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Sample records for labeled single-stranded dna

  1. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  2. Electrochemiluminescent DNA sensing using carbon nitride nanosheets as emitter for loading of hemin labeled single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaqiang; Wang, Quanbo; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-11-15

    Carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) have been reported as a cathodic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) emitter in the presence of dissolved oxygen to produce an endogenous coreactant H2O2 on electrode surface. This work uses this emitter to construct an ECL sensing platform for sensitive DNA detection through its adsorption ability toward single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The adsorption of hemin-labeled ssDNA on CNNS leads to in situ consumption of dissolved oxygen via hemin-mediated electrocatalytic reduction, thus decreases the formation of coreactant and quenches the ECL emission of CNNS. The ECL sensing platform is designed using hemin-labeled ssDNA to recognize the target DNA, which results in the departure of hemin-labeled hybridization product from the CNNS modified electrode, thus inhibits the annihilation of coreactant and recovers the ECL emission. Under optimized conditions, the proposed sensing strategy shows a wide detection range over 6 orders of magnitude and wondrously high sensitivity with a detection limit down to 2.0 fM. Moreover, the ECL sensor exhibits good performance with excellent selectivity, high reliability, and acceptable fabrication reproducibility. The sensitive sensing strategy provides a new paradigm for the design of ultrasensitive detection method. PMID:26042872

  3. Solvent-modified ultrafast decay dynamics in conjugated polymer/dye labeled single stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Inhong; Kang, Mijeong; Woo, Han Young; Oh, Jin-Woo; Kyhm, Kwangseuk

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated that organic solvent (DMSO, dimethyl sulfoxide) modifies energy transfer efficiency between conjugated polymers (donors) and fluorescein-labeled single stranded DNAs (acceptors). In a mixture of buffer and organic solvent, fluorescence of the acceptors is significantly enhanced compared to that of pure water solution. This result can be attributed to change of the donor-acceptor environment such as decreased hydrophobicity of polymers, screening effect of organic solvent molecules, resulting in an enhanced energy transfer efficiency. Time-resolved fluorescence decay of the donors and the acceptors was modelled by considering the competition between the energy harvesting Foerster resonance energy transfer and the energy-wasting quenching. This enables to quantity that the Foerster distance (R0 = 43.3 Å) and resonance energy transfer efficiency (EFRET = 58.7 %) of pure buffer solution become R0 = 38.6 Å and EFRET = 48.0 % when 80% DMSO/buffer mixture is added.

  4. Single strand DNA functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes as sensitive electrochemical labels for arsenite detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Yiqiang; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a simple and sensitive electrochemical strategy for arsenite detection based on the ability of arsenite bound to single-strand DNA (ssDNA) and the signal transduction of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is developed. To realize this purpose, the ssDNA/SWCNTs complexes were formed at first by making ssDNA wrapped around SWCNTs via π-stacking. In the presence of arsenite, the arsenite could strongly bind with the G/T bases of ssDNA and decrease the π-π interaction between ssDNA and SWCNTs, resulting in a certain amount of ssDNA dissociating from the complexes. The separated SWCNTs were selectively assembled on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) modified Au electrode. Then the SWCNTs onto the SAM-modified Au electrode substantially restored heterogeneous electron transfer that was almost totally blocked by the SAM. The assembled SWCNTs could generate a considerably sensitive and specific tactic for signal transduction, which was related to the concentration of the arsenite. Through detecting the currents mediated by SWCNTs, a linear response to concentration of arsenite ranging from 0.5 to 10ppb and a detection limit of 0.5ppb was readily achieved with desirable specificity and sensitivity. Such a SWCNTs-based biosensor creates a simple, sensitive, nonradioactive route for detection of arsenite. In addition, this demonstration provides a new approach to fabrication of stable biosensors with favorable electrochemical properties believed to be appealing to electroanalytical applications. PMID:25966391

  5. DNA sequencing by a single molecule detection of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a single strand of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Wilkerson, C.W.; Hammond, M.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Jett, J.H.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A. ); Haces, A.; Shih, P.J.; Harding, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    We are developing a laser-based technique for the rapid sequencing of large DNA fragments (several kb in size) at a rate of 100 to 1000 bases per second. Our approach relies on fluorescent labeling of the bases in a single fragment of DNA, attachment of this labeled DNA fragment to a support, movement of the supported DNA into a flowing sample stream, sequential cleavage of the end nucleotide from the DNA fragment with an exonuclease, and detection of the individual fluorescently labeled bases by laser-induced fluorescence.

  6. DNA sequencing by a single molecule detection of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a single strand of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Wilkerson, C.W.; Hammond, M.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Jett, J.H.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A.; Haces, A.; Shih, P.J.; Harding, J.D.

    1993-02-01

    We are developing a laser-based technique for the rapid sequencing of large DNA fragments (several kb in size) at a rate of 100 to 1000 bases per second. Our approach relies on fluorescent labeling of the bases in a single fragment of DNA, attachment of this labeled DNA fragment to a support, movement of the supported DNA into a flowing sample stream, sequential cleavage of the end nucleotide from the DNA fragment with an exonuclease, and detection of the individual fluorescently labeled bases by laser-induced fluorescence.

  7. 18F-labeled Single-Stranded DNA Aptamer for PET Imaging of Protein Tyrosine Kinase-7 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhe; Yang, Xiangyu; Dewhurst, Andrew; Ma, Ying; Zhu, Guizhi; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7), a member of receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily initially identified as colon carcinoma kinase-4 (CCK-4), is highly expressed in various human malignancies. Its expression was found to correlate with aggressive biological behaviors such as increased cell proliferation, invasiveness and migration. Despite the importance and unmet need of imaging PTK7 in vivo, there is currently no clinically-relevant method to visualize tumoral PTK7 expression noninvasively such as PET or SPECT. This study aims to develop a specific, selective and high affinity PET radioligand based on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer to address this challenge. Methods Sgc8, a 41-oligonucleotide that targets to PTK7, was labeled with F-18 using a two-step radiochemical synthesis, which featured a direct one-step radiofluorination on the distinctive spirocyclic hypervalent iodine(III) precursor to give 18F-fluorobenzyl azide followed by copper mediated “click” conjugation with Sgc8-alkyne. 18F-Sgc8 was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in two cell lines, HCT116 and U87MG, which express high and low amounts of PTK7, respectively. Results Sgc8 was labeled efficiently with F-18 in an isolated radiochemical yield of 62 ± 2%, non-decay-corrected (ndc) based on 18F-fluorobenzyl azide. 18F-Tr-Sgc8 was found to possess high affinity binding to both cell lines, with IC50 values for HCT116 as 2.7 ± 0.6 nM and U87MG as 16.9 ± 2.1 nM. In vivo PET imaging clearly visualized PTK7 expression in HCT116 xenografted mice with tumor uptake of 0.76 ± 0.09 %ID/g at 30 min post-injection (p.i.) for the subcutaneous tumor model and greater than 1.5 %ID/g for the liver metastasis model. U87MG xenograft tumors had much lower tracer accumulation (0.13 ± 0.06 %ID/g at 30 min p.i.), which was consistent with the lower expression of PTK7 in this tumor model. The labeled aptamer was rapidly cleared from the blood through the kidneys and bladder to give high tumor-to-blood and tumor

  8. Label-Free and Separation-Free Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry-Based Bioassay: Sensitive Determination of Single-Strand DNA, Protein, and Double-Strand DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Piaopiao; Wu, Peng; Chen, Junbo; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Xinfeng; Zheng, Chengbin; Hou, Xiandeng

    2016-02-16

    Based on selective and sensitive determination of Hg(2+) released from mercury complex by cold vapor generation (CVG) atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) using SnCl2 as a reductant, a novel label-free and separation-free strategy was proposed for DNA and protein bioassay. To construct the DNA bioassay platform, an Hg(2+)-mediated molecular beacon (hairpin) without labeling but possessing several thymine (T) bases at both ends was employed as the probe. It is well-known that Hg(2+) could trigger the formation of the hairpin structure through T-Hg(2+)-T connection. In the presence of a specific target, the hairpin structure could be broken and the captured Hg(2+) was released. Interestingly, it was found that SnCl2 could selectively reduce only free Hg(2+) to Hg(0) vapor in the presence of T-Hg(2+)-T complex, which could be separated from sample matrices for sensitive AFS detection. Three different types of analyte, namely, single-strand DNA (ssDNA), protein, and double-strand DNA (dsDNA), were investigated as the target analytes. Under the optimized conditions, this bioassay provided high sensitivity for ssDNA, protein, and dsDNA determination with the limits of detection as low as 0.2, 0.08, and 0.3 nM and the linear dynamic ranges of 10-150, 5-175, and 1-250 nM, respectively. The analytical performance for these analytes compares favorably with those by previously reported methods, demonstrating the potential usefulness and versatility of this new AFS-based bioassay. Moreover, the bioassay retains advantages of simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and sensitivity compared to most of the conventional methods. PMID:26781421

  9. Label-Free and Sensitive Fluorescent Detection of Sequence-Specific Single-Strand DNA Based on S1 Nuclease Cleavage Effects

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zheng; Liu, Jinchuan; Bai, Wenhui; Lv, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Xiaoling; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang; Lv, Guiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect sequence-specific single-strand DNA (ssDNA) in complex, contaminant-ridden samples, using a fluorescent method directly without a DNA extraction and PCR step could simplify the detection of pathogens in the field and in the clinic. Here, we have demonstrated a simple label-free sensing strategy to detect ssDNA by employing its complementary ssDNA, S1 nuclease and nucleic acid fluorescent dyes. Upon clearing away redundant complementary ssDNA and possibly mismatched double strand DNA by using S1 nuclease, the fluorescent signal-to-noise ratio could be increased dramatically. It enabled the method to be adaptable to three different types of DNA fluorescent dyes and the ability to detect target ssDNA in complex, multicomponent samples, like tissue homogenate. The method can distinguish a two-base mismatch from avian influenza A (H1N1) virus. Also, it can detect the appearance of 50 pM target ssDNA in 0.5 µg·mL−1 Lambda DNA, and 50 nM target ssDNA in 5 µg·mL−1 Lambda DNA or in tissue homogenate. It is facile and cost-effective, and could be easily extended to detect other ssDNA with many common nucleic acid fluorescent dyes. PMID:25285445

  10. Label-free and sensitive fluorescent detection of sequence-specific single-strand DNA based on S1 nuclease cleavage effects.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng; Liu, Jinchuan; Bai, Wenhui; Lv, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Xiaoling; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang; Lv, Guiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect sequence-specific single-strand DNA (ssDNA) in complex, contaminant-ridden samples, using a fluorescent method directly without a DNA extraction and PCR step could simplify the detection of pathogens in the field and in the clinic. Here, we have demonstrated a simple label-free sensing strategy to detect ssDNA by employing its complementary ssDNA, S1 nuclease and nucleic acid fluorescent dyes. Upon clearing away redundant complementary ssDNA and possibly mismatched double strand DNA by using S1 nuclease, the fluorescent signal-to-noise ratio could be increased dramatically. It enabled the method to be adaptable to three different types of DNA fluorescent dyes and the ability to detect target ssDNA in complex, multicomponent samples, like tissue homogenate. The method can distinguish a two-base mismatch from avian influenza A (H1N1) virus. Also, it can detect the appearance of 50 pM target ssDNA in 0.5 µg · mL(-1) Lambda DNA, and 50 nM target ssDNA in 5 µg · mL(-1) Lambda DNA or in tissue homogenate. It is facile and cost-effective, and could be easily extended to detect other ssDNA with many common nucleic acid fluorescent dyes. PMID:25285445

  11. Recombination in Eukaryotic Single Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Darren P.; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution. PMID:21994803

  12. Isolating single stranded DNA using a microfluidic dialysis device

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Yixiao

    2013-01-01

    Isolating a particular strand of DNA from a double stranded DNA duplex is an important step in aptamer generation as well as many other biotechnology applications. Here we describe a microfluidic, flow-through, dialysis device for isolating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) from double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The device consists of two channels fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) separated by a track etched polycarbonate membrane (800 nm pore size). To isolate ssDNA, dual-biotin labelled dsDNA was immobilized onto streptavidin-coated polystyrene beads. Alkaline treatment was used to denature dsDNA, releasing the non-biotinylated ssDNA. In the flow-through dialysis device the liberated ssDNA was able to cross the membrane and was collected in an outlet channel. The complementary sequence bound to the bead was unable to cross the membrane and was directed to a waste channel. The effect of NaOH concentration and flow rate on purity and yield were compared. >95% ssDNA purity was achieved at 25mM NaOH. However, lower flow rates were necessary to achieve ssDNA yields approaching the 50% theoretical maximum of the concurrent-flow device. Under optimized conditions the microfluidic isolation achieved even higher purity ssDNA than analogous manual procedures. PMID:24213273

  13. Fast micromethod DNA single-strand-break assay.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Heinz C; Batel, Renato; Schwertner, Heiko; Boreiko, Oleksandra; Müller, Werner E G

    2006-01-01

    The Fast Micromethod is a convenient and quick fluorimetric microplate assay for the assessment of DNA single-strand breaks and their repair. This method measures the rate of unwinding of cellular DNA on exposure to alkaline conditions using a fluorescent dye which preferentially binds to double-stranded DNA, but not to single-stranded DNA or protein. The advantages of this method are that it requires only minute amounts of material (30 ng of DNA or about 3000 cells per single well), it allows simultaneous measurements of multiple samples, and it can be performed within 3 h or less (for one 96-well microplate). The Fast Micromethod can be used for the routine determination of DNA damage in cells and tissue samples after irradiation, exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic agents, or chemotherapy. PMID:16673889

  14. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. Probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations.

  15. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1991-07-02

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. The probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations. No Drawings

  16. Isolation of single stranded DNA related to the transcriptional activity of animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tapiero, H; Leibowitch, S A; Shaool, D; Monier, M N; Harel, J

    1976-01-01

    Single stranded DNA (s.s.DNA) comprising 1-2% of the total nuclear DNA was isolated by an improved method of hydroxyapatite chromatography from native nuclear DNA3 of embryonic chick cells, labeled for several cell generations with 3H-thymidine. Small quantities of 3H-DNA were annealed with a large excess of unlabeled DNA or polysomal RNA from chick embryos. Hybridization kinetics (monitored by the use of SI nuclease digestion, hydroxyapatite chromatography and thermalfusion), indicated that s.s.DNA belongs to the non repetitious fraction of the cell genome. One third represents DNA sequences engaged in the transcription of messenger RNA's. PMID:944919

  17. Visualizing recombination intermediates with single-stranded DNA curtains.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi; Greene, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a critical cellular process for repairing double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) - a toxic type of DNA lesion that can result in chromosomal rearrangements and cancer. During the early stages of HR, members from the Rad51/RecA family of recombinases assemble into long filaments on the single-stranded DNA overhangs that are present at processed DSBs. These nucleoprotein filaments are referred to as presynaptic complexes, and these presynaptic complexes must align and pair homologous DNA sequences during HR. Traditional ensemble methods cannot easily access the transient and often heterogeneous intermediates that are typical of DNA recombination reactions, and as a consequence, there remain many open questions with respect to the molecular details of this pathway. Novel single-molecule approaches that are capable of directly visualizing reaction intermediates in solution and in real time offer the potential for new insights into the mechanism of homologous DNA recombination. Here we highlight recently developed single stranded DNA curtain methods for studying the properties of individual Rad51 presynaptic complexes and other related recombination intermediates at the single-molecule level. PMID:27038747

  18. Diffusion of human Replication Protein A along single stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Sokoloski, Joshua; Galletto, Roberto; Elson, Elliot L.; Wold, Marc S.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is a eukaryotic single stranded (ss) DNA binding protein that plays critical roles in most aspects of genome maintenance, including replication, recombination and repair. RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, destabilizes DNA secondary structure and facilitates binding of other proteins to ssDNA. However, RPA must be removed from or redistributed along ssDNA during these processes. To probe the dynamics of RPA-DNA interactions, we combined ensemble and single molecule fluorescence approaches to examine human RPA diffusion along ssDNA and find that an hRPA hetero-trimer can diffuse rapidly along ssDNA. Diffusion of hRPA is functional in that it provides the mechanism by which hRPA can transiently disrupt DNA hairpins by diffusing in from ssDNA regions adjacent to the DNA hairpin. hRPA diffusion was also monitored by the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity of a Cy3 fluorophore attached to the end of ssDNA. Using a novel method to calibrate the Cy3 fluorescence intensity as a function of hRPA position on the ssDNA, we estimate a one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of hRPA on ssDNA of D1 ~5000 nucleotide2s−1 at 37°C. Diffusion of hRPA while bound to ssDNA enables it to be readily repositioned to allow other proteins access to ssDNA. PMID:25058683

  19. Dynamics of single-stranded DNA tethered to a solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiom, Milad; Paul, Mark R.; Ducker, William A.

    2016-06-01

    Tethering is used to deliver specific biological and industrial functions. For example, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is tethered to polymerases and long sequences of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during replication, and to solids in DNA microarrays. However, tethering ssDNA to a large object limits not only the available ssDNA conformations, but also the range of time-scales over which the mechanical responses of ssDNA are important. In this work we examine the effect of tethering by measurement of the mechanical response of ssDNA that is tethered at each end to two separate atomic force microscope cantilevers in aqueous solution. Thermal motion of the cantilevers drives the ends of the ssDNA chain at frequencies near 2 kHz. The presence of a tethered molecule makes a large difference to the asymmetric cross-correlation of two cantilevers, which enables resolution of the mechanical properties in our experiments. By analysis of the correlated motion of the cantilevers we extract the friction and stiffness of the ssDNA. We find that the measured friction is much larger than the friction that is usually associated with the unencumbered motion of ssDNA. We also find that the measured relaxation time, ∼30 μs, is much greater than prior measurements of the free-molecule relaxation time. We attribute the difference to the loss of conformational possibilities as a result of constraining the ends of the ssDNA.

  20. Dynamics of single-stranded DNA tethered to a solid.

    PubMed

    Radiom, Milad; Paul, Mark R; Ducker, William A

    2016-06-24

    Tethering is used to deliver specific biological and industrial functions. For example, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is tethered to polymerases and long sequences of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during replication, and to solids in DNA microarrays. However, tethering ssDNA to a large object limits not only the available ssDNA conformations, but also the range of time-scales over which the mechanical responses of ssDNA are important. In this work we examine the effect of tethering by measurement of the mechanical response of ssDNA that is tethered at each end to two separate atomic force microscope cantilevers in aqueous solution. Thermal motion of the cantilevers drives the ends of the ssDNA chain at frequencies near 2 kHz. The presence of a tethered molecule makes a large difference to the asymmetric cross-correlation of two cantilevers, which enables resolution of the mechanical properties in our experiments. By analysis of the correlated motion of the cantilevers we extract the friction and stiffness of the ssDNA. We find that the measured friction is much larger than the friction that is usually associated with the unencumbered motion of ssDNA. We also find that the measured relaxation time, ∼30 μs, is much greater than prior measurements of the free-molecule relaxation time. We attribute the difference to the loss of conformational possibilities as a result of constraining the ends of the ssDNA. PMID:27176643

  1. Two classes of single-stranded regions evident in deproteinized preparations of replicating DNA isolated from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B.W.; Kavallaris, M.; Catchpoole, D.; Norris, M.D. )

    1991-02-01

    In DNA isolated from proliferating human lymphoblastoid CCRF-CEM cells which had been pulse-labeled by exposure to (3H)thymidine for periods from 30 s to 10 min, single-stranded regions were analyzed by caffeine-gradient elution from benzoylated DEAE-cellulose. Two classes of structural defect were evident. Some replicating DNA exhibited single-stranded regions of approximately 200 nucleotides, while most newly incorporated radioactivity was associated with DNA containing single-stranded regions from 900 to approximately 4000 nucleotides. The distribution of thymidine-derived radioactivity did not suggest sequential or preferential labeling of these DNA fractions as the incorporation time was varied. The findings may be correlated with recent proposals regarding the structural basis of eukaryotic DNA replication.

  2. Single-Stranded Tile Stoppers for Interlocked DNA Architectures.

    PubMed

    Valero, Julián; Lohmann, Finn; Keppner, Daniel; Famulok, Michael

    2016-06-16

    Interlocked DNA architectures are useful for DNA nanotechnology because of their mechanically bonded components, which can move relative to one another without disassembling. We describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of novel single-stranded tile (SST) stoppers for the assembly of interlocked DNA architectures. SST stoppers are shown to self-assemble into a square-shaped rigid structure upon mixing 97 oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) strands. The structures are equipped with a sticky end that is designed for hybridization with the sticky ends of a dsDNA axle of a DNA rotaxane. Because the diameter of the macrocycle threaded onto the axle is 14 nm, the dimension of the square-shaped stopper was designed to be bulky enough to prevent the dethreading of the macrocycle. An asymmetric rotaxane with a SST- and a ring-shaped stopper featuring two stations for hybridization of the macrocycle to the axle was assembled. The macrocycle can be directed towards one or the other station upon triggering with fuel ODNs. PMID:26972112

  3. Improved single-strand DNA sizing accuracy in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, B B; Oaks, F; Menchen, S; Johnson, B

    1997-01-01

    Interpolation algorithms can be developed to size unknown single-stranded (ss) DNA fragments based on their electrophoretic mobilities, when they are compared with the mobilities of standard fragments of known sizes; however, sequence-specific anomalous electrophoretic migration can affect the accuracy and precision of the called sizes of the fragments. We used the anomalous migration of ssDNA fragments to optimize denaturation conditions for capillary electrophoresis. The capillary electrophoretic system uses a refillable polymer that both coats the capillary wall to suppress electro-osmotic flow and acts as the sieving matrix. The addition of 8 M urea to the polymer solution, as in slab gel electrophoresis, is insufficient to fully denature some anomalously migrating ssDNA fragments in this capillary electrophoresis system. The sizing accuracy of these fragments is significantly improved by the addition of 2-pyrrolidinone, or increased capillary temperature (60 degrees C). the effect of these two denaturing strategies is additive, and the best accuracy and precision in sizing results are obtained with a combination of chemical and thermal denaturation. PMID:9380518

  4. Measurement of mRNA by solution hybridization with /sup 32/P-labelled single stranded cRNA probe (SP6 test). Comparison with a /sup 32/P-labelled single stranded cDNA as hybridization probe (S1 test) for measurement of AVP mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, G.; Haenze, J.L.; Lehmann, E.; Lang, R.E.; Burbach, J.H.; Ganten, D.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactively labelled cRNA for the rat AVP gene exon C was synthetized from a pSP64-vector and used for solution hybridization measurement of AVP mRNA (SP6 test). For comparison hybridization was carried out with a gel-purified radioactively labelled cDNA probe synthetized by primer extension of AVP gene exon C cloned into an M13mp9 phage vector DNA (S1 test). Both tests had a comparable sensitivity of up to 0.2 pg AVP mRNA. Under optimal hybridization conditions kinetics were similar in both tests. The fast and easy preparation of large amounts of labelled cDNA probe and simple determination of absolute amounts of mRNA by saturation kinetics without need of a mRNA standard makes the SP6 test an attractive alternative to the known S1 test. The SP6 test should be applicable for a wide variety of genes.

  5. Purification and characterization of a mitochondrial, single-stranded-DNA-binding protein from Paracentrotus lividus eggs.

    PubMed

    Roberti, M; Musicco, C; Loguercio Polosa, P; Gadaleta, M N; Quagliariello, E; Cantatore, P

    1997-07-01

    A binding protein for single-stranded DNA was purified from Paracentrotus lividus egg mitochondria to near homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel and single-stranded-DNA-cellulose. The protein consists of a single polypeptide of about 15 kDa. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis suggested that P. lividus mitochondrial single-stranded-DNA-binding protein exists as a homo-oligomer, possibly a tetramer, in solution. The protein shows a stronger preference for poly(dT) with respect to single-stranded M13, poly(dI) and poly(dC). Binding to poly(dA) takes place with much lower affinity. The binding-site size, determined by gel mobility-shift experiments with oligonucleotides of different length, is approximately 45 nucleotides. The binding to single-stranded DNA occurs with low or no cooperativity and is not influenced by ionic strength. The protein has a very high affinity for the DNA: its apparent macroscopic association constant is 2x10(9) M(-1), a value which is the highest among the mitochondrial single-stranded-DNA-binding proteins characterized to date. The lack of cooperativity and the high association constant represent distinctive features of this protein and might be related to the peculiar mechanism of sea urchin mitochondrial DNA replication. PMID:9249008

  6. Efficient Production of Single-Stranded Phage DNA as Scaffolds for DNA Origami

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami enables the fabrication of a variety of complex nanostructures that promise utility in diverse fields of application, ranging from biosensing over advanced therapeutics to metamaterials. The broad applicability of DNA origami as a material beyond the level of proof-of-concept studies critically depends, among other factors, on the availability of large amounts of pure single-stranded scaffold DNA. Here, we present a method for the efficient production of M13 bacteriophage-derived genomic DNA using high-cell-density fermentation of Escherichia coli in stirred-tank bioreactors. We achieve phage titers of up to 1.6 × 1014 plaque-forming units per mL. Downstream processing yields up to 410 mg of high-quality single-stranded DNA per one liter reaction volume, thus upgrading DNA origami-based nanotechnology from the milligram to the gram scale. PMID:26028443

  7. Direct imaging of single UvrD helicase dynamics on long single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Balci, Hamza; Jia, Haifeng; Lohman, Timothy M; Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging of single-protein dynamics on DNA has been largely limited to double-stranded DNA or short single-stranded DNA. We have developed a hybrid approach for observing single proteins moving on laterally stretched kilobase-sized ssDNA. Here we probed the single-stranded DNA translocase activity of Escherichia coli UvrD by single fluorophore tracking, while monitoring DNA unwinding activity with optical tweezers to capture the entire sequence of protein binding, single-stranded DNA translocation and multiple pathways of unwinding initiation. The results directly demonstrate that the UvrD monomer is a highly processive single-stranded DNA translocase that is stopped by a double-stranded DNA, whereas two monomers are required to unwind DNA to a detectable degree. The single-stranded DNA translocation rate does not depend on the force applied and displays a remarkable homogeneity, whereas the unwinding rate shows significant heterogeneity. These findings demonstrate that UvrD assembly state regulates its DNA helicase activity with functional implications for its stepping mechanism, and also reveal a previously unappreciated complexity in the active species during unwinding. PMID:23695672

  8. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  9. Chemo-mechanical pushing of proteins along single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Sokoloski, Joshua E; Kozlov, Alexander G; Galletto, Roberto; Lohman, Timothy M

    2016-05-31

    Single-stranded (ss)DNA binding (SSB) proteins bind with high affinity to ssDNA generated during DNA replication, recombination, and repair; however, these SSBs must eventually be displaced from or reorganized along the ssDNA. One potential mechanism for reorganization is for an ssDNA translocase (ATP-dependent motor) to push the SSB along ssDNA. Here we use single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to detect such pushing events. When Cy5-labeled Escherichia coli (Ec) SSB is bound to surface-immobilized 3'-Cy3-labeled ssDNA, a fluctuating FRET signal is observed, consistent with random diffusion of SSB along the ssDNA. Addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1, a 5' to 3' ssDNA translocase, results in the appearance of isolated, irregularly spaced saw-tooth FRET spikes only in the presence of ATP. These FRET spikes result from translocase-induced directional (5' to 3') pushing of the SSB toward the 3' ssDNA end, followed by displacement of the SSB from the DNA end. Similar ATP-dependent pushing events, but in the opposite (3' to 5') direction, are observed with EcRep and EcUvrD (both 3' to 5' ssDNA translocases). Simulations indicate that these events reflect active pushing by the translocase. The ability of translocases to chemo-mechanically push heterologous SSB proteins along ssDNA provides a potential mechanism for reorganization and clearance of tightly bound SSBs from ssDNA. PMID:27185951

  10. New insights on single-stranded versus double-stranded DNA library preparation for ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Wales, Nathan; Carøe, Christian; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela; Gamba, Cristina; Barnett, Ross; Samaniego, José Alfredo; Madrigal, Jazmín Ramos; Orlando, Ludovic; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    An innovative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method has sparked great interest among ancient DNA (aDNA) researchers, especially after reports of endogenous DNA content increases >20-fold in some samples. To investigate the behavior of this method, we generated ssDNA and conventional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) libraries from 23 ancient and historic plant and animal specimens. We found ssDNA library preparation substantially increased endogenous content when dsDNA libraries contained <3% endogenous DNA, but this enrichment is less pronounced when dsDNA preparations successfully recover short endogenous DNA fragments (mean size < 70 bp). Our findings can help researchers determine when to utilize the time- and resource-intensive ssDNA library preparation method. PMID:26651516

  11. Fluorescence detection of single-nucleotide polymorphism with single-strand triplex-forming DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinpeng; Wang, Yuan; Guo, Jiajie; Tang, Xinjing

    2011-12-16

    Triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are widespread in the genome and have been found in regulatory regions, especially in promoter zones and recombination hotspots of DNA. To specifically detect these polypurine sequences, we designed and synthesized two dual pyrene-labeled single-strand oligonucleotide probes (TFO-FPs) consisting of recognition, linker, and detection sequences. The hybridization processes of TFO-FPs with target polypurine oligonucleotides involve both Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base-pairings. Through double sensing of oligonucleotide sequences, single mutations of target oligonucleotides are detected by monitoring changes in pyrene fluorescence. The high specificities of the probes are maintained over a wide temperature range without sacrifice of hybridization kinetics. PMID:22095630

  12. Evidence that DNA fragmentation in apoptosis is initiated and propagated by single-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Walker, P R; LeBlanc, J; Sikorska, M

    1997-08-01

    Apoptosis is characterised by the degradation of DNA into a specific pattern of high and low molecular weight fragments seen on agarose gels as a distribution of sizes between 50-300 kb and sometimes, but not always, a ladder of smaller oligonucleosomal fragments. Using a 2D pulsed field-conventional agarose gel electrophoresis technique, where the second dimension is run under either normal or denaturing conditions, we show that single-strand breaks are introduced into DNA at the initial stages of fragmentation. Using single-strand specific nuclease probes we further show that the complete fragmentation pattern, including release of small oligonucleosomal fragments can also be generated by a single-strand endonuclease. Three classes of sites where single-strand breaks accumulate were identified. The initial breaks produce a distribution of fragment sizes (50 kb to >1 Mb) similar to those generated by Topoisomerase II inhibitors suggesting that cleavage may commence at sites of attachment of DNA to the nuclear matrix. A second class of rare sites is also cut further reducing the size distribution of the fragments to 50-300 kb. Thirdly, single-strand breaks accumulate at the linker region between nucleosomes eventually causing double-strand scissions which release oligonucleosomes. These observations further define the properties of the endonuclease responsible for DNA fragmentation in apoptosis. PMID:16465272

  13. Fluorescent Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein as a Probe for Sensitive, Real-Time Assays of Helicase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dillingham, Mark S.; Tibbles, Katherine L.; Hunter, Jackie L.; Bell, Jason C.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Webb, Martin R.

    2008-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) are essential parts of many processes involving DNA. For example, strand separation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is catalyzed by helicases, and this exposure of the bases on the DNA allows further processing, such as replication, recombination, or repair. Assays of helicase activity and probes for their mechanism are essential for understanding related biological processes. Here we describe the development and use of a fluorescent probe to measure ssDNA formation specifically and in real time, with high sensitivity and time resolution. The reagentless biosensor is based on the ssDNA binding protein (SSB) from Escherichia coli, labeled at a specific site with a coumarin fluorophore. Its use in the study of DNA manipulations involving ssDNA intermediates is demonstrated in assays for DNA unwinding, catalyzed by DNA helicases. PMID:18599625

  14. Replication by a single DNA polymerase of a stretched single-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Berenike; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to the study of DNA/protein interactions has been opened through the recent advances in the manipulation of single DNA molecules. These allow the behavior of individual molecular motors to be studied under load and compared with bulk measurements. One example of such a motor is the DNA polymerase, which replicates DNA. We measured the replication rate by a single enzyme of a stretched single strand of DNA. The marked difference between the elasticity of single- and double-stranded DNA allows for the monitoring of replication in real time. We have found that the rate of replication depends strongly on the stretching force applied to the template. In particular, by varying the load we determined that the biochemical steps limiting replication are coupled to movement. The replication rate increases at low forces, decreases at forces greater than 4 pN, and ceases when the single-stranded DNA substrate is under a load greater than ≈20 pN. The decay of the replication rate follows an Arrhenius law and indicates that multiple bases on the template strand are involved in the rate-limiting step of each cycle. This observation is consistent with the induced-fit mechanism for error detection during replication. PMID:11050232

  15. Monoclonal antibody to single-stranded DNA: a potential tool for DNA repair studies.

    PubMed

    Cooke, M S; Patel, K; Ahmad, J; Holloway, K; Evans, M D; Lunec, J

    2001-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity is an important factor in cancer risk and is therefore essential to assess. Immunochemical assays are amenable to the detection of repair products in complex matrices, such as urine, facilitating noninvasive measurements, although diet and extra-DNA sources of lesion can confound interpretation. The production of single-stranded, lesion-containing DNA oligomers characterises nucleotide excision repair (NER) and hence defines the repair pathway from which a lesion may be derived. Herein we describe the characterisation of a monoclonal antibody which recognises guanine moieties in single-stranded DNA. Application of this antibody in ELISA, demonstrated such oligomers in supernatants from repair-proficient cells post-insult. Testing of urine samples from volunteers demonstrated a relationship between oligomer levels and two urinary DNA damage products, thymine dimers and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, supporting our hypothesis that NER gives rise to lesion-containing oligomers which are specific targets for the investigation of DNA repair. PMID:11374895

  16. Single-stranded-DNA-binding protein-dependent DNA unwinding of the yeast ARS1 region.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, K; Ishimi, Y

    1994-01-01

    DNA unwinding of autonomously replicating sequence 1 (ARS1) from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. When a negatively supercoiled plasmid DNA containing ARS1 was digested with single-strand-specific mung bean nuclease, a discrete region in the vector DNA was preferentially digested. The regions containing the core consensus A domain and the 3'-flanking B domain of ARS1 were weakly digested. When the DNA was incubated with the multisubunit single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB, also called RPA [replication protein A]) from human and yeast cells prior to mung bean nuclease digestion, the cleavage in the A and B domains was greatly increased. Furthermore, a region corresponding to the 5'-flanking C domain of ARS1 was digested. These results indicate that three domains of ARS1, each of which is important for replication in yeast cells, closely correspond to the regions where the DNA duplex is easily unwound by torsional stress. SSB may stimulate the unwinding of the ARS1 region by its preferential binding to the destabilized three domains. Mung bean nuclease digestion of the substitution mutants with mutations of ARS1 (Y. Marahrens and B. Stillman, Science 255:817-823, 1992) revealed that the sequences in the B2 and A elements are responsible for the unwinding of the B domain and the region containing the A domain, respectively. Images PMID:8007967

  17. Zn2+ blocks annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA in a sequence-selective manner

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple low-temperature EDTA-free agarose gel electrophoresis procedure (LTEAGE) coupled with UV-Vis spectrum and fluorescence quenching analyses was developed and the Zn2+-single-stranded (ss) DNA interaction was investigated under near-physiological conditions. It was found that Zn2+ blocked the...

