Science.gov

Sample records for labeling probes enables

  1. Facilitating unambiguous NMR assignments and enabling higher probe density through selective labeling of all methyl containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Frank, Andreas O; Ruggiu, Fiorella; Mamo, Mulugeta; Lingel, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The deuteration of proteins and selective labeling of side chain methyl groups has greatly enhanced the molecular weight range of proteins and protein complexes which can be studied using solution NMR spectroscopy. Protocols for the selective labeling of all six methyl group containing amino acids individually are available, however to date, only a maximum of five amino acids have been labeled simultaneously. Here, we describe a new methodology for the simultaneous, selective labeling of all six methyl containing amino acids using the 115 kDa homohexameric enzyme CoaD from E. coli as a model system. The utility of the labeling protocol is demonstrated by efficiently and unambiguously assigning all methyl groups in the enzymatic active site using a single 4D (13)C-resolved HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment, in conjunction with a crystal structure. Furthermore, the six fold labeled protein was employed to characterize the interaction between the substrate analogue (R)-pantetheine and CoaD by chemical shift perturbations, demonstrating the benefit of the increased probe density. PMID:27130242

  2. Fluorous photoaffinity labeling to probe protein-small molecule interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weigang; Zhang, Qisheng

    2015-01-01

    Identifying cellular targets of bioactive small molecules is essential for their applications as chemical probes or drug candidates. Of equal importance is to determine their "off-target" interactions, which usually account for unwanted properties including toxicity. Among strategies to profile small molecule-interacting proteins, photoaffinity labeling has been widely used because of its distinct advantages such as sensitivity. When combined with mass spectrometry, this approach can provide additional structural and mechanistic information, such as drug-target stoichiometry and exact interacting amino acid residues. We have described a novel fluorous photoaffinity labeling approach, in which a fluorous tag is incorporated into the photoaffinity labeling reagent to enable the enrichment of the labeled species from complex mixtures for analysis. This new feature likely makes the fluorous photoaffinity labeling approach suitable to identify transient interactions, and low-abundant, low-affinity interacting proteins in a cellular environment. PMID:25618351

  3. Labeled nucleotide phosphate (NP) probes

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  4. Far-Red Fluorescent Lipid-Polymer Probes for an Efficient Labeling of Enveloped Viruses.

    PubMed

    Lacour, William; Adjili, Salim; Blaising, Julie; Favier, Arnaud; Monier, Karine; Mezhoud, Sarra; Ladavière, Catherine; Place, Christophe; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Charreyre, Marie-Thérèse

    2016-08-01

    Far-red emitting fluorescent lipid probes are desirable to label enveloped viruses, for their efficient tracking by optical microscopy inside autofluorescent cells. Most used probes are rapidly released from membranes, leading to fluorescence signal decay and loss of contrast. Here, water-soluble lipid-polymer probes are synthesized harboring hydrophilic or hydrophobic far-red emitting dyes, and exhibiting enhanced brightness. They efficiently label Hepatitis C Virus pseudotyped particles (HCVpp), more stably and reproducibly than commercial probes, and a strong fluorescence signal is observed with a high contrast. Labeling with such probes do not alter virion morphology, integrity, nor infectivity. Finally, it is shown by fluorescence microscopy that these probes enable efficient tracking of labeled HCVpp inside hepatocarcinoma cells used as model hepatocytes, in spite of their autofluorescence up to 700 nm. These novel fluorescent lipid-polymer probes should therefore enable a better characterization of early stages of infection of autofluorescent cells by enveloped viruses. PMID:27113918

  5. Directly labeled fluorescent DNA probes for chromosome mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Deaven, L.L.; Chen, D.J.; Park, Min S.; MacInnes, M.A.; Salzman, G.C.; Yoshida, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A new strategy is briefly described for employing nucleic acid probes that are directly labeled with fluorochromes in fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. These probes will permit the detection, quantitation, and high-precision spatial analysis of multiple DNA sequences along a single chromosome using video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing and analysis. Potential advantages of direct labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization far surpass currently available, indirect DNA probe labeling techniques in ease of use, versatility, and increased signal- to-noise ratio.

  6. Labeled line drawing of Galileo spacecraft's atmospheric probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Labeled line drawing entitled GALILEO PROBE identifies the deceleration module aft cover, descent module, and deceleration module aeroshell configurations and dimensions prior to and during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere.

  7. Synthesis of biotinylated probes of artemisinin for affinity labeling

    PubMed Central

    Konziase, Benetode

    2015-01-01

    In this data article, we described the synthetic routes to four biotinylated probes (2, 3, 4, and 5) of artemisinin and the associated experimental procedures. We also provided the physical data for the synthesized compounds. These synthesized biotinylated probes of artemisinin are useful molecular tools for the affinity-labeling study of target receptor proteins of artemisinin in tropical pathogens such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, and Schistosoma. The data provided herein are related to “Biotinylated probes of artemisinin with labeling affinity toward Trypanosoma brucei brucei target proteins”, by Konziase (Anal. Biochem. (2015)). PMID:26217765

  8. Probes labelled with energy transfer coupled dyes

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Glazer, A.; Ju, J.

    1997-11-18

    Compositions are provided comprising sets of fluorescent labels carrying pairs of donor and acceptor dye molecules, designed for efficient excitation of the donors at a single wavelength and emission from the acceptor in each of the pairs at different wavelengths. The different molecules having different donor-acceptor pairs can be modified to have substantially the same mobility under separation conditions, by varying the distance between the donor and acceptor in a given pair. Particularly, the fluorescent compositions find use as labels in sequencing nucleic acids. 7 figs.

  9. Probes labelled with energy transfer coupled dyes

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Glazer, Alexander; Ju, Jingyue

    1997-01-01

    Compositions are provided comprising sets of fluorescent labels carrying pairs of donor and acceptor dye molecules, designed for efficient excitation of the donors at a single wavelength and emission from the acceptor in each of the pairs at different wavelengths. The different molecules having different donor-acceptor pairs can be modified to have substantially the same mobility under separation conditions, by varying the distance between the donor and acceptor in a given pair. Particularly, the fluorescent compositions find use as labels in sequencing nucleic acids.

  10. Labeling Cytosolic Targets in Live Cells with Blinking Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianmin; Chang, Jason; Yan, Qi; Dertinger, Thomas; Bruchez, Marcel; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of superresolution imaging methods, fast dynamic imaging of biological processes in live cells remains a challenge. A subset of these methods requires the cellular targets to be labeled with spontaneously blinking probes. The delivery and specific targeting of cytosolic targets and the control of the probes’ blinking properties are reviewed for three types of blinking probes: quantum dots, synthetic dyes, and fluorescent proteins. PMID:23930154

  11. DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies enables detection of gene mutations without a fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Park, Lian-Chun; Shinohara, Toshimitsu; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a simple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis utilizing DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies. The novel technique enables the detection of a single-base mismatch in a DNA sequence without a fluorescent probe. This report describes for the first time that DNA hybridization occurs in the nanostructural molecular assemblies (termed reverse micelles) formed in an organic medium. The restricted nanospace in the reverse micelles amplifies the differences in the hybridization rate between mismatched and perfectly matched DNA probes. For a model system, we hybridized a 20-mer based on the p53 gene sequence to 20-mer complementary oligonucleotides with various types of mismatches. Without any DNA labeling or electrochemical apparatus, we successfully detected the various oligonucleotide mismatches by simply measuring the UV absorbance at 260 nm. PMID:14715007

  12. Comparative examination of probe labeling methods for microarray hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, David I.; Woodward, Karen; Setterquist, Robert A.; Kawasaki, Ernest S.

    2001-06-01

    For detection of differential gene expression, confocal laser based scanners are now capable of analyzing microarrays using one to five wavelengths. This allows investigators to choose among several labeling methods. Here we compare direct incorporation and indirect methods (amino-allyl and dendrimers) for labeling cDNA probes. We assessed reproducible sensitivity of each probe preparation method in two ways. First, by comparing hybridization intensities for limit of signal detection and second by measuring the lowest detectable concentration of a known ratio of mixed DNA (spikes). Limit of detection assay was done using arrays of mixed targets consisting of a serially diluted human specific gene fragment (HU1) and an undiluted DNA of chloramphenicol acetyl tranferase (CAT) gene. Then, individual single target arrays of CAT and HU1 DNA were used to determine the lowest detectable spike ratio of each labeling method. The results of this study will be presented and their significance for the analysis of microarrays will be discussed.

  13. NeuO: a fluorescent chemical probe for live neuron labeling.

    PubMed

    Er, Jun Cheng; Leong, Cheryl; Teoh, Chai Lean; Yuan, Qiang; Merchant, Paolomi; Dunn, Matthew; Sulzer, David; Sames, Dalibor; Bhinge, Akshay; Kim, Dongyoon; Kim, Seong-Min; Yoon, Myung-Han; Stanton, Lawrence W; Je, Shawn H; Yun, Seong-Wook; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-02-16

    To address existing limitations in live neuron imaging, we have developed NeuO, a novel cell-permeable fluorescent probe with an unprecedented ability to label and image live neurons selectively over other cells in the brain. NeuO enables robust live neuron imaging and isolation in vivo and in vitro across species; its versatility and ease of use sets the basis for its development in a myriad of neuronal targeting applications. PMID:25565332

  14. A new membrane probing steroidal spin label: synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Katoch, R; Trivedi, G K; Phadke, R S

    2000-02-01

    The applicability of a new steroidal spin label, 3-oxo-androstan-17 beta-yl-(2",2",6",6"-tetramethyl-N-oxyl) piperidyl butan-1',4'-dioate, in studying the phase transition properties of model membrane L-alpha-dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) in the presence and absence of drugs has been explored. Its synthesis and characterization has been described herein. Besides, the localization of this spin label in lipid liposomes has been studied using electron spin resonance (ESR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopic techniques. The label has also been used to study the permeability of epinephrine into membrane. The results show that the spin label has a good potential as a spin probe in the study of biomembranes. PMID:10983412

  15. Multitarget super-resolution microscopy with high-density labeling by exchangeable probes.

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Tai; Higuchi, Makio; Takamura, Akihiro; Maruoka, Masahiro; Watanabe, Naoki

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a multitarget super-resolution microscopy technique called image reconstruction by integrating exchangeable single-molecule localization (IRIS). IRIS uses protein fragment-based probes that directly associate with and dissociate from their targets over durations on the order of tens of milliseconds. By integrating single-molecule localization and sequential labeling, IRIS enables unprecedented labeling density along multiple cellular structures. IRIS can be used to discern the area-specific proximity between cytoskeletal components and focal adhesions within a single cell. PMID:26147917

  16. Water soluble fluorescence quantum dot probe labeling liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Baoxing; Yang, Xianjun; Wang, Fang; Wang, Yinsong; Yang, Rui; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Baiqi

    2013-11-01

    Water soluble quantum dots (QDs) have been prepared by hydrothermal method and characterized by ultraviolet irradiation, XRD, TEM, UV-Vis absorption spectrometer and fluorescence spectrometer. Then the QD-antibody-AFP probes (QD-Ab-AFP) were synthesized by chemical process and specifically labeled AFP antigen in PLC/PRF/5 liver cancer cells. The results showed that the QDs were cubic structure and had excellent optical properties. Moreover, the QD-Ab-AFP with good stability could specifically label liver cancer cells. This work provides strong foundation for further studying and developing new approach to detect liver cancer at early stage. PMID:23888351

  17. Robust 3D DNA FISH using directly labeled probes.

    PubMed

    Bolland, Daniel J; King, Michelle R; Reik, Wolf; Corcoran, Anne E; Krueger, Christel

    2013-01-01

    3D DNA FISH has become a major tool for analyzing three-dimensional organization of the nucleus, and several variations of the technique have been published. In this article we describe a protocol which has been optimized for robustness, reproducibility, and ease of use. Brightly fluorescent directly labeled probes are generated by nick-translation with amino-allyldUTP followed by chemical coupling of the dye. 3D DNA FISH is performed using a freeze-thaw step for cell permeabilization and a heating step for simultaneous denaturation of probe and nuclear DNA. The protocol is applicable to a range of cell types and a variety of probes (BACs, plasmids, fosmids, or Whole Chromosome Paints) and allows for high-throughput automated imaging. With this method we routinely investigate nuclear localization of up to three chromosomal regions. PMID:23978815

  18. Robust 3D DNA FISH Using Directly Labeled Probes

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Daniel J.; King, Michelle R.; Reik, Wolf; Corcoran, Anne E.; Krueger, Christel

    2013-01-01

    3D DNA FISH has become a major tool for analyzing three-dimensional organization of the nucleus, and several variations of the technique have been published. In this article we describe a protocol which has been optimized for robustness, reproducibility, and ease of use. Brightly fluorescent directly labeled probes are generated by nick-translation with amino-allyldUTP followed by chemical coupling of the dye. 3D DNA FISH is performed using a freeze-thaw step for cell permeabilization and a heating step for simultaneous denaturation of probe and nuclear DNA. The protocol is applicable to a range of cell types and a variety of probes (BACs, plasmids, fosmids, or Whole Chromosome Paints) and allows for high-throughput automated imaging. With this method we routinely investigate nuclear localization of up to three chromosomal regions. PMID:23978815

  19. Single-molecule protein arrays enabled by scanning probe block copolymer lithography.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jinan; Wong, Lu Shin; Giam, Louise; Mirkin, Chad A

    2011-12-01

    The ability to control the placement of individual protein molecules on surfaces could enable advances in a wide range of areas, from the development of nanoscale biomolecular devices to fundamental studies in cell biology. Such control, however, remains a challenge in nanobiotechnology due to the limitations of current lithographic techniques. Herein we report an approach that combines scanning probe block copolymer lithography with site-selective immobilization strategies to create arrays of proteins down to the single-molecule level with arbitrary pattern control. Scanning probe block copolymer lithography was used to synthesize individual sub-10-nm single crystal gold nanoparticles that can act as scaffolds for the adsorption of functionalized alkylthiol monolayers, which facilitate the immobilization of specific proteins. The number of protein molecules that adsorb onto the nanoparticles is dependent upon particle size; when the particle size approaches the dimensions of a protein molecule, each particle can support a single protein. This was demonstrated with both gold nanoparticle and quantum dot labeling coupled with transmission electron microscopy imaging experiments. The immobilized proteins remain bioactive, as evidenced by enzymatic assays and antigen-antibody binding experiments. Importantly, this approach to generate single-biomolecule arrays is, in principle, applicable to many parallelized cantilever and cantilever-free scanning probe molecular printing methods. PMID:22106270

  20. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Andrey N; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N

    2016-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging. PMID:27339882

  1. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging.

  2. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging. PMID:27339882

  3. Photolytic Labeling to Probe Molecular Interactions in Lyophilized Powders

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lavanya K.; Moorthy, Balakrishnan S.; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Local side-chain interactions in lyophilized protein formulations were mapped using solid-state photolytic labeling-mass spectrometry (ssPL-MS). Photoactive amino acid analogs (PAAs) were used as probes and either added to the lyophilized matrix or incorporated within the amino acid sequence of a peptide. In the first approach, apomyoglobin was lyophilized with sucrose and varying concentrations of photo-leucine (L-2-amino-4, 4′-azipentanoic acid; pLeu). The lyophilized solid was irradiated at 365 nm to initiate photolabeling. The rate and extent of labeling were measured using ESI-HPLC-MS, with labeling reaching a plateau at ∼ 30 min, forming up to 6 labeled populations. Bottom-up MS/MS analysis was able to provide peptidelevel resolution of the location of pLeu. ssPL-MS was also able to detect differences in side-chain environment between sucrose and guanidine hydrochloride formulations. In the second approach, peptide GCG (1-8)* containing p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (pBpA) in the amino acid sequence was lyophilized with various excipients and irradiated. Peptide-peptide and peptide-excipient adducts were detected using MS. Top-down MS/MS on the peptide dimer provided amino acidlevel resolution regarding interactions and the cross-linking partner for pBpA in the solid state. The results show that ssPL-MS can provide high-resolution information about protein interactions in the lyophilized environment. PMID:24125175

  4. A set of external reference controls/probes that enable quality assurance between different microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hideo; Ueda, Yoji; Nobumasa, Hitoshi; Ooshima, Hiroyuki; Ishizawa, Yohei; Kitahiro, Koji; Miyagawa, Isao; Watanabe, Kazufumi; Nakamura, Takazumi; Tanaka, Ritsuka; Yamamoto, Nobuko; Nakae, Hiroki; Kawase, Mitsuo; Gemma, Nobuhiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Matoba, Ryo

    2015-03-01

    RNA external standards, although important to ensure equivalence across many microarray platforms, have yet to be fully implemented in the research community. In this article, a set of unique RNA external standards (or RNA standards) and probe pairs that were added to total RNA in the samples before amplification and labeling are described. Concentration-response curves of RNA external standards were used across multiple commercial DNA microarray platforms and/or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and next-generation sequencing to identify problematic assays and potential sources of variation in the analytical process. A variety of standards can be added in a range of concentrations spanning high and low abundances, thereby enabling the evaluation of assay performance across the expected range of concentrations found in a clinical sample. Using this approach, we show that we are able to confirm the dynamic range and the limit of detection for each DNA microarray platform, RT-PCR protocol, and next-generation sequencer. In addition, the combination of a series of standards and their probes was investigated on each platform, demonstrating that multiplatform calibration and validation is possible. PMID:25481737

  5. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of the fluorescent probes for the labeling of Microthrix parvicella.

    PubMed

    Li, Songya; Fei, Xuening; Jiao, Xiumei; Lin, Dayong; Zhang, Baolian; Cao, Lingyun

    2016-03-01

    Although the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been widely used to identify the Microthrix parvicella (M. parvicella), there are a few disadvantages and difficulties, such as complicated process, time consuming, etc. In this work, a series of fluorescent probes, which were modified by long-chain alkane with hydrophobic property and based on the property of M. parvicella utilizing long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), for the labeling of M. parvicella in bulking sludge were designed, synthesized, and characterized. The probes were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, (1)H NMR spectra, and mass spectra, and the photostability and hydrophobic property of probes were investigated. All the results showed that the probes were quite stable and suitable for the fluorescent labeling. The probes had a large stoke shift of 98-137 nm, which was benefit for the fluorescent labeling. In the fluorescent labeling of M. parvicella by the synthesized probes, the probes had excellent labeling effects. By comparison of the images and the Image Pro Plus 6.0 analysis, the optimal concentration of the probes in the activated sludge sample for labeling was 0.010 mmol/L and the probe 3d had the best labeling. In addition, the effect of the duration time of probes was also investigated, and the results showed that the fluorescent intensity of probes hardly changed in a long period of time and it was suitable for labeling. PMID:26603763

  7. Functionalized Polymer Microgel Particles Enable Customizable Production of Label-Free Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Lifson, Mark A; Carter, Jared A; Miller, Benjamin L

    2015-08-01

    Probe molecule immobilization onto surfaces is a critical step in the production of many analytical devices, including labeled and label-free microarrays. New methods to increase the density and uniformity of probe deposition have the potential to significantly enhance the ultimate limits of detection and reproducibility. Hydrogel-based materials have been employed in the past to provide a 3D protein-friendly surface for deposition of antibodies and nucleic acids. However, these methods are susceptible to variation during polymerization of the hydrogel scaffold and provide limited opportunities for tuning deposition parameters on an antibody-by-antibody basis. In this work, a versatile hydrogel nanoparticle deposition method was developed for the production of label-free microarrays and tested in the context of antibody-antigen binding. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (PNIPAM) were conjugated to antibodies using an avidin/biotin system and deposited onto surfaces using a noncontact printing system. After drying, these gel spots formed uniform and thin layers <10 nm in height. The conjugates were characterized with dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. We tested this format in the context of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) detection via arrayed imaging reflectometry (AIR), a label-free protein microarray method. This method of probe molecule deposition should be generally useful in the production of microarrays for label-free detection. PMID:26140413

  8. Protein rotational dynamics investigated with a dual EPR/optical molecular probe. Spin-labeled eosin.

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, C E; Hustedt, E J; Beechem, J M; Beth, A H

    1993-01-01

    An acyl spin-label derivative of 5-aminoeosin (5-SLE) was chemically synthesized and employed in studies of rotational dynamics of the free probe and of the probe when bound noncovalently to bovine serum albumin using the spectroscopic techniques of fluorescence anisotropy decay and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and their long-lifetime counterparts phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR. Previous work (Beth, A. H., Cobb, C. E., and J. M. Beechem, 1992. Synthesis and characterization of a combined fluorescence, phosphorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance probe. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy III. 504-512) has shown that the spin-label moiety only slightly altered the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes and quantum yields of 5-SLE when compared with 5-SLE whose nitroxide had been reduced with ascorbate and with the diamagnetic homolog 5-acetyleosin. In the present work, we have utilized time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and linear EPR spectroscopies to observe and quantitate the psec motions of 5-SLE in solution and the nsec motions of the 5-SLE-bovine serum albumin complex. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR studies have been carried out to observe and quantitate the microseconds motions of the 5-SLE-albumin complex in glycerol/buffer solutions of varying viscosity. These latter studies have enabled a rigorous comparison of rotational correlation times obtained from these complementary techniques to be made with a single probe. The studies described demonstrate that it is possible to employ a single molecular probe to carry out the full range of fluorescence, phosphorescence, EPR, and saturation transfer EPR studies. It is anticipated that "dual" molecular probes of this general type will significantly enhance capabilities for extracting dynamics and structural information from macromolecules and their functional

  9. Dense small molecule labeling enables activator-dependent STORM by proximity mapping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Gu, Min; Gunning, Peter W; Russell, Sarah M

    2016-09-01

    Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) enables high-resolution imaging, but multi-channel 3D imaging is problematic because of chromatic aberrations and alignment errors. The use of activator-dependent STORM in which spectrally distinct activators can be coupled with a single reporter can circumvent such issues. However, the standard approach of linking activators and reporters to a single antibody molecule is hampered by low labeling density and the large size of the antibody. We proposed that small molecule labels might enable activator-dependent STORM if the reporter or activator were linked to separate small molecules that bound within 3.5 nm of each other. This would greatly increase the labeling density and therefore improve resolution. We tested various mixtures of phalloidin- or mCling-conjugated fluorophore to demonstrate this feasibility. The specific activation was dependent on the choice of activator, its density, a matching activating laser and its power. In addition to providing an effective means of multi-channel 3D STORM imaging, this method also provides information about the local proximity between labels, potentially enabling super-resolved mapping of the conformation of the labeled structures. PMID:27246003

  10. Live Imaging of Endogenous PSD-95 Using ENABLED: A Conditional Strategy to Fluorescently Label Endogenous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Dale A.; Tillo, Shane E.; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B.; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V.; Guo, Caiying

    2014-01-01

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. PMID:25505322

  11. Detection of viral genomes in the liver by in situ hybridization using 35S-, bromodeoxyuridine-, and biotin-labeled probes

    SciTech Connect

    Niedobitek, G.; Finn, T.; Herbst, H.; Stein, H.

    1989-03-01

    Methods employing /sup 35/S-, biotin-, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd)-labeled DNA probes were compared for the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the liver. The results demonstrate that: 1) HBV can be detected reliably only by the use of radiolabeled probes, whereas methods employing nonradioactive probes obviously are not sensitive enough for this virus. The use of /sup 35/S-labeled probes shortens the exposure times considerably in comparison to tritiated probes. 2) Biotin-labeled probes are of limited value for in situ hybridization on liver tissues because the presence of endogenous avidin-binding activity often leads to false positive results. 3) Brd-Urd-labeled probes are a useful alternative to biotinylated probes for the detection of CMV. In comparison with biotinylated probes, BrdUrd-labeled probes produce a specific signal of similar staining intensity in the absence of background staining in the liver.

  12. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries

    PubMed Central

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection–based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization. PMID:26054766

  13. Using phylogenetic probes for quantification of stable isotope labeling and microbial community analysis

    DOEpatents

    Brodie, Eoin L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Karaoz, Ulas; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-12-09

    Herein is described methods for a high-sensitivity means to measure the incorporation of stable isotope labeled substrates into RNA following stable isotope probing experiments (SIP). RNA is hybridized to a set of probes such as phylogenetic microarrays and isotope incorporation is quantified such as by secondary ion mass spectrometer imaging (NanoSIMS).

  14. Improvement of probe peptides for coiled-coil labeling by introducing phosphoserines.

    PubMed

    Ono, Satoshi; Yano, Yoshiaki; Matsuzaki, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a method of rapidly labeling membrane proteins in living cells using a high-affinity heterodimeric coiled-coil construct containing an E3 tag (EIAALEK)(3) genetically fused to the target protein and a K4 probe (KIAALKE)(4) labeled with a fluorophore such as tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) at its N-terminus (TMR-K4). However, coiled-coil labeling cannot be applied to highly negatively charged cell lines such as HEK293, because of the nonspecific adsorption of the positively charged K4 probes to cell membranes. To reduce the net positive charge, we synthesized new probes that include phosphoserine residues (pSer) between the K4 sequence and TMR fluorophore (TMR-(pSer)(n)-K4, [n = 1-3]). The affinity of the pSer-introduced probes was comparable to that of the TMR-K4 probe. However, the TMR-(pSer)(2)-K4 and TMR-(pSer)(3)-K4 probes tended to aggregate during labeling. In contrast, TMR-pSer-K4, which was as soluble as TMR-K4, achieved higher signal/background ratios (30-100) for four host cell lines (HEK293, HeLa, SH-SY5Y, and PC12) than did TMR-K4 (~10 for HEK293 cells), demonstrating that the improved probe can be used for various types of cells. PMID:22782565

  15. Nanoscopic polypyrrole AFM-SECM probes enabling force measurements under potential control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, P.; Higgins, M. J.; Kranz, C.

    2014-01-01

    Conductive polymers, and in particular polypyrrole, are frequently used as biomimetic interfaces facilitating growth and/or differentiation of cells and tissues. Hence, studying forces and local interactions between such polymer interfaces and cells at the nanoscale is of particular interest. Frequently, such force interactions are not directly accessible with high spatial resolution. Consequently, we have developed nanoscopic polypyrrole electrodes, which are integrated in AFM-SECM probes. Bifunctional AFM-SECM probes were modified via ion beam-induced deposition resulting in pyramidal conductive Pt-C composite electrodes. These nanoscopic electrodes then enabled localized polypyrrole deposition, thus resulting in polymer-modified AFM probes with a well-defined geometry. Furthermore, such probes may be reversibly switched from an insulating to a conductive state. In addition, the hydrophilicity of such polymer tips is dependent on the dopant, and hence, on the oxidation state. Force studies applying different tip potentials were performed at plasma-treated glass surfaces providing localized information on the associated force interactions, which are dependent on the applied potential and the dopant.Conductive polymers, and in particular polypyrrole, are frequently used as biomimetic interfaces facilitating growth and/or differentiation of cells and tissues. Hence, studying forces and local interactions between such polymer interfaces and cells at the nanoscale is of particular interest. Frequently, such force interactions are not directly accessible with high spatial resolution. Consequently, we have developed nanoscopic polypyrrole electrodes, which are integrated in AFM-SECM probes. Bifunctional AFM-SECM probes were modified via ion beam-induced deposition resulting in pyramidal conductive Pt-C composite electrodes. These nanoscopic electrodes then enabled localized polypyrrole deposition, thus resulting in polymer-modified AFM probes with a well

  16. Thiol- and biotin-labeled probes for oligonucleotide quartz crystal microbalance biosensors of microalga alexandrium minutum.

    PubMed

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  17. Thiol- and Biotin-Labeled Probes for Oligonucleotide Quartz Crystal Microbalance Biosensors of Microalga Alexandrium Minutum

    PubMed Central

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  18. Resonant waveguide grating biosensor-enabled label-free and fluorescence detection of cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Zaytseva, Natalya; Lynn, Jeffery G.; Wu, Qi; Mudaliar, Deepti J.; Sun, Haiyan; Kuang, Patty Q.; Fang, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) is fundamental to many distinct aspects of cell biology, and has been an active topic for label-free biosensors. However, little attention has been paid to study the impact of receptor signaling on the cell adhesion process. We here report the development of resonant waveguide grating biosensor-enabled label-free and fluorescent approaches, and their use for investigating the adhesion of an engineered HEK-293 cell line stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) onto distinct surfaces under both ambient and physiological conditions. Results showed that cell adhesion is sensitive to both temperature and ECM coating, and distinct mechanisms govern the cell adhesion process under different conditions. The β2-AR agonists, but not its antagonists or partial agonists, were found to be capable of triggering signaling during the adhesion process, leading to an increase in the adhesion of the engineered cells onto fibronectin-coated biosensor surfaces. These results suggest that the dual approach presented is useful to investigate the mechanism of cell adhesion, and to identify drug molecules and receptor signaling that interfere with cell adhesion. PMID:24319319

  19. Detection of Potato spindle tuber viroid and Other Related Viroids by a DIG Labelled RNA Probe.

    PubMed

    Monger, Wendy A; Jeffries, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Viroids can cause diseases of considerable economic importance; in Europe the main concern is with pospiviroids that may affect the tomato and potato industries. Methods for detection are required that are both sensitive and robust. The detection method described here is a probe hybridization method with a commercially available digoxigenin (DIG) labelled full-length Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) RNA probe. This method detects PSTVd and all other known pospiviroids. PMID:25981260

  20. Solid- and solution-phase synthesis and application of R6G dual-labeled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Skoblov, Aleksander Yu; Vichuzhanin, Maxim V; Farzan, Valentina M; Veselova, Olga A; Konovalova, Tatiana A; Podkolzin, Alexander T; Shipulin, German A; Zatsepin, Timofei S

    2015-10-15

    A novel N-TFA-protected carboxyrhodamine 6G (R6G) phosphoramidite was synthesized for use in an automated DNA synthesis to prepare 5'-labeled oligonucleotides. Deprotection and purification conditions were optimized for 5'-labeled and dual-labeled oligonucleotide probes. As an alternative we synthesized an azide derivative of R6G for CuAAC post-synthetic oligonucleotide labeling. Dual-labeled probes obtained by both methods showed the same efficacy in a quantitative PCR assay. R6G-labeled probes demonstrated superior properties in a qPCR assay in comparison with alternative HEX, JOE and SIMA dyes due to more efficient fluorescence quenching by BHQ-1. We successfully used R6G dual-labeled probes for rotavirus genotyping. PMID:26392371

  1. Luminescent/paramagnetic xanthane probes in the study of labeled biological assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghardt, Thomas P.; Toft, Daniel J.; Ajtai, Katalin

    1993-05-01

    The techniques for specifying the angular distribution of luminescent and paramagnetic probes on biological assemblies have been combined in the investigation of probe orientation and order of labeled myosin cross-bridges muscle fibers. This combination has been accomplished on two levels involving: (1) a mathematical formalism that permits the combination of data from individual luminescent and paramagnetic probes, and (2) the introduction of a family of specific extrinsic probes that are capable of producing an interpretable luminescent and paramagnetic signal when attached to a muscle fiber. The mathematical formalism has been applied to several probes of the myosin cross-bridge in muscle fibers to establish that the cross-bridge rotates during muscle contraction to produce muscle shortening (Burghardt & Ajtai, 1992 Biochemistry 31, 200; Ajtai et al., 1992 Biochemistry 31, 207). The luminescent/paramagnetic probes have also been employed in the investigation of order and orientation of cross-bridge in muscle fibers (Ajtai & Burghardt, 1992 Biochemistry 31, 4265). The properties of these dual nature probes invites further development of experimental techniques exploiting the high orientation sensitivity of paramagnetic probes with the ability of the probe to absorb and emit light. Flash-photolysis electron paramagnetic resonance is one such technique that may prove useful in the investigation of probe order in biological assemblies.

