15N isotopically enriched media. These procedures routinely yield 180 mumoles of labelled NTPs per gram of 13C enriched glucose. The labelled NTPs were then used to synthesize RNA oligomers by in vitro transcription. Several 13C and/or 15N labelled RNAs have been synthesized for the sequence r(GGCGCUUGCGUC). Under conditions of high salt or low salt, this RNA forms either a symmetrical duplex with two U.U base pairs or a hairpin containing a CUUG loop respectively. These procedures were used to synthesize uniformly labelled RNAs and a RNA labelled only on the G and C residues. The ability to generate milligram quantities of isotopically labelled RNAs allows application of multi-dimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance experiments that enormously simplify the resonance assignment and solution structure determination of RNAs. Examples of several such heteronuclear NMR experiments are shown. PMID:1383927

  18. Probabilistic Interaction Network of Evidence Algorithm and its Application to Complete Labeling of Peak Lists from Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Assadi, Amir H.; Markley, John L.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.

    2009-01-01

    The process of assigning a finite set of tags or labels to a collection of observations, subject to side conditions, is notable for its computational complexity. This labeling paradigm is of theoretical and practical relevance to a wide range of biological applications, including the analysis of data from DNA microarrays, metabolomics experiments, and biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We present a novel algorithm, called Probabilistic Interaction Network of Evidence (PINE), that achieves robust, unsupervised probabilistic labeling of data. The computational core of PINE uses estimates of evidence derived from empirical distributions of previously observed data, along with consistency measures, to drive a fictitious system M with Hamiltonian H to a quasi-stationary state that produces probabilistic label assignments for relevant subsets of the data. We demonstrate the successful application of PINE to a key task in protein NMR spectroscopy: that of converting peak lists extracted from various NMR experiments into assignments associated with probabilities for their correctness. This application, called PINE-NMR, is available from a freely accessible computer server (http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu). The PINE-NMR server accepts as input the sequence of the protein plus user-specified combinations of data corresponding to an extensive list of NMR experiments; it provides as output a probabilistic assignment of NMR signals (chemical shifts) to sequence-specific backbone and aliphatic side chain atoms plus a probabilistic determination of the protein secondary structure. PINE-NMR can accommodate prior information about assignments or stable isotope labeling schemes. As part of the analysis, PINE-NMR identifies, verifies, and rectifies problems related to chemical shift referencing or erroneous input data. PINE-NMR achieves robust and consistent results that have been shown to be effective in subsequent steps of NMR structure determination. PMID

  19. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  20. A General Assignment Method for Oriented Sample (OS) Solid-state NMR of Proteins Based on The Correlation of Resonances through Heteronuclear Dipolar Couplings in Samples Aligned Parallel and Perpendicular to the Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Lu, George J.; Son, Woo Sung; Opella, Stanley J.

    2011-01-01

    A general method for assigning oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR spectra of proteins is demonstrated. In principle, this method requires only a single sample of a uniformly 15N-labeled membrane protein in magnetically aligned bilayers, and a previously assigned isotropic chemical shift spectrum obtained either from solution NMR on micelle or isotropic bicelle samples or from magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR on unoriented proteoliposomes. The sequential isotropic resonance assignments are transferred to the OS solid-state NMR spectra of aligned samples by correlating signals from the same residue observed in protein-containing bilayers aligned with their normals parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. The underlying principle is that the resonances from the same residue have heteronuclear dipolar couplings that differ by exactly a factor of two between parallel and perpendicular alignments. The method is demonstrated on the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bilayers, whose assignments have been previously made using an earlier generation of methods that relied on the preparation of many selectively labeled (by residue type) samples. The new method provides the correct resonance assignments using only a single uniformly 15N-labeled sample, two solid-state NMR spectra, and a previously assigned isotropic spectrum. Significantly, this approach is equally applicable to residues in alpha helices, beta sheets, loops, and any other elements of tertiary structure. Moreover, the strategy bridges between OS solid-state NMR of aligned samples and solution NMR or MAS solid-state NMR of unoriented samples. In combination with the development of complementary experimental methods, it provides a step towards unifying these apparently different NMR approaches. PMID:21316275

  1. Comprehensive signal assignment of 13C-labeled lignocellulose using multidimensional solution NMR and 13C chemical shift comparison with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-09-17

    A multidimensional solution NMR method has been developed using various pulse programs including HCCH-COSY and (13)C-HSQC-NOESY for the structural characterization of commercially available (13)C labeled lignocellulose from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and corn (Zea mays). This new method allowed for 119 of the signals in the (13)C-HSQC spectrum of lignocelluloses to be assigned and was successfully used to characterize the structures of lignocellulose samples from three plants in terms of their xylan and xyloglucan structures, which are the major hemicelluloses in angiosperm. Furthermore, this new method provided greater insight into fine structures of lignin by providing a high resolution to the aromatic signals of the β-aryl ether and resinol moieties, as well as the diastereomeric signals of the β-aryl ether. Finally, the (13)C chemical shifts assigned in this study were compared with those from solid-state NMR and indicated the presence of heterogeneous dynamics in the polysaccharides where rigid cellulose and mobile hemicelluloses moieties existed together. PMID:24010724

  2. Apparatus for direct addition of reagents into a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sample in the NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Charles L.; Rivero, Ignacio A.

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a widely used tool in chemistry and biochemistry. It is occasionally necessary to add small aliquots of solvents or reagents repeatedly into the NMR tube. Ordinarily this is accomplished only by ejecting the sample and carrying out the addition outside the probe. It would be preferable to add the aliquot directly into the sample. We have designed and implemented a delivery system to accomplish this. This apparatus is particularly applicable to a recent NMR titration method for measuring relative pK's and to experiments where temperature must also be varied. This apparatus provides a safe, simple, and inexpensive method for repeated aliquot addition directly into the sample in the NMR probe.

  3. Sensitive, quantitative carbon-13 NMR spectra by mechanical sample translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Allen, Mary; Martin, Rachel W.; Shaka, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    Collecting a truly quantitative carbon-13 spectrum is a time-consuming chore. Very long relaxation delays, required between transients to allow the z-magnetization, M z, of the spin with the longestT1 to return to the equilibrium value, M0, must precede each transient. These long delays also reduce sensitivity, as fewer transients per unit time can be acquired. In addition, sometimes T1 is not known to within even a factor of two: a conservative guess for the relaxation delay then leads to very low sensitivity. We demonstrate a fresh method to bypass these problems and collect quantitative carbon-13 spectra by swapping the sample volume after each acquisition with a different portion where the magnetization is already equilibrated to M0. Loading larger sample volumes of 10-20 mL into an unusually long (1520 mm) 5 mm OD. NMR tube and vertically sliding the tube between acquisitions accomplishes the swap. The relaxation delay can then be skipped altogether. The spectra are thus both quantitative, and far more sensitive. We demonstrate the moving tube technique on two small molecules (thymol and butylhydroxytoluene) and show good carbon-13 quantification. The gain in sensitivity can be as much as 10-fold for slowly-relaxing 13C resonances. These experiments show that quantitative, sensitive carbon-13 spectra are possible whenever sufficient sample volumes are available. The method is applicable to any slow-relaxing nuclear spin species, such as 29Si, 15N and other low-γ nuclei.

  4. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  5. NMR characterization of a 72 kDa transcription factor using differential isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sulakshana P; Borin, Brendan; Quintas, Pedro O; Dyson, H Jane

    2016-03-01

    NF-κB is a major transcription factor that mediates a number of cellular signaling pathways. Crystal structure analysis gives an incomplete picture of the behavior of the protein, particularly in the free state; free monomers or dimers of NF-κB have never been crystallized. NMR analysis gives insights into the structure and dynamics of the protein in solution, but a necessary first step is the assignment of resonances. The size of the heterodimer of the Rel homology regions of the NF-κB monomers p65 and p50 (72 kDa) prohibits the straightforward use of triple-resonance spectroscopy to obtain the assignments. However, the dynamic nature of the free heterodimer, in particular the independence of the DNA-binding and dimerization domains of each monomer, allows the assignments made on differentially labeled smaller domains to be mapped successfully onto the spectrum of the larger full-length RHR. Problematic areas such as the p65 nuclear localization sequence, which is disordered in the free protein, can be approached by residue-specific labeling and comparison with previously-published spectra of a short peptide with the same sequence. Overall, this NMR analysis of NF-κB has given valuable insights into the highly dynamic nature of the free state, which is likely to play an important role in the functional cycle of NF-κB in the cell. PMID:26647230

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise oreintationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions is zero.

  7. NMR determination of photorespiration in intact leaves using in vivo 13CO 2 labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegelski, Lynette; Schaefer, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of intact soybean leaves labeled by 13CO 2 lead to the conclusion that photorespiration is 17% of photosynthesis for a well-watered and fertilized plant. This is the first direct assessment of the level of photorespiration in a functioning plant. A 13C{ 31P} rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurement tracked the incorporation of 13C label into intermediates in the Calvin cycle as a function of time. For labeling times of 5 min or less, the isotopic enrichment of the Calvin cycle depends on the flux of labeled carbon from 13CO 2, relative to the flux of unlabeled carbon from glycerate returned from the photorespiratory cycle. Comparisons of these two rates for a fixed value of the 13CO 2 concentration indicate that the ratio of the rate of photosynthesis to the rate of photorespiration of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in soybean leaves is 5.7. This translates into a photorespiratory CO 2 loss that is 21% of net CO 2 assimilation, about 80% of the value estimated from Rubisco kinetics parameters. The ratio of rates is reduced at low external CO 2 concentrations, as measured by net carbon assimilation rates. The carbon assimilation was determined from 13C-label spin counts converted into total carbon by the REDOR-determined isotopic enrichments of the Calvin cycle. The net carbon assimilation rates indicate that the rate of decarboxylation of glycine is not directly proportional to the oxygenase activity of Rubisco as is commonly assumed.

  8. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  9. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  10. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  11. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  12. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  13. Gridding and fast Fourier transformation on non-uniformly sparse sampled multidimensional NMR data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Xianwang; Xiao, Nan; Zhang, Xu; Jiang, Ling; Mao, Xi-an; Liu, Maili

    2010-05-01

    For multidimensional NMR method, indirect dimensional non-uniform sparse sampling can dramatically shorten acquisition time of the experiments. However, the non-uniformly sampled NMR data cannot be processed directly using fast Fourier transform (FFT). We show that the non-uniformly sampled NMR data can be reconstructed to Cartesian grid with the gridding method that has been wide applied in MRI, and sequentially be processed using FFT. The proposed gridding-FFT (GFFT) method increases the processing speed sharply compared with the previously proposed non-uniform Fourier Transform, and may speed up application of the non-uniform sparse sampling approaches. PMID:20236843

  14. Gridding and fast Fourier transformation on non-uniformly sparse sampled multidimensional NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Xianwang; Xiao, Nan; Zhang, Xu; Jiang, Ling; Mao, Xi-an; Liu, Maili

    2010-05-01

    For multidimensional NMR method, indirect dimensional non-uniform sparse sampling can dramatically shorten acquisition time of the experiments. However, the non-uniformly sampled NMR data cannot be processed directly using fast Fourier transform (FFT). We show that the non-uniformly sampled NMR data can be reconstructed to Cartesian grid with the gridding method that has been wide applied in MRI, and sequentially be processed using FFT. The proposed gridding-FFT (GFFT) method increases the processing speed sharply compared with the previously proposed non-uniform Fourier Transform, and may speed up application of the non-uniform sparse sampling approaches.

  15. NMR studies of bent DNA using {sup 13}C-enriched samples

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, D.P.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Bending of the DNA double helix can be brought about by introducing runs of adenines (A-tracts) in phase with the helical repeat of the DNA. The requirements for bending of DNA by A-tracts are that the length of the A-tract be greater than 3 base pairs and that the A-tracts must be in phase with the helical repeat (every 10 or 11 bp). Other factors, such as the number of adenines in the run, flanking sequences, and whether the A-tracts are phased with respect to the 5{prime}A or the 3{prime}A, have effects upon the degree of bending as assayed by electrophoretic mobility on native polyacrylamide gels. There are a number of models for bending A-tract DNA. The junction-bending model postulates that the structure of A-tracts is similar to the fiber diffraction structure of poly A, in which there is a significant degree of base pair tilt with respect to the helix axis. In this model, bending occurs at the junction between the A-tract and the B-form helix to allow favorable stacking interactions to occur. The bend of the helix could arise as a result of some other perturbation of B-form DNA by A-tracts, such as propeller twist; bending also could be due to a combination of factors. Our goal is to find the structural features of A-tracts responsible for bending of the helix by performing NMR on oligonucleotides containing A-tracts to obtain higher resolution structural data. One of the problems encountered in NMR structure determination of nucleic acids and other macromolecules is the assignment of resonances to nuclei. This procedure can be greatly facilitated through the use of {sup 13}C-enriched nucleic acid samples. We are developing a technique for the enzymatic synthesis of labeled DNA for NMR. The technique we are developing is similar to RNA labeling techniques already in use. The technique involves growth of methylotrophic bacteria on {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH.

  16. Sequences of 12 monoclonal anti-dinitrophenyl spin-label antibodies for NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D.J.; Rule, G.S.; Whittaker, M.M.; McConnell, H.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies specific for a spin-labeled dinitrophenyl hapten (DNP-SL) have been produces for use in NMR studies. They have been named AN01 and ANO3-AN12. The stability constants for the association of these antibodies with DNP-SL and related haptens were measured by fluorescence quenching. cDNA clones coding for the heavy and light chains of each antibody and of an additional anti-DNP-SL monoclonal antibody, ANO2, have been isolated. The nucleic acid sequence of the 5{prime} end of each clone has been determined, and the amino acid sequence of the variable regions of each antibody has been deduced from the cDNA sequence. The sequences are relatively heterogeneous, but both the heavy and the light chains of ANO1 and ANO3 are derived from the same variable-region gene families as those of the ANO2 antibody. ANO7 has a heavy chain that is related to that of ANO2, and ANO9 has a related light chain. ANO5 and ANO6 are unrelated to ANO2 but share virtually identical heavy and light chains. Preliminary NMR difference spectra comparing related antibodies show that sequence-specific assignment of resonances is possible. Such spectra also provide a measure of structural relatedness.

  17. 13C-NMR study of labeled vinyl groups in paramagnetic myoglobin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sankar, S S; La Mar, G N; Smith, K M; Fujinari, E M

    1987-04-01

    The 13C-NMR spectra of high-spin met-aquo myoglobin, spin-equilibrium met-azido myoglobin, low-spin met-cyano myoglobin, deoxy myoglobin and carbonmonoxy myoglobin from sperm whale reconstituted with hemin 13C enriched at both vinyl alpha or beta positions have been recorded. In all cases the labeled vinyl 13C signals are clearly resolved and useful spectra could be obtained within approx. 15 minutes. The decoupling of multiplet structure due to attached proton(s) has led to the specific assignment of vinyl 13C alpha signals in all paramagnetic derivatives and the 13C beta signals in met-cyano myoglobin. In all other cases, the collapse of the proton multiplet structure as a function of 1H decoupling frequency has located, but not assigned, the attached 1H resonance positions which are obscured by the intense diamagnetic envelope in the 1H-NMR spectrum. The resulting vinyl 13C hyperfine shifts follow Curie behavior, and the patterns closely resemble those in the appropriate model complexes in the same oxidation/spin/ligation state, except that the protein exhibits more in-plane asymmetry. The hyperfine shift patterns are indicative of dominant pi contact shifts for all ferric complexes. Deoxy myoglobin vinyl 13C and 1H contact shifts provide little evidence for pi bonding. PMID:3828362

  18. Strategy for Enhancement of (13)C-Photo-CIDNP NMR Spectra by Exploiting Fractional (13)C-Labeling of Tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Joshi, Monika; Illarionov, Boris; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Lukaschek, Michail; Kothe, Gerd; Budisa, Nediljko; Fischer, Markus; Bacher, Adelbert; Weber, Stefan

    2015-10-29

    The photo-CIDNP effect has proven to be useful to strongly enhance NMR signals of photochemically active proteins simply by irradiation with light. The evolving characteristic patterns of enhanced absorptive and emissive NMR lines can be exploited to elucidate the photochemistry and photophysics of light-driven protein reactions. In particular, by the assignment of (13)C NMR resonances, redox-active amino acids may be identified and thereby electron-transfer pathways unraveled, in favorable cases, even with (13)C at natural abundance. If signal enhancement is weak, uniform (13)C isotope labeling is traditionally applied to increase the signal strength of protein (13)C NMR. However, this typically leads to cross relaxation, which transfers light-induced nuclear-spin polarization to adjacent (13)C nuclei, thereby preventing an unambiguous analysis of the photo-CIDNP effect. In this contribution, two isotope labeling strategies are presented; one leads to specific but ubiquitous (13)C labeling in tryptophan, and the other is based on fractional isotope labeling affording sets of isotopologs with low probability of next-neighbor isotope accumulation within individual tryptophan molecules. Consequently, cross relaxation is largely avoided while the signal enhancement by (13)C enrichment is preserved. This results in significantly simplified polarization patterns that are easier to analyze with respect to the generation of light-generated nuclear-spin polarization. PMID:26244593

  19. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastian C.

    2006-03-15

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon registered seat, and Kalrez registered O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  20. Resonator with reduced sample heating and increased homogeneity for solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahn, Alexander; Priller, Uwe; Emsley, Lyndon; Engelke, Frank

    2008-03-01

    In the application of solid-state NMR to many systems, the presence of radiofrequency (rf) electric fields inside classical solenoidal coils causes heating of lossy samples. In particular, this is critical for proteins in ionic buffers. Rf sample heating increases proportional to frequency which may result in the need to reduce the rf pulse power to prevent partial or total sample deterioration. In the present paper, we propose a multifrequency-tunable NMR resonator where the sample is electrically shielded from the NMR coil by a conductive sheet that increases the magneto-electric ratio. Expressions for the B1 efficiency as function of magnetic and electric filling factors are derived that allow a direct comparison of different resonators. Rf efficiency, homogeneity, signal-to-noise, and rf sample heating are compared. NMR spectra at 700 MHz on ethylene glycol, glycine, and a model protein were acquired to compare the resonators under realistic experimental conditions.

  1. Structure and Metabolic-Flow Analysis of Molecular Complexity in a (13) C-Labeled Tree by 2D and 3D NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Ohishi, Risa; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-05-10

    Improved signal identification for biological small molecules (BSMs) in a mixture was demonstrated by using multidimensional NMR on samples from (13) C-enriched Rhododendron japonicum (59.5 atom%) cultivated in air containing (13) C-labeled carbon dioxide for 14 weeks. The resonance assignment of 386 carbon atoms and 380 hydrogen atoms in the mixture was achieved. 42 BSMs, including eight that were unlisted in the spectral databases, were identified. Comparisons between the experimental values and the (13) C chemical shift values calculated by density functional theory supported the identifications of unlisted BSMs. Tracing the (13) C/(12) C ratio by multidimensional NMR spectra revealed faster and slower turnover ratios of BSMs involved in central metabolism and those categorized as secondary metabolites, respectively. The identification of BSMs and subsequent flow analysis provided insight into the metabolic systems of the plant. PMID:27060701

  2. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropies in solid-state NMR under high-speed magic-angle spinning and in uniformly 13C-labeled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jerry C. C.; Tycko, Robert

    2003-05-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of recoupling chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) interactions in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) under high-speed magic-angle spinning (MAS) while retaining a static CSA powder pattern line shape and simultaneously attenuating homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. CSA recoupling is accomplished by a rotation-synchronized radio-frequency pulse sequence with symmetry properties that permit static CSA line shapes to be obtained. We suggest a specific recoupling sequence, which we call ROCSA, for which the scaling factors for CSA and homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions are 0.272 and approximately 0.05, respectively. This sequence is suitable for high-speed 13C MAS NMR experiments on uniformly 13C-labeled organic compounds, including biopolymers. We demonstrate the ROCSA sequence experimentally by measuring the 13C CSA patterns of the uniformly labeled, polycrystalline compounds L-alanine and N-acetyl-D,L-valine at MAS frequencies of 11 and 20 kHz. We also present experimental data for amyloid fibrils formed by a 15-residue fragment of the β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, in which four amino acid residues are uniformly labeled, demonstrating the applicability to biochemical systems of high molecular weight and significant complexity. Analysis of the CSA patterns in the amyloid fibril sample demonstrates the utility of ROCSA measurements as probes of peptide and protein conformation in noncrystalline solids.

  3. Application of Site-Specific Spin Labeling for NMR Detecting Inhibitor-Induced Conformational Change of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Seetaha, Supaporn; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Ishii, Kentaro; Hannongbua, Supa; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Kato, Koichi

    2016-02-17

    Paramagnetism-assisted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques can provide long-range structural information complemented with local information derived from chemical-shift perturbation and nuclear Overhauser effect data. Here, we address the application of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) to detect inhibitor-induced conformational change of a drug target protein using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) as a model protein. Using a site-specific spin-labeled HIV-1 RT mutant with selective (13) C labeling, conformation-dependent PREs were successfully observed reflecting the stabilization of an open conformation of this enzyme caused by inhibitor binding. This study demonstrates that the paramagnetism-assisted NMR approach offers an alternative strategy in protein-based drug screening to identify allosteric inhibitors of a target protein. PMID:26804978

  4. Non-Uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-08-24

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in the efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. PMID:26227870

  5. (19)F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sochor, F; Silvers, R; Müller, D; Richter, C; Fürtig, B; Schwalbe, H

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus (19)F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5'-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the (19)F isotope. The thermal stability of the (19)F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a (1)H,(15)N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson-Crick base paired uridine signals and the (19)F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of (19)F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides. PMID:26704707

  6. Quantum dot conjugates as labels for bacteria in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Neal, Andrea; Holden, Patricia; Mielke, Randall

    Quantum dots (fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals, QDs) have optical and physical properties that make them superior to fluorescent dyes for detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, especially in the field or in flight instruments where optical instrumentation is limited. They are extremely bright, providing a significant fluorescent signal even upon excitation with low-power LEDs. Their absorbance is broad, but their emission spectra are narrow, allowing for many colours to be excited with a single light source and the resulting emission to be readily deconvolved without output filters. They are both fluorescent and electron-dense, permitting them to be used for both fluorescence and electron microscopy. They are resistant to electron radiation and the oxidants most likely to be found on Mars. The challenge for their use in a potential wet-chemistry instrument is two-fold: first, to coat them with specific organic ligands for targeting bacteria in a non-Earth-centric fashion. Second, to ensure their stability during transport and determine potential false-positive results that may arise due to environmental conditions. We present some results on labelling of biofilm samples from the Canadian High Arctic, and some future plans for improvement of labelling techniques and targets that will address the goals of near-term Mars missions.

  7. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD....12 Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. (a) Samples of foreign canned or packaged products bearing on their immediate containers trade labels which have not...

  8. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD....12 Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. (a) Samples of foreign canned or packaged products bearing on their immediate containers trade labels which have not...

  9. Reproducibility of NMR Analysis of Urine Samples: Impact of Sample Preparation, Storage Conditions, and Animal Health Status

    PubMed Central

    Schreier, Christina; Kremer, Werner; Huber, Fritz; Neumann, Sindy; Pagel, Philipp; Lienemann, Kai; Pestel, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Spectroscopic analysis of urine samples from laboratory animals can be used to predict the efficacy and side effects of drugs. This employs methods combining 1H NMR spectroscopy with quantification of biomarkers or with multivariate data analysis. The most critical steps in data evaluation are analytical reproducibility of NMR data (collection, storage, and processing) and the health status of the animals, which may influence urine pH and osmolarity. Methods. We treated rats with a solvent, a diuretic, or a nephrotoxicant and collected urine samples. Samples were titrated to pH 3 to 9, or salt concentrations increased up to 20-fold. The effects of storage conditions and freeze-thaw cycles were monitored. Selected metabolites and multivariate data analysis were evaluated after 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. We showed that variation of pH from 3 to 9 and increases in osmolarity up to 6-fold had no effect on the quantification of the metabolites or on multivariate data analysis. Storage led to changes after 14 days at 4°C or after 12 months at −20°C, independent of sample composition. Multiple freeze-thaw cycles did not affect data analysis. Conclusion. Reproducibility of NMR measurements is not dependent on sample composition under physiological or pathological conditions. PMID:23865070

  10. Facilitating unambiguous NMR assignments and enabling higher probe density through selective labeling of all methyl containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Frank, Andreas O; Ruggiu, Fiorella; Mamo, Mulugeta; Lingel, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The deuteration of proteins and selective labeling of side chain methyl groups has greatly enhanced the molecular weight range of proteins and protein complexes which can be studied using solution NMR spectroscopy. Protocols for the selective labeling of all six methyl group containing amino acids individually are available, however to date, only a maximum of five amino acids have been labeled simultaneously. Here, we describe a new methodology for the simultaneous, selective labeling of all six methyl containing amino acids using the 115 kDa homohexameric enzyme CoaD from E. coli as a model system. The utility of the labeling protocol is demonstrated by efficiently and unambiguously assigning all methyl groups in the enzymatic active site using a single 4D (13)C-resolved HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment, in conjunction with a crystal structure. Furthermore, the six fold labeled protein was employed to characterize the interaction between the substrate analogue (R)-pantetheine and CoaD by chemical shift perturbations, demonstrating the benefit of the increased probe density. PMID:27130242

  11. 1H HRMAS NMR Derived Bio-markers Related to Tumor Grade, Tumor Cell Fraction, and Cell Proliferation in Prostate Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Stenman, Katarina; Stattin, Pär; Stenlund, Hans; Riklund, Katrine; Gröbner, Gerhard; Bergh, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopic approach is presented for evaluating the occurrence, amount and aggressiveness of cancer in human prostate tissue samples. Using this technique, key metabolites in malignant and non-malignant samples (n = 149) were identified, and patterns of their relative abundance were analyzed by multivariate statistical methods. Ratios of various metabolites – including (glycerophophorylcholine + phosphorylcholine)/creatine, myo-inositol/scyllo-inositol, scyllo-inositol/creatine, choline/creatine, and citrate/creatine – correlated with: i) for non-malignant tissue samples, the distance to the nearest tumor and its Gleason score and; ii) the fraction of tumor cells present in the sample; and iii) tumor cell proliferation (Ki67 labelling index). This NMR-based approach allows the extraction of information that could be useful for developing novel diagnostic methods for prostate cancer. PMID:21499438

  12. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples.

    PubMed

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G; Simpson, Myrna J; Maas, Werner E; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate (1)H and (13)C spectra for the different phases. In addition, (19)F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of (19)F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state. PMID:22425441

  13. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: Basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Maas, Werner E.; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J.; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J.

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate 1H and 13C spectra for the different phases. In addition, 19F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of 19F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state.

  14. Enzymatic 13C Labeling and Multidimensional NMR Analysis of Miltiradiene Synthesized by Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii*

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-13C6]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with 13C stable isotope (>99%). The fully 13C-labeled product was subjected to 13C-13C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one-dimensional and

  15. Biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone. 1. Identification of biosynthetic precursors using /sup 13/C labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1988-09-28

    The biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in the methylotropic bacterium methylobacterium AM1 has been investigated using /sup 13/C-labelling of the products and NMR spectroscopy. The data indicated that the quinoline portion of PQQ is formed by a novel condensation of N-1, C-2, -3, and -4 of glutamate with a symmetrical six-carbon ring derived from the shikimate pathway. It is postulated that tyrosine is the shikimate-derived percursor, since pyrrole could be formed by the internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  16. PQQ: Biosynthetic studies in Methylobacterium AM1 and Hyphomicrobium X using specific TC labeling and NMR. [Pyrroloquinoline quinones

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.; van Kleef, M.A.G.; Duine, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Using TC labeling and NMR spectroscopy we have determined biosynthetic precursors of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in two closely related serine-type methylotrophs, Methylobacterium AM1 and Hyphomicrobium X. Analysis of the TC-labeling data revealed that PQQ is constructed from two amino acids: the portion containing N-6, C-7,8,9 and the two carboxylic acid groups, C-7' and 9', is derived-intact-from glutamate. The remaining portion is derived from tyrosine; the phenol side chain provides the six carbons of the ring containing the orthoquinone, whereas internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone forms the pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid moiety. This is analogous to the cyclization of dopaquinone to form dopachrome. Dopaquinone is a product of the oxidation of tyrosine (via dopa) in reactions catalyzed by monophenol monooxygenase (EC 1.14.18.1). Starting with tyrosine and glutamate, we will discuss possible biosynthetic routes to PQQ. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Performance limitations of label-free sensors in molecular diagnosis using complex samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    Label-free biosensors promised a paradigm involving direct detection of biomarkers from complex samples such as serum without requiring multistep sample processing typical of labelled methods such as ELISA or immunofluorescence assays. Label-free sensors have witnessed decades of development with a veritable zoo of techniques available today exploiting a multitude of physical effects. It is appropriate now to critically assess whether label-free technologies have succeeded in delivering their promise with respect to diagnostic applications, particularly, ambitious goals such as early cancer detection using serum biomarkers, which require low limits of detection (LoD). Comparison of nearly 120 limits of detection (LoD) values reported by labelled and label-free sensing approaches over a wide range of detection techniques and target molecules in serum revealed that labeled techniques achieve 2-3 orders of magnitude better LoDs. Data from experiments where labelled and label-free assays were performed simultaneously using the same assay parameters also confirm that the LoD achieved by labelled techniques is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude better than that by label-free techniques. Furthermore, label-free techniques required significant signal amplification, for e.g. using nanoparticle conjugated secondary antibodies, to achieve LoDs comparable to labelled methods substantially deviating from the original "direct detection" paradigm. This finding has important implications on the practical limits of applying label-free detection methods for molecular diagnosis.

  18. Spin-labeled gel for the production of radical-free dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced molecules for NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarney, Evan R.; Han, Songi

    2008-02-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently received much attention as a viable approach to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and the contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where the significantly higher electron spin polarization of stable radicals is transferred to nuclear spins. In order to apply DNP-enhanced NMR and MRI signal to biological and in vivo systems, it is crucial to obtain highly polarized solution samples at ambient temperatures. As stable radicals are employed as the source for the DNP polarization transfer, it is also crucial that the highly polarized sample lacks residual radical concentration because the polarized molecules will be introduced to a biological system that will be sensitive to the presence of radicals. We developed an agarose-based porous media that is covalently spin-labeled with stable radicals. The loading of solvent accessible radical is sufficiently high and their mobility approximates that in solution, which ensures high efficiency for Overhauser mechanism induced DNP without physically releasing any measurable radical into the solution. Under ambient conditions at 0.35 T magnetic field, we measure the DNP enhancement efficiency of 1H signal of stagnant and continuously flowing water utilizing immobilized stable nitroxide radicals that contain two or three ESR hyperfine splitting lines and compare them to the performance of freely dissolved radicals.

  19. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  20. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  1. Preparation of Protein Samples for NMR Structure, Function, and Small Molecule Screening Studies

    PubMed Central

    Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Anderson, Stephen; Aramini, James; Buchwald, William A.; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Conover, Ken; Everett, John; Hamilton, Keith; Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Janjua, Haleema; Kornhaber, Gregory; Lau, Jessica; Lee, Dong Yup; Liu, Gaohua; Maglaqui, Melissa; Ma, Lichung; Mao, Lei; Patel, Dayaban; Rossi, Paolo; Sahdev, Seema; Shastry, Ritu; Swapna, G.V.T.; Tang, Yeufeng; Tong, Saichiu; Wang, Dongyan; Wang, Huang; Zhao, Li; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we concentrate on the production of high quality protein samples for NMR studies. In particular, we provide an in-depth description of recent advances in the production of NMR samples and their synergistic use with recent advancements in NMR hardware. We describe the protein production platform of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, and outline our high-throughput strategies for producing high quality protein samples for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Our strategy is based on the cloning, expression and purification of 6X-His-tagged proteins using T7-based Escherichia coli systems and isotope enrichment in minimal media. We describe 96-well ligation-independent cloning and analytical expression systems, parallel preparative scale fermentation, and high-throughput purification protocols. The 6X-His affinity tag allows for a similar two-step purification procedure implemented in a parallel high-throughput fashion that routinely results in purity levels sufficient for NMR studies (> 97% homogeneity). Using this platform, the protein open reading frames of over 17,500 different targeted proteins (or domains) have been cloned as over 28,000 constructs. Nearly 5,000 of these proteins have been purified to homogeneity in tens of milligram quantities (see Summary Statistics, http://nesg.org/statistics.html), resulting in more than 950 new protein structures, including more than 400 NMR structures, deposited in the Protein Data Bank. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium pipeline has been effective in producing protein samples of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. Although this paper describes our entire pipeline for producing isotope-enriched protein samples, it focuses on the major updates introduced during the last 5 years (Phase 2 of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative). Our advanced automated and/or parallel cloning, expression, purification, and biophysical screening

  2. Sample-efficient learning with auxiliary class-label information

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quang; Valizadegan, Hamed; Seybert, Amy; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2011-01-01

    Building classification models from clinical data collected for past patients often requires additional example labeling and annotation by a human expert. Since example labeling may require to review a complete electronic health record the process can be very time consuming and costly. To make the process more cost-efficient, the number of examples an expert needs to label should be reduced. We develop and test a new approach for the classification learning in which, in addition to class labels provided by an expert, the learner is provided with auxiliary information that reflects how strong the expert feels about the class label. We show that this information can be extremely useful for practical classification tasks based on human assessment and can lead to improved learning with a smaller number of examples. We develop a new classification approach based on the support vector machines and the learning to rank methodologies capable of utilizing the auxiliary information during the model learning process. We demonstrate the benefit of the approach on the problem of learning an alert model for Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT) by showing an improved classification performance of the models that are trained on a smaller number of labeled examples. PMID:22195160

  3. Membrane protein structural validation by oriented sample solid-state NMR: diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Li, Conggang; Gao, F Philip; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-04-15

    The validation of protein structures through functional assays has been the norm for many years. Functional assays perform this validation for water-soluble proteins very well, but they need to be performed in the same environment as that used for the structural analysis. This is difficult for membrane proteins that are often structurally characterized in detergent environments, although functional assays for these proteins are most frequently performed in lipid bilayers. Because the structure of membrane proteins is known to be sensitive to the membrane mimetic environment, such functional assays are appropriate for validating the protein construct, but not the membrane protein structure. Here, we compare oriented sample solid-state NMR spectral data of diacylglycerol kinase previously published with predictions of such data from recent structures of this protein. A solution NMR structure of diacylglycerol kinase has been obtained in detergent micelles and three crystal structures have been obtained in a monoolein cubic phase. All of the structures are trimeric with each monomer having three transmembrane and one amphipathic helices. However, the solution NMR structure shows typical perturbations induced by a micelle environment that is reflected in the predicted solid-state NMR resonances from the structural coordinates. The crystal structures show few such perturbations, especially for the wild-type structure and especially for the monomers that do not have significant crystal contacts. For these monomers the predicted and observed data are nearly identical. The thermostabilized constructs do show more perturbations, especially the A41C mutation that introduces a hydrophilic residue into what would be the middle of the lipid bilayer inducing additional hydrogen bonding between trimers. These results demonstrate a general technique for validating membrane protein structures with minimal data obtained from membrane proteins in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers by

  4. Origin and Correction of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneity at the Interface in Biphasic NMR Samples

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bryan T.; Chingas, G. C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of susceptibility matching to minimize spectral distortion of biphasic samples layered in a standard 5 mm NMR tube is described. The approach uses magic angle spinning (MAS) to first extract chemical shift differences by suppressing bulk magnetization. Then, using biphasic coaxial samples, magnetic susceptibilities are matched by titration with a paramagnetic salt. The matched phases are then layered in a standard NMR tube where they can be shimmed and examined. Line widths of two distinct spectral lines, selected to characterize homogeneity in each phase, are simultaneously optimized. Two-dimensional distortion-free, slice-resolved spectra of an octanol/water system illustrate the method. These data are obtained using a 2D stepped-gradient pulse sequence devised for this application. Advantages of this sequence over slice-selective methods are that acquisition efficiency is increased and processing requires only conventional software. PMID:22459062

  5. Origin and correction of magnetic field inhomogeneity at the interface in biphasic NMR samples.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan T; Chingas, G C; McDougal, Owen M

    2012-05-01

    The use of susceptibility matching to minimize spectral distortion of biphasic samples layered in a standard 5 mm NMR tube is described. The approach uses magic angle spinning (MAS) to first extract chemical shift differences by suppressing bulk magnetization. Then, using biphasic coaxial samples, magnetic susceptibilities are matched by titration with a paramagnetic salt. The matched phases are then layered in a standard NMR tube where they can be shimmed and examined. Linewidths of two distinct spectral lines, selected to characterize homogeneity in each phase, are simultaneously optimized. Two-dimensional distortion-free, slice-resolved spectra of an octanol/water system illustrate the method. These data are obtained using a 2D stepped-gradient pulse sequence devised for this application. Advantages of this sequence over slice-selective methods are that acquisition efficiency is increased and processing requires only conventional software. PMID:22459062

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation... Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called Mizer Motors has a product line composed of eight car lines. Of these eight, four are available with the...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation... Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called Mizer Motors has a product line composed of eight car lines. Of these eight, four are available with the...

  8. Evaluation of Phosphorus Characterization in Ileal Digesta, Manure, and Litter Samples: 31P-NMR vs. HPLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resosonance Spectroscopy (31P-NMR) to characterize phosphorus (P) in manures and litter has become prevalent in the area of nutrient management. To date, there has been no published work evaluating P quantification in manure/litter samples with 31P-NMR compared ...

  9. Evaluation of Phosphorus Characterization in Broiler Ileal Digesta, Manure, and Litter Samples: 31P-NMR vs. HPLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resosonance Spectroscopy (31P-NMR) to characterize phosphorus (P) in manures and litter has become prevalent in the area of nutrient management. To date, there has been no published work evaluating P quantification in manure/litter samples with 31P-NMR compared t...

