Science.gov

Sample records for labeled nmr samples

  1. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  2. Preparation of uniformly labeled NMR samples in Escherichia coli under the tight control of the araBAD promoter: expression of an archaeal homolog of the RNase P Rpp29 protein.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, William P; Raj, M L Stephen; Gopalan, Venkat; Foster, Mark P

    2003-04-01

    We report the first use of the tightly regulated araBAD promoter for generating uniformly labeled samples for NMR. The araBAD promoter provides a distinct advantage over that of the most commonly used protein overexpression systems in bacteria (e.g., in pET vectors: T7lac), in that it provides much tighter control over basal expression. However, use of araBAD-regulated expression for preparation of uniformly labeled protein samples for NMR is complicated by the fact that glucose (the most commonly used carbon source in defined minimal media) indirectly represses transcription, and thus, cannot be used. After experimenting with alternative media, we found that uniformly labeled NMR samples can be prepared using the highly regulated arabinose-inducible promoter and that suitable yields can be obtained in defined minimal media containing glycerol, not glucose, as the carbon source. PMID:12699688

  3. Sensitivity of nonuniform sampling NMR.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Melissa R; Suiter, Christopher L; Henry, Geneive E; Rovnyak, James; Hoch, Jeffrey C; Polenova, Tatyana; Rovnyak, David

    2015-06-01

    Many information-rich multidimensional experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can benefit from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement of up to about 2-fold if a decaying signal in an indirect dimension is sampled with nonconsecutive increments, termed nonuniform sampling (NUS). This work provides formal theoretical results and applications to resolve major questions about the scope of the NUS enhancement. First, we introduce the NUS Sensitivity Theorem in which any decreasing sampling density applied to any exponentially decaying signal always results in higher sensitivity (SNR per square root of measurement time) than uniform sampling (US). Several cases will illustrate this theorem and show that even conservative applications of NUS improve sensitivity by useful amounts. Next, we turn to a serious limitation of uniform sampling: the SNR by US decreases for extending evolution times, and thus total experimental times, beyond 1.26T2 (T2 = signal decay constant). Thus, SNR and resolution cannot be simultaneously improved by extending US beyond 1.26T2. We find that NUS can eliminate this constraint, and we introduce the matched NUS SNR Theorem: an exponential sampling density matched to the signal decay always improves the SNR with additional evolution time. Though proved for a specific case, broader classes of NUS densities also improve SNR with evolution time. Applications of these theoretical results are given for a soluble plant natural product and a solid tripeptide (u-(13)C,(15)N-MLF). These formal results clearly demonstrate the inadequacies of applying US to decaying signals in indirect nD-NMR dimensions, supporting a broader adoption of NUS. PMID:25901905

  4. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  5. Algal autolysate medium to label proteins for NMR in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Carmelo; Luchinat, Enrico; Barbieri, Letizia; Neri, Sara; Fragai, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In-cell NMR provides structural and functional information on proteins directly inside living cells. At present, the high costs of the labeled media for mammalian cells represent a limiting factor for the development of this methodology. Here we report a protocol to prepare a homemade growth medium from Spirulina platensis autolysate, suitable to express uniformly labeled proteins inside mammalian cells at a reduced cost-per-sample. The human proteins SOD1 and Mia40 were overexpressed in human cells grown in (15)N-enriched S. platensis algal-derived medium, and high quality in-cell NMR spectra were obtained. PMID:27106902

  6. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  7. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  8. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  9. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  11. Efficient cellular solid-state NMR of membrane proteins by targeted protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay A; Daniëls, Mark; van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Folkers, Gert E; Baldus, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) has made significant progress towards the study of membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes. However, reduced spectroscopic sensitivity and high background signal levels can complicate these experiments. Here, we describe a method for ssNMR to specifically label a single protein by repressing endogenous protein expression with rifampicin. Our results demonstrate that treatment of E. coli with rifampicin during induction of recombinant membrane protein expression reduces background signals for different expression levels and improves sensitivity in cellular membrane samples. Further, the method reduces the amount of time and resources needed to produce membrane protein samples, enabling new strategies for studying challenging membrane proteins by ssNMR. PMID:25956570

  12. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  13. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  14. Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels: NMR Imaging Methods, Preliminary Results, and New Optimized Coils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pratik

    1992-01-01

    The investigations focussed on in vivo NMR imaging studies of magnetic particles with and within neural cells. NMR imaging methods, both Fourier transform and projection reconstruction, were implemented and new protocols were developed to perform "Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels" on small animal brains. Having performed the preliminary experiments with neuronal tracing, new optimized coils and experimental set-up were devised. A novel gradient coil technology along with new rf-coils were implemented, and optimized for future use with small animals in them. A new magnetic labelling procedure was developed that allowed labelling of billions of cells with ultra -small magnetite particles in a short time. The relationships among the viability of such cells, the amount of label and the contrast in the images were studied as quantitatively as possible. Intracerebral grafting of magnetite labelled fetal rat brain cells made it possible for the first time to attempt monitoring in vivo the survival, differentiation, and possible migration of both host and grafted cells in the host rat brain. This constituted the early steps toward future experiments that may lead to the monitoring of human brain grafts of fetal brain cells. Preliminary experiments with direct injection of horse radish peroxidase-conjugated magnetite particles into neurons, followed by NMR imaging, revealed a possible non-invasive alternative, allowing serial study of the dynamic transport pattern of tracers in single living animals. New gradient coils were built by using parallel solid-conductor ribbon cables that could be wrapped easily and quickly. Rapid rise times provided by these coils allowed implementation of fast imaging methods. Optimized rf-coil circuit development made it possible to understand better the sample-coil properties and the associated trade -offs in cases of small but conducting samples.

  15. Solid-state 19F-NMR analysis of 19F-labeled tryptophan in gramicidin A in oriented membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L; Wang, Junfeng; Cross, Timothy A; Ulrich, Anne S

    2002-01-01

    The response of membrane-associated peptides toward the lipid environment or other binding partners can be monitored by solid-state NMR of suitably labeled side chains. Tryptophan is a prominent amino acid in transmembrane helices, and its (19)F-labeled analogues are generally biocompatible and cause little structural perturbation. Hence, we use 5F-Trp as a highly sensitive NMR probe to monitor the conformation and dynamics of the indole ring. To establish this (19)F-NMR strategy, gramicidin A was labeled with 5F-Trp in position 13 or 15, whose chi(1)/chi(2) torsion angles are known from previous (2)H-NMR studies. First, the alignment of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor within the membrane was deduced by lineshape analysis of oriented samples. Next, the three principal axes of the (19)F chemical shift anisotropy tensor were assigned within the molecular frame of the indole ring. Finally, determination of chi(1)/chi(2) for 5F-Trp in the lipid gel phase showed that the side chain alignment differs by up to 20 degrees from its known conformation in the liquid crystalline state. The sensitivity gain of (19)F-NMR and the reduction in the amount of material was at least 10-fold compared with previous (2)H-NMR studies on the same system and 100-fold compared with (15)N-NMR. PMID:12496101

  16. REDOR NMR of stable-isotope-labeled protein binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.

    1994-12-01

    Rotational-echo, double resonance (REDOR) NMR, a new analytical spectroscopic technique for solids spinning at the magic angle, has been developed over the last 5 years. REDOR provides a direct measure of heteronuclear dipolar coupling between isolated pairs of labeled nuclei. In a solid with a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N labeled pair, for example, the {sup 13}C rotational echoes that form each rotor period following a{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization transfer can be prevented from reaching full intensity by insertion of a {sup 15}N {pi} pulse each half rotor period. The REDOR difference (the difference between a {sup 13}C NMR spectrum obtained under these conditions and one obtained with no {sup 15}N {pi} pulses) has a strong dependence on the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar coupling, and hence, the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N internuclear distance. REDOR is described as double-resonance even though three radio frequencies (typically {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N) are used because the protons are removed from the important evolution part of the experiment by resonant decoupling. The dephasing of magnetization in REDOR arises from a local dipolar {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N field gradient and involves no polarization transfer. REDOR has no dependence on {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N chemical-shift tensors and does not require resolution of a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N coupling in the chemical-shift dimension.

  17. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  18. On electrophoretic NMR. Exploring high conductivity samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejewski, Michał; Giesecke, Marianne; Furó, István

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a new electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) method that uses a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train with repeated electric field reversal is investigated. We show that this pulse sequence, with acronym CPMGER, yields strongly reduced artifacts from convective flow effects caused by the simultaneous presence of electroosmotic and thermal driving forces. We demonstrate the achieved improvements in various aqueous solutions. Ultimately, the method can be used for obtaining electrophoretic mobilities by eNMR without relying on uncharged reference molecules, otherwise a significant limitation for electrophoretic experiments performed with nuclei other than 1H.

  19. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  20. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, A.; Samoson, A.

    1990-02-06

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero. 8 figs.

  1. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... Part 305—Sample Labels ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER29AU07.126 SAMPLE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.127 SAMPLE LABEL...

  2. Labeling strategy and signal broadening mechanism of Protein NMR spectroscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yansheng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Yanhua; Xu, Guohua; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Zeting; Yao, Chendie; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2015-06-01

    We used Xenopus laevis oocytes, a paradigm for a variety of biological studies, as a eukaryotic model system for in-cell protein NMR spectroscopy. The small globular protein GB1 was one of the first studied in Xenopus oocytes, but there have been few reports since then of high-resolution spectra in oocytes. The scarcity of data is at least partly due to the lack of good labeling strategies and the paucity of information on resonance broadening mechanisms. Here, we systematically evaluate isotope enrichment and labeling methods in oocytes injected with five different proteins with molecular masses of 6 to 54 kDa. (19) F labeling is more promising than (15) N, (13) C, and (2) H enrichment. We also used (19) F NMR spectroscopy to quantify the contribution of viscosity, weak interactions, and sample inhomogeneity to resonance broadening in cells. We found that the viscosity in oocytes is only about 1.2 times that of water, and that inhomogeneous broadening is a major factor in determining line width in these cells. PMID:25965532

  3. 19 CFR 12.22 - Labels; samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labels; samples. 12.22 Section 12.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Antitoxins, and Analogous Products for...

  4. 19 CFR 12.22 - Labels; samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labels; samples. 12.22 Section 12.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Antitoxins, and Analogous Products for...

  5. 19 CFR 12.22 - Labels; samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labels; samples. 12.22 Section 12.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Antitoxins, and Analogous Products for...

  6. NMR conformational properties of an Anthrax Lethal Factor domain studied by multiple amino acid-selective labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vourtsis, Dionysios J.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Pairas, George; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A polypeptide, N-ALF{sub 233}, was overexpressed in E. coli and successfully isolated. • We produced {sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C labeled protein samples. • Amino acid selective approaches were applied. • We acquired several heteronuclear NMR spectra, to complete the backbone assignment. • Prediction of the secondary structure was performed. - Abstract: NMR-based structural biology urgently needs cost- and time-effective methods to assist both in the process of acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra and their subsequent analysis. Especially for bigger proteins (>20 kDa) selective labeling is a frequently used means of sequence-specific assignment. In this work we present the successful overexpression of a polypeptide of 233 residues, corresponding to the structured part of the N-terminal domain of Anthrax Lethal Factor, using Escherichia coli expression system. The polypeptide was subsequently isolated in pure, soluble form and analyzed structurally by solution NMR spectroscopy. Due to the non-satisfying quality and resolution of the spectra of this 27 kDa protein, an almost complete backbone assignment became feasible only by the combination of uniform and novel amino acid-selective labeling schemes. Moreover, amino acid-type selective triple-resonance NMR experiments proved to be very helpful.

  7. Preparation of isotopically labeled ribonucleotides for multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Batey, R T; Inada, M; Kujawinski, E; Puglisi, J D; Williamson, J R

    1992-01-01

    A general method for large scale preparation of uniformly isotopically labeled ribonucleotides and RNAs is described. Bacteria are grown on isotopic growth medium, and their nucleic acids are harvested and degraded to mononucleotides. These are enzymatically converted into ribonucleoside triphosphates, which are used in transcription reactions in vitro to prepare RNAs for NMR studies. For 15N-labeling, E.coli is grown on 15N-ammonium sulfate, whereas for 13C-labeling, Methylophilus methylotrophus is grown on 13C-methanol, which is more economical than 13C-glucose. To demonstrate the feasibility and utility of this method, uniformly 13C-labeled ribonucleotides were used to synthesize a 31 nucleotide HIV TAR RNA that was analyzed by 3D-NMR. This method should find widespread use in the structural analysis of RNA by NMR. Images PMID:1383928

  8. Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

  9. Simple, efficient protocol for enzymatic synthesis of uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled DNA for heteronuclear NMR studies.

    PubMed Central

    Masse, J E; Bortmann, P; Dieckmann, T; Feigon, J

    1998-01-01

    The use of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled RNA has greatly facilitated structural studies of RNA oligonucleotides by NMR. Application of similar methodologies for the study of DNA has been limited, primarily due to the lack of adequate methods for sample preparation. Methods for both chemical and enzymatic synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides uniformly labeled with 13C and/or 15N have been published, but have not yet been widely used. We have developed a modified procedure for preparing uniformly 13C,15N-labeled DNA based on enzymatic synthesis using Taq DNA polymerase. The highly efficient protocol results in quantitative polymerization of the template and approximately 80% incorporation of the labeled dNTPs. Procedures for avoiding non-templated addition of nucleotides or for their removal are given. The method has been used to synthesize several DNA oligonucleotides, including two complementary 15 base strands, a 32 base DNA oligonucleotide that folds to form an intramolecular triplex and a 12 base oligonucleotide that dimerizes and folds to form a quadruplex. Heteronuclear NMR spectra of the samples illustrate the quality of the labeled DNA obtained by these procedures. PMID:9592146

  10. Multiplexed NMR: An Automated CapNMR Dual-Sample Probe

    PubMed Central

    Norcross, James A.; Milling, Craig T.; Olson, Dean L.; Xu, Duanxiang; Audrieth, Anthony; Albrecht, Robert; Ruan, Ke; Likos, John; Jones, Claude; Peck, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    A new generation of micro-scale, nuclear magnetic resonance (CapNMR™) probe technology employs two independent detection elements to accommodate two samples simultaneously. Each detection element in the Dual-Sample CapNMR Probe (DSP) delivers the same spectral resolution and S/N as in a CapNMR probe configured to accommodate one sample at a time. A high degree of electrical isolation allows the DSP to be used in a variety of data acquisition modes. Both samples are shimmed simultaneously to achieve high spectral resolution for simultaneous data acquisition, or alternatively, a flowcell-specific shim set is readily called via spectrometer subroutines to enable acquisition from one sample while the other is being loaded. An automation system accommodates loading of two samples via dual injection ports on an autosampler and two completely independent flowpaths leading to dedicated flowcells in the DSP probe. PMID:20681560

  11. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling of samples. 301.33 Section 301.33 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are...

  12. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling of samples. 301.33 Section 301.33 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are...

  13. Methyl-specific isotopic labeling: a molecular tool box for solution NMR studies of large proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerfah, Rime; Plevin, Michael J; Sounier, Remy; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jerome

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a uniquely powerful tool for studying the structure, dynamics and interactions of biomolecules at atomic resolution. In the past 15 years, the development of new isotopic labeling strategies has opened the possibility of exploiting NMR spectroscopy in the study of supra-molecular complexes with molecular weights of up to 1MDa. At the core of these isotopic labeling developments is the specific introduction of [(1)H,(13)C]-labeled methyl probes into perdeuterated proteins. Here, we describe the evolution of these approaches and discuss their impact on structural and biological studies. The relevant protocols are succinctly reviewed for single and combinatorial isotopic-labeling of methyl-containing residues, and examples of applications on challenging biological systems, including high molecular weight and membrane proteins, are presented. PMID:25881211

  14. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... amendment published at 75 FR 49819, Aug. 16, 2010. ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER29AU07.126 SAMPLE LABEL...

  15. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... For Federal Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... Part 305—Sample Labels ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER21DE11.065 ER21DE11.066 ER21DE11.067...

  16. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and... Part 305—Sample Labels ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER21DE11.065 ER21DE11.066 ER21DE11.067...

  17. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  18. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples,...

  19. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples,...

  20. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples,...

  1. 27 CFR 20.253 - Labels for samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labels for samples. 20.253 Section 20.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Denatured Spirits § 20.253 Labels for samples. When a sample of specially denatured spirits is...

  2. 27 CFR 20.253 - Labels for samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labels for samples. 20.253 Section 20.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Denatured Spirits § 20.253 Labels for samples. When a sample of specially denatured spirits is...

  3. 27 CFR 20.253 - Labels for samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labels for samples. 20.253 Section 20.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Denatured Spirits § 20.253 Labels for samples. When a sample of specially denatured spirits is...

  4. Assignment of Oriented Sample NMR Resonances from a Three Transmembrane Helix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. T.; Hung, I.; Cross, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientation in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  5. Assignment of oriented sample NMR resonances from a three transmembrane helix protein.

    PubMed

    Murray, D T; Hung, I; Cross, T A

    2014-03-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientations in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  6. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t = 0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t = 0 to - tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory

  7. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t=0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t=0 to -tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory enables

  8. Classification of commercial Catuaba samples by NMR, HPLC and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Daolio, Cristina; Beltrame, Flávio L; Ferreira, Antonio G; Cass, Quezia B; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Ferreira, Márcia M C

    2008-01-01

    For over a century, Catuaba has been used in Brazilian folk medicine as an aphrodisiac even though the identity of the plant material employed is often uncertain. The species recommended by the Brazilian Pharmacopeia is Anemopaegma arvense (Bignoniaceae), but many other plants, regionally known as Catuaba, are commercialised. Frequently, the quality control of such a complex system is based on chemical markers that do not supply a general idea of the system. With the advent of the metabolomics approach, a global analysis of samples becomes possible. It appears that (1)H-NMR is the most useful method for such application, since it can be used as a wide-spectrum chemical analysis technique. Unfortunately, the generated spectra is complex so a possible approach is to look at the metabolite profile as a whole using multivariate methods, for example, by application of principal component analysis (PCA). In the present paper, we describe for the first time a proton high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-HR-MAS NMR) method coupled with PCA for the metabolomic analysis of some commercial Catuaba samples, which provided a reduction in the time required for such analysis. A comparative study of HPLC, HR-MAS and liquid-NMR techniques is also reported. PMID:17890569

  9. Elucidation of the Cross-Link Structure of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides Using NMR of C-13-Labeled Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Solid NMR of C-13 isotope-labeled samples of PMR-15 was used to follow the cross-linking reaction of the nadic end cap. Some samples were labeled on one of the carbon atoms of the nadic end cap, and others on the methylene carbon atom of the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer. NMR spectra were run on these samples both before and after cross-linking. In this way, direct evidence of the major products of cross-linking under normal cure conditions is provided. The majority (approximately 85%) of the cross-linking derives from olefin polymerization through the double bond of the end cap. Approximately 15% of the products could come from a pathway involving a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. However, all of the products could be explained by a biradical intermediate without a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. Evidence is also presented that the methylene moiety in the methylenedianiline part of the polymer chain also participates in the cross-linking, albeit to a small extent, by a radical transfer reaction. Different cure conditions (higher temperatures, longer times) could change the relative distribution of the products.

  10. Optimization of protein samples for NMR using thermal shift assays.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Sandra; Lercher, Lukas; Karanth, Megha N; Meijers, Rob; Carlomagno, Teresa; Boivin, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    Maintaining a stable fold for recombinant proteins is challenging, especially when working with highly purified and concentrated samples at temperatures >20 °C. Therefore, it is worthwhile to screen for different buffer components that can stabilize protein samples. Thermal shift assays or ThermoFluor(®) provide a high-throughput screening method to assess the thermal stability of a sample under several conditions simultaneously. Here, we describe a thermal shift assay that is designed to optimize conditions for nuclear magnetic resonance studies, which typically require stable samples at high concentration and ambient (or higher) temperature. We demonstrate that for two challenging proteins, the multicomponent screen helped to identify ingredients that increased protein stability, leading to clear improvements in the quality of the spectra. Thermal shift assays provide an economic and time-efficient method to find optimal conditions for NMR structural studies. PMID:26984476

  11. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sample Labels L Appendix L to Part 305... RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. L Appendix L to Part 305—Sample Labels Link to a correction published at 78...