  2. Detection of specific DNA sequences with short biotin-labeled probes.

    PubMed

    Chu, B C; Orgel, L E

    1985-08-01

    We have developed a simple, general synthesis of nonradioactive DNA probes in which biotin is attached to the 5'-terminal phosphate of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide 16 bases long via an ethylenediamine or hexamethylenediamine linker. The products are stable under normal hybridization conditions. They hybridize to target DNA as efficiently as the underivatized oligodeoxyribonucleotide. Color development, using a commercially available kit, is complete within 3 hr using the biotin-detection method. The sensitivity of detection of homologous DNA with a probe to which biotin was attached via a hexamethylenediamine linker is about one-tenth of that achieved overnight by autoradiography with the corresponding 32P-labeled probe. PMID:4042814

  3. Label-free probe of HIV-1 TAT peptide binding to mimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yi; Kwok, Sheldon J J; Lombardi, Julien; Turro, Nicholas J; Eisenthal, Kenneth B

    2014-09-01

    The transacting activator of transduction (TAT) protein plays a key role in the progression of AIDS. Studies have shown that a +8 charged sequence of amino acids in the protein, called the TAT peptide, enables the TAT protein to penetrate cell membranes. To probe mechanisms of binding and translocation of the TAT peptide into the cell, investigators have used phospholipid liposomes as cell membrane mimics. We have used the method of surface potential sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG), which is a label-free and interface-selective method, to study the binding of TAT to anionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-1'-rac-glycerol (POPG) and neutral 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) liposomes. It is the SHG sensitivity to the electrostatic field generated by a charged interface that enabled us to obtain the interfacial electrostatic potential. SHG together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation yielded the dependence of the surface potential on the density of adsorbed TAT. We obtained the dissociation constants Kd for TAT binding to POPC and POPG liposomes and the maximum number of TATs that can bind to a given liposome surface. For POPC Kd was found to be 7.5 ± 2 μM, and for POPG Kd was 29.0 ± 4.0 μM. As TAT was added to the liposome solution the POPC surface potential changed from 0 mV to +37 mV, and for POPG it changed from -57 mV to -37 mV. A numerical calculation of Kd, which included all terms obtained from application of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation to the TAT liposome SHG data, was shown to be in good agreement with an approximated solution. PMID:25136100

  4. Label-free probe of HIV-1 TAT peptide binding to mimetic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Yi; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; Lombardi, Julien; Turro, Nicholas J.; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    2014-01-01

    The transacting activator of transduction (TAT) protein plays a key role in the progression of AIDS. Studies have shown that a +8 charged sequence of amino acids in the protein, called the TAT peptide, enables the TAT protein to penetrate cell membranes. To probe mechanisms of binding and translocation of the TAT peptide into the cell, investigators have used phospholipid liposomes as cell membrane mimics. We have used the method of surface potential sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG), which is a label-free and interface-selective method, to study the binding of TAT to anionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-1′-rac-glycerol (POPG) and neutral 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) liposomes. It is the SHG sensitivity to the electrostatic field generated by a charged interface that enabled us to obtain the interfacial electrostatic potential. SHG together with the Poisson–Boltzmann equation yielded the dependence of the surface potential on the density of adsorbed TAT. We obtained the dissociation constants Kd for TAT binding to POPC and POPG liposomes and the maximum number of TATs that can bind to a given liposome surface. For POPC Kd was found to be 7.5 ± 2 μM, and for POPG Kd was 29.0 ± 4.0 μM. As TAT was added to the liposome solution the POPC surface potential changed from 0 mV to +37 mV, and for POPG it changed from −57 mV to −37 mV. A numerical calculation of Kd, which included all terms obtained from application of the Poisson–Boltzmann equation to the TAT liposome SHG data, was shown to be in good agreement with an approximated solution. PMID:25136100

  5. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and

  6. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-05-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for 'lab-on-a-chip' type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  7. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  8. Histotripsy Lesion Formation using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    When applying histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the formation of a dense bubble cloud only relies on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the “intrinsic threshold” of the medium (absolute value of 26 – 30 MPa in most soft tissue). A previous study conducted by our research group showed that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds (“dual-beam histotripsy”). This paper investigates the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach. More specifically, an ATL L7–4 imaging transducer, pulsed by a Verasonics V-1 Data Acquisition System, was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345 kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red-blood-cell (RBC) tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the RBC phantoms. The results showed that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm while that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two advantages, 1) lesion

  9. Histotripsy Lesion Formation Using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    When histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles are applied, the formation of a dense bubble cloud relies only on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the "intrinsic threshold" of the medium (absolute value of 26-30 MPa in most soft tissues). It has been found that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds ("dual-beam histotripsy"). Here, the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach is investigated. More specifically, an ATL L7-4 imaging transducer (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA), pulsed by a V-1 Data Acquisition System (Verasonics, Redmond, WA, USA), was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345-kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high-voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the red blood cell phantoms. The results indicated that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm, whereas that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two

  10. Ultrasensitive and label-free molecular level detection enabled by light phase control in magnetoplasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Maccaferri, Nicolò; Gregorczyk, Keith; de Oliveira, Thales V. A. G.; Kataja, Mikko; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Pirzadeh, Zhaleh; Dmitriev, Alexandre; Åkerman, Johan; Knez, Mato; Vavassori, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Systems allowing label-free molecular detection are expected to have enormous impact on biochemical sciences. Research focuses on materials and technologies based on exploiting localized surface plasmon resonances in metallic nanostructures. The reason for this focused attention is their suitability for single molecule sensing, arising from intrinsically nanoscopic sensing volume, and the high sensitivity to the local environment. Here we propose an alternative route, which enables radically improved sensitivity compared torecently reported plasmon-based sensors. Such high sensitivity is achieved by exploiting the control of the phase of light in magnetoplasmonic nanoantennas. We demonstrate a manifold improvement of refractometric sensing figure-of-merit. Most remarkably, we show a raw surface sensitivity (i.e., without applying fitting procedures) of two orders of magnitude higher than the current values reported for nanoplasmonic sensors. Such sensitivity corresponds to a mass of ~0.8 ag per nanoantenna of polyamide-6.6 (n=1.51), which is representative for a large variety of polymers, peptides and proteins. PMID:25639190

  11. Dark Hydrazone Fluorescence Labeling Agents Enable Imaging of Cellular Aldehydic Load.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Lik Hang; Saxena, Nivedita S; Park, Hyun Shin; Weinberg, Kenneth; Kool, Eric T

    2016-08-19

    Aldehydes are key intermediates in many cellular processes, from endogenous metabolic pathways like glycolysis to undesired exogenously induced processes such as lipid peroxidation and DNA interstrand cross-linking. Alkyl aldehydes are well documented to be cytotoxic, affecting the functions of DNA and protein, and their levels are tightly regulated by the oxidative enzyme ALDH2. Mutations in this enzyme are associated with cardiac damage, diseases such as Fanconi anemia (FA), and cancer. Many attempts have been made to identify and quantify the overall level of these alkyl aldehydes inside cells, yet there are few practical methods available to detect and monitor these volatile aldehydes in real time. Here, we describe a multicolor fluorogenic hydrazone transfer ("DarkZone") system to label alkyl aldehydes, yielding up to 30-fold light-up response in vitro. A cell-permeant DarkZone dye design was applied to detect small-molecule aldehydes in the cellular environment. The new dye design also enabled the monitoring of cellular acetaldehyde production from ethanol over time by flow cytometry, demonstrating the utility of the DarkZone dyes for measuring and imaging the aldehydic load related to human disease. PMID:27326450

  12. Complex Coacervate Core Micelles with Spectroscopic Labels for Diffusometric Probing of Biopolymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Bourouina, Nadia; de Kort, Daan W; Hoeben, Freek J M; Janssen, Henk M; Van As, Henk; Hohlbein, Johannes; van Duynhoven, John P M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2015-11-24

    We present the design, preparation, and characterization of two types of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) with cross-linked cores and spectroscopic labels and demonstrate their use as diffusional probes to investigate the microstructure of percolating biopolymer networks. The first type consists of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEO-b-PMAA), labeled with ATTO 488 fluorescent dyes. We show that the size of these probes can be tuned by choosing the length of the PEO-PMAA chains. ATTO 488-labeled PEO113-PMAA15 micelles are very bright with 18 dye molecules incorporated into their cores. The second type is a (19)F-labeled micelle, for which we used PAH and a (19)F-labeled diblock copolymer tailor-made from poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(acrylic acid) (mPEO79-b-PAA14). These micelles contain approximately 4 wt % of (19)F and can be detected by (19)F NMR. The (19)F labels are placed at the end of a small spacer to allow for the necessary rotational mobility. We used these ATTO- and (19)F-labeled micelles to probe the microstructures of a transient gel (xanthan gum) and a cross-linked, heterogeneous gel (κ-carrageenan). For the transient gel, sensitive optical diffusometry methods, including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and super-resolution single nanoparticle tracking, allowed us to measure the diffusion coefficient in networks with increasing density. From these measurements, we determined the diameters of the constituent xanthan fibers. In the heterogeneous κ-carrageenan gels, bimodal nanoparticle diffusion was observed, which is a signpost of microstructural heterogeneity of the network. PMID:26535962

  13. Microbial food web mapping: linking carbon cycling and community structure in soils through pyrosequencing enabled stable isotope probing

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Daniel H.

    2015-03-15

    Soil represents a massive reservoir of active carbon and climate models vary dramatically in predicting how this carbon will respond to climate change over the coming century. A major cause of uncertainty is that we still have a very limited understand the microorganisms that dominate the soil carbon cycle. The vast majority of soil microbes cannot be cultivated in the laboratory and the diversity of organisms and enzymes that participate in the carbon cycle is staggeringly complex. We have developed a new toolbox for exploring the carbon cycle and the metabolic and ecological characteristics of uncultivated microorganisms. The high-resolution nucleic acid stable isotope probing approach that we have developed makes it possible to characterize microbial carbon cycling dynamics in soil. The approach allows us to track multiple 13C-labeled substrates into thousands of microbial taxa over time. Using this approach we have discovered several major lineages of uncultivated microorganisms that participate in cellulose metabolism and are found widely in soils (including Verrucomicrobia and Chloroflexi, which have not previously been implicated as major players in the soil carbon cycle). Furthermore, isotopic labelling of nucleic acids enables community genomics and permits genome fragment binning for a majority of these cellulolytic microorganisms allowing us to explore the metabolic underpinnings of cellulose degradation. This approach has allowed us to describe unexpected dynamics of carbon metabolism with different microbial taxa exhibiting characteristic patterns of carbon substrate incorporation, indicative of distinct ecological strategies. The data we describe allows us to characterize the activity of novel microorganisms as they occur in the environment and these data provide a basis for understanding how the physiological traits of discrete microorganisms sum to govern the complex responses of the soil carbon cycle.

  14. Combined Labelled and Label-free SERS Probes for Triplex Three-dimensional Cellular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Bai, Xiangru; Su, Le; Du, Zhanwei; Shen, Aiguo; Materny, Arnulf; Hu, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Cells are complex chemical systems, where the molecular composition at different cellular locations and specific intracellular chemical interactions determine the biological function. An in-situ nondestructive characterization of the complicated chemical processes (like e.g. apoptosis) is the goal of our study. Here, we present the results of simultaneous and three-dimensional imaging of double organelles (nucleus and membrane) in single HeLa cells by means of either labelled or label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This combination of imaging with and without labels is not possible when using fluorescence microscopy. The SERS technique is used for a stereoscopic description of the intrinsic chemical nature of nuclei and the precise localization of folate (FA) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on the membrane under highly confocal conditions. We also report on the time-dependent changes of cell nuclei as well as membrane receptor proteins during apoptosis analyzed by statistical multivariate methods. The multiplex three-dimensional SERS imaging technique allows for both temporal (real time) and spatial (multiple organelles and molecules in three-dimensional space) live-cell imaging and therefore provides a new and attractive 2D/3D tracing method in biomedicine on subcellular level.

  15. Combined Labelled and Label-free SERS Probes for Triplex Three-dimensional Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Bai, Xiangru; Su, Le; Du, Zhanwei; Shen, Aiguo; Materny, Arnulf; Hu, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Cells are complex chemical systems, where the molecular composition at different cellular locations and specific intracellular chemical interactions determine the biological function. An in-situ nondestructive characterization of the complicated chemical processes (like e.g. apoptosis) is the goal of our study. Here, we present the results of simultaneous and three-dimensional imaging of double organelles (nucleus and membrane) in single HeLa cells by means of either labelled or label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This combination of imaging with and without labels is not possible when using fluorescence microscopy. The SERS technique is used for a stereoscopic description of the intrinsic chemical nature of nuclei and the precise localization of folate (FA) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on the membrane under highly confocal conditions. We also report on the time-dependent changes of cell nuclei as well as membrane receptor proteins during apoptosis analyzed by statistical multivariate methods. The multiplex three-dimensional SERS imaging technique allows for both temporal (real time) and spatial (multiple organelles and molecules in three-dimensional space) live-cell imaging and therefore provides a new and attractive 2D/3D tracing method in biomedicine on subcellular level. PMID:26781186

  16. Combined Labelled and Label-free SERS Probes for Triplex Three-dimensional Cellular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Bai, Xiangru; Su, Le; Du, Zhanwei; Shen, Aiguo; Materny, Arnulf; Hu, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Cells are complex chemical systems, where the molecular composition at different cellular locations and specific intracellular chemical interactions determine the biological function. An in-situ nondestructive characterization of the complicated chemical processes (like e.g. apoptosis) is the goal of our study. Here, we present the results of simultaneous and three-dimensional imaging of double organelles (nucleus and membrane) in single HeLa cells by means of either labelled or label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This combination of imaging with and without labels is not possible when using fluorescence microscopy. The SERS technique is used for a stereoscopic description of the intrinsic chemical nature of nuclei and the precise localization of folate (FA) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on the membrane under highly confocal conditions. We also report on the time-dependent changes of cell nuclei as well as membrane receptor proteins during apoptosis analyzed by statistical multivariate methods. The multiplex three-dimensional SERS imaging technique allows for both temporal (real time) and spatial (multiple organelles and molecules in three-dimensional space) live-cell imaging and therefore provides a new and attractive 2D/3D tracing method in biomedicine on subcellular level. PMID:26781186

  17. Label-free colorimetric aptasensor for IgE using DNA pseudoknot probe.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Chen, Chen-Yu; Zhao, Xihong; Wu, Tzu-Heng; Wei, Shih-Chung; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2014-07-01

    The development of simple and low-cost approaches to the detection of immunoglobulin E (IgE) would provide a method for the early diagnosis and prevention of atopic diseases. The current methods of detection are generally tedious, multi-step processes and are limited by the high cost of the labeled proteins. We describe here a label-free structure-switching colorimetric method for the simple measurement of IgE using DNA pseudoknot probes and gold nanoparticles. In the absence of a target the IgE aptamer probe adopts a pseudoknot conformation that dissociates a capture probe from the unmodified gold nanoparticles. However, when IgE binds to the aptamer probe, the pseudoknot is resolved, leading to a favorable hybridization between the 3' terminal loop of the aptamer probe and the capture probe; this induces the aggregation of the gold nanoparticles. As a result, the colorimetric IgE sensor using this structure-switching mechanism is sensitive, specific and convenient, and the assay works even when challenged with complicated biological matrixes such as vaginal fluids. The proposed method is expected to be of great clinical value for IgE detection and could be used, after appropriate design, for sensing applications of other structured aptamers. PMID:24821053

  18. Cationized Magnetoferritin Enables Rapid Labeling and Concentration of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in Magnetic Cell Separation Columns

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, J.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to identify pathogens rapidly and reliably, bacterial capture and concentration from large sample volumes into smaller ones are often required. Magnetic labeling and capture of bacteria using a magnetic field hold great promise for achieving this goal, but the current protocols have poor capture efficiency. Here, we present a rapid and highly efficient approach to magnetic labeling and capture of both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria using cationized magnetoferritin (cat-MF). Magnetic labeling was achieved within a 1-min incubation period with cat-MF, and 99.97% of the labeled bacteria were immobilized in commercially available magnetic cell separation (MACS) columns. Longer incubation times led to more efficient capture, with S. aureus being immobilized to a greater extent than E. coli. Finally, low numbers of magnetically labeled E. coli bacteria (<100 CFU per ml) were immobilized with 100% efficiency and concentrated 7-fold within 15 min. Therefore, our study provides a novel protocol for rapid and highly efficient magnetic labeling, capture, and concentration of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a significant global challenge. Rapid identification of pathogens will retard the spread of AMR by enabling targeted treatment with suitable agents and by reducing inappropriate antimicrobial use. Rapid detection methods based on microfluidic devices require that bacteria are concentrated from large volumes into much smaller ones. Concentration of bacteria is also important to detect low numbers of pathogens with confidence. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic separation columns capture small amounts of bacteria with 100% efficiency. Rapid magnetization was achieved by exposing bacteria to cationic magnetic nanoparticles, and magnetized bacteria were concentrated 7-fold inside the column. Thus, bacterial capture and concentration were achieved

  19. A Native Chemical Ligation Handle that Enables the Synthesis of Advanced Activity-Based Probes: Diubiquitin as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Monique P C; El Oualid, Farid; ter Beek, Jarno; Ovaa, Huib

    2014-01-01

    We present the development of a native chemical ligation handle that also functions as a masked electrophile that can be liberated during synthesis when required. This handle can thus be used for the synthesis of complex activity-based probes. We describe the use of this handle in the generation of linkage-specific activity-based deubiquitylating enzyme probes that contain substrate context and closely mimic the native ubiquitin isopeptide linkage. We have generated activity-based probes based on all seven isopeptide-linked diubiquitin topoisomers and demonstrated their structural integrity and ability to label DUBs in a linkage-specific manner. PMID:24623714

  20. Phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-Trisphosphate Activity Probes for the Labeling and Proteomic Characterization of Protein Binding Partners

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Meng M.; Bostic, Heidi E.; Gong, Denghuang; Speers, Anna E.; Lucas, Nathan; Cho, Wonhwa; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Best, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate lipids, such as phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3), regulate critical biological processes, many of which are aberrant in disease. These lipids often act as site-specific ligands in interactions that enforce membrane-association of protein binding partners. Herein, we describe the development of bifunctional activity probes corresponding to the headgroup of PI(3,4,5)P3 that are effective for identifying and characterizing protein binding partners from complex samples, namely cancer cell extracts. These probes contain both a photoaffinity tag for covalent labeling of target proteins as well as a secondary handle for subsequent detection or manipulation of labeled proteins. Probes bearing different secondary tags were exploited, either by direct attachment of a fluorescent dye for optical detection or by using an alkyne that can be derivatized after protein labeling via click chemistry. First, we describe the design and modular synthetic strategy used to generate multiple probes with different reporter tags of use for characterizing probe-labeled proteins. Next, we report initial labeling studies using purified protein, the PH domain of Akt, in which probes were found to label this target, as judged by on-gel detection. Furthermore, protein labeling was abrogated by controls including competition with an unlabeled PI(3,4,5)P3 headgroup analog as well as through protein denaturation, indicating specific labeling. In addition, probes featuring different linker lengths between the PI(3,4,5)P3 headgroup and photoaffinity tag led to variations in protein labeling, indicating that a shorter linker was more effective in this case. Finally, proteomic labeling studies were performed using cell extracts, labeled proteins were observed by in-gel detection and characterized using post-labeling with biotin, affinity chromatography and identification via tandem mass spectrometry. These studies yielded a total of 265 proteins

  1. Microfluidic Technology Platforms for Synthesizing, Labeling and Measuring the Kinetics of Transport and Biochemical Reactions for Developing Molecular Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Michael E.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotracer techniques are used in environmental sciences, geology, biology and medicine. Radiotracers with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provided biological examinations of ~3 million patients 2008. Despite the success of positron labeled tracers in many sciences, there is limited access in an affordable and convenient manner to develop and use new tracers. Integrated microfluidic chips are a new technology well matched to the concentrations of tracers. Our goal is to develop microfluidic chips and new synthesis approaches to enable wide dissemination of diverse types of tracers at low cost, and to produce new generations of radiochemists for which there are many unfilled jobs. The program objectives are to: 1. Develop an integrated microfluidic platform technology for synthesizing and 18F-labeling diverse arrays of different classes of molecules. 2. Incorporate microfluidic chips into small PC controlled devices (“Synthesizer”) with a platform interfaced to PC for electronic and fluid input/out control. 3. Establish a de-centralized model with Synthesizers for discovering and producing molecular imaging probes, only requiring delivery of inexpensive [18F]fluoride ion from commercial PET radiopharmacies vs the centralized approach of cyclotron facilities synthesizing and shipping a few different types of 18F-probes. 4. Develop a position sensitive avalanche photo diode (PSAPD) camera for beta particles embedded in a microfluidic chip for imaging and measuring transport and biochemical reaction rates to valid new 18F-labeled probes in an array of cell cultures. These objectives are met within a research and educational program integrating radio-chemistry, synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, engineering and biology in the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging. The Radiochemistry Training Program exposes PhD and post doctoral students to molecular imaging in vitro in cells and microorganisms in microfluidic chips and in vivo with PET, from new technologies

  2. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  3. Pneumococcal Neuraminidase Substrates Identified through Comparative Proteomics Enabled by Chemoselective Labeling.

    PubMed

    McCombs, Janet E; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-04-20

    Neuraminidases (sialidases) are enzymes that hydrolytically remove sialic acid from sialylated proteins and lipids. Neuraminidases are encoded by a range of human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa. Many pathogen neuraminidases are virulence factors, indicating that desialylation of host glycoconjugates can be a critical step in infection. Specifically, desialylation of host cell surface glycoproteins can enable these molecules to function as pathogen receptors or can alter signaling through the plasma membrane. Despite these critical effects, no unbiased approaches exist to identify glycoprotein substrates of neuraminidases. Here, we combine previously reported glycoproteomics methods with quantitative proteomics analysis to identify glycoproteins whose sialylation changes in response to neuraminidase treatment. The two glycoproteomics methods-periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (PAL) and galactose oxidase and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (GAL)-rely on chemoselective labeling of sialylated and nonsialylated glycoproteins, respectively. We demonstrated the utility of the combined approaches by identifying substrates of two pneumococcal neuraminidases in a human cell line that models the blood-brain barrier. The methods deliver complementary lists of neuraminidase substrates, with GAL identifying a larger number of substrates than PAL (77 versus 17). Putative neuraminidase substrates were confirmed by other methods, establishing the validity of the approach. Among the identified substrates were host glycoproteins known to function in bacteria adherence and infection. Functional assays suggest that multiple desialylated cell surface glycoproteins may act together as pneumococcus receptors. Overall, this method will provide a powerful approach to identify glycoproteins that are desialylated by both purified neuraminidases and intact pathogens. PMID:26954852

  4. Label-free probing of genes by time-domain terahertz sensing.

    PubMed

    Haring Bolivar, P; Brucherseifer, M; Nagel, M; Kurz, H; Bosserhoff, A; Büttner, R

    2002-11-01

    A label-free sensing approach for the label-free characterization of genetic material with terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves is presented. Time-resolved THz analysis of polynucleotides demonstrates a strong dependence of the complex refractive index of DNA molecules in the THz frequency range on their hybridization state. By monitoring THz signals one can thus infer the binding state (hybridized or denatured) of oligo- and polynucleotides, enabling the label-free determination the genetic composition of unknown DNA sequences. A broadband experimental proof-of-principle in a freespace analytic configuration, as well as a higher-sensitivity approach using integrated THz sensors reaching femtomol detection levels and demonstrating the capability to detect single-base mutations, are presented. The potential application for next generation high-throughput label-free genetic analytic systems is discussed. PMID:12452572

  5. Effect of Fluorescently Labeling Protein Probes on Kinetics of Protein-Ligand Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.S.; Landry, J.P.; Fei, Y.Y.; Luo, J.T.; Wang, X.B.; Lam, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Un-labeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured kon and koff for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as KD = koff/kon, for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3 ~ 4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye; and (2) KD for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  6. A peptide with a cysteine terminus: probe for label-free fluorescent detection of thrombin activity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jingjing; Zhuo, Caixia; Ma, Xuejuan; Li, Shuangqin; Zhang, Yaodong

    2016-07-21

    Thrombin has been implicated in atherosclerotic disease development. However, thrombin activity detection is currently limited because of the lack of convenient fluorescent probes. We developed a label-free fluorescent method to assay thrombin activity on the basis of a designed peptide probe with a thrombin-cleavable peptide sequence and a cysteine terminus. The peptide probe can be conjugated to DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) through Ag-S bonding; as a result, the fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs was enhanced. As the DNA-AgNCs-peptide conjugate was adsorbed to graphene oxide (GO), the enhanced fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs was quenched. Once the peptide probe was cleaved by thrombin, the resulting release of the DNA-AgNCs from the surface of GO restored the enhanced fluorescence. Thrombin can be determined with a linear range of 0.0-50.0 nM with a detection limit of 1 nM. The thrombin-sensitive probe with a cysteine terminus may be developed into probes to detect other proteases. PMID:27187619

  7. Click labeling of unnatural sugars metabolically incorporated into viral envelope glycoproteins enables visualization of single particle fusion.

    PubMed

    Oum, Yoon Hyeun; Desai, Tanay M; Marin, Mariana; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2016-07-01

    Enveloped viruses infect target cells by fusing their membrane with cellular membrane through a process that is mediated by specialized viral glycoproteins. The inefficient and highly asynchronous nature of viral fusion complicates studies of virus entry on a population level. Single virus imaging in living cells has become an important tool for delineating the entry pathways and for mechanistic studies of viral fusion. We have previously demonstrated that incorporation of fluorescent labels into the viral membrane and trapping fluorescent proteins in the virus interior enables the visualization of single virus fusion in living cells. Here, we implement a new approach to non-invasively label the viral membrane glycoproteins through metabolic incorporation of unnatural sugars followed by click-reaction with organic fluorescent dyes. This approach allows for efficient labeling of diverse viral fusion glycoproteins on the surface of HIV pseudoviruses. Incorporation of a content marker into surface-labeled viral particles enables sensitive detection of single virus fusion with live cells. PMID:27033181

  8. Effect of fluorescently labeling protein probes on kinetics of protein-ligand reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y S; Landry, J P; Fei, Y Y; Zhu, X D; Luo, J T; Wang, X B; Lam, K S

    2008-12-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Unlabeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured k(on) and k(off) for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as K(D) = k(off)/k(on), for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3-4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye and (2) K(D) for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  9. Nic1 Inactivation Enables Stable Isotope Labeling with 13C615N4-Arginine in Schizosaccharomyces pombe*

    PubMed Central

    Carpy, Alejandro; Patel, Avinash; Tay, Ye Dee; Hagan, Iain M.; Macek, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids (SILAC) is a commonly used method in quantitative proteomics. Because of compatibility with trypsin digestion, arginine and lysine are the most widely used amino acids for SILAC labeling. We observed that Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cannot be labeled with a specific form of arginine, 13C615N4-arginine (Arg-10), which limits the exploitation of SILAC technology in this model organism. We hypothesized that in the fission yeast the guanidinium group of 13C615N4-arginine is catabolized by arginase and urease activity to 15N1-labeled ammonia that is used as a precursor for general amino acid biosynthesis. We show that disruption of Ni2+-dependent urease activity, through deletion of the sole Ni2+ transporter Nic1, blocks this recycling in ammonium-supplemented EMMG medium to enable 13C615N4-arginine labeling for SILAC strategies in S. pombe. Finally, we employed Arg-10 in a triple-SILAC experiment to perform quantitative comparison of G1 + S, M, and G2 cell cycle phases in S. pombe. PMID:25368411

  10. Fluorescent labelling of in situ hybridisation probes through the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Susann; Manetto, Antonio; Cassinelli, Valentina; Fuchs, Jörg; Ma, Lu; Raddaoui, Nada; Houben, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    In situ hybridisation is a powerful tool to investigate the genome and chromosome architecture. Nick translation (NT) is widely used to label DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). However, NT is limited to the use of long double-stranded DNA and does not allow the labelling of single-stranded and short DNA, e.g. oligonucleotides. An alternative technique is the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), at which azide and alkyne functional groups react in a multistep process catalysed by copper(I) ions to give 1,4-distributed 1,2,3-triazoles at a high yield (also called 'click reaction'). We successfully applied this technique to label short single-stranded DNA probes as well as long PCR-derived double-stranded probes and tested them by FISH on plant chromosomes and nuclei. The hybridisation efficiency of differently labelled probes was compared to those obtained by conventional labelling techniques. We show that copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition-labelled probes are reliable tools to detect different types of repetitive sequences on chromosomes opening new promising routes for the detection of single copy gene. Moreover, a combination of FISH using such probes with other techniques, e.g. immunohistochemistry (IHC) and cell proliferation assays using 5-ethynyl-deoxyuridine, is herein shown to be easily feasible. PMID:27095480

  11. The double helix is dehydrated: evidence from the hydrolysis of acridinium ester-labeled probes.

    PubMed

    Becker, M; Lerum, V; Dickson, S; Nelson, N C; Matsuda, E

    1999-04-27

    A highly chemiluminescent reporter molecule, acridinium ester (AE), was tethered to single-stranded oligonucleotide probes and hybridized to complementary as well as mismatched target sequences. When tethered to single-stranded probes, AE was readily hydrolyzed by water or hydroxide ion. In contrast, when hybridized to a complementary target, hydrolysis of the AE probe was markedly inhibited. Mismatches near AE eliminated the ability of the double helix to strongly inhibit AE hydrolysis. To establish the molecular basis for these remarkable hydrolysis properties of AE-labeled probes, the binding and hydrolysis mechanisms of AE-labeled probes were examined. When tethered to single- or double-stranded nucleic acids, hydrolysis of AE was found to proceed by generalized base catalysis in which a base abstracts a proton from water and the resulting hydroxide ion then hydrolyzes AE. Analysis of the hydrolysis rates of AE bound to DNA revealed that AE binds the minor groove of DNA and that its hydrolysis is inhibited by low water activity within the minor groove of the helix. Depending upon the sequence of the DNA, the water activity of the minor groove was estimated to be at least 2-4-fold lower than bulk solution. Hydrolysis measurements of AE tethered to RNA as well as RNA/DNA hybrids argued that the grooves of these double helices are also dehydrated relative to bulk solution. Remarkably, mismatched bases, regardless of their structure or sequence context, enhanced hydrolysis of AE by inducing hydration of the double helix that spread approximately five base pairs on either side of the mismatch. PMID:10220349

  12. Carbon-13 Labeling Used to Probe Cure and Degradation Reactions of High- Temperature Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature, crosslinked polyimides are typically insoluble, intractible materials. Consequently, in these systems it has been difficult to follow high-temperature curing or long-term degradation reactions on a molecular level. Selective labeling of the polymers with carbon-13, coupled with solid nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), enables these reactions to be followed. We successfully employed this technique to provide insight into both curing and degradation reactions of PMR-15, a polymer matrix resin used extensively in aircraft engine applications.

  13. Properties of polyethylene glycol/cyclodextrin hydrogels revealed by spin probes and spin labelling methods.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Gabriela; Ariciu, Ana Maria; Turcu, Ioana Maria; Chechik, Victor

    2014-03-21

    The properties of a gel consisting of a covalent network formed by the reaction of isocyanate end-capped polyethylene glycol (PEG) with β-cyclodextrin, were investigated by EPR spectroscopy. Spin-labelled cyclodextrin was incorporated into the cross-link points of the gel and at the chain ends. The dynamics of the gel fibres as reported by the spin label, was found to be sensitive to the H-bonding ability of the solvent, density of cross-links and temperature. Addition of spin probes (e.g., TEMPO and adamantane-TEMPO) to the unlabelled gel made it possible to characterise the solvent pools in the gel. While TEMPO was uniformly distributed throughout the solvent pools, the adamantane derivative was located at the gel fibre-solvent pool interface; these two probes thus reported on the different locations in the solvent pools. At low temperature, the gels were shown to prevent ice crystallisation in the solvent pools resulting in the formation of supercooled water. Both probes showed that the water froze at ca. 250 K, thus suggesting that the properties of the supercooled water are uniform across the solvent pools. PMID:24651650

  14. [Detection of human papillomavirus in Chinese laryngeal carcinoma with digoxigenin labelled probe prepared by PCR].

    PubMed

    Zhao, S; Lu, S; Fei, S

    1998-04-01

    The studies described here detect HPV DNA in 124 cases of fresh tissue samples with different lesions of larynx using a nonradioactive Digoxigenin Labelled Probe prepared by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The labelled probe of HPV consensus primers was obtained, which can detect nine types of HPVs DNAs such as HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 42 and 58. The results showed that the rate of positive cases with HPV infection was 45.6% (31/68) in the group of laryngeal carcinoma, 20.0% (3/15) for the group of neck metastatic lymph node, 11.8% (2/17) for precarcinous lesions group and 6.3% (1/16) for the group of vocal cord polypus, respectively. Fifteen cases of normal laryngeal tissue adjacent to the carcinoma and 15 cases adjacent to the carcinoma were HPV DNA negative. The carcinogenic action of HPV in laryngeal carcinoma and the sensitivity and specificity of the probe prepared by PCR are discussed in this paper. PMID:11189144

  15. EPR techniques to probe insertion and conformation of spin-labeled proteins in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bordignon, Enrica; Polyhach, Yevhen

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin-labeled membrane proteins is a valuable biophysical technique to study structural details and conformational transitions of proteins close to their physiological environment, e.g., in liposomes, membrane bilayers, and nanodiscs. Unlike in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, having only one or few specific side chains labeled at a time with paramagnetic probes makes the size of the object under investigation irrelevant in terms of technique sensitivity. As a drawback, extensive site-directed mutagenesis is required in order to analyze the properties of the protein under investigation. EPR can provide detailed information on side chain dynamics of large membrane proteins or protein complexes embedded in membranes with an exquisite sensitivity for flexible regions and on water accessibility profiles across the membrane bilayer. Moreover, distances between the two spin-labeled side chains in membrane proteins can be detected with high precision in the 1.5-6 nm range at cryogenic temperatures. The application of EPR to membrane proteins still presents some challenges in terms of sample preparation, sensitivity, and data interpretation; thus no ready-to-go methodological recipes can be given. However this chapter describes the state of the art in the application of nitroxide-based site-directed spin labeling EPR to membrane proteins, with specific focus on the different types of information which can be obtained with continuous wave and pulsed techniques and on the challenges in sample preparation and data analysis for functional and structural membrane protein studies. PMID:23404283

  16. Labeling of active proteases in fresh-frozen tissues by topical application of quenched activity-based probes.

    PubMed

    Withana, Nimali P; Garland, Megan; Verdoes, Martijn; Ofori, Leslie O; Segal, Ehud; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Active enzymes, such as proteases, often serve as valuable biomarkers for various disease pathologies. Therefore, methods to detect specific enzyme activities in biological samples can provide information to guide disease detection and diagnosis and to increase our understanding of the biological roles of specific enzyme targets. In this protocol, we outline methods for the topical application of fluorescently quenched activity-based probes (qABPs) to fresh-frozen tissue samples. This technique enables rapid imaging of enzyme activity at cellular resolution, and it can be combined with antibody labeling for immunodiagnosis. In this method, fresh-frozen tissue sections are fixed, incubated with the probe and imaged using fluorescence microscopy. This provides an advance over classical immunohistochemistry (IHC) in that it is rapid (4-8 h) and inexpensive, and it provides information on enzyme activity. Furthermore, it can be used with any of the growing number of fluorescent ABPs to provide data for more effective disease monitoring and diagnosis. PMID:26716706

  17. Electrophilic activity-based RNA probes reveal a self-alkylating RNA for RNA labeling

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Richard I.; Guilinger, John P.; Mukherji, Shankar; Curtis, Edward A.; Lee, Won I.; Liu, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Probes that form covalent bonds with RNA molecules based on their chemical reactivity would advance our ability to study the transcriptome. We developed a set of electrophilic activity-based RNA probes designed to react with unusually nucleophilic RNAs. We used these probes to identify reactive genome-encoded RNAs, resulting in the discovery of a 42-nt catalytic RNA from an archaebacterium that reacts with a 2,3-disubstituted epoxide at N7 of a specific guanosine. Detailed characterization of the catalytic RNA revealed the structural requirements for reactivity. We developed this catalytic RNA into a general tool to selectively conjugate a small molecule to an RNA of interest. This strategy enabled up to 500-fold enrichment of target RNA from total mammalian RNA or from cell lysate. We demonstrated the utility of this approach by selectively capturing proteins in yeast cell lysate that bind to the ASH1 mRNA. PMID:25306441

  18. 15N labeled brain enables quantification of proteome and phosphoproteome in cultured primary neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lujian; Sando, Richard C.; Farnum, John B.; Vanderklish, Peter W.; Maximov, Anton; Yates, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Terminally differentiated primary cells represent a valuable in vitro model to study signaling events associated within a specific tissue. Quantitative proteomic methods using metabolic labeling in primary cells encounter labeling efficiency issues hindering the use of these cells. Here we developed a method to quantify the proteome and phosphoproteome of cultured neurons using 15N labeled brain tissue as an internal standard, and applied this method to determine how an inhibitor of an excitatory neural transmitter receptor, phencyclidine (PCP), affects the global phosphoproteome of cortical neurons. We identified over 10,000 phosphopeptides and made accurate quantitative measurements of the neuronal phosphoproteome after neuronal inhibition. We show that short PCP treatments lead to changes in phosphorylation for 7% of neuronal phosphopeptides and that prolonged PCP treatment alters the total levels of several proteins essential for synaptic transmission and plasticity and leads to a massive reduction in the synaptic strength of inhibitory synapses. The results provide valuable insights into the dynamics of molecular networks implicated in PCP-mediated NMDA receptor inhibition and sensorimotor deficits. PMID:22070516

  19. A two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe enables spatial coordinates determination of intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Sun, Yuming; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Yong; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Zhao, Ning