  10. Systematic NMR Analysis of Stable Isotope Labeled Metabolite Mixtures in Plant and Animal Systems: Coarse Grained Views of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Suto, Michitaka; Nishihara, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic phenotyping has become an important ‘bird's-eye-view’ technology which can be applied to higher organisms, such as model plant and animal systems in the post-genomics and proteomics era. Although genotyping technology has expanded greatly over the past decade, metabolic phenotyping has languished due to the difficulty of ‘top-down’ chemical analyses. Here, we describe a systematic NMR methodology for stable isotope-labeling and analysis of metabolite mixtures in plant and animal systems. Methodology/Principal Findings The analysis method includes a stable isotope labeling technique for use in living organisms; a systematic method for simultaneously identifying a large number of metabolites by using a newly developed HSQC-based metabolite chemical shift database combined with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy; Principal Components Analysis; and a visualization method using a coarse-grained overview of the metabolic system. The database contains more than 1000 1H and 13C chemical shifts corresponding to 142 metabolites measured under identical physicochemical conditions. Using the stable isotope labeling technique in Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and Bombyx mori, we systematically detected >450 HSQC peaks in each 13C-HSQC spectrum derived from model plant, Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and the invertebrate animal model Bombyx mori. Furthermore, for the first time, efficient 13C labeling has allowed reliable signal assignment using analytical separation techniques such as 3D HCCH-COSY spectra in higher organism extracts. Conclusions/Significance Overall physiological changes could be detected and categorized in relation to a critical developmental phase change in B. mori by coarse-grained representations in which the organization of metabolic pathways related to a specific developmental phase was visualized on the basis of constituent changes of 56 identified metabolites. Based on the observed intensities of 13C atoms of

  11. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  12. Untangling a Repetitive Amyloid Sequence: Correlating Biofilm-Derived and Segmentally Labeled Curli Fimbriae by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schubeis, Tobias; Yuan, Puwei; Ahmed, Mumdooh; Nagaraj, Madhu; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    Curli are functional bacterial amyloids produced by an intricate biogenesis machinery. Insights into their folding and regulation can advance our understanding of amyloidogenesis. However, gaining detailed structural information of amyloids, and their tendency for structural polymorphisms, remains challenging. Herein we compare high-quality solid-state NMR spectra from biofilm-derived and recombinantly produced curli and provide evidence that they adopt a similar, well-defined β-solenoid arrangement. Curli subunits consist of five sequence repeats, resulting in severe spectral overlap. Using segmental isotope labeling, we obtained the unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure of one repeat, and demonstrate that all repeats are most likely structurally equivalent. PMID:26474178

  13. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments. PMID:27074782

  14. High Field Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Investigation of (15)N-Labeled Rosette Nanotubes: Hydrogen Bond Network and Channel-Bound Water.

    PubMed

    Fenniri, Hicham; Tikhomirov, Grigory A; Brouwer, Darren H; Bouatra, Souhaila; El Bakkari, Mounir; Yan, Zhimin; Cho, Jae-Young; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2016-05-18

    (15)N-labeled rosette nanotubes were synthesized and investigated using high-field solid-state NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and electron microscopy. The results established the H-bond network involved in the self-assembly of the nanostructure as well as bound water molecules in the nanotube's channel. PMID:27141817

  15. NMR relaxation times of trabecular bone—reproducibility, relationships to tissue structure and effects of sample freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prantner, Viktória; Isaksson, Hanna; Närväinen, Johanna; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nissi, Mikko J.; Avela, Janne; Gröhn, Olli H. J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a potential tool for non-invasive evaluation of the trabecular bone structure. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the NMR relaxation parameters (T2, Carr-Purcel-T2, T1ρ) for fat and water and relate those to the structural parameters obtained by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Especially, we aimed to evaluate the effect of freezing on the relaxation parameters. For storing bone samples, freezing is the standard procedure during which the biochemical and cellular organization of the bone marrow may be affected. Bovine trabecular bone samples were stored at -20 °C for 7 days and measured by NMR spectroscopy before and after freezing. The reproducibility of NMR relaxation parameters, as expressed by the coefficient of variation, ranged from 3.1% to 27.9%. In fresh samples, some correlations between NMR and structural parameters (Tb.N, Tb.Sp) were significant (e.g. the relaxation rate for T2 of fat versus Tb.Sp: r = -0.716, p < 0.01). Freezing did not significantly change the NMR relaxation times but the correlations between relaxation parameters and the μCT structural parameters were not statistically significant after freezing, suggesting some nonsystematic alterations of the marrow structure. Therefore, the use of frozen bone samples for NMR relaxation studies may provide inferior information about the trabecular bone structure.

  16. Nonuniform sampling of hypercomplex multidimensional NMR experiments: Dimensionality, quadrature phase and randomization

    PubMed Central

    Schuyler, Adam D; Maciejewski, Mark W; Stern, Alan S; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    Nonuniform sampling (NUS) in multidimensional NMR permits the exploration of higher dimensional experiments and longer evolution times than the Nyquist Theorem practically allows for uniformly sampled experiments. However, the spectra of NUS data include sampling-induced artifacts and may be subject to distortions imposed by sparse data reconstruction techniques, issues not encountered with the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) applied to uniformly sampled data. The characterization of these NUS-induced artifacts allows for more informed sample schedule design and improved spectral quality. The DFT–Convolution Theorem, via the point-spread function (PSF) for a given sampling scheme, provides a useful framework for exploring the nature of NUS sampling artifacts. In this work, we analyze the PSFs for a set of specially constructed NUS schemes to quantify the interplay between randomization and dimensionality for reducing artifacts relative to uniformly undersampled controls. In particular, we find a synergistic relationship between the indirect time dimensions and the “quadrature phase dimension” (i.e. the hypercomplex components collected for quadrature detection). The quadrature phase dimension provides additional degrees of freedom that enable partial-component NUS (collecting a subset of quadrature components) to further reduce sampling-induced aliases relative to traditional full-component NUS (collecting all quadrature components). The efficacy of artifact reduction is exponentially related to the dimensionality of the sample space. Our results quantify the utility of partial-component NUS as an additional means for introducing decoherence into sampling schemes and reducing sampling artifacts in high dimensional experiments. PMID:25899289

  17. High-resolution NMR of anisotropic samples with spinning away from the magic angle

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos A.; Martin, Rachel W.; Pines, Alexander

    2003-03-31

    High-resolution NMR of samples in the solid state is typically performed under mechanical sample spinning around an axis that makes an angle, called the magic angle, of 54.7 degrees with the static magnetic field. There are many cases in which geometrical and engineering constraints prevent spinning at this specific angle. Implementations of in-situ and ex-situ magic angle field spinning might be extremely demanding because of the power requirements or an inconvenient sample size or geometry. Here we present a methodology based on switched angle spinning between two angles, none of which is the magic angle, which provide both isotropic and anisotropic information. Using this method, named Projected Magic Angle Spinning, we were able to obtain resolved isotropic chemical shifts in spinning samples where the broadening is mostly inhomogeneous.

  18. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, Kent R. Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  19. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  20. Lipid bilayer preparations of membrane proteins for oriented and magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR samples

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nabanita; Murray, Dylan T; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has been used successfully for characterizing the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins as well as their interactions with other proteins in lipid bilayers. such an environment is often necessary for achieving native-like structures. sample preparation is the key to this success. Here we present a detailed description of a robust protocol that results in high-quality membrane protein samples for both magic-angle spinning and oriented-sample solid-state NMR. the procedure is demonstrated using two proteins: CrgA (two transmembrane helices) and rv1861 (three transmembrane helices), both from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. the success of this procedure relies on two points. First, for samples for both types of NMR experiment, the reconstitution of the protein from a detergent environment to an environment in which it is incorporated into liposomes results in ‘complete’ removal of detergent. second, for the oriented samples, proper dehydration followed by rehydration of the proteoliposomes is essential. By using this protocol, proteoliposome samples for magic-angle spinning NMR and uniformly aligned samples (orientational mosaicity of <1°) for oriented-sample NMR can be obtained within 10 d. PMID:24157546

  1. Non-uniform sampling: post-Fourier era of NMR data collection and processing.

    PubMed

    Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Orekhov, Vladislav

    2015-11-01

    The invention of multidimensional techniques in the 1970s revolutionized NMR, making it the general tool of structural analysis of molecules and materials. In the most straightforward approach, the signal sampling in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment is performed in the same manner as in the direct dimension, i.e. with a grid of equally spaced points. This results in lengthy experiments with a resolution often far from optimum. To circumvent this problem, numerous sparse-sampling techniques have been developed in the last three decades, including two traditionally distinct approaches: the radial sampling and non-uniform sampling. This mini review discusses the sparse signal sampling and reconstruction techniques from the point of view of an underdetermined linear algebra problem that arises when a full, equally spaced set of sampled points is replaced with sparse sampling. Additional assumptions that are introduced to solve the problem, as well as the shape of the undersampled Fourier transform operator (visualized as so-called point spread function), are shown to be the main differences between various sparse-sampling methods. PMID:26290057

  2. Photochemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Observed by Solid-State NMR in a Uniformly (13)C-Isotope-Labeled Photosynthetic Reaction Center.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shubhajit; Bode, Bela E; Matysik, Jörg; Alia, A

    2015-10-29

    A sample of solubilized and quinone-depleted reaction centers from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (R.) sphaeroides wild type has been prepared entirely (13)C and (15)N isotope labeled at all positions of the protein as well as of the cofactors. In this sample, the occurrence of the solid-state photo-CIDNP (photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization) effect has been probed by (13)C solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR under illumination. Under continuous illumination, signal intensities are modified by the three-spin mixing (TSM) mechanism. Time-resolved illumination experiments reveal the occurrence of light-induced nuclear polarization on the time scale of hundreds of microseconds, initially dominated by the transient polarization of the singlet branch of the radical-pair mechanism. A first kinetic analysis shows that the lifetime of the polarization from the singlet branch, indicated by the enhanced absorptive intensities of the signals from aliphatic carbons, is significantly extended. Upon arrival of the polarization from the triplet decay branch, emissive polarization caused by the TSM mechanism is observed. Also, this arrival is significantly delayed. The decay of TSM polarization occurs in two steps, assigned to intra- and intermolecular spin diffusion. PMID:26110356

  3. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of site-specific isotopically labeled nucleotides for use in NMR resonance assignment, dynamics and structural characterizations.

    PubMed

    Longhini, Andrew P; LeBlanc, Regan M; Becette, Owen; Salguero, Carolina; Wunderlich, Christoph H; Johnson, Bruce A; D'Souza, Victoria M; Kreutz, Christoph; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotope labeling is central to NMR studies of nucleic acids. Development of methods that incorporate labels at specific atomic positions within each nucleotide promises to expand the size range of RNAs that can be studied by NMR. Using recombinantly expressed enzymes and chemically synthesized ribose and nucleobase, we have developed an inexpensive, rapid chemo-enzymatic method to label ATP and GTP site specifically and in high yields of up to 90%. We incorporated these nucleotides into RNAs with sizes ranging from 27 to 59 nucleotides usingin vitrotranscription: A-Site (27 nt), the iron responsive elements (29 nt), a fluoride riboswitch fromBacillus anthracis(48 nt), and a frame-shifting element from a human corona virus (59 nt). Finally, we showcase the improvement in spectral quality arising from reduced crowding and narrowed linewidths, and accurate analysis of NMR relaxation dispersion (CPMG) and TROSY-based CEST experiments to measure μs-ms time scale motions, and an improved NOESY strategy for resonance assignment. Applications of this selective labeling technology promises to reduce difficulties associated with chemical shift overlap and rapid signal decay that have made it challenging to study the structure and dynamics of large RNAs beyond the 50 nt median size found in the PDB. PMID:26657632

  4. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of site-specific isotopically labeled nucleotides for use in NMR resonance assignment, dynamics and structural characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Longhini, Andrew P.; LeBlanc, Regan M.; Becette, Owen; Salguero, Carolina; Wunderlich, Christoph H.; Johnson, Bruce A.; D'Souza, Victoria M.; Kreutz, Christoph; Dayie, T. Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is central to NMR studies of nucleic acids. Development of methods that incorporate labels at specific atomic positions within each nucleotide promises to expand the size range of RNAs that can be studied by NMR. Using recombinantly expressed enzymes and chemically synthesized ribose and nucleobase, we have developed an inexpensive, rapid chemo-enzymatic method to label ATP and GTP site specifically and in high yields of up to 90%. We incorporated these nucleotides into RNAs with sizes ranging from 27 to 59 nucleotides using in vitro transcription: A-Site (27 nt), the iron responsive elements (29 nt), a fluoride riboswitch from Bacillus anthracis (48 nt), and a frame-shifting element from a human corona virus (59 nt). Finally, we showcase the improvement in spectral quality arising from reduced crowding and narrowed linewidths, and accurate analysis of NMR relaxation dispersion (CPMG) and TROSY-based CEST experiments to measure μs-ms time scale motions, and an improved NOESY strategy for resonance assignment. Applications of this selective labeling technology promises to reduce difficulties associated with chemical shift overlap and rapid signal decay that have made it challenging to study the structure and dynamics of large RNAs beyond the 50 nt median size found in the PDB. PMID:26657632

  5. Individual Human Metabolic Phenotype Analyzed by (1)H NMR of Saliva Samples.

    PubMed

    Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Tenori, Leonardo; Mazzoleni, Antonio; Dieber-Rotheneder, Martina; Konrad, Manuela; Hofmann, Peter; Luchinat, Claudio; Turano, Paola; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Saliva is an important physiological fluid that contains a complex mixture of analytes that may produce a characteristic individual signature. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that urine possesses a clear signature of the individual metabolic phenotype. Here NMR-based metabolomics was employed to analyze saliva from 23 healthy volunteers. About six saliva samples were collected daily from each individual for 10 consecutive days: 7 days in a real-life situation (days 1-7, Phase I) and 3 days (days 8-10, Phase II) under a standardized diet plus a physical exercise program at day 10. The result is the first demonstration of the existence of an individual metabolic phenotype in saliva. A systematic comparative analysis with urine samples from the same collection scheme demonstrates that the individual phenotype in saliva is slightly weaker than that in urine but less influenced by diet. PMID:27087681

  6. Efficient DNP NMR of membrane proteins: sample preparation protocols, sensitivity, and radical location.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu Y; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Tuo; Sergeyev, Ivan V; Hong, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Although dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has dramatically enhanced solid-state NMR spectral sensitivities of many synthetic materials and some biological macromolecules, recent studies of membrane-protein DNP using exogenously doped paramagnetic radicals as polarizing agents have reported varied and sometimes surprisingly limited enhancement factors. This motivated us to carry out a systematic evaluation of sample preparation protocols for optimizing the sensitivity of DNP NMR spectra of membrane-bound peptides and proteins at cryogenic temperatures of ~110 K. We show that mixing the radical with the membrane by direct titration instead of centrifugation gives a significant boost to DNP enhancement. We quantify the relative sensitivity enhancement between AMUPol and TOTAPOL, two commonly used radicals, and between deuterated and protonated lipid membranes. AMUPol shows ~fourfold higher sensitivity enhancement than TOTAPOL, while deuterated lipid membrane does not give net higher sensitivity for the membrane peptides than protonated membrane. Overall, a ~100 fold enhancement between the microwave-on and microwave-off spectra can be achieved on lipid-rich membranes containing conformationally disordered peptides, and absolute sensitivity gains of 105-160 can be obtained between low-temperature DNP spectra and high-temperature non-DNP spectra. We also measured the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of lipid signals by TOTAPOL and AMUPol, to determine the depths of these two radicals in the lipid bilayer. Our data indicate a bimodal distribution of both radicals, a surface-bound fraction and a membrane-bound fraction where the nitroxides lie at ~10 Å from the membrane surface. TOTAPOL appears to have a higher membrane-embedded fraction than AMUPol. These results should be useful for membrane-protein solid-state NMR studies under DNP conditions and provide insights into how biradicals interact with phospholipid membranes. PMID:26873390

  7. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here — which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole — circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100 K which shows 30 Hz linewidths. PMID:19356957

  8. Reassessment of MxiH subunit orientation and fold within native Shigella T3SS needles using surface labelling and solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Verasdonck, Joeri; Shen, Da-Kang; Treadgold, Alexander; Arthur, Christopher; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H.; Blocker, Ariel J.

    2015-01-01

    T3SSs are essential virulence determinants of many Gram-negative bacteria, used to inject bacterial effectors of virulence into eukaryotic host cells. Their major extracellular portion, a ∼50 nm hollow, needle-like structure, is essential to host cell sensing and the conduit for effector secretion. It is formed of a small, conserved subunit arranged as a helical polymer. The structure of the subunit has been studied by electron cryomicroscopy within native polymers and by solid-state NMR in recombinant polymers, yielding two incompatible atomic models. To resolve this controversy, we re-examined the native polymer used for electron cryomicroscopy via surface labelling and solid-state NMR. Our data show the orientation and overall fold of the subunit within this polymer is as established by solid-state NMR for recombinant polymers. PMID:26439285

  9. Heteronuclear decoupling in MAS NMR in the intermediate to fast sample spinning regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Equbal, Asif; Bjerring, Morten; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear spin decoupling in solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR is investigated to present methods overcoming interferences between rf irradiation and sample spinning in the intermediate to fast spinning regime. We demonstrate that a recent phase-alternated variant of refocused CW irradiation (rCWApA) provides efficient and robust decoupling in this regime. An extensive experimental and numerical comparison is presented for rCWApA and PISSARRO (phase-inverted supercycled sequence for attenuation of rotary resonance), previously introduced to quench rotary-resonance recoupling effects, under conditions with spinning frequencies between 30 and 60 kHz. Simulations are used to identify the effect of decoupling for various nuclear spin interactions.

  10. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Sample Susceptibility on Measured Diffusion Anisotropy Using NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, J. D.; Dixon, W. T.; Hawkins, J.

    1995-07-01

    Water diffusion measurements in white matter of freshly excised pig spinal cord and in parenchyma of fresh celery (excluding the fibers along the edge of the stalk) were performed using NMR at 200 MHz. In white matter of pig spinal cord, the measured diffusion coefficient is anisotropic and independent of sample orientation with respect to the magnetic field, In celery parenchyma, diffusion is isotropic and independent of orientation in the magnetic field when using a diffusion sequence that gives results independent of self-induced magnetic-held gradients. However, when the standard diffusion pulse sequence that gives results dependent upon self-induced magnetic-field gradients is used, diffusion in celery appears isotropic when the stalk is oriented parallel to the magnetic field but anisotropic when oriented perpendicular. Susceptibility variations leading to anisotropic self-induced magnetic-field gradients approximately 3 kHz/cm in magnitude when the celery is oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can explain this apparent anisotropic diffusion. A study of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in celery as a function of diffusion times ranging from 8 to 22 ms indicates that the motion is at most only slightly restricted. Therefore, although the effect is not seen in all types of samples, one must be aware that self-induced gradients may affect the ADC and may cause isotropic diffusion to appear anisotropic. In addition, NMR experiments that change diffusion-sensitizing gradient timings to study restricted diffusion change the effects of the self-induced gradients as well as the effect of barriers on the ADC, complicating interpretation.

  11. A Monte Carlo/Simulated Annealing Algorithm for Sequential Resonance Assignment in Solid State NMR of Uniformly Labeled Proteins with Magic-Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert; Hu, Kan-Nian

    2010-01-01

    We describe a computational approach to sequential resonance assignment in solid state NMR studies of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with magic-angle spinning. As input, the algorithm uses only the protein sequence and lists of 15N/13Cα crosspeaks from 2D NCACX and NCOCX spectra that include possible residue-type assignments of each crosspeak. Assignment of crosspeaks to specific residues is carried out by a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm, implemented in the program MC_ASSIGN1. The algorithm tolerates substantial ambiguity in residue-type assignments and coexistence of visible and invisible segments in the protein sequence. We use MC_ASSIGN1 and our own 2D spectra to replicate and extend the sequential assignments for uniformly labeled HET-s(218-289) fibrils previously determined manually by Siemer et al. (J. Biomolec. NMR, vol. 34, pp. 75-87, 2006) from a more extensive set of 2D and 3D spectra. Accurate assignments by MC_ASSIGN1 do not require data that are of exceptionally high quality. Use of MC_ASSIGN1 (and its extensions to other types of 2D and 3D data) is likely to alleviate many of the difficulties and uncertainties associated with manual resonance assignments in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins, where spectral resolution and signal-to-noise are often sub-optimal. PMID:20547467

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy...

  15. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  16. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  17. Selective 13C labeling of nucleotides for large RNA NMR spectroscopy using an E. coli strain disabled in the TCA cycle.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Chandar S; Sama, Jacob N; Jackson, Melantha E; Chen, Bin; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2010-12-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is an ideal organism to tailor-make labeled nucleotides for biophysical studies of RNA. Recently, we showed that adding labeled formate enhanced the isotopic enrichment at protonated carbon sites in nucleotides. In this paper, we show that growth of a mutant E. coli strain DL323 (lacking succinate and malate dehydrogenases) on (13)C-2-glycerol and (13)C-1,3-glycerol enables selective labeling at many useful sites for RNA NMR spectroscopy. For DL323 E. coli grown in (13)C-2-glycerol without labeled formate, all the ribose carbon atoms are labeled except the C3' and C5' carbon positions. Consequently the C1', C2' and C4' positions remain singlet. In addition, only the pyrimidine base C6 atoms are substantially labeled to ~96% whereas the C2 and C8 atoms of purine are labeled to ~5%. Supplementing the growth media with (13)C-formate increases the labeling at C8 to ~88%, but not C2. Not unexpectedly, addition of exogenous formate is unnecessary for attaining the high enrichment levels of ~88% for the C2 and C8 purine positions in a (13)C-1,3-glycerol based growth. Furthermore, the ribose ring is labeled in all but the C4' carbon position, such that the C2' and C3' positions suffer from multiplet splitting but the C5' position remains singlet and the C1' position shows a small amount of residual C1'-C2' coupling. As expected, all the protonated base atoms, except C6, are labeled to ~90%. In addition, labeling with (13)C-1,3-glycerol affords an isolated methylene ribose with high enrichment at the C5' position (~90%) that makes it particularly attractive for NMR applications involving CH(2)-TROSY modules without the need for decoupling the C4' carbon. To simulate the tumbling of large RNA molecules, perdeuterated glycerol was added to a mixture of the four nucleotides, and the methylene TROSY experiment recorded at various temperatures. Even under conditions of slow tumbling, all the expected carbon correlations were observed, which indicates

  18. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  19. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved. PMID:25625825

  20. Preparation of RNA samples with narrow line widths for solid state NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Bardaro, Michael F.; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P.

    2012-10-01

    Solid state NMR can provide detailed structural and dynamic information on biological systems that cannot be studied under solution conditions, and can investigate motions which occur with rates that cannot be fully studied by solution NMR. This approach has successfully been used to study proteins, but the application of multidimensional solid state NMR to RNA has been limited because reported line widths have been too broad to execute most multidimensional experiments successfully. A reliable method to generate spectra with narrow line widths is necessary to apply the full range of solid state NMR spectroscopic approaches to RNA. Using the HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA as a model, we present an approach based on precipitation with polyethylene glycol that improves the line width of 13C signals in TAR from >6 ppm to about 1 ppm, making solid state 2D NMR studies of selectively enriched RNAs feasible at ambient temperature.

  1. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  2. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION...

  3. 40 CFR 600.211-08 - Sample calculation of fuel economy values for labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample calculation of fuel economy values for labeling. 600.211-08 Section 600.211-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR...

  4. 76 FR 69585 - Testing and Labeling Pertaining to Product Certification Regarding Representative Samples for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... private labeler. In the Federal Register of May 20, 2010 (75 FR 28336), we published a proposed rule on... being selected (75 FR at 28349 through 28350, 28365). On August 12, 2011, the President signed H.R. 2715...'' (75 FR 28336 (May 20, 2010)) would have treated ``Random Samples'' as a distinct section, rather...

  5. Consideration of some sampling problems in the on-line analysis of batch processes by low-field NMR spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nordon, Alison; Diez-Lazaro, Alvaro; Wong, Chris W L; McGill, Colin A; Littlejohn, David; Weerasinghe, Manori; Mamman, Danladi A; Hitchman, Michael L; Wilkie, Jacqueline

    2008-03-01

    A low-field medium-resolution NMR spectrometer, with an operating frequency of 29 MHz for 1H, has been assessed for on-line process analysis. A flow cell that incorporates a pre-magnetisation region has been developed to minimise the decrease in the signal owing to incomplete polarisation effects. The homogeneous esterification reaction of crotonic acid and 2-butanol was monitored using a simple sampling loop; it was possible to monitor the progression of the reaction through changes in CH signal areas of butanol and butyl crotonate. On-line analysis of heterogeneous water-toluene mixtures proved more challenging and a fast sampling loop system was devised for use with a 5 L reactor. The fast sampling loop operated at a flow rate of 8 L min(-1) and a secondary sampling loop was used to pass a sub-sample through the NMR analyser at a slower (mL min(-1)) rate. It was shown that even with super-isokinetic sampling conditions, unrepresentative sampling could occur owing to inadequate mixing in the reactor. However, it was still possible to relate the 1H NMR signal obtained at a flow rate of 60 mL min(-1) to the composition of the reactor contents. PMID:18299748

  6. A firmware-defined digital direct-sampling NMR spectrometer for condensed matter physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulski, M. Shiroka, T.; Ott, H.-R.; Mesot, J.

    2014-09-15

    We report on the design and implementation of a new digital, broad-band nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for probing condensed matter. The spectrometer uses direct sampling in both transmission and reception. It relies on a single, commercially-available signal processing device with a user-accessible field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Its functions are defined exclusively by the FPGA firmware and the application software. Besides allowing for fast replication, flexibility, and extensibility, our software-based solution preserves the option to reuse the components for other projects. The device operates up to 400 MHz without, and up to 800 MHz with undersampling, respectively. Digital down-conversion with ±10 MHz passband is provided on the receiver side. The system supports high repetition rates and has virtually no intrinsic dead time. We describe briefly how the spectrometer integrates into the experimental setup and present test data which demonstrates that its performance is competitive with that of conventional designs.

  7. A firmware-defined digital direct-sampling NMR spectrometer for condensed matter physics.

    PubMed

    Pikulski, M; Shiroka, T; Ott, H-R; Mesot, J

    2014-09-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a new digital, broad-band nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for probing condensed matter. The spectrometer uses direct sampling in both transmission and reception. It relies on a single, commercially-available signal processing device with a user-accessible field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Its functions are defined exclusively by the FPGA firmware and the application software. Besides allowing for fast replication, flexibility, and extensibility, our software-based solution preserves the option to reuse the components for other projects. The device operates up to 400 MHz without, and up to 800 MHz with undersampling, respectively. Digital down-conversion with ±10 MHz passband is provided on the receiver side. The system supports high repetition rates and has virtually no intrinsic dead time. We describe briefly how the spectrometer integrates into the experimental setup and present test data which demonstrates that its performance is competitive with that of conventional designs. PMID:25273738

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H–13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H–13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H–13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H–13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr–Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr–Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C–13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H-13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H-13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H-13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H-13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C-13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils.

  10. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei. PMID:8995843

  11. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  12. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  13. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  14. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  15. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  16. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants. PMID:26231074

  17. Enhanced sample multiplexing for nitrotyrosine-modified proteins using combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Renã A S; Evans, Adam R

    2012-06-01

    Current strategies for identification and quantification of 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) post-translationally modified proteins (PTM) generally rely on biotin/avidin enrichment. Quantitative approaches have been demonstrated which employ isotopic labeling or isobaric tagging in order to quantify differences in the relative abundances of 3NT-modified proteins in two or potentially eight samples, respectively. Here, we present a novel strategy which uses combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT) to increase the multiplexing capability of quantifying 3NT-modified proteins to 12 or 16 samples using commercially available tandem mass tags (TMT) or isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), respectively. This strategy employs "light" and "heavy" labeled acetyl groups to block both N-termini and lysine residues of tryptic peptides. Next, 3NT is reduced to 3-aminotyrosine (3AT) using sodium dithionite followed by derivatization of light and heavy labeled 3AT-peptides with either TMT or iTRAQ multiplex reagents. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle utility of cPILOT with in vitro nitrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and mouse splenic proteins using TMT(0), TMT(6), and iTRAQ(8) reagents and discuss limitations of the strategy. PMID:22509719

  18. Radioassay of dual-labeled samples with a Cherenkov counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Haruo; Takiue, Makoto

    1998-03-01

    A new Cherenkov counting technique which allows radioactivities of a dual-labeled sample to be determined simultaneously by using a wavelength shifter has been proposed, and tested for the pairs 32P-36Cl and 86Rb-36Cl. The minimum requirements for this method are a single channel liquid scintillation counter, a wavelength shifter and a reference sample for determining the Cherenkov counting efficiency. The simple procedure for sample preparation and measurement makes the technique very useful for routine radioassay with the help of a desk-top computer.

  19. Radioassay of dual-labeled samples with a Cherenkov counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Haruo; Takiue, Makoto

    1988-03-01

    A new Cherenkov counting technique which allows radioactivities of a dual-labeled sample to be determined simultaneously by using a wavelength shifter has been proposed, and tested for the pairs 32P 36Cl and 86Rb 36Cl. The minimum requirements for this method are a single channel liquid scintillation counter, a wavelength shifter and a reference sample for determining the Cherenkov counting efficiency. The simple procedure for sample preparation and measurement makes the technique very useful for routine radioassay with the help of a desk-top computer.

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis using samples obtained with laser microdissection and saturation dye labelling.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kate E; Marouga, Rita; Prime, John E; Pashby, D Paul; Orange, Paul R; Crosier, Steven; Keith, Alexander B; Lathe, Richard; Mullins, John; Estibeiro, Peter; Bergling, Helene; Hawkins, Edward; Morris, Christopher M

    2005-10-01

    Comparative proteomic methods are rapidly being applied to many different biological systems including complex tissues. One pitfall of these methods is that in some cases, such as oncology and neuroscience, tissue complexity requires isolation of specific cell types and sample is limited. Laser microdissection (LMD) is commonly used for obtaining such samples for proteomic studies. We have combined LMD with sensitive thiol-reactive saturation dye labelling of protein samples and 2-D DIGE to identify protein changes in a test system, the isolated CA1 pyramidal neurone layer of a transgenic (Tg) rat carrying a human amyloid precursor protein transgene. Saturation dye labelling proved to be extremely sensitive with a spot map of over 5,000 proteins being readily produced from 5 mug total protein, with over 100 proteins being significantly altered at p < 0.0005. Of the proteins identified, all showed coherent changes associated with transgene expression. It was, however, difficult to identify significantly different proteins using PMF and MALDI-TOF on gels containing less than 500 mug total protein. The use of saturation dye labelling of limiting samples will therefore require the use of highly sensitive MS techniques to identify the significantly altered proteins isolated using methods such as LMD. PMID:16145713

  1. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model...

  3. Expression and purification of isotopically labeled peptide inhibitors and substrates of cAMP-dependant protein kinase A for NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Larry R; Bortone, Nadia; Yu, Tao; Ha, Kim N; Gaffarogullari, Ece C; Nguyen, Oanh; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2009-04-01

    Extensive X-ray crystallographic studies carried out on the catalytic-subunit of protein kinase A (PKA-C) enabled the atomic characterization of inhibitor and/or substrate peptide analogues trapped at its active site. Yet, the structural and dynamic transitions of these peptides from the free to the bound state are missing. These conformational transitions are central to understanding molecular recognition and the enzymatic cycle. NMR spectroscopy allows one to study these phenomena under functionally relevant conditions. However, the amounts of isotopically labeled peptides required for this technique present prohibitive costs for solid-phase peptide synthesis. To enable NMR studies, we have optimized both expression and purification of isotopically enriched substrate/inhibitor peptides using a recombinant fusion protein system. Three of these peptides correspond to the cytoplasmic regions of the wild-type and lethal mutants of the membrane protein phospholamban, while the fourth peptide correspond to the binding epitope of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor (PKI(5-24)). The target peptides were fused to the maltose binding protein (MBP), which is further purified using a His(6) tag approach. This convenient protocol allows for the purification of milligram amounts of peptides necessary for NMR analysis. PMID:19027069

  4. Synthesis of [13C6]-labelled phenethylamine derivatives for drug quantification in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, HuiLing; Berg, Thomas; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2014-05-15

    The availability of high-quality (13)C-labelled internal standards will improve accurate quantification of narcotics and drugs in biological samples. Thus, the synthesis of 10 [(13)C6]-labelled phenethylamine derivatives, namely amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine, 4-methoxyamphetamine, 4-methoxymethamphetamine, 3,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine, have been undertaken. [(13)C6]-Phenol proved to be an excellent starting material for making (13)C-labelled narcotic substances in the phenethylamine class, and a developed Stille-type coupling enabled an efficient synthesis of the 3,4-methylenedioxy and 4-methoxy derivatives. The pros and cons of alternative routes and transformations are also discussed. The [(13)C6]-labelled compounds are intended for use as internal standards in forensic analysis, health sciences and metabolomics studies by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:24634286

  5. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches. PMID:22427982

  6. Use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for the analysis of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products in enviornmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful analytical techniques for elucidating the molecular structure of organic compounds. In environmental samples, the identification and detection of chemical warfare related compounds is best accomplished using high field high resolution NMR. This paper describes the experimental procedures.

  7. Off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation spectra of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei in static samples.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Deng, F; Ye, C

    1995-12-01

    The off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei are demonstrated with perturbation theory and numerical calculation in static samples. The off-resonant (delta omega) rf field (omega 1) enlarges a nutation frequency and consequently increases the measurement range of nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters. When omega e > omega Qmax, and arctg(omega 1/delta omega) = +/- 54.7 degrees (magic angle), the satellite lines (produced by coherence transfers) in a nutation spectrum are superimposed with the line of central transition, and hence the nutation spectrum is simplified and its sensitivity is enhanced. The nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters of 23Na nuclei in Na omega molecular sieve are obtained using 2D NMR nutation. PMID:9053113

  8. Sample Preparation Approaches for iTRAQ Labeling and Quantitative Proteomic Analyses in Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Christos; Moore, J Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of global quantification strategies utilized in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) are an attractive option for examining the relative amounts of proteins in different samples. The inherent complexity of mammalian proteomes and the diversity of protein physicochemical properties mean that complete proteome coverage is still unlikely from a single analytical method. Numerous options exist for reducing protein sample complexity and resolving digested peptides prior to MS analysis. Indeed, the reliability and efficiency of protein identification and quantitation from an iTRAQ workflow strongly depend on sample preparation upstream of MS. Here we describe our methods for: (1) total protein extraction from immortalized cells; (2) subcellular fractionation of murine tissue; (3) protein sample desalting, digestion, and iTRAQ labeling; (4) peptide separation by strong cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography; and (5) peptide separation by isoelectric focusing. PMID:26700038

  9. Metabolic Profiling and Classification of Propolis Samples from Southern Brazil: An NMR-Based Platform Coupled with Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Maraschin, Marcelo; Somensi-Zeggio, Amélia; Oliveira, Simone K; Kuhnen, Shirley; Tomazzoli, Maíra M; Raguzzoni, Josiane C; Zeri, Ana C M; Carreira, Rafael; Correia, Sara; Costa, Christopher; Rocha, Miguel

    2016-01-22

    The chemical composition of propolis is affected by environmental factors and harvest season, making it difficult to standardize its extracts for medicinal usage. By detecting a typical chemical profile associated with propolis from a specific production region or season, certain types of propolis may be used to obtain a specific pharmacological activity. In this study, propolis from three agroecological regions (plain, plateau, and highlands) from southern Brazil, collected over the four seasons of 2010, were investigated through a novel NMR-based metabolomics data analysis workflow. Chemometrics and machine learning algorithms (PLS-DA and RF), including methods to estimate variable importance in classification, were used in this study. The machine learning and feature selection methods permitted construction of models for propolis sample classification with high accuracy (>75%, reaching ∼90% in the best case), better discriminating samples regarding their collection seasons comparatively to the harvest regions. PLS-DA and RF allowed the identification of biomarkers for sample discrimination, expanding the set of discriminating features and adding relevant information for the identification of the class-determining metabolites. The NMR-based metabolomics analytical platform, coupled to bioinformatic tools, allowed characterization and classification of Brazilian propolis samples regarding the metabolite signature of important compounds, i.e., chemical fingerprint, harvest seasons, and production regions. PMID:26693586

  10. Application of on-line HPLC-1H NMR to environmental samples: analysis of groundwater near former ammunition plants.

    PubMed

    Godejohann, M; Preiss, A; Mügge, C; Wünsch, G

    1997-09-15

    Coupling of HPLC to NMR was applied for the first time to the analysis of environmental samples, i.e., water samples from an ammunition hazardous waste site. Using the continuous flow mode at very low flow rates (< or = 0.017 mL/min) and large volume injection (400 microL), the confirmation of many nitroaromatic compounds could be achieved down to the microgram-per-liter level after solid phase extraction of a groundwater sample from a former ammunition production site. At a flow rate of 0.006 mL/min, it is possible to detect less than 29 nmol (5 micrograms) of 1,3-dinitrobenzene injected on a 75 mm x 4 mm reversed phase C-18 column (particle size, 5 microns). The results obtained by HPLC-NMR are compared to those obtained by HPLC-PDA (photodiode array) of the same sample, demonstrating that many more compounds can be identified by the former compared to the latter method as a result of coelution of major and minor components in the HPLC chromatogram. PMID:9302876

  11. Carbon-proton scalar couplings in RNA. 3D heteronuclear and 2D isotope-edited NMR of a [sup 13]C-labeled extra-stable hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; Varani, G.; Tinoco, I. Jr. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-29

    Long range carbon-proton scalar couplings were measured for an RNA hairpin of 12 nucleotides using 3D and [sup 13]C-edited 2D NMR. The large one-bond carbon-proton scalar couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) and small n-bond couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) produce ECOSY type cross-peaks, thus facilitating the determination of the sign and magnitude of the smaller [sup 2]J[sub CH] or [sup 3]J[sub CH]. The UUCGRNA hairpin (5[prime]-rGGACUUCGGUCC-3[prime]), whose structure has been determined by our laboratory, was uniformly [sup 13]C-labeled at 30% isotopic enrichment. The observed [sup 1]J[sub CH] couplings were then correlated to the known structure. The signs of [sup 2]J[sub C4[prime]H5[prime

  12. FM Reconstruction of Non-Uniformly Sampled Protein NMR Data at Higher Dimensions and Optimization by Distillation

    PubMed Central

    Hyberts, Sven G.; Frueh, Dominique P.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Wagner, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Non-uniform sampling (NUS) enables recording of multidimensional NMR data at resolutions matching the resolving power of modern instruments without using excessive measuring time. However, in order to obtain satisfying results, efficient reconstruction methods are needed. Here we describe an optimized version of the Forward Maximum entropy (FM) reconstruction method, which can reconstruct up to three indirect dimensions. For complex datasets, such as NOESY spectra, the performance of the procedure is enhanced by a distillation procedure that reduces artifacts stemming from intense peaks. PMID:19705283

  13. An NMR study of the interaction of 15N-labelled bradykinin with an antibody mimic of the bradykinin B2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ottleben, H; Haasemann, M; Ramachandran, R; Görlach, M; Müller-Esterl, W; Brown, L R

    1997-03-01

    An isotope-edited NMR study of the peptide hormone bradykinin (RPPGFSPFR) bound to the Fab fragment of a monoclonal antibody against bradykinin (MBK3) is reported. MBK3 was previously shown to provide a binding site model of the B2 bradykinin receptor [Haasemann, M., Buschko, J., Faussner, A., Roscher, A. A., Hoebeke, J., Burch, R. M. & Muller-Esterl, W. (1991) Anti-idiotypic antibodies bearing the internal image of a bradykinin epitope, J. Immunol. 147, 3882-3892]. Bradykinin was obtained in a uniformly 15N-labelled form using recombinant expression of a fusion protein consisting of the glutathione-binding domain of glutathione S-transferase fused to residues 354-375 of the high-molecular-mass kininogen from which bradykinin was released by proteolytic digestion with its natural protease plasma kallikrein. Bradykinin forms a complex with the Fab fragment of MBK3 which exchanges slowly on the NMR time scale. The 15N and 1H resonances of the tightly bound residues of bradykinin show appreciable changes in chemical shift with respect to the free form, while the 15N and 1H linewidths indicate that the hydrodynamic behaviour of bound bradykinin is dominated by the high-molecular-mass Fab fragment. The NMR data indicate that essentially the entire nonapeptide is involved in binding. The kinetics of the ligand-exchange process, together with resonance assignments obtained via exchange spectroscopy. indicate that bradykinin binds to MBK3 only in the all-trans conformation at all three Xaa-Pro amide bonds. NH-NH NOE connectivities suggest that bradykinin is bound in an extended conformation. The spectroscopic data obtained from this study are compared to recently proposed computational models of the conformation of bradykinin bound to the B2 receptor. PMID:9119014

  14. Ultrafast in vivo microwave irradiation for enhanced metabolic stability of brain biopsy samples during HRMAS NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Detour, J; Elbayed, K; Piotto, M; Moussallieh, F M; Nehlig, A; Namer, I J

    2011-09-30

    High resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy is a well established technique for ex vivo metabolite investigations but experimental factors such as ischemic delay or mechanical stress due to continuous spinning deserve further investigations. Cortical brain samples from rats that underwent ultrafast in vivo microwave irradiation (MWp group) were compared to similar samples that underwent standard nitrogen freezing with and without exposure to domestic microwaves (FN and FN+MWd groups). One dimensional (1)H HRMAS NMR spectra were acquired and 16 metabolites of interest were quantified. Within each group 3 samples underwent long lasting acquisition (up to 15 h). Statistically significant differences in metabolite concentrations were observed between groups for metabolites associated to post mortem biochemical changes and/or anaerobic glycolysis including several neurotransmitters. Spectral assessment over time showed a drastic reduction of biochemical variations in both MW groups. Only 2/16 metabolites exhibited significant signal variations after 15 h of continuous spinning and acquisition in the MWp group. This number increased to 10 in the FN group. We confirmed limited anaerobic metabolism and post mortem degradation after ultra fast in vivo MW irradiation. Furthermore, spectra obtained after MWp and MWd irradiation exhibited an extremely stable spectral pattern over extended periods of continuous acquisition. PMID:21803072

  15. Rapid milk group classification by 1H NMR analysis of Le and H epitopes in human milk oligosaccharide donor samples.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Sander S; Schoemaker, Ruud J W; Gerwig, Gerrit J; van Leusen-van Kan, Ellen J M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2014-08-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are a major constituent of human breast milk and play an important role in reducing the risk of infections in infants. The structures of these HMOs show similarities with blood group antigens in protein glycosylation, in particular in relation to fucosylation in Lewis blood group-type epitopes, matching the maternal pattern. Previously, based on the Secretor and Lewis blood group system, four milk groups have been defined, i.e. Lewis-positive Secretors, Lewis-positive non-Secretors, Lewis-negative Secretors and Lewis-negative non-Secretors. Here, a rapid one-dimensional (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis method is presented that identifies the presence/absence of (α1-2)-, (α1-3)- and (α1-4)-linked fucose residues in HMO samples, affording the essential information to attribute different HMO samples to a specific milk group. The developed method is based on the NMR structural-reporter-group concept earlier established for glycoprotein glycans. Further evaluation of the data obtained from the analysis of 36 HMO samples shows that within each of the four milk groups the relative levels of the different fucosylation epitopes can greatly vary. The data also allow a separation of the Lewis-positive Secretor milk group into two sub-groups. PMID:24789815

  16. Construction and performance of an NMR tube with a sample cavity formed within magnetic susceptibility-matched glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Hallenga, Klaas; Shigezane, Masahiro; Waelchli, Markus; Löhr, Frank; Markley, John L.; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2011-04-01

    We describe the construction and performance of an NMR tube with a magnetic susceptibility matched sample cavity that confines the solution within the detection zone in the axial direction and in a quasi-rectangular region in the radial direction. The slot-like sample cavity provides both good sample volume efficiency and tolerance to sensitivity loss in the sample space. The signal-to-noise ratio per unit volume of the constructed tube was 2.2 times higher than that of a cylindrical tube of 5 mm outer diameter with a sample containing 300 mM NaCl at a static magnetic field of 14.1 T. Even the overall signal-to-noise ratio of the slot tube was 35% higher than that of the conventional 5 mm tube for a sample containing 300 mM NaCl. Similar improvements over existing sample tube geometries were obtained at 950 MHz. Moreover the temperature rise resulting from RF heating was found to be significantly lower for the slot tube even when compared to 3 and 4 mm outer diameter cylindrical tubes as measured in a 5 mm cryoprobe. A further advantage of this type of tube is that a sample cavity of any desired size and shape can be formed within a cylindrical tube for use in a single cryogenic probe.