  18. MALDI-MS detection of noncovalent interactions of single stranded DNA with Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fan; Mädler, Stefanie; Weidmann, Simon; Zenobi, Renato

    2012-05-01

    The Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) selectively binds single-stranded (ss) DNA and participates in the process of DNA replication, recombination and repair. Different binding modes have previously been observed in SSB•ssDNA complexes, due to the four potential binding sites of SSB. Here, chemical cross-linking, combined with high-mass matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS), is used to determine the stoichiometry of the SSB•ssDNA complex. SSB forms a stable homotetramer in solution, but only the monomeric species (m/z 19,100) can be detected with standard MALDI-MS. With chemical cross-linking, the quaternary structure of SSB is conserved, and the tetramer (m/z 79,500) was observed. We found that ssDNA also functions as a stabilizer to conserve the quaternary structure of SSB, as evidenced by the detection of a SSB•ssDNA complex at m/z 94,200 even in the absence of chemical cross-linking. The stability of the SSB•ssDNA complex with MALDI strongly depends on the length and strand of oligonucleotides and the stoichiometry of the SSB•ssDNA complex, which could be attributed to electrostatic interactions that are enhanced in the gas phase. The key factor affecting the stoichiometry of the SSB•ssDNA complex is how ssDNA binds to SSB, rather than the protein-to-DNA ratio. This further suggests that detection of the complex by MALDI is a result of specific binding, and not due to non-specific aggregation in the MALDI plume. PMID:22549990

  19. Photoactivated uranyl ion produces single strand breaks in plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    George, Shannon A; Whittaker, Aaron M; Stearns, Diane M

    2011-11-21

    Uranium is an important emerging toxicant whose use has outpaced the rate at which we are learning about its health effects. One unexplored pathway for uranium toxicity involves the photoactivation of uranyl ion by UV light to produce U(5+) and oxygen radicals. The purpose of this study was to provide proof of principle data by testing the hypothesis that coexposures of DNA to uranyl acetate and UVB irradiation should produce more DNA strand breaks than individual exposures. Results supported the hypothesis and suggest that investigations of uranium toxicity be expanded to include skin as a potential target organ for carcinogenesis, especially in populations with high uranium and high UV radiation exposures. PMID:22013951

  20. Selective Detection of 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine in Single-Stranded DNA via Nanopore Sensing Approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yuru; Li, Ting; Xie, Jiani; Chen, Chaofei; Liu, Quansheng; Zhang, Shouwen; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2016-01-19

    We have developed a nanopore sensing approach for the selective detection of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG) in single-stranded DNA. First, 1,12-dodecanediamine is coupled with 8-oxoG-containing DNA molecules in high yield which leaves a free amine group for subsequent attaching of an adamantane moiety. After incubation with cucurbit[7]uril, the host-guest complex-modified DNA hybrid is translocated through an α-hemolysin nanopore. Highly characteristic events can be recorded and used to quantify the 8-oxoG-DNA content in a DNA mixture. Compared with the existing methods, this study provides a reliable, quick, and low-cost approach for the detection of 8-oxoG site in single-stranded DNA at the single-molecule level, particularly suitable for high-throughput screening of a massive number of samples. PMID:26699617

  1. Single-Stranded DNA Aptamers against Pathogens and Toxins: Identification and Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ka Lok; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular recognition elements (MREs) can be short sequences of single-stranded DNA, RNA, small peptides, or antibody fragments. They can bind to user-defined targets with high affinity and specificity. There has been an increasing interest in the identification and application of nucleic acid molecular recognition elements, commonly known as aptamers, since they were first described in 1990 by the Gold and Szostak laboratories. A large number of target specific nucleic acids MREs and their applications are currently in the literature. This review first describes the general methodologies used in identifying single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers. It then summarizes advancements in the identification and biosensing application of ssDNA aptamers specific for bacteria, viruses, their associated molecules, and selected chemical toxins. Lastly, an overview of the basic principles of ssDNA aptamer-based biosensors is discussed. PMID:26199940

  2. Temporary electron localization and scattering in disordered single strands of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, Laurent; Sanche, Leon

    2006-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of the effect of structural and base sequence disorders on the transport properties of nonthermal electron scattering within and from single strands of DNA. The calculations are based on our recently developed formalism to treat multiple elastic scattering from simplified pseudomolecular DNA subunits. Structural disorder is shown to increase both the elastic scattering cross section and the attachment probability on the bases at low energy. Sequence disorder, however, has no significant effect.

  3. Defective processing of methylated single-stranded DNA by E. coli alkB mutants

    PubMed Central

    Dinglay, Suneet; Trewick, Sarah C.; Lindahl, Tomas; Sedgwick, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli alkB mutants are very sensitive to DNA methylating agents. Despite these mutants being the subject of many studies, no DNA repair or other function has been assigned to the AlkB protein or to its human homolog. Here, we report that reactivation of methylmethanesulfonate (MMS)-treated single-stranded DNA phages, M13, f1, and G4, was decreased dramatically in alkB mutants. No such decrease occurred when using methylated λ phage or M13 duplex DNA. These data show that alkB mutants have a marked defect in processing methylation damage in single-stranded DNA. Recombinant AlkB protein bound more efficiently to single- than double-stranded DNA. The single-strand damage processed by AlkB was primarily cytotoxic and not mutagenic and was induced by SN2 methylating agents, MMS, DMS, and MeI but not by SN1 agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea or by γ irradiation. Strains lacking other DNA repair activities, alkA tag, xth nfo, uvrA, mutS, and umuC, were not defective in reactivation of methylated M13 phage and did not enhance the defect of an alkB mutant. A recA mutation caused a small but additive defect. Thus, AlkB functions in a novel pathway independent of these activities. We propose that AlkB acts on alkylated single-stranded DNA in replication forks or at transcribed regions. Consistent with this theory, stationary phase alkB cells were less MMS sensitive than rapidly growing cells. PMID:10950872

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of γ-ray-irradiated single-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunmo; Hong, W.; Han, J. H.; Choi, D. M.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Kim, H. D.; Kim, J.

    2015-07-01

    The effects of γ-ray irradiation on herring sperm single-stranded DNA have been studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the view of the bonding configurations and the structural modifications. The significant changes in the hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous bonding energies, as revealed by the XPS analysis, indicate that electron transfers result in the creation of radicals and in DNA strand breaks.

  5. A Single-Strand Annealing Protein Clamps DNA to Detect and Secure Homology.

    PubMed

    Ander, Marcel; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Fahmy, Karim; Stewart, A Francis; Schäffer, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Repair of DNA breaks by single-strand annealing (SSA) is a major mechanism for the maintenance of genomic integrity. SSA is promoted by proteins (single-strand-annealing proteins [SSAPs]), such as eukaryotic RAD52 and λ phage Redβ. These proteins use a short single-stranded region to find sequence identity and initiate homologous recombination. However, it is unclear how SSAPs detect homology and catalyze annealing. Using single-molecule experiments, we provide evidence that homology is recognized by Redβ monomers that weakly hold single DNA strands together. Once annealing begins, dimerization of Redβ clamps the double-stranded region and nucleates nucleoprotein filament growth. In this manner, DNA clamping ensures and secures a successful detection for DNA sequence homology. The clamp is characterized by a structural change of Redβ and a remarkable stability against force up to 200 pN. Our findings not only present a detailed explanation for SSAP action but also identify the DNA clamp as a very stable, noncovalent, DNA-protein interaction. PMID:26271032

  6. Identification of the Block in the Intracellular Replication of Single-Stranded DNA of Photodynamically Inactivated Bacteriophage φX174

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Utpal C.; Poddar, Ramendra K.

    1973-01-01

    32P-labeled single-stranded DNA phage φX174 was photodynamically inactivated by irradiation in air with visible light in the presence of the acridine dye, proflavine sulfate. The inactivated phages could adsorb to the host cells but failed to lyse them. Formation of intracellular mature phages was almost completely inhibited. Photodynamic lesions in φX174 DNA caused intracellular formation of defective double-stranded replicative form molecules which ultimately reverted to the single-stranded configuration. PMID:4570924

  7. The bacterial DnaA-trio replication origin element specifies single-stranded DNA initiator binding.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Tomas T; Harran, Omar; Murray, Heath

    2016-06-16

    DNA replication is tightly controlled to ensure accurate inheritance of genetic information. In all organisms, initiator proteins possessing AAA+ (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) domains bind replication origins to license new rounds of DNA synthesis. In bacteria the master initiator protein, DnaA, is highly conserved and has two crucial DNA binding activities. DnaA monomers recognize the replication origin (oriC) by binding double-stranded DNA sequences (DnaA-boxes); subsequently, DnaA filaments assemble and promote duplex unwinding by engaging and stretching a single DNA strand. While the specificity for duplex DnaA-boxes by DnaA has been appreciated for over 30 years, the sequence specificity for single-strand DNA binding has remained unknown. Here we identify a new indispensable bacterial replication origin element composed of a repeating trinucleotide motif that we term the DnaA-trio. We show that the function of the DnaA-trio is to stabilize DnaA filaments on a single DNA strand, thus providing essential precision to this binding mechanism. Bioinformatic analysis detects DnaA-trios in replication origins throughout the bacterial kingdom, indicating that this element is part of the core oriC structure. The discovery and characterization of the novel DnaA-trio extends our fundamental understanding of bacterial DNA replication initiation, and because of the conserved structure of AAA+ initiator proteins these findings raise the possibility of specific recognition motifs within replication origins of higher organisms. PMID:27281207

  8. MEIOB Targets Single-Strand DNA and Is Necessary for Meiotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hervé, Roxane; Finsterbusch, Friederike; Tourpin, Sophie; Le Bouffant, Ronan; Duquenne, Clotilde; Messiaen, Sébastien; Martini, Emmanuelle; Bernardino-Sgherri, Jacqueline; Toth, Attila; Habert, René; Livera, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is a mandatory process for sexual reproduction. We identified a protein specifically implicated in meiotic homologous recombination that we named: meiosis specific with OB domain (MEIOB). This protein is conserved among metazoan species and contains single-strand DNA binding sites similar to those of RPA1. Our studies in vitro revealed that both recombinant and endogenous MEIOB can be retained on single-strand DNA. Those in vivo demonstrated the specific expression of Meiob in early meiotic germ cells and the co-localization of MEIOB protein with RPA on chromosome axes. MEIOB localization in Dmc1 −/− spermatocytes indicated that it accumulates on resected DNA. Homologous Meiob deletion in mice caused infertility in both sexes, due to a meiotic arrest at a zygotene/pachytene-like stage. DNA double strand break repair and homologous chromosome synapsis were impaired in Meiob −/− meiocytes. Interestingly MEIOB appeared to be dispensable for the initial loading of recombinases but was required to maintain a proper number of RAD51 and DMC1 foci beyond the zygotene stage. In light of these findings, we propose that RPA and this new single-strand DNA binding protein MEIOB, are essential to ensure the proper stabilization of recombinases which is required for successful homology search and meiotic recombination. PMID:24068956

  9. A Single-Strand Annealing Protein Clamps DNA to Detect and Secure Homology

    PubMed Central

    Ander, Marcel; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Fahmy, Karim; Stewart, A. Francis; Schäffer, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Repair of DNA breaks by single-strand annealing (SSA) is a major mechanism for the maintenance of genomic integrity. SSA is promoted by proteins (single-strand-annealing proteins [SSAPs]), such as eukaryotic RAD52 and λ phage Redβ. These proteins use a short single-stranded region to find sequence identity and initiate homologous recombination. However, it is unclear how SSAPs detect homology and catalyze annealing. Using single-molecule experiments, we provide evidence that homology is recognized by Redβ monomers that weakly hold single DNA strands together. Once annealing begins, dimerization of Redβ clamps the double-stranded region and nucleates nucleoprotein filament growth. In this manner, DNA clamping ensures and secures a successful detection for DNA sequence homology. The clamp is characterized by a structural change of Redβ and a remarkable stability against force up to 200 pN. Our findings not only present a detailed explanation for SSAP action but also identify the DNA clamp as a very stable, noncovalent, DNA–protein interaction. PMID:26271032

  10. Rad51 Nucleoprotein Filament Disassembly Captured Using Fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum SSB as a Reporter for Single-Stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Eric Parker; Harris, Derek F; Origanti, Sofia; Antony, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins coordinate DNA replication, repair, and recombination and are critical for maintaining genomic integrity. SSB binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) rapidly and with very high affinity making it a useful molecular tool to detect free ssDNA in solution. We have labeled SSB from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf-SSB) with the MDCC (7-diethylamino-3-((((2-maleimidyl)ethyl)amino)-carbonyl)coumarin) fluorophore which yields a four-fold increase in fluorescence upon binding to ssDNA. Pf-SSBMDCC binding to DNA is unaffected by NaCl or Mg2+ concentration and does not display salt-dependent changes in DNA binding modes or cooperative binding on long DNA substrates. These features are unique to Pf-SSB, making it an ideal tool to probe the presence of free ssDNA in any biochemical reaction. Using this Pf-SSBMDCC probe as a sensor for free ssDNA, we have investigated the clearing of preformed yeast Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments by the Srs2 helicase during HR. Our studies provide a rate for the disassembly of the Rad51 filament by full length Srs2 on long ssDNA substrates. Mutations in the conserved 2B domain in the homologous bacterial UvrD, Rep and PcrA helicases show an enhancement of DNA unwinding activity, but similar mutations in Srs2 do not affect its DNA unwinding or Rad51 clearing properties. These studies showcase the utility of the Pf-SSB probe in mechanistic investigation of enzymes that function in DNA metabolism. PMID:27416037

  11. Rad51 Nucleoprotein Filament Disassembly Captured Using Fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum SSB as a Reporter for Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Eric Parker; Harris, Derek F.; Origanti, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins coordinate DNA replication, repair, and recombination and are critical for maintaining genomic integrity. SSB binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) rapidly and with very high affinity making it a useful molecular tool to detect free ssDNA in solution. We have labeled SSB from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf-SSB) with the MDCC (7-diethylamino-3-((((2-maleimidyl)ethyl)amino)-carbonyl)coumarin) fluorophore which yields a four-fold increase in fluorescence upon binding to ssDNA. Pf-SSBMDCC binding to DNA is unaffected by NaCl or Mg2+ concentration and does not display salt-dependent changes in DNA binding modes or cooperative binding on long DNA substrates. These features are unique to Pf-SSB, making it an ideal tool to probe the presence of free ssDNA in any biochemical reaction. Using this Pf-SSBMDCC probe as a sensor for free ssDNA, we have investigated the clearing of preformed yeast Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments by the Srs2 helicase during HR. Our studies provide a rate for the disassembly of the Rad51 filament by full length Srs2 on long ssDNA substrates. Mutations in the conserved 2B domain in the homologous bacterial UvrD, Rep and PcrA helicases show an enhancement of DNA unwinding activity, but similar mutations in Srs2 do not affect its DNA unwinding or Rad51 clearing properties. These studies showcase the utility of the Pf-SSB probe in mechanistic investigation of enzymes that function in DNA metabolism. PMID:27416037

  12. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  13. Amplification of single-strand DNA binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, J W; Whittier, R F; Auerbach, J; Sancar, A; Rupp, W D

    1980-01-01

    An E. coli strain containing a recombinant plasmid carrying the E. coli ssbA+ gene has been shown to produce 12 to 15 fold increased amounts of single-strand DNA binding-protein relative to wild-type strains. In addition, a gamma transducing phage carrying the E. coli uvrA+ gene has been shown to also carry the ssbA+ gene and to be capable of producing increased amounts of binding protein. PMID:6449689

  14. SSB diffusion on single stranded DNA stimulates RecA filament formation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rahul; Kozlov, Alexander G.; Lohman, Timothy M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2009-01-01

    Single stranded (ss)DNA generated in the cell during DNA metabolism is stabilized and protected by binding of single stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins. E. coli SSB, a representative homotetrameric SSB, binds to ssDNA by wrapping the DNA using its four subunits. However, such a tightly wrapped, high affinity protein-DNA complex still needs to be removed or repositioned quickly for unhindered action of other proteins. Here, we show, using single molecule two and three-color FRET, that tetrameric SSB can spontaneously migrate along ssDNA. Diffusional migration of SSB helps in the local displacement of SSB by an elongating RecA filament. SSB diffusion also melts short DNA hairpins transiently and stimulates RecA filament elongation on DNA with secondary structure. This first observation of diffusional movement of a protein on ssDNA introduces a new paradigm for how an SSB protein can be redistributed, while remaining tightly bound to ssDNA during recombination and repair processes. PMID:19820696

  15. Genomoviridae: a new family of widespread single-stranded DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Ghabrial, Said A; Jiang, Daohong; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-09-01

    Here, we introduce a new family of eukaryote-infecting single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses that was created recently by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). The family, named Genomoviridae, contains a single genus, Gemycircularvirus, which currently has one recognized virus species, Sclerotinia gemycircularvirus 1. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence-associated DNA virus 1 (SsHADV-1) is currently the sole representative isolate of the family; however, a great number of SsHADV-1-like ssDNA virus genomes has been sequenced from various environmental, plant- and animal-associated samples, indicating that members of family Genomoviridae are widespread and abundant in the environment. PMID:27343045

  16. FEN1 participates in repair of the 5'-phosphotyrosyl terminus of DNA single-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Yukiko; Takahata, Chiaki; Narita, Takashi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Etoposide is a widely used anticancer drug and a DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) inhibitor. Etoposide produces Top2-attached single-strand breaks (Top2-SSB complex) and double-strand breaks (Top2-DSB complex) that are thought to induce cell death in tumor cells. The Top2-SSB complex is more abundant than the Top2-DSB complex. Human tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is required for efficient repair of Top2-DSB complexes. However, the identities of the proteins involved in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes are unknown, although yeast genetic data indicate that 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease activity is required for alternative repair of Top2 DNA damage. In this study, we purified a flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) in the 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease family and synthesized single-strand break DNA substrates containing a 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond, mimicking the Top2-SSB complex. We found that FEN1 and XPG did not remove the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing DSB substrates but removed the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates. Under DNA repair conditions, FEN1 efficiently repaired the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates in the presence of DNA ligase and DNA polymerase. Therefore, FEN1 may play an important role in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes in etoposide-treated cells. PMID:26581212

  17. Trashing of single-stranded DNA generated during processing of arrested replication fork in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kohiyama, Masamichi; Contremoulins, Vincent; Baudin, Xavier

    2013-11-29

    We analyzed formation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) related to SOS induction in nalidixilate (Nal)-treated Escherichia coli, using immunofluorescence microscopy accompanied by computer analysis. We found enhancement of both ssDNA concentrations and cells having ssDNA foci that often localized around cellpoles. Analyzing several mutants deficient in DNA repair or replication, we found, after Nal treatment, that recN, recA, uvrD and dnaB failed to increase ssDNA concentration and that recG and particularly ruvA only partially enhanced it. In Nal-treated recB mutant, despite its failure in SOS induction, ssDNA foci positive cells increased with a slight enhancement of its concentration. These observations suggest the existence of a cellular process that sequesters genotoxic ssDNA as inert form, offering a new concept for SOS suppressor genes action. PMID:23810902

  18. Single strand dna breaks in human lymphocytes exposed to para-phenylenediamine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chye, Soi Mei; Hseu, You Cheng; Liang, Shih-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Hui; Chen, Ssu Ching

    2008-01-01

    Para-Phenylenediamine (PPD), the main aromatic amines used in the hair dye formation, and its four derivatives (2-chloro-p-phenylenediamine, 4-chloro-o-phenylenediamine, 2-nitro-p-phenylenediamine, and 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine) were examined for their potential to produce single strand DNA breaks in human lymphocytes using the alkaline comet assay. Results revealed that all the tested chemicals within the range of doses from 100 microM to 500 microM showed the genotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner after the incubation of lymphocytes with these chemicals for 2 h. In this study, we first reported that PPD and its four derivatives can elicit the type of single strand breaks in human lymphocytes. PMID:18058049

  19. Compiling Multicopy Single-Stranded DNA Sequences from Bacterial Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wonseok; Lim, Dongbin

    2016-01-01

    A retron is a bacterial retroelement that encodes an RNA gene and a reverse transcriptase (RT). The former, once transcribed, works as a template primer for reverse transcription by the latter. The resulting DNA is covalently linked to the upstream part of the RNA; this chimera is called multicopy single-stranded DNA (msDNA), which is extrachromosomal DNA found in many bacterial species. Based on the conserved features in the eight known msDNA sequences, we developed a detection method and applied it to scan National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) RefSeq bacterial genome sequences. Among 16,844 bacterial sequences possessing a retron-type RT domain, we identified 48 unique types of msDNA. Currently, the biological role of msDNA is not well understood. Our work will be a useful tool in studying the distribution, evolution, and physiological role of msDNA. PMID:27103888

  20. Mechanism of RecO recruitment to DNA by single-stranded DNA binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Koroleva, Olga; Postnov, Dmitri; Tran, Andrew; Korolev, Sergey

    2011-08-25

    RecO is a recombination mediator protein (RMP) important for homologous recombination, replication repair and DNA annealing in bacteria. In all pathways, the single-stranded (ss) DNA binding protein, SSB, plays an inhibitory role by protecting ssDNA from annealing and recombinase binding. Conversely, SSB may stimulate each reaction through direct interaction with RecO. We present a crystal structure of Escherichia coli RecO bound to the conserved SSB C-terminus (SSB-Ct). SSB-Ct binds the hydrophobic pocket of RecO in a conformation similar to that observed in the ExoI/SSB-Ct complex. Hydrophobic interactions facilitate binding of SSB-Ct to RecO and RecO/RecR complex in both low and moderate ionic strength solutions. In contrast, RecO interaction with DNA is inhibited by an elevated salt concentration. The SSB mutant lacking SSB-Ct also inhibits RecO-mediated DNA annealing activity in a salt-dependent manner. Neither RecO nor RecOR dissociates SSB from ssDNA. Therefore, in E. coli, SSB recruits RMPs to ssDNA through SSB-Ct, and RMPs are likely to alter the conformation of SSB-bound ssDNA without SSB dissociation to initiate annealing or recombination. Intriguingly, Deinococcus radiodurans RecO does not bind SSB-Ct and weakly interacts with the peptide in the presence of RecR, suggesting the diverse mechanisms of DNA repair pathways mediated by RecO in different organisms.

  1. DNA Binding of Centromere Protein C (CENPC) Is Stabilized by Single-Stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yaqing; Topp, Christopher N.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Centromeres are the attachment points between the genome and the cytoskeleton: centromeres bind to kinetochores, which in turn bind to spindles and move chromosomes. Paradoxically, the DNA sequence of centromeres has little or no role in perpetuating kinetochores. As such they are striking examples of genetic information being transmitted in a manner that is independent of DNA sequence (epigenetically). It has been found that RNA transcribed from centromeres remains bound within the kinetochore region, and this local population of RNA is thought to be part of the epigenetic marking system. Here we carried out a genetic and biochemical study of maize CENPC, a key inner kinetochore protein. We show that DNA binding is conferred by a localized region 122 amino acids long, and that the DNA-binding reaction is exquisitely sensitive to single-stranded RNA. Long, single-stranded nucleic acids strongly promote the binding of CENPC to DNA, and the types of RNAs that stabilize DNA binding match in size and character the RNAs present on kinetochores in vivo. Removal or replacement of the binding module with HIV integrase binding domain causes a partial delocalization of CENPC in vivo. The data suggest that centromeric RNA helps to recruit CENPC to the inner kinetochore by altering its DNA binding characteristics. PMID:20140237

  2. Purification of Single-Stranded cDNA Based on RNA Degradation Treatment and Adsorption Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; Franco, Bernardo; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of gene expression is a common research tool to study networks controlling gene expression, the role of genes with unknown function, and environmentally induced responses of organisms. Most of the analytical tools used to analyze gene expression rely on accurate cDNA synthesis and quantification to obtain reproducible and quantifiable results. Thus far, most commercial kits for isolation and purification of cDNA target double-stranded molecules, which do not accurately represent the abundance of transcripts. In the present report, we provide a simple and fast method to purify single-stranded cDNA, exhibiting high purity and yield. This method is based on the treatment with RNase H and RNase A after cDNA synthesis, followed by separation in silica spin-columns and ethanol precipitation. In addition, our method avoids the use of DNase I to eliminate genomic DNA from RNA preparations, which improves cDNA yield. As a case report, our method proved to be useful in the purification of single-stranded cDNA from the pathogenic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. PMID:27352216

  3. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element Specific for Bromacil

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Kulick, Amanda R.; Yedlapalli, Srilakshmi; Battistella, Louisa; Hajiran, Cyrus J.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2014-01-01

    Bromacil is a widely used herbicide that is known to contaminate environmental systems. Due to the hazards it presents and inefficient detection methods, it is necessary to create a rapid and efficient sensing device. Towards this end, we have utilized a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE) specific for bromacil. We have identified one MRE with high affinity (Kd = 9.6 nM) and specificity for bromacil compared to negative targets of selection and other pesticides. The selected ssDNA MRE will be useful as the sensing element in a field-deployable bromacil detection device. PMID:25400940

  4. Mutations at Arginine 276 transform human uracil-DNA glycosylase into a single-stranded DNA-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Yao; Mosbaugh, Dale W.; Bennett, Samuel E.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the role of Arginine 276 in the conserved leucine-loop of human uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG), the effects of six R276 amino acid substitutions (C, E, H, L, W, and Y) on nucleotide flipping and enzyme conformational change were determined using transient and steady state, fluorescence-based, kinetic analysis. Relative to UNG, the mutant proteins exhibited a 2.6- to 7.7-fold reduction in affinity for a doubled-stranded oligonucleotide containing a pseudouracil residue opposite 2-aminopurine, as judged by steady-state DNA binding-base flipping assays. An anisotropy binding assay was utilized to determine the Kd of UNG and the R276 mutants for carboxyfluorescein-labeled uracil-containing single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides; the binding affinities varied 11-fold for single-stranded uracil-DNA, and 43-fold for double-stranded uracil-DNA. Productive uracil-DNA binding was monitored by rapid quenching of UNG intrinsic protein fluorescence. Relative to UNG, the rate of intrinsic fluorescence quenching of five mutant proteins for binding double-stranded uracil-DNA was reduced approximately 50%; the R276E mutant exhibited 1% of the rate of fluorescence quenching of UNG. When reacted with single-stranded uracil-DNA, the rate of UNG fluorescence quenching increased. Moreover, the rate of fluorescence quenching for all the mutant proteins, except R276E, was slightly faster than UNG. The kcat of the R276 mutants was comparable to UNG on single-stranded DNA and differentially affected by NaCl; however, kcat on double-stranded DNA substrate was reduced 4–12-fold and decreased sharply at NaCl concentrations as low as 20 mM. Taken together, these results indicate that the effects of mutations at Arg276 were largely limited to enzyme interactions with double-stranded uracil-containing DNA, and suggested that mutations at Arg276 effectively transformed UNG into a single-stranded DNA-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase. PMID:15970468

  5. Single-molecule imaging reveals the mechanism of Exo1 regulation by single-stranded DNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Zhou, Yi; Gong, Fade; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wold, Marc S.; Miller, Kyle M.; Paull, Tanya T.

    2016-01-01

    Exonuclease 1 (Exo1) is a 5′→3′ exonuclease and 5′-flap endonuclease that plays a critical role in multiple eukaryotic DNA repair pathways. Exo1 processing at DNA nicks and double-strand breaks creates long stretches of single-stranded DNA, which are rapidly bound by replication protein A (RPA) and other single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs). Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging and quantitative cell biology approaches to reveal the interplay between Exo1 and SSBs. Both human and yeast Exo1 are processive nucleases on their own. RPA rapidly strips Exo1 from DNA, and this activity is dependent on at least three RPA-encoded single-stranded DNA binding domains. Furthermore, we show that ablation of RPA in human cells increases Exo1 recruitment to damage sites. In contrast, the sensor of single-stranded DNA complex 1—a recently identified human SSB that promotes DNA resection during homologous recombination—supports processive resection by Exo1. Although RPA rapidly turns over Exo1, multiple cycles of nuclease rebinding at the same DNA site can still support limited DNA processing. These results reveal the role of single-stranded DNA binding proteins in controlling Exo1-catalyzed resection with implications for how Exo1 is regulated during DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26884156

  6. Self-assembly of Complex Two-dimensional Shapes from Single-stranded DNA Tiles

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bryan; Vhudzijena, Michelle K.; Robaszewski, Joanna; Yin, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Current methods in DNA nano-architecture have successfully engineered a variety of 2D and 3D structures using principles of self-assembly. In this article, we describe detailed protocols on how to fabricate sophisticated 2D shapes through the self-assembly of uniquely addressable single-stranded DNA tiles which act as molecular pixels on a molecular canvas. Each single-stranded tile (SST) is a 42-nucleotide DNA strand composed of four concatenated modular domains which bind to four neighbors during self-assembly. The molecular canvas is a rectangle structure self-assembled from SSTs. A prescribed complex 2D shape is formed by selecting the constituent molecular pixels (SSTs) from a 310-pixel molecular canvas and then subjecting the corresponding strands to one-pot annealing. Due to the modular nature of the SST approach we demonstrate the scalability, versatility and robustness of this method. Compared with alternative methods, the SST method enables a wider selection of information polymers and sequences through the use of de novo designed and synthesized short DNA strands. PMID:25993048

  7. Mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins: in search for new functions.

    PubMed

    Tomáska, L; Nosek, J; Kucejová, B

    2001-02-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, genes encoding proteins involved in the metabolism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been transferred from the endosymbiont into the host genome. Mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding (mtSSB) proteins serve as an excellent argument supporting this aspect of the endosymbiotic theory. The crystal structure of the human mtSSB, together with an abundance of biochemical and genetic data, revealed several exciting features of mtSSB proteins and enabled a detailed comparison with their prokaryotic counterparts. Moreover, identification of a novel member of the mtSSB family, mitochondrial telomere-binding protein of the yeast Candida parapsilosis, has raised interesting questions regarding mtDNA metabolism and evolution. PMID:11308016

  8. Sorting Short Fragments of Single-Stranded DNA with an Evolving Electric Double Layer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiamin; Zhao, Shuang-Liang; Gao, Lizeng; Wu, Jianzhong; Gao, Di

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new procedure for separation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fragments that are anchored to the surface of a gold electrode by end hybridization. The new separation procedure takes the advantage of the strong yet evolving non-uniform electric field near the gold surface in contact with a buffer solution gradually being diluted with deionized water. Separation of short ssDNA fragments is demonstrated by monitoring the DNA at the gold surface with in situ fluorescence measurement. The experimental results can be rationalized with a simple theoretical model of electric double layer that relates the strength of the surface pulling force to the ionic concentration of the changing buffer solution. PMID:23356906

  9. Sequence-Dependent Elasticity and Electrostatics of Single-Stranded DNA: Signatures of Base-Stacking

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Dustin B.; Duggan, Gina; Gouil, Quentin; Saleh, Omar A.