  12. Biomolecular DNP-Supported NMR Spectroscopy using Site-Directed Spin Labeling.

    PubMed

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Koers, Eline J; Sauvée, Claire; Hulse, Raymond E; Weingarth, Markus; Ouari, Olivier; Perozo, Eduardo; Tordo, Paul; Baldus, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has been shown to greatly enhance spectroscopic sensitivity, creating novel opportunities for NMR studies on complex and large molecular assemblies in life and material sciences. In such applications, however, site-specificity and spectroscopic resolution become critical factors that are usually difficult to control by current DNP-based approaches. We have examined in detail the effect of directly attaching mono- or biradicals to induce local paramagnetic relaxation effects and, at the same time, to produce sizable DNP enhancements. Using a membrane-embedded ion channel as an example, we varied the degree of paramagnetic labeling and the location of the DNP probes. Our results show that the creation of local spin clusters can generate sizable DNP enhancements while preserving the intrinsic benefits of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)-based NMR approaches. DNP using chemical labeling may hence provide an attractive route to introduce molecular specificity into DNP studies in life science applications and beyond. PMID:26315337

  13. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of 13C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our 13C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the 13C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the 13C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in 13C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  14. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of (13)C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our (13)C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the (13)C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the (13)C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in (13)C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  15. A mutagenesis-free approach to assignment of (19)F NMR resonances in biosynthetically labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Kitevski-LeBlanc, Julianne L; Al-Abdul-Wahid, M Sameer; Prosser, R Scott

    2009-02-18

    Solution NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics using fluorinated amino acid probes are a valuable addition to the repertoire of existing (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H experiments. Despite the numerous advantages of the (19)F nucleus in NMR, protein studies are complicated by the dependence of resonance assignments on site-directed mutagenesis methods which are laborious and often problematic. Here we report an NMR-based route to the assignment of fluorine resonances in (13)C,(15)N-3-fluoro-l-tyrosine labeled calmodulin. The assignment begins with the correlation of the fluorine nucleus to the delta proton in the novel (13)C,(15)N-enriched probe which is achieved using a CT-HCCF-COSY experiment. Connection to the backbone is made through two additional solution NMR experiments, namely the (H(beta))C(beta)(C(gamma)C(delta))H(delta) and HNCACB. Assignments are completed using either previously published backbone chemical shift data or obtained experimentally provided uniform (13)C,(15)N labeling procedures are employed during protein expression. Additional benefits of the (13)C,(15)N-3-fluoro-l-tyrosine probe include the reduction of spectral overlap through ((13)C(19)F) CT-HSQCs, as well as the ability to monitor side chain dynamics using (19)F T(1), T(2), and the (13)C-(19)F NOE. PMID:19173647

  16. Mixing apparatus for preparing NMR samples under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Jin; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Mooberry, Ed S.; Westler, William M.; Markley, John L.

    2003-09-01

    The size limit for protein NMR spectroscopy in solution arises in large part from line broadening caused by slow molecular tumbling. One way to alleviate this problem is to increase the effective tumbling rate by reducing the viscosity of the solvent. Because proteins generally require an aqueous environment to remain folded, one approach has been to encapsulate hydrated proteins in reverse micelles formed by a detergent and to dissolve the encapsulated protein in a low-viscosity fluid. The high volatility of suitable low-viscosity fluids requires that the samples be prepared and maintained under pressure. We describe a novel apparatus used for the preparation of such samples. The apparatus includes a chamber for mixing the detergent with the low-viscosity solvent, a second chamber for mixing this with hydrated protein, and a 5-mm (o.d.) zirconium oxide NMR sample tube with shut-off valves designed to contain pressures on the order of 10 bar, sufficient for liquid propane. Liquids are moved from one location to another by introducing minor pressure differentials between two pressurization vessels. We discuss the operation of this apparatus and illustrate this with data on a 30-kDa protein complex (chymotrypsin:turkey ovomucoid third domain) encapsulated in reverse micelles of the detergent, sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, aerosol-ot (AOT), dissolved in liquid propane.

  17. Preparation of 13C and 15N labelled RNAs for heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Nikonowicz, E P; Sirr, A; Legault, P; Jucker, F M; Baer, L M; Pardi, A

    1992-09-11

    A procedure is described for the efficient preparation of isotopically enriched RNAs of defined sequence. Uniformly labelled nucleotide 5'triphosphates (NTPs) were prepared from E.coli grown on 13C and/or 15N isotopically enriched media. These procedures routinely yield 180 mumoles of labelled NTPs per gram of 13C enriched glucose. The labelled NTPs were then used to synthesize RNA oligomers by in vitro transcription. Several 13C and/or 15N labelled RNAs have been synthesized for the sequence r(GGCGCUUGCGUC). Under conditions of high salt or low salt, this RNA forms either a symmetrical duplex with two U.U base pairs or a hairpin containing a CUUG loop respectively. These procedures were used to synthesize uniformly labelled RNAs and a RNA labelled only on the G and C residues. The ability to generate milligram quantities of isotopically labelled RNAs allows application of multi-dimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance experiments that enormously simplify the resonance assignment and solution structure determination of RNAs. Examples of several such heteronuclear NMR experiments are shown. PMID:1383927

  18. Probabilistic Interaction Network of Evidence Algorithm and its Application to Complete Labeling of Peak Lists from Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Assadi, Amir H.; Markley, John L.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.

    2009-01-01

    The process of assigning a finite set of tags or labels to a collection of observations, subject to side conditions, is notable for its computational complexity. This labeling paradigm is of theoretical and practical relevance to a wide range of biological applications, including the analysis of data from DNA microarrays, metabolomics experiments, and biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We present a novel algorithm, called Probabilistic Interaction Network of Evidence (PINE), that achieves robust, unsupervised probabilistic labeling of data. The computational core of PINE uses estimates of evidence derived from empirical distributions of previously observed data, along with consistency measures, to drive a fictitious system M with Hamiltonian H to a quasi-stationary state that produces probabilistic label assignments for relevant subsets of the data. We demonstrate the successful application of PINE to a key task in protein NMR spectroscopy: that of converting peak lists extracted from various NMR experiments into assignments associated with probabilities for their correctness. This application, called PINE-NMR, is available from a freely accessible computer server (http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu). The PINE-NMR server accepts as input the sequence of the protein plus user-specified combinations of data corresponding to an extensive list of NMR experiments; it provides as output a probabilistic assignment of NMR signals (chemical shifts) to sequence-specific backbone and aliphatic side chain atoms plus a probabilistic determination of the protein secondary structure. PINE-NMR can accommodate prior information about assignments or stable isotope labeling schemes. As part of the analysis, PINE-NMR identifies, verifies, and rectifies problems related to chemical shift referencing or erroneous input data. PINE-NMR achieves robust and consistent results that have been shown to be effective in subsequent steps of NMR structure determination. PMID

  19. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  20. A General Assignment Method for Oriented Sample (OS) Solid-state NMR of Proteins Based on The Correlation of Resonances through Heteronuclear Dipolar Couplings in Samples Aligned Parallel and Perpendicular to the Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Lu, George J.; Son, Woo Sung; Opella, Stanley J.

    2011-01-01

    A general method for assigning oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR spectra of proteins is demonstrated. In principle, this method requires only a single sample of a uniformly 15N-labeled membrane protein in magnetically aligned bilayers, and a previously assigned isotropic chemical shift spectrum obtained either from solution NMR on micelle or isotropic bicelle samples or from magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR on unoriented proteoliposomes. The sequential isotropic resonance assignments are transferred to the OS solid-state NMR spectra of aligned samples by correlating signals from the same residue observed in protein-containing bilayers aligned with their normals parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. The underlying principle is that the resonances from the same residue have heteronuclear dipolar couplings that differ by exactly a factor of two between parallel and perpendicular alignments. The method is demonstrated on the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bilayers, whose assignments have been previously made using an earlier generation of methods that relied on the preparation of many selectively labeled (by residue type) samples. The new method provides the correct resonance assignments using only a single uniformly 15N-labeled sample, two solid-state NMR spectra, and a previously assigned isotropic spectrum. Significantly, this approach is equally applicable to residues in alpha helices, beta sheets, loops, and any other elements of tertiary structure. Moreover, the strategy bridges between OS solid-state NMR of aligned samples and solution NMR or MAS solid-state NMR of unoriented samples. In combination with the development of complementary experimental methods, it provides a step towards unifying these apparently different NMR approaches. PMID:21316275

  1. Comprehensive signal assignment of 13C-labeled lignocellulose using multidimensional solution NMR and 13C chemical shift comparison with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-09-17

    A multidimensional solution NMR method has been developed using various pulse programs including HCCH-COSY and (13)C-HSQC-NOESY for the structural characterization of commercially available (13)C labeled lignocellulose from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and corn (Zea mays). This new method allowed for 119 of the signals in the (13)C-HSQC spectrum of lignocelluloses to be assigned and was successfully used to characterize the structures of lignocellulose samples from three plants in terms of their xylan and xyloglucan structures, which are the major hemicelluloses in angiosperm. Furthermore, this new method provided greater insight into fine structures of lignin by providing a high resolution to the aromatic signals of the β-aryl ether and resinol moieties, as well as the diastereomeric signals of the β-aryl ether. Finally, the (13)C chemical shifts assigned in this study were compared with those from solid-state NMR and indicated the presence of heterogeneous dynamics in the polysaccharides where rigid cellulose and mobile hemicelluloses moieties existed together. PMID:24010724

  2. Apparatus for direct addition of reagents into a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sample in the NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Charles L.; Rivero, Ignacio A.

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a widely used tool in chemistry and biochemistry. It is occasionally necessary to add small aliquots of solvents or reagents repeatedly into the NMR tube. Ordinarily this is accomplished only by ejecting the sample and carrying out the addition outside the probe. It would be preferable to add the aliquot directly into the sample. We have designed and implemented a delivery system to accomplish this. This apparatus is particularly applicable to a recent NMR titration method for measuring relative pK's and to experiments where temperature must also be varied. This apparatus provides a safe, simple, and inexpensive method for repeated aliquot addition directly into the sample in the NMR probe.

  3. Sensitive, quantitative carbon-13 NMR spectra by mechanical sample translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Allen, Mary; Martin, Rachel W.; Shaka, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    Collecting a truly quantitative carbon-13 spectrum is a time-consuming chore. Very long relaxation delays, required between transients to allow the z-magnetization, M z, of the spin with the longestT1 to return to the equilibrium value, M0, must precede each transient. These long delays also reduce sensitivity, as fewer transients per unit time can be acquired. In addition, sometimes T1 is not known to within even a factor of two: a conservative guess for the relaxation delay then leads to very low sensitivity. We demonstrate a fresh method to bypass these problems and collect quantitative carbon-13 spectra by swapping the sample volume after each acquisition with a different portion where the magnetization is already equilibrated to M0. Loading larger sample volumes of 10-20 mL into an unusually long (1520 mm) 5 mm OD. NMR tube and vertically sliding the tube between acquisitions accomplishes the swap. The relaxation delay can then be skipped altogether. The spectra are thus both quantitative, and far more sensitive. We demonstrate the moving tube technique on two small molecules (thymol and butylhydroxytoluene) and show good carbon-13 quantification. The gain in sensitivity can be as much as 10-fold for slowly-relaxing 13C resonances. These experiments show that quantitative, sensitive carbon-13 spectra are possible whenever sufficient sample volumes are available. The method is applicable to any slow-relaxing nuclear spin species, such as 29Si, 15N and other low-γ nuclei.

  4. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  5. NMR characterization of a 72 kDa transcription factor using differential isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sulakshana P; Borin, Brendan; Quintas, Pedro O; Dyson, H Jane

    2016-03-01

    NF-κB is a major transcription factor that mediates a number of cellular signaling pathways. Crystal structure analysis gives an incomplete picture of the behavior of the protein, particularly in the free state; free monomers or dimers of NF-κB have never been crystallized. NMR analysis gives insights into the structure and dynamics of the protein in solution, but a necessary first step is the assignment of resonances. The size of the heterodimer of the Rel homology regions of the NF-κB monomers p65 and p50 (72 kDa) prohibits the straightforward use of triple-resonance spectroscopy to obtain the assignments. However, the dynamic nature of the free heterodimer, in particular the independence of the DNA-binding and dimerization domains of each monomer, allows the assignments made on differentially labeled smaller domains to be mapped successfully onto the spectrum of the larger full-length RHR. Problematic areas such as the p65 nuclear localization sequence, which is disordered in the free protein, can be approached by residue-specific labeling and comparison with previously-published spectra of a short peptide with the same sequence. Overall, this NMR analysis of NF-κB has given valuable insights into the highly dynamic nature of the free state, which is likely to play an important role in the functional cycle of NF-κB in the cell. PMID:26647230

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise oreintationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions is zero.

  7. NMR determination of photorespiration in intact leaves using in vivo 13CO 2 labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegelski, Lynette; Schaefer, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of intact soybean leaves labeled by 13CO 2 lead to the conclusion that photorespiration is 17% of photosynthesis for a well-watered and fertilized plant. This is the first direct assessment of the level of photorespiration in a functioning plant. A 13C{ 31P} rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurement tracked the incorporation of 13C label into intermediates in the Calvin cycle as a function of time. For labeling times of 5 min or less, the isotopic enrichment of the Calvin cycle depends on the flux of labeled carbon from 13CO 2, relative to the flux of unlabeled carbon from glycerate returned from the photorespiratory cycle. Comparisons of these two rates for a fixed value of the 13CO 2 concentration indicate that the ratio of the rate of photosynthesis to the rate of photorespiration of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in soybean leaves is 5.7. This translates into a photorespiratory CO 2 loss that is 21% of net CO 2 assimilation, about 80% of the value estimated from Rubisco kinetics parameters. The ratio of rates is reduced at low external CO 2 concentrations, as measured by net carbon assimilation rates. The carbon assimilation was determined from 13C-label spin counts converted into total carbon by the REDOR-determined isotopic enrichments of the Calvin cycle. The net carbon assimilation rates indicate that the rate of decarboxylation of glycine is not directly proportional to the oxygenase activity of Rubisco as is commonly assumed.

  8. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  9. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  10. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  11. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  12. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  13. Gridding and fast Fourier transformation on non-uniformly sparse sampled multidimensional NMR data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Xianwang; Xiao, Nan; Zhang, Xu; Jiang, Ling; Mao, Xi-an; Liu, Maili

    2010-05-01

    For multidimensional NMR method, indirect dimensional non-uniform sparse sampling can dramatically shorten acquisition time of the experiments. However, the non-uniformly sampled NMR data cannot be processed directly using fast Fourier transform (FFT). We show that the non-uniformly sampled NMR data can be reconstructed to Cartesian grid with the gridding method that has been wide applied in MRI, and sequentially be processed using FFT. The proposed gridding-FFT (GFFT) method increases the processing speed sharply compared with the previously proposed non-uniform Fourier Transform, and may speed up application of the non-uniform sparse sampling approaches. PMID:20236843

  14. Gridding and fast Fourier transformation on non-uniformly sparse sampled multidimensional NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Xianwang; Xiao, Nan; Zhang, Xu; Jiang, Ling; Mao, Xi-an; Liu, Maili

    2010-05-01

    For multidimensional NMR method, indirect dimensional non-uniform sparse sampling can dramatically shorten acquisition time of the experiments. However, the non-uniformly sampled NMR data cannot be processed directly using fast Fourier transform (FFT). We show that the non-uniformly sampled NMR data can be reconstructed to Cartesian grid with the gridding method that has been wide applied in MRI, and sequentially be processed using FFT. The proposed gridding-FFT (GFFT) method increases the processing speed sharply compared with the previously proposed non-uniform Fourier Transform, and may speed up application of the non-uniform sparse sampling approaches.

  15. NMR studies of bent DNA using {sup 13}C-enriched samples

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, D.P.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Bending of the DNA double helix can be brought about by introducing runs of adenines (A-tracts) in phase with the helical repeat of the DNA. The requirements for bending of DNA by A-tracts are that the length of the A-tract be greater than 3 base pairs and that the A-tracts must be in phase with the helical repeat (every 10 or 11 bp). Other factors, such as the number of adenines in the run, flanking sequences, and whether the A-tracts are phased with respect to the 5{prime}A or the 3{prime}A, have effects upon the degree of bending as assayed by electrophoretic mobility on native polyacrylamide gels. There are a number of models for bending A-tract DNA. The junction-bending model postulates that the structure of A-tracts is similar to the fiber diffraction structure of poly A, in which there is a significant degree of base pair tilt with respect to the helix axis. In this model, bending occurs at the junction between the A-tract and the B-form helix to allow favorable stacking interactions to occur. The bend of the helix could arise as a result of some other perturbation of B-form DNA by A-tracts, such as propeller twist; bending also could be due to a combination of factors. Our goal is to find the structural features of A-tracts responsible for bending of the helix by performing NMR on oligonucleotides containing A-tracts to obtain higher resolution structural data. One of the problems encountered in NMR structure determination of nucleic acids and other macromolecules is the assignment of resonances to nuclei. This procedure can be greatly facilitated through the use of {sup 13}C-enriched nucleic acid samples. We are developing a technique for the enzymatic synthesis of labeled DNA for NMR. The technique we are developing is similar to RNA labeling techniques already in use. The technique involves growth of methylotrophic bacteria on {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH.

  16. Sequences of 12 monoclonal anti-dinitrophenyl spin-label antibodies for NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D.J.; Rule, G.S.; Whittaker, M.M.; McConnell, H.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies specific for a spin-labeled dinitrophenyl hapten (DNP-SL) have been produces for use in NMR studies. They have been named AN01 and ANO3-AN12. The stability constants for the association of these antibodies with DNP-SL and related haptens were measured by fluorescence quenching. cDNA clones coding for the heavy and light chains of each antibody and of an additional anti-DNP-SL monoclonal antibody, ANO2, have been isolated. The nucleic acid sequence of the 5{prime} end of each clone has been determined, and the amino acid sequence of the variable regions of each antibody has been deduced from the cDNA sequence. The sequences are relatively heterogeneous, but both the heavy and the light chains of ANO1 and ANO3 are derived from the same variable-region gene families as those of the ANO2 antibody. ANO7 has a heavy chain that is related to that of ANO2, and ANO9 has a related light chain. ANO5 and ANO6 are unrelated to ANO2 but share virtually identical heavy and light chains. Preliminary NMR difference spectra comparing related antibodies show that sequence-specific assignment of resonances is possible. Such spectra also provide a measure of structural relatedness.

  17. 13C-NMR study of labeled vinyl groups in paramagnetic myoglobin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sankar, S S; La Mar, G N; Smith, K M; Fujinari, E M

    1987-04-01

    The 13C-NMR spectra of high-spin met-aquo myoglobin, spin-equilibrium met-azido myoglobin, low-spin met-cyano myoglobin, deoxy myoglobin and carbonmonoxy myoglobin from sperm whale reconstituted with hemin 13C enriched at both vinyl alpha or beta positions have been recorded. In all cases the labeled vinyl 13C signals are clearly resolved and useful spectra could be obtained within approx. 15 minutes. The decoupling of multiplet structure due to attached proton(s) has led to the specific assignment of vinyl 13C alpha signals in all paramagnetic derivatives and the 13C beta signals in met-cyano myoglobin. In all other cases, the collapse of the proton multiplet structure as a function of 1H decoupling frequency has located, but not assigned, the attached 1H resonance positions which are obscured by the intense diamagnetic envelope in the 1H-NMR spectrum. The resulting vinyl 13C hyperfine shifts follow Curie behavior, and the patterns closely resemble those in the appropriate model complexes in the same oxidation/spin/ligation state, except that the protein exhibits more in-plane asymmetry. The hyperfine shift patterns are indicative of dominant pi contact shifts for all ferric complexes. Deoxy myoglobin vinyl 13C and 1H contact shifts provide little evidence for pi bonding. PMID:3828362

  18. Strategy for Enhancement of (13)C-Photo-CIDNP NMR Spectra by Exploiting Fractional (13)C-Labeling of Tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Joshi, Monika; Illarionov, Boris; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Lukaschek, Michail; Kothe, Gerd; Budisa, Nediljko; Fischer, Markus; Bacher, Adelbert; Weber, Stefan

    2015-10-29

    The photo-CIDNP effect has proven to be useful to strongly enhance NMR signals of photochemically active proteins simply by irradiation with light. The evolving characteristic patterns of enhanced absorptive and emissive NMR lines can be exploited to elucidate the photochemistry and photophysics of light-driven protein reactions. In particular, by the assignment of (13)C NMR resonances, redox-active amino acids may be identified and thereby electron-transfer pathways unraveled, in favorable cases, even with (13)C at natural abundance. If signal enhancement is weak, uniform (13)C isotope labeling is traditionally applied to increase the signal strength of protein (13)C NMR. However, this typically leads to cross relaxation, which transfers light-induced nuclear-spin polarization to adjacent (13)C nuclei, thereby preventing an unambiguous analysis of the photo-CIDNP effect. In this contribution, two isotope labeling strategies are presented; one leads to specific but ubiquitous (13)C labeling in tryptophan, and the other is based on fractional isotope labeling affording sets of isotopologs with low probability of next-neighbor isotope accumulation within individual tryptophan molecules. Consequently, cross relaxation is largely avoided while the signal enhancement by (13)C enrichment is preserved. This results in significantly simplified polarization patterns that are easier to analyze with respect to the generation of light-generated nuclear-spin polarization. PMID:26244593

  19. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastian C.