  17. Construction and performance of an NMR tube with a sample cavity formed within magnetic susceptibility-matched glass.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Hallenga, Klaas; Shigezane, Masahiro; Waelchli, Markus; Löhr, Frank; Markley, John L; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2011-04-01

    We describe the construction and performance of an NMR tube with a magnetic susceptibility matched sample cavity that confines the solution within the detection zone in the axial direction and in a quasi-rectangular region in the radial direction. The slot-like sample cavity provides both good sample volume efficiency and tolerance to sensitivity loss in the sample space. The signal-to-noise ratio per unit volume of the constructed tube was 2.2 times higher than that of a cylindrical tube of 5mm outer diameter with a sample containing 300 mM NaCl at a static magnetic field of 14.1T. Even the overall signal-to-noise ratio of the slot tube was 35% higher than that of the conventional 5mm tube for a sample containing 300 mM NaCl. Similar improvements over existing sample tube geometries were obtained at 950 MHz. Moreover the temperature rise resulting from RF heating was found to be significantly lower for the slot tube even when compared to 3 and 4mm outer diameter cylindrical tubes as measured in a 5mm cryoprobe. A further advantage of this type of tube is that a sample cavity of any desired size and shape can be formed within a cylindrical tube for use in a single cryogenic probe. PMID:21316281

  18. MAG-PGSTE: A new STE-based PGSE NMR sequence for the determination of diffusion in magnetically inhomogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gang; Price, William S.

    2008-11-01

    A new stimulated echo based pulsed gradient spin-echo sequence, MAG-PGSTE, has been developed for the determination of self-diffusion in magnetically inhomogeneous samples. The sequence was tested on two glass bead samples (i.e., 212-300 and <106 μm glass bead packs). The MAG-PGSTE sequence was compared to the MAGSTE (or MPFG) (P.Z. Sun, J.G. Seland, D. Cory, Background gradient suppression in pulsed gradient stimulated echo measurements, J. Magn. Reson. 161 (2003) 168-173; P.Z. Sun, S.A. Smith, J. Zhou, Analysis of the magic asymmetric gradient stimulated echo sequence with shaped gradients, J. Magn. Reson. 171 (2004) 324-329; P.Z. Sun, Improved diffusion measurement in heterogeneous systems using the magic asymmetric gradient stimulated echo (MAGSTE) technique, J. Magn. Reson. 187 (2007) 177-183; P. Galvosas, F. Stallmach, J. Kärger, Background gradient suppression in stimulated echo NMR diffusion studies using magic pulsed field gradient ratios, J. Magn. Reson. 166 (2004) 164-173, P. Galvosas, PFG NMR-Diffusionsuntersuchungen mit ultra-hohen gepulsten magnetischen Feldgradienten an mikroporösen Materialien, Ph.D. Thesis, Universität Leipzig, 2003, P.Z. Sun, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Diffusion, Ph.D. Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003) sequence and Cotts 13-interval [R.M. Cotts, M.J.R. Hoch, T. Sun, J.T. Marker, Pulsed field gradient stimulated echo methods for improved NMR diffusion measurements in heterogeneous systems, J. Magn. Reson. 83 (1989) 252-266] sequence using both glass bead samples. The MAG-PGSTE and MAGSTE (or MPFG) sequences outperformed the Cotts 13-interval sequence in the measurement of diffusion coefficients; more interestingly, for the sample with higher background gradients (i.e., the <106 μm glass bead sample), the MAG-PGSTE sequence provided higher signal-to-noise ratios and thus better diffusion measurements than the MAGSTE and Cotts 13-interval sequences. In addition, the MAG-PGSTE sequence provided

  19. Amino-acid selective experiments on uniformly 13C and 15N labeled proteins by MAS NMR: Filtering of lysines and arginines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Stefan; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2006-12-01

    Amino-acid selective magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments can aid the assignment of ambiguous cross-peaks in crowded spectra of solid proteins. In particular for larger proteins, data analysis can be hindered by severe resonance overlap. In such cases, filtering techniques may provide a good alternative to site-specific spin-labeling to obtain unambiguous assignments that can serve as starting points in the assignment procedure. In this paper we present a simple pulse sequence that allows selective excitation of arginine and lysine residues. To achieve this, we make use of a combination of specific cross-polarization for selective excitation [M. Baldus, A.T. Petkova, J. Herzfeld, R.G. Griffin, Cross polarization in the tilted frame: assignment and spectral simplification in heteronuclear spin systems, Mol. Phys. 95 (1998) 1197-1207.] and spin diffusion for transfer along the amino-acid side-chain. The selectivity of the filter is demonstrated with the excitation of lysine and arginine side-chain resonances in a uniformly 13C and 15N labeled protein preparation of the α-spectrin SH3 domain. It is shown that the filter can be applied as a building block in a 13C- 13C lysine-only correlation experiment.

  20. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  1. Nano-Mole Scale Side-Chain Signal Assignment by 1H-Detected Protein Solid-State NMR by Ultra-Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Stereo-Array Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Endo, Yuki; Nemoto, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Asakura, Tetsuo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52–57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems. PMID:25856081

  2. Nano-mole scale side-chain signal assignment by 1H-detected protein solid-state NMR by ultra-fast magic-angle spinning and stereo-array isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songlin; Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Endo, Yuki; Nemoto, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Asakura, Tetsuo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52-57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems. PMID:25856081

  3. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing.

    PubMed

    Riba, J; Gleichmann, T; Zimmermann, S; Zengerle, R; Koltay, P

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  4. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    PubMed Central

    Riba, J.; Gleichmann, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  5. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest. PMID:26302362

  6. Label-free three dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  7. Label-free three-dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  8. Stable isotope labeling strategy based on coding theory.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Takuma; Koshiba, Seizo; Yokoyama, Jun; Kigawa, Takanori

    2015-10-01

    We describe a strategy for stable isotope-aided protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, called stable isotope encoding. The basic idea of this strategy is that amino-acid selective labeling can be considered as "encoding and decoding" processes, in which the information of amino acid type is encoded by the stable isotope labeling ratio of the corresponding residue and it is decoded by analyzing NMR spectra. According to the idea, the strategy can diminish the required number of labelled samples by increasing information content per sample, enabling discrimination of 19 kinds of non-proline amino acids with only three labeled samples. The idea also enables this strategy to combine with information technologies, such as error detection by check digit, to improve the robustness of analyses with low quality data. Stable isotope encoding will facilitate NMR analyses of proteins under non-ideal conditions, such as those in large complex systems, with low-solubility, and in living cells. PMID:26293126

  9. On the Traceability of Commercial Saffron Samples Using ¹H-NMR and FT-IR Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Roberto; Ordoudi, Stella A; Cagliani, Laura R; Tsiangali, Maria; Tsimidou, Maria Z

    2016-01-01

    In previous works on authentic samples of saffron of known history (harvest and processing year, storage conditions, and length of time) some biomarkers were proposed using both FT-IR and NMR metabolomics regarding the shelf life of the product. This work addresses the difficulties to trace back the "age" of commercial saffron samples of unknown history, sets a limit value above which these products can be considered substandard, and offers a useful tool to combat saffron mislabeling and fraud with low-quality saffron material. Investigations of authentic and commercial saffron samples of different origin and harvest year, which had been stored under controlled conditions for different lengths of time, allowed a clear-cut clustering of samples in two groups according to the storage period irrespectively of the provenience. In this respect, the four-year cut off point proposed in our previous work assisted to trace back the "age" of unknown samples and to check for possible mislabeling practices. PMID:26938515

  10. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Evidence for tautomerism in nucleic acid base pairs. 1H NMR study of 15N labeled tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Rüterjans, H; Kaun, E; Hull, W E; Limbach, H H

    1982-01-01

    The imino proton resonances of 15N labeled tRNA appear as asymmetric doublet signals, the asymmetry being dependent on the applied magnetic field strength. Assuming a tautomerism of the type N-H...N not equal to N...H-N in the base pairs the line shapes can be simulated. The most important parameters fitted in the simulation are the rate constants of the proton transfer and the mole fractions of either tautomeric state. The rate constants are of the order of 100s-1 and the mole fractions of the non dominant tautomer about 0.1 depending on the temperature and on the nature of the base pairing. The observations are attributed to a double proton transfer in the base pairs. The unexpectedly slow rates of the double proton transfer process may be connected with a concomitant conformational change of the duplex structure. PMID:7177856

  12. Labeling and confocal imaging of neurons in thick invertebrate tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bellido, Paloma T; Wardill, Trevor J

    2012-09-01

    Neuroscience researchers have long sought methods to describe the neural connectivity of the circuits responsible for specific behaviors. One major obstacle is scale: Neural spines can be <1 µm in diameter, but axons can range from millimeters to centimeters (or larger) in length, making tissue imaging and neuron reconstruction a challenging task. New tissue-clearing agents and long-working-distance objectives offer improved imaging conditions, and here we present a complete protocol for invertebrate tissue that uses these advances. In this protocol, tissue-processing steps previously published in separate articles are combined with recent advances in confocal imaging to visualize invertebrate tissue samples that are >500 µm thick and contain dye-filled neurons. The steps describe dye filling, fixing, antibody labeling, clearing, whole tissue mounting, and confocal imaging with matched refractive indexes. Thus, manual sectioning or "flipping" the tissue to image the whole volume is not required. With matched refractive indexes, loss of resolution and signal is avoided. Tissue volumes are imaged in one stack and nonlinear deformations caused by tissue flipping are prevented. We apply the protocol to whole dragonfly thoracic ganglia (2 × 1 × 0.6 mm) and cephalopod skin samples (20 × 2 × 0.6 mm) with minimal tissue deformation. The resulting images will be used to develop a three-dimensional connectivity atlas of dragonfly ganglia and cephalopod skin innervation. This protocol can be applied to other invertebrate species, and has the advantage that it avoids problems with antigen specificity. PMID:22949711

  13. Properties of bridgehead-substituted polycycloalkanes. Synthesis and NMR analysis of /sup 15/N-labeled 1-aminobicycloalkanes and their hydrochlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Della, E.W.; Kasum, B.; Kirkbride, K.P.

    1987-04-29

    NMR analysis of adamantane and four bicycloalkanes substituted at the bridgehead with /sup 15/N-labeled amino and ammonio groups is described. It is found that where most of the one-bond carbon-nitrogen coupling constants are relatively large, those in 1-aminobicyclo (1.1.1)pentane and its hydrochloride are significantly reduced; in fact, in the latter compound one-bond /sup 13/C-/sup 15/N coupling could not even be detected. Values of experimentally determined vicinal couplings were in accord with those expected on the basis of the number of three-bond pathways available for transmission of spin-spin information; INDO calculations, however, suggest that in the more highly strained systems there is a substantial contribution to /sup 3/J(CN) arising from through-space interactions and that these oppose through-bond effects. Large four-bond /sup 15/N-/sup 1/H couplings were found to occur in 1-aminobicyclo(1.1.1)pentane and its hydrochloride; MO calculations indicate that through-space interactions constitute the predominant mechanism contributing to /sup 4/J(/sup 15/N-/sup 1/H), although in this case through-bond and through-space effects reinforce each other. The nitrogen-15 chemical shifts of the amine hydrochlorides were determined, and they appear to occur in random fashion.

  14. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  15. Sensitivity Gains, Linearity, and Spectral Reproducibility in Nonuniformly Sampled Multidimensional MAS NMR Spectra of High Dynamic Range.

    SciTech Connect

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David M.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David S.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2014-04-22

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C,15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high quality artifact-free datasets.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part...

  18. Dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for simultaneous detection of clothianidin and diniconazole in agricultural samples.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Enze; Shi, Haiyan; Zhou, Liangliang; Hua, Xiude; Feng, Lu; Yu, Tong; Wang, Minghua

    2016-02-01

    Europium (Eu(3+)) and samarium (Sm(3+)) were used as fluorescent labels to develop a highly sensitive dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA) for detect clothianidin and diniconazole in food samples. Under the optimized assay conditions, 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) and the limit of detection (LOD, IC10) of clothianidin were 5.08 and 0.021 μg/L, and 13.14 and 0.029 μg/L for diniconazole. The cross-reactivities (CRs) were negligible except dinotefuran (9.4%) and uniconazole (4.28%). The recoveries of clothianidin and diniconazole ranged from 79.3% to 108.7% in food samples. The results of TRFIA for the authentic samples were validated by gas chromatography (GC) analyses, and a satisfactory correlations were obtained. These results indicated that the method was an alternative tool for simultaneous detection of clothianidin and diniconazole in food samples. PMID:26304380

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--SAMPLE CODING, LABELING, AND FIELD TRACKING PROCEDURES (RTI/ACS-AP-209-070)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This protocol defines the coding scheme, labeling procedures, and field tracking for samples collected in the NHEXAS Region 5 study. Unique sample codes were assigned to all personal, environmental, biological, and quality control samples. A label bearing the code in both bar cod...

  20. A new approach to the optimisation of non-uniform sampling schedules for use in the rapid acquisition of 2D NMR spectra of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    Non-uniform sampling allows the routine, rapid acquisition of 2D NMR data. When the number of points in the NUS schedule is low, the quality of the data obtained is very dependent of the schedule used. A simple proceedure for finding optimium schedules has been developed and is demonstrated for the multiplicity edited HSQC experiment. PMID:27160788

  1. (1)H NMR-based metabolite profiling workflow to reduce inter-sample chemical shift variations in urine samples for improved biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ryan B; Lehmann, Rainer; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Heinzmann, Silke S

    2016-07-01

    Metabolite profiling of urine has seen much advancement in recent years, and its analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become well established. However, the highly variable nature of human urine still requires improved protocols despite some standardization. In particular, diseases such as kidney disease can have a profound effect on the composition of urine and generate a highly diverse sample set for clinical studies. Large variations in pH and the cationic concentration of urine play an important role in creating positional noise within datasets generated from NMR. We demonstrate positional noise to be a confounding variable for multivariate statistical tools such as statistical total correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY), thereby hindering the process of biomarker discovery. We present a two-dimensional buffering system using potassium fluoride (KF) and phosphate buffer to reduce positional noise in metabolomic data generated from urine samples with various levels of proteinuria. KF reduces positional noise in citrate peaks, by decreasing the mean relative standard deviation (RSD) from 0.17 to 0.09. By reducing positional noise with KF, STOCSY analysis of citrate peaks saw significant improvement. We further aligned spectral data using a recursive segment-wise peak alignment (RSPA) method, which leads to further improvement of the positional noise (RSD = 0.06). These results were validated using diverse selection of metabolites which lead to an overall improvement in positional noise using the suggested protocol. In summary, we provide an improved workflow for urine metabolite biomarker discovery to achieve higher data quality for better pathophysiological understanding of human diseases. Graphical abstract Citrate peaks in the range 2.75-2.5 ppm from datasets with different sample preparation protocols and with/without in silico alignment. A Citrate peaks with standard phosphate buffering and without in silico alignment. B citrate

  2. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis. PMID:26659962

  3. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  4. Determination of solution structures of proteins up to 40 kDa using CS-Rosetta with sparse NMR data from deuterated samples

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Song, Yifan; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Aramini, James M.; Ertekin, Asli; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an approach for determining NMR structures of proteins over 20 kDa that utilizes sparse distance restraints obtained using transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy experiments on perdeuterated samples to guide RASREC Rosetta NMR structure calculations. The method was tested on 11 proteins ranging from 15 to 40 kDa, seven of which were previously unsolved. The RASREC Rosetta models were in good agreement with models obtained using traditional NMR methods with larger restraint sets. In five cases X-ray structures were determined or were available, allowing comparison of the accuracy of the Rosetta models and conventional NMR models. In all five cases, the Rosetta models were more similar to the X-ray structures over both the backbone and side-chain conformations than the “best effort” structures determined by conventional methods. The incorporation of sparse distance restraints into RASREC Rosetta allows routine determination of high-quality solution NMR structures for proteins up to 40 kDa, and should be broadly useful in structural biology. PMID:22733734

  5. Quantitative Characterization of Configurational Space Sampled by HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Using Solution NMR, X-ray Scattering and Protein Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G Marius

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic-acid-related events in the HIV-1 replication cycle are mediated by nucleocapsid, a small protein comprising two zinc knuckles connected by a short flexible linker and flanked by disordered termini. Combining experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings, solution X-ray scattering and protein engineering with ensemble simulated annealing, we obtain a quantitative description of the configurational space sampled by the two zinc knuckles, the linker and disordered termini in the absence of nucleic acids. We first compute the conformational ensemble (with an optimal size of three members) of an engineered nucleocapsid construct lacking the N- and C-termini that satisfies the experimental restraints, and then validate this ensemble, as well as characterize the disordered termini, using the experimental data from the full-length nucleocapsid construct. The experimental and computational strategy is generally applicable to multidomain proteins. Differential flexibility within the linker results in asymmetric motion of the zinc knuckles which may explain their functionally distinct roles despite high sequence identity. One of the configurations (populated at a level of ≈40 %) closely resembles that observed in various ligand-bound forms, providing evidence for conformational selection and a mechanistic link between protein dynamics and function. PMID:26946052

  6. Reduction of magnetic field fluctuations in powered magnets for NMR using inductive measurements and sampled-data feedback control.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhou; Schiano, Jeffrey L; Samra, Jenna E; Shetty, Kiran K; Brey, William W

    2011-10-01

    Resistive and hybrid (resistive/superconducting) magnets provide substantially higher magnetic fields than those available in low-temperature superconducting magnets, but their relatively low spatial homogeneity and temporal field fluctuations are unacceptable for high resolution NMR. While several techniques for reducing temporal fluctuations have demonstrated varying degrees of success, this paper restricts attention to methods that utilize inductive measurements and feedback control to actively cancel the temporal fluctuations. In comparison to earlier studies using analog proportional control, this paper shows that shaping the controller frequency response results in significantly higher reductions in temporal fluctuations. Measurements of temporal fluctuation spectra and the frequency response of the instrumentation that cancels the temporal fluctuations guide the controller design. In particular, we describe a sampled-data phase-lead-lag controller that utilizes the internal model principle to selectively attenuate magnetic field fluctuations caused by the power supply ripple. We present a quantitative comparison of the attenuation in temporal fluctuations afforded by the new design and a proportional control design. Metrics for comparison include measurements of the temporal fluctuations using Faraday induction and observations of the effect that the fluctuations have on nuclear resonance measurements. PMID:21885308

  7. HyperSPASM NMR: A new approach to single-shot 2D correlations on DNP-enhanced samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Frydman, Lucio

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution DNP experiments are limited to a single or at most a few scans, before the non-Boltzmann magnetization has been consumed. This makes it impractical to record 2D NMR data by conventional, t1-incremented schemes. Here a new approach termed HyperSPASM to establish 2D heteronuclear correlations in a single scan is reported, aimed at dealing with this kind of challenge. The HyperSPASM experiment relies on imposing an amplitude-modulation of the data by a single Δt1 indirect-domain evolution time, and subsequently monitoring the imparted encoding on separate echo and anti-echo pathway signals within a single continuous acquisition. This is implemented via the use of alternating, switching, coherence selection gradients. As a result of these manipulations the phase imparted by a heteronucleus over its indirect domain evolution can be accurately extracted, and 2D data unambiguously reconstructed with a single-shot excitation. The nature of this sequence makes the resulting experiment particularly well suited for collecting indirectly-detected HSQC data on hyperpolarized samples. The potential of the ensuing HyperSPASM method is exemplified with natural-abundance hyperpolarized correlations on model systems.

  8. NMR Wool Tube: a novel method for NMR solution analysis of derivatized glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Olivia Maria

    2004-08-13

    Glass wool was placed within an NMR tube as a solid support for the covalent attachment of a molecule to allow for a simple one-dimensional 1H FT NMR solution analysis. This novel procedure avoids the use of expensive sample tubes or platforms, as required for magic angle or fast spinning, exotic pulse sequences, isotopic labeling or the use of a large number of scans to provide the ability to analyze the structure, mobility, ligand binding, and solvent interactions of the surface bound molecule. PMID:15387199

  9. The beauty of being (label)-free: sample preparation methods for SWATH-MS and next-generation targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Vowinckel, Jakob; Capuano, Floriana; Campbell, Kate; Deery, Michael J; Lilley, Kathryn S; Ralser, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The combination of qualitative analysis with label-free quantification has greatly facilitated the throughput and flexibility of novel proteomic techniques. However, such methods rely heavily on robust and reproducible sample preparation procedures. Here, we benchmark a selection of in gel, on filter, and in solution digestion workflows for their application in label-free proteomics. Each procedure was associated with differing advantages and disadvantages. The in gel methods interrogated were cost effective, but were limited in throughput and digest efficiency. Filter-aided sample preparations facilitated reasonable processing times and yielded a balanced representation of membrane proteins, but led to a high signal variation in quantification experiments. Two in solution digest protocols, however, gave optimal performance for label-free proteomics. A protocol based on the detergent RapiGest led to the highest number of detected proteins at second-best signal stability, while a protocol based on acetonitrile-digestion, RapidACN, scored best in throughput and signal stability but came second in protein identification. In addition, we compared label-free data dependent (DDA) and data independent (SWATH) acquisition on a TripleTOF 5600 instrument. While largely similar in protein detection, SWATH outperformed DDA in quantification, reducing signal variation and markedly increasing the number of precisely quantified peptides. PMID:24741437

  10. The beauty of being (label)-free: sample preparation methods for SWATH-MS and next-generation targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kate; Deery, Michael J.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Ralser, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The combination of qualitative analysis with label-free quantification has greatly facilitated the throughput and flexibility of novel proteomic techniques. However, such methods rely heavily on robust and reproducible sample preparation procedures. Here, we benchmark a selection of in gel, on filter, and in solution digestion workflows for their application in label-free proteomics. Each procedure was associated with differing advantages and disadvantages. The in gel methods interrogated were cost effective, but were limited in throughput and digest efficiency. Filter-aided sample preparations facilitated reasonable processing times and yielded a balanced representation of membrane proteins, but led to a high signal variation in quantification experiments. Two in solution digest protocols, however, gave optimal performance for label-free proteomics. A protocol based on the detergent RapiGest led to the highest number of detected proteins at second-best signal stability, while a protocol based on acetonitrile-digestion, RapidACN, scored best in throughput and signal stability but came second in protein identification. In addition, we compared label-free data dependent (DDA) and data independent (SWATH) acquisition on a TripleTOF 5600 instrument. While largely similar in protein detection, SWATH outperformed DDA in quantification, reducing signal variation and markedly increasing the number of precisely quantified peptides. PMID:24741437

  11. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  12. A Modified Alderman-Grant Coil makes possible an efficient cross-coil probe for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Christopher V.; Yang, Yuan; Glibowicka, Mira; Wu, Chin H.; Park, Sang Ho; Deber, Charles M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-11-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a cross-coil double-resonance probe for solid-state NMR experiments on lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are described. The outer coil is a Modified Alderman-Grant Coil (MAGC) tuned to the 1H frequency. The inner coil consists of a multi-turn solenoid coil that produces a B 1 field orthogonal to that of the outer coil. This results in a compact nested cross-coil pair with the inner solenoid coil tuned to the low frequency detection channel. This design has several advantages over multiple-tuned solenoid coil probes, since RF heating from the 1H channel is substantially reduced, it can be tuned for samples with a wide range of dielectric constants, and the simplified circuit design and high inductance inner coil provides excellent sensitivity. The utility of this probe is demonstrated on two electrically lossy samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) that are particularly difficult for conventional NMR probes. The 72-residue polypeptide embedding the transmembrane helices 3 and 4 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) (residues 194-241) requires a high salt concentration in order to be successfully reconstituted in phospholipid bicelles. A second application is to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement applied to the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bicelles where the resistance to sample heating enables high duty cycle solid-state NMR experiments to be performed.

  13. Pulsed Field Gradient NMR with Sigmoid Shape Gradient Sampling To Produce More Detailed Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy Maps of Real Complex Mixtures: Examples with Medicine Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Guilhem; Bonny, Alice; Gilard, Véronique; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2016-03-15

    NMR diffusion measurements are based on signal attenuation. In the case of complex mixtures for which some molecules are diffusing quickly while others are significantly slower, it is challenging to obtain a diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY)-type 2D map giving reliable information on all molecules. In this paper, we propose a new gradient sampling approach based on a sigmoid shape allowing the acquisition of a significant number of points for both the fast and slow diffusing molecules. We applied this new gradient sampling strategy to deformulate two medicines whose composition was known (Esomeprazole) or unknown (Mebendazole). PFG NMR associated with a sigmoid gradient ramp is an exciting strategy to study drugs as a whole, i.e., the active ingredient(s) and excipients. PMID:26905176

  14. Aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing (ALCHIM): determining composition of complex lipid samples by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ruiyang; Volden, Paul A.; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the amounts and types of lipids present in mixtures is important in fields as diverse as medicine, food science, and biochemistry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can quantify the total amounts of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in mixtures, but identifying the length of saturated fatty acid or the position of unsaturation by NMR is a daunting challenge. We have developed an NMR technique, aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing, to address this problem. Using a selective total correlation spectroscopy technique to excite and transfer magnetization from a resolved resonance, we demonstrate that the time dependence of this transfer to another resolved site depends linearly on the number of aliphatic carbons separating the two sites. This technique is applied to complex natural mixtures allowing the identification and quantification of the constituent fatty acids. The method has been applied to whole adipocytes demonstrating that it will be of great use in studies of whole tissues. PMID:24831341

  15. Synthesis of a water-soluble analog of 6-methyl-3-N-alkyl catechol labeled with carbon 13: NMR approach to the reactivity of poison ivy/oak sensitizers toward proteins.

    PubMed

    Goetz, G; Meschkat, E; Lepoittevin, J P

    1999-04-19

    A 13-C labeled water soluble derivative of alkylcatechol was synthesized and reacted with human serum albumin in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 in air to allow a slow oxidation of the catechol into orthoquinone. The formation of several adducts was evidenced by a combination of 13C and 1H-13C correlation NMR. Although some adducts could result from a classical o-quinone formation - Michael type addition, our results suggest that a second pathway, involving a direct reaction of a carbon centered radical with proteins could be an important mechanism in the formation of modified proteins. PMID:10328301

  16. Existing and emerging technologies for measuring stable isotope labelled retinol in biological samples: isotope dilution analysis of body retinol stores.

    PubMed

    Preston, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the recent improvements in instrumentation used for stable isotope tracer measurements in the context of measuring retinol stores, in vivo. Tracer costs, together with concerns that larger tracer doses may perturb the parameter under study, demand that ever more sensitive mass spectrometric techniques are developed. GCMS is the most widely used technique. It has high sensitivity in terms of sample amount and uses high resolution GC, yet its ability to detect low isotope ratios is limited by background noise. LCMSMS may become more accessible for tracer studies. Its ability to measure low level stable isotope tracers may prove superior to GCMS, but it is isotope ratio MS (IRMS) that has been designed specifically for low level stable isotope analysis through accurate analysis of tracer:tracee ratios (the tracee being the unlabelled species). Compound-specific isotope analysis, where GC is interfaced to IRMS, is gaining popularity. Here, individual 13C-labelled compounds are separated by GC, combusted to CO2 and transferred on-line for ratiometric analysis by IRMS at the ppm level. However, commercially-available 13C-labelled retinol tracers are 2 - 4 times more expensive than deuterated tracers. For 2H-labelled compounds, GC-pyrolysis-IRMS has now become more generally available as an operating mode on the same IRMS instrument. Here, individual compounds are separated by GC and pyrolysed to H2 at high temperature for analysis by IRMS. It is predicted that GC-pyrolysis-IRMS will facilitate low level tracer procedures to measure body retinol stores, as has been accomplished in the case of fatty acids and amino acids. Sample size requirements for GC-P-IRMS may exceed those of GCMS, but this paper discusses sample preparation procedures and predicts improvements, particularly in the efficiency of sample introduction. PMID:25537104

  17. Aβ Monomers Transiently Sample Oligomer and Fibril-like Configurations: Ensemble Characterization Using a Combined MD/NMR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, David J.; Connors, Christopher; Chen, Wen; Wang, Chunyu; García, Angel E.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are a primary component of fibrils and oligomers implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the intrinsic flexibility of these peptides has frustrated efforts to investigate the secondary and tertiary structure of Aβ monomers, whose conformational landscapes directly contribute to the kinetics and thermodynamics of Aβ aggregation. In this work, de novo replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on the μs/replica timescale are used to characterize the structural ensembles of Aβ42, Aβ40, and M35-oxidized Aβ42, three physiologically relevant isoforms with substantially different aggregation properties. J-coupling data calculated from the REMD trajectories were compared to corresponding NMR-derived values acquired through two different pulse sequences, revealing that all simulations converge on the order of hundreds of ns/replica toward ensembles that yield good agreement with experiment. Though all three Aβ species adopt highly heterogeneous ensembles, these are considerably more structured compared to simulations on shorter timescales. Prominent in the C-terminus are antiparallel β-hairpins between L17-A21, A30-L36, and V39-I41, similar to oligomer and fibril intrapeptide models, that expose these hydrophobic side chains to solvent and may serve as hotspots for self-association. Compared to reduced Aβ42, the absence of a second β-hairpin in Aβ40 and the sampling of alternate β topologies by M35-oxidized Aβ42 may explain the reduced aggregation rates of these forms. A persistent V24-K28 bend motif, observed in all three species, is stabilized by buried backbone to side chain hydrogen bonds with D23 and a cross-region salt bridge between E22 and K28, highlighting the role of the familial AD-linked E22 and D23 residues in Aβ monomer folding. These characterizations help illustrate the conformational landscapes of Aβ monomers at atomic resolution and provide insight into the early stages of A

  18. Label-free detection of low-molecular-weight samples using a terahertz chemical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwana, Takuya; Ogawa, Masahiro; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko; Tsukada, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    A terahertz chemical microscope (TCM) has been proposed and developed to visualize the distribution of biomolecular interactions on a sensing plate without any labels. In this study, the concanavalin A (Con A)-d-(+)-mannose (mannose) interaction was detected using the TCM with mannose applied as the analyte and Con A immobilized on the sensing plate. To demonstrate this interaction, the amplitude of terahertz pulses as a function of Con A-mannose interaction time, as well as the Con A-mannose coupling concentration, was evaluated. The results suggest that coupling kinetics may be evaluated using a TCM.

  19. Geographic origin determination of heroin and cocaine using site-specific isotopic ratio deuterium NMR

    PubMed

    Hays; Remaud; Jamin; Martin

    2000-05-01

    SNIF-NMR (Site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by deuterium NMR) was employed on 36 heroin samples from seven different known origins, and two cocaine samples from two different known origins. Heroin has two "synthetic" deuterium labeled sites (the two acetyls from acetic anhydride, each representing three equivalent nuclei) and 15 "natural" deuterium labeled sites (originating from the morphine produced in the opium plant). The "natural" sites have the potential for determining geographic location of the original opium plant, while the "synthetic" sites could assist in giving information about the commercial source of acetic anhydride used to convert morphine to heroin. Cocaine has 15 "natural" deuterium labeled sites. This study shows that SNIF-NMR has some use in determining the geographic origin of heroin and also has good potential for determining the geographical origin of cocaine. PMID:10855958

  20. Chemo-enzymatic labeling for rapid assignment of RNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Longhini, Andrew P; LeBlanc, Regan M; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2016-07-01

    Even though Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the few techniques capable of determining atomic resolution structures of RNA, it is constrained by two major problems of chemical shift overlap of resonances and rapid signal loss due to line broadening. Emerging tools to tackle these problems include synthesis of atom specifically labeled or chemically modified nucleotides. Herein we review the synthesis of these nucleotides, the design and production of appropriate RNA samples, and the application and analysis of the NMR experiments that take advantage of these labels. PMID:27090003

  1. Simplification of the 1H NMR spectra of enantiomers dissolved in chiral liquid crystals, combining variable angle sample spinning and selective refocusing experiments.

    PubMed

    Beguin, Laetitia; Courtieu, Jacques; Ziani, Latifa; Merlet, Denis

    2006-12-01

    This work presents a technique to simplify overcrowded proton spectra in chiral liquid crystal solvents using rotation of the sample near the magic angle, VASS, combined with homonuclear selective refocusing 2D NMR experiments, SERF. This methodology provides a powerful tool to visualise enantiomers out of unresolved proton spectra. A modified SERF sequence is presented where the resulting 2D spectrum can be phased to increase the resolution. Accurate enantiomeric excesses are determined that are not possible to measure on static samples. Two examples are presented. PMID:16991108

  2. Study of the gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples by {sup 1}H NMR cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Babushkina, T. A.; Klimova, T. P.; Shtykova, E. V.; Dembo, K. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Khripunov, A. K.; Klechkovskaya, V. V.

    2010-03-15

    Gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples have been investigated by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering. The joint use of these two methods made it possible to characterize the sizes of aqueous pores in gel films and estimate the sizes of structural inhomogeneities before and after the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and Se{sub 0} nanoparticles (stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone) into the films. According to small-angle X-ray scattering data, the sizes of inhomogeneities in a gel film change only slightly upon the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and nanoparticles. The impregnated material is sorbed into water-filled cavities that are present in the gel film. {sup 1}H NMR cryoporometry allowed us to reveal the details of changes in the sizes of small aqueous pores during modifications.