    2014-01-01

    Base-stacking is a key factor in the energetics that determines nucleic acid structure. We measure the tensile response of single-stranded DNA as a function of sequence and monovalent salt concentration to examine the effects of base-stacking on the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of single-stranded DNA. By comparing the elastic response of highly stacked poly(dA) and that of a polypyrimidine sequence with minimal stacking, we find that base-stacking in poly(dA) significantly enhances the polymer’s rigidity. The unstacking transition of poly(dA) at high force reveals that the intrinsic electrostatic tension on the molecule varies significantly more weakly on salt concentration than mean-field predictions. Further, we provide a model-independent estimate of the free energy difference between stacked poly(dA) and unstacked polypyrimidine, finding it to be ∼−0.25 kBT/base and nearly constant over three orders of magnitude in salt concentration. PMID:24507606

  10. Electron attachment to the cytosine-centered DNA single strands: does base stacking matter?

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiande; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-02-01

    Electron attachment to the trimer of nucleotide, dGpdCpdG, has been investigated by a quantum mechanical approach at a reliable level of theory. The study of the electron attached dGpdCpdG species demonstrates that cytosine contained DNA single strands have a strong tendency to capture low-energy electrons and to form electronically stable cytosine-centered radical anions. The comparative study of the model molecules pdCpdG and dGpdCp reveals that base stacking has little contribution to the adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of cytosine in DNA single strands. Additionally, the base-base stacking does not affect the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the cytosine-centered radicals. Intrastrand H-bonding is found to be critical in increasing the values of the AEA and VDE. However, base-base stacking is revealed to be important in enlarging the vertical electron affinity (VEA) of cytosine. The electron attachment to the cytosine moiety intensifies the intrastrand H-bonding between the neighboring G and C bases. This process disrupts the base-base stacking interaction in the radical anion of dGpdCpdG. PMID:22225006

  11. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine

    PubMed Central

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Macek, Boris; Cepo, Tina; Mann, Matthias; Davies, Julian; Jensen, Peter R.; Vujaklija, Dusica

    2006-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are required for repair, recombination and replication in all organisms. Eukaryotic SSBs are regulated by phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues. To our knowledge, phosphorylation of SSBs in bacteria has not been reported. A systematic search for phosphotyrosine-containing proteins in Streptomyces griseus by immunoaffinity chromatography identified bacterial SSBs as a novel target of bacterial tyrosine kinases. Since genes encoding protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) have not been recognized in streptomycetes, and SSBs from Streptomyces coelicolor (ScSSB) and Bacillus subtilis (BsSSB) share 38.7% identity, we used a B.subtilis protein-tyrosine kinase YwqD to phosphorylate two cognate SSBs (BsSSB and YwpH) in vitro. We demonstrate that in vivo phosphorylation of B.subtilis SSB occurs on tyrosine residue 82, and this reaction is affected antagonistically by kinase YwqD and phosphatase YwqE. Phosphorylation of B.subtilis SSB increased binding almost 200-fold to single-stranded DNA in vitro. Tyrosine phosphorylation of B.subtilis, S.coelicolor and Escherichia coli SSBs occured while they were expressed in E.coli, indicating that tyrosine phosphorylation of SSBs is a conserved process of post-translational modification in taxonomically distant bacteria. PMID:16549871

  12. Zn2+ Blocks Annealing of Complementary Single-Stranded DNA in a Sequence-Selective Manner

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shunwen

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is the second most abundant trace element essential for all living organisms. In human body, 30–40% of the total zinc ion (Zn2+) is localized in the nucleus. Intranuclear free Zn2+ sparks caused by reactive oxygen species have been observed in eukaryotic cells, but question if these free Zn2+ outrages could have affected annealing of complementary single-stranded (ss) DNA, a crucial step in DNA synthesis, repair and recombination, has never been raised. Here the author reports that Zn2+ blocks annealing of complementary ssDNA in a sequence-selective manner under near-physiological conditions as demonstrated in vitro using a low-temperature EDTA-free agarose gel electrophoresis (LTEAGE) procedure. Specifically, it is shown that Zn2+ does not block annealing of repetitive DNA sequences lacking CG/GC sites that are the major components of junk DNA. It is also demonstrated that Zn2+ blocks end-joining of double-stranded (ds) DNA fragments with 3′ overhangs mimicking double-strand breaks, and prevents renaturation of long stretches (>1 kb) of denatured dsDNA, in which Zn2+-tolerant intronic DNA provides annealing protection on otherwise Zn2+-sensitive coding DNA. These findings raise a challenging hypothesis that Zn2+-ssDNA interaction might be among natural forces driving eukaryotic genomes to maintain the Zn2+-tolerant repetitive DNA for adapting to the Zn2+-rich nucleus. PMID:24965053

  13. Single-stranded DNA phages: from early molecular biology tools to recent revolutions in environmental microbiology.

    PubMed

    Székely, Anna J; Breitbart, Mya

    2016-03-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) phages are profoundly different from tailed phages in many aspects including the nature and size of their genome, virion size and morphology, mutation rate, involvement in horizontal gene transfer, infection dynamics and cell lysis mechanisms. Despite the importance of ssDNA phages as molecular biology tools and model systems, the environmental distribution and ecological roles of these phages have been largely unexplored. Viral metagenomics and other culture-independent viral diversity studies have recently challenged the perspective of tailed, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) phages, dominance by demonstrating the prevalence of ssDNA phages in diverse habitats. However, the differences between ssDNA and dsDNA phages also substantially limit the efficacy of simultaneously assessing the abundance and diversity of these two phage groups. Here we provide an overview of the major differences between ssDNA and tailed dsDNA phages that may influence their effects on bacterial communities. Furthermore, through the analysis of 181 published metaviromes we demonstrate the environmental distribution of ssDNA phages and present an analysis of the methodological biases that distort their study through metagenomics. PMID:26850442

  14. Structure and switching of single-stranded DNA tethered to a charged nanoparticle surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin-Jun, Zhao; Zhi-Fu, Gao

    2016-07-01

    Using a molecular theory, we investigate the temperature-dependent self-assembly of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) tethered to a charged nanoparticle surface. Here the size, conformations, and charge properties of ssDNA are taken into account. The main results are as follows: i) when the temperature is lower than the critical switching temperature, the ssDNA will collapse due to the existence of electrostatic interaction between ssDNA and charged nanoparticle surface; ii) for the short ssDNA chains with the number of bases less than 10, the switching of ssDNA cannot happen, and the critical temperature does not exist; iii) when the temperature increases, the electrostatic attractive interaction between ssDNA and charged nanoparticle surface becomes weak dramatically, and ssDNA chains will stretch if the electrostatic attractive interaction is insufficient to overcome the elastic energy of ssDNA and the electrostatic repulsion energy. These findings accord well with the experimental observations. It is predicted that the switching of ssDNA will not happen if the grafting densities are too high. Project supported by the Joint Funds of Xinjiang Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 2015211C298).

  15. Replication of single-stranded DNA templates by primase-polymerase complexes of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, E E; Biswas, S B

    1988-01-01

    A partially purified primase-polymerase complex from the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was capable of replicating a single stranded circular phage DNA into a replicative form with high efficiency. The primase-polymerase complex exhibited primase activity and polymerase activity on singly primed circular ssDNA as well as on gapped DNA. In addition, it was able to replicate an unprimed, single-stranded, circular phage DNA through a coupled primase-polymerase action. On Biogel A-O.5m filtration the primase-polymerase activities appeared in the void volume, demonstrating a mass of greater than 500 kilodaltons. Primase and various primase-polymerase complexes synthesized unique primers on single stranded DNA templates and the size distribution of primers was dependent on the structure of the DNA and the nature of the primase-polymerase assembly. Images PMID:3041377

  16. Exploring ion induced folding of a single-stranded DNA oligomer from molecular simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Khatua, Prabir; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2016-06-21

    One crucial issue in DNA hydration is the effect of salts on its conformational features. This has relevance in biology as cations present in the cellular environment shield the negative charges on the DNA backbone, thereby reducing the repulsive force between them. By screening the negative charges along the backbone, cations stabilize the folded structure of DNA. To study the effect of the added salt on single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) conformations, we have performed room temperature molecular dynamics simulations of an aqueous solution containing the ss-DNA dodecamer with the 5'-CGCGAATTCGCG-3' sequence in the presence of 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 M NaCl. Our calculations reveal that in the presence of the salt, the DNA molecule forms more collapsed coil-like conformations due to the screening of negative charges along the backbone. Additionally, we demonstrated that the formation of an octahedral inner-sphere complex by the strongly bound ion plays an important role in the stabilization of such folded conformation of DNA. Importantly, it is found that ion-DNA interactions can also explain the formation of non-sequential base stackings with longer lifetimes. Such non-sequential base stackings further stabilize the collapsed coil-like folded form of the DNA oligomer. PMID:27241311

  17. Single-stranded DNA scanning and deamination with Single molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, David

    2012-04-01

    Over the past decade, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy (smFRET) has become an increasingly popular tool to study the structural dynamics of biopolymers, such as DNA, RNA and proteins. The most attractive aspect of single-molecule experiments is that, unlike ensemble-averaged techniques, they directly reveal the structural dynamics of individual molecules, which would otherwise be hidden in ensemble-averaged experiments. Here, we will present a novel single molecule assay to study, for the first time, scanning of an enzyme (APOBEC3G, involved in the defense against HIV) on single stranded DNA (ssDNA). We have investigated the ssDNA scanning and activity of Apo3G with smFRET. Our data show that Apo3G scans ssDNA randomly and bidirectionally with average excursion lengths of ˜ 10 å and ˜1 s-1 scanning rates. Apo3G quasi-localization is observed on highly reactive motifs located near the one end of the ssDNA. Motif-dependent ssDNA bending is also observed, where the bending is maximal for highly reactive targets located near the DNA end. Interestingly, both the Apo3G scanning and Apo3G-induced ssDNA bending is reduced with lowered ionic strength, indicating that Apo3G motion on ssDNA is facilitated by salt by reducing `electrostatic friction'. Although scanning is random, asymmetric catalytic orientation may be the reason for Apo3G directional activity.

  18. A conserved MCM single-stranded DNA binding element is essential for replication initiation

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Clifford A; Kang, Sukhyun; Epling, Leslie B; Bell, Stephen P; Enemark, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    The ring-shaped MCM helicase is essential to all phases of DNA replication. The complex loads at replication origins as an inactive double-hexamer encircling duplex DNA. Helicase activation converts this species to two active single hexamers that encircle single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The molecular details of MCM DNA interactions during these events are unknown. We determined the crystal structure of the Pyrococcus furiosus MCM N-terminal domain hexamer bound to ssDNA and define a conserved MCM-ssDNA binding motif (MSSB). Intriguingly, ssDNA binds the MCM ring interior perpendicular to the central channel with defined polarity. In eukaryotes, the MSSB is conserved in several Mcm2-7 subunits, and MSSB mutant combinations in S. cerevisiae Mcm2-7 are not viable. Mutant Mcm2-7 complexes assemble and are recruited to replication origins, but are defective in helicase loading and activation. Our findings identify an important MCM-ssDNA interaction and suggest it functions during helicase activation to select the strand for translocation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01993.001 PMID:24692448

  19. Breaking and joining single-stranded DNA: the HUH endonuclease superfamily.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Michael; de la Cruz, Fernando; Dyda, Fred; Hickman, Alison B; Moncalian, Gabriel; Ton-Hoang, Bao

    2013-08-01

    HUH endonucleases are numerous and widespread in all three domains of life. The major function of these enzymes is processing a range of mobile genetic elements by catalysing cleavage and rejoining of single-stranded DNA using an active-site Tyr residue to make a transient 5'-phosphotyrosine bond with the DNA substrate. These enzymes have a key role in rolling-circle replication of plasmids and bacteriophages, in plasmid transfer, in the replication of several eukaryotic viruses and in various types of transposition. They have also been appropriated for cellular processes such as intron homing and the processing of bacterial repeated extragenic palindromes. Here, we provide an overview of these fascinating enzymes and their functions, using well-characterized examples of Rep proteins, relaxases and transposases, and we explore the molecular mechanisms used in their diverse activities. PMID:23832240

  20. A 1.7-kilobase single-stranded DNA that folds into a nanoscale octahedron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, William M.; Quispe, Joel D.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2004-02-01

    Molecular self-assembly offers a means of spontaneously forming complex and well-defined structures from simple components. The specific bonding between DNA base pairs has been used in this way to create DNA-based nanostructures and to direct the assembly of material on the subnanometre to micrometre scale. In principle, large-scale clonal production of suitable DNA sequences and the directed evolution of sequence lineages towards optimized behaviour can be realized through exponential DNA amplification by polymerases. But known examples of three-dimensional geometric DNA objects are not amenable to cloning because they contain topologies that prevent copying by polymerases. Here we report the design and synthesis of a 1,669-nucleotide, single-stranded DNA molecule that is readily amplified by polymerases and that, in the presence of five 40-mer synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, folds into an octahedron structure by a simple denaturation-renaturation procedure. We use cryo-electron microscopy to show that the DNA strands fold successfully, with 12 struts or edges joined at six four-way junctions to form hollow octahedra approximately 22 nanometres in diameter. Because the base-pair sequence of individual struts is not repeated in a given octahedron, each strut is uniquely addressable by the appropriate sequence-specific DNA binder.

  1. Interaction of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF6 Protein with Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ozgur, Sezgin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF6 is homologous to the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP8 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BALF2 proteins. Here, we describe its single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding properties. Based on previous findings with ICP8 and BALF2, a 60-amino-acid C-terminal deletion mutant of Orf6 was generated, and the protein was purified to explore the function of the C terminus in ssDNA binding. We showed that full-length ORF6 binds cooperatively to M13 ssDNA, disrupting its secondary structure and extending it to a length equivalent to that of duplex M13 DNA. The width of the ORF6-ssDNA filament is 9 nm, and a 7.3-nm repeat can be distinguished along the filament axis. Fluorescence polarization analysis revealed that the wild-type and C-terminal mutant ORF6 proteins bind equally well to short ssDNA substrates, with dissociation constant (Kd) values of 2.2 × 10−7M and 1.5 × 10−7M, respectively. These values were confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) analysis, which also suggested that binding by the full-length protein may involve both monomers and small multimers. While no significant difference in affinities of binding between full-length ORF6 and the C-terminal deletion mutant were observed with the short DNAs, binding of the C-terminal mutant protein to M13 ssDNA showed a clear lack of cooperativity as seen by electron microscopy (EM). Incubation of a duplex DNA containing a long single-stranded tail with double-helical ORF6 protein filaments revealed that the ssDNA segment can be enveloped within the protein filament without disrupting the filament structure. IMPORTANCE This work describes the biochemical characterization of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of KSHV, ORF6, central to viral DNA replication in infected cells. A C-terminal deletion mutant protein was generated to aid in understanding the role of the C terminus in DNA binding. Here we analyze the binding of the wild-type and

  2. Influence of disordered packing pattern on elastic modulus of single-stranded DNA film on substrate.

    PubMed

    Meng, W L; Zhang, N H; Tang, H S; Tan, Z Q

    2015-10-01

    Determining mechanical properties of single-stranded DNA film grafted on gold surface is critical for analysis and design of DNA-microcantilever biosensors. However, it remains an open issue to quantify the relations among the disordered packing patterns of DNA chains, the mechanical properties of DNA film and the resultant biodetection signals. In this paper, first, the bending experiment of microcantilever is carried out to provide the basic data for a refined multi-scale model of microcantilever deflection induced by ssDNA immobilization. In the model, the complicated interactions in DNA film (consisting of DNA, water molecules and salt ions) are simplified as effective interactions among coarse-grained soft cylinders, which can reveal the varieties of DNA structure in the circumstances of different lengths and salt concentrations; Ohshima's distribution of net charge density is employed to incorporate compositional variations of salt ions along the thickness direction into the Strey's mesoscopic empirical potential on molecular interactions in DNA solutions, and the related model parameters for ssDNA film on substrate are obtained from the curve fitting with our microcantilever bending experiment. Second, the effect of nanoscopic distribution of DNA chains on elastic modulus of ssDNA film is studied by a thought experiment of uniaxial compression, and the disordered patterns of DNA chains are generated by Monte Carlo method. Simulation results point out that nanoscale ssDNA film shows size effect, gradient and diversity in elastic modulus and can achieve maximum stiffness by preferring a disordered and energetically favorable packing pattern collectively induced by electrostatic force, hydration force and configurational entropy. PMID:25749909

  3. Atomic force microscopy reveals two phases in single stranded DNA self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Priscila M; González, Sheila; Domínguez, Carmen M; Cebollada, Alfonso; San Paulo, Alvaro; Calleja, Montserrat; Tamayo, Javier

    2013-08-21

    We have investigated the structure of single-stranded (ss) DNA self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold by combining peak force tapping, Kelvin probe and phase contrast atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The adhesion, surface potential and phase shift signals show heterogeneities in the DNA film structure at two levels: microscale and nanoscale; which cannot be clearly discerned in the topography. Firstly, there is multilayer aggregation covering less than 5% of the surface. The DNA multilayers seem to be ordered phases and their existence suggests that DNA end-to-end interaction can play a role in the self-assembly process. Secondly, we find the formation of two phases in the DNA monolayer, which differ both in surface energy and surface potential. We relate the two domains to differences in the packing density and in the ssDNA conformation. The discovered heterogeneities in ssDNA SAMs provide a new scenario in our vision of these relevant films that have direct consequences on their biological, chemical and physical properties. PMID:23832284

  4. Stabilization of perfect and imperfect tandem repeats by single-strand DNA exonucleases.

    PubMed

    Feschenko, Vladimir V; Rajman, Luis A; Lovett, Susan T

    2003-02-01

    Rearrangements between tandemly repeated DNA sequences are a common source of genetic instability. Such rearrangements underlie several human genetic diseases. In many organisms, the mismatch-repair (MMR) system functions to stabilize repeats when the repeat unit is short or when sequence imperfections are present between the repeats. We show here that the action of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) exonucleases plays an additional, important role in stabilizing tandem repeats, independent of their role in MMR. For perfect repeats of approximately 100 bp in Escherichia coli that are not susceptible to MMR, exonuclease (Exo)-I, ExoX, and RecJ exonuclease redundantly inhibit deletion. Our data suggest that >90% of potential deletion events are avoided by the combined action of these three exonucleases. Imperfect tandem repeats, less prone to rearrangements, are stabilized by both the MMR-pathway and ssDNA-specific exonucleases. For 100-bp repeats containing four mispairs, ExoI alone aborts most deletion events, even in the presence of a functional MMR system. By genetic analysis, we show that the inhibitory effect of ssDNA exonucleases on deletion formation is independent of the MutS and UvrD proteins. Exonuclease degradation of DNA displaced during the deletion process may abort slipped misalignment. Exonuclease action is therefore a significant force in genetic stabilization of many forms of repetitive DNA. PMID:12538867

  5. Tel2p, a regulator of yeast telomeric length in vivo, binds to single-stranded telomeric DNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kota, R S; Runge, K W

    1999-09-01

    The telomeres of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae consist of a duplex region of TG(1-3) repeats that acquire a single-stranded 3' extension of the TG(1-3) strand at the end of S-phase. The length of these repeats is kept within a defined range by regulators such as the TEL2-encoded protein (Tel2p). Here we show that Tel2p can specifically bind to single-stranded TG(1-3). Tel2p binding produced several shifted bands; however, only the slowest migrating band contained Tel2p. Methylation protection and interference experiments as well as gel shift experiments using inosine-containing probes indicated that the faster migrating bands resulted from Tel2p-mediated formation of DNA secondary structures held together by G-G interactions. Tel2p bound to single-stranded substrates that were at least 19 bases in length and contained 14 bases of TG(1-3), and also to double-stranded/single-stranded hybrid substrates with a 3' TG(1-3) overhang. Tel2p binding to a hybrid substrate with a 24 base single-stranded TG(1-3) extension also produced a band characteristic of G-G-mediated secondary structures. These data suggest that Tel2p could regulate telomeric length by binding to the 3' single-stranded TG(1-3) extension present at yeast telomeres. PMID:10525964

  6. RecA-ssDNA filaments supercoil in the presence of single-stranded DNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Weixian; Larson, Ronald G. . E-mail: rlarson@umich.edu

    2007-06-08

    Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we find that RecA-single-stranded DNA (RecA-ssDNA) filaments, in the presence of single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) protein, organize into left-handed bundles, which differ from the previously reported disordered aggregates formed when SSB is excluded from the reaction. In addition, we see both left- and right-handedness on bundles of two filaments. These two-filament supercoils, individual filaments, and other smaller bundles further organize into more complicated bundles, showing overall left-handedness which cannot be explained by earlier arguments that presumed supercoiling is absent in RecA-ssDNA filaments. This novel finding and our previous results regarding supercoiling of RecA-double-stranded DNA (RecA-dsDNA) filaments are, however, consistent with each other and can possibly be explained by the intrinsic tendency of RecA-DNA filaments, in their fully coated form, to order themselves into helical bundles, independent of the DNA inside the filaments (ssDNA or dsDNA). RecA-RecA interactions may dominate the bundling process, while the original conformation of DNA inside filaments and other factors (mechanical properties of filaments, concentration of filaments, and Mg{sup 2+} concentration) could contribute to the variation in the appearance and pitch of supercoils. The tendency of RecA-DNA filaments to form ordered supercoils and their presence during strand exchange suggest a possible biological importance of supercoiled filaments.

  7. Viral Single-Strand DNA Induces p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Fagan, B. Matthew; Dumitru, Raluca; Bower, Jacquelyn J.; Yadav, Swati; Porteus, Matthew H.; Pevny, Larysa H.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are primed for rapid apoptosis following mild forms of genotoxic stress. A natural form of such cellular stress occurs in response to recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) single-strand DNA genomes, which exploit the host DNA damage response for replication and genome persistence. Herein, we discovered a unique DNA damage response induced by rAAV transduction specific to pluripotent hESCs. Within hours following rAAV transduction, host DNA damage signaling was elicited as measured by increased gamma-H2AX, ser15-p53 phosphorylation, and subsequent p53-dependent transcriptional activation. Nucleotide incorporation assays demonstrated that rAAV transduced cells accumulated in early S-phase followed by the induction of apoptosis. This lethal signaling sequalae required p53 in a manner independent of transcriptional induction of Puma, Bax and Bcl-2 and was not evident in cells differentiated towards a neural lineage. Consistent with a lethal DNA damage response induced upon rAAV transduction of hESCs, empty AAV protein capsids demonstrated no toxicity. In contrast, DNA microinjections demonstrated that the minimal AAV origin of replication and, in particular, a 40 nucleotide G-rich tetrad repeat sequence, was sufficient for hESC apoptosis. Our data support a model in which rAAV transduction of hESCs induces a p53-dependent lethal response that is elicited by a telomeric sequence within the AAV origin of replication. PMID:22114676

  8. Development of Single-Stranded DNA Aptamers for Specific Bisphenol A Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Minjoung; Ahn, Ji-Young; Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Seram; Hong, Sun Woo; Yoo, Jae-Wook; Kang, Jeehye; Dua, Pooja

    2011-01-01

    The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity to small molecules is crucial for the high-throughput detection of chemical compounds, such as toxicants or pollutants. Aptamers are short and single-stranded (ss) oligonucleotides able to recognize target molecules with high affinity. Here, we report the selection of ssDNA aptamers that bind to Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental hormone. Using SELEX process, we isolated high affinity aptamers to BPA from a 1015 random library of 60 mer ssDNAs. The selected aptamers bound specifically to BPA, but not to structurally similar molecules, such as Bisphenol B with one methyl group difference, or 4,4′-Bisphenol with 2 methyl groups difference. Using these aptamers, we developed an aptamer-based sol–gel biochip and detected BPA dissolved in water. This novel BPA aptamer-based detection can be further applied to the universal and high-specificity detection of small molecules. PMID:21413891

  9. Quantitation of radiation-, chemical-, or enzyme-induced single strand breaks in nonradioactive DNA by alkaline gel electrophoresis: application to pyrimidine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.E.; Blackett, A.D.; Monteleone, D.C.; Setlow, R.B.; Sutherland, B.M.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1986-10-01

    The authors have developed an alkaline agarose gel method for quantitating single strand breaks in nanogram quantities of nonradioactive DNA. After electrophoresis together with molecular length standards, the DNA is neutralized, stained with ethidium bromide, photographed, and the density profiles recorded with a computer controller scanner. The medium lengths, number average molecular lengths, and length average molecular lengths of the DNAs can be computed by using the mobilities of the molecular length standards. The frequency of single strand breaks can then be determined by comparison of the corresponding average molecular lengths of DNAs treated and not treated with single stand break-inducing agents (radiation, chemicals, or lesion-specific endonuclease). Single stand break yields (induced at pyrimidine dimer sites in uv-irradiated human fibroblasts DNA by the dimer-specific endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus) from our method agree with values obtained for the same DNAs from alkaline sucrose gradient analysis. The method has been used to determined pyrimidine dimer yields in DNA from biopsies of human skin irradiated in situ. It will be especially useful in determining the frequency of single strand breaks (or lesions convertible to single stand breaks by specific cleaving reagents or enzymes) in small quantities of DNA from cells or tissues not amendable to radioactive labeling.

  10. Diversity and distribution of single-stranded DNA phages in the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Kimberly P; Parsons, Rachel; Symonds, Erin M; Breitbart, Mya

    2011-05-01

    Knowledge of marine phages is highly biased toward double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) phages; however, recent metagenomic surveys have also identified single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) phages in the oceans. Here, we describe two complete ssDNA phage genomes that were reconstructed from a viral metagenome from 80 m depth at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site in the northwestern Sargasso Sea and examine their spatial and temporal distributions. Both genomes (SARssφ1 and SARssφ2) exhibited similarity to known phages of the Microviridae family in terms of size, GC content, genome organization and protein sequence. PCR amplification of the replication initiation protein (Rep) gene revealed narrow and distinct depth distributions for the newly described ssDNA phages within the upper 200 m of the water column at the BATS site. Comparison of Rep gene sequences obtained from the BATS site over time revealed changes in the diversity of ssDNA phages over monthly time scales, although some nearly identical sequences were recovered from samples collected 4 years apart. Examination of ssDNA phage diversity along transects through the North Atlantic Ocean revealed a positive correlation between genetic distance and geographic distance between sampling sites. Together, the data suggest fundamental differences between the distribution of these ssDNA phages and the distribution of known marine dsDNA phages, possibly because of differences in host range, host distribution, virion stability, or viral evolution mechanisms and rates. Future work needs to elucidate the host ranges for oceanic ssDNA phages and determine their ecological roles in the marine ecosystem. PMID:21124487

  11. Novel, reversible, benzo[a]pyrene metabolite binding sites in closed-circular, single-stranded DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Price, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of reversible hydrocarbon epoxide-DNA complexes and the simultaneous increase in the reactivity of these bound epoxides is a general phenomenon. The relationship between physical binding, catalysis of epoxide reactions, and the formation of covalent adducts is not clearly understood at present. In these investigations it was found that linear, double-stranded DNA and supercoiled plasmid DNA both bind and enhance the reactivity of epoxide metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene to similar extents. The results of experiments carried out with closed-circular, single-stranded DNA however, indicate that this DNA possesses a unique binding site not present in either linear, double-stranded DNA or supercoiled DNA. Results of kinetic studies revealed that closed-circular, single-stranded DNA was less efficient at catalyzing epoxide reactions that double-stranded DNA. The results of these kinetic studies are explained in terms of a model which takes into account the polyelectrolyte nature of DNA.

  12. The single-stranded DNA-binding protein of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Eggington, Julie Malia; Haruta, Nami; Wood, Elizabeth Anne; Cox, Michael Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Background Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known and is able to repair an unusually large amount of DNA damage without induced mutation. Single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) protein is an essential protein in all organisms and is involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair. The published genomic sequence from Deinococcus radiodurans includes a putative single-stranded DNA-binding protein gene (ssb; DR0100) requiring a translational frameshift for synthesis of a complete SSB protein. The apparently tripartite gene has inspired considerable speculation in the literature about potentially novel frameshifting or RNA editing mechanisms. Immediately upstream of the ssb gene is another gene (DR0099) given an ssb-like annotation, but left unexplored. Results A segment of the Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 genome encompassing the ssb gene has been re-sequenced, and two errors involving omitted guanine nucleotides have been documented. The corrected sequence incorporates both of the open reading frames designated DR0099 and DR0100 into one contiguous ssb open reading frame (ORF). The corrected gene requires no translational frameshifts and contains two predicted oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) folds. The protein has been purified and its sequence is closely related to the Thermus thermophilus and Thermus aquaticus SSB proteins. Like the Thermus SSB proteins, the SSBDr functions as a homodimer. The Deinococcus radiodurans SSB homodimer stimulates Deinococcus radiodurans RecA protein and Escherichia coli RecA protein-promoted DNA three-strand exchange reactions with at least the same efficiency as the Escherichia coli SSB homotetramer. Conclusions The correct Deinococcus radiodurans ssb gene is a contiguous open reading frame that codes for the largest bacterial SSB monomer identified to date. The Deinococcus radiodurans SSB protein includes two OB folds per monomer and functions as a homodimer. The Deinococcus

  13. Multiple Layers of Chimerism in a Single-Stranded DNA Virus Discovered by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Krupovic, Mart; Zhi, Ning; Li, Jungang; Hu, Gangqing; Koonin, Eugene V.; Wong, Susan; Shevchenko, Sofiya; Zhao, Keji; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses with single-stranded (ss) DNA genomes infect hosts in all three domains of life and include many medically, ecologically, and economically important pathogens. Recently, a new group of ssDNA viruses with chimeric genomes has been discovered through viral metagenomics. These chimeric viruses combine capsid protein genes and replicative protein genes that, respectively, appear to have been inherited from viruses with positive-strand RNA genomes, such as tombusviruses, and ssDNA genomes, such as circoviruses, nanoviruses or geminiviruses. Here, we describe the genome sequence of a new representative of this virus group and reveal an additional layer of chimerism among ssDNA viruses. We show that not only do these viruses encompass genes for capsid proteins and replicative proteins that have distinct evolutionary histories, but also the replicative genes themselves are chimeras of functional domains inherited from viruses of different families. Our results underscore the importance of horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of ssDNA viruses and the role of genetic recombination in the emergence of novel virus groups. PMID:25840414

  14. Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy Studies of APOBEC3A-Single-Stranded DNA Complexes.

    PubMed

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S; Dutta, Samrat; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-06-01

    APOBEC3A (A3A) inhibits the replication of a range of viruses and transposons and might also play a role in carcinogenesis. It is a single-domain deaminase enzyme that interacts with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and converts cytidines to uridines within specific trinucleotide contexts. Although there is abundant information that describes the potential biological activities of A3A, the interplay between binding ssDNA and sequence-specific deaminase activity remains controversial. Using a single-molecule atomic force microscopy spectroscopy approach developed by Shlyakhtenko et al. [(2015) Sci. Rep. 5, 15648], we determine the stability of A3A in complex with different ssDNA sequences. We found that the strength of the complex is sequence-dependent, with more stable complexes formed with deaminase-specific sequences. A correlation between the deaminase activity of A3A and the complex strength was identified. The ssDNA binding properties of A3A and those for A3G are also compared and discussed. PMID:27182892

  15. Multicopy single-stranded DNA directs intestinal colonization of enteric pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ansong, Charles; Brewer, Heather M.; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Adams, L. Garry; McClelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Fang, Ferric C.

    2015-09-14

    Multicopy single-stranded DNAs (msDNAs) are hybrid RNA-DNA molecules encoded on retroelements called retrons and produced by the action of retron reverse transcriptases. Retrons are widespread in bacteria but the natural function of msDNA has remained elusive despite 30 years of study. The major roadblock to elucidation of the function of these unique molecules has been the lack of any identifiable phenotypes for mutants unable to make msDNA. We report that msDNA of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium is necessary for colonization of the intestine. Similarly, we observed a defect in intestinal persistence in an enteropathogenic E. coli mutant lacking its retron reverse transcriptase. Under anaerobic conditions in the absence of msDNA, proteins of central anaerobic metabolism needed for Salmonella colonization of the intestine are dysregulated. We show that the msDNA-deficient mutant can utilize nitrate, but not other alternate electron acceptors in anaerobic conditions. Consistent with the availability of nitrate in the inflamed gut, a neutrophilic inflammatory response partially rescued the ability of a mutant lacking msDNA to colonize the intestine. These findings together indicate that the mechanistic basis of msDNA function during Salmonella colonization of the intestine is proper production of proteins needed for anaerobic metabolism. We further conclude that a natural function of msDNA is to regulate protein abundance, the first attributable function for any msDNA. Our data provide novel insight into the function of this mysterious molecule that likely represents a new class of regulatory molecules.

  16. Multicopy single-stranded DNA directs intestinal colonization of enteric pathogens

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ansong, Charles; Brewer, Heather M.; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Adams, L. Garry; McClelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; et al

    2015-09-14

    Multicopy single-stranded DNAs (msDNAs) are hybrid RNA-DNA molecules encoded on retroelements called retrons and produced by the action of retron reverse transcriptases. Retrons are widespread in bacteria but the natural function of msDNA has remained elusive despite 30 years of study. The major roadblock to elucidation of the function of these unique molecules has been the lack of any identifiable phenotypes for mutants unable to make msDNA. We report that msDNA of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium is necessary for colonization of the intestine. Similarly, we observed a defect in intestinal persistence in an enteropathogenic E. coli mutant lacking itsmore » retron reverse transcriptase. Under anaerobic conditions in the absence of msDNA, proteins of central anaerobic metabolism needed for Salmonella colonization of the intestine are dysregulated. We show that the msDNA-deficient mutant can utilize nitrate, but not other alternate electron acceptors in anaerobic conditions. Consistent with the availability of nitrate in the inflamed gut, a neutrophilic inflammatory response partially rescued the ability of a mutant lacking msDNA to colonize the intestine. These findings together indicate that the mechanistic basis of msDNA function during Salmonella colonization of the intestine is proper production of proteins needed for anaerobic metabolism. We further conclude that a natural function of msDNA is to regulate protein abundance, the first attributable function for any msDNA. Our data provide novel insight into the function of this mysterious molecule that likely represents a new class of regulatory molecules.« less

  17. Multicopy Single-Stranded DNA Directs Intestinal Colonization of Enteric Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ansong, Charles; Brewer, Heather M.; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Adams, L. Garry; McClelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.

    2015-01-01

    Multicopy single-stranded DNAs (msDNAs) are hybrid RNA-DNA molecules encoded on retroelements called retrons and produced by the action of retron reverse transcriptases. Retrons are widespread in bacteria but the natural function of msDNA has remained elusive despite 30 years of study. The major roadblock to elucidation of the function of these unique molecules has been the lack of any identifiable phenotypes for mutants unable to make msDNA. We report that msDNA of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium is necessary for colonization of the intestine. Similarly, we observed a defect in intestinal persistence in an enteropathogenic E. coli mutant lacking its retron reverse transcriptase. Under anaerobic conditions in the absence of msDNA, proteins of central anaerobic metabolism needed for Salmonella colonization of the intestine are dysregulated. We show that the msDNA-deficient mutant can utilize nitrate, but not other alternate electron acceptors in anaerobic conditions. Consistent with the availability of nitrate in the inflamed gut, a neutrophilic inflammatory response partially rescued the ability of a mutant lacking msDNA to colonize the intestine. These findings together indicate that the mechanistic basis of msDNA function during Salmonella colonization of the intestine is proper production of proteins needed for anaerobic metabolism. We further conclude that a natural function of msDNA is to regulate protein abundance, the first attributable function for any msDNA. Our data provide novel insight into the function of this mysterious molecule that likely represents a new class of regulatory molecules. PMID:26367458

  18. Multicopy single-stranded DNA directs intestinal colonization of enteric pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ansong, Charles; Brewer, Heather M.; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Adams, L. G.; McClelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.