    2006-03-15

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon registered seat, and Kalrez registered O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  20. Resonator with reduced sample heating and increased homogeneity for solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahn, Alexander; Priller, Uwe; Emsley, Lyndon; Engelke, Frank

    2008-03-01

    In the application of solid-state NMR to many systems, the presence of radiofrequency (rf) electric fields inside classical solenoidal coils causes heating of lossy samples. In particular, this is critical for proteins in ionic buffers. Rf sample heating increases proportional to frequency which may result in the need to reduce the rf pulse power to prevent partial or total sample deterioration. In the present paper, we propose a multifrequency-tunable NMR resonator where the sample is electrically shielded from the NMR coil by a conductive sheet that increases the magneto-electric ratio. Expressions for the B1 efficiency as function of magnetic and electric filling factors are derived that allow a direct comparison of different resonators. Rf efficiency, homogeneity, signal-to-noise, and rf sample heating are compared. NMR spectra at 700 MHz on ethylene glycol, glycine, and a model protein were acquired to compare the resonators under realistic experimental conditions.

  1. Structure and Metabolic-Flow Analysis of Molecular Complexity in a (13) C-Labeled Tree by 2D and 3D NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Ohishi, Risa; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-05-10

    Improved signal identification for biological small molecules (BSMs) in a mixture was demonstrated by using multidimensional NMR on samples from (13) C-enriched Rhododendron japonicum (59.5 atom%) cultivated in air containing (13) C-labeled carbon dioxide for 14 weeks. The resonance assignment of 386 carbon atoms and 380 hydrogen atoms in the mixture was achieved. 42 BSMs, including eight that were unlisted in the spectral databases, were identified. Comparisons between the experimental values and the (13) C chemical shift values calculated by density functional theory supported the identifications of unlisted BSMs. Tracing the (13) C/(12) C ratio by multidimensional NMR spectra revealed faster and slower turnover ratios of BSMs involved in central metabolism and those categorized as secondary metabolites, respectively. The identification of BSMs and subsequent flow analysis provided insight into the metabolic systems of the plant. PMID:27060701

  2. Recoupling of chemical shift anisotropies in solid-state NMR under high-speed magic-angle spinning and in uniformly 13C-labeled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jerry C. C.; Tycko, Robert

    2003-05-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of recoupling chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) interactions in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) under high-speed magic-angle spinning (MAS) while retaining a static CSA powder pattern line shape and simultaneously attenuating homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions. CSA recoupling is accomplished by a rotation-synchronized radio-frequency pulse sequence with symmetry properties that permit static CSA line shapes to be obtained. We suggest a specific recoupling sequence, which we call ROCSA, for which the scaling factors for CSA and homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions are 0.272 and approximately 0.05, respectively. This sequence is suitable for high-speed 13C MAS NMR experiments on uniformly 13C-labeled organic compounds, including biopolymers. We demonstrate the ROCSA sequence experimentally by measuring the 13C CSA patterns of the uniformly labeled, polycrystalline compounds L-alanine and N-acetyl-D,L-valine at MAS frequencies of 11 and 20 kHz. We also present experimental data for amyloid fibrils formed by a 15-residue fragment of the β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, in which four amino acid residues are uniformly labeled, demonstrating the applicability to biochemical systems of high molecular weight and significant complexity. Analysis of the CSA patterns in the amyloid fibril sample demonstrates the utility of ROCSA measurements as probes of peptide and protein conformation in noncrystalline solids.

  3. Application of Site-Specific Spin Labeling for NMR Detecting Inhibitor-Induced Conformational Change of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Seetaha, Supaporn; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Ishii, Kentaro; Hannongbua, Supa; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Kato, Koichi

    2016-02-17

    Paramagnetism-assisted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques can provide long-range structural information complemented with local information derived from chemical-shift perturbation and nuclear Overhauser effect data. Here, we address the application of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) to detect inhibitor-induced conformational change of a drug target protein using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) as a model protein. Using a site-specific spin-labeled HIV-1 RT mutant with selective (13) C labeling, conformation-dependent PREs were successfully observed reflecting the stabilization of an open conformation of this enzyme caused by inhibitor binding. This study demonstrates that the paramagnetism-assisted NMR approach offers an alternative strategy in protein-based drug screening to identify allosteric inhibitors of a target protein. PMID:26804978

  4. Non-Uniform Sampling and J-UNIO Automation for Efficient Protein NMR Structure Determination.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Tatiana; Proudfoot, Andrew; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-08-24

    High-resolution structure determination of small proteins in solution is one of the big assets of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. Improvements in the efficiency of NMR structure determination by advances in NMR experiments and automation of data handling therefore attracts continued interest. Here, non-uniform sampling (NUS) of 3D heteronuclear-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY data yielded two- to three-fold savings of instrument time for structure determinations of soluble proteins. With the 152-residue protein NP_372339.1 from Staphylococcus aureus and the 71-residue protein NP_346341.1 from Streptococcus pneumonia we show that high-quality structures can be obtained with NUS NMR data, which are equally well amenable to robust automated analysis as the corresponding uniformly sampled data. PMID:26227870

  5. (19)F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sochor, F; Silvers, R; Müller, D; Richter, C; Fürtig, B; Schwalbe, H

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus (19)F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5'-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the (19)F isotope. The thermal stability of the (19)F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a (1)H,(15)N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson-Crick base paired uridine signals and the (19)F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of (19)F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides. PMID:26704707

  6. Quantum dot conjugates as labels for bacteria in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Neal, Andrea; Holden, Patricia; Mielke, Randall

    Quantum dots (fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals, QDs) have optical and physical properties that make them superior to fluorescent dyes for detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, especially in the field or in flight instruments where optical instrumentation is limited. They are extremely bright, providing a significant fluorescent signal even upon excitation with low-power LEDs. Their absorbance is broad, but their emission spectra are narrow, allowing for many colours to be excited with a single light source and the resulting emission to be readily deconvolved without output filters. They are both fluorescent and electron-dense, permitting them to be used for both fluorescence and electron microscopy. They are resistant to electron radiation and the oxidants most likely to be found on Mars. The challenge for their use in a potential wet-chemistry instrument is two-fold: first, to coat them with specific organic ligands for targeting bacteria in a non-Earth-centric fashion. Second, to ensure their stability during transport and determine potential false-positive results that may arise due to environmental conditions. We present some results on labelling of biofilm samples from the Canadian High Arctic, and some future plans for improvement of labelling techniques and targets that will address the goals of near-term Mars missions.

  7. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD....12 Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. (a) Samples of foreign canned or packaged products bearing on their immediate containers trade labels which have not...

  8. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD....12 Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. (a) Samples of foreign canned or packaged products bearing on their immediate containers trade labels which have not...

  9. Reproducibility of NMR Analysis of Urine Samples: Impact of Sample Preparation, Storage Conditions, and Animal Health Status

    PubMed Central

    Schreier, Christina; Kremer, Werner; Huber, Fritz; Neumann, Sindy; Pagel, Philipp; Lienemann, Kai; Pestel, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Spectroscopic analysis of urine samples from laboratory animals can be used to predict the efficacy and side effects of drugs. This employs methods combining 1H NMR spectroscopy with quantification of biomarkers or with multivariate data analysis. The most critical steps in data evaluation are analytical reproducibility of NMR data (collection, storage, and processing) and the health status of the animals, which may influence urine pH and osmolarity. Methods. We treated rats with a solvent, a diuretic, or a nephrotoxicant and collected urine samples. Samples were titrated to pH 3 to 9, or salt concentrations increased up to 20-fold. The effects of storage conditions and freeze-thaw cycles were monitored. Selected metabolites and multivariate data analysis were evaluated after 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. We showed that variation of pH from 3 to 9 and increases in osmolarity up to 6-fold had no effect on the quantification of the metabolites or on multivariate data analysis. Storage led to changes after 14 days at 4°C or after 12 months at −20°C, independent of sample composition. Multiple freeze-thaw cycles did not affect data analysis. Conclusion. Reproducibility of NMR measurements is not dependent on sample composition under physiological or pathological conditions. PMID:23865070

  10. Facilitating unambiguous NMR assignments and enabling higher probe density through selective labeling of all methyl containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Frank, Andreas O; Ruggiu, Fiorella; Mamo, Mulugeta; Lingel, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The deuteration of proteins and selective labeling of side chain methyl groups has greatly enhanced the molecular weight range of proteins and protein complexes which can be studied using solution NMR spectroscopy. Protocols for the selective labeling of all six methyl group containing amino acids individually are available, however to date, only a maximum of five amino acids have been labeled simultaneously. Here, we describe a new methodology for the simultaneous, selective labeling of all six methyl containing amino acids using the 115 kDa homohexameric enzyme CoaD from E. coli as a model system. The utility of the labeling protocol is demonstrated by efficiently and unambiguously assigning all methyl groups in the enzymatic active site using a single 4D (13)C-resolved HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment, in conjunction with a crystal structure. Furthermore, the six fold labeled protein was employed to characterize the interaction between the substrate analogue (R)-pantetheine and CoaD by chemical shift perturbations, demonstrating the benefit of the increased probe density. PMID:27130242

  11. 1H HRMAS NMR Derived Bio-markers Related to Tumor Grade, Tumor Cell Fraction, and Cell Proliferation in Prostate Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Stenman, Katarina; Stattin, Pär; Stenlund, Hans; Riklund, Katrine; Gröbner, Gerhard; Bergh, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopic approach is presented for evaluating the occurrence, amount and aggressiveness of cancer in human prostate tissue samples. Using this technique, key metabolites in malignant and non-malignant samples (n = 149) were identified, and patterns of their relative abundance were analyzed by multivariate statistical methods. Ratios of various metabolites – including (glycerophophorylcholine + phosphorylcholine)/creatine, myo-inositol/scyllo-inositol, scyllo-inositol/creatine, choline/creatine, and citrate/creatine – correlated with: i) for non-malignant tissue samples, the distance to the nearest tumor and its Gleason score and; ii) the fraction of tumor cells present in the sample; and iii) tumor cell proliferation (Ki67 labelling index). This NMR-based approach allows the extraction of information that could be useful for developing novel diagnostic methods for prostate cancer. PMID:21499438

  12. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples.

    PubMed

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G; Simpson, Myrna J; Maas, Werner E; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate (1)H and (13)C spectra for the different phases. In addition, (19)F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of (19)F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state. PMID:22425441

  13. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: Basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Maas, Werner E.; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J.; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J.

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate 1H and 13C spectra for the different phases. In addition, 19F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of 19F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state.

  14. Enzymatic 13C Labeling and Multidimensional NMR Analysis of Miltiradiene Synthesized by Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii*

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-13C6]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with 13C stable isotope (>99%). The fully 13C-labeled product was subjected to 13C-13C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one-dimensional and

  15. Biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone. 1. Identification of biosynthetic precursors using /sup 13/C labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1988-09-28

    The biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in the methylotropic bacterium methylobacterium AM1 has been investigated using /sup 13/C-labelling of the products and NMR spectroscopy. The data indicated that the quinoline portion of PQQ is formed by a novel condensation of N-1, C-2, -3, and -4 of glutamate with a symmetrical six-carbon ring derived from the shikimate pathway. It is postulated that tyrosine is the shikimate-derived percursor, since pyrrole could be formed by the internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  16. PQQ: Biosynthetic studies in Methylobacterium AM1 and Hyphomicrobium X using specific TC labeling and NMR. [Pyrroloquinoline quinones

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.; van Kleef, M.A.G.; Duine, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Using TC labeling and NMR spectroscopy we have determined biosynthetic precursors of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in two closely related serine-type methylotrophs, Methylobacterium AM1 and Hyphomicrobium X. Analysis of the TC-labeling data revealed that PQQ is constructed from two amino acids: the portion containing N-6, C-7,8,9 and the two carboxylic acid groups, C-7' and 9', is derived-intact-from glutamate. The remaining portion is derived from tyrosine; the phenol side chain provides the six carbons of the ring containing the orthoquinone, whereas internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone forms the pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid moiety. This is analogous to the cyclization of dopaquinone to form dopachrome. Dopaquinone is a product of the oxidation of tyrosine (via dopa) in reactions catalyzed by monophenol monooxygenase (EC 1.14.18.1). Starting with tyrosine and glutamate, we will discuss possible biosynthetic routes to PQQ. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Performance limitations of label-free sensors in molecular diagnosis using complex samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    Label-free biosensors promised a paradigm involving direct detection of biomarkers from complex samples such as serum without requiring multistep sample processing typical of labelled methods such as ELISA or immunofluorescence assays. Label-free sensors have witnessed decades of development with a veritable zoo of techniques available today exploiting a multitude of physical effects. It is appropriate now to critically assess whether label-free technologies have succeeded in delivering their promise with respect to diagnostic applications, particularly, ambitious goals such as early cancer detection using serum biomarkers, which require low limits of detection (LoD). Comparison of nearly 120 limits of detection (LoD) values reported by labelled and label-free sensing approaches over a wide range of detection techniques and target molecules in serum revealed that labeled techniques achieve 2-3 orders of magnitude better LoDs. Data from experiments where labelled and label-free assays were performed simultaneously using the same assay parameters also confirm that the LoD achieved by labelled techniques is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude better than that by label-free techniques. Furthermore, label-free techniques required significant signal amplification, for e.g. using nanoparticle conjugated secondary antibodies, to achieve LoDs comparable to labelled methods substantially deviating from the original "direct detection" paradigm. This finding has important implications on the practical limits of applying label-free detection methods for molecular diagnosis.

  18. Spin-labeled gel for the production of radical-free dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced molecules for NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarney, Evan R.; Han, Songi

    2008-02-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently received much attention as a viable approach to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and the contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where the significantly higher electron spin polarization of stable radicals is transferred to nuclear spins. In order to apply DNP-enhanced NMR and MRI signal to biological and in vivo systems, it is crucial to obtain highly polarized solution samples at ambient temperatures. As stable radicals are employed as the source for the DNP polarization transfer, it is also crucial that the highly polarized sample lacks residual radical concentration because the polarized molecules will be introduced to a biological system that will be sensitive to the presence of radicals. We developed an agarose-based porous media that is covalently spin-labeled with stable radicals. The loading of solvent accessible radical is sufficiently high and their mobility approximates that in solution, which ensures high efficiency for Overhauser mechanism induced DNP without physically releasing any measurable radical into the solution. Under ambient conditions at 0.35 T magnetic field, we measure the DNP enhancement efficiency of 1H signal of stagnant and continuously flowing water utilizing immobilized stable nitroxide radicals that contain two or three ESR hyperfine splitting lines and compare them to the performance of freely dissolved radicals.

  19. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  20. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  1. Preparation of Protein Samples for NMR Structure, Function, and Small Molecule Screening Studies

    PubMed Central

    Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Anderson, Stephen; Aramini, James; Buchwald, William A.; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Conover, Ken; Everett, John; Hamilton, Keith; Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Janjua, Haleema; Kornhaber, Gregory; Lau, Jessica; Lee, Dong Yup; Liu, Gaohua; Maglaqui, Melissa; Ma, Lichung; Mao, Lei; Patel, Dayaban; Rossi, Paolo; Sahdev, Seema; Shastry, Ritu; Swapna, G.V.T.; Tang, Yeufeng; Tong, Saichiu; Wang, Dongyan; Wang, Huang; Zhao, Li; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we concentrate on the production of high quality protein samples for NMR studies. In particular, we provide an in-depth description of recent advances in the production of NMR samples and their synergistic use with recent advancements in NMR hardware. We describe the protein production platform of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, and outline our high-throughput strategies for producing high quality protein samples for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Our strategy is based on the cloning, expression and purification of 6X-His-tagged proteins using T7-based Escherichia coli systems and isotope enrichment in minimal media. We describe 96-well ligation-independent cloning and analytical expression systems, parallel preparative scale fermentation, and high-throughput purification protocols. The 6X-His affinity tag allows for a similar two-step purification procedure implemented in a parallel high-throughput fashion that routinely results in purity levels sufficient for NMR studies (> 97% homogeneity). Using this platform, the protein open reading frames of over 17,500 different targeted proteins (or domains) have been cloned as over 28,000 constructs. Nearly 5,000 of these proteins have been purified to homogeneity in tens of milligram quantities (see Summary Statistics, http://nesg.org/statistics.html), resulting in more than 950 new protein structures, including more than 400 NMR structures, deposited in the Protein Data Bank. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium pipeline has been effective in producing protein samples of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. Although this paper describes our entire pipeline for producing isotope-enriched protein samples, it focuses on the major updates introduced during the last 5 years (Phase 2 of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative). Our advanced automated and/or parallel cloning, expression, purification, and biophysical screening

  2. Sample-efficient learning with auxiliary class-label information

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quang; Valizadegan, Hamed; Seybert, Amy; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2011-01-01

    Building classification models from clinical data collected for past patients often requires additional example labeling and annotation by a human expert. Since example labeling may require to review a complete electronic health record the process can be very time consuming and costly. To make the process more cost-efficient, the number of examples an expert needs to label should be reduced. We develop and test a new approach for the classification learning in which, in addition to class labels provided by an expert, the learner is provided with auxiliary information that reflects how strong the expert feels about the class label. We show that this information can be extremely useful for practical classification tasks based on human assessment and can lead to improved learning with a smaller number of examples. We develop a new classification approach based on the support vector machines and the learning to rank methodologies capable of utilizing the auxiliary information during the model learning process. We demonstrate the benefit of the approach on the problem of learning an alert model for Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT) by showing an improved classification performance of the models that are trained on a smaller number of labeled examples. PMID:22195160

  3. Membrane protein structural validation by oriented sample solid-state NMR: diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed

    Murray, Dylan T; Li, Conggang; Gao, F Philip; Qin, Huajun; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-04-15

    The validation of protein structures through functional assays has been the norm for many years. Functional assays perform this validation for water-soluble proteins very well, but they need to be performed in the same environment as that used for the structural analysis. This is difficult for membrane proteins that are often structurally characterized in detergent environments, although functional assays for these proteins are most frequently performed in lipid bilayers. Because the structure of membrane proteins is known to be sensitive to the membrane mimetic environment, such functional assays are appropriate for validating the protein construct, but not the membrane protein structure. Here, we compare oriented sample solid-state NMR spectral data of diacylglycerol kinase previously published with predictions of such data from recent structures of this protein. A solution NMR structure of diacylglycerol kinase has been obtained in detergent micelles and three crystal structures have been obtained in a monoolein cubic phase. All of the structures are trimeric with each monomer having three transmembrane and one amphipathic helices. However, the solution NMR structure shows typical perturbations induced by a micelle environment that is reflected in the predicted solid-state NMR resonances from the structural coordinates. The crystal structures show few such perturbations, especially for the wild-type structure and especially for the monomers that do not have significant crystal contacts. For these monomers the predicted and observed data are nearly identical. The thermostabilized constructs do show more perturbations, especially the A41C mutation that introduces a hydrophilic residue into what would be the middle of the lipid bilayer inducing additional hydrogen bonding between trimers. These results demonstrate a general technique for validating membrane protein structures with minimal data obtained from membrane proteins in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers by

  4. Origin and Correction of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneity at the Interface in Biphasic NMR Samples

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bryan T.; Chingas, G. C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of susceptibility matching to minimize spectral distortion of biphasic samples layered in a standard 5 mm NMR tube is described. The approach uses magic angle spinning (MAS) to first extract chemical shift differences by suppressing bulk magnetization. Then, using biphasic coaxial samples, magnetic susceptibilities are matched by titration with a paramagnetic salt. The matched phases are then layered in a standard NMR tube where they can be shimmed and examined. Line widths of two distinct spectral lines, selected to characterize homogeneity in each phase, are simultaneously optimized. Two-dimensional distortion-free, slice-resolved spectra of an octanol/water system illustrate the method. These data are obtained using a 2D stepped-gradient pulse sequence devised for this application. Advantages of this sequence over slice-selective methods are that acquisition efficiency is increased and processing requires only conventional software. PMID:22459062

  5. Origin and correction of magnetic field inhomogeneity at the interface in biphasic NMR samples.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan T; Chingas, G C; McDougal, Owen M

    2012-05-01

    The use of susceptibility matching to minimize spectral distortion of biphasic samples layered in a standard 5 mm NMR tube is described. The approach uses magic angle spinning (MAS) to first extract chemical shift differences by suppressing bulk magnetization. Then, using biphasic coaxial samples, magnetic susceptibilities are matched by titration with a paramagnetic salt. The matched phases are then layered in a standard NMR tube where they can be shimmed and examined. Linewidths of two distinct spectral lines, selected to characterize homogeneity in each phase, are simultaneously optimized. Two-dimensional distortion-free, slice-resolved spectra of an octanol/water system illustrate the method. These data are obtained using a 2D stepped-gradient pulse sequence devised for this application. Advantages of this sequence over slice-selective methods are that acquisition efficiency is increased and processing requires only conventional software. PMID:22459062

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation... Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called Mizer Motors has a product line composed of eight car lines. Of these eight, four are available with the...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation... Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called Mizer Motors has a product line composed of eight car lines. Of these eight, four are available with the...