  3. Study of the gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples by 1H NMR cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babushkina, T. A.; Klimova, T. P.; Shtykova, É. V.; Dembo, K. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Khripunov, A. K.; Klechkovskaya, V. V.

    2010-03-01

    Gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples have been investigated by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering. The joint use of these two methods made it possible to characterize the sizes of aqueous pores in gel films and estimate the sizes of structural inhomogeneities before and after the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and Se0 nanoparticles (stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone) into the films. According to small-angle X-ray scattering data, the sizes of inhomogeneities in a gel film change only slightly upon the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and nanoparticles. The impregnated material is sorbed into water-filled cavities that are present in the gel film. 1H NMR cryoporometry allowed us to reveal the details of changes in the sizes of small aqueous pores during modifications.

  4. Screening proteins for NMR suitability

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Adelinda A.; Semesi, Anthony; Garcia, Maite; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NMR spectroscopy is an invaluable tool in structural genomics. Identification of protein samples that are amenable to structure determination by NMR spectroscopy requires efficient screening. Here, we describe how we prepare multiple samples in parallel and screen by NMR. The method described here is applicable to large structural genomics projects but can easily be scaled down for application to small structural biology projects since all the equipments used are those commonly found in any NMR structural biology laboratory. PMID:24590717

  5. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  6. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  7. Optimization of amino acid type-specific 13C and 15N labeling for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins by solution- and solid-state NMR with the UPLABEL algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hefke, Frederik; Bagaria, Anurag; Reckel, Sina; Ullrich, Sandra Johanna; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens; Güntert, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational method for finding optimal labeling patterns for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins and other large proteins that cannot be assigned by conventional strategies. Following the approach of Kainosho and Tsuji (Biochemistry 21:6273-6279 (1982)), types of amino acids are labeled with (13)C or/and (15)N such that cross peaks between (13)CO(i - 1) and (15)NH(i) result only for pairs of sequentially adjacent amino acids of which the first is labeled with (13)C and the second with (15)N. In this way, unambiguous sequence-specific assignments can be obtained for unique pairs of amino acids that occur exactly once in the sequence of the protein. To be practical, it is crucial to limit the number of differently labeled protein samples that have to be prepared while obtaining an optimal extent of labeled unique amino acid pairs. Our computer algorithm UPLABEL for optimal unique pair labeling, implemented in the program CYANA and in a standalone program, and also available through a web portal, uses combinatorial optimization to find for a given amino acid sequence labeling patterns that maximize the number of unique pair assignments with a minimal number of differently labeled protein samples. Various auxiliary conditions, including labeled amino acid availability and price, previously known partial assignments, and sequence regions of particular interest can be taken into account when determining optimal amino acid type-specific labeling patterns. The method is illustrated for the assignment of the human G-protein coupled receptor bradykinin B2 (B(2)R) and applied as a starting point for the backbone assignment of the membrane protein proteorhodopsin. PMID:21170670

  8. High-field, hyperpolarized Xe-129 NMR: Preparation and transfer of pure spin-polarized xenon gas to the sample.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Sachs, D. B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Lisitza, N. V.; Happer, W.

    2003-03-01

    Hyperpolarized ^129Xe has already found extensive applications in magnetic resonance imaging(M. S. Albert et al., Nature 370, 199 (1994)) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy(J. P. Mugler, et al., Magn. Reson. Med. 37, 809 (1997)). Using hyperpolarized xenon in high-field NMR spectroscopy opens up new prospects for medical diagnostics of many pathologies and disorders(R. K. Mazitov, et al., Doklady Biophysics 364-366, 28-31 (1999)). Here we present a new set-up for production(N. N. Kuzma, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 147602 (2002)), delivery, and temporary storage of pure hyperpolarized xenon gas for high-field (9.4T) NMR spectroscopy, with an emphasis on in-situ monitoring of ^129Xe polarization along the gas flow path and using a 1.1 T permanent magnet for cryogenic separation of hyperpolarized xenon from the buffer gases.

  9. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  10. Large-Scale Multiplexed Quantitative Discovery Proteomics Enabled by the Use of an 18O-Labeled “Universal” Reference Sample

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative comparison of protein abundances across a large number of biological or patient samples represents an important proteomics challenge that needs to be addressed for proteomics discovery applications. Herein, we describe a strategy that incorporates a stable isotope 18O-labeled ″universal″ reference sample as a comprehensive set of internal standards for analyzing large sample sets quantitatively. As a pooled sample, the 18O-labeled ″universal″ reference sample is spiked into each individually processed unlabeled biological sample and the peptide/protein abundances are quantified based on 16O/18O isotopic peptide pair abundance ratios that compare each unlabeled sample to the identical reference sample. This approach also allows for the direct application of label-free quantitation across the sample set simultaneously along with the labeling-approach (i.e., dual-quantitation) since each biological sample is unlabeled except for the labeled reference sample that is used as internal standards. The effectiveness of this approach for large-scale quantitative proteomics is demonstrated by its application to a set of 18 plasma samples from severe burn patients. When immunoaffinity depletion and cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation with high resolution LC-MS measurements were combined, a total of 312 plasma proteins were confidently identified and quantified with a minimum of two unique peptides per protein. The isotope labeling data was directly compared with the label-free 16O-MS intensity data extracted from the same data sets. The results showed that the 18O reference-based labeling approach had significantly better quantitative precision compared to the label-free approach. The relative abundance differences determined by the two approaches also displayed strong correlation, illustrating the complementary nature of the two quantitative methods. The simplicity of including the 18O-reference for accurate quantitation makes this

  11. Strategy for NMR metabolomic analysis of urine in mouse models of obesity--from sample collection to interpretation of acquired data.

    PubMed

    Pelantová, Helena; Bugáňová, Martina; Anýž, Jiří; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka; Novák, Daniel; Haluzík, Martin; Kuzma, Marek

    2015-11-10

    The mouse model of monosodium glutamate induced obesity was used to examine and consequently optimize the strategy for analysis of urine samples by NMR spectroscopy. A set of nineteen easily detectable metabolites typical in obesity-related studies was selected. The impact of urine collection protocol, choice of (1)H NMR pulse sequence, and finally the impact of the normalization method on the detected concentration of selected metabolites were investigated. We demonstrated the crucial effect of food intake and diurnal rhythms resulting in the choice of a 24-hour fasting collection protocol as the most convenient for tracking obesity-induced increased sensitivity to fasting. It was shown that the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment is a better alternative to one-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (1D-NOESY) for NMR analysis of mouse urine due to its ability to filter undesirable signals of proteins naturally present in rodent urine. Normalization to total spectral area provided comparable outcomes as did normalization to creatinine or probabilistic quotient normalization in the CPMG-based model. The optimized approach was found to be beneficial mainly for low abundant metabolites rarely monitored due to their overlap by strong protein signals. PMID:26263053

  12. Slow Magic Angle Sample Spinning: A Non- or Minimally Invasive Method for High- Resolution 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Metabolic Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.

    2011-05-01

    High resolution 1H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using a sample spinning rate of several kHz or more (i.e., high resolution-magic angle spinning (hr-MAS)), is a well established method for metabolic profiling in intact tissues without the need for sample extraction. The only shortcoming with hr-MAS is that it is invasive and is thus unusable for non-destructive detections. Recently, a method called slow-MAS, using the concept of two dimensional NMR spectroscopy, has emerged as an alternative method for non- or minimal invasive metabolomics in intact tissues, including live animals, due to the slow or ultra-slow-sample spinning used. Although slow-MAS is a powerful method, its applications are hindered by experimental challenges. Correctly designing the experiment and choosing the appropriate slow-MAS method both require a fundamental understanding of the operation principles, in particular the details of line narrowing due to the presence of molecular diffusion. However, these fundamental principles have not yet been fully disclosed in previous publications. The goal of this chapter is to provide an in depth evaluation of the principles associated with slow-MAS techniques by emphasizing the challenges associated with a phantom sample consisting of glass beads and H2O, where an unusually large magnetic susceptibility field gradient is obtained.

  13. Prediction Errors in Learning Drug Response from Gene Expression Data – Influence of Labeling, Sample Size, and Machine Learning Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Immanuel; Groth, Philip; Schneckener, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Model-based prediction is dependent on many choices ranging from the sample collection and prediction endpoint to the choice of algorithm and its parameters. Here we studied the effects of such choices, exemplified by predicting sensitivity (as IC50) of cancer cell lines towards a variety of compounds. For this, we used three independent sample collections and applied several machine learning algorithms for predicting a variety of endpoints for drug response. We compared all possible models for combinations of sample collections, algorithm, drug, and labeling to an identically generated null model. The predictability of treatment effects varies among compounds, i.e. response could be predicted for some but not for all. The choice of sample collection plays a major role towards lowering the prediction error, as does sample size. However, we found that no algorithm was able to consistently outperform the other and there was no significant difference between regression and two- or three class predictors in this experimental setting. These results indicate that response-modeling projects should direct efforts mainly towards sample collection and data quality, rather than method adjustment. PMID:23894636

  14. A strip-shield improves the efficiency of a solenoid coil in probes for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin H.; Grant, Christopher V.; Cook, Gabriel A.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    A strip-shield inserted between a high inductance double-tuned solenoid coil and the glass tube containing the sample improves the efficiency of probes used for high-field solid-state NMR experiments on lossy aqueous samples of proteins and other biopolymers. A strip-shield is a coil liner consisting of thin copper strips layered on a PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) insulator. With lossy samples, the shift in tuning frequency is smaller, the reduction in Q, and RF-induced heating are all significantly reduced when the strip-shield is present. The performance of 800 MHz 1H/15N and 1H/13C double-resonance probes is demonstrated on aqueous samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:19559634

  15. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  16. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  17. The role of Al in C-S-H: NMR, XRD, and compositional results for precipitated samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.K.; Young, J. Francis; Kirkpatrick, R. James . E-mail: kirkpat@uiuc.edu

    2006-01-15

    X-ray diffraction, compositional analysis, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectroscopy of Al-substituted tobermorite-type C-S-H made by precipitation from solution provide significant new insight into the structural mechanisms of Al-substitution in this important and complicated phase. Al occurs in 4-, 5-, and 6-coordination (Al[4], Al[5], and Al[6]) and plays multiple structural roles. Al[4] occurs on the bridging tetrahedra of the drierkette Al-silicate chains, and Al[5] and Al[6] occur in the interlayer and perhaps on particle surfaces. Al does not enter either the central Ca-O sheet or the pairing tetrahedra of the tobermorite-type layers. Al[4] occurs on three types of bridging sites, Q{sup 3} sites that bridge across the interlayer; Q{sup 2} sites that are charge balanced by interlayer Ca{sup +2}, Na{sup +}, or H{sup +}; and Q{sup 2} sites that are most likely charge balanced by interlayer or surface Al[5] and Al[6] through Al[4]-O-Al[5,6] linkages. Although the data presented here are for relatively well-crystallized tobermorite-type C-S-H with C/S ratios {<=} 1.2, comparable spectral features for hydrated white cement pastes in previously published papers [M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Incorporation of aluminum in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) of hydrated Portland cements: a high-field {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR investigation Inorg. Chem. 42 (2003) 2280-2287; M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Characterization of white Portland cement hydration and the C-S-H structure in the presence of sodium aliminate by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res. 43 (2004) 857-868; M.D. Andersen, H. J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, A new aluminum-hydrate phase in hydrated Portland cements characterized by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res., submitted for publication.] indicate the presence of similar structural environments in the C-S-H of such pastes, and by implication OPC pastes.

  18. Relative, label-free protein quantitation: spectral counting error statistics from nine replicate MudPIT samples.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Bret; Feng, Jian; Garrett, Wesley M

    2010-09-01

    Nine replicate samples of peptides from soybean leaves, each spiked with a different concentration of bovine apotransferrin peptides, were analyzed on a mass spectrometer using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Proteins were detected from the peptide tandem mass spectra, and the numbers of spectra were statistically evaluated for variation between samples. The results corroborate prior knowledge that combining spectra from replicate samples increases the number of identifiable proteins and that a summed spectral count for a protein increases linearly with increasing molar amounts of protein. Furthermore, statistical analysis of spectral counts for proteins in two- and three-way comparisons between replicates and combined replicates revealed little significant variation arising from run-to-run differences or data-dependent instrument ion sampling that might falsely suggest differential protein accumulation. In these experiments, spectral counting was enabled by PANORAMICS, probability-based software that predicts proteins detected by sets of observed peptides. Three alternative approaches to counting spectra were also evaluated by comparison. As the counting thresholds were changed from weaker to more stringent, the accuracy of ratio determination also changed. These results suggest that thresholds for counting can be empirically set to improve relative quantitation. All together, the data confirm the accuracy and reliability of label-free spectral counting in the relative, quantitative analysis of proteins between samples. PMID:20541435

  19. Optimization of Plasma Sample Pretreatment for Quantitative Analysis Using iTRAQ Labeling and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun proteomic methods involving iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) peptide labeling facilitate quantitative analyses of proteomes and searches for useful biomarkers. However, the plasma proteome's complexity and the highly dynamic plasma protein concentration range limit the ability of conventional approaches to analyze and identify a large number of proteins, including useful biomarkers. The goal of this paper is to elucidate the best approach for plasma sample pretreatment for MS- and iTRAQ-based analyses. Here, we systematically compared four approaches, which include centrifugal ultrafiltration, SCX chromatography with fractionation, affinity depletion, and plasma without fractionation, to reduce plasma sample complexity. We generated an optimized protocol for quantitative protein analysis using iTRAQ reagents and an UltrafleXtreme (Bruker Daltonics) MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometer. Moreover, we used a simple, rapid, efficient, but inexpensive sample pretreatment technique that generated an optimal opportunity for biomarker discovery. We discuss the results from the four sample pretreatment approaches and conclude that SCX chromatography without affinity depletion is the best plasma sample preparation pretreatment method for proteome analysis. Using this technique, we identified 1,780 unique proteins, including 1,427 that were quantified by iTRAQ with high reproducibility and accuracy. PMID:24988083

  20. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory.

  1. Does the time of the sampling matter in 13C pulse labeling and chasing experiments? A case study on beech seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, Olga; Thoms, Ronny; Muhr, Jan; Karlowsky, Stefan; Keitel, Claudia; Kayler, Zachary; Calfapietra, Carlo; Gessler, Arthur; Brugnoli, Enrico; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    13C pulse labeling and chasing is a valuable and very popular tool for determination of the fate and turnover rates of C in plant-soil systems. Continuous isoflux measurements became an accessible reality allowing to cover completely the diurnal variation in label assimilation and respiration fluxes. Label turnover in multiple pools, especially of those located belowground, is more often assessed instead by isolated day-time samplings. By increasing the sampling frequency of belowground compartments we aimed to catch the short-term diurnal variations in label allocation and to link these processes with label dynamics in the aboveground biomass. For these purposes we labeled 3-m height soil-grown European beech seedlings with 13C enriched CO2 and traced the flow of 13C within belowground plant-soil continuum. Continuous soil isoflux measurements were accompanied by a 3-h-frequency sampling of root and soil material during the first 48 h, followed by a daily sampling in the successive 5 days. The amount of label found in microbial biomass depended partially on the amount of roots in the sample. Microbial biomass C (MBC) and microbial respiration showed very strong correlation, suggesting the possibility to use one as a proxy of the other. MBC enrichment showed a clear diurnal pattern with night-time and early morning peaks. These peaks were similar in shape and shifted by one sampling when compared to root sugars enrichment. Soil respiration showed instead a single bell-shape peak in 13C, likely due to a sequence of peaks of root and microbial origin. 13C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed less frequently through phospholipid fatty acid analyses (PLFA). The microorganisms were separated into two distinct groups by the time of the appearance of the label in the single PLFAs. The first group was characterized by a fast appearance of the label and higher enrichment and was composed of Gram negative bacteria and saprotrophic fungi likely living in

  2. 40 CFR 600.211-08 - Sample calculation of fuel economy values for labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample calculation of fuel economy... AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Procedures for Calculating Fuel...

  3. Carbonation of C–S–H and C–A–S–H samples studied by {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2015-05-15

    Synthesized calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) samples with Ca/Si ratios of 0.66, 1.0, and 1.5 have been exposed to atmospheric CO{sub 2} at room temperature and high relative humidity and studied after one to 12 weeks. {sup 29}Si NMR reveals that the decomposition of C–S–H caused by carbonation involves two steps and that the decomposition rate decreases with increasing Ca/Si ratio. The first step is a gradual decalcification of the C–S–H where calcium is removed from the interlayer and defect sites in the silicate chains until Ca/Si = 0.67 is reached, ideally corresponding to infinite silicate chains. In the seconds step, calcium from the principal layers is consumed, resulting in the final decomposition of the C–S–H and the formation of an amorphous silica phase composed of Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} silicate tetrahedra. The amount of solid carbonates and of carbonate ions in a hydrous environment increases with increasing Ca/Si ratio for the C–S–H, as shown by {sup 13}C NMR. For C–A–S–H samples with Ca/Si = 1.0 and 1.5, {sup 27}Al NMR demonstrates that all aluminium sites associated with the C–S–H are consumed during the carbonation reactions and incorporated mainly as tetrahedral Al(–OSi){sub 4} units in the amorphous silica phase. A small amount of penta-coordinated Al sites has also been identified in the silica phase.

  4. Efficient Blind Spectral Unmixing of Fluorescently Labeled Samples Using Multi-Layer Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    Zudaire, Isabel; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The ample variety of labeling dyes and staining methods available in fluorescence microscopy has enabled biologists to advance in the understanding of living organisms at cellular and molecular level. When two or more fluorescent dyes are used in the same preparation, or one dye is used in the presence of autofluorescence, the separation of the fluorescent emissions can become problematic. Various approaches have been recently proposed to solve this problem. Among them, blind non-negative matrix factorization is gaining interest since it requires little assumptions about the spectra and concentration of the fluorochromes. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for blind spectral separation that addresses some of the shortcomings of existing solutions: namely, their dependency on the initialization and their slow convergence. We apply this new algorithm to two relevant problems in fluorescence microscopy: autofluorescence elimination and spectral unmixing of multi-labeled samples. Our results show that our new algorithm performs well when compared with the state-of-the-art approaches for a much faster implementation. PMID:24260120

  5. Separation of high-resolution samples of overlapping latent fingerprints using relaxation labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kun; Schott, Maik; Schöne, Werner; Hildebrandt, Mario

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of latent fingerprint patterns generally requires clearly recognizable friction ridge patterns. Currently, overlapping latent fingerprints pose a major problem for traditional crime scene investigation. This is due to the fact that these fingerprints usually have very similar optical properties. Consequently, the distinction of two or more overlapping fingerprints from each other is not trivially possible. While it is possible to employ chemical imaging to separate overlapping fingerprints, the corresponding methods require sophisticated fingerprint acquisition methods and are not compatible with conventional forensic fingerprint data. A separation technique that is purely based on the local orientation of the ridge patterns of overlapping fingerprints is proposed by Chen et al. and quantitatively evaluated using off-the-shelf fingerprint matching software with mostly artificially composed overlapping fingerprint samples, which is motivated by the scarce availability of authentic test samples. The work described in this paper adapts the approach presented by Chen et al. for its application on authentic high resolution fingerprint samples acquired by a contactless measurement device based on a Chromatic White Light (CWL) sensor. An evaluation of the work is also given, with the analysis of all adapted parameters. Additionally, the separability requirement proposed by Chen et al. is also evaluated for practical feasibility. Our results show promising tendencies for the application of this approach on high-resolution data, yet the separability requirement still poses a further challenge.

  6. Characterization of proteins by in-cell NMR spectroscopy in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy is a unique tool for characterizing biological macromolecules in their physiological environment at atomic resolution. Recent progress in NMR instruments and sample preparation methods allows functional processes, such as metal uptake, disulfide-bond formation and protein folding, to be analyzed by NMR in living, cultured human cells. This protocol describes the necessary steps to overexpress one or more proteins of interest inside human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells, and it explains how to set up in-cell NMR experiments. The cDNA is transiently transfected as a complex with a cationic polymer (DNA:PEI (polyethylenimine)), and protein expression is carried on for 2-3 d, after which the NMR sample is prepared. (1)H and (1)H-(15)N correlation NMR experiments (for example, using band-selective optimized flip-angle short-transient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (SOFAST-HMQC)) can be carried out in <2 h, ensuring cell viability. Uniform (15)N labeling and amino-acid-specific (e.g., cysteine, methionine) labeling schemes are possible. The entire procedure takes 4 d from cell culture seeding to NMR data collection. PMID:27196722

  7. New Detection Modality for Label-Free Quantification of DNA in Biological Samples via Superparamagnetic Bead Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Daniel C.; Li, Jingyi; Strachan, Briony C.; Begley, Matthew R.; Finkler, David; Bazydlo, Lindsay L.; Barker, N. Scott; Haverstick, Doris; Utz, Marcel; Landers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Combining DNA and superparamagnetic beads in a rotating magnetic field produces multiparticle aggregates that are visually striking, and enables label-free optical detection and quantification of DNA at levels in the picogram per microliter range. DNA in biological samples can be quantified directly by simple analysis of optical images of microfluidic wells placed on a magnetic stirrer without DNA purification. Aggregation results from DNA/bead interactions driven either by the presence of a chaotrope (a nonspecific trigger for aggregation) or by hybridization with oligonucleotides on functionalized beads (sequence-specific). This paper demonstrates quantification of DNA with sensitivity comparable to that of the best currently available fluorometric assays. The robustness and sensitivity of the method enable a wide range of applications, illustrated here by counting eukaryotic cells. Using widely available and inexpensive benchtop hardware, the approach provides a highly accessible low-tech microscale alternative to more expensive DNA detection and cell counting techniques. PMID:22423674

  8. Label-free imaging of fatty acid content within yeast samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, N.; Moger, J.

    2013-02-01

    Fungi have been found to be an underlying cause of 70% of all plant and animal extinctions caused by infectious diseases. Fungal infections are a growing problem affecting global health, food production and ecosystems. Lipid metabolism is a promising target for antifungal drugs and since effective treatment of fungal infections requires a better understanding of the effects of antifungal agents at the cellular level, new techniques are needed to investigate this problem. Recent advances in nonlinear microscopy allow chemically-specific contrast to be obtained non-invasively from intrinsic chemical bonds within live samples using advanced spectroscopy techniques probing Raman-active resonances. We present preliminary data using Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy as a means to visualise lipid droplets within individual living fungi by probing Raman resonances of the CH stretching region between 2825cm-1 and 3030cm-1.

  9. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Mustafa, S.; Che Man, Y. B.; Yusop, M. H. M.; Bari, M. F.; Islam, Kh N.; Hasan, M. F.

    2011-05-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml - 1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  10. NMR relaxation of neritic carbonates: An integrated petrophysical and petrographical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Benoit; Fleury, Marc; Santerre, Yannick; Brigaud, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    A set of carbonate outcrop samples, covering a wide range of the sedimentary textures and depositional environments existing on carbonate systems, was studied through an integrated petrographical and petrophysical approach. With the aim of improving the understanding of the NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signal of carbonates, this work is: 1) providing an atlas for various carbonate reservoir rock-types, 2) providing a workflow for integrating geological and petrophysical data and, 3) documenting common shortfalls in NMR/MICP analyses in carbonates. The petrographical investigation includes thin section and SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) observations, whereas petrophysical investigation includes porosity (Φ), permeability (K), NMR, MICP (Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure), and specific surface area (BET) measurements. On the basis of NMR and MICP data, 4 groups of samples were identified: (1) microporous samples, (2) micro-mesoporous samples, (3) wide multimodal samples, and (4) atypical samples. The microporous samples allow us to define a maximum NMR threshold for microporosity at a T 2 of 200 ms. NMR and MICP response of the investigated carbonates are often comparable in terms of modal distribution (microporous, micro-mesoporous and wide multimodal samples). In particular, micritization, a well known but underestimated early diagenetic process, tends to homogenize the NMR signal of primarily different sedimentary facies. A grainstone with heavily micritized grains can display well sorted unimodal NMR and MICP signatures very similar, even identical, to a mudstone-wackestone. Their signatures are comparable to that of a simple sphere packing model. On the contrary, several samples (labeled atypical samples) show a discrepancy between NMR and MICP response. This discrepancy is explained by the fact that MICP can be affected by the physical connectivity of the pore network, in case of disseminated and isolated molds in a micrite matrix for instance

  11. Solution NMR structure of putidaredoxin-cytochrome P450cam complex via a combined residual dipolar coupling-spin labeling approach suggests a role for Trp106 of putidaredoxin in complex formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Pochapsky, Susan S; Pochapsky, Thomas C; Jain, Nitin U

    2008-12-12

    The 58-kDa complex formed between the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, putidaredoxin (Pdx), and cytochrome P450cam (CYP101) from the bacterium Pseudomonas putida has been investigated by high-resolution solution NMR spectroscopy. Pdx serves as both the physiological reductant and effector for CYP101 in the enzymatic reaction involving conversion of substrate camphor to 5-exo-hydroxycamphor. In order to obtain an experimental structure for the oxidized Pdx-CYP101 complex, a combined approach using orientational data on the two proteins derived from residual dipolar couplings and distance restraints from site-specific spin labeling of Pdx has been applied. Spectral changes for residues in and near the paramagnetic metal cluster region of Pdx in complex with CYP101 have also been mapped for the first time using (15)N and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, leading to direct identification of the residues strongly affected by CYP101 binding. The new NMR structure of the Pdx-CYP101 complex agrees well with results from previous mutagenesis and biophysical studies involving residues at the binding interface such as formation of a salt bridge between Asp38 of Pdx and Arg112 of CYP101, while at the same time identifying key features different from those of earlier modeling studies. Analysis of the binding interface of the complex reveals that the side chain of Trp106, the C-terminal residue of Pdx and critical for binding to CYP101, is located across from the heme-binding loop of CYP101 and forms non-polar contacts with several residues in the vicinity of the heme group on CYP101, pointing to a potentially important role in complex formation. PMID:18835276

  12. Solution NMR of large molecules and assemblies†

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mark P.; McElroy, Craig A.; Amero, Carlos D.

    2008-01-01

    Solution NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for examining the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The advent of multidimensional (2D–4D) NMR, together with the widespread use of uniform isotopic labeling of proteins and RNA with the NMR-active isotopes, 15N and 13C, opened the door to detailed analyses of macromolecular structure, dynamics and interactions of smaller macromolecules (< ~25 kDa). Over the past 10 years, advances in NMR and isotope labeling methods have expanded the range of NMR-tractable targets by at least an order of magnitude. Here we briefly describe the methodological advances that allow NMR spectroscopy of large macromolecules and their complexes, and provide a perspective on the wide range of applications of NMR to biochemical problems. PMID:17209543

  13. ¹³C labelled internal standards--a solution to minimize ion suppression effects in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses of drugs in biological samples?

    PubMed

    Berg, Thomas; Strand, Dag Helge

    2011-12-30

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is frequently used to identify and quantify drugs in human biological samples due to the high selectivity and sensitivity of this technique. However, ion suppression effects caused by co-eluting compounds: drugs, metabolites, matrix components, impurities and degradation products, are a major concern. Stable isotope labelled internal standards (SIL ISs), usually deuterium ((2)H) labelled, are often used to compensate for these effects. In many LC separations the retention times of (2)H labelled ISs and their analogues will differ. Ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) is increasingly being used for bio-analysis. With the better chromatographic resolution provided with sub 2 μm particles, larger separation between analytes and their (2)H labelled analogues can be expected, which might reduce the benefits of the SIL IS. There is a greater difference in physico-chemical properties between hydrogen isotopes than between isotopes of other elements. (13)C, (15)N and (18)O labelled ISs are more similar to their analytes than (2)H labelled ISs and thereby expected to behave more similarly in chromatographic separations. In this study we have investigated the use of (13)C and (2)H labelled ISs for the determination of amphetamine and methamphetamine by UPLC-MS/MS. The (13)C labelled ISs were co eluting with their analytes under different chromatographic conditions while the (2)H labelled ISs and their analytes were slightly separated. An improved ability to compensate for ion suppression effects were observed when the (13)C labelled ISs were used. Furthermore, an UPLC-MS/MS method for determination of amphetamine and methamphetamine in urine using (13)C labelled ISs has been developed and validated. Unfortunately, there are few (13)C labelled ISs commercial available today. If more (13)C labelled ISs become commercial available they may well be the coming solution to minimize

  14. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. PMID:23261400

  15. Large-Scale Multiplexed Quantitative Discovery Proteomics Enabled by the Use of an O-18-Labeled “Universal” Reference Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jescheke, Marc G.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Hemdon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative comparison of protein abundances across a relatively large number of patient samples is an important challenge for clinical proteomic applications. Herein we describe a dual-quantitation strategy that allows the simultaneous integration of complementary label-free and stable isotope labeling based approaches without increasing the number of LC-MS analyses. The approach utilizes a stable isotope 18O-labeled “universal” reference sample as a comprehensive set of internal standards spiked into each individually processed unlabeled patient sample. The quantitative data are based on both the direct 16O-MS intensities for label-free quantitation and the 16O/18O isotopic peptide pair ratios that compare each patient sample to the identical labeled reference. The effectiveness of this dual-quantitation approach for large scale quantitative proteomics is demonstrated by the application to a set of 38 clinical plasma samples from surviving and non-surviving severe burn patients. With the coupling of immunoaffinity depletion, cysteinyl-peptide enrichment based fractionation, high resolution LC-MS measurements, and the dual-quantitation approach, a total of 318 proteins were confidently quantified with at least two peptides and 263 proteins were quantified by both approaches. The strategy also enabled a direct comparison between the two approaches with the labeling approach showing significantly better precision in quantitation while the label-free approach resulted in more protein identifications. The relative abundance differences determined by the two approaches also show strong correlation. Finally, the dual-quantitation strategy allowed us to identify more candidate protein biomarkers, illustrating the complementary nature of the two quantitative methods.

  16. Cross polarization and magic angle sample spinning NMR spectra of model organic compounds. 1. Highly protonated molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Alemany, L.B.; Grant, D.M.; Pugmire, R.J.; Alger, T.D.; Zilm, K.W.

    1983-04-20

    CP/MAS /sup 13/C NMR spectra were obtained at various contact times on ten solid organic compounds containing a variety of simple functional groups. The spectra show that signal intensities that agree with atomic ratios can be obtained with a contact time of 2.25 ms and often with a contact time as short as about 1 ms. Computer analysis of signal intensities obtained at a minimum of ten different contact times provides T/sub CH/ data that are consistent with these experimental results. The experimental results are also consistent with the previously reported lack of significant variation in the spectra of complex organic solids obtained with contact times of about 1 to 3 ms. In general, nonprotonated carbon atoms polarize more slowly than protonated carbon atoms. The compounds exhibit a wide range of proton spin lattice relaxation times. Some compounds exhibit more resonances than are found in the /sup 13/C(/sup 1/H) spectra of the compounds in solution because the crystalline environment removes the nominal spatial equivalence found for carbon atoms related to each other by unimolecular symmetry elements.

  17. Sensitive colorimetric detection of cyromazine in cucumber samples by using label-free gold nanoparticles and polythymine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinchuan; Bai, Wenhui; Zhu, Chao; Yan, Mengmeng; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2015-05-01

    Cyromazine (CYR) can cause serious damage to the organs of animals or human beings, and it was found to bind to polythymine (polyT10) via multiple hydrogen bonding interactions. Based on this novel finding, a highly sensitive and simple colorimetric method was developed for CYR detection by using label-free gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and polyT10. Under the optimized conditions, excellent linearity was acquired for CYR within the range of 1-500 ng mL(-1). In addition, the spectra and color changes of the AuNP solution were measured by spectrophotometry and observed by the naked eye, and the results showed that as low as 1 and 5 ng mL(-1) of CYR could be detected, depending upon the measurement methods. Afterwards, cucumber was selected to investigate the sample matrix effect and a sample pretreatment procedure was developed with simple homogenization and filtration. Even after 200 times dilution, the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) reached 252 ng g(-1) and 500 ng g(-1), respectively. The LOD and LOQ satisfied the Chinese requirement for the maximum residue limit (MRL), which is 0.5-1 μg g(-1) of CYR in most vegetables. The assay also showed a good average recovery of 83.7-104.8% with the RSD of less than 7% and good selectivity for cyromazine over other pesticides that may exist in vegetable samples. The method proposed in this study was simple, fast, and highly sensitive and accurate, and the test result with this method was visible to the naked eye. Therefore, it could be used for routine determination of CYR residues in cucumber samples. PMID:25741673

  18. Improved 1H amide resonance line narrowing in oriented sample solid-state NMR of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, George J.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate 1H amide resonance line widths <300 Hz in 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra of membrane proteins in aligned phospholipid bilayers. This represents a substantial improvement over typically observed line widths of ˜1 kHz. Furthermore, in a proton detected local field (PDLF) version of the experiment that measures heteronuclear dipolar couplings, line widths <130 Hz are observed. This dramatic line narrowing of 1H amide resonances enables many more individual signals to be resolved and assigned from uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions of temperature and pH. Finding that the decrease in line widths occurs only for membrane proteins that undergo fast rotational diffusion around the bilayer normal, but not immobile molecules, such as peptide single crystals, identifies a potential new direction for pulse sequence development that includes overall molecular dynamics in their design.

  19. Aberrant sialylation of a prostate-specific antigen: Electrochemical label-free glycoprofiling in prostate cancer serum samples.

    PubMed

    Pihikova, Dominika; Kasak, Peter; Kubanikova, Petra; Sokol, Roman; Tkac, Jan

    2016-08-31

    Electrochemical detection method allowing to detect prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker of prostate cancer (PCa), with PSA glycoprofiling was applied in an analysis of PCa serum samples for the first time. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a label-free method with immobilized anti-PSA was applied for PSA detection and lectins to glycoprofile captured PSA on the same surface. A proper choice of blocking agent providing high selectivity of biosensor detection with the immobilized anti-PSA antibody was done. The biosensor could detect PSA down to 100 ag/mL with a linear concentration working range from 100 ag/mL up to 1 μg/mL, i.e. 10 orders of concentration magnitude and the sensitivity of (5.5 ± 0.2)%/decade. The results showed that a commercial carbo-free blocking solution was the best one, reducing non-specific binding 55-fold when compared to the immunosensor surface without any blocking agent applied, while allowing to detect PSA. The biosensor response obtained after addition of lectin (i.e. proportional to the amount of a particular glycan on PSA) divided by the biosensor response obtained after incubation with a sample (i.e. proportional to the PSA level in the sample) was applied to distinguish serum samples of PCa patients from those of healthy individuals. The results showed that Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA) recognizing α-2,3-terminal sialic acid can be applied to distinguish between these two sets of samples since the MAA/PSA response obtained from the analysis of the PCa samples was significantly higher (5.3-fold) compared to the MAA/PSA response obtained by the analysis of samples from healthy individuals. Thus, combined analysis of serological PSA levels together with PSA glycoprofiling of aberrant glycosylation of PSA (i.e. increase in the level of α-2,3-terminal sialic acid) has a potential to improve detection of PCa. PMID:27506346

  20. Study of the metabolism of /sup 13/C labeled substrates by /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of intact cells, tissues, and organs

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.; London, R.E.; Hutson, J.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labeling, has become an important analytical technique for the study of biological systems and biologically important molecules. The growing list of its well established applications to isolated molecules in solution includes the investigation of: metabolic pathways; the microenvironments of ligands bound to proteins; the architecture and dynamics of macromolecules; the structures of coenzymes and other natural products; and the mechanisms of reactions. Recently interest has been reawakened in the use of the technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The promise and problems in the use of /sup 13/C labeling in such investigations can be illustrated by the results on suspensions of the yeast, Candida utilis.

  1. Using spin-label W-band EPR to study membrane fluidity profiles in samples of small volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainali, Laxman; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional and saturation-recovery (SR) EPR at W-band (94 GHz) using phosphatidylcholine spin labels (labeled at the alkyl chain [n-PC] and headgroup [T-PC]) to obtain profiles of membrane fluidity has been demonstrated. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol have been studied, and the results have been compared with similar studies at X-band (9.4 GHz) (L. Mainali, J.B. Feix, J.S. Hyde, W.K. Subczynski, J. Magn. Reson. 212 (2011) 418-425). Profiles of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1) obtained from SR EPR measurements for n-PCs and T-PC were used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity. Additionally, spectral analysis using Freed's MOMD (microscopic-order macroscopic-disorder) model (E. Meirovitch, J.H. Freed J. Phys. Chem. 88 (1984) 4995-5004) provided rotational diffusion coefficients (R⊥ and R||) and order parameters (S0). Spectral analysis at X-band provided one rotational diffusion coefficient, R⊥. T1-1, R⊥, and R|| profiles reflect local membrane dynamics of the lipid alkyl chain, while the order parameter shows only the amplitude of the wobbling motion of the lipid alkyl chain. Using these dynamic parameters, namely T1-1, R⊥, and R||, one can discriminate the different effects of cholesterol at different depths, showing that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect on alkyl chains to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. The nondynamic parameter, S0, shows that cholesterol has an ordering effect on alkyl chains at all depths. Conventional and SR EPR measurements with T-PC indicate that cholesterol has a fluidizing effect on phospholipid headgroups. EPR at W-band provides more detailed information about the depth-dependent dynamic organization of the membrane compared with information obtained at X-band. EPR at W-band has the potential to be a powerful tool for studying membrane fluidity in samples of small volume, ˜30 n

  2. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  3. Diazonium-based impedimetric aptasensor for the rapid label-free detection of Salmonella typhimurium in food sample.