    2014-11-01

    We reported a two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe for detecting intracellular pH. When excited with 800 nm laser, an optimal output of laser as the routine equipment of two-photon fluorescence microscopy, the two-photon excited fluorescence of this probe showed distinct emission peak shift as large as 109 nm upon the change of pH values in vitro. Very importantly, the experiment results show that this probe has large two-photon absorption cross-section at pH 4.5 at 800 nm of 354 g, which ranks it as one of the best two-photon ratiometric fluorescent pH probes, and its working pH value is between 4.0 and 8.0 which could fit the intracellular pH range. Moreover, utilizing this probe, the two-photon ratiometric fluorescent images in living cells have been obtained, and the spatial coordinates of intracellular pH can be mapped. At the same time, the probe also exhibited selectivity, photostability and membrane permeability. And the photophysical properties of this probe in various solvents indicated that these photophysical properties variations are due to an intramolecular charge transfer process. At last, the imaging depth of the probe in liver biopsy slices was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated the maximum imaging depth can arrive 66 µm in living rat liver tissues. PMID:25127590

  20. Fast 18F Labeling of a Near-Infrared Fluorophore Enables Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We combine a novel boronate trap for F− with a near-infrared fluorophore into a single molecule. Attachment to targeting ligands enables localization by positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). Our first application of this generic tag is to label Lymphoseek (tilmanocept), an agent designed for receptor-specific sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping. The new conjugate incorporates 18F− in a single, aqueous step, targets mouse SLN rapidly (1 h) with reduced distal lymph node accumulation, permits PET or scintigraphic imaging of SLN, and enables NIRF-guided excision and histological verification even after 18F decay. This embodiment is superior to current SLN mapping agents such as nontargeted [99mTc]sulfur colloids and Isosulfan Blue, as well as the phase III targeted ligand [99mTc]SPECT Lymphoseek counterpart, species that are visible by SPECT or visible absorbance separately. Facile incorporation of 18F into a NIRF probe should promote many synergistic PET and NIRF combinations. PMID:20873712

  1. One-to-one quantum dot-labeled single long DNA probes.

    PubMed

    He, Shibin; Huang, Bi-Hai; Tan, Junjun; Luo, Qing-Ying; Lin, Yi; Li, Jun; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Lu; Yan, Shihan; Zhang, Qi; Pang, Dai-Wen; Li, Lijia

    2011-08-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been received most attention due to their unique properties. Constructing QDs conjugated with certain number of biomolecules is considered as one of the most important research goals in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we report polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of primer oligonucleotides bound to QDs, termed as QD-based PCR. Characterization of QD-based PCR products by gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy showed that QD-labeled long DNA strands were synthesized and only a single long DNA strand was conjugated with a QD. The QD-based PCR products still kept fluorescence properties. Moreover, the one-to-one QD-labeled long DNA conjugates as probes could detect a single-copy gene on maize chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Labeling a single QD to a single long DNA will make detection of small single-copy DNA fragments, quantitative detection and single molecule imaging come true by nanotechnology, and it will promote medical diagnosis and basic biological research as well as nano-material fabrication. PMID:21546079

  2. Node-Pore Sensing Enables Label-Free Surface-Marker Profiling of Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a ubiquitous, multiparametric method for characterizing cellular populations. However, this method can grow increasingly complex with the number of proteins that need to be screened simultaneously: spectral emission overlap of fluorophores and the subsequent need for compensation, lengthy sample preparation, and multiple control tests that need to be performed separately must all be considered. These factors lead to increased costs, and consequently, flow cytometry is performed in core facilities with a dedicated technician operating the instrument. Here, we describe a low-cost, label-free microfluidic method that can determine the phenotypic profiles of single cells. Our method employs Node-Pore Sensing to measure the transit times of cells as they interact with a series of different antibodies, each corresponding to a specific cell-surface antigen, that have been functionalized in a single microfluidic channel. We demonstrate the capabilities of our method not only by screening two acute promyelocytic leukemia human cells lines (NB4 and AP-1060) for myeloid antigens, CD13, CD14, CD15, and CD33, simultaneously, but also by distinguishing a mixture of cells of similar size—AP-1060 and NALM-1—based on surface markers CD13 and HLA-DR. Furthermore, we show that our method can screen complex subpopulations in clinical samples: we successfully identified the blast population in primary human bone marrow samples from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and screened these cells for CD13, CD34, and HLA-DR. We show that our label-free method is an affordable, highly sensitive, and user-friendly technology that has the potential to transform cellular screening at the benchside. PMID:25625182

  3. Node-pore sensing enables label-free surface-marker profiling of single cells.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Karthik R; Whang, Jeremy C; Hwang, Richard; Hack, James H; Godley, Lucy A; Sohn, Lydia L

    2015-03-01

    Flow cytometry is a ubiquitous, multiparametric method for characterizing cellular populations. However, this method can grow increasingly complex with the number of proteins that need to be screened simultaneously: spectral emission overlap of fluorophores and the subsequent need for compensation, lengthy sample preparation, and multiple control tests that need to be performed separately must all be considered. These factors lead to increased costs, and consequently, flow cytometry is performed in core facilities with a dedicated technician operating the instrument. Here, we describe a low-cost, label-free microfluidic method that can determine the phenotypic profiles of single cells. Our method employs Node-Pore Sensing to measure the transit times of cells as they interact with a series of different antibodies, each corresponding to a specific cell-surface antigen, that have been functionalized in a single microfluidic channel. We demonstrate the capabilities of our method not only by screening two acute promyelocytic leukemia human cells lines (NB4 and AP-1060) for myeloid antigens, CD13, CD14, CD15, and CD33, simultaneously, but also by distinguishing a mixture of cells of similar size—AP-1060 and NALM-1—based on surface markers CD13 and HLA-DR. Furthermore, we show that our method can screen complex subpopulations in clinical samples: we successfully identified the blast population in primary human bone marrow samples from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and screened these cells for CD13, CD34, and HLA-DR. We show that our label-free method is an affordable, highly sensitive, and user-friendly technology that has the potential to transform cellular screening at the benchside. PMID:25625182

  4. Label-free liquid crystal biosensor based on specific oligonucleotide probes for heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengyuan; Wu, Chao; Tan, Hui; Wu, Yan; Liao, Shuzhen; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, to enhance the capability of metal ions disturbing the orientation of liquid crystals (LCs), we designed a new label-free LC biosensor for the highly selective and sensitive detection of heavy metal ions. This strategy makes use of the target-induced DNA conformational change to enhance the disruption of target molecules for the orientation of LC leading to an amplified optical signal. The Hg(2+) ion, which possesses a unique property to bind specifically to two DNA thymine (T) bases, is used as a model heavy metal ion. In the presence of Hg(2+), the specific oligonucleotide probes form a conformational reorganization of the oligonucleotide probes from hairpin structure to duplex-like complexes. The duplex-like complexes are then bound on the triethoxysilylbutyraldehyde/N,N-dimethyl-N-octadecyl (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilyl chloride (TEA/DMOAP)-coated substrate modified with capture probes, which can greatly distort the orientational profile of LC, making the optical image of LC cell birefringent as a result. The optical signal of LC sensor has a visible change at the Hg(2+) concentration of low to 0.1 nM, showing good detection sensitivity. The cost-effective LC sensing method can translate the concentration signal of heavy metal ions in solution into the presence of DNA duplexes and is expected to be a sensitive detection platform for heavy metal ions and other small molecule monitors. PMID:23214408

  5. Label-free nucleic acids detection based on DNA templated silver nanoclusters fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Based on DNA templated Ag NCs (DNA/Ag NCs) fluorescent probe, a label-free fluorescent method was developed for the detection of clinical significant DNA fragments from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA. Firstly, a hairpin probe, containing target DNA recognition sequence and guanine-rich sequence, was designed to hybridize with the target DNA and form a blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex. Then, exonuclease III (Exo III) was employed to stepwise hydrolyze the mononucleotides from formed blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex, releasing the target DNA and guanine-rich sequence. Finally, DNA/Ag NCs fluorescent probe was introduced to hybridize with the guanine-rich sequence, leading to an enhanced fluorescence signal for detection. The proposed method could detect as low as 2.9×10(-10) mol L(-1) HIV-1 DNA and exhibited excellent selectivity against mismatched target DNA. Furthermore, the method possessed perfect recoveries in cells lysate and human serum, showing potential to be used in biological samples. PMID:25863386

  6. Miniaturized CARS microendoscope probe design for label-free intraoperative imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xu; Wang, Xi; Xu, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Jie; Liu, Zhengfan; Weng, Sheng; Thrall, Michael J.; Goh, Alvin C.; McCormick, Daniel T.; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2014-03-01

    A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microendoscope probe for early stage label-free prostate cancer diagnosis at single cell resolution is presented. The handheld CARS microendoscope probe includes a customized micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror as well as miniature optical and mechanical components. In our design, the excitation laser (pump and stokes beams) from the fiber is collimated, reflected by the reflecting mirror, and transmitted via a 2D MEMS scanning mirror and a micro-objective system onto the sample; emission in the epi-direction is returned through the micro-objective lens, MEMS and reflecting mirror, and collimation system, and finally the emission signal is collected by a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The exit pupil diameter of the collimator system is designed to match the diameter of the MEMS mirror and the entrance pupil diameter of the micro-objective system. The back aperture diameter of the micro-objective system is designed according to the largest MEMS scanning angle and the distance between the MEMS mirror and the back aperture. To increase the numerical aperture (NA) of the micro-objective system in order to enhance the signal collection efficiency, the back aperture diameter of the micro-objective system is enlarged with an upfront achromatic wide angle Keplerian telescope beam expander. The integration of a miniaturized micro-optics probe with optical fiber CARS microscopy opens up the possibility of in vivo molecular imaging for cancer diagnosis and surgical intervention.

  7. Dual-Beam Histotripsy: A Low-Frequency Pump Enabling a High-Frequency Probe for Precise Lesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander P.; Kim, Yohan; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. When using pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the generation of these energetic bubble clouds only depends on where the peak negative pressure (P–) exceeds an intrinsic threshold of a medium (26 – 30 MPa in soft tissue with high water content). This paper investigates a strategic method for precise lesion generation in which a low-frequency pump pulse is applied to enable a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse to exceed the intrinsic threshold. This pump-probe method of controlling a supra-threshold volume can be called “dual-beam histotripsy.” A 20-element dual-frequency (500 kHz and 3 MHz elements confocally aligned) array transducer was used to generate dual-beam histotripsy pulses in RBC phantoms and porcine hepatic tissue specimens. The results showed that, when sub-intrinsic-threshold pump (500 kHz) and probe (3 MHz) pulses were applied together, dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were only generated when their peak negative pressures combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The smallest reproducible lesion varied with the relative amplitude between the pump and probe pulses, and, with a higher proportion of the probe pulse, smaller lesions could be generated. When the propagation direction of the probe pulse relative to the pump pulse was altered, the shape of the produced lesion changed based on the region that exceeded intrinsic threshold. Since the low-frequency pump pulse is more immune to attenuation and aberrations, and the high-frequency probe pulse can provide precision in lesion formation, this dual-beam histotripsy approach would be very useful in situations where precise lesion formation is required through a highly attenuative and aberrative medium, such as transcranial therapy. This is particularly true if a small low-attenuation acoustic window is available for the high

  8. A Metabolic Probe-Enabled Strategy Reveals Uptake and Protein Targets of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Wielsch, Natalie; Hupfer, Yvonne; Mönch, Bettina; Lu-Walther, Hui-Wen; Heintzmann, Rainer; Werz, Oliver; Svatoš, Aleš; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae of crucial importance as they belong to the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Several diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that have been made responsible for chemically mediated interactions in the plankton. PUA-effects include chemical defense by reducing the reproductive success of grazing copepods, allelochemical activity by interfering with the growth of competing phytoplankton and cell to cell signaling. We applied a PUA-derived molecular probe, based on the biologically highly active 2,4-decadienal, with the aim to reveal protein targets of PUAs and affected metabolic pathways. By using fluorescence microscopy, we observed a substantial uptake of the PUA probe into cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in comparison to the uptake of a structurally closely related control probe based on a saturated aldehyde. The specific uptake motivated a chemoproteomic approach to generate a qualitative inventory of proteins covalently targeted by the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element. Activity-based protein profiling revealed selective covalent modification of target proteins by the PUA probe. Analysis of the labeled proteins gave insights into putative affected molecular functions and biological processes such as photosynthesis including ATP generation and catalytic activity in the Calvin cycle or the pentose phosphate pathway. The mechanism of action of PUAs involves covalent reactions with proteins that may result in protein dysfunction and interference of involved pathways. PMID:26496085

  9. A Metabolic Probe-Enabled Strategy Reveals Uptake and Protein Targets of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Wielsch, Natalie; Hupfer, Yvonne; Mönch, Bettina; Lu-Walther, Hui-Wen; Heintzmann, Rainer; Werz, Oliver; Svatoš, Aleš; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae of crucial importance as they belong to the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Several diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that have been made responsible for chemically mediated interactions in the plankton. PUA-effects include chemical defense by reducing the reproductive success of grazing copepods, allelochemical activity by interfering with the growth of competing phytoplankton and cell to cell signaling. We applied a PUA-derived molecular probe, based on the biologically highly active 2,4-decadienal, with the aim to reveal protein targets of PUAs and affected metabolic pathways. By using fluorescence microscopy, we observed a substantial uptake of the PUA probe into cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in comparison to the uptake of a structurally closely related control probe based on a saturated aldehyde. The specific uptake motivated a chemoproteomic approach to generate a qualitative inventory of proteins covalently targeted by the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element. Activity-based protein profiling revealed selective covalent modification of target proteins by the PUA probe. Analysis of the labeled proteins gave insights into putative affected molecular functions and biological processes such as photosynthesis including ATP generation and catalytic activity in the Calvin cycle or the pentose phosphate pathway. The mechanism of action of PUAs involves covalent reactions with proteins that may result in protein dysfunction and interference of involved pathways. PMID:26496085

  10. Label-free capacitive diagnostics: exploiting local redox probe state occupancy.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Joshua; Hobnouse, George C; Fernandes, Flávio C Bedatty; Bueno, Paulo R; Davis, Jason J

    2014-03-01

    An electrode surface confined redox group contributes to a substantial potential-dependent interfacial charging that can be sensitively probed and frequency-resolved by impedance-derived capacitance spectroscopy. In utilizing the sensitivity of this charging fingerprint to redox group environment, one can seek to generate derived sensory configurations. Exemplified here through the generation of mixed molecular films comprising ferrocene and antibody receptors to two clinically important targets, the label-free methodology is able to report on human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), a tumor marker, with a limit of detection of 11 pM and C-reactive protein with a limit of detection of 28 pM. Both assays exhibit linear ranges encompassing those of clinical value. PMID:24491045

  11. Conformationally restricted analog and biotin-labeled probe based on beauveriolide III.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takayuki; Muraoka, Terushige; Ohshiro, Taichi; Matsuda, Daisuke; Yoshida, Masahito; Takahashi, Takashi; Omura, Satoshi; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    A conformationally restricted oxazoline analog 7 was designed on the basis of a SAR study of beauveriolide III (2) and its analogs reported previously. Conformational analysis by molecular mechanics calculation suggested that the three side chains of 7 mostly occupy the same spaces as those of 2. The analog 7 was synthesized by peptide coupling of the d-cyclohexylglycine-containing ester 11 and d-Ser-containing dipeptide 12, macrolactamization, and cyclodehydration of 6 for the construction of an oxazoline ring. The bicyclic 7 exhibited potential inhibitory activity for cholesteryl ester synthesis similar to that by 2. These results revealed biologically important 3D spaces of the three side chains in inhibitory activity for cholesteryl ester synthesis. In addition, we accomplished the synthesis of a biotin-labeled probe 8 by copper-catalyzed (3+2) cycloaddition of a biotin-containing alkyne 16 and azido-containing beauveriolide analog 15 prepared from 6. PMID:22079027

  12. New cross-linking quinoline- and quinolone-based luminescent lanthanide probes for sensitive labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Shyamala; Wirpsza, Laura; Kozlov, Maxim; Marras, Salvatore A. E.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Mustaev, Arkady

    2012-03-01

    New luminescent lanthanide chelates containing thiol-, amine-, and click-reactive groups in antenna-fluorophore moieties were synthesized. The chelates include diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) coupled to two types of chromophores: 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2(1H) quinolinone, and 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-alkoxyquinoline. The synthesized compounds were characterized using NMR, light absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescent spectroscopy. Some of the compounds displayed high brightness with Tb3+, Eu3+, and Dy3+. Obtained reactive lanthanide chelates can be easily attached to biological molecules. The probes demonstrated high performance in molecular beaconbased DNA hybridization assays (sub-pico molar detection limit), in bacterial proteome labeling, and in live cell imaging.

  13. Comparison of peroxidase-labeled DNA probes with radioactive RNA probes for detection of human papillomaviruses by in situ hybridization in paraffin sections

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Kurman, R.J.; Kessis, T.D.; Shah, K.V. )

    1991-01-01

    A study comparing in situ hybridization using nonradioactive DNA probes directly conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and {sup 35}S-labeled antisense RNA probes for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6/11, 16, and 18 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 34 lesions of the cervix and vulva. These lesions included exophytic condylomas and intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms. HPV 6/11 was detected in two of four condylomata acuminata by both in situ techniques. HPV 16 was detected in 13 of 30 cases of intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms by both methods. Discordance between the two methods occurred in two instances. The radiolabeled probe but not the HRP probe detected HPV 16 in one case of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3), whereas the converse occurred in one case of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN 3). HPV 18 was not detected in any of the specimens by either method. This study demonstrates that nonradioactive HRP-labeled probes for the detection of specific HPV types are as sensitive as the more laborious and potentially hazardous radioactive probes.

  14. In situ hybridization of phytoplankton using fluorescently labeled rRNA probes.

    PubMed

    Groben, René; Medlin, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Phytoplankton are one of the major components of ecosystem processes and play an important role in many biogeochemical cycles in the marine and freshwater environment. Despite their importance, many microalgae are poorly described and little is known of broad spatial and temporal scale trends in their abundance and distribution. Reasons for this are that microalgae are often small, lack distinct morphological features, and are unculturable, which make analyses difficult. It is now possible by using molecular biological techniques to advance our knowledge of aquatic biodiversity and to understand how biodiversity supports ecosystem structure, dynamics, and resilience. We present in this chapter a brief review of the progress that has been made in analyzing microalgae from populations to the species level. The described methods range from DNA fingerprinting techniques, such as random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), and simple sequence repeats (SSRs), to microsatellites, which are used in population studies, to sequence analysis, which help to reconstruct the evolutionary history of organisms and to examine relationships at various taxonomic levels. Special emphasis is given to the application of molecular probes for the identification and characterization of microalgal taxa. The fast and secure identification of phytoplankton, especially of toxic species, is important from an ecological and economical point of view and whole-cell hybridization with specific fluorochrome-labeled probes followed by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry offers a fast method for this purpose. In this context, we present a detailed protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) probes that can be applied to many algal cell types and discuss practical considerations of its use. PMID:15865974

  15. Faster than the Speed of Hearing: Nanomechanical Force Probes Enable the Electromechanical Observation of Cochlear Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Peng, Anthony W.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for our sense of hearing requires new tools for unprecedented stimulation and monitoring of sensory cell mechanotransduction at frequencies yet to be explored. We describe nanomechanical force probes designed to evoke mechanotransduction currents at up to 100kHz in living cells. High-speed force and displacement metrology is enabled by integrating piezoresistive sensors and piezoelectric actuators onto nanoscale cantilevers. The design, fabrication process, actuator performance and actuator-sensor crosstalk compensation results are presented. We demonstrate the measurement of mammalian cochlear hair cell mechanotransduction with simultaneous patch clamp recordings at unprecedented speeds. The probes can deliver mechanical stimuli with sub-10 μs rise times in water and are compatible with standard upright and inverted microscopes. PMID:23181721

  16. Supramolecular Probes for Assessing Glutamine Uptake Enable Semi-Quantitative Metabolic Models in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Min; Wei, Wei; Su, Yapeng; Johnson, Dazy; Heath, James R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a supramolecular surface competition assay for quantifying glutamine uptake from single cells. Cy3-labeled cyclodextrins were immobilized on a glass surface as a supramolecular host/FRET donor, and adamantane-BHQ2 conjugates were employed as the guest/quencher. An adamantane-labeled glutamine analog was selected through screening a library of compounds and validated by cell uptake experiments. When integrated onto a single cell barcode chip (SCBC) with a multiplex panel of 15 other metabolites, associated metabolic enzymes, and phosphoproteins, the resultant data provided input for a steady state model that describes energy potential in single cells, and correlates that potential with receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. We utilize this integrated assay to interrogate a dose-dependent response of model brain cancer cells to EGFR inhibition. We find that low dose (1 μM erlotinib) drugging actually increases cellular energy potential even as glucose uptake and phosphoprotein signaling is repressed. We also identify new interactions between phosphoprotein signaling and cellular energy processes that may help explain the facile resistance exhibited by certain cancer patients to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26916347

  17. Supramolecular Probes for Assessing Glutamine Uptake Enable Semi-Quantitative Metabolic Models in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Min; Wei, Wei; Su, Yapeng; Johnson, Dazy; Heath, James R

    2016-03-01

    We describe a supramolecular surface competition assay for quantifying glutamine uptake from single cells. Cy3-labeled cyclodextrins were immobilized on a glass surface as a supramolecular host/FRET donor, and adamantane-BHQ2 conjugates were employed as the guest/quencher. An adamantane-labeled glutamine analog was selected through screening a library of compounds and validated by cell uptake experiments. When integrated onto a single cell barcode chip with a multiplex panel of 15 other metabolites, associated metabolic enzymes, and phosphoproteins, the resultant data provided input for a steady-state model that describes energy potential in single cells and correlates that potential with receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. We utilize this integrated assay to interrogate a dose-dependent response of model brain cancer cells to EGFR inhibition. We find that low-dose (1 μM erlotinib) drugging actually increases cellular energy potential even as glucose uptake and phosphoprotein signaling is repressed. We also identify new interactions between phosphoprotein signaling and cellular energy processes that may help explain the facile resistance exhibited by certain cancer patients to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26916347

  18. Double-labeled donor probe can enhance the signal of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in detection of nucleic acid hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Yukio; Kondo, Satoshi; Sase, Ichiro; Suga, Takayuki; Mise, Kazuyuki; Furusawa, Iwao; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2000-01-01

    A set of fluorescently-labeled DNA probes that hybridize with the target RNA and produce fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals can be utilized for the detection of specific RNA. We have developed probe sets to detect and discriminate single-strand RNA molecules of plant viral genome, and sought a method to improve the FRET signals to handle in vivo applications. Consequently, we found that a double-labeled donor probe labeled with Bodipy dye yielded a remarkable increase in fluorescence intensity compared to a single-labeled donor probe used in an ordinary FRET. This double-labeled donor system can be easily applied to improve various FRET probes since the dependence upon sequence and label position in enhancement is not as strict. Furthermore this method could be applied to other nucleic acid substances, such as oligo RNA and phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (S-oligos) to enhance FRET signal. Although the double-labeled donor probes labeled with a variety of fluorophores had unexpected properties (strange UV-visible absorption spectra, decrease of intensity and decay of donor fluorescence) compared with single-labeled ones, they had no relation to FRET enhancement. This signal amplification mechanism cannot be explained simply based on our current results and knowledge of FRET. Yet it is possible to utilize this double-labeled donor system in various applications of FRET as a simple signal-enhancement method. PMID:11121494

  19. Enabling freehand lateral scanning of optical coherence tomography needle probes with a magnetic tracking system

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Boon Y.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Sampson, David D.

    2012-01-01

    We present a high-resolution three-dimensional position tracking method that allows an optical coherence tomography (OCT) needle probe to be scanned laterally by hand, providing the high degree of flexibility and freedom required in clinical usage. The method is based on a magnetic tracking system, which is augmented by cross-correlation-based resampling and a two-stage moving window average algorithm to improve upon the tracker's limited intrinsic spatial resolution, achieving 18 µm RMS position accuracy. A proof-of-principle system was developed, with successful image reconstruction demonstrated on phantoms and on ex vivo human breast tissue validated against histology. This freehand scanning method could contribute toward clinical implementation of OCT needle imaging. PMID:22808429

  20. Hard real-time beam scheduler enables adaptive images in multi-probe systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    Real-time embedded-system concepts were adapted to allow an imaging system to responsively control the firing of multiple probes. Large-volume, operator-independent (LVOI) imaging would increase the diagnostic utility of ultrasound. An obstacle to this innovation is the inability of current systems to drive multiple transducers dynamically. Commercial systems schedule scanning with static lists of beams to be fired and processed; here we allow an imager to adapt to changing beam schedule demands, as an intelligent response to incoming image data. An example of scheduling changes is demonstrated with a flexible duplex mode two-transducer application mimicking LVOI imaging. Embedded-system concepts allow an imager to responsively control the firing of multiple probes. Operating systems use powerful dynamic scheduling algorithms, such as fixed priority preemptive scheduling. Even real-time operating systems lack the timing constraints required for ultrasound. Particularly for Doppler modes, events must be scheduled with sub-nanosecond precision, and acquired data is useless without this requirement. A successful scheduler needs unique characteristics. To get close to what would be needed in LVOI imaging, we show two transducers scanning different parts of a subjects leg. When one transducer notices flow in a region where their scans overlap, the system reschedules the other transducer to start flow mode and alter its beams to get a view of the observed vessel and produce a flow measurement. The second transducer does this in a focused region only. This demonstrates key attributes of a successful LVOI system, such as robustness against obstructions and adaptive self-correction.

  1. Y-shaped probe for convenient and label-free detection of microRNA-21 in vitro.

    PubMed

    He, Kui; Liao, Rong; Cai, Changqun; Liang, Caishuang; Liu, Chan; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-04-15

    A simple, highly selective, and label-free microRNA (miRNA) detection method based on l-alanine-reduced graphene oxide fluorescence quenching with a Y-shaped probe is proposed. The Y-shaped probe was synthesized by silver nitrate and a cytosine-rich molecular beacon (MB) in two terminals through sodium borohydride reduction, which generated a stronger fluorescent signal than ordinary DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). Meanwhile, the Y-shaped probe contained a single-stranded loop structure, which could be superbly adsorbed onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) via π-π stacking interaction, and this special structure of the probe was designed to improve its sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, the quenching capacities of graphene oxide (GO) and RGO were compared in this research. The strong interaction between nucleobases of the loop structure and RGO nanosheet made the MB-AgNCs-RGO system exhibit minimal background fluorescence. In the presence of miRNA-21, the loop structure of the Y-shaped probe can hybridize with target miRNA-21; the molecular beacon encapsulated probe is far away from RGO surface and produces a detectable signal. The MB-AgNCs based approach provides a label-free avenue to detect miRNA with high selectivity and good reproducibility, which has a promising application in early clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. PMID:26854593

  2. Confined Activation and Subdiffractive Localization Enables Whole-Cell PALM with Genetically Expressed Probes

    PubMed Central

    York, Andrew G.; Ghitani, Alireza; Vaziri, Alipasha; Davidson, Michael W.; Shroff, Hari

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate 3D superresolution microscopy in whole fixed cells using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). The use of the bright, genetically expressed fluorescent marker photoactivatable mCherry (PA-mCherry1) in combination with near diffraction-limited confinement of photoactivation using two-photon illumination and 3D localization methods allowed us to investigate a variety of cellular structures at <50 nm lateral and <100 nm axial resolution. Compared to existing methods, we substantially reduce excitation and bleaching of unlocalized markers, enabling 3D PALM imaging with high localization density in thick structures. Our 3D localization algorithms based on cross-correlation do not rely on idealized noise models or specific optical configurations, allowing flexible instrument design. Generation of appropriate fusion constructs and expression in Cos7 cells allowed us to image invaginations of the nuclear membrane, vimentin fibrils, the mitochondrial network, and the endoplasmic reticulum at depths greater than 8 μm. PMID:21317909

  3. A novel and label-free immunosensor for bisphenol A using rutin as the redox probe.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Li, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Sining

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a new and label-free electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive detection of bisphenol A was reported. MWCNTs and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were modified on glassy carbon electrode surface to enhance current response. The Anti-BPA was immobilized on the modified electrode through AuNPs. Rutin was used for the first time as the redox probe to construct electrochemical immunosensor of bisphenol A. The peak current change due to the specific immuno-interaction between anti-BPA and BPA on the modified electrode surface was utilized to detect bisphenol A. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to trace the assembly process of the electrochemical immunosensor. Experimental factors affecting the sensitivity of the immunosensor were examined in terms of incubation time and pH of phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Under optimized conditions, the linear range of calibration curve based on the relationship between current response and BPA concentration was from 1.0×10(-8)-1.0×10(-6)M with detection limit of 8.7×10(-9)M (S/N=3). The proposed immunosensor showed good reproducibility, selectivity, stability and was successfully applied to the determination of BPA in real sample. PMID:27591610

  4. Biconically Tapered Fiber Optic Probes for Rapid Label-Free Immunoassays ǂ

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John; Castaneda, Angelica; Lee, Kun Ho; Sanchez, Martin; Ortiz, Adrian; Almaz, Ekrem; Turkoglu Almaz, Zuleyha; Murinda, Shelton; Lin, Wei-Jen; Salik, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    We report use of U-shaped biconically tapered optical fibers (BTOF) as probes for label-free immunoassays. The tapered regions of the sensors were functionalized by immobilization of immunoglobulin-G (Ig-G) and tested for detection of anti-IgG at concentrations of 50 ng/mL to 50 µg/mL. Antibody-antigen reaction creates a biological nanolayer modifying the waveguide structure leading to a change in the sensor signal, which allows real-time monitoring. The kinetics of the antibody (mouse Ig-G)-antigen (rabbit anti-mouse IgG) reactions was studied. Hydrofluoric acid treatment makes the sensitive region thinner to enhance sensitivity, which we confirmed by experiments and simulations. The limit of detection for the sensor was estimated to be less than 50 ng/mL. Utilization of the rate of the sensor peak shift within the first few minutes of the antibody-antigen reaction is proposed as a rapid protein detection method. PMID:25836359

  5. Method to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification using an ionically labeled probe and measuring impedance change

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Belgrader, Phillip; Fuller, Christopher D.

    2007-01-02

    Impedance measurements are used to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification. A pair of spaced electrodes are located on a surface of a microfluidic channel and an AC or DC voltage is applied across the electrodes to produce an electric field. An ionically labeled probe will attach to a complementary DNA segment, and a polymerase enzyme will release the ionic label. This causes the conductivity of the solution in the area of the electrode to change. This change in conductivity is measured as a change in the impedance been the two electrodes.

  6. Detection of novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer with an optical nanotechnology detection system enabling label-free diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaja, Simon; Hilgenberg, Jill D.; Collins, Julie L.; Shah, Anna A.; Wawro, Debra; Zimmerman, Shelby; Magnusson, Robert; Koulen, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Ovarian carcinoma has the highest lethality rate of gynecologic tumors, largely attributed to the late-stage diagnosis of the disease. Reliable tools for both accurate diagnosis and early detection of disease onset are lacking, and presently less than 20% of ovarian cancers are detected at an early stage. Protein biomarkers that allow the discrimination of early and late stages of ovarian serous carcinomas are urgently needed as they would enable monitoring pre-symptomatic aspects of the disease, disease progression, and the efficacy of intervention therapies. We compare the absolute and relative protein levels of six protein biomarkers for ovarian cancer in five different established ovarian cancer cell lines, utilizing both quantitative immunoblot analysis and a guided-mode resonance (GMR) bioassay detection system that utilizes a label-free optical biosensor readout. The GMR sensor approach provided highly accurate, consistent, and reproducible quantification of protein biomarkers as validated by quantitative immunoblotting, as well as enhanced sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for quantification and detection of novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer. We identified fibronectin, apolipoprotein A1, and TIMP3 as potential protein biomarkers for the differential diagnosis of primary versus metastatic ovarian carcinoma. Future studies are needed to confirm the suitability of protein biomarkers tested herein in patient samples.

  7. Nanoengineered glycan sensors enabling native glycoprofiling for medicinal applications: towards profiling glycoproteins without labeling or liberation steps.