  8. Evaluation of Phosphorus Characterization in Broiler Ileal Digesta, Manure, and Litter Samples: 31P-NMR vs. HPLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resosonance Spectroscopy (31P-NMR) to characterize phosphorus (P) in manures and litter has become prevalent in the area of nutrient management. To date, there has been no published work evaluating P quantification in manure/litter samples with 31P-NMR compared t...

  9. Evaluation of Phosphorus Characterization in Ileal Digesta, Manure, and Litter Samples: 31P-NMR vs. HPLC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resosonance Spectroscopy (31P-NMR) to characterize phosphorus (P) in manures and litter has become prevalent in the area of nutrient management. To date, there has been no published work evaluating P quantification in manure/litter samples with 31P-NMR compared ...

  10. Systematic NMR Analysis of Stable Isotope Labeled Metabolite Mixtures in Plant and Animal Systems: Coarse Grained Views of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Suto, Michitaka; Nishihara, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic phenotyping has become an important ‘bird's-eye-view’ technology which can be applied to higher organisms, such as model plant and animal systems in the post-genomics and proteomics era. Although genotyping technology has expanded greatly over the past decade, metabolic phenotyping has languished due to the difficulty of ‘top-down’ chemical analyses. Here, we describe a systematic NMR methodology for stable isotope-labeling and analysis of metabolite mixtures in plant and animal systems. Methodology/Principal Findings The analysis method includes a stable isotope labeling technique for use in living organisms; a systematic method for simultaneously identifying a large number of metabolites by using a newly developed HSQC-based metabolite chemical shift database combined with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy; Principal Components Analysis; and a visualization method using a coarse-grained overview of the metabolic system. The database contains more than 1000 1H and 13C chemical shifts corresponding to 142 metabolites measured under identical physicochemical conditions. Using the stable isotope labeling technique in Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and Bombyx mori, we systematically detected >450 HSQC peaks in each 13C-HSQC spectrum derived from model plant, Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and the invertebrate animal model Bombyx mori. Furthermore, for the first time, efficient 13C labeling has allowed reliable signal assignment using analytical separation techniques such as 3D HCCH-COSY spectra in higher organism extracts. Conclusions/Significance Overall physiological changes could be detected and categorized in relation to a critical developmental phase change in B. mori by coarse-grained representations in which the organization of metabolic pathways related to a specific developmental phase was visualized on the basis of constituent changes of 56 identified metabolites. Based on the observed intensities of 13C atoms of

  11. Untangling a Repetitive Amyloid Sequence: Correlating Biofilm-Derived and Segmentally Labeled Curli Fimbriae by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schubeis, Tobias; Yuan, Puwei; Ahmed, Mumdooh; Nagaraj, Madhu; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    Curli are functional bacterial amyloids produced by an intricate biogenesis machinery. Insights into their folding and regulation can advance our understanding of amyloidogenesis. However, gaining detailed structural information of amyloids, and their tendency for structural polymorphisms, remains challenging. Herein we compare high-quality solid-state NMR spectra from biofilm-derived and recombinantly produced curli and provide evidence that they adopt a similar, well-defined β-solenoid arrangement. Curli subunits consist of five sequence repeats, resulting in severe spectral overlap. Using segmental isotope labeling, we obtained the unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure of one repeat, and demonstrate that all repeats are most likely structurally equivalent. PMID:26474178

  12. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  13. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments. PMID:27074782

  14. High Field Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Investigation of (15)N-Labeled Rosette Nanotubes: Hydrogen Bond Network and Channel-Bound Water.

    PubMed

    Fenniri, Hicham; Tikhomirov, Grigory A; Brouwer, Darren H; Bouatra, Souhaila; El Bakkari, Mounir; Yan, Zhimin; Cho, Jae-Young; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2016-05-18

    (15)N-labeled rosette nanotubes were synthesized and investigated using high-field solid-state NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and electron microscopy. The results established the H-bond network involved in the self-assembly of the nanostructure as well as bound water molecules in the nanotube's channel. PMID:27141817

  15. NMR relaxation times of trabecular bone—reproducibility, relationships to tissue structure and effects of sample freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prantner, Viktória; Isaksson, Hanna; Närväinen, Johanna; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nissi, Mikko J.; Avela, Janne; Gröhn, Olli H. J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a potential tool for non-invasive evaluation of the trabecular bone structure. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the NMR relaxation parameters (T2, Carr-Purcel-T2, T1ρ) for fat and water and relate those to the structural parameters obtained by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Especially, we aimed to evaluate the effect of freezing on the relaxation parameters. For storing bone samples, freezing is the standard procedure during which the biochemical and cellular organization of the bone marrow may be affected. Bovine trabecular bone samples were stored at -20 °C for 7 days and measured by NMR spectroscopy before and after freezing. The reproducibility of NMR relaxation parameters, as expressed by the coefficient of variation, ranged from 3.1% to 27.9%. In fresh samples, some correlations between NMR and structural parameters (Tb.N, Tb.Sp) were significant (e.g. the relaxation rate for T2 of fat versus Tb.Sp: r = -0.716, p < 0.01). Freezing did not significantly change the NMR relaxation times but the correlations between relaxation parameters and the μCT structural parameters were not statistically significant after freezing, suggesting some nonsystematic alterations of the marrow structure. Therefore, the use of frozen bone samples for NMR relaxation studies may provide inferior information about the trabecular bone structure.

  16. Nonuniform sampling of hypercomplex multidimensional NMR experiments: Dimensionality, quadrature phase and randomization

    PubMed Central

    Schuyler, Adam D; Maciejewski, Mark W; Stern, Alan S; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    Nonuniform sampling (NUS) in multidimensional NMR permits the exploration of higher dimensional experiments and longer evolution times than the Nyquist Theorem practically allows for uniformly sampled experiments. However, the spectra of NUS data include sampling-induced artifacts and may be subject to distortions imposed by sparse data reconstruction techniques, issues not encountered with the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) applied to uniformly sampled data. The characterization of these NUS-induced artifacts allows for more informed sample schedule design and improved spectral quality. The DFT–Convolution Theorem, via the point-spread function (PSF) for a given sampling scheme, provides a useful framework for exploring the nature of NUS sampling artifacts. In this work, we analyze the PSFs for a set of specially constructed NUS schemes to quantify the interplay between randomization and dimensionality for reducing artifacts relative to uniformly undersampled controls. In particular, we find a synergistic relationship between the indirect time dimensions and the “quadrature phase dimension” (i.e. the hypercomplex components collected for quadrature detection). The quadrature phase dimension provides additional degrees of freedom that enable partial-component NUS (collecting a subset of quadrature components) to further reduce sampling-induced aliases relative to traditional full-component NUS (collecting all quadrature components). The efficacy of artifact reduction is exponentially related to the dimensionality of the sample space. Our results quantify the utility of partial-component NUS as an additional means for introducing decoherence into sampling schemes and reducing sampling artifacts in high dimensional experiments. PMID:25899289

  17. High-resolution NMR of anisotropic samples with spinning away from the magic angle

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos A.; Martin, Rachel W.; Pines, Alexander

    2003-03-31

    High-resolution NMR of samples in the solid state is typically performed under mechanical sample spinning around an axis that makes an angle, called the magic angle, of 54.7 degrees with the static magnetic field. There are many cases in which geometrical and engineering constraints prevent spinning at this specific angle. Implementations of in-situ and ex-situ magic angle field spinning might be extremely demanding because of the power requirements or an inconvenient sample size or geometry. Here we present a methodology based on switched angle spinning between two angles, none of which is the magic angle, which provide both isotropic and anisotropic information. Using this method, named Projected Magic Angle Spinning, we were able to obtain resolved isotropic chemical shifts in spinning samples where the broadening is mostly inhomogeneous.

  18. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  19. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, Kent R. Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  20. Lipid bilayer preparations of membrane proteins for oriented and magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR samples

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nabanita; Murray, Dylan T; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has been used successfully for characterizing the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins as well as their interactions with other proteins in lipid bilayers. such an environment is often necessary for achieving native-like structures. sample preparation is the key to this success. Here we present a detailed description of a robust protocol that results in high-quality membrane protein samples for both magic-angle spinning and oriented-sample solid-state NMR. the procedure is demonstrated using two proteins: CrgA (two transmembrane helices) and rv1861 (three transmembrane helices), both from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. the success of this procedure relies on two points. First, for samples for both types of NMR experiment, the reconstitution of the protein from a detergent environment to an environment in which it is incorporated into liposomes results in ‘complete’ removal of detergent. second, for the oriented samples, proper dehydration followed by rehydration of the proteoliposomes is essential. By using this protocol, proteoliposome samples for magic-angle spinning NMR and uniformly aligned samples (orientational mosaicity of <1°) for oriented-sample NMR can be obtained within 10 d. PMID:24157546

  1. Non-uniform sampling: post-Fourier era of NMR data collection and processing.

    PubMed

    Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Orekhov, Vladislav

    2015-11-01

    The invention of multidimensional techniques in the 1970s revolutionized NMR, making it the general tool of structural analysis of molecules and materials. In the most straightforward approach, the signal sampling in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment is performed in the same manner as in the direct dimension, i.e. with a grid of equally spaced points. This results in lengthy experiments with a resolution often far from optimum. To circumvent this problem, numerous sparse-sampling techniques have been developed in the last three decades, including two traditionally distinct approaches: the radial sampling and non-uniform sampling. This mini review discusses the sparse signal sampling and reconstruction techniques from the point of view of an underdetermined linear algebra problem that arises when a full, equally spaced set of sampled points is replaced with sparse sampling. Additional assumptions that are introduced to solve the problem, as well as the shape of the undersampled Fourier transform operator (visualized as so-called point spread function), are shown to be the main differences between various sparse-sampling methods. PMID:26290057

  2. Photochemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Observed by Solid-State NMR in a Uniformly (13)C-Isotope-Labeled Photosynthetic Reaction Center.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shubhajit; Bode, Bela E; Matysik, Jörg; Alia, A

    2015-10-29

    A sample of solubilized and quinone-depleted reaction centers from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (R.) sphaeroides wild type has been prepared entirely (13)C and (15)N isotope labeled at all positions of the protein as well as of the cofactors. In this sample, the occurrence of the solid-state photo-CIDNP (photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization) effect has been probed by (13)C solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR under illumination. Under continuous illumination, signal intensities are modified by the three-spin mixing (TSM) mechanism. Time-resolved illumination experiments reveal the occurrence of light-induced nuclear polarization on the time scale of hundreds of microseconds, initially dominated by the transient polarization of the singlet branch of the radical-pair mechanism. A first kinetic analysis shows that the lifetime of the polarization from the singlet branch, indicated by the enhanced absorptive intensities of the signals from aliphatic carbons, is significantly extended. Upon arrival of the polarization from the triplet decay branch, emissive polarization caused by the TSM mechanism is observed. Also, this arrival is significantly delayed. The decay of TSM polarization occurs in two steps, assigned to intra- and intermolecular spin diffusion. PMID:26110356

  3. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of site-specific isotopically labeled nucleotides for use in NMR resonance assignment, dynamics and structural characterizations.

    PubMed

    Longhini, Andrew P; LeBlanc, Regan M; Becette, Owen; Salguero, Carolina; Wunderlich, Christoph H; Johnson, Bruce A; D'Souza, Victoria M; Kreutz, Christoph; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotope labeling is central to NMR studies of nucleic acids. Development of methods that incorporate labels at specific atomic positions within each nucleotide promises to expand the size range of RNAs that can be studied by NMR. Using recombinantly expressed enzymes and chemically synthesized ribose and nucleobase, we have developed an inexpensive, rapid chemo-enzymatic method to label ATP and GTP site specifically and in high yields of up to 90%. We incorporated these nucleotides into RNAs with sizes ranging from 27 to 59 nucleotides usingin vitrotranscription: A-Site (27 nt), the iron responsive elements (29 nt), a fluoride riboswitch fromBacillus anthracis(48 nt), and a frame-shifting element from a human corona virus (59 nt). Finally, we showcase the improvement in spectral quality arising from reduced crowding and narrowed linewidths, and accurate analysis of NMR relaxation dispersion (CPMG) and TROSY-based CEST experiments to measure μs-ms time scale motions, and an improved NOESY strategy for resonance assignment. Applications of this selective labeling technology promises to reduce difficulties associated with chemical shift overlap and rapid signal decay that have made it challenging to study the structure and dynamics of large RNAs beyond the 50 nt median size found in the PDB. PMID:26657632

  4. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of site-specific isotopically labeled nucleotides for use in NMR resonance assignment, dynamics and structural characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Longhini, Andrew P.; LeBlanc, Regan M.; Becette, Owen; Salguero, Carolina; Wunderlich, Christoph H.; Johnson, Bruce A.; D'Souza, Victoria M.; Kreutz, Christoph; Dayie, T. Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is central to NMR studies of nucleic acids. Development of methods that incorporate labels at specific atomic positions within each nucleotide promises to expand the size range of RNAs that can be studied by NMR. Using recombinantly expressed enzymes and chemically synthesized ribose and nucleobase, we have developed an inexpensive, rapid chemo-enzymatic method to label ATP and GTP site specifically and in high yields of up to 90%. We incorporated these nucleotides into RNAs with sizes ranging from 27 to 59 nucleotides using in vitro transcription: A-Site (27 nt), the iron responsive elements (29 nt), a fluoride riboswitch from Bacillus anthracis (48 nt), and a frame-shifting element from a human corona virus (59 nt). Finally, we showcase the improvement in spectral quality arising from reduced crowding and narrowed linewidths, and accurate analysis of NMR relaxation dispersion (CPMG) and TROSY-based CEST experiments to measure μs-ms time scale motions, and an improved NOESY strategy for resonance assignment. Applications of this selective labeling technology promises to reduce difficulties associated with chemical shift overlap and rapid signal decay that have made it challenging to study the structure and dynamics of large RNAs beyond the 50 nt median size found in the PDB. PMID:26657632

  5. Individual Human Metabolic Phenotype Analyzed by (1)H NMR of Saliva Samples.

    PubMed

    Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Tenori, Leonardo; Mazzoleni, Antonio; Dieber-Rotheneder, Martina; Konrad, Manuela; Hofmann, Peter; Luchinat, Claudio; Turano, Paola; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Saliva is an important physiological fluid that contains a complex mixture of analytes that may produce a characteristic individual signature. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that urine possesses a clear signature of the individual metabolic phenotype. Here NMR-based metabolomics was employed to analyze saliva from 23 healthy volunteers. About six saliva samples were collected daily from each individual for 10 consecutive days: 7 days in a real-life situation (days 1-7, Phase I) and 3 days (days 8-10, Phase II) under a standardized diet plus a physical exercise program at day 10. The result is the first demonstration of the existence of an individual metabolic phenotype in saliva. A systematic comparative analysis with urine samples from the same collection scheme demonstrates that the individual phenotype in saliva is slightly weaker than that in urine but less influenced by diet. PMID:27087681

  6. Efficient DNP NMR of membrane proteins: sample preparation protocols, sensitivity, and radical location.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu Y; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Tuo; Sergeyev, Ivan V; Hong, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Although dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has dramatically enhanced solid-state NMR spectral sensitivities of many synthetic materials and some biological macromolecules, recent studies of membrane-protein DNP using exogenously doped paramagnetic radicals as polarizing agents have reported varied and sometimes surprisingly limited enhancement factors. This motivated us to carry out a systematic evaluation of sample preparation protocols for optimizing the sensitivity of DNP NMR spectra of membrane-bound peptides and proteins at cryogenic temperatures of ~110 K. We show that mixing the radical with the membrane by direct titration instead of centrifugation gives a significant boost to DNP enhancement. We quantify the relative sensitivity enhancement between AMUPol and TOTAPOL, two commonly used radicals, and between deuterated and protonated lipid membranes. AMUPol shows ~fourfold higher sensitivity enhancement than TOTAPOL, while deuterated lipid membrane does not give net higher sensitivity for the membrane peptides than protonated membrane. Overall, a ~100 fold enhancement between the microwave-on and microwave-off spectra can be achieved on lipid-rich membranes containing conformationally disordered peptides, and absolute sensitivity gains of 105-160 can be obtained between low-temperature DNP spectra and high-temperature non-DNP spectra. We also measured the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of lipid signals by TOTAPOL and AMUPol, to determine the depths of these two radicals in the lipid bilayer. Our data indicate a bimodal distribution of both radicals, a surface-bound fraction and a membrane-bound fraction where the nitroxides lie at ~10 Å from the membrane surface. TOTAPOL appears to have a higher membrane-embedded fraction than AMUPol. These results should be useful for membrane-protein solid-state NMR studies under DNP conditions and provide insights into how biradicals interact with phospholipid membranes. PMID:26873390

  7. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here — which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole — circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100 K which shows 30 Hz linewidths. PMID:19356957

  8. Reassessment of MxiH subunit orientation and fold within native Shigella T3SS needles using surface labelling and solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Verasdonck, Joeri; Shen, Da-Kang; Treadgold, Alexander; Arthur, Christopher; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H.; Blocker, Ariel J.

    2015-01-01

    T3SSs are essential virulence determinants of many Gram-negative bacteria, used to inject bacterial effectors of virulence into eukaryotic host cells. Their major extracellular portion, a ∼50 nm hollow, needle-like structure, is essential to host cell sensing and the conduit for effector secretion. It is formed of a small, conserved subunit arranged as a helical polymer. The structure of the subunit has been studied by electron cryomicroscopy within native polymers and by solid-state NMR in recombinant polymers, yielding two incompatible atomic models. To resolve this controversy, we re-examined the native polymer used for electron cryomicroscopy via surface labelling and solid-state NMR. Our data show the orientation and overall fold of the subunit within this polymer is as established by solid-state NMR for recombinant polymers. PMID:26439285

  9. Heteronuclear decoupling in MAS NMR in the intermediate to fast sample spinning regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Equbal, Asif; Bjerring, Morten; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear spin decoupling in solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR is investigated to present methods overcoming interferences between rf irradiation and sample spinning in the intermediate to fast spinning regime. We demonstrate that a recent phase-alternated variant of refocused CW irradiation (rCWApA) provides efficient and robust decoupling in this regime. An extensive experimental and numerical comparison is presented for rCWApA and PISSARRO (phase-inverted supercycled sequence for attenuation of rotary resonance), previously introduced to quench rotary-resonance recoupling effects, under conditions with spinning frequencies between 30 and 60 kHz. Simulations are used to identify the effect of decoupling for various nuclear spin interactions.

  10. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Sample Susceptibility on Measured Diffusion Anisotropy Using NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, J. D.; Dixon, W. T.; Hawkins, J.

    1995-07-01

    Water diffusion measurements in white matter of freshly excised pig spinal cord and in parenchyma of fresh celery (excluding the fibers along the edge of the stalk) were performed using NMR at 200 MHz. In white matter of pig spinal cord, the measured diffusion coefficient is anisotropic and independent of sample orientation with respect to the magnetic field, In celery parenchyma, diffusion is isotropic and independent of orientation in the magnetic field when using a diffusion sequence that gives results independent of self-induced magnetic-held gradients. However, when the standard diffusion pulse sequence that gives results dependent upon self-induced magnetic-field gradients is used, diffusion in celery appears isotropic when the stalk is oriented parallel to the magnetic field but anisotropic when oriented perpendicular. Susceptibility variations leading to anisotropic self-induced magnetic-field gradients approximately 3 kHz/cm in magnitude when the celery is oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can explain this apparent anisotropic diffusion. A study of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in celery as a function of diffusion times ranging from 8 to 22 ms indicates that the motion is at most only slightly restricted. Therefore, although the effect is not seen in all types of samples, one must be aware that self-induced gradients may affect the ADC and may cause isotropic diffusion to appear anisotropic. In addition, NMR experiments that change diffusion-sensitizing gradient timings to study restricted diffusion change the effects of the self-induced gradients as well as the effect of barriers on the ADC, complicating interpretation.

  11. A Monte Carlo/Simulated Annealing Algorithm for Sequential Resonance Assignment in Solid State NMR of Uniformly Labeled Proteins with Magic-Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert; Hu, Kan-Nian

    2010-01-01

    We describe a computational approach to sequential resonance assignment in solid state NMR studies of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with magic-angle spinning. As input, the algorithm uses only the protein sequence and lists of 15N/13Cα crosspeaks from 2D NCACX and NCOCX spectra that include possible residue-type assignments of each crosspeak. Assignment of crosspeaks to specific residues is carried out by a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm, implemented in the program MC_ASSIGN1. The algorithm tolerates substantial ambiguity in residue-type assignments and coexistence of visible and invisible segments in the protein sequence. We use MC_ASSIGN1 and our own 2D spectra to replicate and extend the sequential assignments for uniformly labeled HET-s(218-289) fibrils previously determined manually by Siemer et al. (J. Biomolec. NMR, vol. 34, pp. 75-87, 2006) from a more extensive set of 2D and 3D spectra. Accurate assignments by MC_ASSIGN1 do not require data that are of exceptionally high quality. Use of MC_ASSIGN1 (and its extensions to other types of 2D and 3D data) is likely to alleviate many of the difficulties and uncertainties associated with manual resonance assignments in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins, where spectral resolution and signal-to-noise are often sub-optimal. PMID:20547467

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy...