    PubMed

    Bagheryan, Zahra; Raoof, Jahan-Bakhsh; Golabi, Mohsen; Turner, Anthony P F; Beni, Valerio

    2016-06-15

    Fast and accurate detection of microorganisms is of key importance in clinical analysis and in food and water quality monitoring. Salmonella typhimurium is responsible for about a third of all cases of foodborne diseases and consequently, its fast detection is of great importance for ensuring the safety of foodstuffs. We report the development of a label-free impedimetric aptamer-based biosensor for S. typhimurium detection. The aptamer biosensor was fabricated by grafting a diazonium-supporting layer onto screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPEs), via electrochemical or chemical approaches, followed by chemical immobilisation of aminated-aptamer. FTIR-ATR, contact angle and electrochemical measurements were used to monitor the fabrication process. Results showed that electrochemical immobilisation of the diazonium-grafting layer allowed the formation of a denser aptamer layer, which resulted in higher sensitivity. The developed aptamer-biosensor responded linearly, on a logarithm scale, over the concentration range 1 × 10(1) to 1 × 10(8)CFU mL(-1), with a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1 × 10(1) CFU mL(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 6 CFU mL(-1). Selectivity studies showed that the aptamer biosensor could discriminate S. typhimurium from 6 other model bacteria strains. Finally, recovery studies demonstrated its suitability for the detection of S. typhimurium in spiked (1 × 10(2), 1 × 10(4) and 1 × 10(6) CFU mL(-1)) apple juice samples. PMID:26894987

  4. Chromatographic NMR in NMR solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Caroline; Viel, Stéphane; Delaurent, Corinne; Ziarelli, Fabio; Excoffier, Grégory; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that pseudo-chromatographic NMR experiments could be performed using typical chromatographic solids and solvents. This first setup yielded improved separation of the spectral components of the NMR spectra of mixtures using PFG self-diffusion measurements. The method (dubbed Chromatographic NMR) was successively shown to possess, in favorable cases, superior resolving power on non-functionalized silica, compared to its LC counterpart. To further investigate the applicability of the method, we studied here the feasibility of Chromatographic NMR in common deuterated solvents. Two examples are provided, using deuterated chloroform and water, for homologous compounds soluble in these solvents, namely aromatic molecules and alcohols, respectively.

  5. Sequential backbone assignment of uniformly 13C-labeled RNAs by a two-dimensional P(CC)H-TOCSY triple resonance NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Wijmenga, S S; Heus, H A; Leeuw, H A; Hoppe, H; van der Graaf, M; Hilbers, C W

    1995-01-01

    A new 1H-13C-31P triple resonance experiment is described which allows unambiguous sequential backbone assignment in 13C-labeled oligonucleotides via through-bond coherence transfer from 31P via 13C to 1H. The approach employs INEPT to transfer coherence from 31P to 13C and homonuclear TOCSY to transfer the 13C coherence through the ribose ring, followed by 13C to 1H J-cross-polarisation. The efficiencies of the various possible transfer pathways are discussed. The most efficient route involves transfer of 31Pi coherence via C4'i and C4'i-1, because of the relatively large JPC4' couplings involved. Via the homonuclear and heteronuclear mixing periods, the C4'i and C4'i-1 coherences are subsequently transferred to, amongst others, H1'i and H1'i-1, respectively, leading to a 2D 1H-31P spectrum which allows a sequential assignment in the 31P-1H1' region of the spectrum, i.e. in the region where the proton resonances overlap least. The experiment is demonstrated on a 13C-labeled RNA hairpin with the sequence 5'(GGGC-CAAA-GCCU)3'. PMID:7533569

  6. Mathematical analysis of isotope labeling in the citric acid cycle with applications to 13C NMR studies in perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Chance, E M; Seeholzer, S H; Kobayashi, K; Williamson, J R

    1983-11-25

    Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with 5 mM glucose and either 5 mM acetate or 1 mM pyruvate to achieve steady state conditions, followed by replacement of the acetate with 90% enriched [2-13C]acetate or pyruvate with 90% enriched [3-13C]pyruvate. The hearts were frozen different times after addition of 13C-substrate and neutralized perchloric acid extracts from three pooled hearts per time point were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled 13C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The 13C fractional enrichment of individual carbons of different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for nuclear Overhauser enhancement and saturation effects. A mathematical flux model of the citric acid cycle and ancillary transamination reactions was constructed with the FACSIMILE program, and used to solve unknown flux parameters with constant pool sizes by nonlinear least squares analysis of the approximately 200 simultaneous differential equations required to describe the reactions. With [2-13C] acetate as substrate, resonances and line splittings due to 13C-13C spin coupling of the C-2, C-3, and C-4 carbons of glutamate were well resolved. The half-times to reach maximum 13C enrichment were 2.6 min for glutamate C-4 and 8 min for glutamate C-2 and C-3. From these data, a well determined citric acid cycle flux of 8.3 mumol/g dry weight X min was calculated for an observed oxygen consumption of 31 mumol/g dry weight X min. With [3-13C]pyruvate as substrate, resonances of aspartate C-2 and C-3 and of alanine C-3 were well resolved in addition to those of glutamate C-2, C-3, and C-4. Nonlinear least squares fitting of these data to the model gave nonrandomly distributed residuals for the 13C fractional enrichments of glutamate C-4, suggesting an incomplete model, but a well determined cycle flux of 11.9 mumol/g dry weight X min for an oxygen uptake of 35 mumol/g dry weight X min. Our studies demonstrate the practicality of 13C NMR

  7. H-1 Relaxation Times of Metabolites in Biological Samples Obtained with Nondestructive Ex-vivo Slow-MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-03-01

    Methods suitable for measuring 1H relaxation times such as T1, T2 and T1p, in small sized biological objects including live cells, excised organs and tissues, oil seeds etc., were developed in this work. This was achieved by combining inversion-recovery, spin-echo, or spin lock segment with the phase-adjusted spinning sideband (PASS) technique that was applied at slow sample spinning rate. Here, 2D-PASS was used to produce a high-resolution 1H spectrum free from the magnetic susceptibility broadening so that the relaxation parameters of individual metabolite can be determined. Because of the slow spinning employed, tissue and cell damage due to sample spinning is minimized. The methodologies were demonstrated by measuring 1H T1, T2 and T1p of metabolites in excised rat livers and sesame seeds at spinning rates of as low as 40 Hz.

  8. A Deuterium NMR Study of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals. 1; Synthesis and Characterization of Deuterium-Labeled Oxadiazole-Containing Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingemans, Theo J.; Madsen, Louis A.; Samulski, Edward T.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have synthesized two deuterated boomerang-shaped liquid crystals based on 2,5-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (ODBP). Deuterium was introduced in the rigid 2,5-diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole core and in the aromatic ring of the terminal 4-dodecyloxyphenyl moiety using standard acid catalyzed deuterium exchange conditions. Both compounds, ([4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl-d4)] di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate: ODBP-d4-Ph-O-C12) and ([4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl)] di-4-dodecyloxy-benzoate-d4; ODBP-Ph-d4-O-C12) were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance, optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The optical textures and thermal behavior of both compounds were found to be identical to the non-deuterated analog [4,4(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl)] di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate (ODBP-Ph-O-C12) which we reported earlier. These compounds exhibit behavior indicative of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase, which we hope to confirm using deuterium NMR spectroscopy in the next phase of this study.

  9. Stable isotope labeling methods for DNA.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Frank H T; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Heus, Hans A

    2016-08-01

    NMR is a powerful method for studying proteins and nucleic acids in solution. The study of nucleic acids by NMR is far more challenging than for proteins, which is mainly due to the limited number of building blocks and unfavorable spectral properties. For NMR studies of DNA molecules, (site specific) isotope enrichment is required to facilitate specific NMR experiments and applications. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of isotope-labeling strategies for obtaining stable isotope labeled DNA as well as specifically stable isotope labeled building blocks required for enzymatic DNA synthesis. PMID:27573183

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for 2013 and Later Model Years

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR... Vehicle Label (Ethanol/Gasoline) with Optional Display of Driving Range Values ER06JY11.050 F....

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for 2013 and Later Model Years

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR... Vehicle Label (Ethanol/Gasoline) with Optional Display of Driving Range Values ER06JY11.050 F....

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for 2013 and Later Model Years

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR... Vehicle Label (Ethanol/Gasoline) with Optional Display of Driving Range Values ER06JY11.050 F....

  13. High-resolution 1H NMR in solids with multiple-pulse sequences and magic-angle sample spinning at 270 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, G.; Haubenreisser, U.; Rosenberger, H.

    A probe suitable for 270-MHz 1H NMR in solids is described, using the combination of the phase-error-compensated WAHUHA multiple-pulse cycle and magic-angle sample spinning (MAS). The experimental results obtained at this frequency are compared with measurements at 60 MHz. Because of the increase of frequency the spectral resolution is improved by a factor of about 5. For a variety of organic and inorganic substances the resolution varies from 0.3 ppm in polycrystalline adamantane to about 2 ppm, sufficient to resolve resonance signals of protons of different molecular groups, such as NH 3, NH 4, olefinic, aromatic, and aliphatic protons. Averaged chemical shifts of a series of selected hydrogen-bonded powder samples are discussed. The residual linewidths were found to be due predominantly to second-order residual dipolar broadening, the cross term between resonance offset and dipolar interaction, nonresolved chemical shifts, and interactions of protons with nuclei which have a strong quadrupolar moment. The resolution is expected to be increased by combining the high-field MAS experiments and more effective multiple-pulse sequences, e.g., the 24-pulse cycle developed recently by Burum and Rhim.

  14. Simultaneous immunofluorescent labeling using anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and a melanocyte-specific marker in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human skin samples.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Morea; Davids, Lester M; Kidson, Susan H

    2012-12-01

    Immunolabeling of tissue sections requires careful optimization of protocols in order to achieve accurate and consistent data. Multiple immunolabeling is desirable when determining the exact location and phenotype of cell populations in the same cellular compartment. 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-immunolabeling is commonly used to assess cellular proliferation in vitro. However, the technical limitations of standard methods preclude multiple antigen immunolabeling. The aim was therefore to develop a robust protocol for simultaneous labeling using anti-BrdU and a melanocyte-specific marker in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skin samples. Human skin samples were obtained from patients undergoing elective plastic surgery. The tissue was incubated with BrdU, and a standard sample procedure for FFPE tissue was used. Heat-induced antigen retrieval was performed in a conventional pressure cooker, followed by immunolabeling with anti-BrdU and anti-Melan A/MART-1 antibodies. Fluorescent-conjugated secondary antibodies were used for signal detection. We have demonstrated both proliferating cells (BrdU-immunopositive) and melanocytes (Melan A/MART-1-immunopositive) in the basal compartment of the epidermis in our skin samples. Successful double labeling requires heat-induced epitope retrieval to replace the harsh pretreatment protocols of standard BrdU immunolabeling methods. We have optimized a robust protocol for the double labeling of proliferating cells and cells bearing melanocyte-specific antigens (melanocytes and/or melanoblasts) in FFPE human skin samples. PMID:22531682

  15. High-Resolution 3D Structure Determination of Kaliotoxin by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korukottu, Jegannath; Schneider, Robert; Vijayan, Vinesh; Lange, Adam; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy can provide structural information of proteins that cannot be studied by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to determine a protein structure by solid-state NMR to a resolution comparable to that by solution NMR. Using an iterative assignment and structure calculation protocol, a large number of distance restraints was extracted from 1H/1H mixing experiments recorded on a single uniformly labeled sample under magic angle spinning conditions. The calculated structure has a coordinate precision of 0.6 Å and 1.3 Å for the backbone and side chain heavy atoms, respectively, and deviates from the structure observed in solution. The approach is expected to be applicable to larger systems enabling the determination of high-resolution structures of amyloid or membrane proteins. PMID:18523586

  16. Solution- and solid-state NMR studies of GPCRs and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Tapaneeyakorn, Satita; Goddard, Alan D; Oates, Joanne; Willis, Christine L; Watts, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the major targets of new drugs on the market given their roles as key membrane receptors in many cellular signalling pathways. Structure-based drug design has potential to be the most reliable method for novel drug discovery. Unfortunately, GPCR-ligand crystallisation for X-ray diffraction studies is very difficult to achieve. However, solution- and solid-state NMR approaches have been developed and have provided new insights, particularly focussing on the study of protein-ligand interactions which are vital for drug discovery. This review provides an introduction for new investigators of GPCRs/ligand interactions using NMR spectroscopy. The guidelines for choosing a system for efficient isotope labelling of GPCRs and their ligands for NMR studies will be presented, along with an overview of the different sample environments suitable for generation of high resolution structural information from NMR spectra. PMID:20951674

  17. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  18. Recent developments in solid-state magic-angle spinning, nuclear magnetic resonance of fully and significantly isotopically labelled peptides and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Suzana K

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, a large number of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed and applied to the study of fully or significantly isotopically labelled ((13)C, (15)N or (13)C/(15)N) biomolecules. In the past few years, the first structures of (13)C/(15)N-labelled peptides, Gly-Ile and Met-Leu-Phe, and a protein, Src-homology 3 domain, were solved using magic-angle spinning NMR, without recourse to any structural information obtained from other methods. This progress has been made possible by the development of NMR experiments to assign solid-state spectra and experiments to extract distance and orientational information. Another key aspect to the success of solid-state NMR is the advances made in sample preparation. These improvements will be reviewed in this contribution. Future prospects for the application of solid-state NMR to interesting biological questions will also briefly be discussed. PMID:15306412

  19. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  20. Determination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Solid Samples by Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry Using ³⁷Cl-Labeled Analogues.

    PubMed

    Somoano-Blanco, Lourdes; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Pablo; García Fonseca, Sergio; Alonso, J Ignacio Garcia

    2015-08-01

    This work describes the first application of (37)Cl-labeled compounds to isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). The synthesis of 12 (37)Cl-labeled polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was carried out by the chlorination of biphenyl with isotopically enriched chlorine gas, generated by the direct oxidation of Na(37)Cl with potassium peroxymonosulfate. After an exhaustive purification due to the presence of other congeners, the concentration and the isotopic enrichment of all (37)Cl-labeled PCBs in the mixture was determined. The proposed procedure allows the simultaneous quantification of every isotope diluted PCB congener in a single gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) injection without resorting to a methodological calibration graph. The results obtained here demonstrate that the use of (37)Cl-labeled analogues provides results in agreement with the certified values of three different Certified Reference Materials (marine sediment SRM 1944, fish tissue 1947, and loamy soil CRM 962-50) and analytical figures of merit comparable to those obtained using regular IDMS procedures based on the use of commercially available (13)C-labeled analogues. PMID:26165349

  1. Metabolic flux analysis of recombinant Pichia pastoris growing on different glycerol/methanol mixtures by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jordà, Joel; de Jesus, Sérgio S; Peltier, Solenne; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2014-01-25

    The yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast cell factories for the production of heterologous proteins. The readily available genetic tools and the ease of high-cell density cultivations using methanol or glycerol/methanol mixtures are among the key factors for this development. Previous studies have shown that the use of mixed feeds of glycerol and methanol seem to alleviate the metabolic burden derived from protein production, allowing for higher specific and volumetric process productivities. However, initial studies of glycerol/methanol co-metabolism in P. pastoris by classical metabolic flux analyses using (13)C-derived Metabolic Flux Ratio (METAFoR) constraints were hampered by the reduced labelling information obtained when using C3:C1 substrate mixtures in relation to the conventional C6 substrate, that is, glucose. In this study, carbon flux distributions through the central metabolic pathways in glycerol/methanol co-assimilation conditions have been further characterised using biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labelling. In particular, metabolic flux distributions were obtained under 3 different glycerol/methanol ratios and growth rates by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids using the software tool (13)CFlux2. Specifically, cells were grown aerobically in chemostat cultures fed with 80:20, 60:40 and 40:60 (w:w) glycerol/methanol mixtures at two dilutions rates (0.05 hour(-1) and 0.16 hour(-1)), allowing to obtain additional data (biomass composition and extracellular fluxes) to complement pre-existing datasets. The performed (13)C-MFA reveals a significant redistribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism as a result of the shift in the dilution rate, while the ratio of carbon sources has a lower impact on carbon flux distribution in cells growing at the same dilution rate. At low growth rate, the percentage of methanol directly dissimilated to CO2 ranges

  2. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  3. Horseradish peroxidase and antibody labeled gold nanoparticle probe for amplified immunoassay of ciguatoxin in fish samples based on capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Chaoying; Luan, Wenxiu

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a new amplified immunoassay with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and antibody (Ab) labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) probe hyphenated to capillary electrophoresis (CE) with electrochemical (EC) detection for ultrasensitive determination of ciguatoxin CTX1B. AuNPs were conjugated with HRP and Ab, and then incubated with limited amount of CTX1B to produce immunocomplex. The immunoreactive sample was injected into capillary for CE separation and EC detection. Enhanced sensitivity was obtained by adopting the AuNPs as carriers of HRP and Ab at high HRP/Ab molar ratio. The calibration curve of CTX1B was in the range of 0.06-90 ng/mL. The detection limit was 0.045 ng/mL, which is 38-fold lower than that of HPLC-MS method for CTX1B analysis. The proposed method was successfully applied for the quantification of CTX1B in contamined fish samples by simultaneously labeling Ab and HRP on AuNPs. The amplified IA with HRP and Ab labeled AuNPs probe hyphenated to CE and EC detection provides a sensitive analytical approach for the determination of trace ciguatoxin in complex samples. PMID:25637767

  4. Insights into the molecular architecture of a peptide nanotube using FTIR and solid-state NMR spectroscopic measurements on an aligned sample.

    PubMed

    Middleton, David A; Madine, Jillian; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W

    2013-09-27

    Queuing up: Molecular orientation within macroscopically aligned nanotubes of the peptide AAAAAAK can be studied by solid-state NMR and IR spectroscopy. Line shape analysis of the NMR spectra indicates that the peptide N-H bonds are tilted 65-70° relative to the nanotube long axis. Re-evaluation of earlier X-ray fiber diffraction data suggests that the peptide molecules are hydrogen-bonded in a helical arrangement along the nanotube axis. PMID:23955926

  5. Heteronuclear Micro-Helmholtz Coil Facilitates µm-Range Spatial and Sub-Hz Spectral Resolution NMR of nL-Volume Samples on Customisable Microfluidic Chips

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Nils; Höfflin, Jens; Moazenzadeh, Ali; Mager, Dario; MacKinnon, Neil; Badilita, Vlad; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    We present a completely revised generation of a modular micro-NMR detector, featuring an active sample volume of ∼ 100 nL, and an improvement of 87% in probe efficiency. The detector is capable of rapidly screening different samples using exchangeable, application-specific, MEMS-fabricated, microfluidic sample containers. In contrast to our previous design, the sample holder chips can be simply sealed with adhesive tape, with excellent adhesion due to the smooth surfaces surrounding the fluidic ports, and so withstand pressures of ∼2.5 bar, while simultaneously enabling high spectral resolution up to 0.62 Hz for H2O, due to its optimised geometry. We have additionally reworked the coil design and fabrication processes, replacing liquid photoresists by dry film stock, whose final thickness does not depend on accurate volume dispensing or precise levelling during curing. We further introduced mechanical alignment structures to avoid time-intensive optical alignment of the chip stacks during assembly, while we exchanged the laser-cut, PMMA spacers by diced glass spacers, which are not susceptible to melting during cutting. Doing so led to an overall simplification of the entire fabrication chain, while simultaneously increasing the yield, due to an improved uniformity of thickness of the individual layers, and in addition, due to more accurate vertical positioning of the wirebonded coils, now delimited by a post base plateau. We demonstrate the capability of the design by acquiring a 1H spectrum of ∼ 11 nmol sucrose dissolved in D2O, where we achieved a linewidth of 1.25 Hz for the TSP reference peak. Chemical shift imaging experiments were further recorded from voxel volumes of only ∼ 1.5nL, which corresponded to amounts of just 1.5 nmol per voxel for a 1 M concentration. To extend the micro-detector to other nuclei of interest, we have implemented a trap circuit, enabling heteronuclear spectroscopy, demonstrated by two 1H/13C 2D HSQC experiments. PMID

  6. Heteronuclear Micro-Helmholtz Coil Facilitates µm-Range Spatial and Sub-Hz Spectral Resolution NMR of nL-Volume Samples on Customisable Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Nils; Höfflin, Jens; Moazenzadeh, Ali; Mager, Dario; MacKinnon, Neil; Badilita, Vlad; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    We present a completely revised generation of a modular micro-NMR detector, featuring an active sample volume of ∼ 100 nL, and an improvement of 87% in probe efficiency. The detector is capable of rapidly screening different samples using exchangeable, application-specific, MEMS-fabricated, microfluidic sample containers. In contrast to our previous design, the sample holder chips can be simply sealed with adhesive tape, with excellent adhesion due to the smooth surfaces surrounding the fluidic ports, and so withstand pressures of ∼2.5 bar, while simultaneously enabling high spectral resolution up to 0.62 Hz for H2O, due to its optimised geometry. We have additionally reworked the coil design and fabrication processes, replacing liquid photoresists by dry film stock, whose final thickness does not depend on accurate volume dispensing or precise levelling during curing. We further introduced mechanical alignment structures to avoid time-intensive optical alignment of the chip stacks during assembly, while we exchanged the laser-cut, PMMA spacers by diced glass spacers, which are not susceptible to melting during cutting. Doing so led to an overall simplification of the entire fabrication chain, while simultaneously increasing the yield, due to an improved uniformity of thickness of the individual layers, and in addition, due to more accurate vertical positioning of the wirebonded coils, now delimited by a post base plateau. We demonstrate the capability of the design by acquiring a 1H spectrum of ∼ 11 nmol sucrose dissolved in D2O, where we achieved a linewidth of 1.25 Hz for the TSP reference peak. Chemical shift imaging experiments were further recorded from voxel volumes of only ∼ 1.5 nL, which corresponded to amounts of just 1.5 nmol per voxel for a 1 M concentration. To extend the micro-detector to other nuclei of interest, we have implemented a trap circuit, enabling heteronuclear spectroscopy, demonstrated by two 1H/13C 2D HSQC experiments. PMID

  7. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  8. A strategy for co-translational folding studies of ribosome-bound nascent chain complexes using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M E; Launay, Hélène M M; Karyadi, Maria-Evangelia; Wang, Xiaolin; Waudby, Christopher A; Deckert, Annika; Robertson, Amy L; Christodoulou, John; Cabrita, Lisa D

    2016-08-01

    During biosynthesis on the ribosome, an elongating nascent polypeptide chain can begin to fold, in a process that is central to all living systems. Detailed structural studies of co-translational protein folding are now beginning to emerge; such studies were previously limited, at least in part, by the inherently dynamic nature of emerging nascent chains, which precluded most structural techniques. NMR spectroscopy is able to provide atomic-resolution information for ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs), but it requires large quantities (≥10 mg) of homogeneous, isotopically labeled RNCs. Further challenges include limited sample working concentration and stability of the RNC sample (which contribute to weak NMR signals) and resonance broadening caused by attachment to the large (2.4-MDa) ribosomal complex. Here, we present a strategy to generate isotopically labeled RNCs in Escherichia coli that are suitable for NMR studies. Uniform translational arrest of the nascent chains is achieved using a stalling motif, and isotopically labeled RNCs are produced at high yield using high-cell-density E. coli growth conditions. Homogeneous RNCs are isolated by combining metal affinity chromatography (to isolate ribosome-bound species) with sucrose density centrifugation (to recover intact 70S monosomes). Sensitivity-optimized NMR spectroscopy is then applied to the RNCs, combined with a suite of parallel NMR and biochemical analyses to cross-validate their integrity, including RNC-optimized NMR diffusion measurements to report on ribosome attachment in situ. Comparative NMR studies of RNCs with the analogous isolated proteins permit a high-resolution description of the structure and dynamics of a nascent chain during its progressive biosynthesis on the ribosome. PMID:27466710

  9. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  10. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  11. Simple sensitive rapid detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in food samples by label-free immunofluorescence strip sensor.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunmei; Li, Jianwu; Liu, Jinxin; Liu, Qing

    2016-08-15

    A simple, one-step, rapid method to detect Escherichia coli O157: H7 (E. coli O157: H7) using a label-free immunofluorescence strip sensor is presented. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was added to the sample culture medium to prepare the fluorescent probe for the label-free strip sensor. With the presence of E. coli O157: H7 in the samples, the bacteria could emit a yellow-green fluorescence after incubation and maintain good affinity to the monoclonal antibodies (McAb) against E. coli O157: H7. The direct-type immunofluorescence strip sensor was based on the binding between fluorescent bacteria and the unlabeled McAb immobilized at the test line in nitrocellulose membrane (NC membrane) reaction zone. The visual limit of detection (LOD) of the strip for qualitative detection was 10(6)cells/mL while the LOD for semi-quantitative detection could go down to 10(5)cells/mL by using scanning reader. The LOD was substantially improved to 1cells/mL of the original bacterial content after pre-incubation of the bread, milk and jelly samples in broth for 10, 10 and 8h respectively, which was competitive to some current rapid E. coli O157: H7 detection methods. Besides the obvious advantages, including reduced detection time and operation procedures, the results of this method meet the various detection requirements for E. coli O157: H7 and are comparable to the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and double antibody sandwich gold-labeled strips. This is the first report of semi-quantitative immunofluorescence strip for directly detecting foodborne pathogen using only one unlabeled antibody. All detections could be achieved in less than 5min. In addition, this simple, low-cost and easy to be popularized method served as a significant step towards the development of monitoring foodborne pathogens in food-safety testing. PMID:27260433

  12. A SENSITIVE NMR THERMOMETER FOR MULTINUCLEI FT NMR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pernicious problem in multinuclei FT NMR is accurate measurement of sample temperature. This arises from several factors including widespread use of high-power decoupling, large sample tubes (with potentially large temperature gradients across the sample volume), and lack of su...

  13. 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy for estimating procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios of condensed tannin samples: correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies with a diverse array of 22 condensed tannin (CT) fractions from 9 plant species demonstrated that procyanidin/prodelphinidin (PC/PD) and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios can be appraised by 1H-13C HSQC NMR. The method was developed from fractions containing 44 to ~100% CT, PC/PD ratios ranging f...

  14. TestSTORM: Simulator for optimizing sample labeling and image acquisition in localization based super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sinkó, József; Kákonyi, Róbert; Rees, Eric; Metcalf, Daniel; Knight, Alex E; Kaminski, Clemens F; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2014-03-01

    Localization-based super-resolution microscopy image quality depends on several factors such as dye choice and labeling strategy, microscope quality and user-defined parameters such as frame rate and number as well as the image processing algorithm. Experimental optimization of these parameters can be time-consuming and expensive so we present TestSTORM, a simulator that can be used to optimize these steps. TestSTORM users can select from among four different structures with specific patterns, dye and acquisition parameters. Example results are shown and the results of the vesicle pattern are compared with experimental data. Moreover, image stacks can be generated for further evaluation using localization algorithms, offering a tool for further software developments. PMID:24688813

  15. Insight into the formation of molecular species in laser-induced plasma of isotopically labeled organic samples.

    PubMed

    Glaus, Reto; Riedel, Jens; Gornushkin, Igor

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the detection of molecular species in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has gained increasing interest, particularly for isotopic analysis. In LIBS of organic materials, it is predominantly CN and C2 species that are formed, and multiple mechanisms may contribute to their formation. To gain deeper insight into the formation of these species, laser-induced plasma of (13)C and (15)N labeled organic materials was investigated in a temporally and spatially resolved manner. LIBS on fumaric acid with a (13)C labeled double bond allowed the formation mechanism of C2 to be investigated by analyzing relative signal intensities of (12)C2, (12)C(13)C, and (13)C2 molecules. In the early plasma (<5 μs), the majority of C2 originates from association of completely atomized target molecules, whereas in the late plasma, the increased concentration of (13)C2 is due to incomplete dissociation of the carbon double bond. The degree of this fragmentation was found to be up to 80% and to depend on the type of the atmospheric gas. Spatial distributions of C2 revealed distinct differences for plasma generated in nitrogen and argon. A study of the interaction of ablated organics with ambient nitrogen showed that the ambient nitrogen contributed mainly to CN formation. The pronounced anisotropy of the C(15)N to C(14)N ratio across the diameter of the plasma was observed in the early plasma, indicating poor initial mixing of the plasma with the ambient gas. Overall, for accurate isotope analysis of organics, LIBS in argon with relatively short integration times (<10 μs) provides the most robust results. On the other hand, if information about the original molecular structure is of interest, then experiments in nitrogen (or air) with long integration times appear to be the most promising. PMID:26402464

  16. Isotope Labeling in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arpana; Saxena, Krishna; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Isotope labeling of proteins represents an important and often required tool for the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure and dynamics of proteins. Mammalian expression systems have conventionally been considered to be too weak and inefficient for protein expression. However, recent advances have significantly improved the expression levels of these systems. Here, we provide an overview of some of the recent developments in expression strategies for mammalian expression systems in view of NMR investigations. PMID:22167668

  17. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  18. Metabolism of 3H- and 14C-labeled glutamate, proline, and alanine in normal and adrenalectomized rats using different sites of tracer administration and sampling.

    PubMed

    Said, H M; Chenoweth, M; Dunn, A

    1989-08-01

    Alanine, glutamate and proline labeled with 14C and 3H were infused into fasted normal and adrenalectomized rats. Alanine was administered by the A-V mode (arterial administration-venous sampling), and glutamate and proline by both the A-V and V-A (venous administration-arterial sampling) modes. The kinetics of 14C alanine and 14C glutamate differed markedly from those of the tritium-labeled compounds, but there was little difference in the kinetics of 3H and 14C proline. The replacement rate calculated from the A-V mode for glutamate was about half that obtained in the V-A mode, but there was little difference with proline. The masses of the amino acids (total content of amino acids in the body) were calculated from the washout curves of the tritium-labeled compounds after the infusion of tracer was terminated. The masses for the normal rats were 407 mumol/kg for alanine, 578 mumol/kg for glutamate and 296 mumol/kg for proline. The so-called distribution spaces calculated conventionally from total masses and the amino acid concentrations in plasma are much greater than the volume of the body, reflecting the fact that amino acid concentrations in tissues greatly exceed those in plasma. Adrenalectomy markedly affected the kinetics of the three amino acids, and their replacement rates were greatly reduced. The proline and glutamate masses were reduced by at least one half, while that of alanine was unchanged. Adrenalectomy markedly reduced the conversion of proline to glutamate. The hydrocortisone regimen used in this study restored the metabolism of alanine and glutamate to normal, but had no effect on that of proline. PMID:2569659

  19. Ammonia fixation by humic substances: A nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 NMR study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The process of ammonia fixation has been studied in three well characterized and structurally diverse fulvic and humic acid samples. The Suwannee River fulvic acid, and the IHSS peat and leonardite humic acids, were reacted with 15N-labelled ammonium hydroxide, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N NMR spectrometry. Elemental analyses and liquid phase 13C NMR spectra also were recorded on the samples before and after reaction with ammonium hydroxide. The largest increase in percent nitrogen occurred with the Suwannee River fulvic acid, which had a nitrogen content of 0.88% before fixation and 3.17% after fixation. The 15N NMR spectra revealed that ammonia reacted similarly with all three samples, indicating that the functional groups which react with ammonia exist in structural configurations common to all three samples. The majority of nitrogcn incorporated into the samples appears to be in the form of indole and pyrrole nitrogen, followed by pyridine, pyrazine, amide and aminohydroquinone nitrogen. Chemical changes in the individual samples upon fixation could not be discerned from the 13C NMR spectra.

  20. Direct and Highly Selective Drug Optosensing in Real, Undiluted Biological Samples with Quantum-Dot-Labeled Hydrophilic Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaqiong; Niu, Hui; Zhang, Huiqi

    2016-06-22

    Quantum-dot (QD)-labeled hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) microparticles were prepared for direct and highly selective optosensing of an antibiotic drug (i.e., tetracycline (Tc)) in pure bovine/goat milks and bovine/porcine serums. "Living" CdTe QD-SiO2 composite microparticles with alkyl bromide groups on their surfaces were first obtained via the one-pot sol-gel reaction, and they were subsequently grafted with a Tc-imprinted polymer layer and poly(glyceryl monomethacrylate) brushes via the successive surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerizations. The resulting MIP microparticles with QD labeling and hydrophilic polymer brushes could function properly in biological samples and showed obvious template-binding-induced fluorescence quenching, which make them a useful fluorescent chemosensor with limits of detection down to 0.14 μM in complex biological media. Moreover, a facile and effective approach was developed based on a newly derived equation to eliminate the false positives of the fluorescent chemosensor and provide it with wider linear detection concentration ranges in comparison with those obtained using the generally adopted Stern-Volmer equation. Furthermore, the fluorescent MIP chemosensor was also successfully applied for directly, sensitively, selectively, and accurately quantifying Tc in biological media, and the average recoveries were in the range of 95%∼105% even when several other drugs and the fluorescently interfering chlortetracycline were present in the samples. PMID:27238184

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization experiments at 14.1 T for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Takahashi, Hiroki; Ueda, Keisuke; Idehara, Toshitaka; Ogawa, Isamu; Toda, Mitsuru; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2010-06-14

    Instrumentation for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 14.1 T was developed to enhance the nuclear polarization for NMR of solids. The gyrotron generated 394.5 GHz submillimeter (sub-mm) wave with a power of 40 W in the second harmonic TE(0,6) mode. The sub-mm wave with a power of 0.5-3 W was transmitted to the sample in a low-temperature DNP-NMR probe with a smooth-wall circular waveguide system. The (1)H polarization enhancement factor of up to about 10 was observed for a (13)C-labeled compound with nitroxyl biradical TOTAPOL. The DNP enhancement was confirmed by the static magnetic field dependence of the NMR signal amplitude at 90 K. Improvements of the high-field DNP experiments are discussed. PMID:20518128

  2. Label-free imaging and quantitative chemical analysis of Alzheimer's disease brain samples with multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Kim, Dae Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Oh, Myoung-Kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2015-05-01

    We developed multimodal multiphoton microspectroscopy using a small-diameter probe with gradient-index lenses and applied it to unstained Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain samples. Our system maintained the image quality and spatial resolution of images obtained using an objective lens of similar numerical aperture. Multicolor images of AD brain samples were obtained simultaneously by integrating two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microendoscope platform. Measurements of two hippocampal regions, the cornus ammonis-1 and dentate gyrus, revealed more lipids, amyloid fibers, and collagen in the AD samples than in the normal samples. Normal and AD brains were clearly distinguished by a large spectral difference and quantitative analysis of the CH mode using CARS microendoscope spectroscopy. We expect this system to be an important diagnosis tool in AD research.

  3. Determination of nonylphenol ethoxylates and octylphenol ethoxylates in environmental samples using 13C-labeled surrogate compounds.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yasuko; Ito, Azusa; Murakami, Masashi; Murakami, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Hideharu; Takeda, Kikuo; Suzuki, Shigeru; Hori, Masahiro

    2007-10-01

    Alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) have been widely used as nonionic surfactants in a variety of industrial and commercial products. Typical compounds are nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs) and octylphenol polyethoxylates (OPEOs), which serve as precursors to nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP), respectively. NP and 4-t-OP are known to have endocrine disrupting effects on fish (medaka, Oryzias latipes), so it is important to know the concentrations of APEOs in the environment. Because the analytical characteristics of these compounds depend on the length of the ethoxy chain, it is necessary to use appropriate compounds as internal standards or surrogates. We synthesized two 13C-labeled surrogate compounds and used these compounds as internal standards to determine NPEOs and OPEOs by high-performance liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry. Method detection limits were 0.015 microg/L for NP (2)EO to 0.037 microg/L for NP(12)EO, and 0.011 microg/L for OP(3,6)EO to 0.024 microg/L for OP (4)EO. NPEO concentrations in water from a sewage treatment plant were less than 0.05-0.52 microg/L for final effluent and 1.2-15 microg/L for influent. OPEO concentrations were less than 0.05-0.15 microg/L for the final effluent and less than 0.05-1.1 microg/L for influent. PMID:17972761

  4. Determination of tritium distribution in labeled compounds using EPR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Postolache, C.; Matei, L.; Georgescu, R.

    2008-07-15

    Usually, the tritium distribution in a labeled compound is analyzed by T-NMR spectrometry. NMR equipment is expensive and its sensitivity is lower in comparison to EPR spectrometry. In this paper, the possibility of determining the distribution of tritium in a labeled molecule using self-radiolytic decay processes was analyzed. (authors)

  5. Maximum type I error rate inflation from sample size reassessment when investigators are blind to treatment labels

    PubMed Central

    Żebrowska, Magdalena; Posch, Martin; Magirr, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Consider a parallel group trial for the comparison of an experimental treatment to a control, where the second-stage sample size may depend on the blinded primary endpoint data as well as on additional blinded data from a secondary endpoint. For the setting of normally distributed endpoints, we demonstrate that this may lead to an inflation of the type I error rate if the null hypothesis holds for the primary but not the secondary endpoint. We derive upper bounds for the inflation of the type I error rate, both for trials that employ random allocation and for those that use block randomization. We illustrate the worst-case sample size reassessment rule in a case study. For both randomization strategies, the maximum type I error rate increases with the effect size in the secondary endpoint and the correlation between endpoints. The maximum inflation increases with smaller block sizes if information on the block size is used in the reassessment rule. Based on our findings, we do not question the well-established use of blinded sample size reassessment methods with nuisance parameter estimates computed from the blinded interim data of the primary endpoint. However, we demonstrate that the type I error rate control of these methods relies on the application of specific, binding, pre-planned and fully algorithmic sample size reassessment rules and does not extend to general or unplanned sample size adjustments based on blinded data. PMID:26694878

  6. Maximum type I error rate inflation from sample size reassessment when investigators are blind to treatment labels.

    PubMed

    Żebrowska, Magdalena; Posch, Martin; Magirr, Dominic

    2016-05-30

    Consider a parallel group trial for the comparison of an experimental treatment to a control, where the second-stage sample size may depend on the blinded primary endpoint data as well as on additional blinded data from a secondary endpoint. For the setting of normally distributed endpoints, we demonstrate that this may lead to an inflation of the type I error rate if the null hypothesis holds for the primary but not the secondary endpoint. We derive upper bounds for the inflation of the type I error rate, both for trials that employ random allocation and for those that use block randomization. We illustrate the worst-case sample size reassessment rule in a case study. For both randomization strategies, the maximum type I error rate increases with the effect size in the secondary endpoint and the correlation between endpoints. The maximum inflation increases with smaller block sizes if information on the block size is used in the reassessment rule. Based on our findings, we do not question the well-established use of blinded sample size reassessment methods with nuisance parameter estimates computed from the blinded interim data of the primary endpoint. However, we demonstrate that the type I error rate control of these methods relies on the application of specific, binding, pre-planned and fully algorithmic sample size reassessment rules and does not extend to general or unplanned sample size adjustments based on blinded data. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26694878

  7. Probing Metal Carbonation Reactions of CO2 in a Model System Containing Forsterite and H2O Using Si-29, C-13 Magic Angle Sample Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Kwak, J.; Hoyt, D. W.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Felmy, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    Ex situ solid state NMR have been used for the first time to study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+scCO2 with and without H2O. Run conditions were 80C and 96 bar. Si-29 NMR clearly shows that in the absence of CO2, the role of H2O is to hydrolyze surface Mg-O-Si bonds to produce Mg2+, and mono- and oligomeric hydroxylated silica species. The surface hydrolysis products contain only Q0 (Si(OH)4) and Q1 (Si(OH)3OSi) species. An equilibrium between Q0, Q1 and Mg2+ with a saturated concentration equivalent to less than 3.2% of the Mg2SiO4 conversion is obtained at a reaction time of up to 7 days. Using scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is observed within 7 days. Using both scCO2 and H2O, the surface reaction products for silica are mainly Q3 (SiOH(OSi)3) species accompanied by a lesser amount of Q2 (Si(OH)2(OSi)2) and Q4 (Si(OSi)4). However, no Q0 and Q1 were detected, indicating the carbonic acid formation/deprotonation and magnesite (MgCO3) precipitation reactions are faster than the forsterite hydrolysis process. Thus it can be concluded that the Mg2SiO4 hydrolysis process is the rate limiting step of the overall mineral carbonation process. Si-29 NMR combined with XRD, TEM, SAED and EDX further reveal that the reaction is a surface reaction with the Mg2SiO4 crystallite in the core and with condensed Q2-Q4 species forming amorphous surface layers. C-13 MAS NMR identified a possible reaction intermediates as (MgCO3)4*Mg(OH)2*5H2O. However, at long reaction times only crystallite magnesite MgCO3 products are observed. This research is part of a broader effort at PNNL to develop experimental tools and fundamental insights into chemical transformations affecting subsurface CO2 reactive transport. Si-29 (left) and C-13 (right) MAS NMR spectra of Mg2SiO4 under various reaction conditions. Si-29 NMR reveals that in scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is

  8. DeepQuanTR: MALDI-MS-based label-free quantification of proteins in complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Tim; Neri, Dario; Roesli, Christoph

    2010-07-01

    The quantification of changes in protein abundance in complex biological specimens is essential for proteomic studies in basic and applied research. Here we report on the development and validation of the DeepQuanTR software for identification and quantification of differentially expressed proteins using LC-MALDI-MS. Following enzymatic digestion, HPLC peptide separation and normalization of MALDI-MS signal intensities to the ones of internal standards, the software extracts peptide features, adjusts differences in HPLC retention times and performs a relative quantification of features. The annotation of multiple peptides to the corresponding parent protein allows the definition of a Protein Quant Value, which is related to protein abundance and which allows inter-sample comparisons. The performance of DeepQuanTR was evaluated by analyzing 24 samples deriving from human serum spiked with different amounts of four proteins and eight complex samples of vascular proteins, derived from surgically resected human kidneys with cancer following ex vivo perfusion with a reactive ester biotin derivative. The identification and experimental validation of proteins, which were differentially regulated in cancerous lesions as compared with normal kidney, was used to demonstrate the power of DeepQuanTR. This software, which can easily be used with established proteomic methodologies, facilitates the relative quantification of proteins derived from a wide variety of different samples. PMID:20455210

  9. Relative, label-free protein quantitation: spectral counting error statistics from nine replicate MudPIT samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine replicate samples of peptides from soybean leaves, each spiked with a different concentration of bovine apotransferrin peptides, were analyzed on a mass spectrometer using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Proteins were detected from the peptide tandem mass spectra a...