    2015-09-14

    Multicopy single-stranded DNAs (msDNAs) are hybrid RNA-DNA molecules encoded on retroelements called retrons and produced by the action of retron reverse transcriptases. Retrons are widespread in bacteria but the natural function of msDNA has remained elusive despite 30 years of study. The major roadblock to elucidation of the function of these unique molecules has been the lack of any identifiable phenotypes for mutants unable to make msDNA. We report that msDNA of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium is necessary for colonization of the intestine. Similarly, we observed a defect in intestinal persistence in an enteropathogenic E. coli mutant lacking its retron reverse transcriptase. Under anaerobic conditions in the absence of msDNA, proteins of central anaerobic metabolism needed for Salmonella colonization of the intestine are dysregulated. We show that the msDNA-deficient mutant can utilize nitrate but not other alternate electron acceptors in anaerobic conditions. Consistent with the availability of nitrate in the inflamed gut, a neutrophilic inflammatory response partially rescued the ability of a mutant lacking msDNA to colonize the intestine. These findings together indicate that the mechanistic basis of msDNA function during Salmonella colonization of the intestine is proper production of proteins needed for anaerobic metabolism. We further conclude that a natural function of msDNA is to regulate protein abundance, the first attributable function for any msDNA. Our data provide novel insight into the function of this mysterious molecule that likely represents a new class of regulatory molecules.

  19. QUANTITATION OF INTRACELLULAR NAD(P)H IN LIVING CELLS CAN MONITOR AN IMBALANCE OF DNA SINGLE STRAND BREAK REPAIR IN REAL TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of intracellular NAD(P)H in living cells can monitor an imbalance of DNA single strand break repair in real time.

    ABSTRACT

    DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) are one of the most frequent DNA lesions in genomic DNA generated either by oxidative stress or du...

  20. Size-controllable DNA nanoribbons assembled from three types of reusable brick single-strand DNA tiles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaolong; Chen, Congzhou; Li, Xin; Song, Tao; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Yanfeng

    2015-11-21

    Precise control of nanostructure is a significant goal shared by supramolecular chemistry, nanotechnology and materials science. In DNA nanotechnology, methods of constructing desired DNA nanostructures using programmable DNA strands have been studied extensively and have become a promising branch of research, but developing universal and low-cost (in the sense of using fewer types of DNA strands) methods remains a challenge. In this work, we propose a novel approach to assemble size-controllable DNA nanoribbons with three types of reusable brick SSTs (single-stranded DNA tiles), where the control of ribbon size is achieved by regulating the concentration ratio between manipulative strands and packed single-stranded DNA tiles. In our method, three types of brick SSTs are sufficient in assembling DNA nanoribbons of different sizes, which is much less than the number of types of unique tile-programmable assembling strategy, thus achieving a universal and low-cost method. The assembled DNA nanoribbons are observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experimental observations strongly suggest the feasibility and reliability of our method. PMID:26367111

  1. Study on the electrical control of graphene with single-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young June; Jung, Youngmo; Choi, Jaebin; Lim, Chaehyun; Lee, Taikjin; Kim, Jae Hun; Seo, Minah; Yi, Jong Chang; Lee, Seok; Kim, Chulki

    2015-07-01

    Graphene is a promising material for its exceptional electrical and mechanical properties. Starting with the initial demonstration of isolating a single graphene sheet from graphite, much progress has been made in realizing graphene based devices for diverse applications. Here, we introduce an experiment in which the electrical properties of graphene are modified by coating different-sequence single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) molecules. We fabricated a graphene-field effect transistor (FET) by transferring CVD graphene on copper foil onto a Si/SiO2 wafer. A passivation layer opened up windows on the surface of the graphene to enable interaction with liquid buffers. ssDNA molecules with different base sequences were coated onto the active graphene channels. We observed a variation in the Dirac voltage of the ssDNA-coated graphene FETs according to the ssDNA base sequences. Electrical control of the graphene FET is obtained via gating effect of the deposited ssDNAs. We conduct a systematic study of this ssDNAinduced gating effect with different base sequences, concentrations, and lengths of molecules, leading to extraction of characteristic parameters of the graphene FET accordingly.

  2. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element against Atrazine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Crihfield, Cassandra L.; Gattu, Srikanth; Holland, Lisa A.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2014-01-01

    Widespread use of the chlorotriazine herbicide, atrazine, has led to serious environmental and human health consequences. Current methods of detecting atrazine contamination are neither rapid nor cost-effective. In this work, atrazine-specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecular recognition elements (MRE) were isolated. We utilized a stringent Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology that placed the greatest emphasis on what the MRE should not bind to. After twelve rounds of SELEX, an atrazine-specific MRE with high affinity was obtained. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of the ssDNA sequence is 0.62 ± 0.21 nM. It also has significant selectivity for atrazine over atrazine metabolites and other pesticides found in environmentally similar locations and concentrations. Furthermore, we have detected environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations in river water using this MRE. The strong affinity and selectivity of the selected atrazine-specific ssDNA validated the stringent SELEX methodology and identified a MRE that will be useful for rapid atrazine detection in environmental samples. PMID:25196435

  3. Structural modifications of gold thin films produced by thiol-derivatized single-stranded DNA immobilization.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Hernández, María; Svec, Martin; Rogero, Celia; Briones, Carlos; Martín-Gago, José Angel; Costa-Krämer, José Luis

    2014-02-01

    Recent experiments have reported an opposite sign of the differential surface stress produced on gold-coated cantilevers by a thiol-derivatized single-stranded DNA (SH-DNA) immobilization process. The sign of the surface stress depends on the method used to evaporate the gold thin film, being compressive (negative) or tensile (positive) for e-beam or resistively deposited gold, respectively. This study investigates the origin of this effect by means of a combination of x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Both e-beam and resistively grown gold thin films are characterized to find the subtle differences responsible for this intriguing stress behaviour. Somewhat remarkably, these studies show a tight relation between the surface structure of the gold overlayer and the SH-DNA immobilization efficiency. The average grain size variation seems to correlate well with the differential surface stress triggered by the SH-DNA immobilization previously reported. These results suggest that the relation of the probe molecules with the surface structure must be considered to understand surface stress changes. PMID:24440831

  4. Formation of AAV Single Stranded DNA Genome from a Circular Plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3+ clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  5. Leishmania replication protein A-1 binds in vivo single-stranded telomeric DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, J.L. Siqueira; Lira, C.B.B.; Giardini, M.A.; Khater, L.; Perez, A.M.; Peroni, L.A.; Reis, J.R.R. dos; Freitas-Junior, L.H.; Ramos, C.H.I.; Cano, M.I.N. . E-mail: micano@ibb.unesp.br

    2007-06-29

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a highly conserved heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA-binding protein involved in different events of DNA metabolism. In yeast, subunits 1 (RPA-1) and 2 (RPA-2) work also as telomerase recruiters and, in humans, the complex unfolds G-quartet structures formed by the 3' G-rich telomeric strand. In most eukaryotes, RPA-1 and RPA-2 bind DNA using multiple OB fold domains. In trypanosomatids, including Leishmania, RPA-1 has a canonical OB fold and a truncated RFA-1 structural domain. In Leishmania amazonensis, RPA-1 alone can form a complex in vitro with the telomeric G-rich strand. In this work, we show that LaRPA-1 is a nuclear protein that associates in vivo with Leishmania telomeres. We mapped the boundaries of the OB fold DNA-binding domain using deletion mutants. Since Leishmania and other trypanosomatids lack homologues of known telomere end binding proteins, our results raise questions about the function of RPA-1 in parasite telomeres.

  6. Diffusion, Dispersion, and Mobility of Single-stranded DNA in Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Roger; Ugaz, Victor

    2004-03-01

    The ability to perform DNA electrophoresis in miniaturized microfluidic systems has the potential to provide a new generation of low-cost high-throughput genomic analysis technology. Further progress toward improving separation performance under these conditions, however, requires a more detailed understanding of diffusion and dispersion phenomena in the gel matrix. Unfortunately, it has thus far proven difficult to obtain extensive measurements of these quantities due in large part to the lack of a convenient experimental platform. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of microfabricated gel electrophoresis devices to measure diffusion, dispersion, and mobility of single-stranded DNA fragments in crosslinked and uncrosslinked polyacrylamide gels. The microdevice format allows a complete set of diffusion and dispersion data to be collected in approximately one hour, as opposed to experiment times lasting several days using conventional sequencing equipment. By comparing runs using identical DNA samples, gel formulations, and operating conditions in both microfabricated electrophoresis devices and an ALF Express automated DNA sequencer, we are able to isolate the key factors governing separation performance in each system. The results of these experiments are then compared with biased reptation theory to extract information about the gel structure and predict achievable resolution. The effects of gel composition and polymerization chemistry are also explored.

  7. Formation of AAV single stranded DNA genome from a circular plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3(+) clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  8. Single-molecule elasticity of single-stranded DNA, a model flexible polyelectrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Dustin B.

    Understanding the structure of unfolded, flexible polyelectrolytes is important for our comprehension of basic processes in molecular biology (e.g., RNA and protein folding) and our ability to exploit the polymers in technology (e.g., in self-assembled nanostructures). Here, we investigate the structure of single single-stranded DNA molecules and their interactions with ions using magnetic tweezers. Our data reveal that single-stranded DNA is not well-described by ideal polymer models such as the Worm-Like Chain. At low force, we report the first experimental observation of a nonlinear elastic regime revealing the relevance of long-range excluded volume effects. At high force, the extension scales as a logarithm in monovalent salt. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this logarithmic regime is the result of ion-stabilized wrinkles at short-length scales along the polymer backbone. Addition of divalent salt to the buffer results in enhanced elasticity indicating increased wrinkling or polymer ''wrapping" around the divalent ions. Using a thermodynamic identity, we are able to count ions as they are released into the bulk upon polymer elongation. We find that ssDNA releases significantly more ions than dsDNA. We posit that the recently termed ''Snake-Like Chain" model (Ullner, J. Phys. Chem B (2003)) for flexible polyelectrolytes may explain these observations. As a first step towards characterizing biologically relevant nucleic acid structures, we measure the effects of base-stacking on ssDNA elasticity. We find that base-stacking in poly(dA) significantly enhances the rigidity of the polymer as evidenced by the low-force elasticity. The unstacking transition of poly(dA) at high force reveals that the intrinsic electrostatic tension on the molecule varies significantly more weakly on salt concentration than predictions from mean-field models. Further, we provide a model-independent estimate of the free energy difference between stacked and unstacked nucleic

  9. Replication Protein A: Single-stranded DNA's first responder : Dynamic DNA-interactions allow Replication Protein A to direct single-strand DNA intermediates into different pathways for synthesis or repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Wold, Marc S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Replication Protein A (RPA), the major single-stranded DNA-binding protein in eukaryotic cells, is required for processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates found in replication, repair and recombination. Recent studies have shown that RPA binding to ssDNA is highly dynamic and that more than high-affinity binding is needed for function. Analysis of DNA binding mutants identified forms of RPA with reduced affinity for ssDNA that are fully active, and other mutants with higher affinity that are inactive. Single molecule studies showed that while RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, the RPA complex can rapidly diffuse along ssDNA and be displaced by other proteins that act on ssDNA. Finally, dynamic DNA binding allows RPA to prevent error-prone repair of double-stranded breaks and promote error-free repair. Together, these findings suggest a new paradigm where RPA acts as a first responder at sites with ssDNA, thereby actively coordinating DNA repair and DNA synthesis. PMID:25171654

  10. An automated microfluidic system for single-stranded DNA preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuaiqin; Sun, Yujia; Gan, Wupeng; Liu, Yan; Xiang, Guangxin; Wang, Dong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-03-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic device capable of performing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis with a white-light detection for detecting mutations that account for hereditary hearing loss. The entire operation process, which includes loading of streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and biotin-labeled polymerase chain reaction products, active dispersion of the MBs with DNA for binding, alkaline denaturation of DNA, dynamic hybridization of the bead-labeled ssDNA to a tag array, and white-light detection, can all be automatically accomplished in a single chamber of the microchip, which was operated on a self-contained instrument with all the necessary components for thermal control, fluidic control, and detection. Two novel mixing valves with embedded polydimethylsiloxane membranes, which can alternately generate a 3-μl pulse flow at a peak rate of around 160 mm/s, were integrated into the chip for thoroughly dispersing magnetic beads in 2 min. The binding efficiency of biotinylated oligonucleotides to beads was measured to be 80.6% of that obtained in a tube with the conventional method. To critically test the performance of this automated microsystem, we employed a commercial microarray-based detection kit for detecting nine mutation loci that account for hereditary hearing loss. The limit of detection of the microsystem was determined as 2.5 ng of input K562 standard genomic DNA using this kit. In addition, four blood samples obtained from persons with mutations were all correctly typed by our system in less than 45 min per run. The fully automated, "amplicon-in-answer-out" operation, together with the white-light detection, makes our system an excellent platform for low-cost, rapid genotyping in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25825617

  11. An automated microfluidic system for single-stranded DNA preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiqin; Sun, Yujia; Liu, Yan; Xiang, Guangxin; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic device capable of performing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis with a white-light detection for detecting mutations that account for hereditary hearing loss. The entire operation process, which includes loading of streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and biotin-labeled polymerase chain reaction products, active dispersion of the MBs with DNA for binding, alkaline denaturation of DNA, dynamic hybridization of the bead-labeled ssDNA to a tag array, and white-light detection, can all be automatically accomplished in a single chamber of the microchip, which was operated on a self-contained instrument with all the necessary components for thermal control, fluidic control, and detection. Two novel mixing valves with embedded polydimethylsiloxane membranes, which can alternately generate a 3-μl pulse flow at a peak rate of around 160 mm/s, were integrated into the chip for thoroughly dispersing magnetic beads in 2 min. The binding efficiency of biotinylated oligonucleotides to beads was measured to be 80.6% of that obtained in a tube with the conventional method. To critically test the performance of this automated microsystem, we employed a commercial microarray-based detection kit for detecting nine mutation loci that account for hereditary hearing loss. The limit of detection of the microsystem was determined as 2.5 ng of input K562 standard genomic DNA using this kit. In addition, four blood samples obtained from persons with mutations were all correctly typed by our system in less than 45 min per run. The fully automated, “amplicon-in-answer-out” operation, together with the white-light detection, makes our system an excellent platform for low-cost, rapid genotyping in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25825617

  12. Fluorescence characteristics of 5-carboxytetramethylrhodamine linked covalently to the 5' end of oligonucleotides: multiple conformers of single-stranded and double-stranded dye-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Vámosi, G; Gohlke, C; Clegg, R M

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence steady-state and lifetime experiments have been carried out on duplex and single-stranded DNA molecules labeled at the 5' ends with 5-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMRh). The temperature and ionic strength of the solutions were varied over large ranges. The results reveal at least three well-defined states of the TMRh-DNA molecules for the single-stranded as well as for the double-stranded DNA molecules. Two states are fluorescent, with lifetimes in the range of 0.5-1 ns and 2.5-3 ns. A third state of TMRh-DNA does not fluoresce (a dark species of TMRh-DNA). The distribution of the TMRh-DNA molecules among these three states is strongly temperature and ionic strength dependent. Estimates are made of some reaction parameters of the multistate model. The results are discussed in terms of the photophysics of TMRh, and consequences of the multiple conformers of TMRh-DNA for studies involving fluorescence studies with TMRh-labeled DNA are considered. PMID:8842236

  13. Acetylation-dependent function of human single-stranded DNA binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Chen, Hongxia; Lu, Jinping; Zhang, Meifang; Zhang, Ruhua; Duan, Tingmei; Wang, Xin; Huang, Jun; Kang, Tiebang

    2015-01-01

    Human single-stranded DNA binding protein 1 (hSSB1) plays a critical role in responding to DNA damage and maintaining genome stability. However, the regulation of hSSB1 remains poorly studied. Here, we determined that hSSB1 acetylation at K94 mediated by the acetyltransferase p300 and the deacetylases SIRT4 and HDAC10 impaired its ubiquitin-mediated degradation by proteasomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that the hSSB1-K94R mutant had reduced cell survival in response to DNA damage by radiation or chemotherapy drugs. Furthermore, the p300/CBP inhibitor C646 significantly enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs, and a positive correlation between hSSB1 and p300 level was observed in clinical colorectal cancer samples. Acetylation, a novel regulatory modification of hSSB1, is crucial for its function under both physiological and pathological conditions. This finding supports the notion that the combination of chemotherapy drugs with acetylation inhibitors may benefit cancer patients. PMID:26170237

  14. Structural Basis of Detection and Signaling of DNA Single-Strand Breaks by Human PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Eustermann, Sebastian; Wu, Wing-Fung; Langelier, Marie-France; Yang, Ji-Chun; Easton, Laura E.; Riccio, Amanda A.; Pascal, John M.; Neuhaus, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) is a key eukaryotic stress sensor that responds in seconds to DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), the most frequent genomic damage. A burst of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis initiates DNA damage response, whereas PARP-1 inhibition kills BRCA-deficient tumor cells selectively, providing the first anti-cancer therapy based on synthetic lethality. However, the mechanism underlying PARP-1’s function remained obscure; inherent dynamics of SSBs and PARP-1’s multi-domain architecture hindered structural studies. Here we reveal the structural basis of SSB detection and how multi-domain folding underlies the allosteric switch that determines PARP-1’s signaling response. Two flexibly linked N-terminal zinc fingers recognize the extreme deformability of SSBs and drive co-operative, stepwise self-assembly of remaining PARP-1 domains to control the activity of the C-terminal catalytic domain. Automodifcation in cis explains the subsequent release of monomeric PARP-1 from DNA, allowing repair and replication to proceed. Our results provide a molecular framework for understanding PARP inhibitor action and, more generally, allosteric control of dynamic, multi-domain proteins. PMID:26626479

  15. The Fitness Effects of Random Mutations in Single-Stranded DNA and RNA Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Cuevas, José M.; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Mutational fitness effects can be measured with relatively high accuracy in viruses due to their small genome size, which facilitates full-length sequencing and genetic manipulation. Previous work has shown that animal and plant RNA viruses are very sensitive to mutation. Here, we characterize mutational fitness effects in single-stranded (ss) DNA and ssRNA bacterial viruses. First, we performed a mutation-accumulation experiment in which we subjected three ssDNA (ΦX174, G4, F1) and three ssRNA phages (Qβ, MS2, and SP) to plaque-to-plaque transfers and chemical mutagenesis. Genome sequencing and growth assays indicated that the average fitness effect of the accumulated mutations was similar in the two groups. Second, we used site-directed mutagenesis to obtain 45 clones of ΦX174 and 42 clones of Qβ carrying random single-nucleotide substitutions and assayed them for fitness. In ΦX174, 20% of such mutations were lethal, whereas viable ones reduced fitness by 13% on average. In Qβ, these figures were 29% and 10%, respectively. It seems therefore that high mutational sensitivity is a general property of viruses with small genomes, including those infecting animals, plants, and bacteria. Mutational fitness effects are important for understanding processes of fitness decline, but also of neutral evolution and adaptation. As such, these findings can contribute to explain the evolution of ssDNA and ssRNA viruses. PMID:19956760

  16. Isolation and Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA Virus Infecting Chaetoceros lorenzianus Grunow▿

    PubMed Central

    Tomaru, Yuji; Takao, Yoshitake; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Koike, Kanae; Nagasaki, Keizo

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the most significant primary producers in the ocean, and the importance of viruses as a potential source of mortality for diatoms has recently been recognized. Thus far, eight different diatom viruses infecting the genera Rhizosolenia and Chaetoceros have been isolated and characterized to different extents. We report the isolation of a novel diatom virus (ClorDNAV), which causes the lysis of the bloom-forming species Chaetoceros lorenzianus, and show its physiological, morphological, and genomic characteristics. The free virion was estimated to be ∼34 nm in diameter. The arrangement of virus particles appearing in cross-section was basically a random aggregation in the nucleus. Occasionally, distinctive formations such as a ring-like array composed of 9 or 10 spherical virions or a centipede-like array composed of rod-shaped particles were also observed. The latent period and the burst size were estimated to be <48 h and 2.2 × 104 infectious units per host cell, respectively. ClorDNAV harbors a covalently closed circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome (5,813 nucleotides [nt]) that includes a partially double-stranded DNA region (979 nt). At least three major open reading frames were identified; one showed a high similarity to putative replicase-related proteins of the other ssDNA diatom viruses, Chaetoceros salsugineum DNA virus (previously reported as CsNIV) and Chaetoceros tenuissimus DNA virus. ClorDNAV is the third member of the closed circular ssDNA diatom virus group, the genus Bacilladnavirus. PMID:21666026

  17. Sequence-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA: oligodeoxynucleotide-EDTA X Fe(II).

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, G B; Dervan, P B

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of a DNA hybridization probe 19 nucleotides in length, equipped with the metal chelator EDTA at C-5 of thymidine in position 10 (indicated by T*) is described. DNA-EDTA 1 has the sequence 5'-T-A-A-C-G-C-A-G-T*-C-A-G-G-C-A-C-C-G-T-3', which is complementary to a 19-nucleotide sequence in the plasmid pBR322. In the presence of Fe(II), O2, and dithiothreitol, DNA-EDTA 1 affords specific cleavage (25 degrees C, pH 7.4, 60 min) at its complementary sequence in a heat-denatured 167-base-pair restriction fragment. Cleavage occurs over a range of 16 nucleotides at the site of hybridization of 1, presumably due to a diffusible reactive species. No other cleavage sites are observed in the 167-base-pair restriction fragment. The procedure used to synthesize DNA-EDTA probes is based on the incorporation of a thymidine modified at C-5 with the triethyl ester of EDTA. By using routine phosphoramidite procedures, thymidine-EDTA can be incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides of any desired length and sequence. Because the efficiency of the DNA cleavage reaction is dependent on the addition of both Fe(II) and reducing agent (dithiothreitol), the initiation of the cleavage reaction can be controlled. These DNA-EDTA X Fe(II) probes should be useful for the sequence-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA (and most likely RNA) under mild conditions. Images PMID:3919391

  18. Distinct Circular Single-Stranded DNA Viruses Exist in Different Soil Types

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Maud M.; Cock, Peter J. A.; Dawson, Lorna; Freitag, Thomas E.; Singh, Brajesh K.; Torrance, Lesley; Mushegian, Arcady R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential dependence of virus populations on soil types was examined by electron microscopy, and the total abundance of virus particles in four soil types was similar to that previously observed in soil samples. The four soil types examined differed in the relative abundances of four morphological groups of viruses. Machair, a unique type of coastal soil in western Scotland and Ireland, differed from the others tested in having a higher proportion of tailed bacteriophages. The other soils examined contained predominantly spherical and thin filamentous virus particles, but the Machair soil had a more even distribution of the virus types. As the first step in looking at differences in populations in detail, virus sequences from Machair and brown earth (agricultural pasture) soils were examined by metagenomic sequencing after enriching for circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) virus genomes. Sequences from the family Microviridae (icosahedral viruses mainly infecting bacteria) of CRESS-DNA viruses were predominant in both soils. Phylogenetic analysis of Microviridae major coat protein sequences from the Machair viruses showed that they spanned most of the diversity of the subfamily Gokushovirinae, whose members mainly infect obligate intracellular parasites. The brown earth soil had a higher proportion of sequences that matched the morphologically similar family Circoviridae in BLAST searches. However, analysis of putative replicase proteins that were similar to those of viruses in the Circoviridae showed that they are a novel clade of Circoviridae-related CRESS-DNA viruses distinct from known Circoviridae genera. Different soils have substantially different taxonomic biodiversities even within ssDNA viruses, which may be driven by physicochemical factors. PMID:25841004

  19. Distinct circular single-stranded DNA viruses exist in different soil types.

    PubMed

    Reavy, Brian; Swanson, Maud M; Cock, Peter J A; Dawson, Lorna; Freitag, Thomas E; Singh, Brajesh K; Torrance, Lesley; Mushegian, Arcady R; Taliansky, Michael

    2015-06-15

    The potential dependence of virus populations on soil types was examined by electron microscopy, and the total abundance of virus particles in four soil types was similar to that previously observed in soil samples. The four soil types examined differed in the relative abundances of four morphological groups of viruses. Machair, a unique type of coastal soil in western Scotland and Ireland, differed from the others tested in having a higher proportion of tailed bacteriophages. The other soils examined contained predominantly spherical and thin filamentous virus particles, but the Machair soil had a more even distribution of the virus types. As the first step in looking at differences in populations in detail, virus sequences from Machair and brown earth (agricultural pasture) soils were examined by metagenomic sequencing after enriching for circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) virus genomes. Sequences from the family Microviridae (icosahedral viruses mainly infecting bacteria) of CRESS-DNA viruses were predominant in both soils. Phylogenetic analysis of Microviridae major coat protein sequences from the Machair viruses showed that they spanned most of the diversity of the subfamily Gokushovirinae, whose members mainly infect obligate intracellular parasites. The brown earth soil had a higher proportion of sequences that matched the morphologically similar family Circoviridae in BLAST searches. However, analysis of putative replicase proteins that were similar to those of viruses in the Circoviridae showed that they are a novel clade of Circoviridae-related CRESS-DNA viruses distinct from known Circoviridae genera. Different soils have substantially different taxonomic biodiversities even within ssDNA viruses, which may be driven by physicochemical factors. PMID:25841004

  20. Stretching and Controlled Motion of Single-Stranded DNA in Locally-Heated Solid-State Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Belkin, Maxim; Maffeo, Christopher; Wells, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Practical applications of solid-state nanopores for DNA detection and sequencing require the electrophoretic motion of DNA through the nanopores to be precisely controlled. Controlling the motion of single-stranded DNA presents a particular challenge, in part because of the multitude of conformations that a DNA strand can adopt in a nanopore. Through continuum, coarse-grained and atomistic modeling, we demonstrate that local heating of the nanopore volume can be used to alter the electrophoretic mobility and conformation of single-stranded DNA. In the nanopore systems considered, the temperature near the nanopore is modulated via a nanometer-size heater element that can be radiatively switched on and off. The local enhancement of temperature produces considerable stretching of the DNA fragment confined within the nanopore. Such stretching is reversible, so that the conformation of DNA can be toggled between compact (local heating is off) and extended (local heating is on) states. The effective thermophoretic force acting on single-stranded DNA in the vicinity of the nanopore is found to be sufficiently large (4–8 pN) to affect such changes in the DNA conformation. The local heating of the nanopore volume is observed to promote single-file translocation of DNA strands at transmembrane biases as low as 10 mV, which opens new avenues for using solid-state nanopores for detection and sequencing of DNA. PMID:23876013

  1. Structure and dynamics of poly(T) single-strand DNA: implications toward CPD formation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew T; Wiest, Olaf

    2007-12-27

    The formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers between adjacent thymines by UV radiation is thought to be the first event in a cascade leading to skin cancer. Recent studies showed that thymine dimers are fully formed within 1 ps of UV irradiation, suggesting that the conformation at the moment of excitation is the determining factor in whether a given base pair dimerizes. MD simulations on the 50 ns time scale are used to study the populations of reactive conformers that exist at any given time in T18 single-strand DNA. Trajectory analysis shows that only a small percentage of the conformations fulfill distance and dihedral requirements for thymine dimerization, in line with the experimentally observed quantum yield of 3%. Plots of the pairwise interactions in the structures predict hot spots of DNA damage where dimerization in the ssT18 is predicted to be most favored. The importance of hairpin formation by intra-strand base pairing for distinguishing reactive and unreactive base pairs is discussed in detail. The data presented thus explain the structural origin of the results from the ultrafast studies of thymine dimer formation. PMID:18052367

  2. Peeling single-stranded DNA from graphite surface to determine oligonucleotide binding energy by force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Suresh; Mantz, Amber R; Bancroft, Kevin E; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand; Vezenov, Dmitri V

    2008-12-01

    We measured the force required to peel single-stranded DNA molecules from single-crystal graphite using chemical force microscopy. Force traces during retraction of a tip chemically modified with oligonucleotides displayed characteristic plateaus with abrupt force jumps, which we interpreted as a steady state peeling process punctuated by complete detachment of one or more molecules. We were able to differentiate between bases in pyrimidine homopolymers; peeling forces were 85.3 - 4.7 pN for polythymine and 60.8 +/- 5.5 pN for polycytosine, substantially independent of salt concentration and the rate of detachment. We developed a model for peeling a freely jointed chain from the graphite surface and estimated the average binding energy per monomer to be 11.5 +/- 0.6 k(B)T and 8.3 +/- 0.7 k(B)T in the cases of thymine and cytosine nucleotides, respectively. The equilibrium free-energy profile simulated using molecular dynamics had a potential well of 18.9 k(B)T for thymidine, showing that nonelectrostatic interactions dominate the binding. The discrepancy between the experiment and theory indicates that not all bases are adsorbed on the surface or that there is a population of conformations in which they adsorb. Force spectroscopy using oligonucleotides covalently linked to AFM tips provides a flexible and unambiguous means to quantify the strength of interactions between DNA and a number of substrates, potentially including nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes. PMID:19368004

  3. Covalent Adduct Formation between the Antihypertensive Drug Hydralazine and Abasic Sites in Double- and Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydralazine (4) is an antihypertensive agent that displays both mutagenic and epigenetic properties. Here, gel electrophoretic, mass spectroscopic, and chemical kinetics methods were used to provide evidence that medicinally relevant concentrations of 4 rapidly form covalent adducts with abasic sites in double- and single-stranded DNA under physiological conditions. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that the genotoxic properties of this clinically used drug arise via reactions with an endogenous DNA lesion rather than with the canonical structure of DNA. PMID:25405892

  4. Assembly of pyrene-modified DNA/RNA duplexes incorporating a G-rich single strand region.

    PubMed

    Seio, Kohji; Tokugawa, Munefumi; Tsunoda, Hirosuke; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Arisaka, Fumio; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2013-12-15

    The structural properties of a DNA/RNA duplex having a pyrene residue at the 5' end of DNA and a G-rich single strand region at the 3' end of RNA were studied in detail. Fluorescence and ultracentrifugation analyses indicated the formation of a complex containing four DNA/RNA duplexes, which required a pyrene residue, G-rich sequence, RNA-type backbone, and high salt concentration. PMID:24183539

  5. Crystal structure of a complex of a type IA DNA topoisomerase with a single-stranded DNA molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, A.; Digate, R.J.; Mondragon, A.

    2010-03-05

    A variety of cellular processes, including DNA replication, transcription, and chromosome condensation, require enzymes that can regulate the ensuing topological changes occurring in DNA. Such enzymes - DNA topoisomerases - alter DNA topology by catalysing the cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), the passage of DNA through the resulting break, and the rejoining of the broken phosphodiester backbone. DNA topoisomerase III from Escherichia coli belongs to the type IA family of DNA topoisomerases, which transiently cleave ssDNA via formation of a covalent 5' phosphotyrosine intermediate. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.05 {angstrom} resolution, of an inactive mutant of E. coli DNA topoisomerase III in a non-covalent complex with an 8-base ssDNA molecule. The enzyme undergoes a conformational change that allows the oligonucleotide to bind within a groove leading to the active site. We note that the ssDNA molecule adopts a conformation like that of B-DNA while bound to the enzyme. The position of the DNA within the realigned active site provides insight into the role of several highly conserved residues during catalysis. These findings confirm various aspects of the type IA topoisomerase mechanism while suggesting functional implications for other topoisomerases and proteins that perform DNA rearrangements.

  6. Hydroxyapatite-mediated separation of double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA genomes from natural viral assemblages.

    PubMed

    Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Fadrosh, Douglas W; Thorpe, Joyce; Williamson, Shannon J

    2010-08-01

    Metagenomics can be used to determine the diversity of complex, often unculturable, viral communities with various nucleic acid compositions. Here, we report the use of hydroxyapatite chromatography to efficiently fractionate double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), dsRNA, and ssRNA genomes from known bacteriophages. Linker-amplified shotgun libraries were constructed to generate sequencing reads from each hydroxyapatite fraction. Greater than 90% of the reads displayed significant similarity to the expected genomes at the nucleotide level. These methods were applied to marine viruses collected from the Chesapeake Bay and the Dry Tortugas National Park. Isolated nucleic acids were fractionated using hydroxyapatite chromatography followed by linker-amplified shotgun library construction and sequencing. Taxonomic analysis demonstrated that the majority of environmental sequences, regardless of their source nucleic acid, were most similar to dsDNA viruses, reflecting the bias of viral metagenomic sequence databases. PMID:20543058

  7. Application of Motif-Based Tools on Evolutionary Analysis of Multipartite Single-Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiang-Iu; Chang, Chih-Hung; Lin, Po-Heng; Fu, Hui-Chuan; Tang, ChuanYi; Yeh, Hsin-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Multipartite viruses contain more than one distinctive genome component, and the origin of multipartite viruses has been suggested to evolve from a non-segmented wild-type virus. To explore whether recombination also plays a role in the evolution of the genomes of multipartite viruses, we developed a systematic approach that employs motif-finding tools to detect conserved motifs from divergent genomic regions and applies statistical approaches to select high-confidence motifs. The information that this approach provides helps us understand the evolution of viruses. In this study, we compared our motif-based strategy with current alignment-based recombination-detecting methods and applied our methods to the analysis of multipartite single-stranded plant DNA viruses, including bipartite begomoviruses, Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) (consisting of 6 genome components) and Faba bean necrotic yellows virus (FBNYV) (consisting of 8 genome components). Our analysis revealed that recombination occurred between genome components in some begomoviruses, BBTV and FBNYV. Our data also show that several unusual recombination events have contributed to the evolution of BBTV genome components. We believe that similar approaches can be applied to resolve the evolutionary history of other viruses. PMID:23936517

  8. Sequence-specific generation of 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine and 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine in single-stranded unmodified DNA.