  15. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  16. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  17. Selective 13C labeling of nucleotides for large RNA NMR spectroscopy using an E. coli strain disabled in the TCA cycle.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Chandar S; Sama, Jacob N; Jackson, Melantha E; Chen, Bin; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2010-12-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is an ideal organism to tailor-make labeled nucleotides for biophysical studies of RNA. Recently, we showed that adding labeled formate enhanced the isotopic enrichment at protonated carbon sites in nucleotides. In this paper, we show that growth of a mutant E. coli strain DL323 (lacking succinate and malate dehydrogenases) on (13)C-2-glycerol and (13)C-1,3-glycerol enables selective labeling at many useful sites for RNA NMR spectroscopy. For DL323 E. coli grown in (13)C-2-glycerol without labeled formate, all the ribose carbon atoms are labeled except the C3' and C5' carbon positions. Consequently the C1', C2' and C4' positions remain singlet. In addition, only the pyrimidine base C6 atoms are substantially labeled to ~96% whereas the C2 and C8 atoms of purine are labeled to ~5%. Supplementing the growth media with (13)C-formate increases the labeling at C8 to ~88%, but not C2. Not unexpectedly, addition of exogenous formate is unnecessary for attaining the high enrichment levels of ~88% for the C2 and C8 purine positions in a (13)C-1,3-glycerol based growth. Furthermore, the ribose ring is labeled in all but the C4' carbon position, such that the C2' and C3' positions suffer from multiplet splitting but the C5' position remains singlet and the C1' position shows a small amount of residual C1'-C2' coupling. As expected, all the protonated base atoms, except C6, are labeled to ~90%. In addition, labeling with (13)C-1,3-glycerol affords an isolated methylene ribose with high enrichment at the C5' position (~90%) that makes it particularly attractive for NMR applications involving CH(2)-TROSY modules without the need for decoupling the C4' carbon. To simulate the tumbling of large RNA molecules, perdeuterated glycerol was added to a mixture of the four nucleotides, and the methylene TROSY experiment recorded at various temperatures. Even under conditions of slow tumbling, all the expected carbon correlations were observed, which indicates

  18. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  19. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved. PMID:25625825

  20. Preparation of RNA samples with narrow line widths for solid state NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Bardaro, Michael F.; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P.

    2012-10-01

    Solid state NMR can provide detailed structural and dynamic information on biological systems that cannot be studied under solution conditions, and can investigate motions which occur with rates that cannot be fully studied by solution NMR. This approach has successfully been used to study proteins, but the application of multidimensional solid state NMR to RNA has been limited because reported line widths have been too broad to execute most multidimensional experiments successfully. A reliable method to generate spectra with narrow line widths is necessary to apply the full range of solid state NMR spectroscopic approaches to RNA. Using the HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA as a model, we present an approach based on precipitation with polyethylene glycol that improves the line width of 13C signals in TAR from >6 ppm to about 1 ppm, making solid state 2D NMR studies of selectively enriched RNAs feasible at ambient temperature.

  1. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  2. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION...

  3. 40 CFR 600.211-08 - Sample calculation of fuel economy values for labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample calculation of fuel economy values for labeling. 600.211-08 Section 600.211-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR...

  4. 76 FR 69585 - Testing and Labeling Pertaining to Product Certification Regarding Representative Samples for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... private labeler. In the Federal Register of May 20, 2010 (75 FR 28336), we published a proposed rule on... being selected (75 FR at 28349 through 28350, 28365). On August 12, 2011, the President signed H.R. 2715...'' (75 FR 28336 (May 20, 2010)) would have treated ``Random Samples'' as a distinct section, rather...

  5. Consideration of some sampling problems in the on-line analysis of batch processes by low-field NMR spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nordon, Alison; Diez-Lazaro, Alvaro; Wong, Chris W L; McGill, Colin A; Littlejohn, David; Weerasinghe, Manori; Mamman, Danladi A; Hitchman, Michael L; Wilkie, Jacqueline

    2008-03-01

    A low-field medium-resolution NMR spectrometer, with an operating frequency of 29 MHz for 1H, has been assessed for on-line process analysis. A flow cell that incorporates a pre-magnetisation region has been developed to minimise the decrease in the signal owing to incomplete polarisation effects. The homogeneous esterification reaction of crotonic acid and 2-butanol was monitored using a simple sampling loop; it was possible to monitor the progression of the reaction through changes in CH signal areas of butanol and butyl crotonate. On-line analysis of heterogeneous water-toluene mixtures proved more challenging and a fast sampling loop system was devised for use with a 5 L reactor. The fast sampling loop operated at a flow rate of 8 L min(-1) and a secondary sampling loop was used to pass a sub-sample through the NMR analyser at a slower (mL min(-1)) rate. It was shown that even with super-isokinetic sampling conditions, unrepresentative sampling could occur owing to inadequate mixing in the reactor. However, it was still possible to relate the 1H NMR signal obtained at a flow rate of 60 mL min(-1) to the composition of the reactor contents. PMID:18299748

  6. A firmware-defined digital direct-sampling NMR spectrometer for condensed matter physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulski, M. Shiroka, T.; Ott, H.-R.; Mesot, J.

    2014-09-15

    We report on the design and implementation of a new digital, broad-band nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for probing condensed matter. The spectrometer uses direct sampling in both transmission and reception. It relies on a single, commercially-available signal processing device with a user-accessible field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Its functions are defined exclusively by the FPGA firmware and the application software. Besides allowing for fast replication, flexibility, and extensibility, our software-based solution preserves the option to reuse the components for other projects. The device operates up to 400 MHz without, and up to 800 MHz with undersampling, respectively. Digital down-conversion with ±10 MHz passband is provided on the receiver side. The system supports high repetition rates and has virtually no intrinsic dead time. We describe briefly how the spectrometer integrates into the experimental setup and present test data which demonstrates that its performance is competitive with that of conventional designs.

  7. A firmware-defined digital direct-sampling NMR spectrometer for condensed matter physics.

    PubMed

    Pikulski, M; Shiroka, T; Ott, H-R; Mesot, J

    2014-09-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a new digital, broad-band nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for probing condensed matter. The spectrometer uses direct sampling in both transmission and reception. It relies on a single, commercially-available signal processing device with a user-accessible field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Its functions are defined exclusively by the FPGA firmware and the application software. Besides allowing for fast replication, flexibility, and extensibility, our software-based solution preserves the option to reuse the components for other projects. The device operates up to 400 MHz without, and up to 800 MHz with undersampling, respectively. Digital down-conversion with ±10 MHz passband is provided on the receiver side. The system supports high repetition rates and has virtually no intrinsic dead time. We describe briefly how the spectrometer integrates into the experimental setup and present test data which demonstrates that its performance is competitive with that of conventional designs. PMID:25273738

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H–13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H–13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H–13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H–13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr–Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr–Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C–13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H-13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H-13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H-13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H-13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C-13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils.

  10. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei. PMID:8995843

  11. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  12. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  13. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  14. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  15. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... identifying lot or control number that will permit the tracking of the distribution of each drug sample unit... sample distribution containing lot or control numbers that are sufficient to permit the tracking...

  16. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants. PMID:26231074

  17. Enhanced sample multiplexing for nitrotyrosine-modified proteins using combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Renã A S; Evans, Adam R

    2012-06-01

    Current strategies for identification and quantification of 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) post-translationally modified proteins (PTM) generally rely on biotin/avidin enrichment. Quantitative approaches have been demonstrated which employ isotopic labeling or isobaric tagging in order to quantify differences in the relative abundances of 3NT-modified proteins in two or potentially eight samples, respectively. Here, we present a novel strategy which uses combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT) to increase the multiplexing capability of quantifying 3NT-modified proteins to 12 or 16 samples using commercially available tandem mass tags (TMT) or isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), respectively. This strategy employs "light" and "heavy" labeled acetyl groups to block both N-termini and lysine residues of tryptic peptides. Next, 3NT is reduced to 3-aminotyrosine (3AT) using sodium dithionite followed by derivatization of light and heavy labeled 3AT-peptides with either TMT or iTRAQ multiplex reagents. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle utility of cPILOT with in vitro nitrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and mouse splenic proteins using TMT(0), TMT(6), and iTRAQ(8) reagents and discuss limitations of the strategy. PMID:22509719

  18. Radioassay of dual-labeled samples with a Cherenkov counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Haruo; Takiue, Makoto

    1998-03-01

    A new Cherenkov counting technique which allows radioactivities of a dual-labeled sample to be determined simultaneously by using a wavelength shifter has been proposed, and tested for the pairs 32P-36Cl and 86Rb-36Cl. The minimum requirements for this method are a single channel liquid scintillation counter, a wavelength shifter and a reference sample for determining the Cherenkov counting efficiency. The simple procedure for sample preparation and measurement makes the technique very useful for routine radioassay with the help of a desk-top computer.

  19. Radioassay of dual-labeled samples with a Cherenkov counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Haruo; Takiue, Makoto

    1988-03-01

    A new Cherenkov counting technique which allows radioactivities of a dual-labeled sample to be determined simultaneously by using a wavelength shifter has been proposed, and tested for the pairs 32P 36Cl and 86Rb 36Cl. The minimum requirements for this method are a single channel liquid scintillation counter, a wavelength shifter and a reference sample for determining the Cherenkov counting efficiency. The simple procedure for sample preparation and measurement makes the technique very useful for routine radioassay with the help of a desk-top computer.

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis using samples obtained with laser microdissection and saturation dye labelling.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kate E; Marouga, Rita; Prime, John E; Pashby, D Paul; Orange, Paul R; Crosier, Steven; Keith, Alexander B; Lathe, Richard; Mullins, John; Estibeiro, Peter; Bergling, Helene; Hawkins, Edward; Morris, Christopher M

    2005-10-01

    Comparative proteomic methods are rapidly being applied to many different biological systems including complex tissues. One pitfall of these methods is that in some cases, such as oncology and neuroscience, tissue complexity requires isolation of specific cell types and sample is limited. Laser microdissection (LMD) is commonly used for obtaining such samples for proteomic studies. We have combined LMD with sensitive thiol-reactive saturation dye labelling of protein samples and 2-D DIGE to identify protein changes in a test system, the isolated CA1 pyramidal neurone layer of a transgenic (Tg) rat carrying a human amyloid precursor protein transgene. Saturation dye labelling proved to be extremely sensitive with a spot map of over 5,000 proteins being readily produced from 5 mug total protein, with over 100 proteins being significantly altered at p < 0.0005. Of the proteins identified, all showed coherent changes associated with transgene expression. It was, however, difficult to identify significantly different proteins using PMF and MALDI-TOF on gels containing less than 500 mug total protein. The use of saturation dye labelling of limiting samples will therefore require the use of highly sensitive MS techniques to identify the significantly altered proteins isolated using methods such as LMD. PMID:16145713

  1. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model...

  3. Expression and purification of isotopically labeled peptide inhibitors and substrates of cAMP-dependant protein kinase A for NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Larry R; Bortone, Nadia; Yu, Tao; Ha, Kim N; Gaffarogullari, Ece C; Nguyen, Oanh; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2009-04-01

    Extensive X-ray crystallographic studies carried out on the catalytic-subunit of protein kinase A (PKA-C) enabled the atomic characterization of inhibitor and/or substrate peptide analogues trapped at its active site. Yet, the structural and dynamic transitions of these peptides from the free to the bound state are missing. These conformational transitions are central to understanding molecular recognition and the enzymatic cycle. NMR spectroscopy allows one to study these phenomena under functionally relevant conditions. However, the amounts of isotopically labeled peptides required for this technique present prohibitive costs for solid-phase peptide synthesis. To enable NMR studies, we have optimized both expression and purification of isotopically enriched substrate/inhibitor peptides using a recombinant fusion protein system. Three of these peptides correspond to the cytoplasmic regions of the wild-type and lethal mutants of the membrane protein phospholamban, while the fourth peptide correspond to the binding epitope of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor (PKI(5-24)). The target peptides were fused to the maltose binding protein (MBP), which is further purified using a His(6) tag approach. This convenient protocol allows for the purification of milligram amounts of peptides necessary for NMR analysis. PMID:19027069

  4. Synthesis of [13C6]-labelled phenethylamine derivatives for drug quantification in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, HuiLing; Berg, Thomas; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2014-05-15

    The availability of high-quality (13)C-labelled internal standards will improve accurate quantification of narcotics and drugs in biological samples. Thus, the synthesis of 10 [(13)C6]-labelled phenethylamine derivatives, namely amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine, 4-methoxyamphetamine, 4-methoxymethamphetamine, 3,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine, have been undertaken. [(13)C6]-Phenol proved to be an excellent starting material for making (13)C-labelled narcotic substances in the phenethylamine class, and a developed Stille-type coupling enabled an efficient synthesis of the 3,4-methylenedioxy and 4-methoxy derivatives. The pros and cons of alternative routes and transformations are also discussed. The [(13)C6]-labelled compounds are intended for use as internal standards in forensic analysis, health sciences and metabolomics studies by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:24634286

  5. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches. PMID:22427982

  6. Use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for the analysis of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products in enviornmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful analytical techniques for elucidating the molecular structure of organic compounds. In environmental samples, the identification and detection of chemical warfare related compounds is best accomplished using high field high resolution NMR. This paper describes the experimental procedures.

  7. Off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation spectra of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei in static samples.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Deng, F; Ye, C

    1995-12-01

    The off-resonance effects on 2D NMR nutation of I = 3/2 quadrupolar nuclei are demonstrated with perturbation theory and numerical calculation in static samples. The off-resonant (delta omega) rf field (omega 1) enlarges a nutation frequency and consequently increases the measurement range of nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters. When omega e > omega Qmax, and arctg(omega 1/delta omega) = +/- 54.7 degrees (magic angle), the satellite lines (produced by coherence transfers) in a nutation spectrum are superimposed with the line of central transition, and hence the nutation spectrum is simplified and its sensitivity is enhanced. The nuclear quadrupolar interaction parameters of 23Na nuclei in Na omega molecular sieve are obtained using 2D NMR nutation. PMID:9053113

  8. Sample Preparation Approaches for iTRAQ Labeling and Quantitative Proteomic Analyses in Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Christos; Moore, J Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of global quantification strategies utilized in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) are an attractive option for examining the relative amounts of proteins in different samples. The inherent complexity of mammalian proteomes and the diversity of protein physicochemical properties mean that complete proteome coverage is still unlikely from a single analytical method. Numerous options exist for reducing protein sample complexity and resolving digested peptides prior to MS analysis. Indeed, the reliability and efficiency of protein identification and quantitation from an iTRAQ workflow strongly depend on sample preparation upstream of MS. Here we describe our methods for: (1) total protein extraction from immortalized cells; (2) subcellular fractionation of murine tissue; (3) protein sample desalting, digestion, and iTRAQ labeling; (4) peptide separation by strong cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography; and (5) peptide separation by isoelectric focusing. PMID:26700038

  9. Metabolic Profiling and Classification of Propolis Samples from Southern Brazil: An NMR-Based Platform Coupled with Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Maraschin, Marcelo; Somensi-Zeggio, Amélia; Oliveira, Simone K; Kuhnen, Shirley; Tomazzoli, Maíra M; Raguzzoni, Josiane C; Zeri, Ana C M; Carreira, Rafael; Correia, Sara; Costa, Christopher; Rocha, Miguel

    2016-01-22

    The chemical composition of propolis is affected by environmental factors and harvest season, making it difficult to standardize its extracts for medicinal usage. By detecting a typical chemical profile associated with propolis from a specific production region or season, certain types of propolis may be used to obtain a specific pharmacological activity. In this study, propolis from three agroecological regions (plain, plateau, and highlands) from southern Brazil, collected over the four seasons of 2010, were investigated through a novel NMR-based metabolomics data analysis workflow. Chemometrics and machine learning algorithms (PLS-DA and RF), including methods to estimate variable importance in classification, were used in this study. The machine learning and feature selection methods permitted construction of models for propolis sample classification with high accuracy (>75%, reaching ∼90% in the best case), better discriminating samples regarding their collection seasons comparatively to the harvest regions. PLS-DA and RF allowed the identification of biomarkers for sample discrimination, expanding the set of discriminating features and adding relevant information for the identification of the class-determining metabolites. The NMR-based metabolomics analytical platform, coupled to bioinformatic tools, allowed characterization and classification of Brazilian propolis samples regarding the metabolite signature of important compounds, i.e., chemical fingerprint, harvest seasons, and production regions. PMID:26693586

  10. Application of on-line HPLC-1H NMR to environmental samples: analysis of groundwater near former ammunition plants.

    PubMed

    Godejohann, M; Preiss, A; Mügge, C; Wünsch, G

    1997-09-15

    Coupling of HPLC to NMR was applied for the first time to the analysis of environmental samples, i.e., water samples from an ammunition hazardous waste site. Using the continuous flow mode at very low flow rates (< or = 0.017 mL/min) and large volume injection (400 microL), the confirmation of many nitroaromatic compounds could be achieved down to the microgram-per-liter level after solid phase extraction of a groundwater sample from a former ammunition production site. At a flow rate of 0.006 mL/min, it is possible to detect less than 29 nmol (5 micrograms) of 1,3-dinitrobenzene injected on a 75 mm x 4 mm reversed phase C-18 column (particle size, 5 microns). The results obtained by HPLC-NMR are compared to those obtained by HPLC-PDA (photodiode array) of the same sample, demonstrating that many more compounds can be identified by the former compared to the latter method as a result of coelution of major and minor components in the HPLC chromatogram. PMID:9302876

  11. Carbon-proton scalar couplings in RNA. 3D heteronuclear and 2D isotope-edited NMR of a [sup 13]C-labeled extra-stable hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; Varani, G.; Tinoco, I. Jr. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-29

    Long range carbon-proton scalar couplings were measured for an RNA hairpin of 12 nucleotides using 3D and [sup 13]C-edited 2D NMR. The large one-bond carbon-proton scalar couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) and small n-bond couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) produce ECOSY type cross-peaks, thus facilitating the determination of the sign and magnitude of the smaller [sup 2]J[sub CH] or [sup 3]J[sub CH]. The UUCGRNA hairpin (5[prime]-rGGACUUCGGUCC-3[prime]), whose structure has been determined by our laboratory, was uniformly [sup 13]C-labeled at 30% isotopic enrichment. The observed [sup 1]J[sub CH] couplings were then correlated to the known structure. The signs of [sup 2]J[sub C4[prime]H5[prime

  12. FM Reconstruction of Non-Uniformly Sampled Protein NMR Data at Higher Dimensions and Optimization by Distillation

    PubMed Central

    Hyberts, Sven G.; Frueh, Dominique P.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Wagner, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Non-uniform sampling (NUS) enables recording of multidimensional NMR data at resolutions matching the resolving power of modern instruments without using excessive measuring time. However, in order to obtain satisfying results, efficient reconstruction methods are needed. Here we describe an optimized version of the Forward Maximum entropy (FM) reconstruction method, which can reconstruct up to three indirect dimensions. For complex datasets, such as NOESY spectra, the performance of the procedure is enhanced by a distillation procedure that reduces artifacts stemming from intense peaks. PMID:19705283

  13. An NMR study of the interaction of 15N-labelled bradykinin with an antibody mimic of the bradykinin B2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ottleben, H; Haasemann, M; Ramachandran, R; Görlach, M; Müller-Esterl, W; Brown, L R

    1997-03-01

    An isotope-edited NMR study of the peptide hormone bradykinin (RPPGFSPFR) bound to the Fab fragment of a monoclonal antibody against bradykinin (MBK3) is reported. MBK3 was previously shown to provide a binding site model of the B2 bradykinin receptor [Haasemann, M., Buschko, J., Faussner, A., Roscher, A. A., Hoebeke, J., Burch, R. M. & Muller-Esterl, W. (1991) Anti-idiotypic antibodies bearing the internal image of a bradykinin epitope, J. Immunol. 147, 3882-3892]. Bradykinin was obtained in a uniformly 15N-labelled form using recombinant expression of a fusion protein consisting of the glutathione-binding domain of glutathione S-transferase fused to residues 354-375 of the high-molecular-mass kininogen from which bradykinin was released by proteolytic digestion with its natural protease plasma kallikrein. Bradykinin forms a complex with the Fab fragment of MBK3 which exchanges slowly on the NMR time scale. The 15N and 1H resonances of the tightly bound residues of bradykinin show appreciable changes in chemical shift with respect to the free form, while the 15N and 1H linewidths indicate that the hydrodynamic behaviour of bound bradykinin is dominated by the high-molecular-mass Fab fragment. The NMR data indicate that essentially the entire nonapeptide is involved in binding. The kinetics of the ligand-exchange process, together with resonance assignments obtained via exchange spectroscopy. indicate that bradykinin binds to MBK3 only in the all-trans conformation at all three Xaa-Pro amide bonds. NH-NH NOE connectivities suggest that bradykinin is bound in an extended conformation. The spectroscopic data obtained from this study are compared to recently proposed computational models of the conformation of bradykinin bound to the B2 receptor. PMID:9119014