  10. (13)C-(1)H NMR relaxation and fluorescence anisotropy decay study of tyrosine dynamics in motilin.

    PubMed Central

    Damberg, Peter; Jarvet, Jüri; Allard, Peter; Mets, Ulo; Rigler, Rudolf; Gräslund, Astrid

    2002-01-01

    Tyrosine ring dynamics of the gastrointestinal hormone motilin was studied using two independent physical methods: fluorescence polarization anisotropy decay and NMR relaxation. Motilin, a 22-residue peptide, was selectively (13)C labeled in the ring epsilon-carbons of the single tyrosine residue. To eliminate effects of differences in peptide concentration, the same motilin sample was used in both experiments. NMR relaxation rates of the tyrosine ring C(epsilon)-H(epsilon) vectors, measured at four magnetic field strengths (9.4, 11.7, 14.1, and 18.8 Tesla) were used to map the spectral density function. When the data were analyzed using dynamic models with the same number of components, the dynamic parameters from NMR and fluorescence are in excellent agreement. However, the estimated rotational correlation times depend on the choice of dynamic model. The correlation times estimated from the two-component model-free approach and the three-component models were significantly different (1.7 ns and 2.2 ns, respectively). Various earlier studies of protein dynamics by NMR and fluorescence were compared. The rotational correlation times estimated by NMR for samples with high protein concentration were on average 18% longer for folded monomeric proteins than the corresponding times estimated by fluorescence polarization anisotropy decay, after correction for differences in viscosity due to temperature and D(2)O/H(2)O ratio. PMID:12414713

  11. Applications of high resolution /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.G.

    1987-10-01

    The advantages of tritium as an NMR nucleus are pointed out. Examples of its use are given, including labelled toluene, hydrogenation of ..beta..-methylstyrene, and maltose and its binding proteins. 7 refs., 2 figs. (DLC)

  12. Methylation patterns of aquatic humic substances determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Steelink, C.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy is used to examine the hydroxyl group functionality of a series of humic and fulvic acids from different aquatic environments. Samples first are methylated with 13C-labeled diazomethane. The NMR spectra of the diazomethylated samples allow one to distinguish between methyl esters of carboxylic acids, methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls, and methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls adjacent to two substituents. Samples are then permethylated with 13C-labeled methyl iodide/NaH. 13C NMR spectra of permethylated samples show that a significant fraction of the hydroxyl groups is not methylated with diazomethane alone. In these spectra methyl ethers of carbohydrate and aliphatic hydroxyls overlap with methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls. Side reactions of the methyltion procedure including carbon methylation in the CH3I/NaH procedure, are also examined. Humic and fulvic acids from bog, swamp, groundwater, and lake waters showssome differences in their distribution of hydroxyl groups, mainly in the concentrations of phenolic hydroxyls, which may be attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. ?? 1987.

  13. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  14. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  15. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  16. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  17. Simultaneous Acquisition of 2D and 3D Solid-State NMR Experiments for Sequential Assignment of Oriented Membrane Protein Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, T.; Mote, Kaustubh R; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins aligned in mechanically or magnetically lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living 15N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through 15N-15N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish 15N-15N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR-mixing experiments. PMID:25749871

  18. Simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR experiments for sequential assignment of oriented membrane protein samples.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, T; Mote, Kaustubh R; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins reconstituted in mechanically or magnetically aligned lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living (15)N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through (15)N-(15)N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish (15)N-(15)N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR-mixing experiments. PMID:25749871

  19. Development of a Coulombimetric immunosensor based on specific antibodies labeled with CdS nanoparticles for sulfonamide antibiotic residues analysis and its application to honey samples.

    PubMed

    Valera, Enrique; Muriano, Alejandro; Pividori, Isabel; Sánchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M-P

    2013-05-15

    A new electrochemical immunosensor has been developed to detect sulfonamide antibiotic residues in food samples. The immunosensor presented uses immunoreagents specifically developed for the broad recognition of the sulfonamide antibiotic family, a graphite composite electrode (GEC), biofunctionalized magnetic μ-particles and electrochemical nanoprobes prepared by labeling the specific antibodies with CdS nanoparticles (CdSNP). After the immunochemical reaction, the CdSNP are dissolved and the metal ions released are reduced at the electrode and read as in the form of current or charge signal, by the well-known anodic stripping technique. Due to the amplification effect on the amperometric/coulombimetric signal produced by the CdSNP, a high detectability can be reached. Thus, sulfapyridine (SPY), one of the most widely used sulfonamide congeners, can be detected in buffer with an IC50current of 0.20±0.25μgL(-1). The immunosensor has been applied to the analysis of residues of this antibiotic in honey samples. Due to the reported formation of sulfonamide-sugar conjugates in this type of matrix, honey samples are first hydrolyzed in acidic media. The use of magnetic particles minimizes the matrix effect allowing to reach a detectability (LOD, limit of detection) of 0.11μgkg(-1) (current measurements), far below the limits established in some countries for these types of residues in honey samples. Due to the use of magnetic racks, multiple samples can be run simultaneously. The whole analysis process can be performed in around 22min. PMID:23313703

  20. Silica Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles as SERS Labels for the Detection of Lymphoma B-Cells in Tissue Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Faouri, Tamara

    The surface of silica encapsulated gold nanoparticles with trans-1,2-bis (4-pyridyl) ethylene Raman active dye were utilized as SERS labels to target CD20 surface protein on lymphoma B-cells in human tissue sections with CLL or FL. SERS labels were functionalized with various antibody linkers including carboxylic, aldehyde, and heterobifunctional PEG chains with an NHS end, to permit them to bind to tissue section samples. NP samples and tissue sections were characterized through UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM, XPS, Zeta potential measurements, Dark Field microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, NMR, and AFM. The number of SERS labels present on a tissue sample was estimated using dark field images and a particle counting software. It was found that the heterobifunctional PEG chains linker provided the most specific binding of SERS labels with an estimated NP count of 1.33x106 NPs on the whole tissue and produced the highest Raman scatter intensity of approximately 48600 counts.

  1. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  2. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  3. Structure of a protein determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Federica; van Rossum, Barth; Diehl, Annette; Schubert, Mario; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2002-11-01

    The determination of a representative set of protein structures is a chief aim in structural genomics. Solid-state NMR may have a crucial role in structural investigations of those proteins that do not easily form crystals or are not accessible to solution NMR, such as amyloid systems or membrane proteins. Here we present a protein structure determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR. Almost complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for a micro-crystalline preparation of the α-spectrin Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance restraints. These restraints were derived from proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) spectra of biosynthetically site-directed, labelled samples obtained from bacteria grown using [1,3-13C]glycerol or [2-13C]glycerol as carbon sources. This allowed the observation of long-range distance correlations up to ~7Å. The calculated global fold of the α-spectrin SH3 domain is based on 286 inter-residue 13C-13C and six 15N-15N restraints, all self-consistently obtained by solid-state MAS NMR. This MAS NMR procedure should be widely applicable to small membrane proteins that can be expressed in bacteria.

  4. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  5. Design and Construction of a Versatile Dual Volume Heteronuclear Double Resonance Microcoil NMR Probe

    PubMed Central

    Kc, Ravi; Henry, Ian D.; Park, Gregory H. J.; Raftery, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Improved NMR detection of mass limited samples can be obtained by taking advantage of the mass sensitivity of microcoil NMR, while throughput issues can be addressed using multiple, parallel sample detection coils. We present the design and construction of a double resonance 300-MHz dual volume microcoil NMR probe with thermally-etched 440-nL detection volumes and fused silica transfer lines for high-throughput stopped-flow or flow-through sample analysis. Two orthogonal solenoidal detection coils and the novel use of shielded inductors allowed the construction of a probe with negligible radio-frequency cross talk. The probe was resonated at 1H–2D (upper coil) and 1H–13C (lower coil) frequencies such that it could perform 1D and 2D experiments with active locking frequency. The coils exhibited line widths of 0.8 to 1.1 Hz with good mass sensitivity for both 1H and 13C NMR detection. 13C directly detected 2D HETCOR spectra of 5% v/v 13C labeled acetic acid were obtained in less than 5 min. Demonstration of the probe characteristics as well as applications of the versatile two-coil double resonance probe are discussed. PMID:19138541

  6. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  7. Development of LC-13C NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, H. C.; Wang, J. S.; Glass, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study involves the development of C-13 nuclear resonance as an on-line detector for liquid chromatography (LC-C-13 NMR) for the chemical characterization of aviation fuels. The initial focus of this study was the development of a high sensitivity flow C-13 NMR probe. Since C-13 NMR sensitivity is of paramount concern, considerable effort during the first year was directed at new NMR probe designs. In particular, various toroid coil designs were examined. In addition, corresponding shim coils for correcting the main magnetic field (B sub 0) homogeneity were examined. Based on these initial probe design studies, an LC-C-13 NMR probe was built and flow C-13 NMR data was obtained for a limited number of samples.

  8. A 1H/19F minicoil NMR probe for solid-state NMR: application to 5-fluoroindoles.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; DeVries, Jeffrey S; McDonald, Robert; Rakovszky, Melissa L; Sykes, Brian D

    2006-01-01

    We show that it is feasible to use a minicoil for solid-state 19F 1H NMR experiments that has short pulse widths, good RF homogeneity, and excellent signal-to-noise for small samples while using low power amplifiers typical to liquid-state NMR. The closely spaced resonant frequencies of 1H and 19F and the ubiquitous use of fluorine in modern plastics and electronic components present two major challenges in the design of a high-sensitivity, high-field 1H/19F probe. Through the selection of specific components, circuit design, and pulse sequence, we were able to build a probe that has low 19F background and excellent separation of 1H and 19F signals. We determine the principle components of the chemical shift anisotropy tensor of 5-fluoroindole-3-acetic acid (5FIAA) and 5-fluorotryptophan. We also solve the crystal structure of 5FIAA, determine the orientation dependence of the chemical shift of a single crystal of 5FIAA, and predict the 19F chemical shift based on the orientation of the fluorine in the crystal. The results show that this 1H/19F probe is suitable for solid-state NMR experiments with low amounts of biological molecules that have been labeled with 19F. PMID:16198131

  9. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  10. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  11. NMR Imaging: Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, Jeremy Mark

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents three original contributions to the field of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR): the experimental framework and analysis for the measurement of a new imaging parameter to describe perfusion; the measurement and analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity and a practical correction system for their reduction; a novel system for the synchronous control of NMR experiments based on the microprogrammed concept. The thesis begins with an introduction to the theory of NMR. The application of NMR to imaging is also introduced with emphasis on the techniques which developed into those in common use today. Inaccurate determination of the traditional NMR parameters (T_1 and T_2 and the molecular diffusion coefficient) can be caused by non-diffusive fluid movement within the sample. The experimental basis for determining a new imaging parameter --the Perfusion coefficient--is presented. This provides a measure of forced isotropic fluid motion through an organ or tissue. The instrumentation required for conducting NMR experiments is described in order to introduce the contribution made in this area during this research: A sequence controller. The controller is based on the concept of microprogramming and enables completely synchronous output of 128 bits of data. The software for the generation and storage of control data and the regulation of the data to provide experimental control is microcomputer based. It affords precise and accurate regulation of the magnetic field gradients, the rf synthesizer and the spectrometer for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Fundamental to the science of NMR is the presence of a magnetic field. A detailed study of the analysis of magnetic field inhomogeneity in terms of spherical harmonics is presented. The field of a whole body imaging system with poor inhomogeneity was measured and analyzed to determine and describe the components of the inhomogeneity. Finally a

  12. Bio-generation of stable isotope-labeled internal standards for absolute and relative quantitation of phase II drug metabolites in plasma samples using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Li, Zi; Beck, Wayne D; Callahan, Patrick M; Terry, Alvin V; Bar-Peled, Maor; Bartlett, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    Quantification of drug metabolites in biological samples has been of great interest in current pharmaceutical research, since metabolite concentrations and pharmacokinetics can contribute to a better understanding of the toxicity of drug candidates. Two major categories of Phase II metabolites, glucuronide conjugates and glutathione conjugates, may cause significant drug toxicity and therefore require close monitoring at early stages of drug development. In order to achieve high precision, accuracy, and robustness, stable isotope-labeled (SIL) internal standards (IS) are widely used in quantitative bioanalytical methods using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), due to their capability of compensating for matrix effects, extraction variations and instrument response fluctuations. However, chemical synthesis of SIL analogues of Phase II metabolites can often be very difficult and require extensive exploratory research, leading to higher cost and significant delays in drug research and development. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a generic method which can synthesize SIL analogues of Phase II metabolites from more available SIL parent drugs or SIL conjugation co-factors, using in vitro biotransformation. This methodology was successfully applied to the bio-generation of SIL glucuronide conjugates and glutathione conjugates. The method demonstrated satisfactory performance in both absolute quantitation and assessment of relative exposure coverage across species in safety tests of drug metabolites (MIST). This generic technique can be utilized as an alternative to chemical synthesis and potentially save time and cost for drug research and development. PMID:25804729

  13. Label-free optical biosensor for detection and quantification of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in milk without any sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Rau, Sabrina; Hilbig, Urs; Gauglitz, Günter

    2014-05-01

    A label-free optical biosensor for detection and quantification of diclofenac in bovine milk has been developed. This was achieved by using reflectometric interference spectroscopy as detection method. In a first step, the immunosensor was developed and optimised in buffer concerning sensitivity, selectivity, stability and reproducibility. By comparing recovery rates—not only the good intra- but also the good inter-chip—reproducibility could be proven. Consequently, the assay was transferred in the more complex matrix milk. By utilising an optimised surface modification and evaluation method, matrix effects could successfully be prevented or circumvented. As a result, the developed immunosensor does not need sample pretreatment at all. By obtaining a limit of detection of 0.112 μg L(−1) (0.108 μg kg(−1)), the capability of the developed biosensor is comparable or better than those of standard detection methods. Moreover, the presented biosensor reaches the range of the maximum residue limit (0.1 μg kg(−1)) set by the European Union. Thus, for the first time, diclofenac was successfully quantified at relevant levels in milk by using an optical biosensor. PMID:24658575

  14. Separation and quantitative determination of cinacalcet metabolites in urine sample using RP-HPLC after derivation with a fluorescent labeling reagent.

    PubMed

    Farnoudian-Habibi, Amir; Jaymand, Mehdi

    2016-08-01

    In this investigation, a novel strategy for separation and quantitative determination of four metabolites of cinacalcet (M2a-Glu, M2b-Glu, M7-Gly, and M8-Gly) in human urine is suggested. The analytical assay is based on a pre-column derivation procedure of cinacalcet metabolites with 1-pyrenyldiazomethane (PDAM) as a fluorescent labeling reagent, and subsequently separation and quantitative determination with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled with a fluorescence detector. Metabolites were separated on a Microsorb-MV 100-5 C18 chromatography column (250×4.6mm, 5μm) using acetate buffer (pH 3.5):methanol (30:70 v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0mLmin(-1). The method was fully validated in terms of linearity (r(2)>0.996; 1-10ngmL(-1)), precision (both intra-day and inter-day; RSD<6.2%), accuracy (92-110%), specificity, robustness (0.15%samples. PMID:27304782

  15. A novel graphene-based label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor for selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species in biological samples and living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yaotang; Garg, Bhaskar; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2016-02-01

    A novel label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti4+-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti4+) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions between phosphate groups and Ti4+. The as-prepared rGO@PDA-Ti4+-FMNs (nanosensor), fluoresce only weakly due to the ineffective Förster resonance energy transfer between the FMNs and rGO@PDA-Ti4+. The experimental findings revealed that the microwave-assisted interaction of the nanosensor with α-, β-casein, ovalbumin, human serum, non-fat milk, egg white, and living cells (all containing Ps) releases FMNs (due to the high formation constant between phosphate groups and Ti4+), leading to an excellent fluorescence `turn-on' response. The fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal microscopy, and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometry were used to detect Ps both qualitatively and quantitatively. Under the optimized conditions, the nanosensor showed a detection limit of ca. 118.5, 28.9, and 54.8 nM for the tryptic digests of α-, β-casein and ovalbumin, respectively. Furthermore, the standard addition method was used as a bench-mark proof for phosphopeptide quantification in egg white samples. We postulate that the present quantitative assay for Ps holds tremendous potential and may pave the way to disease diagnostics in the near future.A novel label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti4+-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti4+) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions

  16. The effect of biradical concentration on the performance of DNP-MAS-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Sascha; Linden, Arne H.; Akbey, Ümit; Trent Franks, W.; Loening, Nikolaus M.; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2012-03-01

    With the technique of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) signal intensity in solid-state MAS-NMR experiments can be enhanced by 2-3 orders of magnitude. DNP relies on the transfer of electron spin polarization from unpaired electrons to nuclear spins. For this reason, stable organic biradicals such as TOTAPOL are commonly added to samples used in DNP experiments. We investigated the effects of biradical concentration on the relaxation, enhancement, and intensity of NMR signals, employing a series of samples with various TOTAPOL concentrations and uniformly 13C, 15N labeled proline. A considerable decrease of the NMR relaxation times (T1, T2∗, and T1ρ) is observed with increasing amounts of biradical due to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). For nuclei in close proximity to the radical, decreasing T1ρ reduces cross-polarization efficiency and decreases in T2∗ broaden the signal. Additionally, paramagnetic shifts of 1H signals can cause further line broadening by impairing decoupling. On average, the combination of these paramagnetic effects (PE; relaxation enhancement, paramagnetic shifts) quenches NMR-signals from nuclei closer than 10 Å to the biradical centers. On the other hand, shorter T1 times allow the repetition rate of the experiment to be increased, which can partially compensate for intensity loss. Therefore, it is desirable to optimize the radical concentration to prevent additional line broadening and to maximize the signal-to-noise observed per unit time for the signals of interest.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of the fluorescent probes for the labeling of Microthrix parvicella.

    PubMed

    Li, Songya; Fei, Xuening; Jiao, Xiumei; Lin, Dayong; Zhang, Baolian; Cao, Lingyun

    2016-03-01

    Although the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been widely used to identify the Microthrix parvicella (M. parvicella), there are a few disadvantages and difficulties, such as complicated process, time consuming, etc. In this work, a series of fluorescent probes, which were modified by long-chain alkane with hydrophobic property and based on the property of M. parvicella utilizing long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), for the labeling of M. parvicella in bulking sludge were designed, synthesized, and characterized. The probes were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, (1)H NMR spectra, and mass spectra, and the photostability and hydrophobic property of probes were investigated. All the results showed that the probes were quite stable and suitable for the fluorescent labeling. The probes had a large stoke shift of 98-137 nm, which was benefit for the fluorescent labeling. In the fluorescent labeling of M. parvicella by the synthesized probes, the probes had excellent labeling effects. By comparison of the images and the Image Pro Plus 6.0 analysis, the optimal concentration of the probes in the activated sludge sample for labeling was 0.010 mmol/L and the probe 3d had the best labeling. In addition, the effect of the duration time of probes was also investigated, and the results showed that the fluorescent intensity of probes hardly changed in a long period of time and it was suitable for labeling. PMID:26603763

  18. A novel graphene-based label-free fluorescence 'turn-on' nanosensor for selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species in biological samples and living cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yaotang; Garg, Bhaskar; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2016-02-28

    A novel label-free fluorescence 'turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti(4+)-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti(4+)) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions between phosphate groups and Ti(4+). The as-prepared rGO@PDA-Ti(4+)-FMNs (nanosensor), fluoresce only weakly due to the ineffective Förster resonance energy transfer between the FMNs and rGO@PDA-Ti(4+). The experimental findings revealed that the microwave-assisted interaction of the nanosensor with α-, β-casein, ovalbumin, human serum, non-fat milk, egg white, and living cells (all containing Ps) releases FMNs (due to the high formation constant between phosphate groups and Ti(4+)), leading to an excellent fluorescence 'turn-on' response. The fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal microscopy, and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometry were used to detect Ps both qualitatively and quantitatively. Under the optimized conditions, the nanosensor showed a detection limit of ca. 118.5, 28.9, and 54.8 nM for the tryptic digests of α-, β-casein and ovalbumin, respectively. Furthermore, the standard addition method was used as a bench-mark proof for phosphopeptide quantification in egg white samples. We postulate that the present quantitative assay for Ps holds tremendous potential and may pave the way to disease diagnostics in the near future. PMID:26758942

  19. NMR investigation of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwanghyo; Jang, Zeehoon

    2013-01-01

    109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation measurements have been performed on two powder samples of Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of 20 nm and 80 nm. The measurements have been done in an external field of 9.4 T and in the temperature range 10 K < T < 280 K. The 109Ag NMR spectra for both samples have close to Lorentzian shapes and turn out to be mixtures of homogeneous and inhomogeneous lines. The linewidth Δ ν at room temperature is 1.3 kHz for both samples and gradually increases with decreasing temperature. Both the Knight shift ( K) and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/ T 1) are observed to be almost identical to the values reported for the bulk Ag metal, whereby the Korringa ratio R(= K 2 T 1 T/S) is found to be 2.0 for both samples in the investigated temperature range.

  20. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  1. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  2. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  3. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  4. 15N-labeled tRNA. Identification of 4-thiouridine in Escherichia coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 by 1H-15N two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffey, R H; Davis, D R; Yamaizumi, Z; Nishimura, S; Hawkins, B L; Poulter, C D

    1986-09-15

    Uridine is uniquely conserved at position 8 in elongator tRNAs and binds to A14 to form a reversed Hoogsteen base pair which folds the dihydrouridine loop back into the core of the L-shaped molecule. On the basis of 1H NMR studies, Hurd and co-workers (Hurd, R. E., Robillard, G. T., and Reid, B. R. (1977) Biochemistry 16, 2095-2100) concluded that the interaction between positions 8 and 14 is absent in Escherichia coli tRNAs with only 3 base pairs in the dihydrouridine stem. We have taken advantage of the unique 15N chemical shift of N3 in thiouridine to identify 1H and 15N resonances for the imino units of S4U8 and s4U9 in E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2. Model studies with chloroform-soluble derivatives of uridine and 4-thiouridine show that the chemical shifts of the protons in the imino moieties move downfield from 7.9 to 14.4 ppm and from 9.1 to 15.7 ppm, respectively; whereas, the corresponding 15N chemical shifts move downfield from 157.5 to 162.5 ppm and from 175.5 to 180.1 ppm upon hydrogen bonding to 5'-O-acetyl-2',3'-isopropylidene adenosine. The large difference in 15N chemical shifts for U and s4U allows one to unambiguously identify s4U imino resonances by 15N NMR spectroscopy. E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 were selectively enriched with 15N at N3 of all uridines and modified uridines. Two-dimensional 1H-15N chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy revealed that both tRNAs have resonances with 1H and 15N chemical shifts characteristic of s4UA pairs. The 1H shift is approximately 1 ppm upfield from the typical s4U8 resonance at 14.8 ppm, presumably as a result of local diamagnetic anisotropies. An additional s4U resonance with 1H and 15N shifts typical of interaction of a bound water or a sugar hydroxyl group with s4U9 was discovered in the spectrum of tRNATyr2. Our NMR results for tRNAs with 3-base pair dihydrouridine stems suggest that these molecules have an U8A14 tertiary interaction similar to that found in tRNAs with 4-base pair dihydrouridine

  5. NMR studies of DOXP reductoisomerase and its inhibitor complex.

    PubMed

    Englert, Nadine E; Richter, Christian; Wiesner, Jochen; Hintz, Martin; Jomaa, Hassan; Schwalbe, Harald

    2011-02-11

    1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) reductoisomerase (EC1.1.1.267) catalyses the second step of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis. The enzyme is used by most bacteria, apicomplexan parasites and the plastids of plants, but not by humans, and therefore represents an attractive target for antibacterial, antiparasitic and herbicidal compounds. Fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of DXR, has been found to be active against bacterial infections and malaria in early clinical studies. Here, we report sample optimisation, partial backbone assignment and secondary-structure prediction of E. coli DXR by heteronuclear NMR analysis for further NMR-aided drug discovery. Perdeuterated (15)N,(13)C-labelled samples were prepared under oxygen exclusion in the presence of Mg(2+), NADPH and the inhibitor FR-900098, a close derivative of fosmidomycin. (1)H and (15)N backbone assignment was achieved for 44 % of the primary structure, and (13)C backbone assignment was achieved for 50 % of the primary structure. Comparison with previously solved crystal structures revealed that the assigned fragments were located mainly in helical regions on the solvent-exposed surface of the enzyme. Torsion angle likelihood obtained from shift and sequence similarity (TALOS) was used for secondary structure prediction, resulting in agreement with eight available crystal structures; deviations could be observed for the catalytic loop region. PMID:21290548

  6. Rapid Spectrophotometric Technique for Quantifying Iron in Cells Labeled with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Potential Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dadashzadeh, Esmaeel R.; Hobson, Matthew; Bryant, L. Henry; Dean, Dana D.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles provides the ability to track cells by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Quantifying intracellular iron concentration in SPIO labeled cells would allow for the comparison of agents and techniques used to magnetically label cells. Here we describe a rapid spectrophotometric technique (ST) to quantify iron content of SPIO labeled cells, circumventing the previous requirement of an overnight acid digestion. Following lysis with 10% SDS of magnetically labeled cells, quantification of SPIO doped or labeled cells was performed using commonly available spectrophotometric instrument(s) by comparing absorptions at 370 and 750 nm with correction for turbidity of cellular products to determine iron content of each sample. Standard curves demonstrated high linear correlation (R2 = 0.998) between absorbance spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles and concentration in known SPIO doped cells. Comparisons of the ST to ICP-MS or NMR relaxometric (R2) determinations of intracellular iron contents in SPIO containing samples resulted in significant linear correlation between the techniques (R2 vs. ST, R2>0.992, p<0.0001, ST vs. ICP-MS, R2>0.995, p<0.0001) with the limit of detection of ST for iron = 0.66μg/ml. We have developed a rapid straightforward protocol that does not require overnight acid digestion for quantifying iron oxide content in magnetically labeled cells using readily available analytic instrumentation that should greatly expedite advances in comparing SPIO agents and protocols for labeling cells. PMID:23109392

  7. Sensitivity-enhanced NMR reveals alterations in protein structure by cellular milieus.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra K; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Corzilius, Björn; Ong, Ta-Chung; Jacavone, Angela C; Griffin, Robert G; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-10-22

    Biological processes occur in complex environments containing a myriad of potential interactors. Unfortunately, limitations on the sensitivity of biophysical techniques normally restrict structural investigations to purified systems, at concentrations that are orders of magnitude above endogenous levels. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and enable structural studies in biologically complex environments. Here, we applied DNP NMR to investigate the structure of a protein containing both an environmentally sensitive folding pathway and an intrinsically disordered region, the yeast prion protein Sup35. We added an exogenously prepared isotopically labeled protein to deuterated lysates, rendering the biological environment "invisible" and enabling highly efficient polarization transfer for DNP. In this environment, structural changes occurred in a region known to influence biological activity but intrinsically disordered in purified samples. Thus, DNP makes structural studies of proteins at endogenous levels in biological contexts possible, and such contexts can influence protein structure. PMID:26456111

  8. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification

    PubMed Central

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Marsh, E. Neil. G.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling 1H-1H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using 1H-1H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time 1H-1H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5–15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils. PMID:26138908

  9. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Marsh, E. Neil. G.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling 1H-1H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using 1H-1H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time 1H-1H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5-15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils.

  10. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification.

    PubMed

    Kotler, Samuel A; Brender, Jeffrey R; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Marsh, E Neil G; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5-15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils. PMID:26138908

  11. One- and two-dimensional exchange J-resolved CP-MAS NMR spectrum of adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, K.; McDowell, C. A.

    1986-02-01

    A combined technique of 1D and 2D exchange NMR and J-resolved CP-MAS NMR of dilute spins in solids and its application to study a spin exchange process of abundant spins in solids is described, and demonstrated for powdered adamantane. A high-resolution J-resolved NMR spectrum of a 13C nucleus obtained by applying homonuclear decoupling and magic angle sample spinning is employed to label the spin states of 1H spins bonded to the 13C nucleus. Perspective 2D exchange spectra are employed to map out connectivity between the proton spin states, and the rate constants for the 1H spin exchange involved are determined by 1D exchange NMR techniques. Discussions based on the total energy conservation enable us to conclude that the observed spin exchange processes are to be ascribed mainly to the flip-flop motion of 1H spins; the spin-lattice process is negligible. The rate constant for the flip-flop motion of the proton spins is determined to be (7±2)×103 s-1 at room temperature.

  12. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  13. Broadband excitation in solid-state NMR of paramagnetic samples using Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation ('Para-DANTE')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Vitzthum, Veronika; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-11-01

    This Letter shows that interleaved sequences of short pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) with N = 1, 2, 3 … equidistant pulses per rotor period extending over K rotor periods can be used to excite, invert or refocus a large number of spinning sidebands of spin-1/2 nuclei in paramagnetic samples where hyperfine couplings lead to very broad spectra that extend over more than 1 MHz. The breadth of the response is maintained for rf-field amplitudes as low as 30 kHz since it results from cumulative effects of individual pulses with very short durations.

  14. Ultra-wide bore 900 MHz high-resolution NMR at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R.; Brey, W. W.; Shetty, K.; Gor'kov, P.; Saha, S.; Long, J. R.; Grant, S. C.; Chekmenev, E. Y.; Hu, J.; Gan, Z.; Sharma, M.; Zhang, F.; Logan, T. M.; Brüschweller, R.; Edison, A.; Blue, A.; Dixon, I. R.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Cross, T. A.

    2005-11-01

    Access to an ultra-wide bore (105 mm) 21.1 T magnet makes possible numerous advances in NMR spectroscopy and MR imaging, as well as novel applications. This magnet was developed, designed, manufactured and tested at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and on July 21, 2004 it was energized to 21.1 T. Commercial and unique homebuilt probes, along with a standard commercial NMR console have been installed and tested with many science applications to develop this spectrometer as a user facility. Solution NMR of membrane proteins with enhanced resolution, new pulse sequences for solid state NMR taking advantage of narrowed proton linewidths, and enhanced spatial resolution and contrast leading to improved animal imaging have been documented. In addition, it is demonstrated that spectroscopy of single site 17O labeled macromolecules in a hydrated lipid bilayer environment can be recorded in a remarkably short period of time. 17O spectra of aligned samples show the potential for using this data for orientational restraints and for characterizing unique details of cation binding properties to ion channels. The success of this NHMFL magnet illustrates the potential for using a similar magnet design as an outsert for high temperature superconducting insert coils to achieve an NMR magnet with a field >25 T.

  15. Stable isotope-enhanced two- and three-dimensional diffusion ordered 13C NMR spectroscopy (SIE-DOSY 13C NMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermillion, Karl; Price, Neil P. J.

    2009-06-01

    The feasibility of obtaining high quality homonuclear or heteronuclear diffusion-ordered 13C NMR data is shown to be greatly improved by using 13C isotopically-enriched samples. Stable isotope-enhanced diffusion ordered (SIE-DOSY) 13C NMR has been applied to 13C-enriched carbohydrates, and has been used to determine diffusion coefficients for pentose and hexose monosaccharides, and a disaccharide and trisaccharide. These 2D spectra were obtained with as little as 8 min of acquisition time. Fully resolved 3D DOSY-HMQC NMR spectra of [U- 13C]xylose, [U- 13C]glucose, and [1- 13C gal]lactose were obtained in 5 h. Sample derivatization with [ carbonyl- 13C]acetate (peracetylation) extends the usefulness of the technique to included non-labeled sugars; the 13C-carbonyl - carbohydrate ring proton 1H- 13C correlations also provide additional structural information, as shown for the 3-D DOSY-HMQC analysis of a mixture of maltotriose and lactose per-[ carbonyl- 13C]acetates.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  17. Effect of Fluorescent Labels on Peptide and Amino Acid Sample Dimensionality in Two Dimensional nLC × μFFE Separations.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Matthew; Bowser, Michael T

    2016-02-16

    Multidimensional separations present a unique opportunity for generating the high peak capacities necessary for the analysis of complex biological mixtures. We have coupled nano liquid chromatography with micro free flow electrophoresis (nLC × μFFE) to produce high peak capacity separations of peptide and amino acid mixtures. Currently, μFFE largely relies on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. We have demonstrated that the choice of fluorescent label significantly affects the fractional coverage and peak capacity of nLC × μFFE separations of peptides and amino acids. Of the labeling reagents assessed, Chromeo P503 performed the best for nLC × μFFE separations of peptides. A nLC × μFFE analysis of a Chromeo P503-labeled BSA tryptic digest produced a 2D separation that made effective use of the available separation space (48%), generating a corrected peak capacity of 521 in a 5 min separation window (104 peaks/min). nLC × μFFE separations of NBD-F-labeled peptides produced similar fractional coverage and peak capacity, but this reagent was able to react with multiple reaction sites, producing an unnecessarily complex analyte mixture. NBD-F performed the best for nLC × μFFE separations of amino acids. NBD-F-labeled amino acids produced a 2D separation that covered 36% of the available separation space, generating a corrected peak capacity of 95 in a 75 s separation window (76 peaks/min). Chromeo P503 and Alexa Fluor 488-labeled amino acids were not effectively separated in the μFFE dimension, giving 2D separations with poor fractional coverage and peak capacity. PMID:26757484

  18. 30 CFR 74.15 - Approval labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval labels. 74.15 Section 74.15 Mineral... DUST SAMPLING DEVICES General Requirements for All Devices § 74.15 Approval labels. (a) Certificate of... reproductions of approval labels and a sketch or description of the position of the labels on each...

  19. Rotational Doppler Effect and Barnett Field in Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Harii, Kazuya; Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Ono, Masao; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the rotational Doppler effect using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have developed a coil-spinning technique that enables measurements by rotating a detector and fixing a sample. We found that the rotational Doppler effect gives rise to NMR frequency shifts equal to the rotation frequency. We formulate the rotational Doppler effect and the Barnett field using a vector model for the nuclear magnetic moment. This formulation reveals that, with just the sample rotating, both effects cancel each other, thereby explaining the absence of an NMR frequency shift in conventional sample-spinning NMR measurements.

  20. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50% of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated with the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from laboratory experiments of terpenes photo-oxidation. The second NMR

  1. [Non-invasive analysis of proteins in living cells using NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tochio, Hidehito; Murayama, Shuhei; Inomata, Kohsuke; Morimoto, Daichi; Ohno, Ayako; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables structural analyses of proteins and has been widely used in the structural biology field in recent decades. NMR spectroscopy can be applied to proteins inside living cells, allowing characterization of their structures and dynamics in intracellular environments. The simplest "in-cell NMR" approach employs bacterial cells; in this approach, live Escherichia coli cells overexpressing a specific protein are subjected to NMR. The cells are grown in an NMR active isotope-enriched medium to ensure that the overexpressed proteins are labeled with the stable isotopes. Thus the obtained NMR spectra, which are derived from labeled proteins, contain atomic-level information about the structure and dynamics of the proteins. Recent progress enables us to work with higher eukaryotic cells such as HeLa and HEK293 cells, for which a number of techniques have been developed to achieve isotope labeling of the specific target protein. In this review, we describe successful use of electroporation for in-cell NMR. In addition, (19)F-NMR to characterize protein-ligand interactions in cells is presented. Because (19)F nuclei rarely exist in natural cells, when (19)F-labeled proteins are delivered into cells and (19)F-NMR signals are observed, one can safely ascertain that these signals originate from the delivered proteins and not other molecules. PMID:25759048

  2. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, J.; Bellama, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two dimensional NMR represents a significant achievement in the continuing effort to increase solution in NMR spectroscopy. This book explains the fundamentals of this new technique and its analytical applications. It presents the necessary information, in pictorial form, for reading the ''2D NMR,'' and enables the practicing chemist to solve problems and run experiments on a commercial spectrometer by using the software provided by the manufacturer.