    PubMed

    Egloff, David; Oleinich, Igor A; Freisinger, Eva

    2015-02-20

    DNA lesions such as 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (εA) and 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (εC) are ubiquitously present in genomes of different organisms and show increasing levels upon exposure to mutagenic substances or under conditions of chronic inflammations and infections. To facilitate investigations of the mutagenic properties and repair mechanisms of etheno-base adducts, access to oligonucleotides bearing these lesions at defined positions is of great advantage. In this study, we report a new synthetic strategy to sequence-specifically generate etheno-adducts in a single-stranded unmodified DNA sequence making use of a DNA-templated approach that positions the alkylating agent close in space to the respective target base. In contrast to solid-phase synthesis of modified oligonucleotides such DNA-templated methods can be applied to single-stranded nucleic acids of unrestricted lengths. The modular nature of the system allows straightforward adaptation to different sequences. PMID:25402665

  9. Single-stranded DNA library preparation uncovers the origin and diversity of ultrashort cell-free DNA in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Philip; Kim, Min Seong; Agbor-Enoh, Sean; Luikart, Helen; Valantine, Hannah A.; Khush, Kiran K.; De Vlaminck, Iwijn

    2016-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is emerging as a powerful monitoring tool in cancer, pregnancy and organ transplantation. Nucleosomal DNA, the predominant form of plasma cfDNA, can be adapted for sequencing via ligation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) adapters. dsDNA library preparations, however, are insensitive to ultrashort, degraded cfDNA. Drawing inspiration from advances in paleogenomics, we have applied a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method to sequencing of cfDNA in the plasma of lung transplant recipients (40 samples, six patients). We found that ssDNA library preparation yields a greater portion of sub-100 bp nuclear genomic cfDNA (p 10−5, Mann-Whitney U Test), and an increased relative abundance of mitochondrial (10.7x, p 10−5) and microbial cfDNA (71.3x, p 10−5). The higher yield of microbial sequences from this method increases the sensitivity of cfDNA-based monitoring for infections following transplantation. We detail the fragmentation pattern of mitochondrial, nuclear genomic and microbial cfDNA over a broad fragment length range. We report the observation of donor-specific mitochondrial cfDNA in the circulation of lung transplant recipients. A ssDNA library preparation method provides a more informative window into understudied forms of cfDNA, including mitochondrial and microbial derived cfDNA and short nuclear genomic cfDNA, while retaining information provided by standard dsDNA library preparation methods. PMID:27297799

  10. Single-stranded DNA library preparation uncovers the origin and diversity of ultrashort cell-free DNA in plasma.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Philip; Kim, Min Seong; Agbor-Enoh, Sean; Luikart, Helen; Valantine, Hannah A; Khush, Kiran K; De Vlaminck, Iwijn

    2016-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is emerging as a powerful monitoring tool in cancer, pregnancy and organ transplantation. Nucleosomal DNA, the predominant form of plasma cfDNA, can be adapted for sequencing via ligation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) adapters. dsDNA library preparations, however, are insensitive to ultrashort, degraded cfDNA. Drawing inspiration from advances in paleogenomics, we have applied a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method to sequencing of cfDNA in the plasma of lung transplant recipients (40 samples, six patients). We found that ssDNA library preparation yields a greater portion of sub-100 bp nuclear genomic cfDNA (p 10(-5), Mann-Whitney U Test), and an increased relative abundance of mitochondrial (10.7x, p 10(-5)) and microbial cfDNA (71.3x, p 10(-5)). The higher yield of microbial sequences from this method increases the sensitivity of cfDNA-based monitoring for infections following transplantation. We detail the fragmentation pattern of mitochondrial, nuclear genomic and microbial cfDNA over a broad fragment length range. We report the observation of donor-specific mitochondrial cfDNA in the circulation of lung transplant recipients. A ssDNA library preparation method provides a more informative window into understudied forms of cfDNA, including mitochondrial and microbial derived cfDNA and short nuclear genomic cfDNA, while retaining information provided by standard dsDNA library preparation methods. PMID:27297799

  11. Structural dynamics of E. coli single-stranded DNA binding protein reveal DNA wrapping and unwrapping pathways

    PubMed Central

    Suksombat, Sukrit; Khafizov, Rustem; Kozlov, Alexander G; Lohman, Timothy M; Chemla, Yann R

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded (ss)DNA binding (SSB) protein mediates genome maintenance processes by regulating access to ssDNA. This homotetrameric protein wraps ssDNA in multiple distinct binding modes that may be used selectively in different DNA processes, and whose detailed wrapping topologies remain speculative. Here, we used single-molecule force and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate E. coli SSB binding to ssDNA. Stretching a single ssDNA-SSB complex reveals discrete states that correlate with known binding modes, the likely ssDNA conformations and diffusion dynamics in each, and the kinetic pathways by which the protein wraps ssDNA and is dissociated. The data allow us to construct an energy landscape for the ssDNA-SSB complex, revealing that unwrapping energy costs increase the more ssDNA is unraveled. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which proteins gain access to ssDNA bound by SSB, as demonstrated by experiments in which SSB is displaced by the E. coli recombinase RecA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08193.001 PMID:26305498

  12. In vivo occupancy of mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein supports the strand displacement mode of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Miralles Fusté, Javier; Shi, Yonghong; Wanrooij, Sjoerd; Zhu, Xuefeng; Jemt, Elisabeth; Persson, Örjan; Sabouri, Nasim; Gustafsson, Claes M; Falkenberg, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation, and mutations affecting the genome have been linked to a number of diseases as well as the natural ageing process in mammals. Human mtDNA is replicated by a molecular machinery that is distinct from the nuclear replisome, but there is still no consensus on the exact mode of mtDNA replication. We here demonstrate that the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein (mtSSB) directs origin specific initiation of mtDNA replication. MtSSB covers the parental heavy strand, which is displaced during mtDNA replication. MtSSB blocks primer synthesis on the displaced strand and restricts initiation of light-strand mtDNA synthesis to the specific origin of light-strand DNA synthesis (OriL). The in vivo occupancy profile of mtSSB displays a distinct pattern, with the highest levels of mtSSB close to the mitochondrial control region and with a gradual decline towards OriL. The pattern correlates with the replication products expected for the strand displacement mode of mtDNA synthesis, lending strong in vivo support for this debated model for mitochondrial DNA replication. PMID:25474639

  13. Mutability dynamics of an emergent single stranded DNA virus in a naïve host.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Subir; Patterson, Edward I; Peters, Andrew; Baker, G Barry; Forwood, Jade K; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Holdsworth, Mark; Baker, Rupert; Murray, Neil; Raidal, Shane R

    2014-01-01

    Quasispecies variants and recombination were studied longitudinally in an emergent outbreak of beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) infection in the orange-bellied parrot (Neophema chrysogaster). Detailed health monitoring and the small population size (<300 individuals) of this critically endangered bird provided an opportunity to longitudinally track viral replication and mutation events occurring in a circular, single-stranded DNA virus over a period of four years within a novel bottleneck population. Optimized PCR was used with different combinations of primers, primer walking, direct amplicon sequencing and sequencing of cloned amplicons to analyze BFDV genome variants. Analysis of complete viral genomes (n = 16) and Rep gene sequences (n = 35) revealed that the outbreak was associated with mutations in functionally important regions of the normally conserved Rep gene and immunogenic capsid (Cap) gene with a high evolutionary rate (3.41×10(-3) subs/site/year) approaching that for RNA viruses; simultaneously we observed significant evidence of recombination hotspots between two distinct progenitor genotypes within orange-bellied parrots indicating early cross-transmission of BFDV in the population. Multiple quasispecies variants were also demonstrated with at least 13 genotypic variants identified in four different individual birds, with one containing up to seven genetic variants. Preferential PCR amplification of variants was also detected. Our findings suggest that the high degree of genetic variation within the BFDV species as a whole is reflected in evolutionary dynamics within individually infected birds as quasispecies variation, particularly when BFDV jumps from one host species to another. PMID:24416396

  14. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27609304

  15. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27609304

  16. CHO cell repair of single-strand and double-strand DNA breaks induced by gamma- and alpha-radiations.

    PubMed

    Cole, A; Shonka, F; Corry, P; Cooper, W G

    1975-01-01

    Neutral and alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis was used to measure double- and single-strand breaks in the DNA of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to either gamma- or alpha-radiation. After irradiation, cells were incubated for 15-180 min to test the ability of the cell to rejoin the DNA breaks. Essentially complete rejoining was observed for single-strand breaks induced by gamma- or alpha-doses below 20 krad and for double-strand breaks induced by gamma doses below 60 krad. Approximately 80% rejoining was observed for double-strand breaks induced by alpha doses below 40 krad. At higher doses, the repair system appeared to saturate in such a way that essentially no additional breaks were rejoined. PMID:1191188

  17. Opposite effects of nitric oxide donors on DNA single strand breakage and cytotoxicity caused by tert-butylhydroperoxide

    PubMed Central

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Sestili, Piero; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    The effects of three different NO donors on tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH)-induced DNA cleavage and toxicity were investigated in U937 cells.Treatment with S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 1–30 μM), while not in itself DNA-damaging, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH in a concentration-dependent fashion. The enhancing effects of SNAP were observed with two different techniques for the assessment of DNA damage. Decomposed SNAP was inactive. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM) and (Z)-1-[(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl) amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA-NO, 1 mM) also increased DNA cleavage generated by tB-OOH and these responses, as well as that mediated by SNAP, were prevented by the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazolin-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO).SNAP neither inhibited catalase activity nor increased the formation of DNA lesions in cells exposed to H2O2. Furthermore, SNAP did not affect the rate of rejoining of the DNA single strand breaks generated by tB-OOH.Under the conditions utilized in the DNA damage experiments, treatment with tB-OOH alone or associated with SNAP did not cause cell death. However, SNAP as well as GSNO markedly reduced the lethal response promoted by millimolar concentrations of tB-OOH and these effects were abolished by PTIO. Decomposed SNAP was inactive.It is concluded that low levels of NO donors, which probably release physiological concentrations of NO, enhance the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks in U937 cells exposed to tB-OOH. This NO-mediated effect appears to (a) not depend on inhibition of either DNA repair (which would increase the net accumulation of DNA lesions by preventing DNA single strand break removal) or catalase activity (which would also enhance the net accumulation of DNA lesions since H2O2 is one of the species mediating the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage) and (b) be caused by enforced formation of tB-OOH-derived DNA-damaging species. In contrast to

  18. Homologous pairing between single-stranded DNA immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane and duplex DNA is specific for RecA activity in bacterial crude extract.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, P; Corteggiani, E; Dutreix, M; Coppey, J; Lopez, B S

    1993-01-01

    Reaction between a circular single stranded and a linear double stranded DNA molecule (ssDNA and dsDNA) provides an efficient system to study recombination mediated by RecA protein. However, classical assays using reaction in solution require highly purified enzymes. This limits biochemical studies of mutant RecA proteins from Escherichia coli or of RecA proteins from other organisms. We describe here an assay that is specific for RecA activity even in bacterial crude extracts. In this assay, the ssDNA is bound to a nitrocellulose membrane, proteins are loaded on this membrane and it is then incubated with a labeled homologous dsDNA. Joint molecules are visualized by autoradiography. We have shown that, despite the reduced mobility of the DNA due to its binding to the membrane, RecA protein is able to promote formation of stable plectonemic joints, in a homology dependent manner. Fourteen other proteins involved in DNA metabolism were checked and did not produce a signal in our assay. Moreover, in Dot blot analysis as well as after native electrophoresis and electrotransfer on a ssDNA coated membrane, production of a signal was strictly dependent on the presence of active RecA protein in the bacterial crude extracts used. We named this assay Pairing On Membrane blot (POM blot). Images PMID:8367282

  19. Single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA irradiated in anoxic solution: Contribution of tert-butanol radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Udovicic, L.; Mark, F.; Bothe, E.

    1996-08-01

    Yields of single-strand breaks induced by {sup 60}Co {gamma} or pulse irradiation in double-stranded calf thymus DNA have been measured in N{sub 2}O-saturated aqueous solution as a function of the concentration of tert-butanol. The yields were found to be dependent on dose rate. The experimental data were analyzed using a theoretical model based on non-homogeneous scavenging kinetics. It is concluded from this analysis after {sup 60}Co {gamma} irradiation in the absence of oxygen, aside from breaks caused by hydroxyl radicals, additional breaks occur which are initiated by hydrogen atoms and secondary radicals of tert-butanol. The efficiency of hydrogen atoms in causing single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA was determined to be 2.3%, while the rate constant for the reaction of tert-butanol radicals with DNA and their efficiency in causing single-strand breaks was determined to be 4.1 x 10{sup 3} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 2%, respectively. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. RPA-coated single-stranded DNA as a platform for post-translational modifications in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Alexandre; Zou, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The Replication Protein A (RPA) complex is an essential regulator of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. RPA avidly binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) through multiple oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding folds and coordinates the recruitment and exchange of genome maintenance factors to regulate DNA replication, recombination and repair. The RPA-ssDNA platform also constitutes a key physiological signal which activates the master ATR kinase to protect and repair stalled or collapsed replication forks during replication stress. In recent years, the RPA complex has emerged as a key target and an important regulator of post-translational modifications in response to DNA damage, which is critical for its genome guardian functions. Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of the RPA complex, and more recently RPA-regulated ubiquitination, have all been shown to control specific aspects of DNA damage signaling and repair by modulating the interactions between RPA and its partners. Here, we review our current understanding of the critical functions of the RPA-ssDNA platform in the maintenance of genome stability and its regulation through an elaborate network of covalent modifications. PMID:25403473

  1. TrmBL2 from Pyrococcus furiosus Interacts Both with Double-Stranded and Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wierer, Sebastian; Daldrop, Peter; Ud Din Ahmad, Misbha; Boos, Winfried; Drescher, Malte; Welte, Wolfram; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    In many hyperthermophilic archaea the DNA binding protein TrmBL2 or one of its homologues is abundantly expressed. TrmBL2 is thought to play a significant role in modulating the chromatin architecture in combination with the archaeal histone proteins and Alba. However, its precise physiological role is poorly understood. It has been previously shown that upon binding TrmBL2 covers double-stranded DNA, which leads to the formation of a thick and fibrous filament. Here we investigated the filament formation process as well as the stabilization of DNA by TrmBL2 from Pyroccocus furiosus in detail. We used magnetic tweezers that allow to monitor changes of the DNA mechanical properties upon TrmBL2 binding on the single-molecule level. Extended filaments formed in a cooperative manner and were considerably stiffer than bare double-stranded DNA. Unlike Alba, TrmBL2 did not form DNA cross-bridges. The protein was found to bind double- and single-stranded DNA with similar affinities. In mechanical disruption experiments of DNA hairpins this led to stabilization of both, the double- (before disruption) and the single-stranded (after disruption) DNA forms. Combined, these findings suggest that the biological function of TrmBL2 is not limited to modulating genome architecture and acting as a global repressor but that the protein acts additionally as a stabilizer of DNA secondary structure. PMID:27214207

  2. Quinolone-DNA Interaction: Sequence-Dependent Binding to Single-Stranded DNA Reflects the Interaction within the Gyrase-DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Christian G.; Barnard, Faye M.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of quinolones with DNA by a number of methods to establish whether a particular binding mode correlates with quinolone potency. The specificities of the quinolone-mediated DNA cleavage reaction of DNA gyrase were compared for a number of quinolones. Two patterns that depended on the potency of the quinolone were identified. Binding to plasmid DNA was examined by measuring the unwinding of pBR322 by quinolones; no correlation with quinolone potency was observed. Quinolone binding to short DNA oligonucleotides was measured by surface plasmon resonance. The quinolones bound to both single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides in an Mg2+-dependent manner. Quinolones bound to single-stranded DNA with a higher affinity, and the binding exhibited sequence dependence; binding to double-stranded DNA was sequence independent. The variations in binding in the presence of metal ions showed that Mg2+ promoted tighter, more specific binding to single-stranded DNA than softer metal ions (Mn2+ and Cd2+). Single-stranded DNA binding by quinolones correlated with the in vitro quinolone potency, indicating that this mode of interaction may reflect the interaction of the quinolone with DNA in the context of the gyrase-DNA complex. PMID:12604512

  3. The Yeast Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor Complex Catalyzes Efficient Priming of DNA Synthesis on Single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Nandakumar, Divya; Deshpande, Aishwarya P; Lucas, Thomas P; R-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Tang, Guo-Qing; Raney, Kevin; Yin, Y Whitney; Patel, Smita S

    2016-08-01

    Primases use single-stranded (ss) DNAs as templates to synthesize short oligoribonucleotide primers that initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis or reprime DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse, but the origin of this activity in the mitochondria remains unclear. Herein, we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41) and its transcription factor (Mtf1) is an efficient primase that initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA coated with the yeast mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Both Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 can synthesize short and long RNAs on ssDNA template and prime DNA synthesis by the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase Mip1. However, the ssDNA-binding protein Rim1 severely inhibits the RNA synthesis activity of Rpo41, but not the Rpo41-Mtf1 complex, which continues to prime DNA synthesis efficiently in the presence of Rim1. We show that RNAs as short as 10-12 nt serve as primers for DNA synthesis. Characterization of the RNA-DNA products shows that Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 have slightly different priming specificity. However, both prefer to initiate with ATP from short priming sequences such as 3'-TCC, TTC, and TTT, and the consensus sequence is 3'-Pu(Py)2-3 Based on our studies, we propose that Rpo41-Mtf1 is an attractive candidate for serving as the primase to initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis during normal replication and/or to restart stalled replication from downstream ssDNA. PMID:27311715

  4. The single-strand DNA binding activity of human PC4 preventsmutagenesis and killing by oxidative DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jen-Yeu; Sarker, Altaf Hossain; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Volkert, Michael R.

    2004-02-01

    Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) is a transcriptional coactivator with a highly conserved single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding domain of unknown function. We identified PC4 as a suppressor of the oxidative mutator phenotype of the Escherichia coli fpg mutY mutant and demonstrate that this suppression requires its ssDNA binding activity. Yeast mutants lacking their PC4 ortholog Sub1 are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and exhibit spontaneous and peroxide induced hypermutability. PC4 expression suppresses the peroxide sensitivity of the yeast sub l{Delta} mutant, suggesting that the human protein has a similar function. A role for yeast and human proteins in DNA repair is suggested by the demonstration that Sub1 acts in a peroxide-resistance pathway involving Rad2 and by the physical interaction of PC4 with the human Rad2 homolog XPG. We show XPG recruits PC4 to a bubble-containing DNA substrate with resulting displacement of XPG and formation of a PC4-DNA complex. We discuss the possible requirement for PC4 in either global or transcription-coupled repair of oxidative DNA damage to mediate the release of XPG bound to its substrate.

  5. Electrical conduction and photoresponses of gamma-ray-irradiated single-stranded DNA/single-walled carbon nanotube composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, W.; Lee, E. M.; Kim, D. W.; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2015-04-01

    Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on the electrical conductivity and photoresponse have been studied for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite films. The temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of the ssDNA/SWNT composite films, well described by a fluctuation-induced tunneling model, indicated modification of the barrier for thermally activated conduction by the gamma-ray irradiation. Besides, the photoresponse measurements indicated modified photoexcited charge carrier generation and oxygen photodesorption in the composite systems due to the gamma-ray irradiation.

  6. Electroporation and Microinjection Successfully Deliver Single-Stranded and Duplex DNA into Live Cells as Detected by FRET Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, Rosemary A.; Zhao, Zheng-yun; Hotchin, Neil A.; Styles, Iain B.; Nash, Gerard B.; Tucker, James H. R.; Bicknell, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology relies on the close proximity of two compatible fluorophores for energy transfer. Tagged (Cy3 and Cy5) complementary DNA strands forming a stable duplex and a doubly-tagged single strand were shown to demonstrate FRET outside of a cellular environment. FRET was also observed after transfecting these DNA strands into fixed and live cells using methods such as microinjection and electroporation, but not when using lipid based transfection reagents, unless in the presence of the endosomal acidification inhibitor bafilomycin. Avoiding the endocytosis pathway is essential for efficient delivery of intact DNA probes into cells. PMID:24755680

  7. TTV, a new human virus with single stranded circular DNA genome.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shigeo

    2002-01-01

    TT virus (TTV) was found in 1997 from a hepatitis patient without virus markers. However, the real impact of TTV on liver diseases remains uncertain to date. Due to the lack of suitable cell systems to support the growth of TTV, the biology of TTV is still obscure. This review tries to summarise the current status of TTV on aspects other than the taxonomic diversity of TTV. TTV was the first human virus with a single stranded circular DNA genome. TTV was considered to be a member of Circoviridae, but others suggested it conformed to a new family. TTV is distinct from ambisense viruses in the genus Circovirus, since the former genome is negative stranded. The genome structure of TTV is more related to chicken anaemia virus in the genus Gyrovirus, however, the sequence similarity is minimal except for a short stretch at 3816-3851 of TA278. Currently the working group is proposing the full name for TTV as TorqueTenoVirus and the TTV-like mini virus as TorqueTenoMiniVirus (TTMV) in a new genus Anellovirus (ring). TTVs are prevalent in non-human primates and human TTV can cross-infect chimpanzees. Furthermore, TTV sequences have been detected in chickens, pigs, cows and sheep. TTV can be transmitted by mother-to-child infection. However, within a year after birth, the prevalence reaches the same level for children born to both TTV-positive and TTV-negative mothers even without breast-feeding. The non-coding region surrounding a short 113 nt GC-rich stretch and occupying approximately one-third of the genome is considered to contain the putative replication origin. Three mRNAs are expressed by TTV, 3.0 and 1.2 and 1.0 kb species. A protein translated from the 3.0 kb mRNA is considered to be the major capsid protein as well as replicase. The nature of the proteins translated by the other two mRNAs are still putative. PMID:11987140

  8. Mec1/ATR regulates the generation of single-stranded DNA that attenuates Tel1/ATM signaling at DNA ends

    PubMed Central

    Clerici, Michela; Trovesi, Camilla; Galbiati, Alessandro; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    Tel1/ATM and Mec1/ATR checkpoint kinases are activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mec1/ATR recruitment to DSBs requires the formation of RPA-coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which arises from 5′–3′ nucleolytic degradation (resection) of DNA ends. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mec1 regulates resection of the DSB ends. The lack of Mec1 accelerates resection and reduces the loading to DSBs of the checkpoint protein Rad9, which is known to inhibit ssDNA generation. Extensive resection is instead inhibited by the Mec1-ad mutant variant that increases the recruitment near the DSB of Rad9, which in turn blocks DSB resection by both Rad53-dependent and Rad53-independent mechanisms. The mec1-ad resection defect leads to prolonged persistence at DSBs of the MRX complex that causes unscheduled Tel1 activation, which in turn impairs checkpoint switch off. Thus, Mec1 regulates the generation of ssDNA at DSBs, and this control is important to coordinate Mec1 and Tel1 signaling activities at these breaks. PMID:24357557

  9. DpnA, a methylase for single-strand DNA in the Dpn II restriction system, and its biological function

    SciTech Connect

    Cerritelli, S.; Springhorn, S.S.; Lacks, S.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The two DNA-adenine methylases encoded by the Dpn II restriction gene cassette were purified, and their activities were compared on various DNA substrates. DpnA was able to methylate single-strand DNA and double-strand DNA, whereas DpnM methylated only double-strand DNA. Although both enzymes act at 5{prime}-GATC-3{prime} in DNA, DpnA can also methylate sequences altered in the guanine position, but at a lower rate. A deletion mutation in the dpnA gene was constructed and transferred to the chromosome. Transmission by way of the transformation pathway of methylated and unmethylated plasmids to dpnA mutant and wild-type recipients was examined. The mutant cells restricted unmethylated donor plasmic establishment much more strongly than did wild-type cells. In the wild type, the single strands of donor plasmid DNA that enter by the transformation pathway are apparently methylated by DpnA prior to conversion of the plasmid to a double-strand form, in which the plasmid would be susceptible to the Dpn II endonuclease. The biological function of DpnA may, therefore, be the enhancement of plasmid transfer to Dpn II-containing strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  10. Conformational transitions and stop-and-go nanopore transport of single-stranded DNA on charged graphene.

    PubMed

    Shankla, Manish; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2014-01-01

    Control over interactions with biomolecules holds the key to applications of graphene in biotechnology. One such application is nanopore sequencing, where a DNA molecule is electrophoretically driven through a graphene nanopore. Here we investigate how interactions of single-stranded DNA and a graphene membrane can be controlled by electrically biasing the membrane. The results of our molecular dynamics simulations suggest that electric charge on graphene can force a DNA homopolymer to adopt a range of strikingly different conformations. The conformational response is sensitive to even very subtle nucleotide modifications, such as DNA methylation. The speed of DNA motion through a graphene nanopore is strongly affected by the graphene charge: a positive charge accelerates the motion, whereas a negative charge arrests it. As a possible application of the effect, we demonstrate stop-and-go transport of DNA controlled by the charge of graphene. Such on-demand transport of DNA is essential for realizing nanopore sequencing. PMID:25296960

  11. Conformational transitions and stop-and-go nanopore transport of single-stranded DNA on charged graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankla, Manish; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2014-10-01

    Control over interactions with biomolecules holds the key to applications of graphene in biotechnology. One such application is nanopore sequencing, where a DNA molecule is electrophoretically driven through a graphene nanopore. Here we investigate how interactions of single-stranded DNA and a graphene membrane can be controlled by electrically biasing the membrane. The results of our molecular dynamics simulations suggest that electric charge on graphene can force a DNA homopolymer to adopt a range of strikingly different conformations. The conformational response is sensitive to even very subtle nucleotide modifications, such as DNA methylation. The speed of DNA motion through a graphene nanopore is strongly affected by the graphene charge: a positive charge accelerates the motion, whereas a negative charge arrests it. As a possible application of the effect, we demonstrate stop-and-go transport of DNA controlled by the charge of graphene. Such on-demand transport of DNA is essential for realizing nanopore sequencing.

  12. Dynamic Mechanism of Single-Stranded DNA Encapsulated into Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yan-Fei; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Mo, Yong-Fang; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang

    2014-02-01

    Hybrids of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and biological molecules have been utilized for numerous applications in sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. By molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the encapsulation of single-strand DNA (ssDNA) containing eight adenine bases with (17,17)-(12,12) SWCNTs. The effects of the diameter and length of SWCNTs on the encapsulation process are explored with the calculated curves of the center-of-mass distance, the van der Waals interaction between the ssDNA and SWCNT, the root-mean-square deviation of the ssDNA, and the radius of gyration of the ssDNA. The free energy of the encapsulated ssDNA for each SWCNT is also obtained via steered molecular dynamics simulation. The most suitable SWCNT for encapsulating the ssDNA is also suggested.

  13. Sub-diffusive electronic transport in a DNA single-strand chain with electron-phonon coupling.

    PubMed

    Sales, M O; Lyra, M L; de Moura, F A B F; Fulco, U L; Albuquerque, E L

    2015-01-28

    We investigate the electronic wavepacket dynamics in a finite segment of a DNA single-strand chain considering the electron-phonon coupling. Our theoretical approach makes use of an effective tight-binding Hamiltonian to describe the electron dynamics, together with a classical harmonic Hamiltonian to treat the intrinsic DNA vibrations. An effective time-dependent Schrödinger equation is then settled up and solved numerically for an initially localized wave-packet using the standard Dormand-Prince eighth-order Runge-Kutta method. Our numerical results indicate the presence of a sub-diffusive electronic wavepacket spread mediated by the electron-phonon interaction. PMID:25564495

  14. Structural basis for Tetrahymena telomerase processivity factor Teb1 binding to single-stranded telomeric-repeat DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhixiong; Min, Bosun; Huang, Jing; Hong, Kyungah; Yang, Yuting; Collins, Kathleen; Lei, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase copies its internal RNA template to synthesize telomeric DNA repeats. Unlike other polymerases, telomerase can retain its single-stranded product through multiple rounds of template dissociation and repositioning to accomplish repeat addition processivity (RAP). Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme RAP depends on a subunit, Teb1, with autonomous DNA-binding activity. Sequence homology and domain modeling suggest that Teb1 is a paralog of RPA70C, the largest subunit of the single-stranded DNA-binding factor replication protein (RPA), but unlike RPA, Teb1 binds DNA with high specificity for telomeric repeats. To understand the structural basis and significance of telomeric-repeat DNA recognition by Teb1, we solved crystal structures of three proposed Teb1 DNA-binding domains and defined amino acids of each domain that contribute to DNA interaction. Our studies indicate that two central Teb1 DNA-binding oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding-fold domains, Teb1A and Teb1B, achieve high affinity and selectivity of telomeric-repeat recognition by principles similar to the telomere end-capping protein POT1 (protection of telomeres 1). An additional C-terminal Teb1 oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding-fold domain, Teb1C, has features shared with the RPA70 C-terminal domain including a putative direct DNA-binding surface that is critical for high-RAP activity of reconstituted holoenzyme. The Teb1C zinc ribbon motif does not contribute to DNA binding but is nonetheless required for high-RAP activity, perhaps contributing to Teb1 physical association with the remainder of the holoenzyme. Our results suggest the biological model that high-affinity DNA binding by Teb1AB recruits holoenzyme to telomeres and subsequent Teb1C–DNA association traps product in a sliding-clamp-like manner that does not require high-affinity DNA binding for high stability of enzyme-product association. PMID:22143754

  15. Deceleration of single-stranded DNA passing through a nanopore using a nanometre-sized bead structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yusuke; Haga, Takanobu; Yanagi, Itaru; Yokoi, Takahide; Takeda, Ken-Ichi

    2015-11-01

    DNA sequencing with a solid-state nanopore requires a reduction of the translocation speeds of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) over 10 μs/base. In this study, we report that a nanometre-sized bead structure constructed around a nanopore can reduce the moving speed of ssDNA to 270 μs/base by adjusting the diameter of the bead and its surface chemical group. This decelerating effect originates from the strong interaction between ssDNA and the chemical group on the surface of the bead. This nanostructure was simply prepared by dip coating in which a substrate with a nanopore was immersed in a silica bead solution and then dried in an oven. As compared with conventional approaches, our novel method is less laborious, simpler to perform and more effective in reducing ssDNA translocation speed.

  16. Deceleration of single-stranded DNA passing through a nanopore using a nanometre-sized bead structure

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yusuke; Haga, Takanobu; Yanagi, Itaru; Yokoi, Takahide; Takeda, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequencing with a solid-state nanopore requires a reduction of the translocation speeds of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) over 10 μs/base. In this study, we report that a nanometre-sized bead structure constructed around a nanopore can reduce the moving speed of ssDNA to 270 μs/base by adjusting the diameter of the bead and its surface chemical group. This decelerating effect originates from the strong interaction between ssDNA and the chemical group on the surface of the bead. This nanostructure was simply prepared by dip coating in which a substrate with a nanopore was immersed in a silica bead solution and then dried in an oven. As compared with conventional approaches, our novel method is less laborious, simpler to perform and more effective in reducing ssDNA translocation speed. PMID:26559466

  17. Recognition of T-rich single-stranded DNA by the cold shock protein Bs-CspB in solution

    PubMed Central

    Zeeb, Markus; Max, Klaas E.A.; Weininger, Ulrich; Löw, Christian; Sticht, Heinrich; Balbach, Jochen

    2006-01-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSP) belong to the family of single-stranded nucleic acid binding proteins with OB-fold. CSP are believed to function as ‘RNA chaperones’ and during anti-termination. We determined the solution structure of Bs-CspB bound to the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fragment heptathymidine (dT7) by NMR spectroscopy. Bs-CspB reveals an almost invariant conformation when bound to dT7 with only minor reorientations in loop β1–β2 and β3–β4 and of few aromatic side chains involved in base stacking. Binding studies of protein variants and mutated ssDNA demonstrated that Bs-CspB associates with ssDNA at almost diffusion controlled rates and low sequence specificity consistent with its biological function. A variation of the ssDNA affinity is accomplished solely by changes of the dissociation rate. 15N NMR relaxation and H/D exchange experiments revealed that binding of dT7 increases the stability of Bs-CspB and reduces the sub-nanosecond dynamics of the entire protein and especially of loop β3–β4. PMID:16956971

  18. FBXL5-mediated degradation of single-stranded DNA-binding protein hSSB1 controls DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Bin; Tang, Nai-Wang; Xu, Yun-Hua; Ye, Xiang-Yun; Li, Zi-Ming; Niu, Xiao-Min; Shen, Sheng-Ping; Lu, Shun; Xu, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Human single-strand (ss) DNA binding proteins 1 (hSSB1) has been shown to participate in DNA damage response and maintenance of genome stability by regulating the initiation of ATM-dependent signaling. ATM phosphorylates hSSB1 and prevents hSSB1 from ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. However, the E3 ligase that targets hSSB1 for destruction is still unknown. Here, we report that hSSB1 is the bona fide substrate for an Fbxl5-containing SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F box) E3 ligase. Fbxl5 interacts with and targets hSSB1 for ubiquitination and degradation, which could be prevented by ATM-mediated hSSB1 T117 phosphorylation. Furthermore, cells overexpression of Fbxl5 abrogated the cellular response to DSBs, including activation of ATM and phosphorylation of ATM targets and exhibited increased radiosensitivity, chemosensitivity and defective checkpoint activation after genotoxic stress stimuli. Moreover, the protein levels of hSSB1 and Fbxl5 showed an inverse correlation in lung cancer cells lines and clinical lung cancer samples. Therefore, Fbxl5 may negatively modulate hSSB1 to regulate DNA damage response, implicating Fbxl5 as a novel, promising therapeutic target for lung cancers. PMID:25249620

  19. FBXL5-mediated degradation of single-stranded DNA-binding protein hSSB1 controls DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Bin; Tang, Nai-Wang; Xu, Yun-Hua; Ye, Xiang-Yun; Li, Zi-Ming; Niu, Xiao-Min; Shen, Sheng-Ping; Lu, Shun; Xu, Ling

    2014-10-01

    Human single-strand (ss) DNA binding proteins 1 (hSSB1) has been shown to participate in DNA damage response and maintenance of genome stability by regulating the initiation of ATM-dependent signaling. ATM phosphorylates hSSB1 and prevents hSSB1 from ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. However, the E3 ligase that targets hSSB1 for destruction is still unknown. Here, we report that hSSB1 is the bona fide substrate for an Fbxl5-containing SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F box) E3 ligase. Fbxl5 interacts with and targets hSSB1 for ubiquitination and degradation, which could be prevented by ATM-mediated hSSB1 T117 phosphorylation. Furthermore, cells overexpression of Fbxl5 abrogated the cellular response to DSBs, including activation of ATM and phosphorylation of ATM targets and exhibited increased radiosensitivity, chemosensitivity and defective checkpoint activation after genotoxic stress stimuli. Moreover, the protein levels of hSSB1 and Fbxl5 showed an inverse correlation in lung cancer cells lines and clinical lung cancer samples. Therefore, Fbxl5 may negatively modulate hSSB1 to regulate DNA damage response, implicating Fbxl5 as a novel, promising therapeutic target for lung cancers. PMID:25249620

  20. Stable DNA Unwinding, not "Breathing," Accounts for Single-Strand-Specific Nuclease Hypersensitivity of Specific A + T-Rich Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, David; Natale, Darren A.; Eddy, Martha J.