    PubMed

    Reuel, Nigel F; Mu, Bin; Zhang, Jingqing; Hinckley, Allison; Strano, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Nanoengineered glycan sensors may help realize the long-held goal of accurate and rapid glycoprotein profiling without labeling or glycan liberation steps. Current methods of profiling oligosaccharides displayed on protein surfaces, such as liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, capillary electrophoresis, and microarray methods, are limited by sample pretreatment and quantitative accuracy. Microarrayed platforms can be improved with methods that better estimate kinetic parameters rather than simply reporting relative binding information. These quantitative glycan sensors are enabled by an emerging class of nanoengineered materials that differ in their mode of signal transduction from traditional methods. Platforms that respond to mass changes include a quartz crystal microbalance and cantilever sensors. Electronic response can be detected from electrochemical, field effect transistor, and pore impedance sensors. Optical methods include fluorescent frontal affinity chromatography, surface plasmon resonance methods, and fluorescent carbon nanotubes. After a very brief primer on glycobiology and its connection to medicine, these emerging systems are critically reviewed for their potential use as core sensors in future glycoprofiling tools. PMID:22868627

  8. Detection of novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer with an optical nanotechnology detection system enabling label-free diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kaja, Simon; Hilgenberg, Jill D.; Collins, Julie L.; Shah, Anna A.; Wawro, Debra; Zimmerman, Shelby; Magnusson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Ovarian carcinoma has the highest lethality rate of gynecologic tumors, largely attributed to the late-stage diagnosis of the disease. Reliable tools for both accurate diagnosis and early detection of disease onset are lacking, and presently less than 20% of ovarian cancers are detected at an early stage. Protein biomarkers that allow the discrimination of early and late stages of ovarian serous carcinomas are urgently needed as they would enable monitoring pre-symptomatic aspects of the disease, disease progression, and the efficacy of intervention therapies. We compare the absolute and relative protein levels of six protein biomarkers for ovarian cancer in five different established ovarian cancer cell lines, utilizing both quantitative immunoblot analysis and a guided-mode resonance (GMR) bioassay detection system that utilizes a label-free optical biosensor readout. The GMR sensor approach provided highly accurate, consistent, and reproducible quantification of protein biomarkers as validated by quantitative immunoblotting, as well as enhanced sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for quantification and detection of novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer. We identified fibronectin, apolipoprotein A1, and TIMP3 as potential protein biomarkers for the differential diagnosis of primary versus metastatic ovarian carcinoma. Future studies are needed to confirm the suitability of protein biomarkers tested herein in patient samples. PMID:23224173

  9. Label-free detection and dynamic monitoring of drug-induced intracellular vesicle formation enabled using a 2-dimensional matched filter

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Obaid; Fryknäs, Mårten; Zhang, Xiaonan; De Milito, Angelo; Hammerling, Ulf; Linder, Stig; Larsson, Rolf; Gustafsson, Mats G

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of vesicle formation and degradation is a central issue in autophagy research and microscopy imaging is revolutionizing the study of such dynamic events inside living cells. A limiting factor is the need for labeling techniques that are labor intensive, expensive, and not always completely reliable. To enable label-free analyses we introduced a generic computational algorithm, the label-free vesicle detector (LFVD), which relies on a matched filter designed to identify circular vesicles within cells using only phase-contrast microscopy images. First, the usefulness of the LFVD is illustrated by presenting successful detections of autophagy modulating drugs found by analyzing the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116 exposed to each substance among 1266 pharmacologically active compounds. Some top hits were characterized with respect to their activity as autophagy modulators using independent in vitro labeling of acidic organelles, detection of LC3-II protein, and analysis of the autophagic flux. Selected detection results for 2 additional cell lines (DLD1 and RKO) demonstrate the generality of the method. In a second experiment, label-free monitoring of dose-dependent vesicle formation kinetics is demonstrated by recorded detection of vesicles over time at different drug concentrations. In conclusion, label-free detection and dynamic monitoring of vesicle formation during autophagy is enabled using the LFVD approach introduced. PMID:24169509

  10. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully. PMID:26572843

  11. Quantitative assay of PCR-amplified hepatitis B virus DNA using a peroxidase-labelled DNA probe and enhanced chemiluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Erhardt, A; Schaefer, S; Athanassiou, N; Kann, M; Gerlich, W H

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive and quantitative assay for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in serum or plasma in which PCR and then microtiter hybridization analysis are used. Assay of HBV DNA in serum or plasma is important for demonstrating viral replication, indicating and monitoring antiviral therapy, determining the infectivities of virus carriers, and ensuring the safety of blood products. Under optimum conditions PCR can amplify one HBV DNA molecule to 10(8) copies, but detection of this amount of DNA still requires hybridization with labelled probes or a nested PCR. We labelled one strand of the PCR product with a biotinylated primer. The double-stranded amplicon was incubated in streptavidin-coated microplate wells. The nonlabelled strand was removed after denaturation of the double-stranded DNA with alkali, and the bound strand was hybridized with a peroxidase-coupled single-stranded probe. The amount of bound peroxidase was measured in a luminometer. Four picograms of amplicon was detectable in this system, whereas conventional ethidium bromide staining requires a 1,000 times higher amplicon concentration. The performance of the new assay was compared with those of nested PCR and a PCR system that uses a digoxigenin label, hybridization to a solid-phase adsorbed probe, and colorimetric detection. The chemiluminescence assay was found to be almost as sensitive as nested PCR and approximately five times more sensitive than the colorimetric test. PMID:8818875

  12. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. PMID:26879193

  13. Combining Single RNA Sensitive Probes with Subdiffraction-Limited and Live-Cell Imaging Enables the Characterization of Virus Dynamics in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The creation of fluorescently labeled viruses is currently limited by the length of imaging observation time (e.g., labeling an envelope protein) and the rescue of viral infectivity (e.g., encoding a GFP protein). Using single molecule sensitive RNA hybridization probes delivered to the cytoplasm of infected cells, we were able to isolate individual, infectious, fluorescently labeled human respiratory syncytial virus virions. This was achieved without affecting viral mRNA expression, viral protein expression, or infectivity. Measurements included the characterization of viral proteins and genomic RNA in a single virion using dSTORM, the development of a GFP fusion assay, and the development of a pulse-chase assay for viral RNA production that allowed for the detection of both initial viral RNA and nascent RNA production at designated times postinfection. Live-cell measurements included imaging and characterization of filamentous virion fusion and the quantification of virus replication within the same cell over an eight-hour period. Using probe-labeled viruses, individual viral particles can be characterized at subdiffraction-limited resolution, and viral infections can be quantified in single cells over an entire cycle of replication. The implication of this development is that MTRIP labeling of viral RNA during virus assembly has the potential to become a general methodology for the labeling and study of many important RNA viruses. PMID:24351207

  14. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Weijun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-05-03

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and environmental electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 79% membrane proteins among all proteins identified from the enriched sample. To illustrate the quantification of membrane proteome changes, enriched membrane protein samples from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) were further labeled with 16O and 18O at the peptide level prior to LC-MS analysis. A chemical-probe-labeled pure protein has also been used as an internal standard for normalization purpose. The quantitative data revealed reduced abundances of many outer membrane proteins such as OmcA and MtrC in ΔgspD mutant cells, which agreed well with previously published studies.

  15. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level 16O and 18O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in ΔgspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-cype cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with previously investigation demonstrating that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system. PMID:20380418

  16. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  17. Detection of Helicobacter Pylori Genome with an Optical Biosensor Based on Hybridization of Urease Gene with a Gold Nanoparticles-Labeled Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrashoob, M.; Mohsenifar, A.; Tabatabaei, M.; Rahmani-Cherati, T.; Mobaraki, M.; Mota, A.; Shojaei, T. R.

    2016-05-01

    A novel optics-based nanobiosensor for sensitive determination of the Helicobacter pylori genome using a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-labeled probe is reported. Two specific thiol-modified capture and signal probes were designed based on a single-stranded complementary DNA (cDNA) region of the urease gene. The capture probe was immobilized on AuNPs, which were previously immobilized on an APTES-activated glass, and the signal probe was conjugated to different AuNPs as well. The presence of the cDNA in the reaction mixture led to the hybridization of the AuNPs-labeled capture probe and the signal probe with the cDNA, and consequently the optical density of the reaction mixture (AuNPs) was reduced proportionally to the cDNA concentration. The limit of detection was measured at 0.5 nM.

  18. PET imaging of liposomes labeled with an [¹⁸F]-fluorocholesteryl ether probe prepared by automated radiosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Andreas Tue Ingemann; Binderup, Tina; Andresen, Thomas L; Kjær, Andreas; Rasmussen, Palle H

    2012-12-01

    A novel [¹⁸F]-labeled cholesteryl ether lipid probe was prepared by synthesis of the corresponding mesylate, which was [¹⁸F]-fluorinated by a [¹⁸F]KF, Kryptofix-222, K₂CO₃ procedure. Fluorination was done for 10 minutes at 165°C and took place with conversion between 3 and 17%, depending on conditions. Radiolabelling of the probe and subsequent in situ purification on SEP-Paks were done on a custom-built, fully automatic synthesis robot. Long-circulating liposomes were prepared by hydration (magnetic stirring) of a lipid film containing the radiolabeled probe, followed by fully automated extrusion through 100-nm filters. The [¹⁸F]-labeled liposomes were injected into nude, tumor-bearing mice, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed several times over 8 hours to investigate the in vivo biodistribution. Clear tumor accumulation, as well as hepatic and splenic uptake, was observed, corresponding to expected liposomal pharmacokinetics. The tumor accumulation 8 hours postinjection accounted for 2.25 ± 0.23 (mean ± standard error of the mean) percent of injected dose per gram (%ID/g), and the tumor-to-muscle ratio reached 2.20 ± 0.24 after 8 hours, which is satisfactorily high for visualization of pathological lesions. Moreover, the blood concentration was still at a high level (13.9 ± 1.5 %ID/g) at the end of the 8-hour time frame. The present work demonstrates the methodology for automated preparation of radiolabeled liposomes, and shows that [¹⁸F]-labeled liposomes could be suitable as a methodology for visualization of tumors and obtaining short-term pharmacokinetics in vivo. PMID:22803638

  19. Frequency-domain flow cytometry: fluorescence-lifetime-based sensing technology for analyzing cells and chromosomes labeled with fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Crissman, Harry A.; Lehnert, Bruce E.; Lehnert, Nancy M.; Deka, Chiranjit

    1997-05-01

    A flow cytometer has been developed that combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making frequency-domain, excited-state lifetime measurements on cells/chromosomes labeled with fluorescent probes, while preserving conventional FCM capabilities. Cells are analyzed as they intersect a high-frequency, intensity-modulated (sine-wave) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence signals are processed by (1) low-pass filtering to obtain conventional FCM dc-excited signals and (2) phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve heterogeneous fluorescence based on differences in lifetimes expressed as phase-shifts and to quantify fluorescence lifetimes in real time. Processed signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate contour diagrams. Recent examples of biological applications include: (1) lifetime histograms recorded on autofluorescent human lung fibroblasts, murine thymus cells labeled with antibodies conjugated to fluorophores for studying fluorescence quenching as a function of antibody dilution and F/P ratio, and on cultured cells, nuclei, and chromosomes stained with DNA-binding fluorochromes and (2) phase-resolved, fluorescence signal- intensity histograms recorded on autofluorescent HLFs labeled with immunofluorescence markers and on murine thymus cells labeled with Red 613-antiThy 1.2 and propidium iodide (PI positive `dead' cells) to demonstrate the resolution of signals from highly overlapping emission spectra. This technology will increase the number of fluorescent markers usable in multilabeling studies and lifetimes can be used as spectroscopic probes to study the interaction of markers with their targets, each other, and the surrounding microenvironment.

  20. Redox-labelled poly(ethylene glycol) used as a diffusion probe in poly(ethylene glycol) melts

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, O.; Velasquez, C.; Porat, Z.

    1995-12-01

    Ferrocene labelled monomethyl poly(ethylene glycol) MPEG with molecular weights of 1900 and 750 was prepared and used as an electrochemical diffusion probe in poly(ethylene glycol) melts. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used in connection with microdisk electrodes to measure the diffusion coefficient of redox tagged molecules using melted poly(ethylene glycol) as a solvent. The molecular weight of the solvent polymer was 750, 2000 and 20000. Results from the temperature dependency of the diffusion process and of the viscosity and conductivity of the polymer electrolyte are presented and discussed.

  1. A H+/Ag+ dual-target responsive label-free light-up probe based on a DNA triplex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Guo, Yahui; Wang, Jine; Zhou, Lu; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Hong, Shanni; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Jianye; Pei, Renjun

    2015-05-01

    We developed a dual-target responsive sensor for label-free light-up fluorescent detection of protons (H(+)) and silver ions (Ag(+)) using an "OR'' logic gate. Berberine, a cost-effective and non-toxic indicator, partially intercalates the formed triplex DNA in the presence of H(+) or Ag(+), generating enhanced fluorescence. The designed Ag(+) probe has high selectivity and desirable sensitivity, which is necessary for practical use. The robust "OR" logic gate is capable of a rapid and reversible response to the H(+) and/or Ag(+) inputs. PMID:25663002

  2. Development of a DNA-Templated Peptide Probe for Photoaffinity Labeling and Enrichment of the Histone Modification Reader Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Lu, Congcong; Jin, Jin; Tian, Shanshan; Guo, Zhenchang; Chen, Pu; Zhai, Guijin; Zheng, Shuzhen; He, Xiwen; Fan, Enguo; Zhang, Yukui; Zhang, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (HPTMs) provide signal platforms to recruit proteins or protein complexes to regulate gene expression. Therefore, the identification of these recruited partners (readers) is essential to understand the underlying regulatory mechanisms. However, it is still a major challenge to profile these partners because their interactions with HPTMs are rather weak and highly dynamic. Herein we report the development of a HPTM dual probe based on DNA-templated technology and a photo-crosslinking method for the identification of HPTM readers. By using the trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4, we demonstrated that this HPTM dual probe can be successfully utilized for labeling and enrichment of HPTM readers, as well as for the discovery of potential HPTM partners. This study describes the development of a new chemical proteomics tool for profiling HPTM readers and can be adapted for broad biomedical applications. PMID:27169517

  3. Solid Phase Synthesis and Application of Labeled Peptide Derivatives: Probes of Receptor-Opioid Peptide Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Jane V.; Kumar, Vivek; Dattachowdhury, Bhaswati; Peck, Angela M.; Wang, Xin; Murray, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Solid phase synthetic methodology has been developed in our laboratory to incorporate an affinity label (a reactive functionality such as isothiocyanate or bromoacetamide) into peptides (Leelasvatanakij, L. and Aldrich, J. V. (2000) J. Peptide Res. 56, 80), and we have used this synthetic strategy to prepare affinity label derivatives of a variety of opioid peptides. To date side reactions have been detected only in two cases, both involving intramolecular cyclization. We have identified several peptide-based affinity labels for δ opioid receptors that exhibit wash-resistant inhibition of binding to these receptors and are valuable pharmacological tools to study opioid receptors. Even in cases where the peptide derivatives do not bind covalently to their target receptor, studying their binding has revealed subtle differences in receptor interactions with particular opioid peptide residues, especially Phe residues in the N-terminal “message” sequences. Solid phase synthetic methodology for the incorporation of other labels (e.g. biotin) into the C-terminus of peptides has also been developed in our laboratory (Kumar, V. and Aldrich, J. V. (2003) Org. Lett. 5, 613). These two synthetic approaches have been combined to prepare peptides containing multiple labels that can be used as tools to study peptide ligand-receptor interactions. These solid phase synthetic methodologies are versatile strategies that are applicable to the preparation of labeled peptides for a variety of targets in addition to opioid receptors. PMID:19956785

  4. Large-Scale Multiplexed Quantitative Discovery Proteomics Enabled by the Use of an O-18-Labeled “Universal” Reference Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jescheke, Marc G.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Hemdon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative comparison of protein abundances across a relatively large number of patient samples is an important challenge for clinical proteomic applications. Herein we describe a dual-quantitation strategy that allows the simultaneous integration of complementary label-free and stable isotope labeling based approaches without increasing the number of LC-MS analyses. The approach utilizes a stable isotope 18O-labeled “universal” reference sample as a comprehensive set of internal standards spiked into each individually processed unlabeled patient sample. The quantitative data are based on both the direct 16O-MS intensities for label-free quantitation and the 16O/18O isotopic peptide pair ratios that compare each patient sample to the identical labeled reference. The effectiveness of this dual-quantitation approach for large scale quantitative proteomics is demonstrated by the application to a set of 38 clinical plasma samples from surviving and non-surviving severe burn patients. With the coupling of immunoaffinity depletion, cysteinyl-peptide enrichment based fractionation, high resolution LC-MS measurements, and the dual-quantitation approach, a total of 318 proteins were confidently quantified with at least two peptides and 263 proteins were quantified by both approaches. The strategy also enabled a direct comparison between the two approaches with the labeling approach showing significantly better precision in quantitation while the label-free approach resulted in more protein identifications. The relative abundance differences determined by the two approaches also show strong correlation. Finally, the dual-quantitation strategy allowed us to identify more candidate protein biomarkers, illustrating the complementary nature of the two quantitative methods.

  5. Visualization of Active Glucocerebrosidase in Rodent Brain with High Spatial Resolution following In Situ Labeling with Fluorescent Activity Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Moro Chao, Daniela; Kallemeijn, Wouter W.; Marques, Andre R. A.; Orre, Marie; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Roomen, Cindy; Foppen, Ewout; Renner, Maria C.; Moeton, Martina; van Eijk, Marco; Boot, Rolf G.; Kamphuis, Willem; Hol, Elly M.; Aten, Jan; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is characterized by lysosomal accumulation of glucosylceramide due to deficient activity of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA). In cells, glucosylceramide is also degraded outside lysosomes by the enzyme glucosylceramidase 2 (GBA2) of which inherited deficiency is associated with ataxias. The interest in GBA and glucosylceramide metabolism in the brain has grown following the notion that mutations in the GBA gene impose a risk factor for motor disorders such as α-synucleinopathies. We earlier developed a β-glucopyranosyl-configured cyclophellitol-epoxide type activity based probe (ABP) allowing in vivo and in vitro visualization of active molecules of GBA with high spatial resolution. Labeling occurs through covalent linkage of the ABP to the catalytic nucleophile residue in the enzyme pocket. Here, we describe a method to visualize active GBA molecules in rat brain slices using in vivo labeling. Brain areas related to motor control, like the basal ganglia and motor related structures in the brainstem, show a high content of active GBA. We also developed a β-glucopyranosyl cyclophellitol-aziridine ABP allowing in situ labeling of GBA2. Labeled GBA2 in brain areas can be identified and quantified upon gel electrophoresis. The distribution of active GBA2 markedly differs from that of GBA, being highest in the cerebellar cortex. The histological findings with ABP labeling were confirmed by biochemical analysis of isolated brain areas. In conclusion, ABPs offer sensitive tools to visualize active GBA and to study the distribution of GBA2 in the brain and thus may find application to establish the role of these enzymes in neurodegenerative disease conditions such as α-synucleinopathies and cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26418157

  6. Multimodal nonlinear endo-microscopy probe design for high resolution, label-free intraoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Daniel T; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T C

    2015-07-01

    We present a portable, multimodal, nonlinear endo-microscopy probe designed for intraoperative oncological imaging. Application of a four-wave mixing noise suppression scheme using dual wavelength wave plates (DWW) and a polarization-maintaining fiber improves tissue signal collection efficiency, allowing for miniaturization. The probe, with a small 14 mm transversal diameter, includes a customized miniaturized two-axis MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) raster scanning mirror and micro-optics with an illumination laser delivered by a polarization-maintaining fiber. The probe can potentially be integrated into the arms of a surgical robot, such as da Vinci robotic surgery system, due to its minimal cross sectional area. It has the ability to incorporate multiple imaging modalities including CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), SHG (second harmonic generation), and TPEF (two-photon excited fluorescence) in order to allow the surgeon to locate tumor cells within the context of normal stromal tissue. The resolution of the endo-microscope is experimentally determined to be 0.78 µm, a high level of accuracy for such a compact probe setup. The expected resolution of the as-built multimodal, nonlinear, endo-microscopy probe is 1 µm based on the calculation tolerance allocation using Monte-Carlo simulation. The reported probe is intended for use in laparoscopic or radical prostatectomy, including detection of tumor margins and avoidance of nerve impairment during surgery. PMID:26203361

  7. Multimodal nonlinear endo-microscopy probe design for high resolution, label-free intraoperative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Daniel T.; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T.C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a portable, multimodal, nonlinear endo-microscopy probe designed for intraoperative oncological imaging. Application of a four-wave mixing noise suppression scheme using dual wavelength wave plates (DWW) and a polarization-maintaining fiber improves tissue signal collection efficiency, allowing for miniaturization. The probe, with a small 14 mm transversal diameter, includes a customized miniaturized two-axis MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) raster scanning mirror and micro-optics with an illumination laser delivered by a polarization-maintaining fiber. The probe can potentially be integrated into the arms of a surgical robot, such as da Vinci robotic surgery system, due to its minimal cross sectional area. It has the ability to incorporate multiple imaging modalities including CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), SHG (second harmonic generation), and TPEF (two-photon excited fluorescence) in order to allow the surgeon to locate tumor cells within the context of normal stromal tissue. The resolution of the endo-microscope is experimentally determined to be 0.78 µm, a high level of accuracy for such a compact probe setup. The expected resolution of the as-built multimodal, nonlinear, endo-microscopy probe is 1 µm based on the calculation tolerance allocation using Monte-Carlo simulation. The reported probe is intended for use in laparoscopic or radical prostatectomy, including detection of tumor margins and avoidance of nerve impairment during surgery. PMID:26203361

  8. Pyrenyl Derivative with a Four-Atom Linker That Can Probe the Local Polarity of Pyrene-Labeled Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Shiva; Duhamel, Jean

    2016-02-01

    The fluorescent probe 1-pyrenemethoxyethanol (PyMeEGOH) was designed to replace commercially available 1-pyrenebutanol (PyButOH) as an alternative fluorescent label to probe the internal dynamics and interior polarity of macromolecules by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence. While excimer formation and sensitivity to solvent polarity are two well-recognized properties of pyrene, much less known is that these properties are often mutually exclusive when a 1-pyrenebutyl derivative is used to prepare pyrene-labeled macromolecules (PyLMs). As the sensitivity of pyrene to solvent polarity is a result of its symmetry, attaching a butyl group to pyrene breaks the symmetry of pyrene, so that the 1-pyrenebutyl derivatives are much less sensitive to the polarity of their environment compared to unmodified pyrene. This report demonstrates that replacement of a methylene group in the β-position of PyButOH by an oxygen atom, such as in PyMeEGOH, restores the sensitivity of this pyrene derivative to the polarity of its local environment to the same level as that of molecular pyrene without impeding pyrene excimer formation upon incorporation into PyLMs. PMID:26734846

  9. Phenotyping hepatocellular metabolism using uniformly labeled carbon-13 molecular probes and LC-HRMS stable isotope tracing.

    PubMed

    Meissen, John K; Pirman, David A; Wan, Min; Miller, Emily; Jatkar, Aditi; Miller, Russell; Steenwyk, Rick C; Blatnik, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Metabolite stable isotope tracing is a powerful bioanalytical strategy that has the potential to unravel phenotypic markers of early pharmaceutical efficacy by monitoring enzymatic incorporation of carbon-13 atoms into targeted pathways over time. The practice of probing biological systems with carbon-13 labeled molecules using broad MS-based screens has been utilized for many years in academic laboratories but has had limited application in the pharmaceutical R&D environment. The goal of this work was to establish a LCMS analytical workflow that was capable of monitoring carbon-13 isotope changes in glycolysis, the TCA and urea cycles, and non-essential amino acid metabolism. This work applies a standardized protein precipitation with 80% cold methanol and two distinct reverse-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography methods coupled to either a positive- or negative-ion mode high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry screening method. The data herein combines thousands of single-point peak integrations into a novel metabolite network map as a visualization aid to probe and monitor stable isotope incorporation in murine hepatocytes using uniformly labeled (13)C6 glucose, (13)C3 lactate, and (13)C5 glutamine. This work also demonstrates that nitrogen metabolism may have a large influence on the TCA cycle and gluconeogenic carbon fluxes in hepatocyte cell culture. PMID:27343766

  10. Probing the Metabolic Network in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei Using Untargeted Metabolomics with Stable Isotope Labelled Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Creek, Darren J.; Mazet, Muriel; Achcar, Fiona; Anderson, Jana; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kamour, Ruwida; Morand, Pauline; Millerioux, Yoann; Biran, Marc; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Weidt, Stefan K.; Burgess, Karl E. V.; Breitling, Rainer; Watson, David G.; Bringaud, Frédéric; Barrett, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate. PMID:25775470

  11. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca(2+) on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26902947

  12. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca2+ on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology.

  13. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca2+ on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology.

  14. Synthesis of reference standards to enable single cell metabolomic studies of tetramethylrhodamine-labelled ganglioside GM1

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, E. Andreas; Olsson, Ulf; Whitmore, Colin; Martins, Rita; Tettamanti, Guido; Schnaar, Ronald L.; Dovichi, Norman J.; Palcic, Monica M.; Hindsgaul, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Ganglioside GM1 and its seven potential catabolic products: asialo-GM1, GM2, asialo-GM2, GM3, Lac-Cer, Glc-Cer and Cer, were labelled with tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) to permit ultra-sensitive analysis using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. The preparation involved acylation of the homogenous C18 lyso-forms of GM1, Lac-Cer, Glc-Cer and Cer with the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of a β-alanine-tethered 6-TMR derivative, followed by conversion of these labelled products using galactosidase, sialidase and sialyltransferase enzymes. The TMR-glycolipd analogs produced are detectable on TLC down to the 1 ng level by naked eye. All 8 compounds could be separated in under 4 minutes in capillary electrophoresis where they could be detected at the zeptomole (ca 1000 molecule) level using LIF. PMID:17069778

  15. Magnetic Particle Spectroscopy Reveals Dynamic Changes in the Magnetic Behavior of Very Small Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles During Cellular Uptake and Enables Determination of Cell-Labeling Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Poller, Wolfram C; Löwa, Norbert; Wiekhorst, Frank; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Möller, Konstantin; Baumann, Gert; Stangl, Verena; Trahms, Lutz; Ludwig, Antje

    2016-02-01

    In vivo tracking of nanoparticle-labeled cells by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) crucially depends on accurate determination of cell-labeling efficacy prior to transplantation. Here, we analyzed the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) for estimation of cell-labeling efficacy in living THP-1 cells incubated with very small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP). Cell viability and proliferation capacity were not affected by the MPS measurement procedure. In VSOP samples without cell contact, MPS enabled highly accurate quantification. In contrast, MPS constantly overestimated the amount of cell associated and internalized VSOP. Analyses of the MPS spectrum shape expressed as harmonic ratio A₅/A₃ revealed distinct changes in the magnetic behavior of VSOP in response to cellular uptake. These changes were proportional to the deviation between MPS and actual iron amount, therefore allowing for adjusted iron quantification. Transmission electron microscopy provided visual evidence that changes in the magnetic properties correlated with cell surface interaction of VSOP as well as with alterations of particle structure and arrangement during the phagocytic process. Altogether, A₅/A₃-adjusted MPS enables highly accurate, cell-preserving VSOP quantification and furthermore provides information on the magnetic characteristics of internalized VSOP. PMID:27305767

  16. Design Strategies for Bioorthogonal Smart Probes

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has enabled the selective labeling and detection of biomolecules in living systems. Bioorthogonal smart probes, which become fluorescent or deliver imaging or therapeutic agents upon reaction, allow for the visualization of biomolecules or targeted delivery even in the presence of excess unreacted probe. This review discusses the strategies used in the development of bioorthogonal smart probes and highlights the potential of these probes to further our understanding of biology. PMID:25315039

  17. Novel Benzodiazepine Photoaffinity Probe Stereoselectively Labels a Site Deep Within the Membrane-spanning Domain of the Cholecystokinin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hadac, Elizabeth M.; Dawson, Eric S.; Darrow, James W.; Sugg, Elizabeth E.; Lybrand, Terry P.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of the molecular basis of drug action provides opportunities for refinement of drug properties and for development of more potent and selective molecules that act at the same biological target. In this work, we have identified the active enantiomers in racemic mixtures of structurally related benzophenone derivatives of 1,5-benzodiazepines, representing both antagonist and agonist ligands of the type A cholecystokinin receptor. The parent compounds of the 1,5-benzodiazepine CCK receptor photoaffinity ligands were originally prepared in an effort to develop orally active drugs. The enantiomeric compounds reported in this study selectively photoaffinity-labeled the CCK receptor, resulting in the identification of a site of attachment for the photolabile moiety of the antagonist probe deep within the receptor’s membrane-spanning region at Leu88, a residue within transmembrane segment two. In contrast, the agonist probe labeled a region including extracellular loop one and a portion of transmembrane segment three. The antagonist covalent attachment site to the receptor served as a guide in the construction of theoretical three-dimensional molecular models for the antagonist-receptor complex. These models provided a means for visualization of physically plausible ligand-receptor interactions in the context of all currently available biological data that address small molecule interactions with the CCK receptor. Our approach, featuring the use of novel photolabile compounds targeting the membrane-spanning receptor domain to probe the binding site region, introduces powerful tools and a strategy for direct and selective investigation of non-peptidyl ligand binding to peptide receptors. PMID:16451051

  18. Electrochemical immobilization of Fluorescent labelled probe molecules on a FTO surface for affinity detection based on photo-excited current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Ryo; Cho, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Sho-taro

    2011-10-01

    Photo-excited current can be generated at a molecular interface between a photo-excited molecules and a semi-conductive material in appropriate condition. The system has been recognized for promoting photo-energy devices such as an organic dye sensitized solar-cell. The photo-current generated reactions are totally dependent on the interfacial energy reactions, which are in a highly fluctuated interfacial environment. The authors investigated the photo-excited current reaction to develop a smart affinity detection method. However, in order to perform both an affinity reaction and a photo-excited current reaction at a molecular interface, ordered fabrications of the functional (affinity, photo-excitation, etc.) molecules layer on a semi-conductive surface is required. In the present research, we would like to present the fabrication and functional performance of photo-excited current-based affinity assay device and its application for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. On the FTO surface, fluorescent pigment labelled affinity peptide was immobilized through the EC tag (electrochemical-tag) method. The modified FTO produced a current when it was irradiated with diode laser light. However, the photo current decreased drastically when estrogen (ES) coexisted in the reaction solution. In this case, immobilized affinity probe molecules formed a complex with ES and estrogen receptor (ER). The result strongly suggests that the photo-excited current transduction between probe molecule-labelled cyanine pigment and the FTO surface was partly inhibited by a complex that formed at the affinity oligo-peptide region in a probe molecule on the FTO electrode. The bound bulky complex may act as an impediment to perform smooth transduction of photo-excited current in the molecular interface. The present system is new type of photo-reaction-based analysis. This system can be used to perform simple high-sensitive homogeneous assays.

  19. Light scattering from metal sol labels on high-density DNA probe arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trulson, Mark O.; Walton, Ian D.; Suseno, Audrey D.; Matsuzaki, Hajime; Stern, David

    1998-04-01

    We have been exploring the use of light scattering as a means to detect the binding of nucleic acids to high density DNA probe arrays. Initial work has concentrated on the use of 100 nanometer gold particles conjugated to monoclonal antibodies. A probe array scanner that utilizes an arc lamp source and a `photocopier grade' linear CCD detector has been developed. The optical configuration of the scanner maximizes dynamic range and minimizes optical backgrounds. Initial development of light scattering detection for the p53 cancer gene application shows that functional performance may be obtained that is essentially equivalent to existing fluorescence detection methodology.

  20. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of adenosine triphosphate using a loop DNA probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chunshui; Cai, Zhixiong; Wang, Yiru; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Chen, Xi

    2014-07-15

    A simple, rapid, label-free, and ultrasensitive fluorescence strategy for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection was developed using a loop DNA probe with low background noise. In this strategy, a loop DNA probe, which is the substrate for both ligation and digestion enzyme reaction, was designed. SYBR green I (SG I), a double-stranded specific dye, was applied for the readout fluorescence signal. Exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease III (Exo III), sequence-independent nucleases, were selected to digest the loop DNA probe in order to minimize the background fluorescence signal. As a result, in the absence of ATP, the loop DNA was completely digested by Exo I and Exo III, leading to low background fluorescence owing to the weak electrostatic interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. On the other hand, ATP induced the ligation of the nicking site, and the sealed loop DNA resisted the digestion of Exo I and ExoIII, resulting in a remarkable increase of fluorescence response. Upon background noise reduction, the sensitivity of the ATP determination was improved significantly, and the detection limitation was found to be 1.2 pM, which is much lower than that in almost all the previously reported methods. This strategy has promise for wide application in the determination of ATP. PMID:24983417

  1. Survival of free-living Acholeplasma in aerated pig manure slurry revealed by 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing

    PubMed Central

    Hanajima, Dai; Aoyagi, Tomo; Hori, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on microbial community succession and/or predominant taxa during the composting process; however, the ecophysiological roles of microorganisms are not well understood because microbial community structures are highly diverse and dynamic. Bacteria are the most important contributors to the organic-waste decomposition process, while decayed bacterial cells can serve as readily digested substrates for other microbial populations. In this study, we investigated the active bacterial species responsible for the assimilation of dead bacterial cells and their components in aerated pig manure slurry by using 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing. After 3 days of forced aeration, 13C-labeled and unlabeled dead Escherichia coli cell suspensions were added to the slurry. The suspensions contained 13C-labeled and unlabeled bacterial cell components, possibly including the cell wall and membrane, as well as intracellular materials. RNA extracted from each slurry sample 2 h after addition of E. coli suspension was density-resolved by isopycnic centrifugation and analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, followed by cloning and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In the heavy isotopically labeled RNA fraction, the predominant 13C-assimilating population was identified as belonging to the genus Acholeplasma, which was not detected in control heavy RNA. Acholeplasma spp. have limited biosynthetic capabilities and possess a wide variety of transporters, resulting in their metabolic dependence on external carbon and energy sources. The prevalence of Acholeplasma spp. was further confirmed in aerated pig manure slurry from four different pig farms by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes; their relative abundance was ∼4.4%. Free-living Acholeplasma spp. had a competitive advantage for utilizing dead bacterial cells and their components more rapidly relative to other microbial populations, thus allowing the survival and prevalence

  2. Near-infrared dyes and upconverting phosphors as biomolecule labels and probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Strekowski, Lucjan; Nguyen, Diem-Ngoc; Seok, Kim Jun

    2007-02-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) absorbing chromophores have been used in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry extensively, including for determination of properties of biomolecules, DNA sequencing, immunoassays, capillary electrophoresis (CE) separations, etc. The major analytical advantages of these dyes are low background interference and high molar absorptivities. NIR dyes have additional advantages due to their sensitivity to microenvironmental changes. Spectral changes induced by the microenvironment are not desirable if the labels are used as a simple reporting group, e.g., during a biorecognition reaction. For these applications upconverting phosphors seem to be a better choice. There are several difficulties in utilizing upconverting phosphors as reporting labels. These are: large physical size, no reactive groups and insolubility in aqueous systems. This presentation will discuss how these difficulties can be overcome for bioanalytical and forensic applications. During these studies we also have investigated how to reduce physical size of the phosphor by simple grinding without losing activity and how to attach reactive moiety to the phosphor to covalently bind to the biomolecule of interest. It has to be emphasized that the described approach is not suitable for medical applications and the results of this research are not applicable in medical applications. For bioanalytical and forensic applications upconverting phosphors used as reporting labels have several advantages. They are excited with lasers that are red shifted respective to phosphorescence, resulting in no light scatter issues during detection. Also some phosphors are excited using eye safe lasers. In addition energy transfer to NIR dyes is possible, allowing detection schemes using donor-acceptor pairs. Data is presented to illustrate the feasibility of this phenomenon. If microenvironmental sensitivity is required, then specially designed NIR dyes can be used as acceptor labels. Several novel dyes

  3. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  4. Probing RNA-protein interactions using pyrene-labeled oligodeoxynucleotides: Qbeta replicase efficiently binds small RNAs by recognizing pyrimidine residues.