  3. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  4. Hepatic cancer: Correlative imaging with radioimmunodetection, NMR, and TCT

    SciTech Connect

    De Lund, F.H.; Lieber, A.; Ram, M.D.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of radioimmunodetection (RAID) imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of hepatic tumors. Twelve consecutive patients with metastatic (11) or primary (1) carcinoma of the liver were imaged concurrently with labeled antibodies-to-tumor antigens and by nuclear magnetic resonance. Evidence of hepatic tumors was corrected with other diagnostic procedures including TCT. Eleven patients were imaged with I-131 labeled antibodies to CEA, CSAP and one with I-131 labeled antibodies to AFP. Polyclonal, monoclonal, and Fab'/sub 2/ antibodies were used. The preparation and labeling of the antibodies have been described previously. Each patient received 2-3 mCi of labeled antibodies and was imaged at 24 to 48 hrs. Nontarget radioactivity was diminished by other radionuclides simulating nontumor distribution using a computer subtraction technique. NMR images were obtained with a 0.15T resistive instrument. In all twelve patients hepatic tumor was diagnosed by RAID. Nine of the hepatic tumors were confirmed by other methods. NMR demonstrated four positive findings in these nine. Computerized tomography detected tumors in three of the nine patients at the time of the first RAID examination, and subsequently in one more patient when RAID and NMR examinations were performed concurrently. In this series of patients the detection of hepatic cancer by RAID showed twice the sensitivity of NMR or TCT.

  5. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  6. Alternate strategies to obtain mass balance without the use of radiolabeled compounds: application of quantitative fluorine (19F) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul; Espina, Robert; Atherton, James; Wang, Jianyao; Talaat, Rasmy; Scatina, JoAnn; Chandrasekaran, Appavu

    2012-03-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in the quantitation of small and large molecules. Recently, we demonstrated that (1)H NMR could be used to quantitate drug metabolites isolated in submilligram quantities from biological sources. It was shown that these metabolites, once quantitated by NMR, were suitable to be used as reference standards in quantitative LC/MS-based assays, hence circumventing the need for radiolabeled material or synthetic standards to obtain plasma exposure estimates in humans and preclinical species. The quantitative capabilities of high-field NMR is further demonstrated in the current study by obtaining the mass balance of fluorinated compounds using (19)F-NMR. Two fluorinated compounds which were radio-labeled with carbon-14 on metabolically stable positions were dosed in rats and urine and feces collected. The mass balance of the compounds was obtained initially by counting the radioactivity present in each sample. Subsequently, the same sets of samples were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, and the concentrations determined by this method were compared with data obtained using radioactivity counting. It was shown that the two methods produced comparable values. To demonstrate the value of this analytical technique in drug discovery, a fluorinated compound was dosed intravenously in dogs and feces and urine collected. Initial profiling of samples showed that this compound was excreted mainly unchanged in feces, and hence, an estimate of mass balance was obtained using (19)F-NMR. The data obtained by this method was confirmed by additional quantitative studies using mass spectrometry. Hence cross-validations of the quantitative (19)F-NMR method by radioactivity counting and mass spectrometric analysis were demonstrated in this study. A strategy outlining the use of fluorinated compounds in conjunction with (19)F-NMR to understand their routes of excretion or mass balance in animals is proposed. These

  7. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ, ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1-40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1-40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16-21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1-40 fibrils in 4 h or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples.

  9. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  10. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  11. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  12. Silver and Gold NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zangger, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Silver and gold, together with copper, form the transition metal group IB elements in the periodic table and possess very different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic properties. While there is only one gold isotope (197Au), which has a spin of 3/2 and therefore a quadrupole moment, silver occurs in two isotopic forms (109Ag and 109Au), both of which have a spin 1/2 and similar NMR spectroscopic properties. The unfavorable properties of gold have prevented its NMR spectroscopic investigation thus far. On the other hand, there are several reports of silver NMR. However, the low sensitivity of silver, combined with its long relaxation times have rendered the direct detection of silver possible only with concentrations greater than a few tenth molar. Reviewed here are the general limitations of silver NMR and some techniques to partially overcome these limitations, as well as a summary of currently available chemical shift and scalar coupling data on 109Ag. PMID:18475898

  13. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  14. 27 CFR 19.704 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containers bear an approved label pursuant to 27 CFR Part 5 and subpart S of this part and the sample is... spirits to be withdrawn under the provisions of § 19.701, the proprietor shall affix a label showing...

  15. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  16. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  17. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  18. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  19. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  20. Co-Labeling for Multi-View Weakly Labeled Learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinxing; Li, Wen; Xu, Dong; Tsang, Ivor W

    2016-06-01

    It is often expensive and time consuming to collect labeled training samples in many real-world applications. To reduce human effort on annotating training samples, many machine learning techniques (e.g., semi-supervised learning (SSL), multi-instance learning (MIL), etc.) have been studied to exploit weakly labeled training samples. Meanwhile, when the training data is represented with multiple types of features, many multi-view learning methods have shown that classifiers trained on different views can help each other to better utilize the unlabeled training samples for the SSL task. In this paper, we study a new learning problem called multi-view weakly labeled learning, in which we aim to develop a unified approach to learn robust classifiers by effectively utilizing different types of weakly labeled multi-view data from a broad range of tasks including SSL, MIL and relative outlier detection (ROD). We propose an effective approach called co-labeling to solve the multi-view weakly labeled learning problem. Specifically, we model the learning problem on each view as a weakly labeled learning problem, which aims to learn an optimal classifier from a set of pseudo-label vectors generated by using the classifiers trained from other views. Unlike traditional co-training approaches using a single pseudo-label vector for training each classifier, our co-labeling approach explores different strategies to utilize the predictions from different views, biases and iterations for generating the pseudo-label vectors, making our approach more robust for real-world applications. Moreover, to further improve the weakly labeled learning on each view, we also exploit the inherent group structure in the pseudo-label vectors generated from different strategies, which leads to a new multi-layer multiple kernel learning problem. Promising results for text-based image retrieval on the NUS-WIDE dataset as well as news classification and text categorization on several real-world multi

  1. Gradient-free microfluidic flow labeling using thin magnetic films and remotely detected MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern-Manners, Nicholas W.; Kennedy, Daniel J.; Trease, David R.; Teisseyre, Thomas Z.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Pines, Alexander; Bajaj, Vikram S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) may be employed as noninvasive measurements yielding detailed information about the chemical and physical parameters that define microscale flows. Despite these advantages, magnetic resonance has been difficult to combine with microfluidics, largely due to its low sensitivity when detecting small sample volumes and the difficulty of efficiently addressing individual flow pathways for parallel measurements without utilizing large electric currents to create pulsed magnetic field gradients. Here, we demonstrate that remotely-detected MRI (RD-MRI) employing static magnetic field gradients produced by thin magnetic films can be used to encode flow and overcome some of these limitations. We show how flow path and history can be selected through the use of these thin film labels and through the application of synchronized, frequency-selective pulses. This obviates the need for large electric currents to produce pulsed magnetic field gradients and may allow for further application of NMR and MRI experiments on microscale devices.

  2. Application and Reliability of Solid-State NMR in Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    technique increases the sensitivity of 13C by magnetization transfer from the 1H to the 13C spin system during a contact time tc. However, one has to bear in mind that some molecular properties may obscure quantification. Thus, for carbons with large C-H internuclear distances (bigger than four bonds, i.e in graphite structures) and for C in groups with high molecular mobility (i.e. gas) the proton-dipolar interactions are weakened and the polarization transfer may be incomplete. The observed intensity can also be affected by interactions of the protons with paramagnetic compounds. To circumvent this problem, the samples are often demineralized with hydrofluoric acid. Alternatively, the Bloch decay, a technique in which the 13C is directly excited is used. Here, on the other hand, one has to consider long relaxation times which may lead to saturation effects. Nevertheless, as it will be discussed within the presentation those quantification problems can be solved for most soil samples and then solid-state NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Special techniques, such as dipolar dephasing or the proton spin relaxation editing can be used to extract additional information about chemical properties or mobility. A more detailed examination of the cross polarization behavior can be used to analyze the interaction of organic matter and paramagnetics but also for obtaining revealing properties on a molecular level. Applications involving isotopic labeling combined with both 13C and/or 15N NMR allows to follow the fate of a specific compound i.e. in a natural matrix and- if the enrichment is high enough - the use of 2D solid-state NMR techniques. In particular with respect to environmental chemistry, this combination of isotopic labeling with the use of corresponding NMR spectroscopy shows great potential for a better understanding of the kind of interaction between pollutants and natural organic matter.

  3. AssignFit: A program for simultaneous assignment and structure refinement from solid-state NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Schwieters, Charles D.; Opella, Stanley J.; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2012-01-01

    AssignFit is a computer program developed within the XPLOR-NIH package for the assignment of dipolar coupling (DC) and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) restraints derived from the solid-state NMR spectra of protein samples with uniaxial order. The method is based on minimizing the difference between experimentally observed solid-state NMR spectra and the frequencies back calculated from a structural model. Starting with a structural model and a set of DC and CSA restraints grouped only by amino acid type, as would be obtained by selective isotopic labeling, AssignFit generates all of the possible assignment permutations and calculates the corresponding atomic coordinates oriented in the alignment frame, together with the associated set of NMR frequencies, which are then compared with the experimental data for best fit. Incorporation of AssignFit in a simulated annealing refinement cycle provides an approach for simultaneous assignment and structure refinement (SASR) of proteins from solid-state NMR orientation restraints. The methods are demonstrated with data from two integral membrane proteins, one α-helical and one β-barrel, embedded in phospholipid bilayer membranes.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Tissue Samples by Combining iTRAQ Isobaric Labeling with Selected/Multiple Reaction Monitoring (SRM/MRM).

    PubMed

    Narumi, Ryohei; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics is an indispensible technique used in the discovery and quantification of phosphorylation events on proteins in biological samples. The application of this technique to tissue samples is especially useful for the discovery of biomarkers as well as biological studies. We herein describe the application of a large-scale phosphoproteome analysis and SRM/MRM-based quantitation to develop a strategy for the systematic discovery and validation of biomarkers using tissue samples. PMID:26584920

  5. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Yang, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    In mature HIV-1 virions, a 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this report, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assemblies that are stable and are not affected by magic angle spinning of the samples at frequencies between 10 and 25 kHz. Multidimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of CA assemblies of uniformly 13C,15N-labelled CA exhibit narrow lines, indicative of conformational homogeneity of the protein in these assemblies. For the conical assemblies, partial residue-specific resonance assignments were obtained. Analysis of the NMR spectra recorded for the conical and spherical assemblies indicates that the CA protein structure is not significantly different in the different morphologies. The present results demonstrate that the assemblies of CA protein are amenable to detailed structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:20092249

  6. Biosynthesis of the antibiotic maduramicin. Origin of the carbon and oxygen atoms as well as the 13C NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Tsou, H; Rajan, S; Fiala, R; Mowery, P C; Bullock, M W; Borders, D B; James, J C; Martin, J H; Morton, G O

    1984-12-01

    The biosynthesis of maduramicin alpha and beta in a culture of Actinomadura yumaensis has been studied using 13C, 14C and 18O labeled precursors. The alpha component of this recently discovered polyether antibiotic, containing forty-seven carbon atoms in a seven-ring system, is derived from eight acetate, seven propionate and four methionine molecules. The beta component which is missing one methoxy group incorporates three methionine methyl groups. The carbohydrate moiety was enriched by methionine, but not significantly by acetate or propionate. Studies of the incorporation of 13C labeled precursors permit the 13C NMR assignment of maduramicin. The origin of oxygen atoms of maduramicin has been examined by feeding [1-13C, 18O2]acetate and [1-13C, 18O2]propionate separately in the fermentation culture and the resulting doubly labeled maduramicin samples were analyzed by the isotopic shifts in the 13C NMR spectra. These results are consistent with the initial formation of a triene, which is converted to maduramicin by cyclization of the triepoxide. PMID:6526733

  7. Study of molecular interactions with 13C DNP-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Mathilde H.; Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Baumann, Herbert; Petersen, Bent O.; Karlsson, Magnus; Duus, Jens Ø.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H.

    2010-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is an established, versatile technique for the detection of molecular interactions, even when these interactions are weak. Signal enhancement by several orders of magnitude through dynamic nuclear polarization alleviates several practical limitations of NMR-based interaction studies. This enhanced non-equilibrium polarization contributes sensitivity for the detection of molecular interactions in a single NMR transient. We show that direct 13C NMR ligand binding studies at natural isotopic abundance of 13C gets feasible in this way. Resultant screens are easy to interpret and can be performed at 13C concentrations below μM. In addition to such ligand-detected studies of molecular interaction, ligand binding can be assessed and quantified with enzymatic assays that employ hyperpolarized substrates at varying enzyme inhibitor concentrations. The physical labeling of nuclear spins by hyperpolarization thus provides the opportunity to devise fast novel in vitro experiments with low material requirement and without the need for synthetic modifications of target or ligands.

  8. An optical NMR spectrometer for Larmor-beat detection and high-resolution POWER NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, J. G.; Marohn, J. A.; Carson, P. J.; Shykind, D. A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Miller, M. A.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2008-06-01

    Optical nuclear magnetic resonance (ONMR) is a powerful probe of electronic properties in III-V semiconductors. Larmor-beat detection (LBD) is a sensitivity optimized, time-domain NMR version of optical detection based on the Hanle effect. Combining LBD ONMR with the line-narrowing method of POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) NMR further enables atomically detailed views of local electronic features in III-Vs. POWER NMR spectra display the distribution of resonance shifts or line splittings introduced by a perturbation, such as optical excitation or application of an electric field, that is synchronized with a NMR multiple-pulse time-suspension sequence. Meanwhile, ONMR provides the requisite sensitivity and spatial selectivity to isolate local signals within macroscopic samples. Optical NMR, LBD, and the POWER method each introduce unique demands on instrumentation. Here, we detail the design and implementation of our system, including cryogenic, optical, and radio-frequency components. The result is a flexible, low-cost system with important applications in semiconductor electronics and spin physics. We also demonstrate the performance of our systems with high-resolution ONMR spectra of an epitaxial AlGaAs /GaAs heterojunction. NMR linewidths down to 4.1Hz full width at half maximum were obtained, a 103-fold resolution enhancement relative any previous optically detected NMR experiment.

  9. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by AMS and NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2011-08-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line air mass concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50 % of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component showed features consistent with less oxygenated aerosols and was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated to the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from

  10. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance. PMID:27095695

  11. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  12. The production of lipids alternately labelled with carbon-13.

    PubMed

    Boyle-Roden, Elizabeth; German, J B; Wood, B J B

    2003-07-01

    Chlorella cells were shown to have similar fatty acid profiles when grown photoautotrophically or if grown photoheterotrophically with ethanoate (acetate) as carbon source. When supplied with ethanoate labelled with carbon-13 in the methyl group, the alga incorporated it into fatty acids with retention of the sequence of labelling on alternate carbon atoms, thus providing a convenient method for synthesising lipids in a form useful for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of lipids in situ in membranes. Marine algae used in fish farming may have higher levels of very highly unsaturated fatty acids; proposals for producing these compounds labelled with carbon-13 are, therefore, presented, based on using centrally labelled glycerol. The scope for producing other substances labelled in a form suitable for NMR studies, such as carotenoids, is discussed. PMID:12919810

  13. Detection of thin film NMR spectrum by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil; Won, Soonho

    2014-03-01

    NMR is widely used in many fields due to its powerful advantages such as nondestructive, chemically selective detection, and local probing. However, because of its low sensitivity, it is difficult to investigate thin film samples by conventional NMR. MRFM is the combined technic of NMR and Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), and it enabled exceptional sensitivity increasement of NMR detection. We succeeded in detecting general thin film NMR spectrum for the first time by modifying the MRFM. CaF2 34nm thin film NMR was detected and we observed 20 Gauss spectrum in proximity to bulk spectrum which is about 10 Gauss.

  14. Low-field (1)H NMR spectroscopy for distinguishing between arabica and robusta ground roast coffees.

    PubMed

    Defernez, Marianne; Wren, Ella; Watson, Andrew D; Gunning, Yvonne; Colquhoun, Ian J; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Williamson, David; Kemsley, E Kate

    2017-02-01

    This work reports a new screening protocol for addressing issues of coffee authenticity using low-field (60MHz) bench-top (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Using a simple chloroform-based extraction, useful spectra were obtained from the lipophilic fraction of ground roast coffees. It was found that 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC, a recognized marker compound for robusta beans) gives rise to an isolated peak in the 60MHz spectrum, which can be used as an indicator of the presence of robusta beans in the sample. A total of 81 extracts from authenticated coffees and mixtures were analysed, from which the detection limit of robusta in arabica was estimated to be between 10% and 20% w/w. Using the established protocol, a surveillance exercise was conducted of 27 retail samples of ground roast coffees which were labelled as "100% arabica". None were found to contain undeclared robusta content above the estimated detection limit. PMID:27596398

  15. Preparation, characterization and pharmacokinetics of fluorescence labeled propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengli; Li, Chunxia; Xue, Yiting; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Hongbing; Zhao, Xia; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi

    2014-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence labeling method was developed and validated for the microanalysis of a sulfated polysaccharide drug,namely propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS), in rat plasma. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was selected to label PSS, and 1, 6-diaminohexane was used to link PSS and FITC in order to prepare FITC-labeled PSS (F-PSS) through a reductive amination reaction. F-PSS was identified by UV-Vis, FT-IR and 1H-NMR spectrum. The cell stability and cytotoxicity of F-PSS were tested in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The results indicated that the labeling efficiency of F-PSS was 0.522% ± 0.0248% and the absolute bioavailability was 8.39%. F-PSS was stable in MDCK cells without obvious cytotoxicity. The method was sensitive and reliable; it showed a good linearity, precision, recovery and stability. The FITC labeling method can be applied to investigating the absorption and metabolism of PSS and other polysaccharides in biological samples.

  16. SQUID detected NMR in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Espy, Michelle A.; George, John S.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    We have built an NMR system that employs a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector and operates in measurement fields of 2-25 μT. The system uses a pre-polarizing field from 4 to 30 mT generated by simple room-temperature wire-wound coils that are turned off during measurements. The instrument has an open geometry with samples located outside the cryostat at room-temperature. This removes constraints on sample size and allows us to obtain signals from living tissue. We have obtained 1H NMR spectra from a variety of samples including water, mineral oil, and a live frog. We also acquired gradient encoded free induction decay (FID) data from a water-plastic phantom in the μT regime, from which simple projection images were reconstructed. NMR signals from samples inside metallic containers have also been acquired. This is possible because the penetration skin depth is much greater at the low operating frequencies of this system than for conventional systems. Advantages to ultra-low field NMR measurements include lower susceptibility artifacts caused by high strength polarizing and measurement fields, and negligible line width broadening due to measurement field inhomogeneity, reducing the burden of producing highly homogeneous fields.

  17. Synthesis and applications of selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Lewis, H.; Cai, Z.; Tinoci, I. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    Spectral overlap is a substantial problem in NMR studies of RNA molecules >30 nucleotides. To overcome this difficulty, we synthesized selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs and adapted several isotope-edited two- and three-dimensional NMR experiments originally developed for protein studies. We optimized protocols for synthesis of multi-gram quantities of CTP, UTp, ATP, and GTP using a combination of synthetic organic and enzymatic methods. Uracil is prepared in 40 to 50% yield from {sup 13}C-cyanide in two steps. Using acetyl- tribenzoyl-ribose and standard chemistry uracil is then attached to the sugar (90% yield). The tribenzoyl-uridine intermediate is converted into uridine or cytidine quantitatively, depending on the deblocking protocol. Labeled purines are synthesized using simple pyrimidine precursors and reacting with {sup 13}C-formic acid (80% yield). Purine nucleosides are then synthesized using uridine phosphorylase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The nucleosides were converted to NMPs by treatment with POC1{sub 3} in triethylphosphate. We converted NMPs to NTPs by standard enzymatic methods. Selectively labeled RNAs were synthesized by run-off transcription using {sup 13}C-labeled NTPs. Several different strategies help solve over-lap problems in larger RNAs. Isotope-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments such as {omega}1-1/2 X-filtered NOESY simplify NMR spectra by dividing the normal NOESY spectrum into two subspectra-one involving NOEs from protons bound to {sup 12}C and one from protons bound to {sup 13}C. For example, we labeled A and U residues of a 34-nucleotide pseudoknot, and the {sup 12}C subspectrum of the 1/2 X-filtered NOESY contained NOEs only from G and C residues (along with adenine 2H); the {sup 13}C subspectrum contained NOEs only from A and U residues. Each subspectrum has less overlap than the NOESY of an unlabeled sample; the editing strategy allows each resonance to be identified by residue type (A, C, G, or U).

  18. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  19. New strategy for stable-isotope-aided, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of DNA oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Okira; Tate, Shin-Ichi; Kainosho, Masatsune

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the most efficient method for determining the solution structures of biomolecules. By applying multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques to {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins, we can determine the solution structures of proteins with molecular mass of 20 to 30kDa at an accuracy similar to that of x-ray crystallography. Improvements in NMR instrumentation and techniques as well as the development of protein engineering methods for labeling proteins have rapidly advanced multidimensional heteronuclear NMR of proteins. In contrast, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR studies of nucleic acids is less advanced because there were no efficient methods for preparing large amounts of labeled DNA/RNA oligomers. In this report, we focused on the chemical synthesis of DNA oligomers labeled at specific residue(s). RNA oligomers with specific labels, which are difficult to synthesize by the enzyme method, can be synthesized by the chemical method. The specific labels are useful for conformational analysis of larger molecules such as protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  20. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  1. Exploring RNA polymerase regulation by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Strauß, Martin; Schweimer, Kristian; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.; Knauer, Stefan H.; Rösch, Paul

    2015-01-01

    RNA synthesis is a central process in all organisms, with RNA polymerase (RNAP) as the key enzyme. Multisubunit RNAPs are evolutionary related and are tightly regulated by a multitude of transcription factors. Although Escherichia coli RNAP has been studied extensively, only little information is available about its dynamics and transient interactions. This information, however, are crucial for the complete understanding of transcription regulation in atomic detail. To study RNAP by NMR spectroscopy we developed a highly efficient procedure for the assembly of active RNAP from separately expressed subunits that allows specific labeling of the individual constituents. We recorded [1H,13C] correlation spectra of isoleucine, leucine, and valine methyl groups of complete RNAP and the separately labeled β’ subunit within reconstituted RNAP. We further produced all RNAP subunits individually, established experiments to determine which RNAP subunit a certain regulator binds to, and identified the β subunit to bind NusE. PMID:26043358

  2. Sensitive detection of NMR for thin films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchil

    2015-10-01

    NMR can provide valuable information about thin films, but its relatively low sensitivity allows data acquisition only from bulk samples. The sensitivity problem is circumvented by detection schemes with higher sensitivity and/or enhanced polarization. In most of these ingenious techniques, electrons play a central role through hyperfine interactions with the nuclei of interest or the conversion of the spin orientation to an electric charge. The state of the art in NMR is the control of a single nuclear spin state, the complete form of which is one of the ultimate goals of nanotechnology. PMID:26549846

  3. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  4. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  5. Cu-NMR spectra in UCu4Ni uncover site disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, O. O.; Rose, D. A.; Wu, Hsin-Ju; Chiang, M.; MacLaughlin, D. E.; Stewart, G. R.; Kim, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Cu-NMR measurements in a random powder of UCu4Ni reveal two types of spectral lines for each of the two isotopes of naturally abundant Cu in the material. These lines, which we label L1 and L2, point to the existence of two inequivalent Cu sites in the sample. We present a study of the NMR line shape in UCu4Ni at three different frequencies (in the range from 40-70 MHz) and two temperature values (10 K and 150 K), that allow us to assign the lines to particular Cu sites. L1 is strongly broadened as the frequency decreases, but changes less with increasing temperature. In contrast, the width of L2 grows in proportion to frequency and decreases noticeably with increasing temperature. This behavior indicates that the crystallographic site corresponding to L1 is exposed to electric field gradients and has lower point symmetry than the site corresponding to L2, which displays some anisotropy but no discernible quadrupole effects. By comparison with the Cu-NMR spectra in UCu4Pd, where only one type of Cu-NMR line has been observed clearly, we can associate L1 with Cu(16e) nuclei: Cu nuclei sitting at the 16e site (Wyckoff notation) in the AuBe5 structure of the parent compound UCu5. This leaves L2 as originating from Cu(4c) nuclei; i.e., those sitting at the 4c site of the same structure. Unlike in UCu4Pd, the appearance of signal from Cu(4c) nuclei in the Ni compound is clear evidence of site disorder in UCu4Ni.

  6. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  7. Frequency-selective REDOR and spin-diffusion relays in uniformly labeled whole cells.

    PubMed

    Rice, David M; Romaniuk, Joseph A H; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-11-01

    Solid-state NMR is a powerful and non-perturbative method to measure and define chemical composition and architecture in bacterial cell walls, even in the context of whole cells. Most NMR studies on whole cells have used selectively labeled samples. Here, we introduce an NMR sequence relay using frequency-selective REDOR (fsREDOR) and spin diffusion elements to probe a unique amine contribution in uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Staphylococcus aureus whole cells that we attribute to the d-alanine of teichoic acid. In addition to the primary peptidoglycan structural scaffold, cell walls can contain significant amounts of teichoic acid that contribute to cell-wall function. When incorporated into teichoic acid, d-alanine is present as an ester, connected via its carbonyl to a ribitol carbon, and thus has a free amine. Teichoic acid d-Ala is removed during cell-wall isolations and can only be detected in the context of whole cells. The sequence presented here begins with fsREDOR and a chemical shift evolution period for 2D data acquisition, followed by DARR spin diffusion and then an additional fsREDOR period. fsREDOR elements were used for (13)C observation to avoid complications from (13)C-(13)C couplings due to uniform labeling and for (15)N dephasing to achieve selectivity in the nitrogens serving as dephasers. The results show that the selected amine nitrogen of interest is near to teichoic acid ribitol carbons and also the methyl group carbon associated with alanine. In addition, its carbonyl is not significantly dephased by amide nitrogens, consistent with the expected microenvironment around teichoic acid. PMID:26493462

  8. Capillary toroid cavity detector for high pressure NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Chen, Michael J.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; ter Horst, Marc

    2007-09-11

    A Toroid Cavity Detector (TCD) is provided for implementing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of chemical reactions under conditions of high pressures and temperatures. A toroid cavity contains an elongated central conductor extending within the toroid cavity. The toroid cavity and central conductor generate an RF magnetic field for NMR analysis. A flow-through capillary sample container is located within the toroid cavity adjacent to the central conductor to subject a sample material flowing through the capillary to a static magnetic field and to enable NMR spectra to be recorded of the material in the capillary under a temperature and high pressure environment.

  9. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  10. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  11. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  12. Enantiodiscrimination by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Salvadori, Piero

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of enantiorecognition processes involves the detection of enantiomeric species as well as the study of chiral discrimination mechanisms. In both fields Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays a fundamental role, providing several tools, based on the use of suitable chiral auxiliaries, for observing distinct signals of enantiomers and for investigating the complexation phenomena involved in enantiodiscrimination processes. PMID:17100610

  13. Characterization of D-glucaric acid using NMR, x-ray crystal structure, and MM3 molecular modeling analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-glucaric acid was characterized in solution by comparing NMR spectra from the isotopically unlabeled molecule with those from D-glucaric acid labeled with deuterium or carbon-13 atoms. The NMR studies provided unequivocal assignments for all carbon atoms and non-hydroxyl protons of the molecule. ...

  14. abFASP-MS: Affinity-Based Filter-Aided Sample Preparation Mass Spectrometry for Quantitative Analysis of Chemically Labeled Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Affinity purification coupled to 1-D gel-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is a well-established and widespread approach for the analyses of noncovalently interacting protein complexes. In this study, two proteins conjugated to a streptavidin-binding peptide and hemagglutinin double tag were expressed in the respective Flp-In HEK293 cell lines: green fluorescent protein (SH-GFP) and TANK binding kinase 1 (SH-TBK1_MOUSE). Fluorescent anti-HA immunoblots revealed that the expression level of SH-GFP was ∼50% lower than that of SH-TBK1_MOUSE. Subsequently, the input material was normalized to obtain a similar quantity of purified SH-tagged proteins. Optimization of the release of protein complexes from the anti-HA-agarose with different eluting agents was then assessed. With respect to the total number of protein groups identified in the purified complexes, elution with 2% SDS surpassed both 100 mM glycine and 100 mM formic acid. Relative quantitation of the purified protein complexes using TMT 6-plex reagents confirmed the higher efficiency of the 2% SDS elution followed by filter-aided sample preparation (FASP). The data presented in this study provide a new application of FASP to quantitative MS analysis of affinity-purified protein complexes. We have termed the approach abFASP-MS, or affinity-based filter-aided sample preparation mass spectrometry. PMID:24400740

  15. Deuterium NMR of Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A in oriented DMPC bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hing, A W; Adams, S P; Silbert, D F; Norberg, R E

    1990-05-01

    Deuterium NMR is used to study the selectively labeled Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A molecule to investigate the structure and dynamics of the C alpha-2H bond in the Ala3 residue of gramicidin. Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A is synthesized, purified, and characterized and then incorporated into oriented bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine sandwiched between glass coverslips. Phosphorus NMR line shapes obtained from this sample are consistent with the presence of the bilayer phase and indicate that no nonbilayer phases are present in significant amounts. Deuterium NMR line shapes obtained from this sample indicate that the motional axis of the gramicidin Ala3 residue is parallel to the coverslip normal, that the distribution of motional axis orientations has a width of 2 degrees, and that only one major conformational and dynamical state of the Ala3 C alpha-2H bond is observed on the NMR time scale. Furthermore, the Ala3 C alpha-2H bond angle relative to the motional axis is 19-20 degrees if fast axial rotation is assumed to be the only motion present but is less than or equal to 19-20 degrees in the absence of such an assumption. This result indicates that various double-stranded, helical dimer models are very unlikely to represent the structure of gramicidin in the sample studied but that the single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer models are consistent with the experimental data. However, a definitive distinction between the left-handed, single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer model and the right-handed, single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer model cannot be made on the basis of the experimental data obtained in this study. PMID:1694457

  16. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  17. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  18. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  19. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  20. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan-Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S; Comment, Arnaud; Duckett, Simon; Edison, Arthur S; Engelke, Frank; Griesinger, Christian; Griffin, Robert G; Hilty, Christian; Maeda, Hidaeki; Parigi, Giacomo; Prisner, Thomas; Ravera, Enrico; van Bentum, Jan; Vega, Shimon; Webb, Andrew; Luchinat, Claudio; Schwalbe, Harald; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi-author interdisciplinary Review presents a state-of-the-art description of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh-field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply and thereby enhance the sensitivity of solid- and liquid-state experiments. While substantial advances have been made in all these areas, numerous challenges remain in the quest of endowing NMR spectroscopy with the sensitivity that has characterized forms of spectroscopies based on electrical or optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed. PMID:26136394

  1. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  2. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  3. Sample Optimization and Identification of Signal Patterns of Amino Acid Side Chains in 2D RFDR Spectra of the α-Spectrin SH3 Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Jutta; van Rossum, Barth; Förster, Hans; de Groot, Huub J. M.; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2000-04-01

    Future structural investigations of proteins by solid-state CPMAS NMR will rely on uniformly labeled protein samples showing spectra with an excellent resolution. NMR samples of the solid α-spectrin SH3 domain were generated in four different ways, and their 13C CPMAS spectra were compared. The spectrum of a [u-13C, 15N]-labeled sample generated by precipitation shows very narrow 13C signals and resolved scalar carbon-carbon couplings. Linewidths of 16-19 Hz were found for the three alanine Cβ signals of a selectively labeled [70% 3-13C]alanine-enriched SH3 sample. The signal pattern of the isoleucine, of all prolines, valines, alanines, and serines, and of three of the four threonines were identified in 2D 13C-13C RFDR spectra of the [u-13C,15N]-labeled SH3 sample. A comparison of the 13C chemical shifts of the found signal patterns with the 13C assignment obtained in solution shows an intriguing match.

  4. Synthesis of carbon-13-labeled tetradecanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, J T; Patel, K M; Morrisett, J D

    1983-07-01

    The synthesis of tetradecanoic acid enriched with 13C at carbons 1, 3, or 6 is described. The label at the carbonyl carbon was introduced by treating 1-bromotridecane with K13CN (90% enriched) to form the 13C-labeled nitrile, which upon hydrolysis yielded the desired acid. The [3-13C]tetradecanoic acid was synthesized by alkylation of diethyl sodio-malonate with [1-13C]1-bromododecane; the acid was obtained upon saponification and decarboxylation. The label at the 6 position was introduced by coupling the appropriately labeled alkylcadmium chloride with the half acid chloride methyl ester of the appropriate dioic acid, giving the corresponding oxo fatty acid ester. Formation of the tosylhydrazone of the oxo-ester followed by reduction with sodium cyanoborohydride gave the labeled methyl tetradecanoate which, upon hydrolysis, yielded the desired tetradecanoic acid. All tetradecanoic acids were identical to unlabeled analogs as evaluated by gas-liquid chromatography and infrared or NMR spectroscopy. These labeled fatty acids were used subsequently to prepare the correspondingly labeled diacyl phosphatidylcholines. PMID:6631228

  5. NMR Determination of Protein pKa Values in the Solid State

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Heather L. Frericks; Shah, Gautam J.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2010-01-01

    Charged residues play an important role in defining key mechanistic features in many biomolecules. Determining the pKa values of large, membrane or fibrillar proteins can be challenging with traditional methods. In this study we show how solid-state NMR is used to monitor chemical shift changes during a pH titration for the small soluble β1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. The chemical shifts of all the amino acids with charged side-chains throughout the uniformly-13C,15N-labeled protein were monitored over several samples varying in pH; pKa values were determined from these shifts for E27, D36, and E42, and the bounds for the pKa of other acidic side-chain resonances were determined. Additionally, this study shows how the calculated pKa values give insights into the crystal packing of the protein. PMID:20563223

  6. Combined approaches of EPR and NMR illustrate only one transmembrane helix in the human IFITM3

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Shenglong; Zhang, Chengwei; Wang, Wei; Cai, Xiaoying; Yu, Lu; Wu, Fangming; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-inducible transmembrane protein IFITM3 was known to restrict the entry of a wide spectrum of viruses to the cytosol of the host. The mechanism used by the protein to restrict viral entry is unclear given the unavailability of the membrane topology and structures of the IFITM family proteins. Systematic site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of IFITM3 in detergent micelles identified a single, long transmembrane helix in the C-terminus and an intramembrane segment in the N-terminal hydrophobic region. Solution NMR studies of the same sample verified the secondary structure distribution and demonstrated two rigid regions interacting with the micellar surface. The resulting membrane topology of IFITM3 supports the mechanism of an enhanced restricted membrane hemi-fusion. PMID:27046158

  7. Jointly deriving NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions by NMR relaxation experiments on partially desaturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Hughes, B.

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a geophysical method widely used in borehole and laboratory applications to nondestructively infer transport and storage properties of rocks and soils as it is directly sensitive to the water/oil content and pore sizes. However, for inferring pore sizes, NMR relaxometry data need to be calibrated with respect to a surface interaction parameter, surface relaxivity, which depends on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock. This study introduces an inexpensive and quick alternative to the classical calibration methods, e.g., mercury injection, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR, or grain size analysis, which allows for jointly estimating NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions using NMR relaxometry data from partially desaturated rocks. Hereby, NMR relaxation experiments are performed on the fully saturated sample and on a sample partially drained at a known differential pressure. Based on these data, the (capillary) pore radius distribution and surface relaxivity are derived by joint optimization of the Brownstein-Tarr and the Young-Laplace equation assuming parallel capillaries. Moreover, the resulting pore size distributions can be used to predict water retention curves. This inverse modeling approach—tested and validated using NMR relaxometry data measured on synthetic porous borosilicate samples with known petrophysical properties (i.e., permeability, porosity, inner surfaces, pore size distributions)—yields consistent and reproducible estimates of surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions. Also, subsequently calculated water retention curves generally correlate well with measured water retention curves.

  8. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  9. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  10. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  11. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in

  12. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  13. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  14. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  15. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  16. Chemometric Analysis of Two Dimensional Decay Data: Application to {sup 17}O NMR Relaxation Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.K.; Alam, T.M.

    1999-03-18

    The use of {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy as a tool to investigate aging in polymer systems has recently been demonstrated. Because the natural abundance of {sup 17}O is extremely low (0.037%), the use of labeled {sup 17}O{sub 2} during the oxidation of polymers produces {sup 17}O NMR spectra whose signals arise entirely from the degradation species (i.e. signals from the bulk or unaged material are not observed). This selective isotopic labeling eliminates the impact of interference from the unaged material, cause (1) above. As discussed by Alam et al. spectral overlap between different degradation species as well as errors in quantification remains a major difficulty in {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. As a demonstration of the DECRA and CTBSA methods, relaxation matrices obtained from {sup 17}O NMR for model alcohol systems are evaluated. The benefits and limitations of these newly developed chemometric techniques are discussed.

  17. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  18. Functional and shunt states of bacteriorhodopsin resolved by 250 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization–enhanced solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Belenky, Marina; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Observation and structural studies of reaction intermediates of proteins are challenging because of the mixtures of states usually present at low concentrations. Here, we use a 250 GHz gyrotron (cyclotron resonance maser) and cryogenic temperatures to perform high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments that enhance sensitivity in magic-angle spinning NMR spectra of cryo-trapped photocycle intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by a factor of ≈90. Multidimensional spectroscopy of U-13C,15N-labeled samples resolved coexisting states and allowed chemical shift assignments in the retinylidene chromophore for several intermediates not observed previously. The correlation spectra reveal unexpected heterogeneity in dark-adapted bR, distortion in the K state, and, most importantly, 4 discrete L substates. Thermal relaxation of the mixture of L's showed that 3 of these substates revert to bR568 and that only the 1 substate with both the strongest counterion and a fully relaxed 13-cis bond is functional. These definitive observations of functional and shunt states in the bR photocycle provide a preview of the mechanistic insights that will be accessible in membrane proteins via sensitivity-enhanced DNP NMR. These observations would have not been possible absent the signal enhancement available from DNP. PMID:19474298

  19. Functional and shunt states of bacteriorhodopsin resolved by 250 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Vikram S; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Belenky, Marina; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2009-06-01

    Observation and structural studies of reaction intermediates of proteins are challenging because of the mixtures of states usually present at low concentrations. Here, we use a 250 GHz gyrotron (cyclotron resonance maser) and cryogenic temperatures to perform high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments that enhance sensitivity in magic-angle spinning NMR spectra of cryo-trapped photocycle intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by a factor of approximately 90. Multidimensional spectroscopy of U-(13)C,(15)N-labeled samples resolved coexisting states and allowed chemical shift assignments in the retinylidene chromophore for several intermediates not observed previously. The correlation spectra reveal unexpected heterogeneity in dark-adapted bR, distortion in the K state, and, most importantly, 4 discrete L substates. Thermal relaxation of the mixture of L's showed that 3 of these substates revert to bR(568) and that only the 1 substate with both the strongest counterion and a fully relaxed 13-cis bond is functional. These definitive observations of functional and shunt states in the bR photocycle provide a preview of the mechanistic insights that will be accessible in membrane proteins via sensitivity-enhanced DNP NMR. These observations would have not been possible absent the signal enhancement available from DNP. PMID:19474298

  20. NMR imaging of components and materials for DOE application

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.R.