    1988-12-01

    A long A+T-rich sequence in supercoiled pBR322 DNA is hypersensitive to single-strand-specific nucleases at 37 degrees C but not at reduced temperature. The basis for the nuclease hypersensitivity is stable DNA unwinding as revealed by (i) the same temperature dependence for hypersensitivity and for stable unwinding of plasmid topoisomers after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, (ii) preferential nuclease digestion of stably unwound topoisomers, and (iii) quantitative nicking of stably unwound topoisomers in the A+T-rich region. Nuclease hypersensitivity of A+T-rich sequences is hierarchical, and either deletion of the primary site or a sufficient increase in the free energy of supercoiling leads to enhanced nicking at an alternative A+T-rich site. The hierarchy of nuclease hypersensitivity reflects a hierarchy in the free energy required for unwinding naturally occurring sequences in supercoiled DNA. This finding, along with the known hypersensitivity of replication origins and transcriptional regulatory regions, has important implications for using single-strand-specific nucleases in DNA structure-function studies.

  1. Single-stranded DNA detection by solvent-induced assemblies of a metallo-peptide-based complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Priyadip; Reches, Meital

    2016-05-01

    DNA detection is highly important for the sensitive sensing of different pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The major challenge is to create a sensor that can selectively detect very small concentrations of DNA without the need for amplification or complicated equipment. Different technologies such as optical, electrochemical and microgravimetric approaches can detect DNA fragments. Here we show, for the first time, the use of self-assembled nanostructures generated by a metallo-peptide as an optical sensing platform for DNA detection. The system can selectively detect single stranded DNA fragments by fluorescence measurements as it can discriminate even one base mismatch and can perform in the presence of other interfering proteins. This system may be useful in lab-on-a-chip applications.DNA detection is highly important for the sensitive sensing of different pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The major challenge is to create a sensor that can selectively detect very small concentrations of DNA without the need for amplification or complicated equipment. Different technologies such as optical, electrochemical and microgravimetric approaches can detect DNA fragments. Here we show, for the first time, the use of self-assembled nanostructures generated by a metallo-peptide as an optical sensing platform for DNA detection. The system can selectively detect single stranded DNA fragments by fluorescence measurements as it can discriminate even one base mismatch and can perform in the presence of other interfering proteins. This system may be useful in lab-on-a-chip applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Peptide and receptor synthesis, characterization of the final and intermediate products, experimental details and additional figures including SEM, TEM, DLS, XRD, UV analysis and AFM topographic analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07714a

  2. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay.

    PubMed

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E

    2014-11-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1°C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9°C with oligomers ⩾10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1μM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9°C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  3. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay

    PubMed Central

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1 °C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9 °C with oligomers ≥10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1 µM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9 °C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  4. Elastic properties and secondary structure formation of single-stranded DNA at monovalent and divalent salt conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Alessandro; Camunas-Soler, Joan; Ritort, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) plays a major role in several biological processes. It is therefore of fundamental interest to understand how the elastic response and the formation of secondary structures are modulated by the interplay between base pairing and electrostatic interactions. Here we measure force-extension curves (FECs) of ssDNA molecules in optical tweezers set up over two orders of magnitude of monovalent and divalent salt conditions, and obtain its elastic parameters by fitting the FECs to semiflexible models of polymers. For both monovalent and divalent salts, we find that the electrostatic contribution to the persistence length is proportional to the Debye screening length, varying as the inverse of the square root of cation concentration. The intrinsic persistence length is equal to 0.7 nm for both types of salts, and the effectivity of divalent cations in screening electrostatic interactions appears to be 100-fold as compared with monovalent salt, in line with what has been recently reported for single-stranded RNA. Finally, we propose an analysis of the FECs using a model that accounts for the effective thickness of the filament at low salt condition and a simple phenomenological description that quantifies the formation of non-specific secondary structure at low forces. PMID:24225314

  5. Charge transport and photoresponses in a single-stranded DNA/single-walled carbon nanotube composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wonseon; Lee, Eunmo; Kue Park, Jun; Eui Lee, Cheol

    2013-06-01

    Electrical conductivity and photoresponse measurements have been carried out on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite film in comparison to those of a SWNT film. While the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of the pristine SWNT film was described well by the combined mechanism of a three-dimensional variable-range hopping and hopping conduction, that of the ssDNA/SWNT composite film followed a fluctuation-induced tunneling model. Besides, competition of photoexcited charge carrier generation and oxygen adsorption/photodesorption in the photoresponses of the films was observed and discussed in view of the role of the DNA wrapping. Thus, the biopolymer coating of the SWNTs is shown to play a significant role in modifying the charge dynamics of the composite system.

  6. Concentration-Dependent Exchange of Replication Protein A on Single-Stranded DNA Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Bryan; Ye, Ling F.; Gergoudis, Stephanie C.; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein necessary for all aspects of DNA metabolism involving an ssDNA intermediate, including DNA replication, repair, recombination, DNA damage response and checkpoint activation, and telomere maintenance [1], [2], [3]. The role of RPA in most of these reactions is to protect the ssDNA until it can be delivered to downstream enzymes. Therefore a crucial feature of RPA is that it must bind very tightly to ssDNA, but must also be easily displaced from ssDNA to allow other proteins to gain access to the substrate. Here we use total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and nanofabricated DNA curtains to visualize the behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPA on individual strands of ssDNA in real-time. Our results show that RPA remains bound to ssDNA for long periods of time when free protein is absent from solution. In contrast, RPA rapidly dissociates from ssDNA when free RPA is present in solution allowing rapid exchange between the free and bound states. In addition, the S. cerevisiae DNA recombinase Rad51 and E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB) also promote removal of RPA from ssDNA. These results reveal an unanticipated exchange between bound and free RPA suggesting a binding mechanism that can confer exceptionally slow off rates, yet also enables rapid displacement through a direct exchange mechanism that is reliant upon the presence of free ssDNA-binding proteins in solution. Our results indicate that RPA undergoes constant microscopic dissociation under all conditions, but this is only manifested as macroscopic dissociation (i.e. exchange) when free proteins are present in solution, and this effect is due to mass action. We propose that the dissociation of RPA from ssDNA involves a partially dissociated intermediate, which exposes a small section of ssDNA allowing other proteins to access to the DNA. PMID:24498402

  7. New single-stranded DNA virus with a unique genomic structure that infects marine diatom Chaetoceros setoensis.

    PubMed

    Tomaru, Yuji; Toyoda, Kensuke; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Kimura, Kei; Takao, Yoshitake

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are among the most abundant organisms in nature; however, their relationships with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses have not yet been defined in detail. We report the isolation and characterisation of a virus (CsetDNAV) that lytically infects the bloom-forming diatom Chaetoceros setoensis. The virion is 33 nm in diameter and accumulates in the nucleus of its host. CsetDNAV harbours a covalently closed-circular ssDNA genome comprising 5836 nucleotides and eight different short-complementary fragments (67-145 nucleotides), which have not been reported in other diatom viruses. Phylogenetic analysis based on the putative replicase-related protein showed that CsetDNAV was not included in the monophyly of the recently established genus Bacilladnavirus. This discovery of CsetDNAV, which harbours a genome with a structure that is unique among known viruses that infect diatoms, suggests that other such undiscovered viruses possess diverse genomic architectures. PMID:24275766

  8. Dda helicase tightly couples translocation on single-stranded DNA to unwinding of duplex DNA: Dda is an optimally active helicase

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Alicia K.; Matlock, Dennis L.; Bagchi, Debjani; Aarattuthodiyil, Suja; Harrison, David; Croquette, Vincent; Raney, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Helicases utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA while translocating on the DNA. Mechanisms for melting the duplex have been characterized as active or passive, depending on whether the enzyme actively separates the base pairs or simply sequesters single-stranded DNA that forms due to thermal fraying. Here we show that Dda translocates unidirectionally on single-stranded DNA at the same rate at which it unwinds double-stranded DNA in both ensemble and single molecule experiments. Further, the unwinding rate is largely insensitive to the duplex stability and to applied force. Thus, Dda transduces all of its translocase activity into DNA unwinding activity so that the rate of unwinding is limited by the rate of translocation and the enzyme actively separates the duplex. Active and passive helicases have been characterized by dividing the velocity of DNA unwinding in base pairs per second (Vun) by the velocity of translocation on single-stranded DNA in nucleotides per second (Vtrans). If the resulting fraction is 0.25, then a helicase is considered to be at the lower end of the “active” range. In the case of Dda, the average DNA unwinding velocity was 257 ± 42 bp/s and the average translocation velocity was 267 ± 15 nucleotides/s. The Vun/Vtrans value of 0.96 places Dda in a unique category of being an essentially “perfectly” active helicase. PMID:22504228

  9. 5′-Single-stranded/duplex DNA junctions are loading sites for E. coli UvrD translocase

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Eric J; Jia, Haifeng; Park, Jeehae; Maluf, Nasib K; Ha, Taekjip; Lohman, Timothy M

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a 3′–5′ superfamily 1A helicase/translocase involved in a variety of DNA metabolic processes. UvrD can function either as a helicase or only as an single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase. The switch between these activities is controlled in vitro by the UvrD oligomeric state; a monomer has ssDNA translocase activity, whereas at least a dimer is needed for helicase activity. Although a 3′-ssDNA partial duplex provides a high-affinity site for a UvrD monomer, here we show that a monomer also binds with specificity to DNA junctions possessing a 5′-ssDNA flanking region and can initiate translocation from this site. Thus, a 5′-ss–duplex DNA junction can serve as a high-affinity loading site for the monomeric UvrD translocase, whereas a 3′-ss–duplex DNA junction inhibits both translocase and helicase activity of the UvrD monomer. Furthermore, the 2B subdomain of UvrD is important for this junction specificity. This highlights a separation of helicase and translocase function for UvrD and suggests that a monomeric UvrD translocase can be loaded at a 5′-ssDNA junction when translocation activity alone is needed. PMID:20877334

  10. 5'-Single-stranded/duplex DNA junctions are loading sites for E. coli UvrD translocase.

    PubMed

    Tomko, Eric J; Jia, Haifeng; Park, Jeehae; Maluf, Nasib K; Ha, Taekjip; Lohman, Timothy M

    2010-11-17

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a 3'-5' superfamily 1A helicase/translocase involved in a variety of DNA metabolic processes. UvrD can function either as a helicase or only as an single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase. The switch between these activities is controlled in vitro by the UvrD oligomeric state; a monomer has ssDNA translocase activity, whereas at least a dimer is needed for helicase activity. Although a 3'-ssDNA partial duplex provides a high-affinity site for a UvrD monomer, here we show that a monomer also binds with specificity to DNA junctions possessing a 5'-ssDNA flanking region and can initiate translocation from this site. Thus, a 5'-ss-duplex DNA junction can serve as a high-affinity loading site for the monomeric UvrD translocase, whereas a 3'-ss-duplex DNA junction inhibits both translocase and helicase activity of the UvrD monomer. Furthermore, the 2B subdomain of UvrD is important for this junction specificity. This highlights a separation of helicase and translocase function for UvrD and suggests that a monomeric UvrD translocase can be loaded at a 5'-ssDNA junction when translocation activity alone is needed. PMID:20877334

  11. A kinetic model of single-strand annealing for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Taleei, Reza; Weinfeld, Michael; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2011-02-01

    Ionising radiation induces different types of DNA damage, including single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks (DSB) and base damages. DSB are considered to be the most critical lesion to be repaired. The three main competitive pathways in the repair of DSB are non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR) and single-strand annealing (SSA). SSA is a non-conservative repair pathway requiring direct repeat sequences for the repair process. In this work, a biochemical kinetic model is presented to describe the SSA repair pathway. The model consists of a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing the steps in the repair pathway. The reaction rates were estimated by comparing the model results with the experimental data for chicken DT40 cells exposed to 20 Gy of X-rays. The model successfully predicts the repair of the DT40 cells with the reaction rates derived from the 20-Gy X-ray experiment. The experimental data and the kinetic model show fast and slow DSB repair components. The half time and fractions of the slow and the fast components of the repair were compared for the model and the experiments. Mathematical and computational modelling in biology has played an important role in predicting biological mechanisms and stimulating future experimentation. The present model of SSA adds to the modelling of NHEJ and HR to provide a more complete description of DSB repair pathways. PMID:21183536

  12. Nerve growth factor inhibits the synthesis of a single-stranded DNA binding protein in pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12).

    PubMed Central

    Biocca, S; Cattaneo, A; Calissano, P

    1984-01-01

    Arrest of mitosis and neurite outgrowth induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) in rat pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12) is accompanied by a progressive inhibition of the synthesis of a protein that binds to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. Time course experiments show that this inhibition is already apparent after a 2-day incubation with NGF and is maximum (85-95%) upon achievement of complete PC12 cell differentiation. Inhibition of the synthesis of this single-stranded DNA binding protein after 48 hr of incubation with NGF is potentiated by concomitant treatment of PC12 cells with antimitotic drugs acting at different levels of DNA replication. Purification on a preparative scale of this protein and analysis of its major physicochemical properties show that: (i) it constitutes 0.5% of total soluble proteins of naive PC12 cells; (ii) its molecular weight measured by NaDodSO4/PAGE is Mr 34,000 (sucrose gradient centrifugation under nondenaturing conditions yields a sedimentation coefficient s20,w of 8.1 S, indicating that the native protein is an oligomer); (iii) amino acid analysis demonstrates a preponderance of acidic over basic residues, while electrofocusing experiments show that it has an isoelectric point around 8.0; (iv) approximately 15% of the protein is phosphorylated in vivo. It is postulated that control of the synthesis of this protein is connected with activation of a differentiative program triggered by NGF in the PC12 neoplastic cell line at some step(s) of DNA activity. Images PMID:6585787

  13. Discovery, Prevalence, and Persistence of Novel Circular Single-Stranded DNA Viruses in the Ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, Mya; Benner, Bayleigh E; Jernigan, Parker E; Rosario, Karyna; Birsa, Laura M; Harbeitner, Rachel C; Fulford, Sidney; Graham, Carina; Walters, Anna; Goldsmith, Dawn B; Berger, Stella A; Nejstgaard, Jens C

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous zooplankton, such as ctenophores and jellyfish, are important components of marine and brackish ecosystems and play critical roles in aquatic biogeochemistry. As voracious predators of plankton, ctenophores have key positions in aquatic food webs and are often successful invaders when introduced to new areas. Gelatinous zooplankton have strong impacts on ecosystem services, particularly in coastal environments. However, little is known about the factors responsible for regulating population dynamics of gelatinous organisms, including biological interactions that may contribute to bloom demise. Ctenophores are known to contain specific bacterial communities and a variety of invertebrate parasites and symbionts; however, no previous studies have examined the presence of viruses in these organisms. Building upon recent studies demonstrating a diversity of single-stranded DNA viruses that encode a replication initiator protein (Rep) in aquatic invertebrates, this study explored the presence of circular, Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses in the ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata collected from the Skidaway River Estuary and Savannah River in Georgia, USA. Using rolling circle amplification followed by restriction enzyme digestion, this study provides the first evidence of viruses in ctenophores. Investigation of four CRESS-DNA viruses over an 8-month period using PCR demonstrated temporal trends in viral prevalence and indicated that some of the viruses may persist in ctenophore populations throughout the year. Although future work needs to examine the ecological roles of these ctenophore-associated viruses, this study indicates that viral infection may play a role in population dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton. PMID:26733971

  14. Discovery, Prevalence, and Persistence of Novel Circular Single-Stranded DNA Viruses in the Ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, Mya; Benner, Bayleigh E.; Jernigan, Parker E.; Rosario, Karyna; Birsa, Laura M.; Harbeitner, Rachel C.; Fulford, Sidney; Graham, Carina; Walters, Anna; Goldsmith, Dawn B.; Berger, Stella A.; Nejstgaard, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous zooplankton, such as ctenophores and jellyfish, are important components of marine and brackish ecosystems and play critical roles in aquatic biogeochemistry. As voracious predators of plankton, ctenophores have key positions in aquatic food webs and are often successful invaders when introduced to new areas. Gelatinous zooplankton have strong impacts on ecosystem services, particularly in coastal environments. However, little is known about the factors responsible for regulating population dynamics of gelatinous organisms, including biological interactions that may contribute to bloom demise. Ctenophores are known to contain specific bacterial communities and a variety of invertebrate parasites and symbionts; however, no previous studies have examined the presence of viruses in these organisms. Building upon recent studies demonstrating a diversity of single-stranded DNA viruses that encode a replication initiator protein (Rep) in aquatic invertebrates, this study explored the presence of circular, Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses in the ctenophores Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata collected from the Skidaway River Estuary and Savannah River in Georgia, USA. Using rolling circle amplification followed by restriction enzyme digestion, this study provides the first evidence of viruses in ctenophores. Investigation of four CRESS-DNA viruses over an 8-month period using PCR demonstrated temporal trends in viral prevalence and indicated that some of the viruses may persist in ctenophore populations throughout the year. Although future work needs to examine the ecological roles of these ctenophore-associated viruses, this study indicates that viral infection may play a role in population dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton. PMID:26733971

  15. Endonuclease IV cleaves apurinic/apyrimidinic sites in single-stranded DNA and its application for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Juan; Wu, Shuang; Cen, Yao; Chen, Ting-Ting; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chu, Xia

    2016-07-21

    Endonuclease IV (Endo IV), as a DNA repairing enzyme, plays a crucial role in repairing damaged DNA comprising abasic sites to maintain genomic integrity. The cleaving capability of Endo IV to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP) in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was demonstrated. It was found that Endo IV has considerably high cleaving activity to AP sites in ssDNA compared with that in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The unique feature of Endo IV in cleaving AP sites in ssDNA was further applied to construct a novel dual signal amplified sensing system for highly sensitive enzyme and protein detection by a combination of exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided cyclic amplification reaction and a rolling circle replication (RCR) technique, which showed a good sensing performance with a detection limit of 0.008 U mL(-1) for Endo IV and 2.5 pM for streptavidin. In addition, the developed method had considerably high specificity for Endo IV and streptavidin over other potential interferences. The developed strategy indeed provides a novel platform for protein and enzyme assays and may find a broad spectrum of applications in bioanalysis, disease diagnosis, and drug development. PMID:27186607

  16. Human origin recognition complex binds preferentially to G-quadruplex-preferable RNA and single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Shoko; Yura, Kei; Teranishi, Honami; Kiyasu, Noriko; Tominaga, Ayumi; Kadoma, Haruka; Nakatsuka, Ayaka; Kunichika, Tomoko; Obuse, Chikashi; Waga, Shou

    2013-10-18

    Origin recognition complex (ORC), consisting of six subunits ORC1-6, is known to bind to replication origins and function in the initiation of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. In contrast to the fact that Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORC recognizes the replication origin in a sequence-specific manner, metazoan ORC has not exhibited strict sequence-specificity for DNA binding. Here we report that human ORC binds preferentially to G-quadruplex (G4)-preferable G-rich RNA or single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). We mapped the G-rich RNA-binding domain in the ORC1 subunit, in a region adjacent to its ATPase domain. This domain itself has an ability to preferentially recognize G4-preferable sequences of ssDNA. Furthermore, we found, by structure modeling, that the G-rich RNA-binding domain is similar to the N-terminal portion of AdoMet_MTase domain of mammalian DNA methyltransferase 1. Therefore, in contrast with the binding to double-stranded DNA, human ORC has an apparent sequence preference with respect to its RNA/ssDNA binding. Interestingly, this specificity coincides with the common signature present in most of the human replication origins. We expect that our findings provide new insights into the regulations of function and chromatin binding of metazoan ORCs. PMID:24003239

  17. Human Origin Recognition Complex Binds Preferentially to G-quadruplex-preferable RNA and Single-stranded DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Hoshina, Shoko; Yura, Kei; Teranishi, Honami; Kiyasu, Noriko; Tominaga, Ayumi; Kadoma, Haruka; Nakatsuka, Ayaka; Kunichika, Tomoko; Obuse, Chikashi; Waga, Shou

    2013-01-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC), consisting of six subunits ORC1–6, is known to bind to replication origins and function in the initiation of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. In contrast to the fact that Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORC recognizes the replication origin in a sequence-specific manner, metazoan ORC has not exhibited strict sequence-specificity for DNA binding. Here we report that human ORC binds preferentially to G-quadruplex (G4)-preferable G-rich RNA or single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). We mapped the G-rich RNA-binding domain in the ORC1 subunit, in a region adjacent to its ATPase domain. This domain itself has an ability to preferentially recognize G4-preferable sequences of ssDNA. Furthermore, we found, by structure modeling, that the G-rich RNA-binding domain is similar to the N-terminal portion of AdoMet_MTase domain of mammalian DNA methyltransferase 1. Therefore, in contrast with the binding to double-stranded DNA, human ORC has an apparent sequence preference with respect to its RNA/ssDNA binding. Interestingly, this specificity coincides with the common signature present in most of the human replication origins. We expect that our findings provide new insights into the regulations of function and chromatin binding of metazoan ORCs. PMID:24003239

  18. Isolation and characterisation of dhel II, a DNA helicase from Drosophila melanogaster embryos stimulated by Escherichia coli-type single-stranded-DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thömmes, P; Marton, R F; Cotterill, S

    1996-01-15

    We have purified a DNA helicase from Drosophila embryos by following unwinding activity during the purification of the cellular single-stranded DNA-binding protein dRP-A. This DNA helicase unwinds DNA 5' to 3', has a salt-tolerant activity, and has a preference for purine triphosphates as cofactors for the unwinding reaction. The purified enzyme consists of a single polypeptide of 120 kDa, which cosediments with the helicase activity. Sedimentation analysis suggests that this polypeptide exists as a monomer under high and low salt conditions. Dhel II is able to unwind long stretches of DNA, but with decreased efficiency. Addition of Escherichia coli-like single-stranded DNA-binding proteins stimulates the unwinding activity at least 10-fold on substrates greater than 200 nucleotides. In particular, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein isolated from Drosophila embryos is able to stimulate unwinding by dhel II. These properties show that the helicase described is different from another Drosophila helicase dhel I; it has thus has been classified as dhel II. PMID:8631322

  19. Single-stranded DNA ligation and XLF-stimulated incompatible DNA end ligation by the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex: influence of terminal DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiafeng; Lu, Haihui; Tsai, Albert G; Schwarz, Klaus; Lieber, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    The double-strand DNA break repair pathway, non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ), is distinctive for the flexibility of its nuclease, polymerase and ligase activities. Here we find that the joining of ends by XRCC4-ligase IV is markedly influenced by the terminal sequence, and a steric hindrance model can account for this. XLF (Cernunnos) stimulates the joining of both incompatible DNA ends and compatible DNA ends at physiologic concentrations of Mg2+, but only of incompatible DNA ends at higher concentrations of Mg2+, suggesting charge neutralization between the two DNA ends within the ligase complex. XRCC4-DNA ligase IV has the distinctive ability to ligate poly-dT single-stranded DNA and long dT overhangs in a Ku- and XLF-independent manner, but not other homopolymeric DNA. The dT preference of the ligase is interesting given the sequence bias of the NHEJ polymerase. These distinctive properties of the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex explain important aspects of its in vivo roles. PMID:17717001

  20. Highly sensitive silicon nanowire biosensor with novel liquid gate control for detection of specific single-stranded DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Adam, Tijjani; Hashim, U

    2015-05-15

    The study demonstrates the development of a liquid-based gate-control silicon nanowire biosensor for detection of specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules. The sensor was fabricated using conventional photolithography coupled with an inductively coupled plasma dry etching process. Prior to the application of DNA to the device, its linear response to pH was confirmed by serial dilution from pH 2 to pH 14. Then, the sensor surface was silanized and directly aminated with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane to create a molecular binding chemistry for biofunctionalization. The resulting Si‒O‒Si‒ components were functionalized with receptor ssDNA, which interacted with the targeted ssDNA to create a field across the silicon nanowire and increase the current. The sensor shows selectivity for the target ssDNA in a linear range from target ssDNA concentrations of 100 pM to 25 nM. With its excellent detection capabilities, this sensor platform is promising for detection of specific biomarkers and other targeted proteins. PMID:25453738

  1. Escherichia coli Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein: NanoESI-MS Studies of Salt-Modulated Subunit Exchange and DNA Binding Transactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Claire E.; Jergic, Slobodan; Lo, Allen T. Y.; Wang, Yao; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2013-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are ubiquitous oligomeric proteins that bind with very high affinity to single-stranded DNA and have a variety of essential roles in DNA metabolism. Nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) was used to monitor subunit exchange in full-length and truncated forms of the homotetrameric SSB from Escherichia coli. Subunit exchange in the native protein was found to occur slowly over a period of hours, but was significantly more rapid in a truncated variant of SSB from which the eight C-terminal residues were deleted. This effect is proposed to result from C-terminus mediated stabilization of the SSB tetramer, in which the C-termini interact with the DNA-binding cores of adjacent subunits. NanoESI-MS was also used to examine DNA binding to the SSB tetramer. Binding of single-stranded oligonucleotides [one molecule of (dT)70, one molecule of (dT)35, or two molecules of (dT)35] was found to prevent SSB subunit exchange. Transfer of SSB tetramers between discrete oligonucleotides was also observed and is consistent with predictions from solution-phase studies, suggesting that SSB-DNA complexes can be reliably analyzed by ESI mass spectrometry.

  2. Crystal structure of DnaT84–153-dT10 ssDNA complex reveals a novel single-stranded DNA binding mode

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Chen, Peng; Wang, Xuejuan; Cai, Gang; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    DnaT is a primosomal protein that is required for the stalled replication fork restart in Escherichia coli. As an adapter, DnaT mediates the PriA-PriB-ssDNA ternary complex and the DnaB/C complex. However, the fundamental function of DnaT during PriA-dependent primosome assembly is still a black box. Here, we report the 2.83 Å DnaT84–153-dT10 ssDNA complex structure, which reveals a novel three-helix bundle single-stranded DNA binding mode. Based on binding assays and negative-staining electron microscopy results, we found that DnaT can bind to phiX 174 ssDNA to form nucleoprotein filaments for the first time, which indicates that DnaT might function as a scaffold protein during the PriA-dependent primosome assembly. In combination with biochemical analysis, we propose a cooperative mechanism for the binding of DnaT to ssDNA and a possible model for the assembly of PriA-PriB-ssDNA-DnaT complex that sheds light on the function of DnaT during the primosome assembly and stalled replication fork restart. This report presents the first structure of the DnaT C-terminal complex with ssDNA and a novel model that explains the interactions between the three-helix bundle and ssDNA. PMID:25053836

  3. Novel method for quantifying radiation-induced single-strand-break yields in plasmid DNA highlights 10-fold discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Balagurumoorthy, Pichumani; Adelstein, S James; Kassis, Amin I

    2011-10-15

    The widely used agarose gel electrophoresis method for assessing radiation-induced single-strand-break (SSB) yield in plasmid DNA involves measurement of the fraction of relaxed-circular (C) form that migrates independently from the intact supercoiled (SC) form. We rationalized that this method may underestimate the SSB yield since the position of the relaxed-circular form is not altered when the number of SSB per DNA molecule is >1. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a novel method that directly probes and quantifies SSBs. Supercoiled (3)H-pUC19 plasmid samples were irradiated with γ-rays, alkali-denatured, dephosphorylated, and kinated with γ-[(32)P]ATP, and the DNA-incorporated (32)P activities were used to quantify the SSB yields per DNA molecule, employing a standard curve generated using DNA molecules containing a known number of SSBs. The same irradiated samples were analyzed by agarose gel and SSB yields were determined by conventional methods. Comparison of the data demonstrated that the mean SSB yield per plasmid DNA molecule of [21.2±0.59]×10(-2)Gy(-1) as measured by direct probing is ~10-fold higher than that obtained from conventional gel-based methods. These findings imply that the SSB yields inferred from agarose gels need reevaluation, especially when they were utilized in the determination of radiation risk. PMID:21741945

  4. Thermodynamic Characterization of Binding Oxytricha nova Single Strand Telomere DNA with the Alpha Protein N-terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Buczek, Pawel; Horvath, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    The Oxytricha nova telomere binding protein alpha subunit binds single strand DNA and participates in a nucleoprotein complex that protects the very ends of chromosomes. To understand how the N-terminal, DNA binding domain of alpha interacts with DNA we measured the stoichiometry, enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), and dissociation constant (KD-DNA) for binding telomere DNA fragments at different temperatures and salt concentrations using native gel electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). About 85% of the total free energy of binding corresponded with non-electrostatic interactions for all DNAs. Telomere DNA fragments d(T2G4), d(T4G4), d(G3T4G4), and d(G4T4G4) each formed monovalent protein complexes. In the case of d(T4G4T4G4), which has two tandemly repeated d(TTTTTGGGG) telomere motifs, two binding sites were observed. The high-affinity “A site” has a dissociation constant, KD-DNA(A)=13(±4) nM, while the low-affinity “B site” is characterized by KD-DNA(B)=5600(±600) nM at 25 °C. Nucleotide substitution variants verified that the A site corresponds principally with the 3′-terminal portion of d(T4G4T4G4). The relative contributions of entropy (ΔS) and enthalpy (ΔH) for binding reactions were DNA length-dependent as was heat capacity (ΔCp). These trends with respect to DNA length likely reflect structural transitions in the DNA molecule that are coupled with DNA–protein association. Results presented here are important for understanding early intermediates and subsequent stages in the assembly of the full telomere nucleoprotein complex and how binding events can prepare the telomere DNA for extension by telomerase, a critical event in telomere biology. PMID:16678852

  5. Identification of several clades of novel single-stranded circular DNA viruses with conserved stem-loop structures in pig feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metagenomic analysis of fecal samples collected from swine with diarrhea detected sequences encoding a replication initiator protein (Rep) typically found in small circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses. Complete nucleotide sequences of ten novel genomes were cloned and determ...

  6. Advanced Characterization of DNA Molecules in rAAV Vector Preparations by Single-stranded Virus Next-generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Emilie; Tournaire, Benoît; Cogné, Benjamin; Dupont, Jean-Baptiste; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martin-Fontaine, Mélanie; Broucque, Frédéric; Robin, Cécile; Hebben, Matthias; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Blouin, Véronique; François, Achille; Redon, Richard; Moullier, Philippe; Léger, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Recent successful clinical trials with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) have led to a renewed interest in gene therapy. However, despite extensive developments to improve vector-manufacturing processes, undesirable DNA contaminants in rAAV preparations remain a major safety concern. Indeed, the presence of DNA fragments containing antibiotic resistance genes, wild-type AAV, and packaging cell genomes has been found in previous studies using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses. However, because qPCR only provides a partial view of the DNA molecules in rAAV preparations, we developed a method based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) to extensively characterize single-stranded DNA virus preparations (SSV-Seq). In order to validate SSV-Seq, we analyzed three rAAV vector preparations produced by transient transfection of mammalian cells. Our data were consistent with qPCR results and showed a quasi-random distribution of contaminants originating from the packaging cells genome. Finally, we found single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) along the vector genome but no evidence of large deletions. Altogether, SSV-Seq could provide a characterization of DNA contaminants and a map of the rAAV genome with unprecedented resolution and exhaustiveness. We expect SSV-Seq to pave the way for a new generation of quality controls, guiding process development toward rAAV preparations of higher potency and with improved safety profiles. PMID:26506038

  7. Sensitive Detection of a Modified Base in Single-Stranded DNA by a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Tang; Liu, Lei; Wu, Hai-Chen; Luo, Mengbo; Li, Jingyuan

    2015-09-15

    In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the responses of the configuration of single-strand DNA (ssDNA) within a carbon nanotube (CNT) and the concomitant ion flow to a single modified base, i.e., benzoimidazole (Bzim)-modified 5-hydroxymethyl cytosine (5hmC). Our simulation results show the Bzim-modified 5hmC can considerably increase the ion flow through a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), despite its larger size, which is consistent with prior experimental results. This phenomenon is attributed to enhanced adsorption of DNA to the interior wall of the CNT driven by the Bzim-modified 5hmC, leading to a reduced steric effect on ion transport through the CNT. As revealed in this work, the distribution of ssDNA can be affected by limited change in the interactions with the CNT surface. Such behavior of ssDNA within small-sized CNTs can be exploited to further improve the sensitivity of nanopore detection. PMID:26259044

  8. The Telomere Binding Protein Cdc13 and the Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein RPA Protect Telomeric DNA from Resection by Exonucleases.

    PubMed

    Greetham, Matthew; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Lydall, David; Connolly, Bernard A

    2015-09-25

    The telomere is present at the ends of all eukaryotic chromosomes and usually consists of repetitive TG-rich DNA that terminates in a single-stranded 3' TG extension and a 5' CA-rich recessed strand. A biochemical assay that allows the in vitro observation of exonuclease-catalyzed degradation (resection) of telomeres has been developed. The approach uses an oligodeoxynucleotide that folds to a stem-loop with a TG-rich double-stranded region and a 3' single-stranded extension, typical of telomeres. Cdc13, the major component of the telomere-specific CST complex, strongly protects the recessed strand from the 5'→3' exonuclease activity of the model exonuclease from bacteriophage λ. The isolated DNA binding domain of Cdc13 is less effective at shielding telomeres. Protection is specific, not being observed in control DNA lacking the specific TG-rich telomere sequence. RPA, the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA binding protein, also inhibits telomere resection. However, this protein is non-specific, equally hindering the degradation of non-telomere controls. PMID:26264873

  9. Yields of single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA irradiated in aqueous solution in the presence of oxygen and scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Udovicic, Lj.; Mark, F.; Bothe, E.