    PubMed

    Preuss, R; Dapprich, J; Walter, N G

    1997-10-31

    Binding of small RNAs by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of coliphage Qbeta was studied utilizing a fluorometric assay. A DNA oligonucleotide probe of sequence 5'-d(TTTTTCC) was 5'-end-labeled with pyrene. In this construct, the proximal thymine residues efficiently quench the fluorophore emission in solution. Upon stoichiometric binding of one probe per polymerase molecule, the pyrene steady-state fluorescence increases by two orders of magnitude, the fluorescence anisotropy increases, and a long fluorescence lifetime component of 140 ns appears. With addition of replicable RNA, steady-state fluorescence decreases in a concentration dependent manner and the long lifetime component is lost. This observation most likely reflects displacement of the pyrene-labeled probe from the proposed nucleic acid binding site II of Qbeta replicase. The effect was utilized to access binding affinities of different RNAs to this site in a reverse titration assay format. In 10 mM sodium phosphate (pH 7.0), 100 mM NaCl, at 16 degrees C, equilibrium dissociation constants for different template midi- and minivariant RNAs were calculated to be in the nanomolar range. In general, the minus and plus strands, concomitantly synthesized by Qbeta replicase during replication, exhibited discriminative affinities, while their hybrid bound less efficiently than either of the single strands. Different non-replicable tRNAs also bound to the polymerase with comparable dissociation constants. By titration with DNA homo-oligonucleotides it was shown that the probed site on Qbeta replicase does not require a 2' hydroxyl group for binding nucleic acids, but recognizes pyrimidine residues. Its interaction with thymine is lost in an A.T base-pair, while that with cytosine is retained after Watson-Crick base-pairing. These findings can explain the affinities of RNA-Qbeta replicase interactions reported here and in earlier investigations. The sensitivity of the described fluorometric assay allows

  5. A label-free turn-on fluorescence probe for rapidly distinguishing cysteine over glutathione in water solution.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liqiang; Kong, Zhineng; Shen, Wei; Du, Wenqi; Zhou, Yan; Qi, Zhengjian

    2016-05-01

    A novel label-free fluorescent chemodosimeter (C1) was synthesized, based on coumarin and N-(4-aminobenzoyl)-β-alanine, for the selective detection of cysteine (Cys) over glutathione (GSH), which involved a click reaction of Cys to CN of a Schiff base. The probe C1 featured a fast response (about 3 min), emission in the visible region, and high selectivity. Addition of Cys in HEPES-NaOH solution (pH 7.4) to C1 in water resulted in the appearance of a new emission peak at 445 nm, in company with remarkable enhancement of fluorescence intensity, while other amino acids did not induce any significant fluorescence change. Meanwhile, the addition reaction of Cys to C1 elicited 90.8-fold fluorescence intensity enhancement, which resulted in a change of emission color from orange to blue. PMID:26869082

  6. A Multiple-Labeling Strategy for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Using Active-Site-Directed Proteomic Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    Genetic approaches have greatly contributed to our understanding of nonribosomal peptide biosynthetic machinery; however, proteomic investigations are limited. Here, we developed a highly sensitive detection strategy for multidomain nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) by using a multiple-labeling technique with active-site-directed probes for adenylation domains. When applied to gramicidin S-producing and -nonproducing strains of Aneurinibacillus migulanus (DSM 5759 and DSM 2895, respectively), the multiple technique sensitively detected an active multidomain NRPS (GrsB) in lysates obtained from the organisms. This functional proteomics method revealed an unknown inactive precursor (or other inactive form) of GrsB in the nonproducing strain. This method provides a new option for the direct detection, functional analysis, and high-resolution identification of low-abundance active NRPS enzymes in native proteomic environments. PMID:26467472

  7. Gold nanoparticles as a label-free probe for the detection of amyloidogenic protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Jie; Zheng, Hu-Zhi; Long, Yi-Juan; Xiao, Geng-Fu; Zhang, Ling-Yan; Wang, Qin-Long; Gao, Mei; Bai, Wen-Jun

    2012-01-30

    Because amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein, β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein, are associated with a variety of diseases, methods for their detection are important. Recombinant prion protein (rPrP) can selectively induce aggregation of dihydrolipoic acid capped gold nanoparticles (DHLA-AuNPs), which reduces the absorbance of the DHLA-AuNPs and changes their color from red to blue. These changes were used for label-free qualitative and quantitative detection of amyloidogenic protein. The addition of NaCl improved the detection sensitivity considerably, and the detection limit was as low as 33 pmol/L. PMID:22284509

  8. Hydrophobic Treatment Enabling Analysis of Wettable Surfaces using a Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Walworth, Matthew J; Stankovich, Joseph J; Van Berkel, Gary J; Schulz, Michael; Minarik, susanne; Nichols, Judy; Reich, Eike

    2011-01-01

    An aerosol application procedure involving one or more commercially available silicone based products was developed to create hydrophobic surfaces that enable analysis of otherwise wettable, absorbent surfaces using a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry system. The treatment process resulted in a hydrophobic surface that enabled formation of the requisite probe - to - surface liquid microjunction for sampling and allowed efficient extraction of the analytes from the surface, but did not contribute significant chemical background in the mass spectra. The utility of this treatment process was demonstrated with the treatment of wettable high performance thin layer chromatography plates, post plate development, and their subsequent analysis with the sampling probe. The surface treatment process for different surface types was described and explained and the effectiveness of the treatment and subsequent analysis was illustrated using alkaloids from Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) root separated on a normal phase silica gel 60 F254S plate and peptides from protein tryptic digests separated on a Protochrom HPTLC Silica gel 60 F254S plate and a Protochrom HPTLC cellulose sheet. This simple surface treatment process significantly expands the analytical surfaces that can be analyzed with the liquid microjunction surface sampling probe, and therefore, also expands the analytical utility of this liquid extraction based surface sampling approach.

  9. Hydrophobic treatment enabling analysis of wettable surfaces using a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry system.

    PubMed

    Walworth, Matthew J; Stankovich, Joseph J; Van Berkel, Gary J; Schulz, Michael; Minarik, Susanne; Nichols, Judy; Reich, Eike

    2011-01-15

    An aerosol application procedure involving one or more commercially available silicone-based products was developed to create hydrophobic surfaces that enable analysis of otherwise wettable, absorbent surfaces using a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry system. The treatment process resulted in a hydrophobic surface that enabled formation of the requisite probe-to-surface liquid microjunction for sampling and allowed efficient extraction of the analytes from the surface, but did not contribute significant chemical background in the mass spectra. The utility of this treatment process was demonstrated with the treatment of wettable high-performance thin layer chromatography plates, post-plate development, and their subsequent analysis with the sampling probe. The surface treatment process for different surface types was described and explained and the effectiveness of the treatment and subsequent analysis was illustrated using alkaloids from goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) root separated on a normal phase silica gel 60 F(254S) plate and peptides from protein tryptic digests separated on a ProteoChrom HPTLC Silica gel 60 F(254S) plate and a ProteoChrom HPTLC Cellulose sheet. This simple surface treatment process significantly expands the analytical surfaces that can be analyzed with the liquid microjunction surface sampling probe, and therefore, also expands the analytical utility of this liquid extraction based surface sampling approach. PMID:21158402

  10. Dopamine transport sites selectively labeled by a novel photoaffinity probe: 125I-DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Wilson, A.A.; Lew, R.; Sharkey, J.S.; Kuhar, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    The dopamine transporter was labeled using a photosensitive compound related to GBR-12909, {sup 125}I-1-(2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl)-4-(2- (4-azido-3-iodophenyl)ethyl)piperazine ({sup 125}I-DEEP). {sup 125}I-DEEP bound reversibly and with high affinity to the dopamine transport protein in the absence of light and could be covalently attached to the protein following exposure to UV light. In rat striatal homogenates, {sup 125}I-DEEP was found to incorporate covalently into a protein with apparent molecular weight of 58,000 Da. The properties of this binding protein were characteristic of the dopamine transporter since covalent attachment could be inhibited by dopamine-uptake blockers with the proper pharmacological rank order of potencies. Covalent binding was also inhibited in a stereospecific manner by (+) and (-) cocaine, as well as other cocaine analogs. The protein was not found in the cerebellum. The dopamine transporter appears to exist in a glycosylated form since photoaffinity-labeled transport sites could adsorb to wheat germ-agglutinin and could be specifically eluted from the column by beta-N-acetylglucosamine.

  11. Label-free analysis of mRNA capping efficiency using RNase H probes and LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Beverly, Michael; Dell, Amy; Parmar, Parul; Houghton, Leslie

    2016-07-01

    A label-free method for determining the 5'-end cap identity and orientation of a messenger RNA (mRNA) is described. Biotin-tagged probes that were complementary to the 5' end of target mRNA were used with RNase H to cleave the 5' end of the mRNA. The cleaved end sequence was isolated using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and then analyzed by LC-MS. Quantitative and qualitative information on the 5' cap was determined from the unique mass of the isolated cleaved sequence. This approach, combined with the use of 5' RNA pyrophosphohydrolase, was also used to ascertain the orientation of the 5' cap. The assay showed low-picomole sensitivity for detecting capping reaction impurities. Uncapped triphosphate mRNA, spiked into 100 pmol of capped mRNA, could be detected over the tested range of 0.5 to 25 % with a linear response. The capping efficiency of several vaccinia-capped mRNA preparations was determined to be between 88 and 98 % depending on the modification type and length of the mRNA. mRNA of 2.2K and 9K nucleotides in length and containing the modified nucleotides pseudouridine and 5-methylcytidine were all successfully analyzed, demonstrating the utility of the technique to study mRNA capping. Graphical abstract mRNA 5' end analysis with RNAse H cleavage and capture probe. PMID:27193635

  12. Proteome-wide Discovery and Characterizations of Nucleotide-binding Proteins with Affinity-labeled Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Jiang, Xinning; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins play pivotal roles in many cellular processes including cell signaling. However, targeted study of sub-proteome of nucleotide-binding proteins, especially protein kinases and GTP-binding proteins, remained challenging. Here, we reported a general strategy in using affinity-labeled chemical probes to enrich, identify, and quantify ATP- and GTP-binding proteins in the entire human proteome. Our results revealed that the ATP/GTP affinity probes facilitated the identification of 100 GTP-binding proteins and 206 kinases with the use of low mg quantities of lysate of HL-60 cells. In combination with the use of SILAC-based quantitative proteomics method, we assessed the ATP/GTP binding selectivities of nucleotide-binding proteins at the global proteome scale. Our results confirmed known and, more importantly, unveiled new ATP/GTP-binding preferences of hundreds of nucleotide-binding proteins. Additionally, our strategy led to the identification of three and one unique nucleotide-binding motifs for kinases and GTP-binding proteins, respectively, and the characterizations of the nucleotide binding selectivities of individual motifs. Our strategy for capturing and characterizing ATP/GTP-binding proteins should be generally applicable for those proteins that can interact with other nucleotides. PMID:23413923

  13. Designed diblock hairpin probes for the nonenzymatic and label-free detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junlin; Chen, Junhua; Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui

    2016-05-15

    The detection of nucleic acid sequences is of great importance in a variety of fields. An ultrasensitive DNA sensing platform is constructed using elaborately designed diblock hairpin probes (DHPs) that are composed of hairpin and poly-adenine blocks. The introduction of an initiator DNA target triggers the catalytic assembly of probes DHP1, DHP2 and DHP3 to fabricate numerous poly-adenine-tailed branched DNA junctions, which significantly amplify the signal of the target-DNA-recognizing event without any enzyme. Coupled to a gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric assay, the amplified recognition signal can be quantitatively detected or visually read with the naked eye. The combination of the high-efficiency target-catalyzed DHP assembly and sensitive gold-based colorimetric assay offers an ultrasensitive detection of DNA with a detection limit of 0.1 pM and a dynamic range from 0.01 to 5 pM. The proposed sensing platform can discriminate even single-base mutations. Moreover, the sensing platform can be expanded to detect pollutant-degrading-bacteria-specific DNA sequences. The proposed sensing system should offer an alternative approach for the detection of nucleic acids in the fields of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and environmental sciences. PMID:26765529

  14. Structural Changes of a Doubly Spin-Labeled Chemically Driven Molecular Shuttle Probed by PELDOR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Paola; Bleve, Valentina; Mezzina, Elisabetta; Schäfer, Christian; Ragazzon, Giulio; Albertini, Marco; Carbonera, Donatella; Credi, Alberto; Di Valentin, Marilena; Lucarini, Marco

    2016-06-20

    Gaining detailed information on the structural rearrangements associated with stimuli-induced molecular movements is of utmost importance for understanding the operation of molecular machines. Pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) was employed to monitor the geometrical changes arising upon chemical switching of a [2]rotaxane that behaves as an acid-base-controlled molecular shuttle. To this aim, the rotaxane was endowed with stable nitroxide radical units in both the ring and axle components. The combination of PELDOR data and molecular dynamic calculations indicates that in the investigated rotaxane, the ring displacement along the axle, caused by the addition of a base, does not alter significantly the distance between the nitroxide labels, but it is accompanied by a profound change in the geometry adopted by the macrocycle. PMID:27123774

  15. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Schmitt, Eberhard; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3d-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27237093

  16. Correction: NanoSIMS analysis of an isotopically labelled organometallic ruthenium(II) drug to probe its distribution and state in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ronald F S; Escrig, Stéphane; Croisier, Marie; Clerc-Rosset, Stéphanie; Knott, Graham W; Meibom, Anders; Davey, Curt A; Johnsson, Kai; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-11-28

    Correction for 'NanoSIMS analysis of an isotopically labelled organometallic ruthenium(II) drug to probe its distribution and state in vitro' by Ronald F. S. Lee et al., Chem. Commun., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cc06983a. PMID:26507472

  17. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses. PMID:27491409

  18. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-08-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses.

  19. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses. PMID:27491409

  20. Structure-Guided DOT1L Probe Optimization by Label-Free Ligand Displacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The DOT1L lysine methyltransferase has emerged as a validated therapeutic target in MLL-rearranged (MLLr) acute leukemias. Although S-adenosylmethionine competitive inhibitors have demonstrated pharmacological proof-of-principle in MLLr-leukemia, these compounds require further optimization to improve cellular potency and pharmacokinetic stability. Limiting DOT1L inhibitor discovery and ligand optimization have been complex biochemical methods often using radionucleotides and cellular methods requiring prolonged culture. We therefore developed a new suite of assay technologies that allows comparative assessment of chemical tools for DOT1L in a miniaturized format. Coupling these assays with structural information, we developed new insights into DOT1L ligand binding and identified several functionalized probes with increased cellular potency (IC50 values ∼10 nM) and excellent selectivity for DOT1L. Together these assay technologies define a platform capability for discovery and optimization of small-molecule DOT1L inhibitors. PMID:25397901

  1. Structure-guided DOT1L probe optimization by label-free ligand displacement.

    PubMed

    Yi, Joanna S; Federation, Alexander J; Qi, Jun; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Hadler, Michael; Xu, Xiang; St Pierre, Roodolph; Varca, Anthony C; Wu, Lei; Marineau, Jason J; Smith, William B; Souza, Amanda; Chory, Emma J; Armstrong, Scott A; Bradner, James E

    2015-03-20

    The DOT1L lysine methyltransferase has emerged as a validated therapeutic target in MLL-rearranged (MLLr) acute leukemias. Although S-adenosylmethionine competitive inhibitors have demonstrated pharmacological proof-of-principle in MLLr-leukemia, these compounds require further optimization to improve cellular potency and pharmacokinetic stability. Limiting DOT1L inhibitor discovery and ligand optimization have been complex biochemical methods often using radionucleotides and cellular methods requiring prolonged culture. We therefore developed a new suite of assay technologies that allows comparative assessment of chemical tools for DOT1L in a miniaturized format. Coupling these assays with structural information, we developed new insights into DOT1L ligand binding and identified several functionalized probes with increased cellular potency (IC50 values ∼10 nM) and excellent selectivity for DOT1L. Together these assay technologies define a platform capability for discovery and optimization of small-molecule DOT1L inhibitors. PMID:25397901

  2. F-18 Labeled RGD Probes Based on Bioorthogonal Strain-Promoted Click Reaction for PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of fluorine-substituted monomeric and dimeric cRGD peptide derivatives, such as cRGD-ADIBOT-F (ADIBOT = azadibenzocyclooctatriazole), di-cRGD-ADIBOT-F, cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-F, and di-cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-F, were prepared by strain-promoted alkyne azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction of the corresponding aza-dibenzocyclooctyne (ADIBO) substituted peptides with a fluorinated azide 3. Among these cRGD derivatives, di-cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-F had the highest binding affinity in a competitive binding assay compared to other derivatives and even the original cRGDyk. On the basis of the in vitro study results, di-cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-18F was prepared from a SPAAC reaction with 18F-labeled azide and subsequent chemo-orthogonal scavenger-assisted separation without high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification in 92% decay-corrected radiochemical yield (dcRCY) with high specific activity for further in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging study. In vivo PET imaging study and biodistribution data showed that this radiotracer allowed successful visualization of tumors with good tumor-to-background contrast and significantly higher tumor uptake compared to other major organs. PMID:25893040

  3. Fiber optic probe enabled by surface-enhanced Raman scattering for early diagnosis of potential acute rejection of kidney transplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Jingmao; Chen, Hui; Tolias, Peter; Du, Henry

    2014-06-01

    We have explored the use of a fiber-optic probe with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing modality for early, noninvasive and, rapid diagnosis of potential renal acute rejection (AR) and other renal graft dysfunction of kidney transplant patients. Multimode silica optical fiber immobilized with colloidal Ag nanoparticles at the distal end was used for SERS measurements of as-collected urine samples at 632.8 nm excitation wavelength. All patients with abnormal renal graft function (3 AR episodes and 2 graft failure episodes) who were clinically diagnosed independently show common unique SERS spectral features in the urines collected just one day after transplant. SERS-based fiber-optic probe has excellent potential to be a bedside tool for early diagnosis of kidney transplant patients for timely medical intervention of patients at high risk of transplant dysfunction.

  4. Novel super-resolution capable mitochondrial probe, MitoRed AIE, enables assessment of real-time molecular mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Camden Yeung-Wah; Chen, Sijie; Creed, Sarah Jayne; Kang, Miaomiao; Zhao, Na; Tang, Ben Zhong; Elgass, Kirstin Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria and mitochondrial dynamics play vital roles in health and disease. With the intricate nanometer-scale structure and rapid dynamics of mitochondria, super-resolution microscopy techniques possess great un-tapped potential to significantly contribute to understanding mitochondrial biology and kinetics. Here we present a novel mitochondrial probe (MitoRed AIE) suitable for live mitochondrial dynamics imaging and single particle tracking (SPT), together with a multi-dimensional data analysis approach to assess local mitochondrial (membrane) fluidity. The MitoRed AIE probe localizes primarily to mitochondrial membranes, with 95 ms fluorophore on-time delivering 106 photons/ms, characteristics which we exploit to demonstrate live cell 100 fps 3D time-lapse tracking of mitochondria. Combining our experimental and analytical approaches, we uncover mitochondrial dynamics at unprecedented time scales. This approach opens up a new regime into high spatio-temporal resolution dynamics in many areas of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27492961

  5. Novel super-resolution capable mitochondrial probe, MitoRed AIE, enables assessment of real-time molecular mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lo, Camden Yeung-Wah; Chen, Sijie; Creed, Sarah Jayne; Kang, Miaomiao; Zhao, Na; Tang, Ben Zhong; Elgass, Kirstin Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria and mitochondrial dynamics play vital roles in health and disease. With the intricate nanometer-scale structure and rapid dynamics of mitochondria, super-resolution microscopy techniques possess great un-tapped potential to significantly contribute to understanding mitochondrial biology and kinetics. Here we present a novel mitochondrial probe (MitoRed AIE) suitable for live mitochondrial dynamics imaging and single particle tracking (SPT), together with a multi-dimensional data analysis approach to assess local mitochondrial (membrane) fluidity. The MitoRed AIE probe localizes primarily to mitochondrial membranes, with 95 ms fluorophore on-time delivering 106 photons/ms, characteristics which we exploit to demonstrate live cell 100 fps 3D time-lapse tracking of mitochondria. Combining our experimental and analytical approaches, we uncover mitochondrial dynamics at unprecedented time scales. This approach opens up a new regime into high spatio-temporal resolution dynamics in many areas of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27492961

  6. Toehold enabling stem-loop inspired hemiduplex probe with enhanced sensitivity and sequence-specific detection of tumor DNA in serum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Siqi; Zhang, Yulin; Tang, Lina; Jin, Dan; Ning, Yong; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-15

    The sensitivity of structure-switchable electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensors is generally limited by the irremovable redox labels that are close to or distant from the sensing interface. To address this issue, we design a semiduplex probe inspired by the stem-loop structure, in which the "nicked loop" domain can serve as toehold to mediate a target-responsive strand-displacement reaction. Such a reaction can fundamentally eliminate the post-responsive background current that arises from the irremovable probe, and thus improve the sensitivity. This novel toehold E-DNA (tE-DNA) sensor is able to achieve a detection limit as low as 0.2pM, which is lower than that of the classic stem-loop structured sensor by two orders of magnitude. Moreover, the toehold domain endows the sensor an excellent selectivity against a single-base mismatched sequence and high binding kinetics. By combining this heterogeneous surface-based dynamic self-assembly design with a homogeneous enzyme amplification strategy, the sensitivity can be further improved by three orders of magnitude to sub-femtomolar level. Additionally, this unique biosensor presents reliable reusability, and is capable of probing low abundance of target DNA directly in complex matrices, such as human serum, with minimal interference. These advantages make our tE-DNA sensor a promising contender in the E-DNA sensor family for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27040528

  7. A novel label-free electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin based on the {nano-Au/thionine}n multilayer films as redox probes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yali; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Zhuo, Ying; Liu, Zhongyuan; Mao, Li; Guan, Shu; Qian, Xiaoqing

    2010-06-01

    Herein, a novel label-free electrochemical aptasensor based on direct immobilization of the redox probes on an electrode surface was reported. Gold electrode coated Nafion was firstly modified with redox probe-thionine (Thi) through ion exchange adsorption. Then, with the help of chemisorption and electrostatic adsorption, negatively charged nano-Au and positively charged Thi were layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembled onto the modified electrode surface, which formed {nano-Au/Thi(+)}(n) multilayer films for improving the amount of redox probes and immobilizing thiolated thrombin aptamers (TBA). In the presence of target thrombin (TB), the TBA on the multilayer film could catch the TB onto the electrode surface, which resulted in a barrier for electro-transfer, leading to decrease of the current. The proposed method avoided the cubsome redox probe labeling process, increased the amount of redox probe and reduced the distance between the redox probe and electrode surface. Thus, the approach showed a high sensitivity and a wider linearity to TB in the range from 0.12 nM to 46 nM with a detection limit of 40 pM. PMID:20493294

  8. A versatile label-free and signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform based on triplex-forming oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuzhong; Jiang, Aiwen; Hou, Ting; Li, Feng

    2015-08-26

    Nucleic acid and protein assays are very important in modern life sciences, and the recently developed triplex-forming oligonucleotide probes provide a unique means for biological analysis of different kinds of analytes. Herein, we report a label-free and signal-on electrochemical sensor for the detection of specific targets, which is based on the triple-helix structure formation between the hairpin molecular beacon and the capture probe through the intermolecular DNA hybridization induced by Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairings. Upon the introduction of a specific target, the triple-helical stem region is dissembled to liberate the hemin aptamer, and a G-quadruplex- hemin complex can be formed in the presence of K(+) and hemin on the electrode surface to give an electrochemical response, thus signaling the presence of the target. With the use of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) as a proof-of-principle analyte, we first demonstrated this approach by using a molecular beacon, which consists of a central section with the DNA sequence complementary to HIV-1, flanked by two arm segments. This newly designed protocol provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of HIV-1 with a limit of detection down to 0.054 nM, and also exhibit good selectivity. Therefore, the as-proposed strategy holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases, and with further development, it could be used as a universal protocol for the detection of various DNA sequences and may be extended for the detection of aptamer-binding molecules. PMID:26347170

  9. Improving the visualization of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles and fluorophore-labeled molecular probes by treatment with CuSO(4) to quench autofluorescence in the rat inner ear.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya; Zhang, Weikai; Johnston, Alexander H; Newman, Tracey A; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Zou, Jing

    2010-10-01

    Fluorescent tags and fluorophore-conjugated molecular probes have been extensively employed in histological studies to demonstrate nanoparticle distribution in inner ear cell populations. However, autofluorescence that exists in the rodent cochleae disturbs visualization of the fluorescent tags and fluorophore labeling. In the present work, we aimed to improve the visualization of fluorescently tagged nanoparticles and fluorophore-labeled molecular probes by treatment with CuSO(4) to quench autofluorescence in the rat inner ear. The in vivo study was performed on eight- to nine-month-old rats using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the in vitro study was carried out with DiI-tagged poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(capro-lactone) polymersomes and different fluorescent-labeling agents using a spectrofluorometer. The nanoparticles were intratympanically administered using either an osmotic pump or transtympanic injection. Abundant autofluorescence was detected in spiral ganglion cells (SGCs), stria marginal cells, spiral ligament fibrocytes (SL) and the subcuticular cytoplasm of inner hair cells (IHCs). Sparsely distributed faint autofluorescence was also visualized in outer hair cells (OHCs). The autofluorescence was eliminated by treatment with 1 mM CuSO(4) (in 0.01 M ammonium acetate buffer) for 70-90 min, while the fluorescent tag in the nanoparticle was absolutely preserved and the labeling fluorescence signals of the molecular probes were mostly retained. PMID:20659540

  10. A highly sensitive, direct and label-free technique for Hg(2+) detection using Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanho; Jang, Kuewhan; Lee, Sangmyung; You, Juneseok; Lee, Soyoung; Ha, Hyunsoo; Yun, Kyungtak; Kim, Junseop; Lee, Howon; Park, Jinsung; Na, Sungsoo

    2015-07-31

    For several decades, various nanomaterials have been used in a wide range of industrial fields, research areas, and commercial products. Among many nanomaterials, nano-sized mercury materials are one of the most widely used nanomaterials in real life. However, due to the high toxicity of Hg(2+), it is imperative to develop an effective and practical detection method for Hg(2+) to protect human health and environment. In this study, a highly sensitive, label-free method of detecting Hg(2+) that requires only a single drop of solution was developed. The detection mechanism is based on the different surface potential arising from Hg(2+) binding to mismatched thymine-thymine sequences, creating a very stable base pair. The surface potential is measured with Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to a molecular resolution. The developed method is capable of detecting 2 fmol of Hg(2+), which is 500 times more sensitive than previously reported techniques. Moreover, our method can selectively detect Hg(2+) and can also be applied to tap water and river water. This KPFM-based Hg(2+) detection method can be used as an early detection technique for practical applications. PMID:26152847

  11. Successful application of enzyme-labeled oligonucleotide probe for rapid and accurate cholera diagnosis in a clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, K; Matsumoto, Y; Hayashi, K; Yoh, M; Yamamoto, K; Honda, T

    1994-01-01

    Two cholera cases were diagnosed using an enzyme-labeled oligonucleotide probe (ELONP) hybridization test for detection of cholera toxin gene (ctx) in a clinical laboratory at Osaka Airport Quarantine Station. The ELONP test with suspicious colonies of Vibrio cholerae O1 grown on TCBS or Vibrio agar plates gave positive result for ctx within 3 hr. We also tried to apply the ELONP test for direct detection of ctx in their stool and their non-selective culture. Specimens from Case #1, which contained 5.9 x 10(5) CFU/g of V. cholerae O1 in the stool, cultured for 7-8 hr or longer in alkaline peptone water or Marine broth at 37C, became positive for ctx. On the other hand, specimens from Case #2, which contained 8.7 x 10(8) CFU/ml (of V. cholerae O1 in the stool), gave positive result in this stool itself without any further culture. These data suggest that the ELONP test provides successfully a more rapid and accurate means of identifying "toxigenic" V. cholerae O1 in a clinical laboratory. PMID:7935049

  12. Luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, highly sensitive and selective detection of minocycline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Peng, Rufang

    2014-11-01

    In this work, luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles (LuAuNPs) were used as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, sensitive and selective detection of minocycline (MC). The LuAuNPs were prepared by simple one-pot reduction of HAuCl4 with luminol, which exhibited a good chemiluminescence (CL) activity owing to the presence of luminol molecules on their surface and surface plasmon resonance absorption. In the absence of MC, the color of LuAuNPs was wine red and their size was relatively small (˜25 nm), which could react with silver nitrate, producing a strong CL emission. Upon the addition of MC at acidic buffer solutions, the electrostatic interaction between positively charged MC and negatively charged LuAuNPs caused the aggregation of LuAuNPs, generating a purple or blue color. Simultaneously, the aggregated LuAuNPs did not effectively react with silver nitrate, producing a weak CL emission. The signal change was linearly dependent on the logarithm of MC concentration in the range from 30 ng to 1.0 μg for colorimetric detection and from 10 ng to 1.0 μg for CL detection. With colorimetry, a detection limit of 22 ng was achieved, while the detection limit for CL detection modality was 9.7 ng.

  13. Evaluation of glucose-linked nitroxide radicals for use as an in vivo spin-label probe.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Nagai, Akio; Onuma, Ryo; Saito, Misaki; Sugawara, Rina; Shinohara, Sayaka; Okabe, Eriko; Ito, Tomohiro; Ogata, Tateaki

    2014-04-24

    In vivo incorporation and reduction abilities of 4-carboxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (4-carboxy-TEMPO) (1), 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrroline-1-oxyl (3-carboxy-dehydro-PROXYL, 3-carboxy-DPRO) (2), 4-hydroxy-TEMPO and 3-hydroxymethyl-DPRO O-β-D-glucosides (3 and 5), and newly designed forms of 6-O-(TEMPO-4-carbonyl and DPRO-3-carbonyl)-D-glucose (4 and 6) were evaluated using white radish sprouts. For each of these compounds, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry was used to measure two effects: the rate of in vitro reduction via the addition of ascorbic acid; and, the rate of successful incorporation into radish sprouts for a reduction to the corresponding hydroxyl amine. DPRO-radicals 2, 5, and 6 were detected significantly more than TEMPO-radicals 1, 3, and 4 in vitro and in vivo for both experiments. Four glucose-linked nitroxide radicals were reduced faster than the glucose-non-linked ones in the in vitro experiment, but were nonetheless detected more each time in radish sprouts due to the absorbability. Glucose ester-linked radicals 4 and 6 were detected more than glycosides 3 and 5, which suggests that glucose ester-linked DPRO-radical 6 is the best for use as a spin-label probe that a plant will incorporate. PMID:24508871

  14. Apoferritin Protein Nanoparticles Dually labeled with Aptamer and Horseradish Peroxidase as a Sensing Probe for Thrombin Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jie; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Haitao; Lin, Yuehe; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-01-08

    A sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor has been developed for the detection of thrombin, based on dual signal-amplification using HRP and apoferritin. Aptamer1 (Apt1) loaded on core/shell Fe3O4/Au magnetic nanoparticle (AuMNP) was used as recognition elements, and apoferritin dually labeled with Aptamer2 (Apt2) and HRP was used as a detection probe. Sandwich-type complex, Apt1/thrombin/Apt2–apoferritin NPs–HRP was formed by the affinity reactions between AuMNPs–Apt1, thrombin, and Apt2–apoferritin–HRP. The complex was anchored on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to monitor the electrode response. The proposed aptasensor yielded a linear current response to thrombin concentrations over a broad range of 0.5 pM to 100 pM with a detection limit of 0.07 pM (S/N = 3). The detection signal was amplified by using apoferritin and HRP. This nanoparticle-based aptasensor offers a new method for rapid, sensitive, selective, and inexpensive quantification of thrombin, and offers a promising potential in biomarker detection and disease diagnosis. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  15. Live cell immunogold labelling of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Orlov, Igor; Schertel, Andreas; Zuber, Guy; Klaholz, Bruno; Drillien, Robert; Weiss, Etienne; Schultz, Patrick; Spehner, Danièle

    2015-01-01

    Labeling nuclear proteins with electron dense probes in living cells has been a major challenge due to their inability to penetrate into nuclei. We developed a lipid-based approach for delivering antibodies coupled to 0.8 nm ultrasmall gold particles into the nucleus to label RNA polymerase II. Focussed Ion Beam slicing coupled to Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM) enabled visualization of entire cells with probe localization accuracy in the 10 nm range. PMID:25662860

  16. Kinetics and motional dynamics of spin-labeled yeast iso-1-cytochrome c: 1. Stopped-flow electron paramagnetic resonance as a probe for protein folding/unfolding of the C-terminal helix spin-labeled at cysteine 102.