    1993-12-01

    The suitability for using NMR imaging to characterize liquid, polymeric, and solid materials was reviewed. The most attractive applications for NMR imaging appear to be liquid-filled porous samples, partially cured polymers, adhesives, and potting compounds, and composite polymers/high explosives containing components with widely varying thermal properties. Solid-state NMR line-narrowing and signal-enhancing markedly improve the imaging possibilities of true solid and materials. These techniques provide unique elemental and chemical shift information for highly complex materials and complement images with similar spatial resolution, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  1. A temperature-jump NMR probe setup using rf heating optimized for the analysis of temperature-induced biomacromolecular kinetic processes.

    PubMed

    Rinnenthal, Jörg; Wagner, Dominic; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Krahn, Alexander; Engelke, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-02-01

    A novel temperature jump (T-jump) probe operational at B(0) fields of 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) with an integrated cage radio-frequency (rf) coil for rapid (<1 s) heating in high-resolution (HR) liquid-state NMR-spectroscopy is presented and its performance investigated. The probe consists of an inner 2.5 mm "heating coil" designed for generating rf-electric fields of 190-220 MHz across a lossy dielectric sample and an outer two coil assembly for (1)H-, (2)H- and (15)N-nuclei. High B(0) field homogeneities (0.7 Hz at 600 MHz) are combined with high heating rates (20-25 K/s) and only small temperature gradients (<±1.5 K, 3s after 20 K T-jump). The heating coil is under control of a high power rf-amplifier within the NMR console and can therefore easily be accessed by the pulse programmer. Furthermore, implementation of a real-time setup including synchronization of the NMR spectrometer's air flow heater with the rf-heater used to maintain the temperature of the sample is described. Finally, the applicability of the real-time T-jump setup for the investigation of biomolecular kinetic processes in the second-to-minute timescale is demonstrated for samples of a model 14mer DNA hairpin and a (15)N-selectively labeled 40nt hsp17-RNA thermometer. PMID:25616187

  2. A temperature-jump NMR probe setup using rf heating optimized for the analysis of temperature-induced biomacromolecular kinetic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinnenthal, Jörg; Wagner, Dominic; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Krahn, Alexander; Engelke, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-02-01

    A novel temperature jump (T-jump) probe operational at B0 fields of 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) with an integrated cage radio-frequency (rf) coil for rapid (<1 s) heating in high-resolution (HR) liquid-state NMR-spectroscopy is presented and its performance investigated. The probe consists of an inner 2.5 mm "heating coil" designed for generating rf-electric fields of 190-220 MHz across a lossy dielectric sample and an outer two coil assembly for 1H-, 2H- and 15N-nuclei. High B0 field homogeneities (0.7 Hz at 600 MHz) are combined with high heating rates (20-25 K/s) and only small temperature gradients (<±1.5 K, 3 s after 20 K T-jump). The heating coil is under control of a high power rf-amplifier within the NMR console and can therefore easily be accessed by the pulse programmer. Furthermore, implementation of a real-time setup including synchronization of the NMR spectrometer's air flow heater with the rf-heater used to maintain the temperature of the sample is described. Finally, the applicability of the real-time T-jump setup for the investigation of biomolecular kinetic processes in the second-to-minute timescale is demonstrated for samples of a model 14mer DNA hairpin and a 15N-selectively labeled 40nt hsp17-RNA thermometer.

  3. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  4. NMR Quantitation of Natural Products at the Nanomole-Scale

    PubMed Central

    Dalisay, Doralyn S.; Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple and accurate method for quantitation by solvent 13C-satellites (QSCS), of very small amounts of natural products using microprobe NMR spectroscopy. The method takes advantage of integration of 13C satellite peaks of deuterated solvents, in particular CDCl3, that have favorable intensities for measurements of samples in NMR microcoils and microprobe tubes in the 1–200 nanomole range. PMID:19399996

  5. Efficient and facile synthesis of novel stable monodeuterium labeled ractopamine.

    PubMed

    Su, Feifei; Wu, Fulong; Tang, He; Wang, Zhonghua; Wu, Fanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthetic route to stable deuterium labeled ractopamine was disclosed with 6.49% total yield and 97.7% isotopic abundance. Its structure and the isotope-abundance were confirmed according to (1)H-NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry. PMID:26526706

  6. Summary of Miniature NMR Development

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Gennady; Feinerman, Alan

    2000-12-31

    The effort in this project has been in 3 distinct directions: (1) First, they focused on development of miniature microfabricated micro-coil NMR detectors with maximum Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio. (2) Secondly, they focused on design of miniature micro-coil NMR detectors that have minimal effect on the NMR spectrum distortions. (3) Lastly they focused on the development of a permanent magnet capable of generating fields on the order of 1 Tesla with better than 10 ppm uniformity.

  7. Diamond deposition and defect chemistry studied via solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Karen K.

    1994-06-01

    Diamond defects were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While maintaining the macroscopic integrity of the films, concentrations between 0.001 and 1.0 at.% H were measured, among the lowest ever reported by solid-state 1H NMR. These concentrations were correlated to infrared absorption in the 8 to 10 micron region and to thermal conductivity. Despite the low concentrations, Multiple Quantum NMR reveals a high degree of hydrogen clustering consistent with grain boundary passivation. Most hydrogen is rigidly held, but some, probably in -OCH3 and -NCH3 defects, undergoes rotation at room temperature. Similar results were obtained for hot-filament, microwave-plasma and DC arc-jet films, suggesting a common surface chemistry, but no hydrogen was detected in an as-deposited combustion film. 13C NMR provided the first quantitative determination of non-diamond bonded carbon defects, providing a benchmark for Raman spectroscopy, the primary characterization method for diamond. Selective 13C labeling demonstrated heterogeneous reactions involving carbon occur at the hot-filament. With high-speed magic-angle-spinning 19F NMR, CFx (x=1-3) functionalities were resolved on the surface of plasma-treated diamond powder. Understanding these defects impacts the understanding of film growth mechanisms and structure-property relationships for CVD diamond.

  8. Sensitive and robust electrophoretic NMR: Instrumentation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Furó, István; Yushmanov, Pavel V.; Stilbs, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although simple as a concept, electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) has so far failed to find wider application. Problems encountered are mainly due to disturbing and partly irreproducible convection-like bulk flow effects from both electro-osmosis and thermal convection. Additionally, bubble formation at the electrodes and rf noise pickup has constrained the typical sample geometry to U-tube-like arrangements with a small filling factor and a low resulting NMR sensitivity. Furthermore, the sign of the electrophoretic mobility cancels out in U-tube geometries. We present here a new electrophoretic sample cell based on a vertically placed conventional NMR sample tube with bubble-suppressing palladium metal as electrode material. A suitable radiofrequency filter design prevents noise pickup by the NMR sample coil from the high-voltage leads which extend into the sensitive sample volume. Hence, the obtained signal-to-noise ratio of this cell is one order of magnitude higher than that of our previous U-tube cells. Permitted by the retention of the sign of the displacement-related signal phase in the new cell design, an experimental approach is described where bulk flow effects by electro-osmosis and/or thermal convection are compensated through parallel monitoring of a reference signal from a non-charged species in the sample. This approach, together with a CPMG-like pulse train scheme provides a superior first-order cancellation of non-electrophoretic bulk flow effects.

  9. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J.; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M.; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of 13C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against 13C’ or 13Cα spins coupled to 15N. As a result, 1H-15N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns. PMID:25442777

  10. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  11. Orientational landscapes of peptides in membranes: prediction of (2)H NMR couplings in a dynamic context.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Martín, Santi; Giménez, Diana; Fuertes, Gustavo; Salgado, Jesús

    2009-12-01

    Unlike soluble proteins, membrane polypeptides face an anisotropic milieu. This imposes restraints on their orientation and provides a reference that makes structure prediction tractable by minimalistic thermodynamic models. Here we use this framework to build orientational distributions of monomeric membrane-bound peptides and to predict their expected solid-state (2)H NMR quadrupolar couplings when labeled at specific side chain positions. Using a complete rigid-body sampling of configurations relative to an implicit lipid membrane, peptide free energy landscapes are calculated. This allows us to obtain probability distributions of the peptide tilt, azimuthal rotation, and depth of membrane insertion. The orientational distributions are broad and originate from an interplay among the three relevant rigid-body degrees of freedom, which allows population of multiple states in shallow free energy minima. Remarkably, only when the orientational distributions are taken into account do we obtain a close correlation between predicted (2)H NMR splittings and values measured in experiments. Such a good correlation is not seen with splittings calculated from single configurations, being either the averaged or the lowest free energy state, showing there are distributions, rather than single structures, that best define the peptide-membrane systems. Moreover, we propose that these distributions contribute to the understanding of the rigid-body dynamics of the system. PMID:19860438

  12. Joint Multilabel Classification With Community-Aware Label Graph Learning.

    PubMed

    Xi Li; Xueyi Zhao; Zhongfei Zhang; Fei Wu; Yueting Zhuang; Jingdong Wang; Xuelong Li

    2016-01-01

    As an important and challenging problem in machine learning and computer vision, multilabel classification is typically implemented in a max-margin multilabel learning framework, where the inter-label separability is characterized by the sample-specific classification margins between labels. However, the conventional multilabel classification approaches are usually incapable of effectively exploring the intrinsic inter-label correlations as well as jointly modeling the interactions between inter-label correlations and multilabel classification. To address this issue, we propose a multilabel classification framework based on a joint learning approach called label graph learning (LGL) driven weighted Support Vector Machine (SVM). In principle, the joint learning approach explicitly models the inter-label correlations by LGL, which is jointly optimized with multilabel classification in a unified learning scheme. As a result, the learned label correlation graph well fits the multilabel classification task while effectively reflecting the underlying topological structures among labels. Moreover, the inter-label interactions are also influenced by label-specific sample communities (each community for the samples sharing a common label). Namely, if two labels have similar label-specific sample communities, they are likely to be correlated. Based on this observation, LGL is further regularized by the label Hypergraph Laplacian. Experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of our approach over several benchmark data sets. PMID:26625416

  13. Trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling for quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-01

    Stable isotope labeling based on relative peptide/protein abundance measurements is commonly applied for quantitative proteomics. Recently, trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling has grown in popularity due to its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and its ability to universally label peptides with high sample recovery. In (18)O labeling, both C-terminal carboxyl group atoms of tryptic peptides can be enzymatically exchanged with (18)O, thus providing the labeled peptide with a 4 Da mass shift from the (16)O-labeled sample. Peptide (18)O labeling is ideally suited for generating a labeled "universal" reference sample used for obtaining accurate and reproducible quantitative measurements across large number of samples in quantitative discovery proteomics.

  14. High resolution NMR measurements using a 400 MHz NMR with an (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting inner coil: Towards a compact super-high-field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, R.; Iguchi, S.; Hamada, M.; Matsumoto, S.; Suematsu, H.; Saito, A. T.; Li, J.; Nakagome, H.; Takao, T.; Takahashi, M.; Maeda, H.; Yanagisawa, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) inner coils in combination with conventional low-temperature superconducting (LTS) outer coils for an NMR magnet, i.e. a LTS/HTS NMR magnet, is a suitable option to realize a high-resolution NMR spectrometer with operating frequency >1 GHz. From the standpoint of creating a compact magnet, (RE: Rare earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) HTS inner coils which can tolerate a strong hoop stress caused by a Lorentz force are preferred. However, in our previous work on a first-generation 400 MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet, the NMR resolution and sensitivity were about ten times worse than that of a conventional LTS NMR magnet. The result was caused by a large field inhomogeneity in the REBCO coil itself and the shielding effect of a screening current induced in that coil. In the present paper, we describe the operation of a modified 400 MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet with an advanced field compensation technology using a combination of novel ferromagnetic shimming and an appropriate procedure for NMR spectrum line shape optimization. We succeeded in obtaining a good NMR line shape and 2D NOESY spectrum for a lysozyme aqueous sample. We believe that this technology is indispensable for the realization of a compact super-high-field high-resolution NMR.

  15. NMR system and method having a permanent magnet providing a rotating magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, Ross D [Berkeley, CA; Budinger, Thomas F [Berkeley, CA

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for generating a rotating magnetic field. The rotating magnetic field can be used to obtain rotating-field NMR spectra, such as magic angle spinning spectra, without having to physically rotate the sample. This result allows magic angle spinning NMR to be conducted on biological samples such as live animals, including humans.

  16. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR. PMID:25924947

  17. Theoretical and experimental insights into applicability of solid-state 93Nb NMR in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Papulovskiy, Evgeniy; Shubin, Alexandre A; Terskikh, Victor V; Pickard, Chris J; Lapina, Olga B

    2013-04-14

    Ab initio DFT calculations of (93)Nb NMR parameters using the NMR-CASTEP code were performed for a series of over fifty individual niobates, and a good agreement has been found with experimental NMR parameters. New experimental and calculated (93)Nb NMR data were obtained for several compounds, AlNbO4, VNb9O25, K8Nb6O19 and Cs3NbO8, which are of particular interest for catalysis. Several interesting trends have been identified between (93)Nb NMR parameters and the specifics of niobium site environments in niobates. These trends may serve as useful guidelines in interpreting (93)Nb NMR spectra of complex niobium oxide systems, including amorphous samples and niobium-based multicomponent heterogeneous catalysts. Potential applications of (93)Nb NMR to study solid polyoxoniobates are discussed. PMID:23450163

  18. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  19. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex. PMID:18004775

  20. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:22986689

  1. A Set of Efficient nD NMR Protocols for Resonance Assignments of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Bellstedt, Peter; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Bordusa, Frank; Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2016-07-01

    The RF pulse scheme RN[N-CA HEHAHA]NH, which provides a convenient approach to the acquisition of different multidimensional chemical shift correlation NMR spectra leading to backbone resonance assignments, including those of the proline residues of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), is experimentally demonstrated. Depending on the type of correlation data required, the method involves the generation of in-phase ((15) N)(x) magnetisation via different magnetisation transfer pathways such as H→N→CO→N, HA→CA→CO→N, H→N→CA→N and H→CA→N, the subsequent application of (15) N-(13) C(α) heteronuclear Hartmann-Hahn mixing over a period of ≈100 ms, chemical-shift labelling of relevant nuclei before and after the heteronuclear mixing step and amide proton detection in the acquisition dimension. It makes use of the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of (1) JCαN and (2) JCαN couplings to achieve efficient correlation of the backbone resonances of each amino acid residue "i" with the backbone amide resonances of residues "i-1" and "i+1". It can be implemented in a straightforward way through simple modifications of the RF pulse schemes commonly employed in protein NMR studies. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated using a uniformly ((15) N,(13) C) labelled sample of α-synuclein. The different possibilities for obtaining the amino-acid-type information, simultaneously with the connectivity data between the backbone resonances of sequentially neighbouring residues, have also been outlined. PMID:27061973

  2. 30 CFR 74.15 - Approval labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval labels. 74.15 Section 74.15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH COAL MINE DUST SAMPLING DEVICES General Requirements for All Devices § 74.15 Approval labels. (a) Certificate...

  3. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  4. 46. VIEW OF SAMPLING ROOM FROM SOUTHEAST. TO LEFT, SAMPLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. VIEW OF SAMPLING ROOM FROM SOUTHEAST. TO LEFT, SAMPLING ELEVATOR AND IN CENTER, SAMPLE BINS WITH DISCHARGE CHUTE AND THREE LABELS. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  5. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  6. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  7. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  8. Automated protein fold determination using a minimal NMR constraint strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Deyou; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Xiao, Rong; Aramini, James; Swapna, G.V.T.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2003-01-01

    Determination of precise and accurate protein structures by NMR generally requires weeks or even months to acquire and interpret all the necessary NMR data. However, even medium-accuracy fold information can often provide key clues about protein evolution and biochemical function(s). In this article we describe a largely automatic strategy for rapid determination of medium-accuracy protein backbone structures. Our strategy derives from ideas originally introduced by other groups for determining medium-accuracy NMR structures of large proteins using deuterated, 13C-, 15N-enriched protein samples with selective protonation of side-chain methyl groups (13CH3). Data collection includes acquiring NMR spectra for automatically determining assignments of backbone and side-chain 15N, HN resonances, and side-chain 13CH3 methyl resonances. These assignments are determined automatically by the program AutoAssign using backbone triple resonance NMR data, together with Spin System Type Assignment Constraints (STACs) derived from side-chain triple-resonance experiments. The program AutoStructure then derives conformational constraints using these chemical shifts, amide 1H/2H exchange, nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), and residual dipolar coupling data. The total time required for collecting such NMR data can potentially be as short as a few days. Here we demonstrate an integrated set of NMR software which can process these NMR spectra, carry out resonance assignments, interpret NOESY data, and generate medium-accuracy structures within a few days. The feasibility of this combined data collection and analysis strategy starting from raw NMR time domain data was illustrated by automatic analysis of a medium accuracy structure of the Z domain of Staphylococcal protein A. PMID:12761394

  9. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  10. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen J.; Pham, Linh M.; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ˜100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species (1H, 19F, 31P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (˜20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities.

  11. ADAPT-NMR 3.0: utilization of BEST-type triple-resonance NMR experiments to accelerate the process of data collection and assignment

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Hesam; Tonelli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) is a software package whose Bayesian core uses on-the-fly chemical shift assignments to guide data acquisition by non-uniform sampling from a panel of through-bond NMR experiments. The new version of ADAPT-NMR (ADAPT-NMR v3.0) has the option of utilizing 2D tilted-plane versions of 3D fast spectral acquisition with BEST-type pulse sequences, while also retaining the capability of acquiring and processing data from tilted-plane versions of conventional sensitivity-enhanced experiments. The use of BEST experiments significantly reduces data collection times and leads to enhanced performance by ADAPT-NMR. PMID:26021595

  12. ADAPT-NMR 3.0: utilization of BEST-type triple-resonance NMR experiments to accelerate the process of data collection and assignment.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Hesam; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2015-07-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) is a software package whose Bayesian core uses on-the-fly chemical shift assignments to guide data acquisition by non-uniform sampling from a panel of through-bond NMR experiments. The new version of ADAPT-NMR (ADAPT-NMR v3.0) has the option of utilizing 2D tilted-plane versions of 3D fast spectral acquisition with BEST-type pulse sequences, while also retaining the capability of acquiring and processing data from tilted-plane versions of conventional sensitivity-enhanced experiments. The use of BEST experiments significantly reduces data collection times and leads to enhanced performance by ADAPT-NMR. PMID:26021595

  13. Susceptibility-matched plugs for microcoil NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kc, Ravi; Gowda, Yashas N.; Djukovic, Danijel; Henry, Ian D.; Park, Gregory H. J.; Raftery, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    For mass-limited samples, the residual sample volume outside the detection coil is an important concern, as is good base line resolution. Here, we present the construction and evaluation of magnetic susceptibility-matched plugs for microcoil NMR sample cells which address these issues. Mixed-epoxy glue and ultem tube plugs that have susceptibility values close to those of perfluorocarbon FC-43 (fluorinert) and copper were used in small volume (0.5-2 μL) and larger volume (15-20 μL) thin glass capillary sample cells. Using these plugs, the sample volume efficiency (i.e. ratio of active volume to total sample volume in the microcoil NMR cell) was improved by 6-12-fold without sensitivity and resolution trade-offs. Comparison with laser etched or heat etched microcoil sample cells is provided. The approaches described are potentially useful in metabolomics for biomarkers detection in mass limited biological samples.

  14. Susceptibility-matched plugs for microcoil NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Kc, Ravi; Gowda, Yashas N; Djukovic, Danijel; Henry, Ian D; Park, Gregory H J; Raftery, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    For mass-limited samples, the residual sample volume outside the detection coil is an important concern, as is good base line resolution. Here, we present the construction and evaluation of magnetic susceptibility-matched plugs for microcoil NMR sample cells which address these issues. Mixed-epoxy glue and ultem tube plugs that have susceptibility values close to those of perfluorocarbon FC-43 (fluorinert) and copper were used in small volume (0.5-2 microL) and larger volume (15-20 microL) thin glass capillary sample cells. Using these plugs, the sample volume efficiency (i.e. ratio of active volume to total sample volume in the microcoil NMR cell) was improved by 6-12-fold without sensitivity and resolution trade-offs. Comparison with laser etched or heat etched microcoil sample cells is provided. The approaches described are potentially useful in metabolomics for biomarkers detection in mass limited biological samples. PMID:20510638

  15. Susceptibility-matched plugs for microcoil NMR probes

    PubMed Central

    Kc, Ravi; Gowda, Yashas N.; Djukovic, Danijel; Henry, Ian D; Park, Gregory H J; Raftery, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    For mass limited samples, the residual sample volume outside the detection coil is an important concern, as is good base line resolution. Here, we present the construction and evaluation of magnetic susceptibility-matched plugs for microcoil NMR sample cells which address these issues. Mixed-epoxy glue and ultem tube plugs that have susceptibility values close to those of perfluorocarbon FC-43 (fluorinert) and copper were used in small volume (0.5 to 2 μL) and larger volume (15 to 20 μL) thin glass capillary sample cells. Using these plugs, the sample volume efficiency (i.e. ratio of active volume to total sample volume in the microcoil NMR cell) was improved by 6 to 12 fold without sensitivity and resolution trade-offs. Comparison with laser etched or heat etched microcoil sample cells is provided. The approaches described are potentially useful in metabolomics for biomarkers detection in mass limited biological samples. PMID:20510638

  16. Overcoming the Solubility Limit with Solubility-Enhancement Tags: Successful Applications in Biomolecular NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pei; Wagner, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Although the rapid progress of NMR technology has significantly expanded the range of NMR-trackable systems, preparation of NMR-suitable samples that are highly soluble and stable remains a bottleneck for studies of many biological systems. The application of solubility-enhancement tags (SETs) has been highly effective in overcoming solubility and sample stability issues and has enabled structural studies of important biological systems previously deemed unapproachable by solution NMR techniques. In this review, we provide a brief survey of the development and successful applications of the SET strategy in biomolecular NMR. We also comment on the criteria for choosing optimal SETs, such as for differently charged target proteins, and recent new developments on NMR-invisible SETs. PMID:19731047

  17. Low Cost CE-NMR with Microcoils for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K; Klunder, G; Demas, V; Malba, V; Bernhardt, A; Evan, L; Harvey, C; Maxwell, R; Herberg, J L

    2009-01-08

    Understanding speciation in solids and solutions is important for environmental and toxicological purposes. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a simple rapid separation technique that can be used to identify species in solution. CE is particularly is well suited for rapid separations of metal containing samples. Direct on-capillary measurement of metal compound speciation can be obtained with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The development of a low-cost microcoil CE-NMR system for in situ characterization of samples of interest is discussed. High precision laser lithography is used to produce copper sputtered microcoils that have comparable resistivity and quality factors to that of hand wound microcoils. A portable NMR system coupled with a CE system has the potential to identify chemical species in aqueous solutions. In addition, transient isotachophoresis can separate and pre-concentrate samples of interest to obtain separate chemical peaks for speciation by online NMR analysis. We are developing separation assays to determine the speciation of chemical complexes in solutions with minimal perturbation to the original sample equilibrium. On-line NMR measurements will be made downstream of the UV detector.

  18. Low Cost CE-NMR with Microcoils for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K L; Klunder, G; Demas, V; Malba, V; Bernhardt, A; Evan, L; Harvey, C; Maxwell, R; Herberg, J

    2008-07-25

    Understanding speciation in solids and solutions is important for environmental and toxicological purposes. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a simple rapid separation technique that can be used to identify species in solution. CE is particularly is well suited for rapid separations of metal containing samples. Direct on-capillary measurement of metal compound speciation can be obtained with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The development of a low-cost microcoil CE-NMR system for in situ characterization of samples of interest is discussed. High precision laser lithography is used to produce copper sputtered microcoils that have comparable resistivity and quality factors to that of hand wound microcoils. A portable NMR system coupled with a CE system has the potential to identify chemical species in aqueous solutions. In addition, transient isotachophoresis can separate and pre-concentrate samples of interest to obtain separate chemical peaks for speciation by online NMR analysis. We are developing separation assays to determine the speciation of chemical complexes in solutions with minimal perturbation to the original sample equilibrium. On-line NMR measurements will be made downstream of the UV detector.

  19. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  20. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  1. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  2. Sensitivity enhancement using paramagnetic relaxation in MAS solid-state NMR of perdeuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linser, Rasmus; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Diehl, Anne; Reif, Bernd

    2007-12-01

    Previously, Ishii et al., could show that chelated paramagnetic ions can be employed to significantly decrease the recycle delay of a MAS solid-state NMR experiment [N.P. Wickramasinghe, M. Kotecha, A. Samoson, J. Past, Y. Ishii, Sensitivity enhancement in C-13 solid-state NMR of protein microcrystals by use of paramagnetic metal ions for optimizing H-1 T-1 relaxation, J. Magn. Reson. 184 (2007) 350-356]. Application of the method is limited to very robust samples, for which sample stability is not compromised by RF induced heating. In addition, probe integrity might be perturbed in standard MAS PRE experiments due to the use of very short duty cycles. We show that these deleterious effects can be avoided if perdeuterated proteins are employed that have been re-crystallized from D 2O:H 2O = 9:1 containing buffer solutions. The experiments are demonstrated using the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin as a model system. The labeling scheme allows to record proton detected 1H, 15N correlation spectra with very high resolution in the absence of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling. Cu-edta as a doping reagent yields a reduction of the recycle delay by up to a factor of 15. In particular, we find that the 1H T1 for the bulk H N magnetization is reduced from 4.4 s to 0.3 s if the Cu-edta concentration is increased from 0 mM to 250 mM. Possible perturbations like chemical shift changes or line broadening due to the paramagnetic chelate complex are minimal. No degradation of our samples was observed in the course of the experiments.

  3. NMR spectroscopy in studies of light-induced structural changes in mammalian rhodopsin: applicability of solution (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Klein-Seetharaman, J; Getmanova, E V; Loewen, M C; Reeves, P J; Khorana, H G

    1999-11-23

    We report high resolution solution (19)F NMR spectra of fluorine-labeled rhodopsin mutants in detergent micelles. Single cysteine substitution mutants in the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin were labeled by attachment of the trifluoroethylthio (TET), CF(3)-CH(2)-S, group through a disulfide linkage. TET-labeled cysteine mutants at amino acid positions 67, 140, 245, 248, 311, and 316 in rhodopsin were thus prepared. Purified mutant rhodopsins (6-10 mg), in dodecylmaltoside, were analyzed at 20 degrees C by solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The spectra recorded in the dark showed the following chemical shifts relative to trifluoroacetate: Cys-67, 9.8 ppm; Cys-140, 10.6 ppm; Cys-245, 9.9 ppm; Cys-248, 9.5 ppm; Cys-311, 9.9 ppm; and Cys-316, 10.0 ppm. Thus, all mutants showed chemical shifts downfield that of free TET (6.5 ppm). On illumination to form metarhodopsin II, upfield changes in chemical shift were observed for (19)F labels at positions 67 (-0.2 ppm) and 140 (-0.4 ppm) and downfield changes for positions 248 (+0.1 ppm) and 316 (+0.1 ppm) whereas little or no change was observed at positions 311 and 245. On decay of metarhodopsin II, the chemical shifts reverted largely to those originally observed in the dark. The results demonstrate the applicability of solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy to studies of the tertiary structures in the cytoplasmic face of intact rhodopsin in the dark and on light activation. PMID:10570143

  4. NMR-Based Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Measurements for Complex Membrane Proteins: Development and Critical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerski, Lech; Vinogradova, Olga; Sanders, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for measuring site-specific amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates for membrane proteins in bilayers is reported and evaluated. This method represents an adaptation and extension of the approach of Dempsey and co-workers (Biophys. J. 70, 1777-1788 (1996)) and is based on reconstituting 15N-labeled membrane proteins into phospholipid bilayers, followed by lyophilization and rehydration with D2O or H2O (control). Following incubation for a time t under hydrated conditions, samples are again lyophilized and then solubilized in an organic solvent system, where 1H-15N HSQC spectra are recorded. Comparison of spectra from D2O-exposed samples to spectra from control samples yields the extent of the H-D exchange which occurred in the bilayers during time t. Measurements are site specific if specific 15N labeling is used. The first part of this paper deals with the search for a suitable solvent system in which to solubilize complex membrane proteins in an amide "exchange-trapped" form for NMR quantitation of amide peak intensities. The second portion of the paper documents application of the overall procedure to measuring site-specific amide exchange rates in diacylglycerol kinase, a representative integral membrane protein. Both the potential usefulness and the significant limitations of the new method are documented.

  5. Structure Determination of a Membrane Protein with Two Trans-membrane Helices in Aligned Phospholipid Bicelles by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Anna A.; Howell, Stanley C.; Nevzorov, Alexander A.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the membrane protein MerFt was determined in magnetically aligned phospholipid bicelles by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. With two trans-membrane helices and a 10-residue inter-helical loop, this truncated construct of the mercury transport membrane protein MerF has sufficient structural complexity to demonstrate the feasibility of determining the structures of polytopic membrane proteins in their native phospholipid bilayer environment under physiological conditions. PISEMA, SAMMY, and other double-resonance experiments were applied to uniformly and selectively 15N labeled samples to resolve and assign the backbone amide resonances, and to measure the associated 15N chemical shift and 1H-15N heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies as orientation constraints for structure calculations. 1H/13C/15N triple-resonance experiments were applied to selectively 13C′ and 15N labeled samples to complete the resonance assignments, especially for residues in the non-helical regions of the protein. A single resonance is observed for each labeled site in one- and two-dimensional spectra. Therefore, each residue has a unique conformation, and all protein molecules in the sample have the same three-dimensional structure and are oriented identically in planar phospholipid bilayers. Combined with the absence of significant intensity near the isotropic resonance frequency, this demonstrates that the entire protein, including the loop and terminal regions, has a well-defined, stable structure in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:16967977

  6. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  7. NMR quantitation: influence of RF inhomogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The NMR peak integral is ideally linearly dependent on the sine of excitation angle (θ), which has provided unsurpassed flexibility in quantitative NMR by allowing the use of a signal of any concentration as the internal concentration reference. Controlling the excitation angle is particularly critical for solvent proton concentration referencing to minimize the negative impact of radiation damping, and to reduce the risk of receiver gain compression. In practice, due to the influence of RF inhomogeneity for any given probe, the observed peak integral is not exactly proportional to sin θ. To evaluate the impact quantitatively, we introduce a RF inhomogeneity factor I(θ) as a function of the nominal pulse excitation angle and propose a simple calibration procedure. Alternatively, I(θ) can be calculated from the probe’s RF profile, which can be readily obtained as a gradient image of an aqueous sample. Our results show that without consideration of I(θ), even for a probe with good RF homogeneity, up to 5% error can be introduced due to different excitation pulse angles used for the analyte and the reference. Hence, a simple calibration of I(θ) can eliminate such errors and allow an accurate description of the observed NMR signal’s dependence on the excitation angle in quantitative analysis. PMID:21919056

  8. Earth's field NMR; a surface moisture detector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Altobelli, Stephen; McDowell, Andrew; Zhang, Tongsheng

    2012-10-01

    Earth's field NMR (EFNMR), being free of magnets, would be an ideal teaching medium as well as a mobile NMR technique except for its weak S/N. The common EFNMR apparatus uses a powerful prepolarization field to enhance the spin magnetization before the experiment. We introduce a coil design geared to larger but manageable samples with sufficient sensitivity without prepolarization to move EFNMR closer to routine use and to provide an inexpensive teaching tool. Our coil consists of parallel wires spread out on a plywood to form a current sheet with the current return wires separated so they will not influence the main part of the coil assembly. The sensitive region is a relatively thin region parallel to the coil and close to it. A single turn of the coil is wound to be topologically equivalent to a figure-8. The two crossing segments in the center of a figure-8 form two of the parallel wires of the flat coil. Thus, a two-turn figure-8 has four crossing wires so its topologically equivalent coil will have four parallel wires with currents in phase. Together with the excellent sensitivity, this coil offers outstanding interference rejection because of the figure-8 geometry. An example of such a coil has 328 parallel wires covering a ˜1 meter square plywood which yields a good NMR signal from 26 liters of water spread out roughly over the area of the coil in less than one minute in a nearby park.

  9. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR.II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. T. S.; Rods, M. S.; Newmark, R. D.; Budinger, T. F.

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high-field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies where the peak RF power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. A stochastic NMR experiment excites the spin system with a sequence of RF pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. In a previous paper the stochastic experiment was analyzed and analytic expressions for the input-output cross-correlations, average signal power, and signal spectral density were obtained for a general stochastic RF excitation. In this paper specific cases of excitation with random phase, fixed flip angle, and excitation with two random components in quadrature are analyzed. The input-output cross-correlation for these two types of excitations is shown to be Lorentzian. Line broadening is the only spectral distortion as the RF excitation power is increased. The systematic noise power is inversely proportional to the number of data points N used in the spectral reconstruction. The use of a complete maximum length sequence (MLS) may improve the signal-to-systematic-noise ratio by 20 dB relative to random binary excitation, but peculiar features in the higher-order autocorrelations of MLS cause noise-like distortion in the reconstructed spectra when the excitation power is high. The amount of noise-like distortion depends on the choice of the MLS generator.

  10. NMR assessment on bone simulated under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Q.; Qin, Y.

    Introduction Microgravity-induced bone loss has been suggested to be similar to disuse-osteoporosis on Earth which constitutes a challenging public health problem No current non-destructive method can provide the microstructural changes in bone particularly on cortical bone Recently the authors have applied low field nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spin-spin relaxation technique and computational analysis method to determine the porosity pore size distribution and microdamage of cortical bone 1-3 The studies by the authors have shown that this technology can be used to characterize microstructural changes as well as bone water distribution bound and mobile water changes of weightless treated simulating a microgravity condition turkey and mouse cortical bone We further determinate that the NMR spin-spin relaxation time T 2 spectrum derived parameters can be used as descriptions of bone quality e g matrix water distribution and porosity size distributions and alone or in combination with current techniques bone mineral density measurements more accurately predict bone mechanical properties Methods underline Bone sample preparation Two kinds of animal samples were collected and prepared for designed experiments from SUNY Cortical bones of the mid-diaphyses of the ulnae of 1-year-old male turkeys were dissected from freshly slaughtered animals Eight samples were categorized from normal or control and four samples were 4-week disuse treated by functionally isolated osteotomies disuse A total of 12

  11. Classification with Noisy Labels by Importance Reweighting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongliang; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study a classification problem in which sample labels are randomly corrupted. In this scenario, there is an unobservable sample with noise-free labels. However, before being observed, the true labels are independently flipped with a probability ρ ∈ [0,0.5), and the random label noise can be class-conditional. Here, we address two fundamental problems raised by this scenario. The first is how to best use the abundant surrogate loss functions designed for the traditional classification problem when there is label noise. We prove that any surrogate loss function can be used for classification with noisy labels by using importance reweighting, with consistency assurance that the label noise does not ultimately hinder the search for the optimal classifier of the noise-free sample. The other is the open problem of how to obtain the noise rate ρ. We show that the rate is upper bounded by the conditional probability P(∧Y|X) of the noisy sample. Consequently, the rate can be estimated, because the upper bound can be easily reached in classification problems. Experimental results on synthetic and real datasets confirm the efficiency of our methods. PMID:27046490

  12. GFT projection NMR spectroscopy for proteins in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Franks, W. Trent; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Recording of four-dimensional (4D) spectra for proteins in the solid state has opened new avenues to obtain virtually complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins. As in solution state NMR, the sampling of three indirect dimensions leads per se to long minimal measurement time. Furthermore, artifact suppression in solid state NMR relies primarily on radio-frequency pulse phase cycling. For an n-step phase cycle, the minimal measurement times of both 3D and 4D spectra are increased n times. To tackle the associated ‘sampling problem’ and to avoid sampling limited data acquisition, solid state G-Matrix Fourier Transform (SS GFT) projection NMR is introduced to rapidly acquire 3D and 4D spectral information. Specifically, (4,3)D (HA)CANCOCX and (3,2)D (HACA)NCOCX were implemented and recorded for the 6 kDa protein GB1 within about 10% of the time required for acquiring the conventional congeners with the same maximal evolution times and spectral widths in the indirect dimensions. Spectral analysis was complemented by comparative analysis of expected spectral congestion in conventional and GFT NMR experiments, demonstrating that high spectral resolution of the GFT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain nearly complete resonance assignments even for large proteins. PMID:21052779

  13. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  14. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  15. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions. PMID:27353494

  16. Consumer Perceptions of Health Claims in Advertisements and Food Labels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazis, Michael B.; Raymond, Mary Anne

    1997-01-01

    Of sample of 180 women, 60 received information from ads, 60 from product labels, and 60 from labels with nutrition information. Beliefs about products did not differ whether health claims appeared in ads or on labels. Nutrition information influenced beliefs. Health claims challenged by the Federal Trade Commission or consumer groups were less…

  17. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  18. The development of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Most biological functions are carried out in supramolecular assemblies. As a result of their slow reorientation in solution, these assemblies have been resistant to the widely employed solution NMR approaches. The development of solid-state NMR to first of all overcome the correlation time problem and then obtain informative high-resolution spectra of proteins in supramolecular assemblies, such as virus particles and membranes, is described here. High resolution solid-state NMR is deeply intertwined with the history of NMR, and the seminal paper was published in 1948. Although the general principles were understood by the end of the 1950s, it has taken more than fifty years for instrumentation and experimental methods to become equal to the technical problems presented by the biological assemblies of greatest interest. It is now possible to obtain atomic resolution structures of viral coat proteins in virus particles and membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by oriented sample solid-state NMR methods. The development of this aspect of the field of solid-state NMR is summarized in this review article. PMID:26069880

  19. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  20. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.