  14. Ultrafast in vivo microwave irradiation for enhanced metabolic stability of brain biopsy samples during HRMAS NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Detour, J; Elbayed, K; Piotto, M; Moussallieh, F M; Nehlig, A; Namer, I J

    2011-09-30

    High resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy is a well established technique for ex vivo metabolite investigations but experimental factors such as ischemic delay or mechanical stress due to continuous spinning deserve further investigations. Cortical brain samples from rats that underwent ultrafast in vivo microwave irradiation (MWp group) were compared to similar samples that underwent standard nitrogen freezing with and without exposure to domestic microwaves (FN and FN+MWd groups). One dimensional (1)H HRMAS NMR spectra were acquired and 16 metabolites of interest were quantified. Within each group 3 samples underwent long lasting acquisition (up to 15 h). Statistically significant differences in metabolite concentrations were observed between groups for metabolites associated to post mortem biochemical changes and/or anaerobic glycolysis including several neurotransmitters. Spectral assessment over time showed a drastic reduction of biochemical variations in both MW groups. Only 2/16 metabolites exhibited significant signal variations after 15 h of continuous spinning and acquisition in the MWp group. This number increased to 10 in the FN group. We confirmed limited anaerobic metabolism and post mortem degradation after ultra fast in vivo MW irradiation. Furthermore, spectra obtained after MWp and MWd irradiation exhibited an extremely stable spectral pattern over extended periods of continuous acquisition. PMID:21803072

  15. Rapid milk group classification by 1H NMR analysis of Le and H epitopes in human milk oligosaccharide donor samples.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Sander S; Schoemaker, Ruud J W; Gerwig, Gerrit J; van Leusen-van Kan, Ellen J M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2014-08-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are a major constituent of human breast milk and play an important role in reducing the risk of infections in infants. The structures of these HMOs show similarities with blood group antigens in protein glycosylation, in particular in relation to fucosylation in Lewis blood group-type epitopes, matching the maternal pattern. Previously, based on the Secretor and Lewis blood group system, four milk groups have been defined, i.e. Lewis-positive Secretors, Lewis-positive non-Secretors, Lewis-negative Secretors and Lewis-negative non-Secretors. Here, a rapid one-dimensional (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis method is presented that identifies the presence/absence of (α1-2)-, (α1-3)- and (α1-4)-linked fucose residues in HMO samples, affording the essential information to attribute different HMO samples to a specific milk group. The developed method is based on the NMR structural-reporter-group concept earlier established for glycoprotein glycans. Further evaluation of the data obtained from the analysis of 36 HMO samples shows that within each of the four milk groups the relative levels of the different fucosylation epitopes can greatly vary. The data also allow a separation of the Lewis-positive Secretor milk group into two sub-groups. PMID:24789815

  16. Construction and performance of an NMR tube with a sample cavity formed within magnetic susceptibility-matched glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Hallenga, Klaas; Shigezane, Masahiro; Waelchli, Markus; Löhr, Frank; Markley, John L.; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2011-04-01

    We describe the construction and performance of an NMR tube with a magnetic susceptibility matched sample cavity that confines the solution within the detection zone in the axial direction and in a quasi-rectangular region in the radial direction. The slot-like sample cavity provides both good sample volume efficiency and tolerance to sensitivity loss in the sample space. The signal-to-noise ratio per unit volume of the constructed tube was 2.2 times higher than that of a cylindrical tube of 5 mm outer diameter with a sample containing 300 mM NaCl at a static magnetic field of 14.1 T. Even the overall signal-to-noise ratio of the slot tube was 35% higher than that of the conventional 5 mm tube for a sample containing 300 mM NaCl. Similar improvements over existing sample tube geometries were obtained at 950 MHz. Moreover the temperature rise resulting from RF heating was found to be significantly lower for the slot tube even when compared to 3 and 4 mm outer diameter cylindrical tubes as measured in a 5 mm cryoprobe. A further advantage of this type of tube is that a sample cavity of any desired size and shape can be formed within a cylindrical tube for use in a single cryogenic probe.

  17. Construction and performance of an NMR tube with a sample cavity formed within magnetic susceptibility-matched glass.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Hallenga, Klaas; Shigezane, Masahiro; Waelchli, Markus; Löhr, Frank; Markley, John L; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2011-04-01

    We describe the construction and performance of an NMR tube with a magnetic susceptibility matched sample cavity that confines the solution within the detection zone in the axial direction and in a quasi-rectangular region in the radial direction. The slot-like sample cavity provides both good sample volume efficiency and tolerance to sensitivity loss in the sample space. The signal-to-noise ratio per unit volume of the constructed tube was 2.2 times higher than that of a cylindrical tube of 5mm outer diameter with a sample containing 300 mM NaCl at a static magnetic field of 14.1T. Even the overall signal-to-noise ratio of the slot tube was 35% higher than that of the conventional 5mm tube for a sample containing 300 mM NaCl. Similar improvements over existing sample tube geometries were obtained at 950 MHz. Moreover the temperature rise resulting from RF heating was found to be significantly lower for the slot tube even when compared to 3 and 4mm outer diameter cylindrical tubes as measured in a 5mm cryoprobe. A further advantage of this type of tube is that a sample cavity of any desired size and shape can be formed within a cylindrical tube for use in a single cryogenic probe. PMID:21316281

  18. MAG-PGSTE: A new STE-based PGSE NMR sequence for the determination of diffusion in magnetically inhomogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gang; Price, William S.

    2008-11-01

    A new stimulated echo based pulsed gradient spin-echo sequence, MAG-PGSTE, has been developed for the determination of self-diffusion in magnetically inhomogeneous samples. The sequence was tested on two glass bead samples (i.e., 212-300 and <106 μm glass bead packs). The MAG-PGSTE sequence was compared to the MAGSTE (or MPFG) (P.Z. Sun, J.G. Seland, D. Cory, Background gradient suppression in pulsed gradient stimulated echo measurements, J. Magn. Reson. 161 (2003) 168-173; P.Z. Sun, S.A. Smith, J. Zhou, Analysis of the magic asymmetric gradient stimulated echo sequence with shaped gradients, J. Magn. Reson. 171 (2004) 324-329; P.Z. Sun, Improved diffusion measurement in heterogeneous systems using the magic asymmetric gradient stimulated echo (MAGSTE) technique, J. Magn. Reson. 187 (2007) 177-183; P. Galvosas, F. Stallmach, J. Kärger, Background gradient suppression in stimulated echo NMR diffusion studies using magic pulsed field gradient ratios, J. Magn. Reson. 166 (2004) 164-173, P. Galvosas, PFG NMR-Diffusionsuntersuchungen mit ultra-hohen gepulsten magnetischen Feldgradienten an mikroporösen Materialien, Ph.D. Thesis, Universität Leipzig, 2003, P.Z. Sun, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Diffusion, Ph.D. Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003) sequence and Cotts 13-interval [R.M. Cotts, M.J.R. Hoch, T. Sun, J.T. Marker, Pulsed field gradient stimulated echo methods for improved NMR diffusion measurements in heterogeneous systems, J. Magn. Reson. 83 (1989) 252-266] sequence using both glass bead samples. The MAG-PGSTE and MAGSTE (or MPFG) sequences outperformed the Cotts 13-interval sequence in the measurement of diffusion coefficients; more interestingly, for the sample with higher background gradients (i.e., the <106 μm glass bead sample), the MAG-PGSTE sequence provided higher signal-to-noise ratios and thus better diffusion measurements than the MAGSTE and Cotts 13-interval sequences. In addition, the MAG-PGSTE sequence provided

  19. Amino-acid selective experiments on uniformly 13C and 15N labeled proteins by MAS NMR: Filtering of lysines and arginines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Stefan; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2006-12-01

    Amino-acid selective magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments can aid the assignment of ambiguous cross-peaks in crowded spectra of solid proteins. In particular for larger proteins, data analysis can be hindered by severe resonance overlap. In such cases, filtering techniques may provide a good alternative to site-specific spin-labeling to obtain unambiguous assignments that can serve as starting points in the assignment procedure. In this paper we present a simple pulse sequence that allows selective excitation of arginine and lysine residues. To achieve this, we make use of a combination of specific cross-polarization for selective excitation [M. Baldus, A.T. Petkova, J. Herzfeld, R.G. Griffin, Cross polarization in the tilted frame: assignment and spectral simplification in heteronuclear spin systems, Mol. Phys. 95 (1998) 1197-1207.] and spin diffusion for transfer along the amino-acid side-chain. The selectivity of the filter is demonstrated with the excitation of lysine and arginine side-chain resonances in a uniformly 13C and 15N labeled protein preparation of the α-spectrin SH3 domain. It is shown that the filter can be applied as a building block in a 13C- 13C lysine-only correlation experiment.

  20. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  1. Nano-Mole Scale Side-Chain Signal Assignment by 1H-Detected Protein Solid-State NMR by Ultra-Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Stereo-Array Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Endo, Yuki; Nemoto, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Asakura, Tetsuo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52–57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems. PMID:25856081

  2. Nano-mole scale side-chain signal assignment by 1H-detected protein solid-state NMR by ultra-fast magic-angle spinning and stereo-array isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songlin; Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Endo, Yuki; Nemoto, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Asakura, Tetsuo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52-57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems. PMID:25856081

  3. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing.

    PubMed

    Riba, J; Gleichmann, T; Zimmermann, S; Zengerle, R; Koltay, P

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  4. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    PubMed Central

    Riba, J.; Gleichmann, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  5. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest. PMID:26302362

  6. Label-free three dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  7. Label-free three-dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  8. Stable isotope labeling strategy based on coding theory.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Takuma; Koshiba, Seizo; Yokoyama, Jun; Kigawa, Takanori

    2015-10-01

    We describe a strategy for stable isotope-aided protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, called stable isotope encoding. The basic idea of this strategy is that amino-acid selective labeling can be considered as "encoding and decoding" processes, in which the information of amino acid type is encoded by the stable isotope labeling ratio of the corresponding residue and it is decoded by analyzing NMR spectra. According to the idea, the strategy can diminish the required number of labelled samples by increasing information content per sample, enabling discrimination of 19 kinds of non-proline amino acids with only three labeled samples. The idea also enables this strategy to combine with information technologies, such as error detection by check digit, to improve the robustness of analyses with low quality data. Stable isotope encoding will facilitate NMR analyses of proteins under non-ideal conditions, such as those in large complex systems, with low-solubility, and in living cells. PMID:26293126

  9. On the Traceability of Commercial Saffron Samples Using ¹H-NMR and FT-IR Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Roberto; Ordoudi, Stella A; Cagliani, Laura R; Tsiangali, Maria; Tsimidou, Maria Z

    2016-01-01

    In previous works on authentic samples of saffron of known history (harvest and processing year, storage conditions, and length of time) some biomarkers were proposed using both FT-IR and NMR metabolomics regarding the shelf life of the product. This work addresses the difficulties to trace back the "age" of commercial saffron samples of unknown history, sets a limit value above which these products can be considered substandard, and offers a useful tool to combat saffron mislabeling and fraud with low-quality saffron material. Investigations of authentic and commercial saffron samples of different origin and harvest year, which had been stored under controlled conditions for different lengths of time, allowed a clear-cut clustering of samples in two groups according to the storage period irrespectively of the provenience. In this respect, the four-year cut off point proposed in our previous work assisted to trace back the "age" of unknown samples and to check for possible mislabeling practices. PMID:26938515

  10. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Evidence for tautomerism in nucleic acid base pairs. 1H NMR study of 15N labeled tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Rüterjans, H; Kaun, E; Hull, W E; Limbach, H H

    1982-01-01

    The imino proton resonances of 15N labeled tRNA appear as asymmetric doublet signals, the asymmetry being dependent on the applied magnetic field strength. Assuming a tautomerism of the type N-H...N not equal to N...H-N in the base pairs the line shapes can be simulated. The most important parameters fitted in the simulation are the rate constants of the proton transfer and the mole fractions of either tautomeric state. The rate constants are of the order of 100s-1 and the mole fractions of the non dominant tautomer about 0.1 depending on the temperature and on the nature of the base pairing. The observations are attributed to a double proton transfer in the base pairs. The unexpectedly slow rates of the double proton transfer process may be connected with a concomitant conformational change of the duplex structure. PMID:7177856

  12. Labeling and confocal imaging of neurons in thick invertebrate tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bellido, Paloma T; Wardill, Trevor J

    2012-09-01

    Neuroscience researchers have long sought methods to describe the neural connectivity of the circuits responsible for specific behaviors. One major obstacle is scale: Neural spines can be <1 µm in diameter, but axons can range from millimeters to centimeters (or larger) in length, making tissue imaging and neuron reconstruction a challenging task. New tissue-clearing agents and long-working-distance objectives offer improved imaging conditions, and here we present a complete protocol for invertebrate tissue that uses these advances. In this protocol, tissue-processing steps previously published in separate articles are combined with recent advances in confocal imaging to visualize invertebrate tissue samples that are >500 µm thick and contain dye-filled neurons. The steps describe dye filling, fixing, antibody labeling, clearing, whole tissue mounting, and confocal imaging with matched refractive indexes. Thus, manual sectioning or "flipping" the tissue to image the whole volume is not required. With matched refractive indexes, loss of resolution and signal is avoided. Tissue volumes are imaged in one stack and nonlinear deformations caused by tissue flipping are prevented. We apply the protocol to whole dragonfly thoracic ganglia (2 × 1 × 0.6 mm) and cephalopod skin samples (20 × 2 × 0.6 mm) with minimal tissue deformation. The resulting images will be used to develop a three-dimensional connectivity atlas of dragonfly ganglia and cephalopod skin innervation. This protocol can be applied to other invertebrate species, and has the advantage that it avoids problems with antigen specificity. PMID:22949711

  13. Properties of bridgehead-substituted polycycloalkanes. Synthesis and NMR analysis of /sup 15/N-labeled 1-aminobicycloalkanes and their hydrochlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Della, E.W.; Kasum, B.; Kirkbride, K.P.

    1987-04-29

    NMR analysis of adamantane and four bicycloalkanes substituted at the bridgehead with /sup 15/N-labeled amino and ammonio groups is described. It is found that where most of the one-bond carbon-nitrogen coupling constants are relatively large, those in 1-aminobicyclo (1.1.1)pentane and its hydrochloride are significantly reduced; in fact, in the latter compound one-bond /sup 13/C-/sup 15/N coupling could not even be detected. Values of experimentally determined vicinal couplings were in accord with those expected on the basis of the number of three-bond pathways available for transmission of spin-spin information; INDO calculations, however, suggest that in the more highly strained systems there is a substantial contribution to /sup 3/J(CN) arising from through-space interactions and that these oppose through-bond effects. Large four-bond /sup 15/N-/sup 1/H couplings were found to occur in 1-aminobicyclo(1.1.1)pentane and its hydrochloride; MO calculations indicate that through-space interactions constitute the predominant mechanism contributing to /sup 4/J(/sup 15/N-/sup 1/H), although in this case through-bond and through-space effects reinforce each other. The nitrogen-15 chemical shifts of the amine hydrochlorides were determined, and they appear to occur in random fashion.

  14. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  15. Sensitivity Gains, Linearity, and Spectral Reproducibility in Nonuniformly Sampled Multidimensional MAS NMR Spectra of High Dynamic Range.

    SciTech Connect

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David M.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David S.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2014-04-22

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C,15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high quality artifact-free datasets.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part...

  18. Dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for simultaneous detection of clothianidin and diniconazole in agricultural samples.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Enze; Shi, Haiyan; Zhou, Liangliang; Hua, Xiude; Feng, Lu; Yu, Tong; Wang, Minghua

    2016-02-01

    Europium (Eu(3+)) and samarium (Sm(3+)) were used as fluorescent labels to develop a highly sensitive dual-labeled time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA) for detect clothianidin and diniconazole in food samples. Under the optimized assay conditions, 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) and the limit of detection (LOD, IC10) of clothianidin were 5.08 and 0.021 μg/L, and 13.14 and 0.029 μg/L for diniconazole. The cross-reactivities (CRs) were negligible except dinotefuran (9.4%) and uniconazole (4.28%). The recoveries of clothianidin and diniconazole ranged from 79.3% to 108.7% in food samples. The results of TRFIA for the authentic samples were validated by gas chromatography (GC) analyses, and a satisfactory correlations were obtained. These results indicated that the method was an alternative tool for simultaneous detection of clothianidin and diniconazole in food samples. PMID:26304380

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--SAMPLE CODING, LABELING, AND FIELD TRACKING PROCEDURES (RTI/ACS-AP-209-070)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This protocol defines the coding scheme, labeling procedures, and field tracking for samples collected in the NHEXAS Region 5 study. Unique sample codes were assigned to all personal, environmental, biological, and quality control samples. A label bearing the code in both bar cod...

  20. A new approach to the optimisation of non-uniform sampling schedules for use in the rapid acquisition of 2D NMR spectra of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    Non-uniform sampling allows the routine, rapid acquisition of 2D NMR data. When the number of points in the NUS schedule is low, the quality of the data obtained is very dependent of the schedule used. A simple proceedure for finding optimium schedules has been developed and is demonstrated for the multiplicity edited HSQC experiment. PMID:27160788

  1. (1)H NMR-based metabolite profiling workflow to reduce inter-sample chemical shift variations in urine samples for improved biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ryan B; Lehmann, Rainer; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Heinzmann, Silke S

    2016-07-01

    Metabolite profiling of urine has seen much advancement in recent years, and its analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become well established. However, the highly variable nature of human urine still requires improved protocols despite some standardization. In particular, diseases such as kidney disease can have a profound effect on the composition of urine and generate a highly diverse sample set for clinical studies. Large variations in pH and the cationic concentration of urine play an important role in creating positional noise within datasets generated from NMR. We demonstrate positional noise to be a confounding variable for multivariate statistical tools such as statistical total correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY), thereby hindering the process of biomarker discovery. We present a two-dimensional buffering system using potassium fluoride (KF) and phosphate buffer to reduce positional noise in metabolomic data generated from urine samples with various levels of proteinuria. KF reduces positional noise in citrate peaks, by decreasing the mean relative standard deviation (RSD) from 0.17 to 0.09. By reducing positional noise with KF, STOCSY analysis of citrate peaks saw significant improvement. We further aligned spectral data using a recursive segment-wise peak alignment (RSPA) method, which leads to further improvement of the positional noise (RSD = 0.06). These results were validated using diverse selection of metabolites which lead to an overall improvement in positional noise using the suggested protocol. In summary, we provide an improved workflow for urine metabolite biomarker discovery to achieve higher data quality for better pathophysiological understanding of human diseases. Graphical abstract Citrate peaks in the range 2.75-2.5 ppm from datasets with different sample preparation protocols and with/without in silico alignment. A Citrate peaks with standard phosphate buffering and without in silico alignment. B citrate

  2. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis. PMID:26659962

  3. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  4. Determination of solution structures of proteins up to 40 kDa using CS-Rosetta with sparse NMR data from deuterated samples

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Song, Yifan; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Aramini, James M.; Ertekin, Asli; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an approach for determining NMR structures of proteins over 20 kDa that utilizes sparse distance restraints obtained using transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy experiments on perdeuterated samples to guide RASREC Rosetta NMR structure calculations. The method was tested on 11 proteins ranging from 15 to 40 kDa, seven of which were previously unsolved. The RASREC Rosetta models were in good agreement with models obtained using traditional NMR methods with larger restraint sets. In five cases X-ray structures were determined or were available, allowing comparison of the accuracy of the Rosetta models and conventional NMR models. In all five cases, the Rosetta models were more similar to the X-ray structures over both the backbone and side-chain conformations than the “best effort” structures determined by conventional methods. The incorporation of sparse distance restraints into RASREC Rosetta allows routine determination of high-quality solution NMR structures for proteins up to 40 kDa, and should be broadly useful in structural biology. PMID:22733734

  5. Reduction of magnetic field fluctuations in powered magnets for NMR using inductive measurements and sampled-data feedback control.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhou; Schiano, Jeffrey L; Samra, Jenna E; Shetty, Kiran K; Brey, William W

    2011-10-01

    Resistive and hybrid (resistive/superconducting) magnets provide substantially higher magnetic fields than those available in low-temperature superconducting magnets, but their relatively low spatial homogeneity and temporal field fluctuations are unacceptable for high resolution NMR. While several techniques for reducing temporal fluctuations have demonstrated varying degrees of success, this paper restricts attention to methods that utilize inductive measurements and feedback control to actively cancel the temporal fluctuations. In comparison to earlier studies using analog proportional control, this paper shows that shaping the controller frequency response results in significantly higher reductions in temporal fluctuations. Measurements of temporal fluctuation spectra and the frequency response of the instrumentation that cancels the temporal fluctuations guide the controller design. In particular, we describe a sampled-data phase-lead-lag controller that utilizes the internal model principle to selectively attenuate magnetic field fluctuations caused by the power supply ripple. We present a quantitative comparison of the attenuation in temporal fluctuations afforded by the new design and a proportional control design. Metrics for comparison include measurements of the temporal fluctuations using Faraday induction and observations of the effect that the fluctuations have on nuclear resonance measurements. PMID:21885308

  6. Quantitative Characterization of Configurational Space Sampled by HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Using Solution NMR, X-ray Scattering and Protein Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G Marius

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic-acid-related events in the HIV-1 replication cycle are mediated by nucleocapsid, a small protein comprising two zinc knuckles connected by a short flexible linker and flanked by disordered termini. Combining experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings, solution X-ray scattering and protein engineering with ensemble simulated annealing, we obtain a quantitative description of the configurational space sampled by the two zinc knuckles, the linker and disordered termini in the absence of nucleic acids. We first compute the conformational ensemble (with an optimal size of three members) of an engineered nucleocapsid construct lacking the N- and C-termini that satisfies the experimental restraints, and then validate this ensemble, as well as characterize the disordered termini, using the experimental data from the full-length nucleocapsid construct. The experimental and computational strategy is generally applicable to multidomain proteins. Differential flexibility within the linker results in asymmetric motion of the zinc knuckles which may explain their functionally distinct roles despite high sequence identity. One of the configurations (populated at a level of ≈40 %) closely resembles that observed in various ligand-bound forms, providing evidence for conformational selection and a mechanistic link between protein dynamics and function. PMID:26946052

  7. HyperSPASM NMR: A new approach to single-shot 2D correlations on DNP-enhanced samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Frydman, Lucio

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution DNP experiments are limited to a single or at most a few scans, before the non-Boltzmann magnetization has been consumed. This makes it impractical to record 2D NMR data by conventional, t1-incremented schemes. Here a new approach termed HyperSPASM to establish 2D heteronuclear correlations in a single scan is reported, aimed at dealing with this kind of challenge. The HyperSPASM experiment relies on imposing an amplitude-modulation of the data by a single Δt1 indirect-domain evolution time, and subsequently monitoring the imparted encoding on separate echo and anti-echo pathway signals within a single continuous acquisition. This is implemented via the use of alternating, switching, coherence selection gradients. As a result of these manipulations the phase imparted by a heteronucleus over its indirect domain evolution can be accurately extracted, and 2D data unambiguously reconstructed with a single-shot excitation. The nature of this sequence makes the resulting experiment particularly well suited for collecting indirectly-detected HSQC data on hyperpolarized samples. The potential of the ensuing HyperSPASM method is exemplified with natural-abundance hyperpolarized correlations on model systems.