    PubMed

    Qu, K; Vaughn, J L; Sienkiewicz, A; Scholes, C P; Fetrow, J S

    1997-03-11

    The kinetics of chemically induced folding and unfolding processes in spin-labeled yeast iso-1-cytochrome c were measured by stopped-flow electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Stopped-flow EPR, based on a new dielectric resonator structure [Sienkiewicz, A., Qu, K., & Scholes, C. P. (1994) Rev. Sci. Instrum. 65, 68-74], gives a new temporal component to probing nanosecond molecular tumbling motions that are modulated by macromolecular processes requiring time resolution of milliseconds to seconds. The stopped-flow EPR technique presented in this work is a kinetic technique that has not been previously used with such a time resolution on spin-labeled systems, and it has the potential for application to numerous spin-labeled sites in this and other proteins. The cysteine-specific spin-label, methanethiosulfonate spin-label (MTSSL), was attached to yeast iso-1-cytochrome c at the single naturally occurring cysteine102, and the emphasis for this work was on this disulfide-attached spin-labeled prototype. This probe has the advantage of reflecting the protein tertiary fold, as shown by recent, systematic site-directed spin labeling of T4 lysozyme [Mchaourab, H. S. Lietzow, M. A., Hideg, K., & Hubbell, W. L. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 7692-7704], and protein backbone dynamics, as also shown by model peptide studies [Todd, A. P., & Millhauser, G. L. (1991) Biochemistry 30, 5515-5523]. The C-terminal cytochrome c helix where the label is attached is thought to be critical in the initial steps of protein folding and unfolding. Stopped-flow EPR resolved the monoexponential, guanidinium-induced unfolding process at pH 6.5 with an approximately 20 ms time constant; this experiment required less than 150 microL of 80 microM spin-labeled protein. We observed an approximately 50-fold decrease of this unfolding time from the 1 s range to the 20 ms time range as the guanidinium denaturant concentration was increased from 0.6 to 2.0 M. The more complex refolding kinetics of our labeled

  17. Label-free luminescence switch-on detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity using a G-quadruplex-selective probe.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Zhang; Leung, Ka-Ho; Wang, Wei; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2014-05-25

    A label-free, oligonucleotide-based, switch-on luminescence detection method for T4 polynucleotide kinase activity has been developed using a novel G-quadruplex-selective luminescent Ir(iii) complex probe. The application of the assay for screening potential T4 PNK inhibitors is also demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first metal-based assay for PNK activity. PMID:24336506

  18. A Strongly Absorbing Class of Non-Natural Labels for Probing Protein Electrostatics and Solvation with FTIR and 2D IR Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Skoff, David R.; Moran, Sean D.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-natural infrared probes is reported that consist of a metal-tricarbonyl modified with a -(CH2)n- linker and cysteine-specific leaving group. They can be site-specifically attached to proteins using mutagenesis and similar protocols for EPR spin labels, which have the same leaving group. We characterize the label’s frequencies and lifetimes using 2D IR spectroscopy in solvents of varying dielectric. The frequency range spans 10 cm−1, and the variation in lifetimes ranges from 6 to 19 ps, indicating that these probes are very sensitive to their environments. Also, we attached probes with -(CH2)-, -(CH2)3-, -(CH2)4- linkers to ubiquitin at positions 6 and 63 and collected spectra in aqueous buffer. The frequencies and lifetimes were correlated for 3C and 4C linkers, as they were in the solvents, but did not correlate for the 1C linker. We concluded that lifetime measures solvation, whereas frequency reflects the electrostatics of the environment, which in the case of the 1C linker is a measure of the protein electrostatic field. We also labeled V71C α-synuclein in buffer and membrane-bound. Unlike most other infrared labels, this label has extremely-strong cross-sections and so can be measured with 2D IR spectroscopy at sub-millimolar concentrations. We expect that these labels will find use in studying the structure and dynamics of membrane-bound, aggregated, and kinetically-evolving proteins for which high signal-to-noise at low protein concentrations is imperative. PMID:23537223

  19. Fluorescence of nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids in model membranes is connected not to lipid mobility but to probe location.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Mariana; Filipe, Hugo A L; Prates Ramalho, J P; Hof, Martin; Loura, Luís M S

    2016-03-14

    Nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids are popular fluorescent membrane probes. However, the understanding of important aspects of the photophysics of NBD remains incomplete, including the observed shift in the emission spectrum of NBD-lipids to longer wavelengths following excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum (red-edge excitation shift or REES). REES of NBD-lipids in membrane environments has been previously interpreted as reflecting restricted mobility of solvent surrounding the fluorophore. However, this requires a large change in the dipole moment (Δμ) of NBD upon excitation. Previous calculations of the value of Δμ of NBD in the literature have been carried out using outdated semi-empirical methods, leading to conflicting values. Using up-to-date density functional theory methods, we recalculated the value of Δμ and verified that it is rather small (∼2 D). Fluorescence measurements confirmed that the value of REES is ∼16 nm for 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine-N-(NBD) (NBD-PS) in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles. However, the observed shift is independent of both the temperature and the presence of cholesterol and is therefore insensitive to the mobility and hydration of the membrane. Moreover, red-edge excitation leads to an increased contribution of the decay component with a shorter lifetime, whereas time-resolved emission spectra of NBD-PS displayed an atypical blue shift following excitation. This excludes restrictions to solvent relaxation as the cause of the measured REES and TRES of NBD, pointing instead to the heterogeneous transverse location of probes as the origin of these effects. The latter hypothesis was confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, from which the calculated heterogeneity of the hydration and location of NBD correlated with the measured fluorescence lifetimes/REES. Globally, our combination of theoretical and experiment-based techniques has led to a considerably improved understanding of

  20. Design of a dual-function peptide probe as a binder of angiotensin II and an inducer of silver nanoparticle aggregation for use in label-free colorimetric assays.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Kuboyama, Masashi; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Label-free colorimetric assays using metallic nanoparticles have received much recent attention, for their application in simple and sensitive methods for detection of biomolecules. Short peptide probes that can bind to analyte biomolecules are attractive ligands in molecular nanotechnology; however, identification of biological recognition motifs is usually based on trial-and-error experiments. Herein, a peptide probe was screened for colorimetric detection of angiotensin II (Ang II) using a mechanism for non-crosslinking aggregation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The dual-function peptides, which bind to the analyte and induce AgNP aggregation, were identified using a two-step strategy: (1) screening of an Ang II-binding peptide from an Ang II receptor sequence library, using SPOT technology, which enable peptides synthesis on cellulose membranes via an Fmoc method and (2) selection of peptide probes that effectively induce aggregation of AgNPs using a photolinker modified peptide array. Using the identified peptide probe, KGKNKRRR, aggregation of AgNPs was detected by observation of a pink color in the absence of Ang II, whereas AgNPs remained dispersed in the presence of Ang II (yellow). The color changes were not observed in the presence of other hormone molecules. Ang II could be detected within 15 min, with a detection limit of 10 µM, by measuring the ratio of absorbance at 400 nm and 568 nm; the signal could also be observed with the naked eye. These data suggest that the peptide identified here could be used as a probe for simple and rapid colorimetric detection of Ang II. This strategy for the identification of functional peptides shows promise for the development of colorimetric detection of various diagnostically important biomolecules. PMID:26003717

  1. Evaluation of 68Ga-labeled MG7 antibody: a targeted probe for PET/CT imaging of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Li, Xiaowei; Yin, Jipeng; Liang, Cong; Liu, Lijuan; Qiu, Zhaoyan; Yao, Liping; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Jing; Wu, Kaichun

    2015-01-01

    MG7-Ag, a specific gastric cancer-associated antigen, can be used to non-invasively monitor gastric cancer by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). In this study, we prepared and evaluated a (68)Ga-labeled MG7 antibody as a molecular probe for nanoPET/CT imaging of gastric cancer in a BGC-823 tumor xenografted mouse model. Macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N0,N00-triacetic acid (NOTA)-conjugated MG7 antibody was synthesized and radiolabeled with (68)Ga (t1/2 = 67.71 min). Then, (68)Ga-NOTA-MG7 was tested using in vitro cytological studies, in vivo nanoPET/CT and Cerenkov imaging studies as well as ex vivo biodistribution and histology studies. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that (68)Ga-NOTA-MG7 has an excellent radiolabeling efficiency of approximately 99% without purification, and it is stable in serum after 120 min of incubation. Cell uptake and retention studies confirmed that (68)Ga-NOTA-MG7 has good binding affinity and tumor cell retention. For the nanoPET imaging study, the predominant uptake of (68)Ga-NOTA-MG7 was visualized in tumor, liver and kidneys. The tumor uptake reached at its peak (2.53 ± 0.28%ID/g) at 60 min pi. Cherenkov imaging also confirmed the specificity of tumor uptake. Moreover, the biodistribution results were consistent with the quantification data of nanoPET/CT imaging. Histologic analysis also demonstrated specific staining of BGC-823 tumor cell lines. PMID:25733152

  2. Evaluation of 68Ga-Labeled MG7 Antibody: A Targeted Probe for PET/CT Imaging of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing; Li, Xiaowei; Yin, Jipeng; Liang, Cong; Liu, Lijuan; Qiu, Zhaoyan; Yao, Liping; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Jing; Wu, Kaichun

    2015-01-01

    MG7-Ag, a specific gastric cancer-associated antigen, can be used to non-invasively monitor gastric cancer by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). In this study, we prepared and evaluated a 68Ga-labeled MG7 antibody as a molecular probe for nanoPET/CT imaging of gastric cancer in a BGC-823 tumor xenografted mouse model. Macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N0,N00-triacetic acid (NOTA)-conjugated MG7 antibody was synthesized and radiolabeled with 68Ga (t1/2 = 67.71 min). Then, 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 was tested using in vitro cytological studies, in vivo nanoPET/CT and Cerenkov imaging studies as well as ex vivo biodistribution and histology studies. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 has an excellent radiolabeling efficiency of approximately 99% without purification, and it is stable in serum after 120 min of incubation. Cell uptake and retention studies confirmed that 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 has good binding affinity and tumor cell retention. For the nanoPET imaging study, the predominant uptake of 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 was visualized in tumor, liver and kidneys. The tumor uptake reached at its peak (2.53 ± 0.28%ID/g) at 60 min pi. Cherenkov imaging also confirmed the specificity of tumor uptake. Moreover, the biodistribution results were consistent with the quantification data of nanoPET/CT imaging. Histologic analysis also demonstrated specific staining of BGC-823 tumor cell lines. PMID:25733152

  3. Efficient enzymatic synthesis and dual-colour fluorescent labelling of DNA probes using long chain azido-dUTP and BCN dyes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaomei; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-05-01

    A sterically undemanding azide analogue of dTTP (AHP dUTP) with an alkyl chain and ethynyl attachment to the nucleobase was designed and incorporated into DNA by primer extension, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An azide-modified 523 bp PCR amplicon with all 335 thymidines replaced by AHP dU was shown to be a perfect copy of the template from which it was amplified. Replacement of thymidine with AHP dU increases duplex stability, accounting in part for the high incorporation efficiency of the azide-modified triphosphate. Single-stranded azide-labelled DNA was conveniently prepared from PCR products by λ-exonuclease digestion and streptavidin magnetic bead isolation. Efficient fluorescent labelling of single and double-stranded DNA was carried out using dyes functionalized with bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) via the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction. This revealed that the degree of labelling must be carefully controlled to achieve optimum fluorescence and avoid fluorescence quenching. Dual-coloured probes were obtained in a single tube fluorescent labelling reaction; and varying the ratios of the two dyes provides a simple method to prepare DNA probes with unique fluorescent signatures. AHP dUTP is a versatile clickable nucleotide with potentially wide applications in biology and nanotechnology including single molecule studies and synthesis of modified aptamer libraries via SELEX. PMID:26819406

  4. Efficient enzymatic synthesis and dual-colour fluorescent labelling of DNA probes using long chain azido-dUTP and BCN dyes

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaomei; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2016-01-01

    A sterically undemanding azide analogue of dTTP (AHP dUTP) with an alkyl chain and ethynyl attachment to the nucleobase was designed and incorporated into DNA by primer extension, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An azide-modified 523 bp PCR amplicon with all 335 thymidines replaced by AHP dU was shown to be a perfect copy of the template from which it was amplified. Replacement of thymidine with AHP dU increases duplex stability, accounting in part for the high incorporation efficiency of the azide-modified triphosphate. Single-stranded azide-labelled DNA was conveniently prepared from PCR products by λ-exonuclease digestion and streptavidin magnetic bead isolation. Efficient fluorescent labelling of single and double-stranded DNA was carried out using dyes functionalized with bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) via the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction. This revealed that the degree of labelling must be carefully controlled to achieve optimum fluorescence and avoid fluorescence quenching. Dual-coloured probes were obtained in a single tube fluorescent labelling reaction; and varying the ratios of the two dyes provides a simple method to prepare DNA probes with unique fluorescent signatures. AHP dUTP is a versatile clickable nucleotide with potentially wide applications in biology and nanotechnology including single molecule studies and synthesis of modified aptamer libraries via SELEX. PMID:26819406

  5. Indole-3-acetic acid biosensor based on G-rich DNA labeled AuNPs as chemiluminescence probe coupling the DNA signal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hun, Xu; Mei, Zhenghua; Wang, Zhouping; He, Yunhua

    2012-09-01

    A highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for detection of phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was developed by using G-rich DNA labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as CL probe coupling the DNA signal amplification technology. The IAA antibody was immobilized on carboxyl terminated magnetic beads (MBs). In the presence of IAA, antibody labeled AuNPs were captured by antibody functionalized MBs. The DNA on AuNPs is released by a ligand exchange process induced by the addition of DTT. The released DNA is then acted as the linker and hybridized with the capture DNA on MBs and probe DNA on AuNPs CL probe. The CL signal is obtained via the instantaneous derivatization reaction between a specific CL reagent, 3,4,5-trimethoxyl-phenylglyoxal (TMPG), and the G-rich DNA on AuNPs CL probe. IAA can be detected in the concentration range from 0.02 ng/mL to 30 ng/mL, and the limit of detection is 0.01 ng/mL.

  6. Application of Sequence-Specific Labeled 16S rRNA Gene Oligonucleotide Probes for Genetic Profiling of Cyanobacterial Abundance and Diversity by Array Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Rudi, Knut; Skulberg, Olav M.; Skulberg, Randi; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.

    2000-01-01

    DNA sequence information for the small-subunit rRNA gene (16S rDNA) obtained from cyanobacterial cultures was used to investigate the presence of cyanobacteria and their abundance in natural habitats. Eight planktonic communities developing in lakes characterized by relatively low algal biomass (mesotrophic) and in lakes with correspondingly high biomass (eutrophic) were selected for the study. The organismal compositions of the water samples were analyzed genetically, using multiplex sequence-specific labeling of oligonucleotide probes targeted to 16S rDNA and subsequent hybridization of the labeled probes to their respective complements spotted onto a solid support (DNA array). Ten probes were established to determine the relative abundances of the discernible cyanobacteria encountered in the selected lakes. The probes were generally specific for their targets, as determined through analyses of clone cultures. Reproducible abundance profiles were established for the lakes investigated in the subsequent analyses of natural cyanobacterial communities. The results from the genetic analyses were then compared with information obtained from standard hydrobiological and hydrochemical analyses. Qualitatively, there were relatively good correlations among the groups of organisms (Nostoc, Microcystis, and Planktothrix species) found in the different lakes. The levels of correlation were lower for the quantitative data. This may, however, be due to differences in sample processing technique. The conclusions from these comparisons are that the genetic abundance profiles may provide a foundation for separating and quantifying genetically distinct groups of cyanobacteria in their natural habitats. PMID:10966421

  7. In situ detection of bacteria in continuous-flow cultures of seawater sediment suspensions with fluorescently labelled rRNA-directed oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Bruns, A; Berthe-Corti, L

    1998-10-01

    rRNA-targeted and fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes were used to study the composition of natural bacterial populations in continuous-flow cultures of seawater sediment suspensions. The cultures were run as enrichment cultures with increasing dilution rates, and hexadecane as the sole carbon source. Total cell numbers were analysed by counting DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole)-stained cells. To differentiate the population composition, oligonucleotide probes for eubacteria, for Cytophaga/Flavobacteria, and for four subclasses of the Proteobacteria (alpha, beta, gamma and delta) were used. About 40-80% of the DAPI-stained cells could be detected with the EUB338 probe. Moreover, it was possible to detect a shift in the composition of the natural bacterial population with increasing dilution rate of the continuous culture, from large amounts of Cytophaga/Flavobacteria to large numbers of members of the gamma-Proteobacteria. The cell recovery rate for bacteria labelled with specific oligonucleotide probes was analysed with defined cell numbers of Rhodospirillum rubrum, Comamonas testosteroni and Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris introduced into the seawater sediment suspension, and was determined to be 13.9-33.5%. The standard deviation determined for this method applied to sediment suspensions was +/- 8.3%. The results suggest that the application of the in situ hybridization technique allows a good insight into the structure of populations growing in sediment suspensions. PMID:9802019

  8. In Situ Accessibility of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S rRNA to Cy3-Labeled Oligonucleotide Probes Comprising the D1 and D2 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, João; Behrens, Sebastian; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Fonseca, Álvaro; Spencer-Martins, Isabel; Amann, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has proven to be most useful for the identification of microorganisms. However, species-specific oligonucleotide probes often fail to give satisfactory results. Among the causes leading to low hybridization signals is the reduced accessibility of the targeted rRNA site to the oligonucleotide, mainly for structural reasons. In this study we used flow cytometry to determine whole-cell fluorescence intensities with a set of 32 Cy3-labeled oligonucleotide probes covering the full length of the D1 and D2 domains in the 26S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PYCC 4455T. The brightest signal was obtained with a probe complementary to positions 223 to 240. Almost half of the probes conferred a fluorescence intensity above 60% of the maximum, whereas only one probe could hardly detect the cells. The accessibility map based on the results obtained can be extrapolated to other yeasts, as shown experimentally with 27 additional species (14 ascomycetes and 13 basidiomycetes). This work contributes to a more rational design of species-specific probes for yeast identification and monitoring. PMID:12732564

  9. A regenerated electrochemical biosensor for label-free detection of glucose and urea based on conformational switch of i-motif oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Chen, Dong Mei; Lei, Jing Lei; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2015-10-15

    Improving the reproducibility of electrochemical signal remains a great challenge over the past decades. In this work, i-motif oligonucleotide probe-based electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor is introduced for the first time as a regenerated sensing platform, which enhances the reproducibility of electrochemical signal, for label-free detection of glucose and urea. The addition of glucose or urea is able to activate glucose oxidase-catalyzed or urease-catalyzed reaction, inducing or destroying the formation of i-motif oligonucleotide probe. The conformational switch of oligonucleotide probe can be recorded by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Thus, the difference of electron transfer resistance is utilized for the quantitative determination of glucose and urea. We further demonstrate that the E-DNA sensor exhibits high selectivity, excellent stability, and remarkable regenerated ability. The human serum analysis indicates that this simple and regenerated strategy holds promising potential in future biosensing applications. PMID:26515000

  10. Measurement of mRNA by solution hybridization with /sup 32/P-labelled single stranded cRNA probe (SP6 test). Comparison with a /sup 32/P-labelled single stranded cDNA as hybridization probe (S1 test) for measurement of AVP mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, G.; Haenze, J.L.; Lehmann, E.; Lang, R.E.; Burbach, J.H.; Ganten, D.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactively labelled cRNA for the rat AVP gene exon C was synthetized from a pSP64-vector and used for solution hybridization measurement of AVP mRNA (SP6 test). For comparison hybridization was carried out with a gel-purified radioactively labelled cDNA probe synthetized by primer extension of AVP gene exon C cloned into an M13mp9 phage vector DNA (S1 test). Both tests had a comparable sensitivity of up to 0.2 pg AVP mRNA. Under optimal hybridization conditions kinetics were similar in both tests. The fast and easy preparation of large amounts of labelled cDNA probe and simple determination of absolute amounts of mRNA by saturation kinetics without need of a mRNA standard makes the SP6 test an attractive alternative to the known S1 test. The SP6 test should be applicable for a wide variety of genes.

  11. Conformationally Strained trans-Cyclooctene (sTCO) Enables the Rapid Construction of 18F-PET Probes via Tetrazine Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengzhe; Svatunek, Dennis; Rohlfing, Katarina; Liu, Yu; Wang, Hui; Giglio, Ben; Yuan, Hong; Wu, Zhanghong; Li, Zibo; Fox, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The bioorthogonal reaction between tetrazines and trans-cyclooctenes is a method for the rapid construction of F-18 probes for PET imaging. Described here is a second generation 18F-labeling system based on a conformationally strained trans-cyclooctene (sTCO)—a dienophile that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude more reactive than conventional TCO dienophiles. Starting from a readily prepared tosylate precursor, an 18F labeled sTCO derivative (18F-sTCO) could be synthesized in 29.3 +/- 5.1% isolated yield and with high specific activity. Tetrazine ligation was carried out with a cyclic RGD-conjugate of a diphenyl-s-tetrazine analogue (RGD-Tz) chosen from a diene class with an excellent combination of fast reactivity and stability both for the diene as well as the Diels-Alder adduct. For both the tetrazine and the sTCO, mini-PEG spacers were included to enhance solubility and improve the in vivo distribution profile of the resulting probe. Extremely fast reactivity (up to 2.86 x 105 M-1s-1 at 25 °C in water) has been observed in kinetic studies in the reaction of sTCO with diphenyl-s-tetrazine derivatives. A kinetic study on sTCO diastereomers in 55:45 MeOH:water showed that the syn-diastereomer displayed slightly faster reactivity than the anti-diastereomer. An 18F-sTCO conjugate with RGD-Tz demonstrated prominent and persistent tumor uptake in vivo with good tumor-to-background contrast. Unlike most radiolabeled RGD peptides, the tumor uptake of this PET agent increased from 5.3 +/- 0.2% ID/g at 1 h post injection (p.i.), to 8.9 +/- 0.5% ID/g at 4 h p.i., providing evidence for prolonged blood circulation. These findings suggest that tetrazine ligations employing 18F-sTCO should serve as a powerful and general platform for the rapid construction of peptide or protein derived PET agents. PMID:27162558

  12. Probing the reaction mechanism of spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) via diastereoselectively labeled dinucleotide SP TpT substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Lin, Gengjie; Liu, Degang; Dria, Karl J.; Telser, Joshua; Li, Lei

    2011-01-01

    5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine (commonly called spore photoproduct or SP) is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores. It is generated in the bacterial sporulation phase and repaired by a radical SAM enzyme, spore photoproduct lyase (SPL), at the early germination phase. SPL utilizes a special [4Fe-4S] cluster to reductively cleave S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to generate a reactive 5′-dA radical. The 5′-dA radical is proposed to abstract one of the two H atoms at the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process. Via organic synthesis and DNA photochemistry, we selectively labeled the 6-HproS or 6-HproR position with a deuterium in a dinucleotide SP TpT substrate. Monitoring the deuterium migration in enzyme catalysis (employing Bacillus subtilis SPL) revealed that it is the 6-HproR atom of SP that is abstracted by the 5′-dA radical. Surprisingly, the abstracted deuterium was not returned to the resulting TpT after enzymatic catalysis, an H atom from the aqueous buffer was incorporated into TpT instead. This result questions the currently hypothesized SPL mechanism which excludes the involvement of protein residue(s) in SPL reaction, suggesting that some protein residue(s), which is capable of exchanging a proton with the aqueous buffer, is involved in the enzyme catalysis. Moreover, evidence has been obtained for a possible SAM regeneration after each catalytic cycle; however, such a regeneration process is more complex than currently thought, with one or even more protein residues involved as well. These observations have enabled us to propose a modified reaction mechanism for this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. PMID:21671623

  13. Analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid by stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Hao, Yan-Hong; Liu, Ming-Zhou; Yue, Jiang; Ni, Jian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) belong to eicosanoids and are potent lipid mediators of inflammation. It is well-known that eicosanoids play an important role in numerous pathophysiological processes. Therefore, quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA, including hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatreinoic acids (EETs), and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) can provide crucial information to uncover underlying mechanisms of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA related diseases. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive method to identify and quantify HETEs, EETs, and DHETs in lipid extracts of biological samples based on stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. To this end, a pair of stable isotope probes, 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED), were utilized to facilely label eicosanoids. The heavy labeled eicosanoid standards were prepared and used as internal standards for quantification to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the detection sensitivities of DMED labeled eicosanoids improved by 3-104 folds in standard solution and 5-138 folds in serum matrix compared with unlabeled analytes. Moreover, a good separation of eicosanoids isomers was achieved upon DMED labeling. The established method provided substantial sensitivity (limit of quantification at sub-picogram), high specificity, and broad linear dynamics range (3 orders of magnitude). We further quantified cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA in rat liver, heart, brain tissues and human serum using the developed method. The results showed that 19 eicosanoids could be distinctly detected and the contents of 11-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 5,6-EET, and 14,15-EET in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 5-, 11-, 12-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-DHET in myeloid leukemia patients had significant changes

  14. Horseradish peroxidase and antibody labeled gold nanoparticle probe for amplified immunoassay of ciguatoxin in fish samples based on capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Chaoying; Luan, Wenxiu

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a new amplified immunoassay with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and antibody (Ab) labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) probe hyphenated to capillary electrophoresis (CE) with electrochemical (EC) detection for ultrasensitive determination of ciguatoxin CTX1B. AuNPs were conjugated with HRP and Ab, and then incubated with limited amount of CTX1B to produce immunocomplex. The immunoreactive sample was injected into capillary for CE separation and EC detection. Enhanced sensitivity was obtained by adopting the AuNPs as carriers of HRP and Ab at high HRP/Ab molar ratio. The calibration curve of CTX1B was in the range of 0.06-90 ng/mL. The detection limit was 0.045 ng/mL, which is 38-fold lower than that of HPLC-MS method for CTX1B analysis. The proposed method was successfully applied for the quantification of CTX1B in contamined fish samples by simultaneously labeling Ab and HRP on AuNPs. The amplified IA with HRP and Ab labeled AuNPs probe hyphenated to CE and EC detection provides a sensitive analytical approach for the determination of trace ciguatoxin in complex samples. PMID:25637767

  15. Phase-sensitive flow cytometry: fluorescence lifetime-based sensing technology for analyzing free fluorophore and cells/particles labeled with fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-12-01

    A phase-sensitive cytometer has been developed that combines flow cytometry and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique features for making frequency-domain lifetime measurements on free fluorophore (solution) and on fluorophore-labeled cells/particles in real time. No other instrument can quantify lifetimes directly and resolve heterogeneous fluorescence based on differences in lifetimes (expressed as phase shifts), while maintaining the capability to make conventional flow cytometric measurements. The technology has been characterized with respect to measurement precision, linearity, sensitivity, and dynamic range. Fluorescence lifetime distributions have been measured on autofluorescence lung cells, thymocytes labeled with antibody conjugated to fluorophores for studying fluorescence quenching as a function of antibody dilution and F/P ratio, cells stained with DNA-binding fluorochromes, and on particles labeled with fluorophores and free fluorophore (solution). Phase-resolved, fluorescence signal- intensity histograms have been recorded on thymocytes labeled with a phycoerythrin/Texas Red tandem conjugate and propidium iodide to demonstrate the resolution of signals from highly overlapping emission spectra. This technology adds a new dimension to flow analyses of free and cell/particle-bound fluorophore. Lifetimes can be used as spectroscopic probes to study the interaction of markers with their targets, each other, and the surrounding microenvironment.

  16. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 2. Transport studies, photoaffinity labeling, and identification of the membrane carrier protein for methotrexate from murine L1210 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1987-07-28

    A membrane-derived component of the methotrexate/one-carbon-reduced folate transport system in murine L1210 cells has been identified by using a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate. The compound, a radioiodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative of the lysine analogue of methotrexate, is transported into murine L1210 cells in a temperature-dependent, sulfhydryl reagent inhibitable manner with a K/sub t/ of 506 +/- 79 nM and a V/sub max/ of 17.9 +/- 4.2 pmol min/sup -1/ (mg of total cellular protein)/sup -1/. Uptake of the iodinated compound at 200 nM is inhibited by low amounts of methotrexate. The parent compounds of the iodinated photoprobe inhibit (/sup 3/H)methotrexate uptake, with the uniodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative exhibiting a K/sub i/ of 66 +/- 21 nM. UV irradiation, at 4 /sup 0/C, of a cell suspension that had been incubated with the probe results in the covalent modification of a 46K-48K protein. This can be demonstrated when the plasma membranes from the labeled cells are analyzed via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Labeling of this protein occurs half-maximally at a reagent concentration that correlates with the K/sub t/ for transport of the iodinated compound. Protection against labeling of this protein by increasing amounts of methotrexate parallels the concentration dependence of inhibition of photoprobe uptake by methotrexate. Evidence that, in the absence of irradiation and at 37/sup 0/C, the iodinated probe is actually internalized is demonstrated by the labeling of two soluble proteins (M/sub r/ 38K and 21K) derived from the cell homogenate supernatant.

  17. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RIBOSOMAL RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluroescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligonu...

  18. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem, in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligo...

  19. Separation of uncompromised whole blood mixtures for single source STR profiling using fluorescently-labeled human leukocyte antigen (HLA) probes and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Dean, Lee; Kwon, Ye Jin; Philpott, M Katherine; Stanciu, Cristina E; Seashols-Williams, Sarah J; Dawson Cruz, Tracey; Sturgill, Jamie; Ehrhardt, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of biological mixtures is a significant problem for forensic laboratories, particularly when the mixture contains only one cell type. Contributions from multiple individuals to biologic evidence can complicate DNA profile interpretation and often lead to a reduction in the probative value of DNA evidence or worse, its total loss. To address this, we have utilized an analytical technique that exploits the intrinsic immunological variation among individuals to physically separate cells from different sources in a mixture prior to DNA profiling. Specifically, we applied a fluorescently labeled antibody probe to selectively bind to one contributor in a mixture through allele-specific interactions with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are expressed on the surfaces of most nucleated cells. Once the contributor's cells were bound to the probe, they were isolated from the mixture using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)-a high throughput technique for separating cell populations based on their optical properties-and then subjected to STR analysis. We tested this approach on two-person and four-person whole blood mixtures where one contributor possessed an HLA allele (A*02) that was not shared by other contributors to the mixture. Results showed that hybridization of the mixture with a fluorescently-labeled antibody probe complimentary to the A*02 allele's protein product created a cell population with a distinct optical profile that could be easily differentiated from other cells in the mixture. After sorting the cells with FACS, genetic analysis showed that the STR profile of this cell population was consistent with that of the contributor who possessed the A*02 allele. Minor peaks from the A*02 negative contributor(s) were observed but could be easily distinguished from the profile generated from A*02 positive cells. Overall, this indicates that HLA antibody probes coupled to FACS may be an effective approach for generating STR profiles of

  20. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gyoyeon; Lee, Hansol; Lee, Jiyeon

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. PMID:26449454

  1. A label-free fluorescence strategy for selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide based on a dumbbell-like probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-15

    In this work we developed a novel label-free fluorescence sensing approach for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) based on a dumbbell-like DNA probe designed for both ligation reaction and digestion reaction with low background noise. SYBR Green I (SG I), a double-helix dye, was chosen as the readout fluorescence signal. In the absence of NAD(+), the ligation reaction did not occur, but the probe was digested to mononucleotides after the addition of exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease I (Exo III), resulting in a weak fluorescence intensity due to the weak interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. In the presence of NAD(+), the DNA probe was ligated by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, blocking the digestion by Exo I and Exo III. As a result, SG I was intercalated into the stem part of the DNA dumbbell probe and fluorescence enhancement was achieved. This method was simple in design, fast to operate, with good sensitivity and selectivity which could discriminate NAD(+) from its analogs. PMID:26454831

  2. Monitoring triplex DNA formation with fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a fluorophore-labeled probe and intercalating dyes.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chiuan-Chian; Chen, Shiau-Wen; Luo, Ji-Dung; Chien, Yu-Tzu

    2011-09-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are sequence-dependent DNA binders that may be useful for DNA targeting and detection. A sensitive and convenient method to monitor triplex formation by a TFO and its target DNA duplex is required for the application of TFO probes. Here we describe a novel design by which triplex formation can be monitored homogeneously without prelabeling the target duplex. The design uses a TFO probe tagged with a fluorophore that undergoes fluorescence resonance energy transfer with fluorescent dyes that intercalate into the target duplex. Through color compensation analysis, the specific emission of the TFO probe reveals the status of the triple helices. We used this method to show that triple helix formation with TFOs is magnesium dependent. We also demonstrated that the TFO probe can be used for detection of sequence variation in melting analysis and for DNA quantitation in real-time polymerase chain reaction. PMID:21609711

  3. In Situ Detection of Bacteria within Paraffin-embedded Tissues Using a Digoxin-labeled DNA Probe Targeting 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yong Cheol; Baek, Keum Jin; Choi, Youngnim

    2015-01-01

    The presence of bacteria within the pocket epithelium and underlying connective tissue in gingival biopsies from patients with periodontitis has been reported using various methods, including electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence using bacteria-specific antibodies, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe. Nevertheless, these methods are not widely used due to technical limitation or difficulties. Here a method to localize bacteria within paraffin-embedded tissues using DIG-labeled DNA probes has been introduced. The paraffin-embedded tissues are the most common form of biopsy tissues available from pathology banks. Bacteria can be detected either in a species-specific or universal manner. Bacterial signals are detected as either discrete forms (coccus, rod, fusiform, and hairy form) of bacteria or dispersed forms. The technique allows other histological information to be obtained: the epithelia, connective tissue, inflammatory infiltrates, and blood vessels are well distinguished. This method can be used to study the role of bacteria in various diseases, such as periodontitis, cancers, and inflammatory immune diseases. PMID:26066790

  4. Probing the unfolding of myoglobin and domain C of PARP-1 with covalent labeling and top-down ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, Michael; Lin, Ke-Yi; Pruet, Jeff; Liu, Hung-Wen; Brodbelt, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    Ultraviolet photodissocation (UVPD) mass spectrometry was used for high mass accuracy top-down characterization of two proteins labeled by the chemical probe, S-ethylacetimidate (SETA), in order to evaluate conformational changes as a function of denaturation. The SETA labeling/UVPD-MS methodology was used to monitor the mild denaturation of horse heart myoglobin by acetonitrile, and the results showed good agreement with known acetonitrile and acid unfolding pathways of myoglobin. UVPD outperformed electron transfer dissociation (ETD) in terms of sequence coverage, allowing the SETA reactivity of greater number of lysine amines to be monitored and thus providing a more detailed map of myoglobin. This strategy was applied to the third zinc-finger binding domain, domain C, of PARP-1 (PARP-C), to evaluate the discrepancies between the NMR and crystal structures which reported monomer and dimer forms of the protein, respectively. The trends reflected from the reactivity of each lysine as a function of acetonitrile denaturation in the present study support that PARP-C exists as a monomer in solution with a close-packed C-terminal α helix. Additionally, those lysines for which the SETA reactivity increased under denaturing conditions were found to engage in tertiary polar contacts such as salt bridging and hydrogen bonding, providing evidence that the SETA/UVPD-MS approach offers a versatile means to probe the interactions responsible for conformational changes in proteins. PMID:24484264

  5. Photoaffinity labeling of mammalian. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptors: identification of the ligand binding subunit with a high affinity radioiodinated probe. [Rats, guinea pigs, rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Leeb-Lundberg, L.M.F.; Dickinson, K.E.J.; Heald, S.L.; Wikberg, J.E.S.; Hagen, P.O.; DeBernardis, J.F.; Winn, M.; Arendsen, D.L.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Caron, M.G.

    1984-02-01

    A description is given of the synthesised and characterization of a novel high affinity radioiodinated ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor photoaffinity probe, 4-amino-6,7-dimethoxy-2-(4-(5-(4-azido-3-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)pentanoyl)-1-piperazinyl) quinazoline. In the absence of light, this ligand binds with high affinity (K/sub d/ = 130 pm) in a reverisble and saturable manner to sites in rat hepatic plasma membranes. The binding is stereoselective and competitively inhibited by adrenergic agonists and antagonists with an ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic specificity. Upon photolysis, this ligand incorporates irreversibly into plasma membranes prepared from several mammalian tissues including rat liver, rat, guinea pig, and rabbit spleen, rabbit lung, and rabbit aorta vascular smooth muscle cells, also with typical ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic specificity. Autoradiograms of such membrane samples subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveal a major specifically labeled polypeptide at M/sub 4/ = 78,000-85,000, depending on the tissue used, in addition to some lower molecular weight peptides. Protease inhibitors, in particular EDTA, a metalloprotease inhibitor, dramatically increases the predominance of the M/sub r/ = 78,000-85,000 polypeptide while attenuating the labeling of the lower molecular weight bands. This new high affinity radioiodinated photoaffinity probe should be of great value for the molecular characterization of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor.

  6. Deuterated carbohydrate probes as ‘label-free’ substrates for probing nutrient uptake in mycobacteria by nuclear reaction analysis† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cc09588j Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, R.; Gibson, M. I.; Thompson, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and probing small molecule uptake in cells is challenging, requiring sterically large chemical labels, or radioactive isotopes. Here, the uptake of deuterated sugars by Mycobacterium smegmatis, a non-pathogenic model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has been investigated using ion-beam (nuclear reaction) analysis demonstrating a new technique for label-free nutrient acquisition measurement. PMID:25695462

  7. Large-Scale Multiplexed Quantitative Discovery Proteomics Enabled by the Use of an 18O-Labeled “Universal” Reference Sample

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative comparison of protein abundances across a large number of biological or patient samples represents an important proteomics challenge that needs to be addressed for proteomics discovery applications. Herein, we describe a strategy that incorporates a stable isotope 18O-labeled ″universal″ reference sample as a comprehensive set of internal standards for analyzing large sample sets quantitatively. As a pooled sample, the 18O-labeled ″universal″ reference sample is spiked into each individually processed unlabeled biological sample and the peptide/protein abundances are quantified based on 16O/18O isotopic peptide pair abundance ratios that compare each unlabeled sample to the identical reference sample. This approach also allows for the direct application of label-free quantitation across the sample set simultaneously along with the labeling-approach (i.e., dual-quantitation) since each biological sample is unlabeled except for the labeled reference sample that is used as internal standards. The effectiveness of this approach for large-scale quantitative proteomics is demonstrated by its application to a set of 18 plasma samples from severe burn patients. When immunoaffinity depletion and cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation with high resolution LC-MS measurements were combined, a total of 312 plasma proteins were confidently identified and quantified with a minimum of two unique peptides per protein. The isotope labeling data was directly compared with the label-free 16O-MS intensity data extracted from the same data sets. The results showed that the 18O reference-based labeling approach had significantly better quantitative precision compared to the label-free approach. The relative abundance differences determined by the two approaches also displayed strong correlation, illustrating the complementary nature of the two quantitative methods. The simplicity of including the 18O-reference for accurate quantitation makes this

  8. Carbon nanotube enhanced label-free detection of microRNAs based on hairpin probe triggered solid-phase rolling-circle amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qianqian; Wang, Ying; Deng, Ruijie; Lin, Lei; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2014-12-01

    The detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) is imperative for gaining a better understanding of the functions of these biomarkers and has great potential for the early diagnosis of human disease. High sensitivity and selectivity for miRNA detection brings new challenges. Herein, an ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of miRNA is designed through carbon nanotube (CNT) enhanced label-free detection based on hairpin probe triggered solid-phase rolling-circle amplification (RCA). Traditionally, RCA, widely applied for signal enhancement in the construction of a variety of biosensors, has an intrinsic limitation of ultrasensitive detection, as it is difficult to separate the enzymes, templates, and padlock DNAs from the RCA products in the homogeneous solution. We purposely designed a solid-phase RCA strategy, using CNTs as the solid substrate, integrated with a hairpin structured probe to recognize target miRNA. In the presence of miRNA the stem-loop structure will be unfolded, triggering the CNT based RCA process. Due to the efficient blocking effect originating from the polymeric RCA products, the label-free assay of miRNA exhibits an ultrasensitive detection limit of 1.2 fM. Furthermore, the protocol possesses excellent specificity for resolving lung cancer-related let-7 family members which have only one-nucleotide variations. The high sensitivity and selectivity give the method great potential for applications in online diagnostics and in situ detection in long-term development.The detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) is imperative for gaining a better understanding of the functions of these biomarkers and has great potential for the early diagnosis of human disease. High sensitivity and selectivity for miRNA detection brings new challenges. Herein, an ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of miRNA is designed through carbon nanotube (CNT) enhanced label-free detection based on hairpin probe triggered solid-phase rolling-circle amplification

  9. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and site-directed isotope labeling as a probe of local secondary structure in the transmembrane domain of phospholamban.