    1994-11-01

    Yields of radiation-induced single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA have been measured as a function of OH scavenger concentration in N{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}-saturated aqueous solution. The experimental data are well represented by a theoretical model based on non-homogeneous reaction kinetics, without the need to adjust any parameter. The good agreement between experimental and theoretical data is taken as evidence that, in the presence of oxygen, the main effect of added scavengers with respect to the formation of single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA is OH radical scavenging. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Detection of short single-strand DNA homopolymers with ultrathin S i3N4 nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Qiu, Yinghua; Yuan, Zhishan; Zhang, Yin; Sha, Jingjie; Liu, Lei; Sun, Litao; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Li, Deyu; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-08-01

    A series of nanopores with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 63 nm are fabricated on a reduced S i3N4 membrane by focused ion beam and high energy electron beam. Through measuring the blocked ionic currents for DNA strands threading linearly through those solid-state nanopores, it is found that the blockade ionic current is proportional to the square of the hydrodynamic diameter of the DNA strand. With the nanopore diameter reduced to be comparable with that of DNA strands, the hydrodynamic diameter of the DNA becomes smaller, which is attributed to the size confinement effects. The duration time for the linear DNA translocation events increases monotonically with the nanopore length. By comparing the spatial configurations of DNA strands through nanopores with different diameters, it is found that the nanopore with large diameter has enough space to allow the DNA strand to translocate through with complex conformation. With the decrease of the nanopore diameter, the folded part of the DNA is prone to be straightened by the nanopore, which leads to the increase in the occurrence frequency of the linear DNA translocation events. Reducing the diameter of the nanopore to 2.5 nm allows the detection and discrimination of three nucleotide "G" and three nucleotide "T" homopolymer DNA strands based on differences in their physical dimensions.

  11. Charge Enhancement of Single-Stranded DNA in Negative Electrospray Ionization Using the Supercharging Reagent Meta-nitrobenzyl Alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1 % m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1 % m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  12. Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA monomer is a single-stranded DNA translocase but not a processive helicase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Chesnik, Marla A; Tomko, Eric J; Lohman, Timothy M

    2007-09-14

    Structural studies of the Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA protein along with biochemical studies of the single-stranded (ss) DNA translocation activity of PcrA monomers have led to the suggestion that a PcrA monomer possesses processive helicase activity in vitro. Yet definitive studies testing whether the PcrA monomer possesses processive helicase activity have not been performed. Here we show, using single turnover kinetic methods, that monomers of PcrA are able to translocate along ssDNA, in the 3' to 5' direction, rapidly and processively, whereas these same monomers display no detectable helicase activity under the same solution conditions in vitro. The PcrA monomer ssDNA translocation activity, although necessary, is not sufficient for processive helicase activity, and thus the translocase and helicase activities of PcrA are separable. These results also suggest that the helicase activity of PcrA needs to be activated either by self-assembly or through interactions with accessory proteins. This same behavior is displayed by both the Escherichia coli Rep and UvrD monomers. Hence, all three of these SF1 enzymes are ssDNA translocases as monomers but do not display processive helicase activity in vitro unless activated. The fact that the translocase and helicase activities are separable suggests that each activity may be used for different functions in vivo. PMID:17631491

  13. A source of the single-stranded DNA substrate for activation-induced deaminase during somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohua; Fan, Manxia; Kalis, Susan; Wei, Lirong; Scharff, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    During somatic hypermutation (SHM), activation-induced deaminase (AID) mutates deoxycytidine on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) generated by the transcription machinery, but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. Here we report a higher abundance of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable (Igh-V) region compared with the constant region and partially transcribed Igh RNAs, suggesting a slower Pol II progression at Igh-V that could result in some early/premature transcription termination after prolonged pausing/stalling of Pol II. Knocking down RNA-exosome complexes, which could decrease premature transcription termination, leads to decreased SHM. Knocking down Spt5, which can augment premature transcription termination, leads to increase in both, SHM and the abundance of ssDNA substrates. Collectively, our data support the model that, following the reduction of Pol II progression (pausing or stalling) at the Igh-V, additional steps such as premature transcription termination are involved in providing ssDNA substrates for AID during SHM. PMID:24923561

  14. Defective DNA single-strand break repair is responsible for senescence and neoplastic escape of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nassour, Joe; Martien, Sébastien; Martin, Nathalie; Deruy, Emeric; Tomellini, Elisa; Malaquin, Nicolas; Bouali, Fatima; Sabatier, Laure; Wernert, Nicolas; Pinte, Sébastien; Gilson, Eric; Pourtier, Albin; Pluquet, Olivier; Abbadie, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    The main characteristic of senescence is its stability which relies on the persistence of DNA damage. We show that unlike fibroblasts, senescent epithelial cells do not activate an ATM-or ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR), but accumulate oxidative-stress-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs). These breaks remain unrepaired because of a decrease in PARP1 expression and activity. This leads to the formation of abnormally large and persistent XRCC1 foci that engage a signalling cascade involving the p38MAPK and leading to p16 upregulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, the default in SSB repair also leads to the emergence of post-senescent transformed and mutated precancerous cells. In human-aged skin, XRCC1 foci accumulate in the epidermal cells in correlation with a decline of PARP1, whereas DDR foci accumulate mainly in dermal fibroblasts. These findings point SSBs as a DNA damage encountered by epithelial cells with aging which could fuel the very first steps of carcinogenesis. PMID:26822533

  15. Defective DNA single-strand break repair is responsible for senescence and neoplastic escape of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nassour, Joe; Martien, Sébastien; Martin, Nathalie; Deruy, Emeric; Tomellini, Elisa; Malaquin, Nicolas; Bouali, Fatima; Sabatier, Laure; Wernert, Nicolas; Pinte, Sébastien; Gilson, Eric; Pourtier, Albin; Pluquet, Olivier; Abbadie, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    The main characteristic of senescence is its stability which relies on the persistence of DNA damage. We show that unlike fibroblasts, senescent epithelial cells do not activate an ATM-or ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR), but accumulate oxidative-stress-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs). These breaks remain unrepaired because of a decrease in PARP1 expression and activity. This leads to the formation of abnormally large and persistent XRCC1 foci that engage a signalling cascade involving the p38MAPK and leading to p16 upregulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, the default in SSB repair also leads to the emergence of post-senescent transformed and mutated precancerous cells. In human-aged skin, XRCC1 foci accumulate in the epidermal cells in correlation with a decline of PARP1, whereas DDR foci accumulate mainly in dermal fibroblasts. These findings point SSBs as a DNA damage encountered by epithelial cells with aging which could fuel the very first steps of carcinogenesis. PMID:26822533

  16. Salt Dependence of the Radius of Gyration and Flexibility of Single-stranded DNA in Solution probed by Small-angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Lipfert, Jan; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian

    2012-07-06

    Short single-stranded nucleic acids are ubiquitous in biological processes and understanding their physical properties provides insights to nucleic acid folding and dynamics. We used small angle x-ray scattering to study 8-100 residue homopolymeric single-stranded DNAs in solution, without external forces or labeling probes. Poly-T's structural ensemble changes with increasing ionic strength in a manner consistent with a polyelectrolyte persistence length theory that accounts for molecular flexibility. For any number of residues, poly-A is consistently more elongated than poly-T, likely due to the tendency of A residues to form stronger base-stacking interactions than T residues.

  17. Single-strand breakage of DNA in UV-irradiated uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M S; Ross, L

    1985-01-01

    We transduced the uvrA6, uvrB5, uvrC34, and uvrC56 markers from the original mutagenized strains into an HF4714 background. Although in the original mutagenized strains uvrA6 cells are more UV sensitive than uvrB5 and uvrC34 cells, in the new background no significant difference in UV sensitivity is observed among uvrA6, uvrB5, and uvrC34 cells. No DNA single-strand breaks are detected in UV-irradiated uvrA6 or uvrB5 cells, whereas in contrast a significant number of single-strand breaks are detected in both UV-irradiated uvrC34 and uvrC56 cells. The number of single-strand breaks in these cells reaches a plateau at 20-J/m2 irradiation. Since these single-strand breaks can be detected by both alkaline sucrose and neutral formamide-sucrose gradient sedimentation, we concluded that the single-strand breaks observed in UV-irradiated uvrC cells are due to phosphodiester bond interruptions in DNA and are not due to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. PMID:3882671

  18. Products of ozonized arachidonic acid potentiate the formation of DNA single strand breaks in cultured human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kozumbo, W.J.; Hanley, N.M.; Agarwal, S.

    1996-12-31

    In this study we examined the potential for environmental levels of ozone (O{sub 3}) to degrade arachidonic acid (AA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid abundantly present in the lung, into products that can produce DNA single strand breaks (ssb) in cultured human lung cells. Human lung fibroblasts were incubated with 60 {mu}M AA that had been previously exposed to an degraded by 0.4 ppm O{sub 3} (1 hr). Incubation of the cells with O{sub 3}-exposed AA (but not with vehicle alone) for 1 hr at 4{degrees}C and 37{degrees}C produced 555 and 245 rad-equivalents of DNA ssb, respectively, as determined by the DNA alkaline elution technique. These breaks were completely eliminated when the ozonized AA solution was incubated with catalase prior to cell treatment, indicating that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was solely responsible for damaging DNA. Superoxide dismutase, bovine serum albumin, or heat-inactivated catalase showed little, if any, inhibitory activity. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content for only about 40% of the observed breaks. Potentiation of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced DNA ssb persisted after removal of the carbonyl substances by chromatographic procedures, suggesting that the non-carbonyl component of ozonized AA was the responsible component for inducing augmentation of the observed increases in DNA ssb. Ozonized AA also induced DNA ssb in cultures of the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. Again, these breaks were shown to exceed levels that could be attributed to the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone. These results indicate that products of ozonized AA can interact to potentiate DNA ssb in human lung cells. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Rolling-circle replication of UV-irradiated duplex DNA in the phi X174 replicative-form----single-strand replication system in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Shavitt, O.; Livneh, Z.

    1989-06-01

    Cloning of the phi X174 viral origin of replication into phage M13mp8 produced an M13-phi X174 chimera, the DNA of which directed efficient replicative-form----single-strand rolling-circle replication in vitro. This replication assay was performed with purified phi X174-encoded gene A protein, Escherichia coli rep helicase, single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. The nicking of replicative-form I (RFI) DNA by gene A protein was essentially unaffected by the presence of UV lesions in the DNA. However, unwinding of UV-irradiated DNA by the rep helicase was inhibited twofold as compared with unwinding of the unirradiated substrate. UV irradiation of the substrate DNA caused a strong inhibition in its ability to direct DNA synthesis. However, even DNA preparations that contained as many as 10 photodimers per molecule still supported the synthesis of progeny full-length single-stranded DNA. The appearance of full-length radiolabeled products implied at least two full rounds of replication, since the first round released the unlabeled plus viral strand of the duplex DNA. Pretreatment of the UV-irradiated DNA substrate with purified pyrimidine dimer endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus, which converted photodimer-containing supercoiled RFI DNA into relaxed, nicked RFII DNA and thus prevented its replication, reduced DNA synthesis by 70%. Analysis of radiolabeled replication products by agarose gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography revealed that this decrease was due to a reduction in the synthesis of progeny full-length single-stranded DNA. This implies that 70 to 80% of the full-length DNA products produced in this system were synthesized on molecules that carried photodimers.

  20. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecule, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G • U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G • U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation. PMID:26461456

  1. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecue, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G•U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G•U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  2. A Non-uniform Stepping Mechanism for E. coli UvrD Monomer Translocation along Single Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Eric J.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary E. coli UvrD is an SF1 helicase involved in several DNA metabolic processes. Although a UvrD dimer is needed for helicase activity, a monomer can translocate with 3′ to 5′ directionality along single stranded DNA and this ATP-dependent translocation is likely involved in RecA displacement. In order to understand how the monomeric translocase functions, we have combined fluorescence stopped-flow kinetic methods with novel analysis methods to determine the kinetic mechanism, including ATP coupling stoichiometry, for UvrD monomer translocation along ssDNA. Our results suggest that the macroscopic rate of UvrD monomer translocation is not limited by each ATPase cycle, but rather by a slow step (pause) in each translocation cycle that occurs after four to five rapid one nucleotide translocation steps, with each rapid step coupled to hydrolysis of one ATP. These results suggest a non-uniform stepping mechanism that differs from either a Brownian motor or previous structure based inch-worm mechanisms. PMID:17499041

  3. A nonuniform stepping mechanism for E. coli UvrD monomer translocation along single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Tomko, Eric J; Fischer, Christopher J; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Lohman, Timothy M

    2007-05-11

    E. coli UvrD is an SF1 helicase involved in several DNA metabolic processes. Although a UvrD dimer is needed for helicase activity, a monomer can translocate with 3' to 5' directionality along single-stranded DNA, and this ATP-dependent translocation is likely involved in RecA displacement. In order to understand how the monomeric translocase functions, we have combined fluorescence stopped-flow kinetic methods with recently developed analysis methods to determine the kinetic mechanism, including ATP coupling stoichiometry, for UvrD monomer translocation along ssDNA. Our results suggest that the macroscopic rate of UvrD monomer translocation is not limited by each ATPase cycle but rather by a slow step (pause) in each translocation cycle that occurs after four to five rapid 1 nt translocation steps, with each rapid step coupled to hydrolysis of one ATP. These results suggest a nonuniform stepping mechanism that differs from either a Brownian motor or previous structure-based inchworm mechanisms. PMID:17499041

  4. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells.

    PubMed

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J; Te Riele, Hein P J

    2016-04-12

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype. PMID:26951689

  5. DNA damage response by single-strand breaks in terminally differentiated muscle cells and the control of muscle integrity.

    PubMed

    Fortini, P; Ferretti, C; Pascucci, B; Narciso, L; Pajalunga, D; Puggioni, E M R; Castino, R; Isidoro, C; Crescenzi, M; Dogliotti, E

    2012-11-01

    DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) formation coordinates the myogenic program, and defects in SSB repair in post-mitotic cells have been associated with human diseases. However, the DNA damage response by SSB in terminally differentiated cells has not been explored yet. Here we show that mouse post-mitotic muscle cells accumulate SSB after alkylation damage, but they are extraordinarily resistant to the killing effects of a variety of SSB-inducers. We demonstrate that, upon SSB induction, phosphorylation of H2AX occurs in myotubes and is largely ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent. However, the DNA damage signaling cascade downstream of ATM is defective as shown by lack of p53 increase and phosphorylation at serine 18 (human serine 15). The stabilization of p53 by nutlin-3 was ineffective in activating the cell death pathway, indicating that the resistance to SSB inducers is due to defective p53 downstream signaling. The induction of specific types of damage is required to activate the cell death program in myotubes. Besides the topoisomerase inhibitor doxorubicin known for its cardiotoxicity, we show that the mitochondria-specific inhibitor menadione is able to activate p53 and to kill effectively myotubes. Cell killing is p53-dependent as demonstrated by full protection of myotubes lacking p53, but there is a restriction of p53-activated genes. This new information may have important therapeutic implications in the prevention of muscle cell toxicity. PMID:22705848

  6. Human PrimPol is a highly error-prone polymerase regulated by single-stranded DNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guilliam, Thomas A.; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K.; Ehlinger, Aaron; Barnes, Ryan P.; Rudd, Sean G.; Bailey, Laura J.; Skehel, J. Mark; Eckert, Kristin A.; Chazin, Walter J.; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2015-01-01

    PrimPol is a recently identified polymerase involved in eukaryotic DNA damage tolerance, employed in both re-priming and translesion synthesis mechanisms to bypass nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions. In this report, we investigate how the enzymatic activities of human PrimPol are regulated. We show that, unlike other TLS polymerases, PrimPol is not stimulated by PCNA and does not interact with it in vivo. We identify that PrimPol interacts with both of the major single-strand binding proteins, RPA and mtSSB in vivo. Using NMR spectroscopy, we characterize the domains responsible for the PrimPol-RPA interaction, revealing that PrimPol binds directly to the N-terminal domain of RPA70. In contrast to the established role of SSBs in stimulating replicative polymerases, we find that SSBs significantly limit the primase and polymerase activities of PrimPol. To identify the requirement for this regulation, we employed two forward mutation assays to characterize PrimPol's replication fidelity. We find that PrimPol is a mutagenic polymerase, with a unique error specificity that is highly biased towards insertion-deletion errors. Given the error-prone disposition of PrimPol, we propose a mechanism whereby SSBs greatly restrict the contribution of this enzyme to DNA replication at stalled forks, thus reducing the mutagenic potential of PrimPol during genome replication. PMID:25550423

  7. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  8. New single-stranded DNA virus with a unique genomic structure that infects marine diatom Chaetoceros setoensis

    PubMed Central

    Tomaru, Yuji; Toyoda, Kensuke; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Kimura, Kei; Takao, Yoshitake

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are among the most abundant organisms in nature; however, their relationships with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses have not yet been defined in detail. We report the isolation and characterisation of a virus (CsetDNAV) that lytically infects the bloom-forming diatom Chaetoceros setoensis. The virion is 33 nm in diameter and accumulates in the nucleus of its host. CsetDNAV harbours a covalently closed-circular ssDNA genome comprising 5836 nucleotides and eight different short-complementary fragments (67–145 nucleotides), which have not been reported in other diatom viruses. Phylogenetic analysis based on the putative replicase-related protein showed that CsetDNAV was not included in the monophyly of the recently established genus Bacilladnavirus. This discovery of CsetDNAV, which harbours a genome with a structure that is unique among known viruses that infect diatoms, suggests that other such undiscovered viruses possess diverse genomic architectures. PMID:24275766

  9. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    PubMed Central

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  10. Single-stranded DNA translocation of E. coli UvrD monomer is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Tomko, Eric J; Fischer, Christopher J; Lohman, Timothy M

    2012-04-20

    Escherichia coli UvrD is an SF1A (superfamily 1 type A) helicase/translocase that functions in several DNA repair pathways. A UvrD monomer is a rapid and processive single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase but is unable to unwind DNA processively in vitro. Based on data at saturating ATP (500 μM), we proposed a nonuniform stepping mechanism in which a UvrD monomer translocates with biased (3' to 5') directionality while hydrolyzing 1 ATP per DNA base translocated, but with a kinetic step size of 4-5 nt/step, suggesting that a pause occurs every 4-5 nt translocated. To further test this mechanism, we examined UvrD translocation over a range of lower ATP concentrations (10-500 μM ATP), using transient kinetic approaches. We find a constant ATP coupling stoichiometry of ∼1 ATP/DNA base translocated even at the lowest ATP concentration examined (10 μM), indicating that ATP hydrolysis is tightly coupled to forward translocation of a UvrD monomer along ssDNA with little slippage or futile ATP hydrolysis during translocation. The translocation kinetic step size remains constant at 4-5 nt/step down to 50 μM ATP but increases to ∼7 nt/step at 10 μM ATP. These results suggest that UvrD pauses more frequently during translocation at low ATP but with little futile ATP hydrolysis. PMID:22342931

  11. In vitro topological loading of bacterial condensin MukB on DNA, preferentially single-stranded DNA rather than double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Niki, Hironori; Yano, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Condensin is the major driving force in the segregation of daughter chromosomes in prokaryotes. Core subunits of condensin belong to the SMC protein family, whose members are characterized by a unique ATPase activity and dimers with a V-shaped structure. The V-shaped dimers might close between head domains, forming a ring structure that can encircle DNA. Indeed, cohesin, which is a subfamily of SMC proteins, encircles double-stranded DNA to hold sister chromatids in eukaryotes. However, the question of whether or not condensin encircles the chromosomal DNA remains highly controversial. Here we report that MukB binds topologically to DNA in vitro, and this binding is preferentially single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) rather than double-stranded DNA. The binding of MukB to ssDNA does not require ATP. In fact, thermal energy enhances the binding. The non-SMC subunits MukF and MukE did stimulate the topological binding of MukB, although they hindered DNA-binding of MukB. Recent reports on the distribution of condensin in genomes reveal that actively transcribed genes in yeast and humans are enriched in condensin. In consideration of all these results, we propose that the binding specificity of condensin to chromosome is provided not by the DNA sequence but by the DNA structure, which is ssDNA. PMID:27387439

  12. In vitro topological loading of bacterial condensin MukB on DNA, preferentially single-stranded DNA rather than double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Niki, Hironori; Yano, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Condensin is the major driving force in the segregation of daughter chromosomes in prokaryotes. Core subunits of condensin belong to the SMC protein family, whose members are characterized by a unique ATPase activity and dimers with a V-shaped structure. The V-shaped dimers might close between head domains, forming a ring structure that can encircle DNA. Indeed, cohesin, which is a subfamily of SMC proteins, encircles double-stranded DNA to hold sister chromatids in eukaryotes. However, the question of whether or not condensin encircles the chromosomal DNA remains highly controversial. Here we report that MukB binds topologically to DNA in vitro, and this binding is preferentially single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) rather than double-stranded DNA. The binding of MukB to ssDNA does not require ATP. In fact, thermal energy enhances the binding. The non-SMC subunits MukF and MukE did stimulate the topological binding of MukB, although they hindered DNA-binding of MukB. Recent reports on the distribution of condensin in genomes reveal that actively transcribed genes in yeast and humans are enriched in condensin. In consideration of all these results, we propose that the binding specificity of condensin to chromosome is provided not by the DNA sequence but by the DNA structure, which is ssDNA. PMID:27387439

  13. Chimeric viruses blur the borders between the major groups of eukaryotic single-stranded DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Roux, Simon; Enault, François; Bronner, Gisèle; Vaulot, Daniel; Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomic studies have uncovered an astonishing diversity of ssDNA viruses encoding replication proteins (Reps) related to those of eukaryotic Circoviridae, Geminiviridae or Nanoviridae; however, exact evolutionary relationships among these viruses remain obscure. Recently, a unique chimeric virus (CHIV) genome, which has apparently emerged via recombination between ssRNA and ssDNA viruses, has been discovered. Here we report on the assembly of 13 new CHIV genomes recovered from various environments. Our results indicate a single event of capsid protein (CP) gene capture from an RNA virus in the history of this virus group. The domestication of the CP gene was followed by an unprecedented recurrent replacement of the Rep genes in CHIVs with distant counterparts from diverse ssDNA viruses. We suggest that parasitic and symbiotic interactions between unicellular eukaryotes were central for the emergence of CHIVs and that such turbulent evolution was primarily dictated by incongruence between the CP and Rep proteins. PMID:24193254

  14. Electronic excitation processes in single-strand and double-strand DNA: a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Plasser, Felix; Aquino, Adélia J A; Lischka, Hans; Nachtigallová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Absorption of UV light by nucleic acids can lead to damaging photoreactions, which may ultimately lead to mutations of the genetic code. The complexity of the photodynamical behavior of nucleobases in the DNA double-helix provides a great challenge to both experimental and computational chemists studying these processes. Starting from the initially excited states, the main question regards the understanding of the subsequent relaxation processes, which can either utilize monomer-like deactivation pathways or lead to excitonic or charge transfer species with new relaxation dynamics. After a review of photophysical processes in single nucleobases we outline the theoretical background relevant for interacting chromophores and assess a large variety of computational approaches relevant for the understanding of the nature and dynamics of excited states of DNA. The discussion continues with the analysis of calculations on excitonic and charge transfer states followed by the presentation of the dynamics of excited-state processes in DNA. The review is concluded by topics on proton transfer in DNA and photochemical dimer formation of nucleobases. PMID:24549841

  15. Uranyl acetate causes DNA single strand breaks in vitro in the presence of ascorbate (vitamin C).

    PubMed

    Yazzie, Monica; Gamble, Shania L; Civitello, Edgar R; Stearns, Diane M

    2003-04-01

    Uranium is a radioactive heavy metal with isotopes that decay on the geological time scale. People are exposed to uranium through uranium mining, processing, the resulting mine tailings, and the use of depleted uranium in the military. Acute exposures to uranium are chemically toxic to the kidney; however, little is known about chronic exposures, for example, if there is a direct chemical genotoxicity of uranium. The hypothesis that is being tested in the current work is that hexavalent uranium, as uranyl ion, may have a chemical genotoxicity similar to that of hexavalent chromium. In the current study, reactions of uranyl acetate (UA) and ascorbate (vitamin C) were observed to produce plasmid relaxation in pBluescript DNA. DNA strand breaks increased with increasing concentrations of a 1:1 reaction of UA and ascorbate but were not affected by increasing the ratio of ascorbate. Plasmid relaxation was inhibited by coincubation of reactions with catalase but not by coincubation with the radical scavengers mannitol, sodium azide, or 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. Reactions of UA and ascorbate monitored by (1)H NMR spectroscopy showed formation of a uranyl ascorbate complex, with no evidence of a dehydroascorbate product. A previous study inferred that hydroxyl radical formation was responsible for oxidative DNA damage in the presence of reactions of uranyl ion, hydrogen peroxide, and ascorbate [Miller et al. (2002) J. Bioinorg. Chem. 91, 246-252]. Current results, in the absence of added hydrogen peroxide, were not completely consistent with the interpretation that strand breaks were produced by a Fenton type generation of reactive oxygen species. Data were also consistent with the interpretation that a uranyl ascorbate complex was catalyzing hydrolysis of the DNA-phosphate backbone, in a manner similar to that known for the lanthanides. These data suggest that uranium may be directly genotoxic and may, like chromium, react with DNA by more than one pathway. PMID

  16. Mechanism of ATP-dependent translocation of E.coli UvrD monomers along single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christopher J; Maluf, Nasib K; Lohman, Timothy M

    2004-12-10

    Escherichia coli UvrD protein is a 3' to 5' SF1 DNA helicase involved in methyl-directed mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair of DNA. Using stopped-flow methods we have examined the kinetic mechanism of translocation of UvrD monomers along single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in vitro by monitoring the transient kinetics of arrival of protein at the 5'-end of the ssDNA. Arrival at the 5'-end was monitored by the effect of protein on the fluorescence intensity of fluorophores (Cy3 or fluorescein) attached to the 5'-end of a series of oligodeoxythymidylates varying in length from 16 to 124 nt. We find that UvrD monomers are capable of ATP-dependent translocation along ssDNA with a biased 3' to 5' directionality. Global non-linear least-squares analysis of the full kinetic time-courses in the presence of a protein trap to prevent rebinding of free protein to the DNA using the methods described in the accompanying paper enabled us to obtain quantitative estimates of the kinetic parameters for translocation. We find that UvrD monomers translocate in discrete steps with an average kinetic step-size, m=3.68(+/-0.03) nt step(-1), a translocation rate constant, kt=51.3(+/-0.6) steps s(-1), (macroscopic translocation rate, mkt=189.0(+/-0.7) nt s(-1)), with a processivity corresponding to an average translocation distance of 2400(+/-600) nt before dissociation (10 mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.3), 20 mM NaCl, 20% (v/v) glycerol, 25 degrees C). However, in spite of its ability to translocate rapidly and efficiently along ssDNA, a UvrD monomer is unable to unwind even an 18 bp duplex in vitro. DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a UvrD dimer that unwinds DNA with a similar kinetic step-size of 4-5 bp step(-1), but an approximately threefold slower unwinding rate of 68(+/-9) bp s(-1) under the same solution conditions, indicating that DNA unwinding activity requires more than the ability to simply translocate directionally along ss-DNA. PMID:15561144

  17. Separation performance of single-stranded DNA electrophoresis in photopolymerized cross-linked polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Lo, Roger C; Ugaz, Victor M

    2006-02-01

    Considerable effort has been directed toward optimizing performance and maximizing throughput in ssDNA electrophoresis because it is a critical analytical step in a variety of genomic assays. Ultimately, it would be desirable to quantitatively determine the achievable level of separation resolution directly from measurements of fundamental physical properties associated with the gel matrix rather than by the trial and error process often employed. Unfortunately, this predictive capability is currently lacking, due in large part to the need for a more detailed understanding of the fundamental parameters governing separation performance (mobility, diffusion, and dispersion). We seek to address this issue by systematically characterizing electrophoretic mobility, diffusion, and dispersion behavior of ssDNA fragments in the 70-1,000 base range in a photopolymerized cross-linked polyacrylamide matrix using a slab gel DNA sequencer. Data are collected for gel concentrations of 6, 9, and 12%T at electric fields ranging from 15 to 40 V/cm, and resolution predictions are compared with corresponding experimentally measured values. The data exhibit a transition from behavior consistent with the Ogston model for small fragments to behavior in agreement with the biased reptation model at larger fragment sizes. Mobility data are also used to estimate the mean gel pore size and compare the predictions of several models. PMID:16331587

  18. The interplay of primer-template DNA phosphorylation status and single-stranded DNA binding proteins in directing clamp loaders to the appropriate polarity of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hayner, Jaclyn N.; Douma, Lauren G.; Bloom, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    Sliding clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders to serve the critical role of coordinating various enzymes on DNA. Clamp loaders must quickly and efficiently load clamps at primer/template (p/t) junctions containing a duplex region with a free 3′OH (3′DNA), but it is unclear how clamp loaders target these sites. To measure the Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader specificity toward 3′DNA, fluorescent β and PCNA clamps were used to measure clamp closing triggered by DNA substrates of differing polarity, testing the role of both the 5′phosphate (5′P) and the presence of single-stranded binding proteins (SSBs). SSBs inhibit clamp loading by both clamp loaders on the incorrect polarity of DNA (5′DNA). The 5′P groups contribute selectivity to differing degrees for the two clamp loaders, suggesting variations in the mechanism by which clamp loaders target 3′DNA. Interestingly, the χ subunit of the E. coli clamp loader is not required for SSB to inhibit clamp loading on phosphorylated 5′DNA, showing that χ·SSB interactions are dispensable. These studies highlight a common role for SSBs in directing clamp loaders to 3′DNA, as well as uncover nuances in the mechanisms by which SSBs perform this vital role. PMID:25159615

  19. A Systematic Study of Single-stranded DNA Electrophoresis in Photopolymerized Crosslinked Polyacrylamide Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Roger

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of mobility, diffusion, and dispersion in crosslinked polyacrylamide gels through parallel use of an automated DNA sequencer and a microfabricated electrophoresis device with integrated on-chip electrodes, heaters, and temperature sensors. DNA separations are conducted using the same sample, gel formulations, and operating conditions in both platforms. The microfabricated electrophoresis chip make it possible to collect a complete set of diffusion and dispersion data within about one hour, while it takes several days to finish the same work using a traditional sequencer under the same experimental conditions. By comparing data collected from these two platforms, we can isolate key parameters governing separation performance in both systems. These experimental results are compared with reptation theory to extract information on the gel structure and also predict achievable separation resolution under various operating conditions. We also investigate the effects of gel composition and polymerization chemistry and find that these photopolymerized crosslinked polyacrylamide gels provide good separation resolution at relatively low electric field strengths (10-20 V/cm). This makes it possible to customize the microfabricated electrophoresis chip for microdevice-based applications according to desired separation performance.

  20. Organophosphorus pesticides detection using broad-specific single-stranded DNA based fluorescence polarization aptamer assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzheng; Wang, Li; Tu, Zhui; Sun, Xing; He, Qinghua; Lei, Zhaojing; Xu, Chongxin; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Xiao; Yang, Jingyi; Liu, Xianjin; Xu, Yang

    2014-05-15

    An approach is developed to detect the organophosphorus pesticides via competitive binding to a recombinant broad-specificity DNA aptamer with a molecular beacon (MB), the binding of the MB to the aptamer results in the activation of a fluorescent signal, which can be measured for pesticide quantification. Aptamers selected via the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) were structurally modified and truncated to narrow down the binding region of the target, which indicated that loops of the aptamer contributed different functions for different chemical recognition. Thereafter, a variant fused by two different minimum functional structures, was clarified with broad specificity and increased affinity. Further molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations was conducted to understand the molecular interaction between DNA structure and chemicals. 3D modeling revealed a hot spot area formed by 3 binding sites, forces including hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions appear to play a significant role in enabling and stabilizing the binding of chemicals. Finally, an engineered aptamer based approach for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides was successfully applied in a test using a real sample, the limit of quantification (LOQ) for phorate, profenofos, isocarbophos, and omethoate reached 19.2, 13.4, 17.2, and 23.4 nM (0.005 mg L(-1)), respectively. PMID:24384262

  1. Ion Density Analysis of Single-Stranded DNA in Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabata, Kazuki; Seki, Yasutaka; Toizumi, Ryota; Shimada, Yuki; Furue, Hirokazu; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2013-09-01

    With the widespread use of liquid crystals (LCs) in liquid crystal displays, we have looked into the application of liquid crystals in biotechnology. The purpose of the study described here is to investigate the physical properties of DNA using LCs. Synthetic oligonucleotide molecules were dispersed in MLC6884, the sample injected into antiparallel cells, and the amount of mobile ions was measured. The LC cell doped with oligonucleotide molecules showed a sequence-dependent, specific correlation between oligonucleotide concentration and the amount of mobile ions in the LC cells. In the framework of the Stokes model and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis, we speculate that this result arises from the difference in ion mobility, which is caused by the shape of the oligonucleotide molecule in the LC.

  2. Mammalian cells are not killed by DNA single-strand breaks caused by hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.F.; Blakely, W.F.; Joner, E.I.