  8. NMR Wool Tube: a novel method for NMR solution analysis of derivatized glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Olivia Maria

    2004-08-13

    Glass wool was placed within an NMR tube as a solid support for the covalent attachment of a molecule to allow for a simple one-dimensional 1H FT NMR solution analysis. This novel procedure avoids the use of expensive sample tubes or platforms, as required for magic angle or fast spinning, exotic pulse sequences, isotopic labeling or the use of a large number of scans to provide the ability to analyze the structure, mobility, ligand binding, and solvent interactions of the surface bound molecule. PMID:15387199

  9. The beauty of being (label)-free: sample preparation methods for SWATH-MS and next-generation targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Vowinckel, Jakob; Capuano, Floriana; Campbell, Kate; Deery, Michael J; Lilley, Kathryn S; Ralser, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The combination of qualitative analysis with label-free quantification has greatly facilitated the throughput and flexibility of novel proteomic techniques. However, such methods rely heavily on robust and reproducible sample preparation procedures. Here, we benchmark a selection of in gel, on filter, and in solution digestion workflows for their application in label-free proteomics. Each procedure was associated with differing advantages and disadvantages. The in gel methods interrogated were cost effective, but were limited in throughput and digest efficiency. Filter-aided sample preparations facilitated reasonable processing times and yielded a balanced representation of membrane proteins, but led to a high signal variation in quantification experiments. Two in solution digest protocols, however, gave optimal performance for label-free proteomics. A protocol based on the detergent RapiGest led to the highest number of detected proteins at second-best signal stability, while a protocol based on acetonitrile-digestion, RapidACN, scored best in throughput and signal stability but came second in protein identification. In addition, we compared label-free data dependent (DDA) and data independent (SWATH) acquisition on a TripleTOF 5600 instrument. While largely similar in protein detection, SWATH outperformed DDA in quantification, reducing signal variation and markedly increasing the number of precisely quantified peptides. PMID:24741437

  10. The beauty of being (label)-free: sample preparation methods for SWATH-MS and next-generation targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kate; Deery, Michael J.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Ralser, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The combination of qualitative analysis with label-free quantification has greatly facilitated the throughput and flexibility of novel proteomic techniques. However, such methods rely heavily on robust and reproducible sample preparation procedures. Here, we benchmark a selection of in gel, on filter, and in solution digestion workflows for their application in label-free proteomics. Each procedure was associated with differing advantages and disadvantages. The in gel methods interrogated were cost effective, but were limited in throughput and digest efficiency. Filter-aided sample preparations facilitated reasonable processing times and yielded a balanced representation of membrane proteins, but led to a high signal variation in quantification experiments. Two in solution digest protocols, however, gave optimal performance for label-free proteomics. A protocol based on the detergent RapiGest led to the highest number of detected proteins at second-best signal stability, while a protocol based on acetonitrile-digestion, RapidACN, scored best in throughput and signal stability but came second in protein identification. In addition, we compared label-free data dependent (DDA) and data independent (SWATH) acquisition on a TripleTOF 5600 instrument. While largely similar in protein detection, SWATH outperformed DDA in quantification, reducing signal variation and markedly increasing the number of precisely quantified peptides. PMID:24741437

  11. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  12. A Modified Alderman-Grant Coil makes possible an efficient cross-coil probe for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Christopher V.; Yang, Yuan; Glibowicka, Mira; Wu, Chin H.; Park, Sang Ho; Deber, Charles M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-11-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a cross-coil double-resonance probe for solid-state NMR experiments on lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are described. The outer coil is a Modified Alderman-Grant Coil (MAGC) tuned to the 1H frequency. The inner coil consists of a multi-turn solenoid coil that produces a B 1 field orthogonal to that of the outer coil. This results in a compact nested cross-coil pair with the inner solenoid coil tuned to the low frequency detection channel. This design has several advantages over multiple-tuned solenoid coil probes, since RF heating from the 1H channel is substantially reduced, it can be tuned for samples with a wide range of dielectric constants, and the simplified circuit design and high inductance inner coil provides excellent sensitivity. The utility of this probe is demonstrated on two electrically lossy samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) that are particularly difficult for conventional NMR probes. The 72-residue polypeptide embedding the transmembrane helices 3 and 4 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) (residues 194-241) requires a high salt concentration in order to be successfully reconstituted in phospholipid bicelles. A second application is to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement applied to the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bicelles where the resistance to sample heating enables high duty cycle solid-state NMR experiments to be performed.

  13. Pulsed Field Gradient NMR with Sigmoid Shape Gradient Sampling To Produce More Detailed Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy Maps of Real Complex Mixtures: Examples with Medicine Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Guilhem; Bonny, Alice; Gilard, Véronique; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2016-03-15

    NMR diffusion measurements are based on signal attenuation. In the case of complex mixtures for which some molecules are diffusing quickly while others are significantly slower, it is challenging to obtain a diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY)-type 2D map giving reliable information on all molecules. In this paper, we propose a new gradient sampling approach based on a sigmoid shape allowing the acquisition of a significant number of points for both the fast and slow diffusing molecules. We applied this new gradient sampling strategy to deformulate two medicines whose composition was known (Esomeprazole) or unknown (Mebendazole). PFG NMR associated with a sigmoid gradient ramp is an exciting strategy to study drugs as a whole, i.e., the active ingredient(s) and excipients. PMID:26905176

  14. Aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing (ALCHIM): determining composition of complex lipid samples by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ruiyang; Volden, Paul A.; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the amounts and types of lipids present in mixtures is important in fields as diverse as medicine, food science, and biochemistry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can quantify the total amounts of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in mixtures, but identifying the length of saturated fatty acid or the position of unsaturation by NMR is a daunting challenge. We have developed an NMR technique, aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing, to address this problem. Using a selective total correlation spectroscopy technique to excite and transfer magnetization from a resolved resonance, we demonstrate that the time dependence of this transfer to another resolved site depends linearly on the number of aliphatic carbons separating the two sites. This technique is applied to complex natural mixtures allowing the identification and quantification of the constituent fatty acids. The method has been applied to whole adipocytes demonstrating that it will be of great use in studies of whole tissues. PMID:24831341

  15. Synthesis of a water-soluble analog of 6-methyl-3-N-alkyl catechol labeled with carbon 13: NMR approach to the reactivity of poison ivy/oak sensitizers toward proteins.

    PubMed

    Goetz, G; Meschkat, E; Lepoittevin, J P

    1999-04-19

    A 13-C labeled water soluble derivative of alkylcatechol was synthesized and reacted with human serum albumin in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 in air to allow a slow oxidation of the catechol into orthoquinone. The formation of several adducts was evidenced by a combination of 13C and 1H-13C correlation NMR. Although some adducts could result from a classical o-quinone formation - Michael type addition, our results suggest that a second pathway, involving a direct reaction of a carbon centered radical with proteins could be an important mechanism in the formation of modified proteins. PMID:10328301

  16. Existing and emerging technologies for measuring stable isotope labelled retinol in biological samples: isotope dilution analysis of body retinol stores.

    PubMed

    Preston, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the recent improvements in instrumentation used for stable isotope tracer measurements in the context of measuring retinol stores, in vivo. Tracer costs, together with concerns that larger tracer doses may perturb the parameter under study, demand that ever more sensitive mass spectrometric techniques are developed. GCMS is the most widely used technique. It has high sensitivity in terms of sample amount and uses high resolution GC, yet its ability to detect low isotope ratios is limited by background noise. LCMSMS may become more accessible for tracer studies. Its ability to measure low level stable isotope tracers may prove superior to GCMS, but it is isotope ratio MS (IRMS) that has been designed specifically for low level stable isotope analysis through accurate analysis of tracer:tracee ratios (the tracee being the unlabelled species). Compound-specific isotope analysis, where GC is interfaced to IRMS, is gaining popularity. Here, individual 13C-labelled compounds are separated by GC, combusted to CO2 and transferred on-line for ratiometric analysis by IRMS at the ppm level. However, commercially-available 13C-labelled retinol tracers are 2 - 4 times more expensive than deuterated tracers. For 2H-labelled compounds, GC-pyrolysis-IRMS has now become more generally available as an operating mode on the same IRMS instrument. Here, individual compounds are separated by GC and pyrolysed to H2 at high temperature for analysis by IRMS. It is predicted that GC-pyrolysis-IRMS will facilitate low level tracer procedures to measure body retinol stores, as has been accomplished in the case of fatty acids and amino acids. Sample size requirements for GC-P-IRMS may exceed those of GCMS, but this paper discusses sample preparation procedures and predicts improvements, particularly in the efficiency of sample introduction. PMID:25537104

  17. Aβ Monomers Transiently Sample Oligomer and Fibril-like Configurations: Ensemble Characterization Using a Combined MD/NMR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, David J.; Connors, Christopher; Chen, Wen; Wang, Chunyu; García, Angel E.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are a primary component of fibrils and oligomers implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the intrinsic flexibility of these peptides has frustrated efforts to investigate the secondary and tertiary structure of Aβ monomers, whose conformational landscapes directly contribute to the kinetics and thermodynamics of Aβ aggregation. In this work, de novo replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on the μs/replica timescale are used to characterize the structural ensembles of Aβ42, Aβ40, and M35-oxidized Aβ42, three physiologically relevant isoforms with substantially different aggregation properties. J-coupling data calculated from the REMD trajectories were compared to corresponding NMR-derived values acquired through two different pulse sequences, revealing that all simulations converge on the order of hundreds of ns/replica toward ensembles that yield good agreement with experiment. Though all three Aβ species adopt highly heterogeneous ensembles, these are considerably more structured compared to simulations on shorter timescales. Prominent in the C-terminus are antiparallel β-hairpins between L17-A21, A30-L36, and V39-I41, similar to oligomer and fibril intrapeptide models, that expose these hydrophobic side chains to solvent and may serve as hotspots for self-association. Compared to reduced Aβ42, the absence of a second β-hairpin in Aβ40 and the sampling of alternate β topologies by M35-oxidized Aβ42 may explain the reduced aggregation rates of these forms. A persistent V24-K28 bend motif, observed in all three species, is stabilized by buried backbone to side chain hydrogen bonds with D23 and a cross-region salt bridge between E22 and K28, highlighting the role of the familial AD-linked E22 and D23 residues in Aβ monomer folding. These characterizations help illustrate the conformational landscapes of Aβ monomers at atomic resolution and provide insight into the early stages of A

  18. Label-free detection of low-molecular-weight samples using a terahertz chemical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwana, Takuya; Ogawa, Masahiro; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko; Tsukada, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    A terahertz chemical microscope (TCM) has been proposed and developed to visualize the distribution of biomolecular interactions on a sensing plate without any labels. In this study, the concanavalin A (Con A)-d-(+)-mannose (mannose) interaction was detected using the TCM with mannose applied as the analyte and Con A immobilized on the sensing plate. To demonstrate this interaction, the amplitude of terahertz pulses as a function of Con A-mannose interaction time, as well as the Con A-mannose coupling concentration, was evaluated. The results suggest that coupling kinetics may be evaluated using a TCM.

  19. Geographic origin determination of heroin and cocaine using site-specific isotopic ratio deuterium NMR

    PubMed

    Hays; Remaud; Jamin; Martin

    2000-05-01

    SNIF-NMR (Site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by deuterium NMR) was employed on 36 heroin samples from seven different known origins, and two cocaine samples from two different known origins. Heroin has two "synthetic" deuterium labeled sites (the two acetyls from acetic anhydride, each representing three equivalent nuclei) and 15 "natural" deuterium labeled sites (originating from the morphine produced in the opium plant). The "natural" sites have the potential for determining geographic location of the original opium plant, while the "synthetic" sites could assist in giving information about the commercial source of acetic anhydride used to convert morphine to heroin. Cocaine has 15 "natural" deuterium labeled sites. This study shows that SNIF-NMR has some use in determining the geographic origin of heroin and also has good potential for determining the geographical origin of cocaine. PMID:10855958

  20. Chemo-enzymatic labeling for rapid assignment of RNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Longhini, Andrew P; LeBlanc, Regan M; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2016-07-01

    Even though Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the few techniques capable of determining atomic resolution structures of RNA, it is constrained by two major problems of chemical shift overlap of resonances and rapid signal loss due to line broadening. Emerging tools to tackle these problems include synthesis of atom specifically labeled or chemically modified nucleotides. Herein we review the synthesis of these nucleotides, the design and production of appropriate RNA samples, and the application and analysis of the NMR experiments that take advantage of these labels. PMID:27090003

  1. Simplification of the 1H NMR spectra of enantiomers dissolved in chiral liquid crystals, combining variable angle sample spinning and selective refocusing experiments.

    PubMed

    Beguin, Laetitia; Courtieu, Jacques; Ziani, Latifa; Merlet, Denis

    2006-12-01

    This work presents a technique to simplify overcrowded proton spectra in chiral liquid crystal solvents using rotation of the sample near the magic angle, VASS, combined with homonuclear selective refocusing 2D NMR experiments, SERF. This methodology provides a powerful tool to visualise enantiomers out of unresolved proton spectra. A modified SERF sequence is presented where the resulting 2D spectrum can be phased to increase the resolution. Accurate enantiomeric excesses are determined that are not possible to measure on static samples. Two examples are presented. PMID:16991108

  2. Study of the gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples by 1H NMR cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babushkina, T. A.; Klimova, T. P.; Shtykova, É. V.; Dembo, K. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Khripunov, A. K.; Klechkovskaya, V. V.

    2010-03-01

    Gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples have been investigated by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering. The joint use of these two methods made it possible to characterize the sizes of aqueous pores in gel films and estimate the sizes of structural inhomogeneities before and after the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and Se0 nanoparticles (stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone) into the films. According to small-angle X-ray scattering data, the sizes of inhomogeneities in a gel film change only slightly upon the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and nanoparticles. The impregnated material is sorbed into water-filled cavities that are present in the gel film. 1H NMR cryoporometry allowed us to reveal the details of changes in the sizes of small aqueous pores during modifications.

  3. Study of the gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples by {sup 1}H NMR cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Babushkina, T. A.; Klimova, T. P.; Shtykova, E. V.; Dembo, K. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Khripunov, A. K.; Klechkovskaya, V. V.

    2010-03-15

    Gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples have been investigated by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering. The joint use of these two methods made it possible to characterize the sizes of aqueous pores in gel films and estimate the sizes of structural inhomogeneities before and after the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and Se{sub 0} nanoparticles (stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone) into the films. According to small-angle X-ray scattering data, the sizes of inhomogeneities in a gel film change only slightly upon the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and nanoparticles. The impregnated material is sorbed into water-filled cavities that are present in the gel film. {sup 1}H NMR cryoporometry allowed us to reveal the details of changes in the sizes of small aqueous pores during modifications.

  4. Screening proteins for NMR suitability

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Adelinda A.; Semesi, Anthony; Garcia, Maite; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NMR spectroscopy is an invaluable tool in structural genomics. Identification of protein samples that are amenable to structure determination by NMR spectroscopy requires efficient screening. Here, we describe how we prepare multiple samples in parallel and screen by NMR. The method described here is applicable to large structural genomics projects but can easily be scaled down for application to small structural biology projects since all the equipments used are those commonly found in any NMR structural biology laboratory. PMID:24590717

  5. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  6. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  7. Optimization of amino acid type-specific 13C and 15N labeling for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins by solution- and solid-state NMR with the UPLABEL algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hefke, Frederik; Bagaria, Anurag; Reckel, Sina; Ullrich, Sandra Johanna; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens; Güntert, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational method for finding optimal labeling patterns for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins and other large proteins that cannot be assigned by conventional strategies. Following the approach of Kainosho and Tsuji (Biochemistry 21:6273-6279 (1982)), types of amino acids are labeled with (13)C or/and (15)N such that cross peaks between (13)CO(i - 1) and (15)NH(i) result only for pairs of sequentially adjacent amino acids of which the first is labeled with (13)C and the second with (15)N. In this way, unambiguous sequence-specific assignments can be obtained for unique pairs of amino acids that occur exactly once in the sequence of the protein. To be practical, it is crucial to limit the number of differently labeled protein samples that have to be prepared while obtaining an optimal extent of labeled unique amino acid pairs. Our computer algorithm UPLABEL for optimal unique pair labeling, implemented in the program CYANA and in a standalone program, and also available through a web portal, uses combinatorial optimization to find for a given amino acid sequence labeling patterns that maximize the number of unique pair assignments with a minimal number of differently labeled protein samples. Various auxiliary conditions, including labeled amino acid availability and price, previously known partial assignments, and sequence regions of particular interest can be taken into account when determining optimal amino acid type-specific labeling patterns. The method is illustrated for the assignment of the human G-protein coupled receptor bradykinin B2 (B(2)R) and applied as a starting point for the backbone assignment of the membrane protein proteorhodopsin. PMID:21170670

  8. High-field, hyperpolarized Xe-129 NMR: Preparation and transfer of pure spin-polarized xenon gas to the sample.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Sachs, D. B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Lisitza, N. V.; Happer, W.

    2003-03-01

    Hyperpolarized ^129Xe has already found extensive applications in magnetic resonance imaging(M. S. Albert et al., Nature 370, 199 (1994)) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy(J. P. Mugler, et al., Magn. Reson. Med. 37, 809 (1997)). Using hyperpolarized xenon in high-field NMR spectroscopy opens up new prospects for medical diagnostics of many pathologies and disorders(R. K. Mazitov, et al., Doklady Biophysics 364-366, 28-31 (1999)). Here we present a new set-up for production(N. N. Kuzma, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 147602 (2002)), delivery, and temporary storage of pure hyperpolarized xenon gas for high-field (9.4T) NMR spectroscopy, with an emphasis on in-situ monitoring of ^129Xe polarization along the gas flow path and using a 1.1 T permanent magnet for cryogenic separation of hyperpolarized xenon from the buffer gases.