    PubMed Central

    Ludlam, C F; Arkin, I T; Liu, X M; Rothman, M S; Rath, P; Aimoto, S; Smith, S O; Engelman, D M; Rothschild, K J

    1996-01-01

    Phospholamban is a 52-amino acid residue membrane protein that regulates Ca(2+)-ATPase activity in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiac muscle cells. The hydrophobic C-terminal 28 amino acid fragment of phospholamban (hPLB) anchors the protein in the membrane and may form part of a Ca(2+)-selective ion channel. We have used polarized attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy along with site-directed isotope labeling to probe the local structure of hPLB. The frequency and dichroism of the amide I and II bands appearing at 1658 cm-1 and 1544 cm-1, respectively, show that dehydrated and hydrated hPLB reconstituted into dimyristoylphosphatidycholine bilayer membranes is predominantly alpha-helical and has a net transmembrane orientation. Specific local secondary structure of hPLB was probed by incorporating 13C at two positions in the protein backbone. A small band seen near 1614 cm-1 is assigned to the amide I mode of the 13C-labeled amide carbonyl group(s). The frequency and dichroism of this band indicate that residues 39 and 46 are alpha-helical, with an axial orientation that is approximately 30 degrees relative to the membrane normal. Upon exposure to 2H2O (D2O), 30% of the peptide amide groups in hPLB undergo a slow deuterium/hydrogen exchange. The remainder of the protein, including the peptide groups of Leu-39 and Leu-42, appear inaccessible to exchange, indicating that most of the hPLB fragment is embedded in the lipid bilayer. By extending spectroscopic characterization of PLB to include hydrated, deuterated as well as site-directed isotope-labeled hPLB films, our results strongly support models of PLB that predict the existence of an alpha-helical hydrophobic region spanning the membrane domain. PMID:8785331

  10. Dual-Labeled Near-Infrared/99mTc Imaging Probes Using PAMAM-Coated Silica Nanoparticles for the Imaging of HER2-Expressing Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Haruka; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Tsubokawa, Norio

    2016-01-01

    We sought to develop dual-modality imaging probes using functionalized silica nanoparticles to target human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and achieve efficient target imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Polyamidoamine-based functionalized silica nanoparticles (PCSNs) for multimodal imaging were synthesized with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (indocyanine green (ICG)) and technetium-99m (99mTc) radioactivity. Anti-HER2 antibodies were bound to the labeled PCSNs. These dual-imaging probes were tested to image HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells. In vivo imaging was also examined in breast tumor xenograft models in mice. SK-BR3 (HER2 positive) cells were imaged with stronger NIR fluorescent signals than that in MDA-MB231 (HER2 negative) cells. The increased radioactivity of the SK-BR3 cells was also confirmed by phosphor imaging. NIR images showed strong fluorescent signals in the SK-BR3 tumor model compared to muscle tissues and the MDA-MB231 tumor model. Automatic well counting results showed increased radioactivity in the SK-BR3 xenograft tumors. We developed functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with 99mTc and ICG for the targeting and imaging of HER2-expressing cells. The dual-imaging probes efficiently imaged HER2-overexpressing cells. Although further studies are needed to produce efficient isotope labeling, the results suggest that the multifunctional silica nanoparticles are a promising vehicle for imaging specific components of the cell membrane in a dual-modality manner. PMID:27399687

  11. Dual-Labeled Near-Infrared/(99m)Tc Imaging Probes Using PAMAM-Coated Silica Nanoparticles for the Imaging of HER2-Expressing Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Haruka; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Tsubokawa, Norio

    2016-01-01

    We sought to develop dual-modality imaging probes using functionalized silica nanoparticles to target human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and achieve efficient target imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Polyamidoamine-based functionalized silica nanoparticles (PCSNs) for multimodal imaging were synthesized with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (indocyanine green (ICG)) and technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) radioactivity. Anti-HER2 antibodies were bound to the labeled PCSNs. These dual-imaging probes were tested to image HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells. In vivo imaging was also examined in breast tumor xenograft models in mice. SK-BR3 (HER2 positive) cells were imaged with stronger NIR fluorescent signals than that in MDA-MB231 (HER2 negative) cells. The increased radioactivity of the SK-BR3 cells was also confirmed by phosphor imaging. NIR images showed strong fluorescent signals in the SK-BR3 tumor model compared to muscle tissues and the MDA-MB231 tumor model. Automatic well counting results showed increased radioactivity in the SK-BR3 xenograft tumors. We developed functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with (99m)Tc and ICG for the targeting and imaging of HER2-expressing cells. The dual-imaging probes efficiently imaged HER2-overexpressing cells. Although further studies are needed to produce efficient isotope labeling, the results suggest that the multifunctional silica nanoparticles are a promising vehicle for imaging specific components of the cell membrane in a dual-modality manner. PMID:27399687

  12. Monodisperse REPO4 (RE = Yb, Gd, Y) hollow microspheres covered with nanothorns as affinity probes for selectively capturing and labeling phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Liu, Yan-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2012-02-13

    Rare-earth phosphate microspheres with unique structures were developed as affinity probes for the selective capture and tagging of phosphopeptides. Prickly REPO(4) (RE = Yb, Gd, Y) monodisperse microspheres, that have hollow structures, low densities, high specific surface areas, and large adsorptive capacities were prepared by an ion-exchange method. The elemental compositions and crystal structures of these affinity probes were confirmed by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The morphologies of these compounds were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nitrogen-adsorption isotherms. The potential ability of these microspheres for selectively capturing and labeling target biological molecules was evaluated by using protein-digestion analysis and a real sample as well as by comparison with the widely used TiO(2) affinity microspheres. These results show that these porous rare-earth phosphate microspheres are highly promising probes for the rapid purification and recognition of phosphopeptides. PMID:22241661

  13. Custom 4-Plex DiLeu Isobaric Labels Enable Relative Quantification of Urinary Proteins in Men with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS)

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Hao, Ling; Nechyporenko, Anatoliy; Lee, Sanghee; Vezina, Chad M.; Ricke, Will A.; Marker, Paul C.; Bjorling, Dale E.; Bushman, Wade; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    The relative quantification of proteins using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has allowed researchers to compile lists of potential disease markers. These complex quantitative workflows often include isobaric labeling of enzymatically-produced peptides to analyze their relative abundances across multiple samples in a single LC-MS run. Recent efforts by our lab have provided scientists with cost-effective alternatives to expensive commercial labels. Although the quantitative performance of these dimethyl leucine (DiLeu) labels has been reported using known ratios of complex protein and peptide standards, their potential in large-scale proteomics studies using a clinically relevant system has never been investigated. Our work rectifies this oversight by implementing 4-plex DiLeu to quantify proteins in the urine of aging human males who suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Protein abundances in 25 LUTS and 15 control patients were compared, revealing that of the 836 proteins quantified, 50 were found to be differentially expressed (>20% change) and statistically significant (p-value <0.05). Gene ontology (GO) analysis of the differentiated proteins showed that many were involved in inflammatory responses and implicated in fibrosis. While confirmation of individual protein abundance changes would be required to verify protein expression, this study represents the first report using the custom isobaric label, 4-plex DiLeu, to quantify protein abundances in a clinically relevant system. PMID:26267142

  14. Analysis of photoaffinity label derivatives to probe thyroid hormone receptor in human fibroblasts, GH1 cells, and soluble receptor preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Z.D.; Sahnoun, H.; Pascual, A.; Casanova, J.; Samuels, H.H.

    1988-05-15

    The regulation of growth hormone gene expression by thyroid hormone in cultured GH1 cells is mediated by a chromatin-associated receptor. We have previously described a photoaffinity label derivative of 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-T3) in which the alanine side chain was modified to form N-2-diazo-3,3,3-trifluoropropionyl-L-T3 (L-(125I)T3-PAL). On exposure to 254 nm UV light, L-(125I)T3-PAL generates a carbene which covalently modifies two thyroid hormone receptor forms in intact GH1 cells; an abundant 47,000 Mr species and a less abundant 57,000 Mr form. We have now synthesized similar photoaffinity label derivatives of 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodo-L-thyronine (L-T4) and 3,3',5'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-rT3). Both compounds identify the same receptor forms in intact cells and in nuclear extracts in vitro as L-(125I)T3-PAL. Labeling by L-(125I)rT3-PAL was low and consistent with the very low occupancy of receptor by L-rT3. Underivatized L-(125I)T3 and L-(125I)T4 labeled the same receptor forms at 254 nm but at a markedly lower efficiency than their PAL derivatives. In contrast, N-bromoacetyl-L-(125I)T3, a chemical affinity labeling agent, did not derivatize either receptor form in vitro. The relative efficiency of coupling to receptor at 254 nm was L-(125I)T4-PAL greater than L-(125I)T3-PAL greater than L-(125I)T4 greater than L-(125I)T3. Although L-(125I)T4-PAL has a lower affinity for receptor than L-(125I)T3-PAL, its coupling efficiency was 5-10-fold higher. This suggests that the alanine side chain of L-(125I)T4-PAL is positioned in the ligand binding region near a residue which is efficiently modified by photoactivation. With L-(125I)T4-PAL we were able to identify three different molecular weight receptor species in human fibroblast nuclei.

  15. Complementary optical and nuclear imaging of caspase-3 activity using combined activatable and radio-labeled multimodality molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeran; Akers, Walter J.; Cheney, Philip P.; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-07-01

    Based on the capability of modulating fluorescence intensity by specific molecular events, we report a new multimodal optical-nuclear molecular probe with complementary reporting strategies. The molecular probe (LS498) consists of tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid (DOTA) for chelating a radionuclide, a near-infrared fluorescent dye, and an efficient quencher dye. The two dyes are separated by a cleavable peptide substrate for caspase-3, a diagnostic enzyme that is upregulated in dying cells. LS498 is radiolabeled with 64Cu, a radionuclide used in positron emission tomography. In the native form, LS498 fluorescence is quenched until caspase-3 cleavage of the peptide substrate. Enzyme kinetics assay shows that LS498 is readily cleaved by caspase-3, with excellent enzyme kinetic parameters kcat and KM of 0.55+/-0.01 s-1 and 1.12+/-0.06 μM, respectively. In mice, the initial fluorescence of LS498 is ten-fold less than control. Using radiolabeled 64Cu-LS498 in a controlled and localized in-vivo model of caspase-3 activation, a time-dependent five-fold NIR fluorescence enhancement is observed, but radioactivity remains identical in caspase-3 positive and negative controls. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using radionuclide imaging for localizing and quantifying the distribution of molecular probes and optical imaging for reporting the functional status of diagnostic enzymes.

  16. A DNA-templated silver nanocluster probe for label-free, turn-on fluorescence-based screening of homo-adenine binding molecules.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-02-15

    A novel, label-free, turn-on fluorescence strategy to detect molecules that bind to adenine-rich DNA sequences has been developed. The probe employs DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) as the key detection component. The new strategy relies on the formation of non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex, triggered by strong interactions with homo-adenine binding molecules, which brings a guanine-rich sequence in one strand close to DNA-AgNCs located on the opposite strand. This phenomenon transforms weakly fluorescent AgNCs into highly emissive species that display bright red fluorescence. Finally, we have shown that the new fluorescence turn-on strategy can be employed to detect coralyne, the most representative homo-adenine binding molecule that triggers formation of a non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex. PMID:25441410

  17. Terminal protection of a small molecule-linked loop DNA probe for turn-on label-free fluorescence detection of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Luo, Feng; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-09-15

    A novel label-free turn-on fluorescence biosensor for the determination of streptavidin (SA) was proposed. Using terminal protection of small molecule-linked DNA chimeras, which can protect DNA from degradation by various exonucleases when the small molecule moieties are bound to their protein target, we designed a loop probe, where the 3'-end was modified with biotin to resist digestion by exonucleases in the presence of target SA. Coupled with an intercalating dye, SYBR Green I, strong enhancement of the fluorescence signals was obtained compared with that in the absence of SA. A linear correlation equation was obtained for SA from 0 to 200nM with a limit detection of 0.4nM. This strategy holds great promise for practical applications with good specificity and sensitivity. PMID:27107146

  18. Dual Unnatural Amino Acid Incorporation and Click-Chemistry Labeling to Enable Single-Molecule FRET Studies of p97 Folding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taehyung C; Kang, Minjin; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Schultz, Peter G; Chapman, Eli; Deniz, Ashok A

    2016-06-01

    Many cellular functions are critically dependent on the folding of complex multimeric proteins, such as p97, a hexameric multidomain AAA+ chaperone. Given the complex architecture of p97, single-molecule (sm) FRET would be a powerful tool for studying folding while avoiding ensemble averaging. However, dual site-specific labeling of such a large protein for smFRET is a significant challenge. Here, we address this issue by using bioorthogonal azide-alkyne chemistry to attach an smFRET dye pair to site-specifically incorporated unnatural amino acids, allowing us to generate p97 variants reporting on inter- or intradomain structural features. An initial proof-of-principle set of smFRET results demonstrated the strengths of this labeling method. Our results highlight this as a powerful tool for structural studies of p97 and other large protein machines. PMID:27115850

  19. Synthesis of a Targeted Biarsenical Cy3-Cy5 Affinity Probe for Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Na; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-11-01

    Photoswitchable fluorescent probes capable of the targeted labeling of tagged proteins are of significant interest due to their ability to enable in situ imaging of protein complexes within native biomolecular assemblies. Here we describe the synthesis of a fluorescent probe (AsCy3Cy5), and demonstrate the targeted labeling and super-resolution imaging of a tagged protein within a supramolecular protein complex.

  20. Strategies to enhance signal intensity with paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for 19F magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; Botta, Mauro; Parker, David

    2011-01-28

    The synthesis and (19)F NMR spectroscopic properties are reported for three series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes, based on mono- and diamide cyclen ligands. Analyses of variable temperature, pH and field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopic experiments are reported and the merits of a triphosphinate mono-amide complex defined by virtue of its favourable isomer distribution and attractive relaxation properties. These lead to an enhanced sensitivity of detection in (19)F magnetic resonance experiments versus a diamagnetic Y(III) analogue, paving the way for future shift and imaging studies. PMID:21127807

  1. Use of the fluorescent probe LAURDAN to label and measure inner membrane fluidity of endospores of Clostridium spp.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Simmon; Denter, Christian; Winter, Roland; McMullen, Lynn M; Gänzle, Michael G

    2012-10-01

    A method for measuring the fluidity of inner membranes of populations of endospores of Clostridium spp. with a fluorescent dye was developed. Cells of Clostridium beijerinckii ATCC 8260 and Clostridium sporogenes ATCC 7955 were allowed to sporulate in the presence of 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (LAURDAN) on a soil-based media. Labeling of endospores with LAURDAN did not affect endospore viability. Removal of the outer membranes of endospores was done using a chemical treatment and confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and generalized polarization (GP) measurements were used to assess fluorescence of endospores. Lipid composition analysis of cells and endospores was done to determine whether differences in GP values are attributable to differences in membrane composition. Removal of the outer membranes of endospores did not significantly impact GP values. Decoated, labeled endospores of C. sporogenes ATCC 7955 and C. beijerinckii ATCC 8260 exhibited GP values of 0.77±0.031 and 0.74±0.027 respectively. Differences in ratios of fatty acids between cells and endospores are unlikely to be responsible for high GP values observed in endospores. These GP values indicate high levels of lipid order and the exclusion of water from within inner membranes of endospores. PMID:22884687

  2. A systematic study of protein labeling by fluorogenic probes using cysteine targeting vinyl sulfone-cyclooctyne tags.

    PubMed

    Söveges, B; Imre, T; Szende, T; Póti, Á L; Cserép, G B; Hegedűs, T; Kele, P; Németh, K

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent tagging of proteins via accessible cysteine residues is of paramount importance. In this study, model proteins of interest (mitogen-activated protein kinases) were labeled successfully in native state on their free thiols by direct fluorescence derivatization, or in a sequential manner where conjugation of the site specific linker and the fluorophore is carried out in two steps. To this end we designed and prepared two novel chemical reporters carrying vinyl sulfone as Cys targeting function and cyclooctyne motifs, suitable for subsequent conjugation with fluorogenic azides via copper free strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry. Direct and sequential labeling reaction steps were analyzed by native PAGE, capillary zone electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry. The efficiency of tagging was correlated with solvent accessibility of the Cys residues. Our results indicated that conjugation of native proteins by vinyl sulfone linkers was fast and thiol-selective. Subsequent click reaction with fluorogenic dyes generates intensive fluorescence signals and fulfills all requirements of bioorthogonality. PMID:27244693

  3. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 1. Photoaffinity labeling of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase and amino acid sequence of the binding region

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Smith, P.L.; Klein, T.E.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1987-07-28

    N/sup ..cap alpha../-(4-Amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroyl)-N/sup epsilon/-(4-azido-5-(/sup 125/I)iodosalicylyl)-L-lysine, a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, is only 2-fold less potent than methotrexate in the inhibition of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase. Irradiation of the enzyme in the presence of an equimolar concentration of the /sup 125/I-labeled analogue ultimately leads to an 8% incorporation of the photoprobe. A 100-fold molar excess of methotrexate essentially blocks this incorporation. Cyanogen bromide digestion of the labeled enzyme, followed by high-pressure liquid chromatography purification of the generated peptides, indicates that greater than 85% of the total radioactivity is incorporated into a single cyanogen bromide peptide. Sequence analysis revealed this peptide to be residues 53-111, with a majority of the radioactivity centered around residues 63-65 (Lys-Asn-Arg). These data demonstrate that the photoaffinity analogue specifically binds to dihydrofolate reductase and covalently modifies the enzyme following irradiation and is therefore a photolabeling agent useful for probing the inhibitor binding domain of the enzyme.

  4. Quality analysis of in vivo near-infrared fluorescence and conventional gamma images acquired using a dual-labeled tumor-targeting probe.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jessica P; Ke, Shi; Wang, Wei; Li, Chun; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2005-01-01

    The cyclic peptide, cyclopentapeptide cyclo(lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-phe) (c(KRGDf)), which is known to target alpha(v)beta3 integrin, is dual-labeled with a radiotracer, (111)indium, for gamma scintigraphy as well as with a near-infrared dye, IRDye800, for continuous-wave (cw) imaging of alpha(v)beta3 positive human M21 melanoma in xenografts. Twenty-four hours after administration of the dual-labeled peptide at a dose equivalent to 90 microCi of (111)In and 5 nmol of near-infrared (NIR) dye, whole-body gamma scintigraphy and cw imaging was conducted. Image acquisition time was 15 min for the gamma scintigraphy images and 800 ms for the optical images acquired using an NIR sensitive intensified charge-coupled device. The results show that while the target-to-background ratio (TBR) of nuclear and optical imaging were similar for surface regions of interest and consistent with the origin of gamma and NIR radiation from a common targeted peptide, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was significantly higher for optical than nuclear imaging. Furthermore, an analysis of SNR versus contrast showed greater sensitivity of optical over nuclear imaging for the subcutaneous tumor targets. While tomographic reconstructions are necessary to probe TBR, SNR, and contrast for interior tissues, this work demonstrates for the first time the direct comparison of molecular optical and planar nuclear imaging for surface and subsurface cancers. PMID:16292970

  5. The fluorescence and infrared absorption probe para-cyanophenylalanine: Effect of labeling on the behavior of different membrane-interacting peptides.

    PubMed

    Bobone, Sara; De Zotti, Marta; Bortolotti, Annalisa; Biondi, Barbara; Ballano, Gema; Palleschi, Antonio; Toniolo, Claudio; Formaggio, Fernando; Stella, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    Total syntheses and complete characterizations of singly substituted PheCN -based analogs of alamethicin AlaP, which is active on model and natural membranes, and the TM peptide, which inserts in a transmembrane orientation in lipid bilayers, are reported. The syntheses of the AlaP analogs were performed in solution, while those of TM and its analogs were carried out by solid phase. Using the cyanophenyl fluorescence and infrared (IR) absorption probe, an in-depth investigation of the self-association, membrane-interacting, permeabilizing, and orientation properties of these peptides were conducted. The aromatic residue incorporated induces only a negligible modification to the properties of the parent peptides. The PheCN IR absorption band was located between 2228 and 2230 cm(-1) for all peptides, irrespective of the position of labeling. By contrast, as the width of this band varied significantly with the depth of probe insertion in the bilayer, it could represent a good marker of the PheCN position in phospholipid membranes. PMID:25968959

  6. In situ hybridisation for the detection of Leishmania species in paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues using a digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Dinhopl, N; Mostegl, M M; Richter, B; Nedorost, N; Maderner, A; Fragner, K; Weissenböck, H

    2011-11-12

    The diagnosis of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is currently predominantly achieved by cytological or histological identification of amastigotes in biopsy samples, demonstration of specific anti-Leishmania antibodies and PCR-based approaches. All these methods have the advantage of being sensitive and more or less specific; nevertheless, most of them also have disadvantages. A chromogenic in situ hybridisation (ISH) procedure with a digoxigenin-labelled probe, targeting a fragment of the 5.8S rRNA was developed for the detection of all species of Leishmania parasites in routinely paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues. This method was validated in comparison with traditional techniques (histology, PCR), on various tissues from three dogs with histological changes consistent with a florid leishmaniosis. Amastigote forms of Leishmania gave clear signals and were easily identified using ISH. Various tissues from 10 additional dogs with clinical suspicion or/and a positive serological test but without histological presence of amastigotes did not show any ISH signals. Potential cross-reactivity of the probe was ruled out by negative outcome of the ISH against selected protozoa (including the related Trypanosoma cruzi) and fungi. Thus, ISH proved to be a powerful tool for unambiguous detection of Leishmania parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissues. PMID:21921059

  7. In vivo quantifying molecular specificity of Cy5.5-labeled cyclic 9-mer peptide probe with dynamic fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunpeng; Yin, Jipeng; Huang, Yu; Chen, Xueli; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Yajun; Zhang, Xianghan; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Liang, Jimin

    2016-04-01

    We quantified molecular specificity of Cy5.5-GX1 in vivo with dynamic fluorescence imaging to better understand its kinetic properties. According to whether or not free GX1 was injected and when it was injected, twelve of BGC-823 xenografted mice were randomly divided into three groups and underwent a 60 minute dynamic fluorescence scanning. Combined with a principal-component analysis, the binding potential (Bp) of the probe was determined by both Logan graphical analysis with reference tissue model (GARTM) and Lammertsma simplified reference tissue model (SRTM). The sum of the pharmacokinetic rate constants (SKRC) was quantified by the Gurfinkel exponential model (GEXPM). Cy5.5-GX1 specifically targeted tumor both in vitro and in vivo. We obtained similar quantification results of Bp (GARTM Bp = 0.582 ± 0.2655, SRTM Bp = 0.618 ± 0.2923), and obtained a good linear relation between the Bp value and the SKRC value. Our results indicate that the SKRC value is more suitable for an early-stage kinetic data analysis, and the Bp value depicts kinetic characteristics under the equilibrium state. Dynamic fluorescence imaging in conjunction with various kinetic models are optimal tools to quantify molecular specificity of the Cy5.5-GX1 probe in vivo. PMID:27446643

  8. In vivo quantifying molecular specificity of Cy5.5-labeled cyclic 9-mer peptide probe with dynamic fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yunpeng; Yin, Jipeng; Huang, Yu; Chen, Xueli; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Yajun; Zhang, Xianghan; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    We quantified molecular specificity of Cy5.5-GX1 in vivo with dynamic fluorescence imaging to better understand its kinetic properties. According to whether or not free GX1 was injected and when it was injected, twelve of BGC-823 xenografted mice were randomly divided into three groups and underwent a 60 minute dynamic fluorescence scanning. Combined with a principal-component analysis, the binding potential (Bp) of the probe was determined by both Logan graphical analysis with reference tissue model (GARTM) and Lammertsma simplified reference tissue model (SRTM). The sum of the pharmacokinetic rate constants (SKRC) was quantified by the Gurfinkel exponential model (GEXPM). Cy5.5-GX1 specifically targeted tumor both in vitro and in vivo. We obtained similar quantification results of Bp (GARTM Bp = 0.582 ± 0.2655, SRTM Bp = 0.618 ± 0.2923), and obtained a good linear relation between the Bp value and the SKRC value. Our results indicate that the SKRC value is more suitable for an early-stage kinetic data analysis, and the Bp value depicts kinetic characteristics under the equilibrium state. Dynamic fluorescence imaging in conjunction with various kinetic models are optimal tools to quantify molecular specificity of the Cy5.5-GX1 probe in vivo. PMID:27446643

  9. Two-photon excitation in chip electrophoresis enabling label-free fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer chips.

    PubMed

    Geissler, David; Belder, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    One of the most commonly employed detection methods in microfluidic research is fluorescence detection, due to its ease of integration and excellent sensitivity. Many analytes though do not show luminescence when excited in the visible light spectrum, require suitable dyes. Deep-ultraviolet (UV) excitation (<300 nm) allows label-free detection of a broader range of analytes but also mandates the use of expensive fused silica glass, which is transparent to UV light. Herein, we report the first application of label-free deep UV fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer microfluidic devices. This was achieved by means of two-photon excitation in the visible range (λex = 532 nm). Issues associated with the low optical transmittance of plastics in the UV range were successfully circumvented in this way. The technique was investigated by application to microchip electrophoresis of small aromatic compounds. Various polymers, such as poly(methyl methacrylate), cyclic olefin polymer, and copolymer as well as poly(dimethylsiloxane) were investigated and compared with respect to achievable LOD and ruggedness against photodamage. To demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the method was also applied to the determination of serotonin and tryptamine in fruit samples. PMID:26333008

  10. Advances in fluorescence labeling strategies for dynamic cellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic advances in optical physics, probe design, molecular biology, labeling techniques and computational analysis have propelled fluorescence imaging into new realms of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. This review aims to discuss advances in fluorescent probes and live-cell labeling strategies, two areas that remain pivotal for future advances in imaging technology. Fluorescent protein– and bio-orthogonal–based methods for protein and RNA imaging are discussed as well as emerging bioengineering techniques that enable their expression at specific genomic loci (for example, CRISPR and TALENs). Important attributes that contribute to the success of each technique are emphasized, providing a guideline for future advances in dynamic live-cell imaging. PMID:24937069

  11. Multicolor protein labeling in living cells using mutant β-lactamase-tag technology.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shuji; Mizukami, Shin; Hori, Yuichiro; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2010-12-15

    Protein labeling techniques using small molecule probes have become important as practical alternatives to the use of fluorescent proteins (FPs) in live cell imaging. These labeling techniques can be applied to more sophisticated fluorescence imaging studies such as pulse-chase imaging. Previously, we reported a novel protein labeling system based on the combination of a mutant β-lactamase (BL-tag) with coumarin-derivatized probes and its application to specific protein labeling on cell membranes. In this paper, we demonstrated the broad applicability of our BL-tag technology to live cell imaging by the development of a series of fluorescence labeling probes for this technology, and the examination of the functions of target proteins. These new probes have a fluorescein or rhodamine chromophore, each of which provides enhanced photophysical properties relative to coumarins for the purpose of cellular imaging. These probes were used to specifically label the BL-tag protein and could be used with other small molecule fluorescent probes. Simultaneous labeling using our new probes with another protein labeling technology was found to be effective. In addition, it was also confirmed that this technology has a low interference with respect to the functions of target proteins in comparison to GFP. Highly specific and fast covalent labeling properties of this labeling technology is expected to provide robust tools for investigating protein functions in living cells, and future applications can be improved by combining the BL-tag technology with conventional imaging techniques. The combination of probe synthesis and molecular biology techniques provides the advantages of both techniques and can enable the design of experiments that cannot currently be performed using existing tools. PMID:20961132

  12. Use of Dimedone-Based Chemical Probes for Sulfenic Acid Detection: Methods to Visualize and Identify Labeled Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kimberly J.; Klomsiri, Chananat; Codreanu, Simona G.; Soito, Laura; Liebler, Daniel C.; Rogers, LeAnn C.; Daniel, Larry W.; Poole, Leslie B.