    1985-09-01

    Cell killing by ionizing radiation has been shown to be caused by hydroxyl free radicals formed by water radiolysis. The authors have previously suggested that the killing is not caused by individual OH free radicals but by the interaction of volumes of high radical density with DNA to cause locally multiple damaged sites (LMDS). Here they test this hypothesis using hydrogen dioxide as an alternate source of OH radicals. The route to OH production from H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is expected to cause singly damaged sites rather than LMDS. Chinese hamster V79-171 cells were treated with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at varying concentrations for varying times at 0/sup 0/C. The yield of DNA damage produced increases with increasing concentration of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and with time of exposure. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is efficient in producing single-strand breaks; treatment with 50 ..mu..M for 30 min produces damage equivalent to that formed by 10 Gy of ..cap alpha.. irradiation. In the presence of a hydroxyl radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the yield of damage decreases with increasing DMSO concentration consistent with the scavenging of hydroxyl radicals. In contrast to DNA damage production, cell killing by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ treatment at 0/sup 0/C is inefficient. The conclusion drawn is that individual DNA damage sites are ineffectual in killing cells. Mechanisms are suggested for killing at 0/sup 0/C at high concentrations and for the efficient cell killing by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C at much lower concentrations.

  3. Single-stranded DNA oligomers stimulate error-prone alternative repair of DNA double-strand breaks through hijacking Ku protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ying; Britton, Sébastien; Delteil, Christine; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P.; Barboule, Nadia; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In humans, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by two mutually-exclusive mechanisms, homologous recombination or end-joining. Among end-joining mechanisms, the main process is classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) which relies on Ku binding to DNA ends and DNA Ligase IV (Lig4)-mediated ligation. Mostly under Ku- or Lig4-defective conditions, an alternative end-joining process (A-EJ) can operate and exhibits a trend toward microhomology usage at the break junction. Homologous recombination relies on an initial MRN-dependent nucleolytic degradation of one strand at DNA ends. This process, named DNA resection generates 3′ single-stranded tails necessary for homologous pairing with the sister chromatid. While it is believed from the current literature that the balance between joining and recombination processes at DSBs ends is mainly dependent on the initiation of resection, it has also been shown that MRN activity can generate short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssO) that may also be implicated in repair regulation. Here, we evaluate the effect of ssO on end-joining at DSB sites both in vitro and in cells. We report that under both conditions, ssO inhibit C-NHEJ through binding to Ku and favor repair by the Lig4-independent microhomology-mediated A-EJ process. PMID:26350212

  4. Single-stranded DNA oligomers stimulate error-prone alternative repair of DNA double-strand breaks through hijacking Ku protein.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Britton, Sébastien; Delteil, Christine; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P; Barboule, Nadia; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    In humans, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by two mutually-exclusive mechanisms, homologous recombination or end-joining. Among end-joining mechanisms, the main process is classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) which relies on Ku binding to DNA ends and DNA Ligase IV (Lig4)-mediated ligation. Mostly under Ku- or Lig4-defective conditions, an alternative end-joining process (A-EJ) can operate and exhibits a trend toward microhomology usage at the break junction. Homologous recombination relies on an initial MRN-dependent nucleolytic degradation of one strand at DNA ends. This process, named DNA resection generates 3' single-stranded tails necessary for homologous pairing with the sister chromatid. While it is believed from the current literature that the balance between joining and recombination processes at DSBs ends is mainly dependent on the initiation of resection, it has also been shown that MRN activity can generate short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssO) that may also be implicated in repair regulation. Here, we evaluate the effect of ssO on end-joining at DSB sites both in vitro and in cells. We report that under both conditions, ssO inhibit C-NHEJ through binding to Ku and favor repair by the Lig4-independent microhomology-mediated A-EJ process. PMID:26350212

  5. Switching from single-stranded to double-stranded DNA limits the unwinding processivity of ring-shaped T7 DNA helicase

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yong-Joo; Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Patel, Smita S.

    2013-01-01

    Phage T7 helicase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by encircling one strand while excluding the complementary strand from its central channel. When T7 helicase translocates on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), it has kilobase processivity; yet, it is unable to processively unwind linear dsDNA, even 60 base-pairs long. Particularly, the GC-rich dsDNAs are unwound with lower amplitudes under single-turnover conditions. Here, we provide evidence that T7 helicase switches from ssDNA to dsDNA during DNA unwinding. The switching propensity is higher when dsDNA is GC-rich or when the 3′-overhang of forked DNA is <15 bases. Once helicase encircles dsDNA, it travels along dsDNA and dissociates from the end of linear DNA without strand separation, which explains the low unwinding amplitude of these substrates. Trapping the displaced strand with ssDNA binding protein or changing its composition to morpholino oligomer that does not interact with helicase increases the unwinding amplitude. We conclude that the displaced strand must be continuously excluded and kept away from the central channel for processive DNA unwinding. The finding that T7 helicase can switch from ssDNA to dsDNA binding mode during unwinding provides new insights into ways of limiting DNA unwinding and triggering fork regression when stalled forks need to be restarted. PMID:23446275

  6. Isolation of Single-Stranded DNA Aptamers That Distinguish Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Subtype H1 from H5

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sanggyu; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Surface protein hemagglutinin (HA) mediates the binding of influenza virus to host cell receptors containing sialic acid, facilitating the entry of the virus into host cells. Therefore, the HA protein is regarded as a suitable target for the development of influenza virus detection devices. In this study, we isolated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers binding to the HA1 subunit of subtype H1 (H1-HA1), but not to the HA1 subunit of subtype H5 (H5-HA1), using a counter-systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (counter-SELEX) procedure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance studies showed that the selected aptamers bind tightly to H1-HA1 with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the aptamers were binding to H1-HA1 in a concentration-dependent manner, yet were not binding to H5-HA1. Interestingly, the selected aptamers contained G-rich sequences in the central random nucleotides region. Further biophysical analysis showed that the G-rich sequences formed a G-quadruplex structure, which is a distinctive structure compared to the starting ssDNA library. Using flow cytometry analysis, we found that the aptamers did not bind to the receptor-binding site of H1-HA1. These results indicate that the selected aptamers that distinguish H1-HA1 from H5-HA1 can be developed as unique probes for the detection of the H1 subtype of influenza virus. PMID:25901739

  7. Development of a Single Stranded DNA Aptamer as a Molecular Probe for LNCap Cells Using Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Almasi, Faezeh; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed Latif; Bitaraf, Fatemeh; Rasoulinejad, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, highly specific aptamers generated by cell SELEX technology (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) are being applied for early detection of cancer cells. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA), over expressed in prostate cancer, is a highly specific marker and therefore can be used for diagnosis of the prostate cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to select single-stranded DNA aptamers against LNCap cells highly expressing PSMA, using cell–SELEX method which can be used as a diagnostic tool for the detection of prostate cancer cells. Methods: After 10 rounds of cell-SELEX, DNA aptamers were isolated against PSMA using LNCaP cells as a target and PC-3 cell lines for counter SELEX. Five DNA aptamers with more than 70% affinity were selected up on flow cytometry analysis of positive clones. Results: Dissociation constants of two selected sequences (A12-B1) were estimated in the range of 33.78±3.77 and 57.49±2.214 pmol, respectively. Conserved secondary structures of A12 and B1 sequences suggest the necessity of these structures for binding with high affinity to native PSMA. Comparison of the secondary structures of our isolated aptamers and aptamer A10 obtained by protein SELEX showed similar stem-loop structures which could be responsible for the recognition of PSMA on LNCap cell surface. Conclusion: Our results indicated that selected aptamers may turn out to be ideal candidates for the development of a detection tool and also can be used in targeted drug delivery for future smart drugs. PMID:27563422

  8. Characterisation of CAH alleles with non-radioactive DNA single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the CYP21 gene.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Iolascon, A; Giannattasio, S; Albrizio, M; Sinisi, A; Prisco, F; Schettini, F; Marra, E

    1997-03-01

    The major cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a common recessive genetic disease, is the deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase (21OH), a microsomal enzyme encoded by the CYP21 gene. Although several CAH causing mutations have been identified in the CYP21 gene of patients with 21OH deficiency, genotyping of the 21OH locus is quite complex because of the high frequency of gene conversion and the presence of multiple mutations on single CAH alleles. In order to perform the complete characterisation of the CYP21 gene coding region more simply, we developed a highly sensitive, non-radioactive method allowing DNA single strand conformation polymorphism (DNA-SSCP) analysis. This method was applied to the characterisation of all the exons and intron-exon junctions of the CYP21 gene in five patients affected by the simple virilising form and one affected by the salt wasting form. In all samples showing SSCP signals, direct sequence analysis showed the presence of more than one single sequence variant. In particular, four mutations which are already known to cause the disease, 16 polymorphisms, and one newly identified C to T transition at position 849 were detected. A random sequence analysis, performed on 31 out of 81 exons showing a normal SSCP pattern, shows the method to be highly sensitive: no sequence variant was detected, thus confirming the validity of this non-radioactive DNA-SSCP analysis in characterising the CYP21 gene in patients with steroid 21OH deficiency. Notwithstanding the complete characterisation of all exons and exon/intron junctions of the CYP21 gene, no complete genotype/phenotype correlation was found in the panel of patients analysed, thus suggesting that characterisation of CAH alleles must be extended to outside the coding region of the CYP21 gene, most probably into the promoter region. PMID:9132494

  9. Characterisation of CAH alleles with non-radioactive DNA single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the CYP21 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bobba, A; Iolascon, A; Giannattasio, S; Albrizio, M; Sinisi, A; Prisco, F; Schettini, F; Marra, E

    1997-01-01

    The major cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a common recessive genetic disease, is the deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase (21OH), a microsomal enzyme encoded by the CYP21 gene. Although several CAH causing mutations have been identified in the CYP21 gene of patients with 21OH deficiency, genotyping of the 21OH locus is quite complex because of the high frequency of gene conversion and the presence of multiple mutations on single CAH alleles. In order to perform the complete characterisation of the CYP21 gene coding region more simply, we developed a highly sensitive, non-radioactive method allowing DNA single strand conformation polymorphism (DNA-SSCP) analysis. This method was applied to the characterisation of all the exons and intron-exon junctions of the CYP21 gene in five patients affected by the simple virilising form and one affected by the salt wasting form. In all samples showing SSCP signals, direct sequence analysis showed the presence of more than one single sequence variant. In particular, four mutations which are already known to cause the disease, 16 polymorphisms, and one newly identified C to T transition at position 849 were detected. A random sequence analysis, performed on 31 out of 81 exons showing a normal SSCP pattern, shows the method to be highly sensitive: no sequence variant was detected, thus confirming the validity of this non-radioactive DNA-SSCP analysis in characterising the CYP21 gene in patients with steroid 21OH deficiency. Notwithstanding the complete characterisation of all exons and exon/intron junctions of the CYP21 gene, no complete genotype/phenotype correlation was found in the panel of patients analysed, thus suggesting that characterisation of CAH alleles must be extended to outside the coding region of the CYP21 gene, most probably into the promoter region. Images PMID:9132494

  10. Retention of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) UL37 protein on single-stranded DNA columns requires the HSV-1 ICP8 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, L S; Albright, A G; Ruyechan, W T; Jenkins, F J

    1994-01-01

    The UL37 and ICP8 proteins present in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected-cell extracts produced at 24 h postinfection coeluted from single-stranded-DNA-cellulose columns. Experiments carried out with the UL37 protein expressed by a vaccinia virus recombinant (V37) revealed that the UL37 protein did not exhibit DNA-binding activity in the absence of other HSV proteins. Analysis of extracts derived from cells coinfected with V37 and an ICP8-expressing vaccinia virus recombinant (V8) and analysis of extracts prepared from cells infected with the HSV-1 ICP8 deletion mutants d21 and n10 revealed that the retention of the UL37 protein on single-stranded DNA columns required a DNA-binding-competent ICP8 protein. Images PMID:8254765

  11. Transient oxidative stress and inflammation after intraperitoneal administration of multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with single strand DNA in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clichici, Simona; Biris, Alexandru Radu; Tabaran, Flaviu; Filip, Adriana

    2012-03-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are widely used for nanotechnology. Their impact on living organisms is, however, not entirely clarified. Oxidative stress and inflammation seem to be the key mechanisms involved in MWCNTs' cytotoxicity. Until present, pulmonary and skin models were the main tested experimental designs to assess carbon nanotubes' toxicity. The systemic administration of MWCNTs is essential, with respect for future medical applications. Our research is performed on Wistar rats and is focused on the dynamics of oxidative stress parameters in blood and liver and pro-inflammatory cytokines in liver, after single dose (270 mg l{sup −1}) ip administration of MWCNTs (exterior diameter 15–25 nm, interior diameter 10–15 nm, surface 88 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) functionalized with single strand DNA (ss-DNA). The presence of MWCNTs in blood was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, while in liver histological examination and confocal microscopy were used. It was found that ss-DNA-MWCNTs induce oxidative stress in plasma and liver, with the return of the tested parameters to normal values, 6 h after ip injection of nanotubes, with the exception of reduced glutathione in plasma. The inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) had a similar pattern of evolution. We also assessed the level of ERK1/2 and the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-kB in liver that had a transient increase and returned to normal at the end of the tested period. Our results demonstrate that ss-DNA-MWCNTs produce oxidative stress and inflammation, but with a transient pattern. Given the fact that antioxidants modify the profile not only for oxidative stress, but also of inflammation, the dynamics of these alterations may be of practical importance for future protective strategies. -- Highlights: ► ss-DNA-MWCNTs ip administration induce oxidative stress in plasma and liver. ► ss-DNA-MWCNTs ip administration determine liver inflammation. ► ERK1/2 and p65 phosphorylated NF-KB increase

  12. Effects of pressure and temperature on the binding of RecA protein to single-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Merrin, Jack; Kumar, Pradeep; Libchaber, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The binding and polymerization of RecA protein to DNA is required for recombination, which is an essential function of life. We study the pressure and temperature dependence of RecA binding to single-stranded DNA in the presence of adenosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate (ATP[γ-S]), in a temperature regulated high pressure cell using fluorescence anisotropy. Measurements were possible at temperatures between 5–60 °C and pressures up to 300 MPa. Experiments were performed on Escherichia coli RecA and RecA from a thermophilic bacteria, Thermus thermophilus. For E. coli RecA at a given temperature, binding is a monotonically decreasing and reversible function of pressure. At atmospheric pressure, E. coli RecA binding decreases monotonically up to 42 °C, where a sharp transition to the unbound state indicates irreversible heat inactivation. T. thermophilus showed no such transition within the temperature range of our apparatus. Furthermore, we find that binding occurs for a wider range of pressure and temperature for T. thermophilus compared to E. coli RecA, suggesting a correlation between thermophilicity and barophilicity. We use a two-state model of RecA binding/unbinding to extract the associated thermodynamic parameters. For E. coli, we find that the binding/unbinding phase boundary is hyperbolic. Our results of the binding of RecA from E. coli and T. thermophilus show adaptation to pressure and temperature at the single protein level. PMID:22123983

  13. The formation of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human blood lymphocytes exposed to 365-nm UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Smetanina, Nadezhda M; Pustovalova, Margarita V; Arkhangelskaya, Ekaterina; Klokov, Dmitry

    2014-08-01

    The potency of UVA radiation, representing 90% of solar UV light reaching the earth's surface, to induce human skin cancer is the subject of continuing controversy. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species in DNA damage produced by the exposure of human cells to UVA radiation. This knowledge is important for better understanding of UV-induced carcinogenesis. We measured DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo to various doses of 365-nm UV photons compared to X-rays and hydrogen peroxide using the comet assay. We demonstrated that the UVA-induced DNA damage increased in a linear dose-dependent manner. The rate of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure to 1J/cm(2) was similar to the rate induced by exposure to 1 Gy of X-rays or 25 μM hydrogen peroxide. The presence of either the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide or the singlet oxygen quencher sodium azide resulted in a significant reduction in the UVA-induced DNA damage, suggesting a role for these reactive oxygen species in mediating UVA-induced DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites. We also showed that chromatin relaxation due to hypertonic conditions resulted in increased damage in both untreated and UVA-treated cells. The effect was the most significant in the presence of 0.5M Na(+), implying a role for histone H1. Our data suggest that the majority of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure of human lymphocytes to UVA are produced by reactive oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen) and that the state of chromatin may substantially contribute to the outcome of such exposures. PMID:24816295

  14. Surface area as a dose metric for carbon black nanoparticles: A study of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breakage and inflammation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Li-Chen; Lei, Yu-Chen; Wu, Kuen-Yuh; Feng, Po-Hao; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2015-04-01

    Combustion-derived nanoparticles are characterised by a high surface area (SA) per mass. SA is proposed to regulate the bioreactivity of nanoparticles; however, the dose metric for carbon black remains controversial. To determine the relationships between bioreactivity and SA, male spontaneously hypertensive rats were exposed to carbon black (CB) nanoparticles (15, 51 and 95 nm) via intratracheal instillation for 24 h. Pulmonary exposure to CB resulted in a significant increase in systemic 8-hydroxy-2‧-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), DNA single-strand breakages in peripheral blood cells and pulmonary cell infiltration in rats. The oxidative potential and particularly the corresponding SA of CB were correlated with the level of 8-OHdG, DNA single-strand breakages and pulmonary cell infiltration in rats. We conclude that SA is an important dose metric for CB that can regulate oxidative stress and DNA damage in rats. Furthermore, this observation was more significant for smaller sized CB.

  15. DNA single-strand breaks and cytotoxicity induced by chromate(VI), cadmium(II), and mercury(II) in hydrogen peroxide-resistant cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, K; Sugiyama, M; Haramaki, N

    1994-01-01

    The induction of cytotoxicity and DNA single-strand breaks by chromium(VI), cadmium(II), and mercury(II) were compared in H2O2-resistant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO(R)) cells and parental (CHO(P)) cells. Using a colony-forming assay, CHO(R) cells were found to be significantly more resistant than CHO(P) cells to the cytotoxicity caused by CdCl2 and HgCl2, but not to that caused by Na2CrO4. However, the DNA single-strand breaks produced by each of these metals were significantly lower in the CHO(R) cells. With respect to chromium reduction, the level of chromium(V) in CHO(R) cells was decreased. The role of intracellular active oxygen in the heavy metal-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity is discussed. PMID:7843132

  16. Nucleotide fluctuation of radiation-resistant Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (RPA) genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Subramaniam, R.; Gadura, N.; Schneider, P.; Sullivan, R.; Flamholz, A.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T. D.

    2009-08-01

    The Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein (RPA) Genes in gamma ray radiation-resistant halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 were analyzed in terms of their nucleotide fluctuations. In an ATCG sequence, each base was assigned a number equal to its atomic number. The resulting numerical sequence was the basis of the statistical analysis in this study. Fractal analysis using the Higuchi method gave fractal dimensions of 2.04 and 2.06 for the gene sequences VNG2160 and VNG2162, respectively. The 16S rRNA sequence has a fractal dimension of 1.99. The di-nucleotide Shannon entropy values were found to be negatively correlated with the observed fractal dimensions (R2~ 0.992, N=3). Inclusion of Deinococcus radiodurans Rad-A in the regression analysis decreases the R2 slightly to 0.98 (N=4). A third VNG2163 RPA gene of unknown function but with upregulation activity under irradiation was found to have a fractal dimension of 2.05 and a Shannon entropy of 3.77 bits. The above results are similar to those found in bacterial Deinococcus radiodurans and suggest that their high radiation resistance property would have favored selection of CG di-nucleotide pairs. The two transcription factors TbpD (VNG7114) and TfbA (VNG 2184) were also studied. Using VNG7114, VNG2184, and VNG2163; the regression analysis of fractal dimension versus Shannon entropy shows that R2 ~ 0.997 for N =3. The VNG2163 unknown function may be related to the pathways with transcriptions closely regulated to sequences VNG7114 and VNG2184.

  17. Origin Single-stranded DNA Releases Sld3 Protein from the Mcm2–7 Complex, Allowing the GINS Tetramer to Bind the Mcm2–7 Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    The replication fork helicase in eukaryotic cells is comprised of Cdc45, Mcm2–7, and GINS (CMG complex). In budding yeast, Sld3, Sld2, and Dpb11 are required for the initiation of DNA replication, but Sld3 and Dpb11 do not travel with the replication fork. Sld3 and Cdc45 bind to early replication origins during the G1 phase of the cell cycle, whereas Sld2, GINS, polymerase ϵ, and Dpb11 form a transient preloading complex that associates with origins during S phase. We show here that Sld3 binds tightly to origin single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). CDK-phosphorylated Sld3 binds to origin ssDNA with similar high affinity. Origin ssDNA does not disrupt the interaction between Sld3 and Dpb11, and origin ssDNA does not disrupt the interaction between Sld3 and Cdc45. However, origin ssDNA substantially disrupts the interaction between Sld3 and Mcm2–7. GINS and Sld3 compete with one another for binding to Mcm2–7. However, in a mixture of Sld3, GINS, and Mcm2–7, origin ssDNA inhibits the interaction between Sld3 and Mcm2–7, whereas origin ssDNA promotes the association between GINS and Mcm2–7. We also show that origin single-stranded DNA promotes the formation of the CMG complex. We conclude that origin single-stranded DNA releases Sld3 from Mcm2–7, allowing GINS to bind Mcm2–7. PMID:21460226

  18. The HRDC domain of E. coli RecQ helicase controls single-stranded DNA translocation and double-stranded DNA unwinding rates without affecting mechanoenzymatic coupling

    PubMed Central

    Harami, Gábor M.; Nagy, Nikolett T.; Martina, Máté; Neuman, Keir C.; Kovács, Mihály

    2015-01-01

    DNA-restructuring activities of RecQ-family helicases play key roles in genome maintenance. These activities, driven by two tandem RecA-like core domains, are thought to be controlled by accessory DNA-binding elements including the helicase-and-RnaseD-C-terminal (HRDC) domain. The HRDC domain of human Bloom’s syndrome (BLM) helicase was shown to interact with the RecA core, raising the possibility that it may affect the coupling between ATP hydrolysis, translocation along single-stranded (ss)DNA and/or unwinding of double-stranded (ds)DNA. Here, we determined how these activities are affected by the abolition of the ssDNA interaction of the HRDC domain or the deletion of the entire domain in E. coli RecQ helicase. Our data show that the HRDC domain suppresses the rate of DNA-activated ATPase activity in parallel with those of ssDNA translocation and dsDNA unwinding, regardless of the ssDNA binding capability of this domain. The HRDC domain does not affect either the processivity of ssDNA translocation or the tight coupling between the ATPase, translocation, and unwinding activities. Thus, the mechanochemical coupling of E. coli RecQ appears to be independent of HRDC-ssDNA and HRDC-RecA core interactions, which may play roles in more specialized functions of the enzyme. PMID:26067769

  19. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: polynucleotide binding and cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E.; Baase, Walter A.; Michael, Miya M.; von Hippel, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    We here use our site-specific base analog mapping approach to study the interactions and binding equilibria of cooperatively-bound clusters of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) of the T4 DNA replication complex with longer ssDNA (and dsDNA) lattices. We show that in cooperatively bound clusters the binding free energy appears to be equi-partitioned between the gp32 monomers of the cluster, so that all bind to the ssDNA lattice with comparable affinity, but also that the outer domains of the gp32 monomers at the ends of the cluster can fluctuate on and off the lattice and that the clusters of gp32 monomers can slide along the ssDNA. We also show that at very low binding densities gp32 monomers bind to the ssDNA lattice at random, but that cooperatively bound gp32 clusters bind preferentially at the 5′-end of the ssDNA lattice. We use these results and the gp32 monomer-binding results of the companion paper to propose a detailed model for how gp32 might bind to and interact with ssDNA lattices in its various binding modes, and also consider how these clusters might interact with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275774

  20. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: polynucleotide binding and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E; Baase, Walter A; Michael, Miya M; von Hippel, Peter H

    2015-10-30

    We here use our site-specific base analog mapping approach to study the interactions and binding equilibria of cooperatively-bound clusters of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) of the T4 DNA replication complex with longer ssDNA (and dsDNA) lattices. We show that in cooperatively bound clusters the binding free energy appears to be equi-partitioned between the gp32 monomers of the cluster, so that all bind to the ssDNA lattice with comparable affinity, but also that the outer domains of the gp32 monomers at the ends of the cluster can fluctuate on and off the lattice and that the clusters of gp32 monomers can slide along the ssDNA. We also show that at very low binding densities gp32 monomers bind to the ssDNA lattice at random, but that cooperatively bound gp32 clusters bind preferentially at the 5'-end of the ssDNA lattice. We use these results and the gp32 monomer-binding results of the companion paper to propose a detailed model for how gp32 might bind to and interact with ssDNA lattices in its various binding modes, and also consider how these clusters might interact with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275774

  1. Structure-Based Analysis of the Interaction between the Simian Virus 40 T-Antigen Origin Binding Domain and Single-Stranded DNA

    SciTech Connect

    G Meinke; P Phelan; A Fradet-Turcotte; A Bohm; J Archambault; P Bullock

    2011-12-31

    The origin-binding domain (OBD) of simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen (T-Ag) is essential for many of T-Ag's interactions with DNA. Nevertheless, many important issues related to DNA binding, for example, how single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) transits along the T-Ag OBD, have yet to be established. Therefore, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the costructure of the T-Ag OBD bound to DNA substrates such as the single-stranded region of a forked oligonucleotide. A second structure of the T-Ag OBD crystallized in the presence of poly(dT){sub 12} is also reported. To test the conclusions derived from these structures, residues identified as being involved in binding to ssDNA by crystallography or by an earlier nuclear magnetic resonance study were mutated, and their binding to DNA was characterized via fluorescence anisotropy. In addition, these mutations were introduced into full-length T-Ag, and these mutants were tested for their ability to support replication. When considered in terms of additional homology-based sequence alignments, our studies refine our understanding of how the T-Ag OBDs encoded by the polyomavirus family interact with ssDNA, a critical step during the initiation of DNA replication.

  2. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  3. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-07-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  4. Functional roles of N-terminal and C-terminal domains in the overall activity of a novel single-stranded DNA binding protein of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Ujaoney, Aman K.; Basu, Bhakti; Muniyappa, K.; Apte, Shree K.

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding protein (Ssb) of Deinococcus radiodurans comprises N- and C-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) folds connected by a beta hairpin connector. To assign functional roles to the individual OB folds, we generated three Ssb variants: SsbN (N-terminal without connector), SsbNC (N-terminal with connector) and SsbC (C-terminal), each harboring one OB fold. Both SsbN and SsbNC displayed weak single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding activity, compared to the full-length Ssb (SsbFL). The level of ssDNA binding activity displayed by SsbC was intermediate between SsbFL and SsbN. SsbC and SsbFL predominantly existed as homo-dimers while SsbNC/SsbN formed different oligomeric forms. In vitro, SsbNC or SsbN formed a binary complex with SsbC that displayed enhanced ssDNA binding activity. Unlike SsbFL, Ssb variants were able to differentially modulate topoisomerase-I activity, but failed to stimulate Deinococcal RecA-promoted DNA strand exchange. The results suggest that the C-terminal OB fold is primarily responsible for ssDNA binding. The N-terminal OB fold binds weakly to ssDNA but is involved in multimerization. PMID:25973364

  5. Polyelectrolyte properties of single stranded DNA measured using SAXS and single molecule FRET: beyond the wormlike chain model

    PubMed Central

    Meisburger, Steve P.; Sutton, Julie L.; Chen, Huimin; Pabit, Suzette A.; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Elber, Ron; Pollack, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids are highly charged polyelectrolytes that interact strongly with salt ions. Rigid, base-paired regions are successfully described with worm like chain models, but non base-paired single stranded regions have fundamentally different polymer properties because of their greater flexibility. Recently, attention has turned to single stranded nucleic acids due to the growing recognition of their biological importance, as well as the availability of sophisticated experimental techniques sensitive to the conformation of individual molecules. We investigate polyelectrolyte properties of poly(dT), an important and widely studied model system for flexible single stranded nucleic acids, in physiologically important mixed mono- and di-valent salt. We report measurements of the form factor and interparticle interactions using SAXS, end to end distances using smFRET, and number of excess ions using ASAXS. We present a coarse-grained model that accounts for flexibility, excluded volume, and electrostatic interactions in these systems. Predictions of the model are validated against experiment. We also discuss the state of all-atom, explicit solvent Molecular Dynamics simulations of poly(dT), the next step in understanding the complexities of ion interactions with these highly charged and flexible polymers. PMID:23606337

  6. Polysaccharide/polynucleotide complexes. Part 6: complementary-strand-induced release of single-stranded DNA bound in the schizophyllan complex.

    PubMed

    Koumoto, Kazuya; Mizu, Masami; Sakurai, Kazuo; Kunitake, Toyoki; Shinkai, Seiji

    2004-03-01

    Spectroscopic properties of single-stranded DNA/schizophyllan ternary complexes (ss-DNA2s-SPG), induced by addition of either complementary or noncomplementary strands, have been investigated. The addition of the complementary strands to ss-DNA2s-SPG induced the quick release of the bound ss-DNA to the complementary strands (both DNA and RNA), whereas the ternary complex was unaffected upon addition of noncomplementary strands. Our experiments imply that SPG has complexation properties indispensable to the gene carriers. As far as we know, there is no report on exploitation of such nonviral gene carriers that can accomplish an intelligent release of the bound ss-DNA toward the complementary strands. We believe, therefore, that SPG, a natural and neutral polysaccharide, has a great potential to become a new ss-DNA carrier. PMID:17191866

  7. Measurement of steady-state kinetic parameters for DNA unwinding by the bacteriophage T4 Dda helicase: use of peptide nucleic acids to trap single-stranded DNA products of helicase reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nanduri, Bindu; Eoff, Robert L.; Tackett, Alan J.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of steady-state rates of unwinding of double-stranded oligonucleotides by helicases is hampered due to rapid reannealing of the single-stranded DNA products. Including an oligonucleotide in the reaction mixture which can hybridize with one of the single strands can prevent reannealing. However, helicases bind to single-stranded DNA, therefore the additional oligonucleotide can sequester the enzyme, leading to slower observed rates for unwinding. To circumvent this problem, the oligonucleotide that serves as a trap was replaced with a strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Fluorescence polarization was used to determine that a 15mer PNA strand does not bind to the bacteriophage T4 Dda helicase. Steady-state kinetic parameters of unwinding catalyzed by Dda were determined by using PNA as a trapping strand. The substrate consisted of a partial duplex with 15 nt of single-stranded DNA and 15 bp. In the presence of 250 nM substrate and 1 nM Dda, the rate of unwinding in the presence of the DNA trapping strand was 0.30 nM s–1 whereas the rate was 1.34 nM s–1 in the presence of the PNA trapping strand. PNA prevents reannealing of single-stranded DNA products, but does not sequester the helicase. This assay will prove useful in defining the complete kinetic mechanism for unwinding of oligonucleotide substrates by this helicase. PMID:11433029

  8. Direct Binding to Replication Protein A (RPA)-coated Single-stranded DNA Allows Recruitment of the ATR Activator TopBP1 to Sites of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Julyana; Yan, Shan; Michael, W Matthew

    2016-06-17

    A critical event for the ability of cells to tolerate DNA damage and replication stress is activation of the ATR kinase. ATR activation is dependent on the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) repeat-containing protein TopBP1. Previous work has shown that recruitment of TopBP1 to sites of DNA damage and stalled replication forks is necessary for downstream events in ATR activation; however, the mechanism for this recruitment was not known. Here, we use protein binding assays and functional studies in Xenopus egg extracts to show that TopBP1 makes a direct interaction, via its BRCT2 domain, with RPA-coated single-stranded DNA. We identify a point mutant that abrogates this interaction and show that this mutant fails to accumulate at sites of DNA damage and that the mutant cannot activate ATR. These data thus supply a mechanism for how the critical ATR activator, TopBP1, senses DNA damage and stalled replication forks to initiate assembly of checkpoint signaling complexes. PMID:27129245

  9. New Type of Papillomavirus and Novel Circular Single Stranded DNA Virus Discovered in Urban Rattus norvegicus Using Circular DNA Enrichment and Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Thomas Arn; Fridholm, Helena; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Kjartansdóttir, Kristín Rós; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Rattus norvegicus (R. norvegicus) are ubiquitous and their presence has several effects on the human populations in our urban areas on a global scale. Both historically and presently, this close interaction has facilitated the dissemination of many pathogens to humans, making screening for potentially zoonotic and emerging viruses in rats highly relevant. We have investigated faecal samples from R. norvegicus collected from urban areas using a protocol based on metagenomic enrichment of circular DNA genomes and subsequent sequencing. We found a new type of papillomavirus, with a L1 region 82% identical to that of the known R. norvegicus Papillomavirus 2. Additionally, we found 20 different circular replication associated protein (Rep)-encoding single stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA) virus-like genomes, one of which has homology to the replication-associated gene of Beak and feather disease virus. Papillomaviruses are a group of viruses known for their carcinogenic potential, and although they are known to infect several different vertebrates, they are mainly studied and characterised in humans. CRESS-DNA viruses are found in many different environments and tissue types. Both papillomaviruses and CRESS-DNA viruses are known to have pathogenic potential and screening for novel and known viruses in R. norvegicus could help identify viruses with pathogenic potential. PMID:26559957

  10. Histone H3.3 promotes IgV gene diversification by enhancing formation of AID-accessible single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Romanello, Marina; Schiavone, Davide; Frey, Alexander; Sale, Julian E

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin diversification is driven by activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytidine to uracil within the Ig variable (IgV) regions. Central to the recruitment of AID to the IgV genes are factors that regulate the generation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), the enzymatic substrate of AID Here, we report that chicken DT40 cells lacking variant histone H3.3 exhibit reduced IgV sequence diversification. We show that this results from impairment of the ability of AID to access the IgV genes due to reduced formation of ssDNA during IgV transcription. Loss of H3.3 also diminishes IgV R-loop formation. However, reducing IgV R-loops by RNase HI overexpression in wild-type cells does not affect IgV diversification, showing that these structures are not necessary intermediates for AID access. Importantly, the reduction in the formation of AID-accessible ssDNA in cells lacking H3.3 is independent of any effect on the level of transcription or the kinetics of RNAPII elongation, suggesting the presence of H3.3 in the nucleosomes of the IgV genes increases the chances of the IgV DNA becoming single-stranded, thereby creating an effective AID substrate. PMID:27220848