  9. Moving NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Danieli, Ernesto; Gong, Qingxia; Greferath, Marcus; Haber, Agnes; Kolz, Jürgen; Perlo, Juan

    2008-12-01

    Initiated by the use of NMR for well logging, portable NMR instruments are being developed for a variety of novel applications in materials testing and process analysis and control. Open sensors enable non-destructive testing of large objects, and small, cup-size magnets become available for high throughput analysis by NMR relaxation and spectroscopy. Some recent developments of mobile NMR are reviewed which delineate the direction into which portable NMR is moving.

  10. Large-Scale Multiplexed Quantitative Discovery Proteomics Enabled by the Use of an 18O-Labeled “Universal” Reference Sample

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative comparison of protein abundances across a large number of biological or patient samples represents an important proteomics challenge that needs to be addressed for proteomics discovery applications. Herein, we describe a strategy that incorporates a stable isotope 18O-labeled ″universal″ reference sample as a comprehensive set of internal standards for analyzing large sample sets quantitatively. As a pooled sample, the 18O-labeled ″universal″ reference sample is spiked into each individually processed unlabeled biological sample and the peptide/protein abundances are quantified based on 16O/18O isotopic peptide pair abundance ratios that compare each unlabeled sample to the identical reference sample. This approach also allows for the direct application of label-free quantitation across the sample set simultaneously along with the labeling-approach (i.e., dual-quantitation) since each biological sample is unlabeled except for the labeled reference sample that is used as internal standards. The effectiveness of this approach for large-scale quantitative proteomics is demonstrated by its application to a set of 18 plasma samples from severe burn patients. When immunoaffinity depletion and cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation with high resolution LC-MS measurements were combined, a total of 312 plasma proteins were confidently identified and quantified with a minimum of two unique peptides per protein. The isotope labeling data was directly compared with the label-free 16O-MS intensity data extracted from the same data sets. The results showed that the 18O reference-based labeling approach had significantly better quantitative precision compared to the label-free approach. The relative abundance differences determined by the two approaches also displayed strong correlation, illustrating the complementary nature of the two quantitative methods. The simplicity of including the 18O-reference for accurate quantitation makes this

  11. Strategy for NMR metabolomic analysis of urine in mouse models of obesity--from sample collection to interpretation of acquired data.

    PubMed

    Pelantová, Helena; Bugáňová, Martina; Anýž, Jiří; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka; Novák, Daniel; Haluzík, Martin; Kuzma, Marek

    2015-11-10

    The mouse model of monosodium glutamate induced obesity was used to examine and consequently optimize the strategy for analysis of urine samples by NMR spectroscopy. A set of nineteen easily detectable metabolites typical in obesity-related studies was selected. The impact of urine collection protocol, choice of (1)H NMR pulse sequence, and finally the impact of the normalization method on the detected concentration of selected metabolites were investigated. We demonstrated the crucial effect of food intake and diurnal rhythms resulting in the choice of a 24-hour fasting collection protocol as the most convenient for tracking obesity-induced increased sensitivity to fasting. It was shown that the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment is a better alternative to one-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (1D-NOESY) for NMR analysis of mouse urine due to its ability to filter undesirable signals of proteins naturally present in rodent urine. Normalization to total spectral area provided comparable outcomes as did normalization to creatinine or probabilistic quotient normalization in the CPMG-based model. The optimized approach was found to be beneficial mainly for low abundant metabolites rarely monitored due to their overlap by strong protein signals. PMID:26263053

  12. Slow Magic Angle Sample Spinning: A Non- or Minimally Invasive Method for High- Resolution 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Metabolic Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.

    2011-05-01

    High resolution 1H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using a sample spinning rate of several kHz or more (i.e., high resolution-magic angle spinning (hr-MAS)), is a well established method for metabolic profiling in intact tissues without the need for sample extraction. The only shortcoming with hr-MAS is that it is invasive and is thus unusable for non-destructive detections. Recently, a method called slow-MAS, using the concept of two dimensional NMR spectroscopy, has emerged as an alternative method for non- or minimal invasive metabolomics in intact tissues, including live animals, due to the slow or ultra-slow-sample spinning used. Although slow-MAS is a powerful method, its applications are hindered by experimental challenges. Correctly designing the experiment and choosing the appropriate slow-MAS method both require a fundamental understanding of the operation principles, in particular the details of line narrowing due to the presence of molecular diffusion. However, these fundamental principles have not yet been fully disclosed in previous publications. The goal of this chapter is to provide an in depth evaluation of the principles associated with slow-MAS techniques by emphasizing the challenges associated with a phantom sample consisting of glass beads and H2O, where an unusually large magnetic susceptibility field gradient is obtained.

  13. Prediction Errors in Learning Drug Response from Gene Expression Data – Influence of Labeling, Sample Size, and Machine Learning Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Immanuel; Groth, Philip; Schneckener, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Model-based prediction is dependent on many choices ranging from the sample collection and prediction endpoint to the choice of algorithm and its parameters. Here we studied the effects of such choices, exemplified by predicting sensitivity (as IC50) of cancer cell lines towards a variety of compounds. For this, we used three independent sample collections and applied several machine learning algorithms for predicting a variety of endpoints for drug response. We compared all possible models for combinations of sample collections, algorithm, drug, and labeling to an identically generated null model. The predictability of treatment effects varies among compounds, i.e. response could be predicted for some but not for all. The choice of sample collection plays a major role towards lowering the prediction error, as does sample size. However, we found that no algorithm was able to consistently outperform the other and there was no significant difference between regression and two- or three class predictors in this experimental setting. These results indicate that response-modeling projects should direct efforts mainly towards sample collection and data quality, rather than method adjustment. PMID:23894636

  14. A strip-shield improves the efficiency of a solenoid coil in probes for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin H.; Grant, Christopher V.; Cook, Gabriel A.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    A strip-shield inserted between a high inductance double-tuned solenoid coil and the glass tube containing the sample improves the efficiency of probes used for high-field solid-state NMR experiments on lossy aqueous samples of proteins and other biopolymers. A strip-shield is a coil liner consisting of thin copper strips layered on a PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) insulator. With lossy samples, the shift in tuning frequency is smaller, the reduction in Q, and RF-induced heating are all significantly reduced when the strip-shield is present. The performance of 800 MHz 1H/15N and 1H/13C double-resonance probes is demonstrated on aqueous samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:19559634

  15. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  16. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  17. The role of Al in C-S-H: NMR, XRD, and compositional results for precipitated samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.K.; Young, J. Francis; Kirkpatrick, R. James . E-mail: kirkpat@uiuc.edu

    2006-01-15

    X-ray diffraction, compositional analysis, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectroscopy of Al-substituted tobermorite-type C-S-H made by precipitation from solution provide significant new insight into the structural mechanisms of Al-substitution in this important and complicated phase. Al occurs in 4-, 5-, and 6-coordination (Al[4], Al[5], and Al[6]) and plays multiple structural roles. Al[4] occurs on the bridging tetrahedra of the drierkette Al-silicate chains, and Al[5] and Al[6] occur in the interlayer and perhaps on particle surfaces. Al does not enter either the central Ca-O sheet or the pairing tetrahedra of the tobermorite-type layers. Al[4] occurs on three types of bridging sites, Q{sup 3} sites that bridge across the interlayer; Q{sup 2} sites that are charge balanced by interlayer Ca{sup +2}, Na{sup +}, or H{sup +}; and Q{sup 2} sites that are most likely charge balanced by interlayer or surface Al[5] and Al[6] through Al[4]-O-Al[5,6] linkages. Although the data presented here are for relatively well-crystallized tobermorite-type C-S-H with C/S ratios {<=} 1.2, comparable spectral features for hydrated white cement pastes in previously published papers [M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Incorporation of aluminum in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) of hydrated Portland cements: a high-field {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR investigation Inorg. Chem. 42 (2003) 2280-2287; M.D. Andersen, H.J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, Characterization of white Portland cement hydration and the C-S-H structure in the presence of sodium aliminate by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res. 43 (2004) 857-868; M.D. Andersen, H. J. Jakobsen, J. Skibsted, A new aluminum-hydrate phase in hydrated Portland cements characterized by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, Cem. Concr. Res., submitted for publication.] indicate the presence of similar structural environments in the C-S-H of such pastes, and by implication OPC pastes.

  18. Relative, label-free protein quantitation: spectral counting error statistics from nine replicate MudPIT samples.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Bret; Feng, Jian; Garrett, Wesley M

    2010-09-01

    Nine replicate samples of peptides from soybean leaves, each spiked with a different concentration of bovine apotransferrin peptides, were analyzed on a mass spectrometer using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Proteins were detected from the peptide tandem mass spectra, and the numbers of spectra were statistically evaluated for variation between samples. The results corroborate prior knowledge that combining spectra from replicate samples increases the number of identifiable proteins and that a summed spectral count for a protein increases linearly with increasing molar amounts of protein. Furthermore, statistical analysis of spectral counts for proteins in two- and three-way comparisons between replicates and combined replicates revealed little significant variation arising from run-to-run differences or data-dependent instrument ion sampling that might falsely suggest differential protein accumulation. In these experiments, spectral counting was enabled by PANORAMICS, probability-based software that predicts proteins detected by sets of observed peptides. Three alternative approaches to counting spectra were also evaluated by comparison. As the counting thresholds were changed from weaker to more stringent, the accuracy of ratio determination also changed. These results suggest that thresholds for counting can be empirically set to improve relative quantitation. All together, the data confirm the accuracy and reliability of label-free spectral counting in the relative, quantitative analysis of proteins between samples. PMID:20541435

  19. Optimization of Plasma Sample Pretreatment for Quantitative Analysis Using iTRAQ Labeling and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun proteomic methods involving iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) peptide labeling facilitate quantitative analyses of proteomes and searches for useful biomarkers. However, the plasma proteome's complexity and the highly dynamic plasma protein concentration range limit the ability of conventional approaches to analyze and identify a large number of proteins, including useful biomarkers. The goal of this paper is to elucidate the best approach for plasma sample pretreatment for MS- and iTRAQ-based analyses. Here, we systematically compared four approaches, which include centrifugal ultrafiltration, SCX chromatography with fractionation, affinity depletion, and plasma without fractionation, to reduce plasma sample complexity. We generated an optimized protocol for quantitative protein analysis using iTRAQ reagents and an UltrafleXtreme (Bruker Daltonics) MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometer. Moreover, we used a simple, rapid, efficient, but inexpensive sample pretreatment technique that generated an optimal opportunity for biomarker discovery. We discuss the results from the four sample pretreatment approaches and conclude that SCX chromatography without affinity depletion is the best plasma sample preparation pretreatment method for proteome analysis. Using this technique, we identified 1,780 unique proteins, including 1,427 that were quantified by iTRAQ with high reproducibility and accuracy. PMID:24988083

  20. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory.

  1. Does the time of the sampling matter in 13C pulse labeling and chasing experiments? A case study on beech seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, Olga; Thoms, Ronny; Muhr, Jan; Karlowsky, Stefan; Keitel, Claudia; Kayler, Zachary; Calfapietra, Carlo; Gessler, Arthur; Brugnoli, Enrico; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    13C pulse labeling and chasing is a valuable and very popular tool for determination of the fate and turnover rates of C in plant-soil systems. Continuous isoflux measurements became an accessible reality allowing to cover completely the diurnal variation in label assimilation and respiration fluxes. Label turnover in multiple pools, especially of those located belowground, is more often assessed instead by isolated day-time samplings. By increasing the sampling frequency of belowground compartments we aimed to catch the short-term diurnal variations in label allocation and to link these processes with label dynamics in the aboveground biomass. For these purposes we labeled 3-m height soil-grown European beech seedlings with 13C enriched CO2 and traced the flow of 13C within belowground plant-soil continuum. Continuous soil isoflux measurements were accompanied by a 3-h-frequency sampling of root and soil material during the first 48 h, followed by a daily sampling in the successive 5 days. The amount of label found in microbial biomass depended partially on the amount of roots in the sample. Microbial biomass C (MBC) and microbial respiration showed very strong correlation, suggesting the possibility to use one as a proxy of the other. MBC enrichment showed a clear diurnal pattern with night-time and early morning peaks. These peaks were similar in shape and shifted by one sampling when compared to root sugars enrichment. Soil respiration showed instead a single bell-shape peak in 13C, likely due to a sequence of peaks of root and microbial origin. 13C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed less frequently through phospholipid fatty acid analyses (PLFA). The microorganisms were separated into two distinct groups by the time of the appearance of the label in the single PLFAs. The first group was characterized by a fast appearance of the label and higher enrichment and was composed of Gram negative bacteria and saprotrophic fungi likely living in

  2. 40 CFR 600.211-08 - Sample calculation of fuel economy values for labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample calculation of fuel economy... AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Procedures for Calculating Fuel...

  3. Carbonation of C–S–H and C–A–S–H samples studied by {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2015-05-15

    Synthesized calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) samples with Ca/Si ratios of 0.66, 1.0, and 1.5 have been exposed to atmospheric CO{sub 2} at room temperature and high relative humidity and studied after one to 12 weeks. {sup 29}Si NMR reveals that the decomposition of C–S–H caused by carbonation involves two steps and that the decomposition rate decreases with increasing Ca/Si ratio. The first step is a gradual decalcification of the C–S–H where calcium is removed from the interlayer and defect sites in the silicate chains until Ca/Si = 0.67 is reached, ideally corresponding to infinite silicate chains. In the seconds step, calcium from the principal layers is consumed, resulting in the final decomposition of the C–S–H and the formation of an amorphous silica phase composed of Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} silicate tetrahedra. The amount of solid carbonates and of carbonate ions in a hydrous environment increases with increasing Ca/Si ratio for the C–S–H, as shown by {sup 13}C NMR. For C–A–S–H samples with Ca/Si = 1.0 and 1.5, {sup 27}Al NMR demonstrates that all aluminium sites associated with the C–S–H are consumed during the carbonation reactions and incorporated mainly as tetrahedral Al(–OSi){sub 4} units in the amorphous silica phase. A small amount of penta-coordinated Al sites has also been identified in the silica phase.

  4. Efficient Blind Spectral Unmixing of Fluorescently Labeled Samples Using Multi-Layer Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    Zudaire, Isabel; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The ample variety of labeling dyes and staining methods available in fluorescence microscopy has enabled biologists to advance in the understanding of living organisms at cellular and molecular level. When two or more fluorescent dyes are used in the same preparation, or one dye is used in the presence of autofluorescence, the separation of the fluorescent emissions can become problematic. Various approaches have been recently proposed to solve this problem. Among them, blind non-negative matrix factorization is gaining interest since it requires little assumptions about the spectra and concentration of the fluorochromes. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for blind spectral separation that addresses some of the shortcomings of existing solutions: namely, their dependency on the initialization and their slow convergence. We apply this new algorithm to two relevant problems in fluorescence microscopy: autofluorescence elimination and spectral unmixing of multi-labeled samples. Our results show that our new algorithm performs well when compared with the state-of-the-art approaches for a much faster implementation. PMID:24260120

  5. Separation of high-resolution samples of overlapping latent fingerprints using relaxation labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kun; Schott, Maik; Schöne, Werner; Hildebrandt, Mario

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of latent fingerprint patterns generally requires clearly recognizable friction ridge patterns. Currently, overlapping latent fingerprints pose a major problem for traditional crime scene investigation. This is due to the fact that these fingerprints usually have very similar optical properties. Consequently, the distinction of two or more overlapping fingerprints from each other is not trivially possible. While it is possible to employ chemical imaging to separate overlapping fingerprints, the corresponding methods require sophisticated fingerprint acquisition methods and are not compatible with conventional forensic fingerprint data. A separation technique that is purely based on the local orientation of the ridge patterns of overlapping fingerprints is proposed by Chen et al. and quantitatively evaluated using off-the-shelf fingerprint matching software with mostly artificially composed overlapping fingerprint samples, which is motivated by the scarce availability of authentic test samples. The work described in this paper adapts the approach presented by Chen et al. for its application on authentic high resolution fingerprint samples acquired by a contactless measurement device based on a Chromatic White Light (CWL) sensor. An evaluation of the work is also given, with the analysis of all adapted parameters. Additionally, the separability requirement proposed by Chen et al. is also evaluated for practical feasibility. Our results show promising tendencies for the application of this approach on high-resolution data, yet the separability requirement still poses a further challenge.

  6. Characterization of proteins by in-cell NMR spectroscopy in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy is a unique tool for characterizing biological macromolecules in their physiological environment at atomic resolution. Recent progress in NMR instruments and sample preparation methods allows functional processes, such as metal uptake, disulfide-bond formation and protein folding, to be analyzed by NMR in living, cultured human cells. This protocol describes the necessary steps to overexpress one or more proteins of interest inside human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells, and it explains how to set up in-cell NMR experiments. The cDNA is transiently transfected as a complex with a cationic polymer (DNA:PEI (polyethylenimine)), and protein expression is carried on for 2-3 d, after which the NMR sample is prepared. (1)H and (1)H-(15)N correlation NMR experiments (for example, using band-selective optimized flip-angle short-transient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (SOFAST-HMQC)) can be carried out in <2 h, ensuring cell viability. Uniform (15)N labeling and amino-acid-specific (e.g., cysteine, methionine) labeling schemes are possible. The entire procedure takes 4 d from cell culture seeding to NMR data collection. PMID:27196722

  7. New Detection Modality for Label-Free Quantification of DNA in Biological Samples via Superparamagnetic Bead Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Daniel C.; Li, Jingyi; Strachan, Briony C.; Begley, Matthew R.; Finkler, David; Bazydlo, Lindsay L.; Barker, N. Scott; Haverstick, Doris; Utz, Marcel; Landers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Combining DNA and superparamagnetic beads in a rotating magnetic field produces multiparticle aggregates that are visually striking, and enables label-free optical detection and quantification of DNA at levels in the picogram per microliter range. DNA in biological samples can be quantified directly by simple analysis of optical images of microfluidic wells placed on a magnetic stirrer without DNA purification. Aggregation results from DNA/bead interactions driven either by the presence of a chaotrope (a nonspecific trigger for aggregation) or by hybridization with oligonucleotides on functionalized beads (sequence-specific). This paper demonstrates quantification of DNA with sensitivity comparable to that of the best currently available fluorometric assays. The robustness and sensitivity of the method enable a wide range of applications, illustrated here by counting eukaryotic cells. Using widely available and inexpensive benchtop hardware, the approach provides a highly accessible low-tech microscale alternative to more expensive DNA detection and cell counting techniques. PMID:22423674

  8. Label-free imaging of fatty acid content within yeast samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, N.; Moger, J.

    2013-02-01

    Fungi have been found to be an underlying cause of 70% of all plant and animal extinctions caused by infectious diseases. Fungal infections are a growing problem affecting global health, food production and ecosystems. Lipid metabolism is a promising target for antifungal drugs and since effective treatment of fungal infections requires a better understanding of the effects of antifungal agents at the cellular level, new techniques are needed to investigate this problem. Recent advances in nonlinear microscopy allow chemically-specific contrast to be obtained non-invasively from intrinsic chemical bonds within live samples using advanced spectroscopy techniques probing Raman-active resonances. We present preliminary data using Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy as a means to visualise lipid droplets within individual living fungi by probing Raman resonances of the CH stretching region between 2825cm-1 and 3030cm-1.

  9. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Mustafa, S.; Che Man, Y. B.; Yusop, M. H. M.; Bari, M. F.; Islam, Kh N.; Hasan, M. F.

    2011-05-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml - 1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  10. NMR relaxation of neritic carbonates: An integrated petrophysical and petrographical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Benoit; Fleury, Marc; Santerre, Yannick; Brigaud, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    A set of carbonate outcrop samples, covering a wide range of the sedimentary textures and depositional environments existing on carbonate systems, was studied through an integrated petrographical and petrophysical approach. With the aim of improving the understanding of the NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signal of carbonates, this work is: 1) providing an atlas for various carbonate reservoir rock-types, 2) providing a workflow for integrating geological and petrophysical data and, 3) documenting common shortfalls in NMR/MICP analyses in carbonates. The petrographical investigation includes thin section and SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) observations, whereas petrophysical investigation includes porosity (Φ), permeability (K), NMR, MICP (Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure), and specific surface area (BET) measurements. On the basis of NMR and MICP data, 4 groups of samples were identified: (1) microporous samples, (2) micro-mesoporous samples, (3) wide multimodal samples, and (4) atypical samples. The microporous samples allow us to define a maximum NMR threshold for microporosity at a T 2 of 200 ms. NMR and MICP response of the investigated carbonates are often comparable in terms of modal distribution (microporous, micro-mesoporous and wide multimodal samples). In particular, micritization, a well known but underestimated early diagenetic process, tends to homogenize the NMR signal of primarily different sedimentary facies. A grainstone with heavily micritized grains can display well sorted unimodal NMR and MICP signatures very similar, even identical, to a mudstone-wackestone. Their signatures are comparable to that of a simple sphere packing model. On the contrary, several samples (labeled atypical samples) show a discrepancy between NMR and MICP response. This discrepancy is explained by the fact that MICP can be affected by the physical connectivity of the pore network, in case of disseminated and isolated molds in a micrite matrix for instance