    2013-01-01

    Reversible thiol modification is a major component of the modulation of cell-signaling pathways by reactive oxygen species. Hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, or lipid hydroperoxides are all able to oxidize cysteines to form cysteine sulfenic acids; this reactive intermediate can be directly reduced to thiol by cellular reductants such as thioredoxin or further participate in disulfide bond formation with glutathione or cysteine residues in the same or another protein. To identify the direct protein targets of cysteine modification and the conditions under which they are oxidized, a series of dimedone-based reagents linked to affinity or fluorescent tags have been developed that specifically alkylate and trap cysteine sulfenic acids. In this chapter, we provide detailed methods using one of our biotin-tagged reagents, DCP-Bio1, to identify and monitor proteins that are oxidized in vitro and in vivo. Using streptavidin-linked agarose beads, this biotin-linked reagent can be used to affinity capture labeled proteins. Stringent washing of the beads prior to elution minimizes the contamination of the enriched material with unlabeled proteins through coimmunoprecipitation or nonspecific binding. In particular, we suggest including DTT in one of the washes to remove proteins covalently linked to biotinylated proteins through a disulfide bond, except in cases where these linked proteins are of interest. We also provide methods for targeted approaches monitoring cysteine oxidation in individual proteins, global approaches to follow total cysteine oxidation in the cell, and guidelines for proteomic analyses to identify novel proteins with redox sensitive cysteines. PMID:20513473

  13. Single Qdot-labeled glycosylase molecules use a wedge amino acid to probe for lesions while scanning along DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Andrew R.; Kad, Neil M.; Nelson, Shane R.; Warshaw, David M.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Within the base excision repair (BER) pathway, the DNA N-glycosylases are responsible for locating and removing the majority of oxidative base damages. Endonuclease III (Nth), formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (Nei) are members of two glycosylase families: the helix–hairpin–helix (HhH) superfamily and the Fpg/Nei family. The search mechanisms employed by these two families of glycosylases were examined using a single molecule assay to image quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled glycosylases interacting with YOYO-1 stained λ-DNA molecules suspended between 5 µm silica beads. The HhH and Fpg/Nei families were found to have a similar diffusive search mechanism described as a continuum of motion, in keeping with rotational diffusion along the DNA molecule ranging from slow, sub-diffusive to faster, unrestricted diffusion. The search mechanism for an Fpg variant, F111A, lacking a phenylalanine wedge residue no longer displayed slow, sub-diffusive motion compared to wild type, suggesting that Fpg base interrogation may be accomplished by Phe111 insertion. PMID:21666255

  14. Direct Monitoring of γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Activity In Vivo Using a Hyperpolarized (13) C-Labeled Molecular Probe.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Tatsuya; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Nonaka, Hiroshi; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Can, Emine; Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Takado, Yuhei; Comment, Arnaud; Sando, Shinsuke

    2016-08-26

    The γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) enzyme plays a central role in glutathione homeostasis. Direct detection of GGT activity could provide critical information for the diagnosis of several pathologies. We propose a new molecular probe, γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly, for monitoring GGT activity in vivo by hyperpolarized (HP) (13) C magnetic resonance (MR). The properties of γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly are suitable for in vivo HP (13) C metabolic analysis since the chemical shift between γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly and its metabolic product, [1-(13) C]Gly, is large (4.3 ppm) and the T1 of both compounds is relatively long (30 s and 45 s, respectively, in H2 O at 9.4 T). We also demonstrate that γ-Glu-[1-(13) C]Gly is highly sensitive to in vivo modulation of GGT activity induced by the inhibitor acivicin. PMID:27483206

  15. A simple and sensitive label-free fluorescent approach for protein detection based on a Perylene probe and aptamer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zhenzhen; Liu, Jinchuan; Bai, Wenhui; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2015-02-15

    Highly sensitive detection of proteins is of great importance for effective clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. However, so far most detection methods rely on antibody-based immunoassays and are usually laborious and time-consuming with poor sensitivity. Here, we developed a simple and ultra-sensitive method to detect a biomarker protein-thrombin by taking advantage of the fluorescent probe Perylene tetracarboxylic acid diimide (PTCDI) derivatives and thrombin aptamer. The water-soluble dye PTCDI shows strong fluorescence in buffer solution for the existence of free dye monomer, but becomes weak after aggregation through self-assembly on nucleic acid aptamer. In the presence of thrombin, it specifically binds to thrombin aptamer which causes the conformational transition between aptamer and PTCDI and results in a significant fluorescence recovery. The results showed that as low as 40 pM of thrombin could be detected by this method. The high sensitivity of the developed sensing system mainly attributes to the ultra-sensitivity of the fluorescence intensity changes of PTCDI. With the specificity of aptamer, the assay exhibited high selectivity for thrombin against three other proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, mouse IgG) and 1% diluted fetal bovine serum. The detection method might be extended to sensitive detection of a variety of proteins for its advantages of isothermal conditions required, simple and rapid without multiple separation and washing steps. PMID:25310484

  16. A new label-free and turn-on strategy for endonuclease detection using a DNA-silver nanocluster probe.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue; Kong, Xiang-Juan; Zhu, Zi-Mao; Chen, Ting-Ting; Chu, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Endonuclease plays a vital role in a variety of biological processes and the assay of endonuclease activity and inhibitors is of high importance in the fields ranging from biotechnology to pharmacology. Howerer, traditional techniques usually suffer from time intensive, laborious, and cost-expensive. This work aims to develop a facile and sensitive method for endonuclease activity assay by making use of the fluorescence enhancement effect when DNA-silver nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs) are in proximity to guanine-rich DNA sequences. The system mainly consists of block DNA (B-DNA), G-DNA and Ag-DNA. B-DNA serves as the substrate of the endonuclease (S1 nuclease as the model enzyme). G-DNA, which is predesigned entirely complementary to B strand, contains a guanine-rich overhang sequence and hybridization part at the 5'-end. Ag-DNA involves a sequence for Ag NCs synthesis and a sequence complementary to the hybridization part of the G-DNA. In the "off" state, B-DNA plays the role as a blocker that inhibit the proximity between Ag NCs and guanine-rich DNA sequences, resulting in a low fluorescence readout. However, if S1 nuclease is introduced into the system, B-DNA was cleaved into mono- or short-oligonucleotides fragments, which could not hybridize with G-DNA. As a result, the subsequent addition of DNA-Ag NCs could bring guanine-rich DNA sequences close to the Ag NCs, accompanied by a significant fluorescence enhancement. Therefore, endonuclease activity could be successfully quantified by monitoring the variation in fluorescence intensity. In addition, this approach can also be applied for inhibitor screening of endonuclease. This label-free and turn-on fluorescent assays employing the mechanism proposed here for the detection of nuclease and inhibitors turn out to be sensitive, selective, and convenient. PMID:25281081

  17. Development of a new colorimetric and red-emitting fluorescent dual probe for G-quadruplex nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin-Wu; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Liu, Hui-Yun; Ye, Wen-Jie; Ou, Tian-Miao; Tan, Jia-Heng; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2014-07-01

    A tailor-made colorimetric and red-emitting fluorescent dual probe for G-quadruplex nucleic acids was developed by incorporating a coumarin-hemicyanine fluorophore into an isaindigotone framework. The significant and distinct changes in both the color and fluorescence of this probe enable the label-free and visual detection of G-quadruplex structures. PMID:24841696

  18. Evaluation of 89Zr-Labeled Human Anti-CD147 Monoclonal Antibody as a Positron Emission Tomography Probe in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Sudo, Hitomi; Nagatsu, Kotaro; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Ukai, Yoshinori; Kurosawa, Gene; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer and its prognosis remains poor. Therefore, additional effective therapy is required to augment and/or complement current therapy. CD147, high expression in pancreatic cancer, is involved in the metastatic process and is considered a good candidate for targeted therapy. CD147-specfic imaging could be useful for selection of appropriate patients. Therefore, we evaluated the potential of a fully human anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody 059-053 as a new positron emission tomography (PET) probe for pancreatic cancer. Methods CD147 expression was evaluated in four pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA Paca-2, PANC-1, BxPC-3, and AsPC-1) and a mouse cell line A4 as a negative control. Cell binding, competitive inhibition and internalization assays were conducted with 125I-, 67Ga-, or 89Zr-labeled 059-053. In vivo biodistribution of 125I- or 89Zr-labeled 059-053 was conducted in mice bearing MIA Paca-2 and A4 tumors. PET imaging with [89Zr]059-053 was conducted in subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor mouse models. Results Among four pancreatic cancer cell lines, MIA Paca-2 cells showed the highest expression of CD147, while A4 cells had no expression. Immunohistochemical staining showed that MIA Paca-2 xenografts also highly expressed CD147 in vivo. Radiolabeled 059-053 specifically bound to MIA Paca-2 cells with high affinity, but not to A4. [89Zr]059-053 uptake in MIA Paca-2 tumors increased with time from 11.0±1.3% injected dose per gram (ID/g) at day 1 to 16.9±3.2% ID/g at day 6, while [125I]059-053 uptake was relatively low and decreased with time, suggesting that 059-053 was internalized into tumor cells in vivo and 125I was released from the cells. PET with [89Zr]059-053 clearly visualized subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors. Conclusion [89Zr]059-053 is a promising PET probe for imaging CD147 expression in pancreatic cancer and has the potential to select appropriate patients with CD147-expressing tumors who could gain

  19. A label-free fluorescent probe for Hg2+ and biothiols based on graphene oxide and Ru-complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Yao, Tianming; Shi, Shuo; Cao, Yanlin; Sun, Wenliang

    2014-06-01

    A novel, selective and sensitive switch-on fluorescent sensor for Hg2+ and switch-off fluorescent probe for biothiols was developed by using [Ru(bpy)2(pip)]2+ as the signal reporter and graphene oxide (GO) as the quencher. Due to the affinity of GO towards single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) and [Ru(bpy)2(pip)]2+, the three components assembled, resulting in fluorescence quenching. Upon addition of Hg2+, a double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) via T-Hg2+-T base pairs was formed, and [Ru(bpy)2(pip)]2+ intercalated into the newly formed ds-DNA. Then, [Ru(bpy)2(pip)]2+ and ds-DNA were removed from the surface of GO, resulting in the restoration of fluorescence. Subsequently, upon addition of biothiols, Hg2+ was released from ds-DNA, due to the higher affinity of Hg2+ to the sulfur atoms of biothiols, which could induce ds-DNA unwinding to form ss-DNA. Then ss-DNA and [Ru(bpy)2(pip)]2+ were adsorbed on the surface of GO, the fluorescence of [Ru(bpy)2(pip)]2+ was quenched again. Therefore, the changes in emission intensity of [Ru(bpy)2(pip)]2+ directly correlated to the amount of detection target (Hg2+ or biothiols) in solution. The assay exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity, with the limits of detection for Hg2+, cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH) to be 2.34 nM, 6.20 nM and 4.60 nM, respectively.

  20. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  1. Detection of Early Stage Apoptotic Cells Based on Label-Free Cytochrome c Assay Using Bioconjugated Metal Nanoclusters as Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Molaabasi, Fatemeh; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Rahmati, Fereshteh

    2016-02-16

    Cytochrome c (Cyt c) is an important biomarker in cell lysates for the early stage of apoptosis or anticancer agents. Here, two novel label-free fluorescence assays based on hemoglobin-stabilized gold nanoclusters (Hb/AuNCs) and aptamer-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) for analysis of Cyt c are presented. The heme group of the protein induces sensitive sensing platforms accompanied by the decreased fluorescence of both metal nanoclusters. The quenching processes observed found to be based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer mechanism from Hb/AuNCs to Cyt c and photoinduced electron transfer from DNA/AgNCs to the aptamer-Cyt c complex. The linear range for Cyt c was found to be 0-10 μM for Hb/AuNCs and from 0 to 1 μM for DNA/AgNCs, with limits of detection of ∼15 nM. On the basis of strong binding affinity of DNA aptamers for their target proteins, the DNA/AgNCs probe was successfully applied to the quantitative determination of Cyt c in cell lysates, which opens a new avenue to early diagnostics and drug screening with high sensitivity. Compared to the conventional Western blot method, the presented assays are low cost, easy to prepare the fluorescent probes, and sensitive, while overall time for the detection and quantitation of Cyt c from isolated mitochondria is only 20 min. The proposed method for Cyt c detection may also be useful for the study of those materials that cause mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death. PMID:26812937

  2. Site-specific incorporation of probes into RNA polymerase by unnatural-amino-acid mutagenesis and Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Mazumder, Abhishek; Lin, Miaoxin; Hasemeyer, Adam; Xu, Qumiao; Wang, Dongye; Ebright, Yon W.; Ebright, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A three-step procedure comprising (i) unnatural-amino-acid mutagenesis with 4-azido-phenylalanine, (ii) Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation with a probe-phosphine derivative, and (iii) in vitro reconstitution of RNA polymerase (RNAP) enables the efficient site-specific incorporation of a fluorescent probe, a spin label, a crosslinking agent, a cleaving agent, an affinity tag, or any other biochemical or biophysical probe, at any site of interest in RNAP. Straightforward extensions of the procedure enable the efficient site-specific incorporation of two or more different probes in two or more different subunits of RNAP. We present protocols for synthesis of probe-phosphine derivatives, preparation of RNAP subunits and the transcription initiation factor σ, unnatural amino acid mutagenesis of RNAP subunits and σ, Staudinger ligation with unnatural-amino-acid-containing RNAP subunits and σ, quantitation of labelling efficiency and labelling specificity, and reconstitution of RNAP. PMID:25665560

  3. Targeting CD146 with a 64Cu-labeled antibody enables in vivo immunoPET imaging of high-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hernandez, Reinier; Rao, Jun; Yin, Li; Qu, Yazhuo; Wu, Jinrong; England, Christopher G.; Graves, Stephen A.; Lewis, Christina M.; Wang, Pu; Meyerand, Mary E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Bian, Xiu-wu; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    Given the highly heterogeneous character of brain malignancies and the associated implication for its proper diagnosis and treatment, finding biomarkers that better characterize this disease from a molecular standpoint is imperative. In this study, we evaluated CD146 as a potential molecular target for diagnosis and targeted therapy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal brain malignancy. YY146, an anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody, was generated and radiolabeled for noninvasive positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging of orthotopic GBM models. 64Cu-labeled YY146 preferentially accumulated in the tumors of mice bearing U87MG xenografts, which allowed the acquisition of high-contrast PET images of small tumor nodules (∼2 mm). Additionally, we found that tumor uptake correlated with the levels of CD146 expression in a highly specific manner. We also explored the potential therapeutic effects of YY146 on the cancer stem cell (CSC) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) properties of U87MG cells, demonstrating that YY146 can mitigate those aggressive phenotypes. Using YY146 as the primary antibody, we performed histological studies of World Health Organization (WHO) grades I through IV primary gliomas. The positive correlation found between CD146-positive staining and high tumor grade (χ2 = 9.028; P = 0.029) concurred with the GBM data available in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and validated the clinical value of YY146. In addition, we demonstrate that YY146 can be used to detect CD146 in various cancer cell lines and human resected tumor tissues of multiple other tumor types (gastric, ovarian, liver, and lung), indicating a broad applicability of YY146 in solid tumors. PMID:26553993

  4. Targeting CD146 with a 64Cu-labeled antibody enables in vivo immunoPET imaging of high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunan; Hernandez, Reinier; Rao, Jun; Yin, Li; Qu, Yazhuo; Wu, Jinrong; England, Christopher G; Graves, Stephen A; Lewis, Christina M; Wang, Pu; Meyerand, Mary E; Nickles, Robert J; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Cai, Weibo

    2015-11-24

    Given the highly heterogeneous character of brain malignancies and the associated implication for its proper diagnosis and treatment, finding biomarkers that better characterize this disease from a molecular standpoint is imperative. In this study, we evaluated CD146 as a potential molecular target for diagnosis and targeted therapy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal brain malignancy. YY146, an anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody, was generated and radiolabeled for noninvasive positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging of orthotopic GBM models. (64)Cu-labeled YY146 preferentially accumulated in the tumors of mice bearing U87MG xenografts, which allowed the acquisition of high-contrast PET images of small tumor nodules (∼ 2 mm). Additionally, we found that tumor uptake correlated with the levels of CD146 expression in a highly specific manner. We also explored the potential therapeutic effects of YY146 on the cancer stem cell (CSC) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) properties of U87MG cells, demonstrating that YY146 can mitigate those aggressive phenotypes. Using YY146 as the primary antibody, we performed histological studies of World Health Organization (WHO) grades I through IV primary gliomas. The positive correlation found between CD146-positive staining and high tumor grade (χ(2) = 9.028; P = 0.029) concurred with the GBM data available in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and validated the clinical value of YY146. In addition, we demonstrate that YY146 can be used to detect CD146 in various cancer cell lines and human resected tumor tissues of multiple other tumor types (gastric, ovarian, liver, and lung), indicating a broad applicability of YY146 in solid tumors. PMID:26553993

  5. 203Pb-Labeled Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide as an Imaging Probe for Melanoma Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yubin, Miao; Figueroa, Said D.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Moore, Herbert A.; Testa, Richard F.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2008-05-01

    Abbreviations: a-MSH; alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone, DOTA; 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid, Re(Arg11)CCMSH; DOTA-[Cys3,4,10, D-Phe7, Arg11]a-MSH3-13, NDP; [Nle4,d-Phe7] a-MSH3-13. Abstract Peptide-targeted alpha therapy with 200 mCi of 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH cured 45% of B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice in a 120-day study, highlighting its melanoma treatment potential. However, there is a need to develop an imaging surrogate for patient specific dosimetry and to monitor the tumor response to 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH as a matched-pair SPECT imaging agent for 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH. Method: DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was labeled with 203Pb in 0.5 M NH4OAc buffer at pH 5.4. The internalization and efflux of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were examined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. A micro-SPECT/CT imaging study was performed with 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in a B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mouse at 2 h post-injection. Results: 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was easily prepared in NH4OAc buffer and completely separated from the excess non-radiolabeled peptide by RP-HPLC. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH displayed fast internalization and extended retention in B16/F1 cells. Approximately 73% of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH activity internalized after a 20-min incubation at 25C. After incubating the cells in culture media for 20 min, 78% of internalized activity remained in the cells. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited similar biodistribution pattern with 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor uptake of 12.00 +/- 3.20 %ID/g at 1 h post-injection. The tumor uptake gradually decreased to 3.43 +/- 1.12 %ID/g at 48 h post-injection. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor to kidney

  6. A novel multiplex RT-qPCR method based on dual-labelled probes suitable for typing all known genotypes of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, D; López-Vázquez, C; Skall, H F; Mikkelsen, S S; Olesen, N J; Dopazo, C P

    2016-04-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) is a notifiable fish disease, whose causative agent is a rhabdovirus isolated from a wide range of fish species, not only in fresh but also in marine and brackish waters. Phylogenetic studies have identified four major genotypes, with a strong geographical relationship. In this study, we have designed and validated a new procedure - named binary multiplex RT-qPCR (bmRT-qPCR) - for simultaneous detection and typing of all four genotypes of VHSV by real-time RT-PCR based on dual-labelled probes and composed by two multiplex systems designed for European and American/Asiatic isolates, respectively, using a combination of three different fluorophores. The specificity of the procedure was assessed by including a panel of 81 VHSV isolates covering all known genotypes and subtypes of the virus, and tissue material from experimentally infected rainbow trout, resulting in a correct detection and typing of all strains. The analytical sensitivity was evaluated in a comparative assay with titration in cell culture, observing that both methods provided similar limits of detection. The proposed method can be a powerful tool for epidemiological analysis of VHSV by genotyping unknown samples within a few hours. PMID:25952496

  7. Development of a real-time PCR assay with fluorophore-labelled hybridization probes for detection of Schistosoma mekongi in infected snails and rat feces.

    PubMed

    Sanpool, O; Intapan, P M; Thanchomnang, T; Sri-Aroon, P; Lulitanond, V; Sadaow, L; Maleewong, W

    2012-09-01

    Schistosoma mekongi, a blood-dwelling fluke, is a water-borne parasite that is found in communities along the lower Mekong River basin, i.e. Cambodia and Lao People's Democratic Republic. This study developed a real-time PCR assay combined with melting-curve analysis to detect S. mekongi in laboratory setting conditions, in experimentally infected snails, and in fecal samples of infected rats. The procedure is based on melting-curve analysis of a hybrid between an amplicon from S. mekongi mitochondrion sequence, the 260 bp sequence specific to S. mekongi, and specific fluorophore-labelled probes. This method could detect as little as a single cercaria artificially introduced into a pool of 10 non-infected snails, a single cercaria in filtered paper, and 2 eggs inoculated in 100 mg of non-infected rat feces. All S. mekongi-infected snails and fecal samples from infected rats were positive. Non-infected snails, non-infected rat feces, and genomic DNA of other parasites were negative. The method gave high sensitivity and specificity, and could be applied as a fast and reliable tool for cercarial location in water environments in endemic areas and for epidemiological studies and eradication programmes for intermediate hosts. PMID:22717071

  8. Carbon dots as a fluorescent probe for label-free detection of physiological potassium level in human serum and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingyang; Chen, Shenna; Zhao, Qian; Huang, Haowen

    2015-06-23

    A unique photoluminescence carbon dots (CDs) with larger size were prepared by microwave-assisted method. Complex functional groups on the surface of the CDs facilitate the nanoparticles to form affinity with some metal ions. Taking advantage of the effective fluorescence quenching effect of K(+), a highly sensitive CD-based fluorescence analytical system for label-free detection of K(+) with limit of detection (LOD) 1.0×10(-12) M was established. The concentrations of potassium ion in biological samples such as human serum are usually found at millimolar levels or even higher. The proposed method begins with a substantial dilution of the sample to place the K(+) concentration in the dynamic range for quantification, which covers 3 orders of magnitude. This offers some advantages: the detection of K(+) only needs very small quantities of biological samples, and the dilution of samples such as serum may effectively eliminate the potential interferences that often originate from the background matrix. The determined potassium levels were satisfactory and closely comparable with the results given by the hospital, indicating that this fluorescent probe is applicable to detection of physiological potassium level with high accuracy. Compared with other relative biosensors requiring modified design, bio-molecular modification or/and sophisticated instruments, this CD-based sensor is very simple, cost-effective and easy detection, suggesting great potential applications for successively monitoring physiological potassium level and the change in biological system. PMID:26092345

  9. Simultaneous electrochemical detection of cervical cancer markers using reduced graphene oxide-tetraethylene pentamine as electrode materials and distinguishable redox probes as labels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Guo, Aiping; Guo, Zhankui; Xie, Lili; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2014-04-15

    A novel, highly sensitive electrochemical immunoassay was proposed for the simultaneous determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) for the diagnosis of cervical cancer. Using an electrochemical analysis technique, two well-separated peaks were generated by neutral red and thionine, making the simultaneous detection of the two analytes on the electrode possible. Reduced graphene oxide-tetraethylene pentamine (rGO-TEPA), containing more amino groups, was of benefit to immobilize the primary antibody (Ab1) through an amidation reaction. Au@mesoporous carbon CMK-3 was synthesized and incubated with two secondary antibodies (Ab2) and different redox probes (neutral red and thionine) to fabricate the electrochemical immunosensor label intending to improve the analytical performance of the immunosensor. The immunosensor was prepared with a sandwich structure based on the peak current change of neutral red and thionine before and after the antigen-antibody reaction. The results showed that the immunosensor had a wide linear range, low detection limit, good reproducibility and stability. The method has been applied to the analysis of serum samples with satisfactory results. PMID:24333936

  10. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carboxystyryl)benzene as a probe for β-amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Matveev, Sergey V; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M; Fazio, Robert C; Watt, David S; LeVine, Harry

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[(3)H]-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils. PMID:25452000

  11. /sup 125/I-FK 33-824: a selective probe for radioautographic labeling of mu opioid receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Moyse, E.; Pasquini, F.; Quirion, R.; Beaudet, A.

    1986-03-01

    The selectivity of the Met-enkephalin analog FK 33-824 (FK) for mu opioid receptors has been, over the years, a matter of controversy. We report here pharmacological and radioautographic data demonstrating that at nanomolar concentrations. /sup 125/I-FK interacts exclusively with mu sites. (1) Specific binding of /sup 125/I-FK to rat striatal membranes is totally inhibited by mu- and/or delta-preferring ligands according to monovalent, Michaelian kinetics, with a potency proportional to the affinity of competing drugs for mu receptors. (2) Unlabeled FK competes only at high concentration with the delta-selective ligand 3H-DPLPE and according to the same kinetics as the mu-selective agonist DAGO. (3) /sup 125/I-FK generates the same regional radioautographic labeling pattern as 3H-DAGO. We conclude that when used at nanomolar concentrations /sup 125/I-FK constitutes a selective probe for the radioautographic detection of mu opioid receptors at both light and electron microscopic levels.

  12. Differentiating inflamed and normal lungs by the apparent reaction rate constants of lactate dehydrogenase probed by hyperpolarized 13C labeled pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, He N.; Kadlececk, Stephen; Shaghaghi, Hoora; Zhao, Huaqing; Profka, Harilla; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Rizi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically translatable hyperpolarized (HP) 13C-NMR can probe in vivo enzymatic reactions, e.g., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-catalyzed reaction by injecting HP 13C-pyruvate into the subject, which is converted to 13C labeled lactate by the enzyme. Parameters such as 13C-lactate signals and lactate-to-pyruvate signal ratio are commonly used for analyzing the HP 13C-NMR data. However, the biochemical/biological meaning of these parameters remains either unclear or dependent on experimental settings. It is preferable to quantify the reaction rate constants with a clearer physical meaning. Here we report the extraction of the kinetic parameters of the LDH reaction from HP 13C-NMR data and investigate if they can be potential predictors of lung inflammation. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats (12 controls, 14 treated) were used. One dose of bleomycin (2.5 U/kg) was administered intratracheally to the treatment group. The lungs were removed, perfused, and observed by the HP-NMR technique, where a HyperSense dynamic nuclear polarization system was used to generate the HP 13C-pyruvate for injecting into the lungs. A 20 mm 1H/13C dual-tuned coil in a 9.4-T Varian vertical bore NMR spectrometer was employed to acquire the 13C spectral data every 1 s over a time period of 300 s using a non-selective, 15-degree radiofrequency pulse. The apparent rate constants of the LDH reaction and their ratio were quantified by applying ratiometric fitting analysis to the time series data of 13C labeled pyruvate and lactate. Results The apparent forward rate constant kp=(3.67±3.31)×10−4 s−1, reverse rate constant kl=(4.95±2.90)×10−2 s−1, rate constant ratio kp/kl=(7.53±5.75)×10−3 for the control lungs; kp=(11.71±4.35)×10−4 s−1, kl=(9.89±3.89)×10−2 s−1, and kp/kl=(12.39±4.18)×10−3 for the inflamed lungs at the 7th day post treatment. Wilcoxon rank-sum test showed that the medians of these kinetic parameters of the 7-day cohort were significantly

  13. Evaluation of a fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide probe targeting 23S rRNA for in situ detection of Salmonella serovars in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and their rapid identification in bacterial smears.

    PubMed Central

    Nordentoft, S; Christensen, H; Wegener, H C

    1997-01-01

    A method for the detection of Salmonella based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been developed and applied for the direct detection of Salmonella in pure cultures and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. On the basis of the 23S rRNA gene sequences representing all of the S. enterica subspecies and S. bongori, an 18-mer oligonucleotide probe was selected. The specificity of the probe was tested by in situ hybridization to bacterial cell smears of pure cultures. Forty-nine of 55 tested Salmonella serovars belonging to subspecies I, II, IIIb, IV, and VI hybridized with the probe. The probe did not hybridize to serovars from subspecies IIIa (S. arizonae) or to S. bongori. No cross-reaction to 64 other strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae or 18 other bacterial strains outside this family was observed. The probe was tested with sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from experimentally infected mice or from animals with a history of clinical salmonellosis. In these tissue sections the probe hybridized specifically to Salmonella serovars, allowing for the detection of single bacterial cells. The development of a fluorescence-labelled specific oligonucleotide probe makes the FISH technique a promising tool for the rapid identification of S. enterica in bacterial smears, as well as for the detection of S. enterica in histological tissue sections. PMID:9316923

  14. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pusey, Marc; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent. PMID:26144224

  15. Unsupervised Identification of Isotope-Labeled Peptides.

    PubMed

    Goldford, Joshua E; Libourel, Igor G L

    2016-06-01

    In vivo isotopic labeling coupled with high-resolution proteomics is used to investigate primary metabolism in techniques such as stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) and peptide-based metabolic flux analysis (PMFA). Isotopic enrichment of carbon substrates and intracellular metabolism determine the distribution of isotopes within amino acids. The resulting amino acid mass distributions (AMDs) are convoluted into peptide mass distributions (PMDs) during protein synthesis. With no a priori knowledge on metabolic fluxes, the PMDs are therefore unknown. This complicates labeled peptide identification because prior knowledge on PMDs is used in all available peptide identification software. An automated framework for the identification and quantification of PMDs for nonuniformly labeled samples is therefore lacking. To unlock the potential of peptide labeling experiments for high-throughput flux analysis and other complex labeling experiments, an unsupervised peptide identification and quantification method was developed that uses discrete deconvolution of mass distributions of identified peptides to inform on the mass distributions of otherwise unidentifiable peptides. Uniformly (13)C-labeled Escherichia coli protein was used to test the developed feature reconstruction and deconvolution algorithms. The peptide identification was validated by comparing MS(2)-identified peptides to peptides identified from PMDs using unlabeled E. coli protein. Nonuniformly labeled Glycine max protein was used to demonstrate the technology on a representative sample suitable for flux analysis. Overall, automatic peptide identification and quantification were comparable or superior to manual extraction, enabling proteomics-based technology for high-throughput flux analysis studies. PMID:27145348

  16. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:26061541

  17. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:26061541

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of phosphorescent oligonucleotide probes for hybridisation assays.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Paul J; Burke, Martina; Soini, Aleksi E; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2002-11-01

    Monofunctional, p-isothiocyanatophenyl-derivatives of platinum (II)-coproporphyrin-I (PtCP-NCS) were evaluated as phosphorescent labelling reagents for synthetic oligonucleotides containing a 3'- or 5'-amino modification. Synthesis and purification conditions were optimised to generate high yields and purity of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotide probes. Phosphorescent properties of the PtCP label have been shown to be largely unaffected by conjugation to oligonucleotides of various length, GC composition and label attachment site. 5'-PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides were shown to work efficiently as primers in a standard PCR. A dedicated 532 nm laser-based time-resolved fluorescence plate reader enabled highly sensitive detection of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides and PCR products, both in solution and in agarose gels, with limits of detection in the order of 0.3 pM. A model system employing two complementary oligonucleotides labelled with PtCP and QSY 7 dye (dark quencher) showed strong (approximately 20-fold) and specific proximity quenching of PtCP label upon hybridisation in solution. The potential applications of PtCP-labelled probes in hybridisation assays were discussed. PMID:12409473

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of phosphorescent oligonucleotide probes for hybridisation assays

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Paul J.; Burke, Martina; Soini, Aleksi E.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2002-01-01

    Monofunctional, p-isothiocyanatophenyl-derivatives of platinum (II)-coproporphyrin-I (PtCP-NCS) were evaluated as phosphorescent labelling reagents for synthetic oligonucleotides containing a 3′- or 5′-amino modification. Synthesis and purification conditions were optimised to generate high yields and purity of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotide probes. Phosphorescent properties of the PtCP label have been shown to be largely unaffected by conjugation to oligonucleotides of various length, GC composition and label attachment site. 5′-PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides were shown to work efficiently as primers in a standard PCR. A dedicated 532 nm laser-based time-resolved fluorescence plate reader enabled highly sensitive detection of PtCP-labelled oligonucleotides and PCR products, both in solution and in agarose gels, with limits of detection in the order of 0.3 pM. A model system employing two complementary oligonucleotides labelled with PtCP and QSY® 7 dye (dark quencher) showed strong (∼20-fold) and specific proximity quenching of PtCP label upon hybridisation in solution. The potential applications of PtCP-labelled probes in hybridisation assays were discussed. PMID:12409473

  20. Design principles and theory of paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for (19)F magnetic resonance: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; De Luca, Elena; Hogg, Naomi H M; Kenwright, Alan M; Kuprov, Ilya; Parker, David; Botta, Mauro; Wilson, J Ian; Blamire, Andrew M

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis and spectroscopic properties of a series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes (Ln=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) with amide-substituted ligands based on 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane are described. The theoretical contributions of the (19)F magnetic relaxation processes in these systems are critically assessed and selected volumetric plots are presented. These plots allow an accurate estimation of the increase in the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation as a function of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the fluorine nucleus, the applied magnetic field, and the re-rotational correlation time of the complex, for a given Ln(III) ion. Selected complexes exhibit pH-dependent chemical shift behaviour, and a pK(a) of 7.0 was determined in one example based on the holmium complex of an ortho-cyano DO3A-monoamide ligand, which allowed the pH to be assessed by measuring the difference in chemical shift (varying by over 14 ppm) between two (19)F resonances. Relaxation analyses of variable-temperature and variable-field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopy experiments are reported, aided by identification of salient low-energy conformers by using density functional theory. The study of fluorine relaxation rates, over a field range of 4.7 to 16.5 T allowed precise computation of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the CF(3) reporter group by using global fitting methods. The sensitivity benefits of using such paramagnetic fluorinated probes in (19)F NMR spectroscopic studies are quantified in preliminary spectroscopic and imaging experiments with respect to a diamagnetic yttrium(III) analogue. PMID:19957317

  1. Estimation of free energy barriers in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase reactions probed by hydrogen-exchange kinetics of C alpha-labeled amino acids with solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, D.A.; Wiesinger, H.; Toney, M.D.; Kirsch, J.F. )

    1989-05-02

    The existence of the postulated quinonoid intermediate in the cytoplasmic aspartate amino-transferase catalyzed transamination of aspartate to oxaloacetate was probed by determining the extent of transfer of tritium from the C alpha position of tritiated L-aspartate to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate in single turnover experiments in which washout from the back-reaction was obviated by product trapping. The maximum amount of transferred tritium observed was 0.7%, consistent either with a mechanism in which a fraction of the net transamination reaction proceeds through a quinonoid intermediate or with a mechanism in which this intermediate is formed off the main reaction pathway. It is shown that transfer of labeled hydrogen from the amino acid to cofactor cannot be used to differentiate a stepwise from a concerted transamination mechanism. The amount of tritium transferred is a function of the rate constant for torsional equilibration about the epsilon-amino group of Lys-258, the presumptive abstractor of the C alpha proton; the relative rate constants for hydrogen exchange with solvent versus cofactor protonation; and the tritium isotope effect on this ratio. The free energy barriers facing the covalent intermediate between aldimine and keto acid product (i.e., ketimine and possibly quinonoid) were evaluated relatively by comparing the rates of C alpha-hydrogen exchange in starting amino acid with the rates of keto acid formation. The value of theta (= kexge/kprod) was found to be 2.6 for the reaction of cytoplasmic isozyme with aspartate and ca. 0.5 for that of the mitochondrial form with glutamate.

  2. Europium-decorated graphene quantum dots as a fluorescent probe for label-free, rapid and sensitive detection of Cu(2+) and L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liping; Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Wang, Yiru; Zhao, Li; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Xi

    2015-09-01

    In this work, europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) were prepared by treating three-dimensional Eu-decorated graphene (3D Eu-graphene) via a strong acid treatment. Various characterizations revealed that Eu atoms were successfully complexed with the oxygen functional groups on the surface of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with the atomic ratio of 2.54%. Compared with Eu free GQDs, the introduction of Eu atoms enhanced the electron density and improved the surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. Therefore, the obtained Eu-GQDs were used as a novel "off-on" fluorescent probe for the label-free determination of Cu(2+) and l-cysteine (L-Cys) with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs was quenched in the presence of Cu(2+) owing to the coordination reaction between Cu(2+) and carboxyl groups on the surface of the Eu-GQDs. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs recovered with the subsequent addition of L-Cys because of the strong affinity of Cu(2+) to L-Cys via the Cu-S bond. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence variation of the proposed approach had a good linear relationship in the range of 0.1-10 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.5-50 μM for L-Cys with corresponding detection limits of 0.056 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.31 μM for L-Cys. The current approach also displayed a special response to Cu(2+) and L-Cys over the other co-existing metal ions and amino acids, and the results obtained from buffer-diluted serum samples suggested its applicability in biological samples. PMID:26388385

  3. Reversible and irreversible labeling and autoradiographic localization of the cerebral histamine H2 receptor using ( sup 125 I)iodinated probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruat, M.; Traiffort, E.; Bouthenet, M.L.; Schwartz, J.C.; Hirschfeld, J.; Buschauer, A.; Schunack, W. )

    1990-03-01

    Iodoaminopotentidine (I-APT)--i.e., N-(2-(4-amino-3-iodobenzamido)ethyl)-N'-cyano-N''-(3-(3- (1-piperidinylmethyl)phenoxy)propyl)guanidine--represents one of the most potent H2-receptor antagonists known so far. In membranes of guinea pig brain 125I-APT bound reversibly, selectively, and with high affinity (Kd = 0.3 nM) to a homogeneous population of sites unambiguously identified as H2 receptors by inhibition studies conducted with a large panel of antagonists. 125I-APT binding was also inhibited by histamine, and the effect was modulated by a guanyl nucleotide, which is consistent with the association of the H2 receptor with a guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein. The low nonspecific binding of 125I-APT generated high contrast autoradiographic pictures in brain sections and established the precise distribution of H2 receptors. Their highly heterogeneous distribution and laminated pattern in some areas suggest their major association with neuronal elements. These localizations were more consistent than those of H1 receptors with the distribution of histaminergic projections, indicating that H2 receptors mediate a larger number of postsynaptic actions of histamine--e.g., in striatum. Colocalizations of H1 and H2 receptors in some areas account for their known synergistic interactions in cAMP formation induced by histamine. The distribution of 125I-APT binding sites did not strictly parallel that of the H2-receptor-linked adenylate cyclase activity, which may reflect heterogeneity among H2 receptors. After UV irradiation and SDS/PAGE analysis, (125I)iodoazidopotentidine (125I-AZPT), a photoaffinity probe derived from 125I-APT, was covalently incorporated in several peptides, among which the labeling of two peptides of 59 and 32 kDa was prevented by H2 antagonists, suggesting that they correspond to H2-receptor binding peptides or proteolysis products of the latter.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Sloppy Molecular Beacon and Dual-Labeled Probe Melting Temperature Assays to Identify Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resulting in Rifampin, Fluoroquinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance.

    PubMed

    Roh, Sandy S; Smith, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Via, Laura E; Barry, Clifton E; Alland, David; Chakravorty, Soumitesh

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular assays to detect resistance to Rifampin, the Fluoroquinolones, and Aminoglycosides in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) have been recently described. A systematic approach for comparing these assays in the laboratory is needed in order to determine the relative advantage of each assay and to decide which ones should be advanced to evaluation. We performed an analytic comparison of a Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB) melting temperature (Tm) assay and a Dual labeled probe (DLP) Tm assay. Both assays targeted the M. tuberculosis rpoB, gyrA, rrs genes and the eis promoter region. The sensitivity and specificity to detect mutations, analytic limit of detection (LOD) and the detection of heteroresistance were tested using a panel of 56 clinical DNA samples from drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Both SMB and DLP assays detected 29/29 (100%) samples with rpoB RRDR mutations and 3/3 (100%) samples with eis promoter mutations correctly. The SMB assay detected all 17/17 gyrA mutants and 22/22 rrs mutants, while the DLP assay detected 16/17 (94%) gyrA mutants and 12/22 (55%) rrs mutants. Both assays showed comparable LODs for detecting rpoB and eis mutations; however, the SMB assay LODs were at least two logs better for detecting wild type and mutants in gyrA and rrs targets. The SMB assay was also moderately better at detecting heteroresistance. In summary, both assays appeared to be promising methods to detect drug resistance associated mutations in M. tuberculosis; however, the relative advantage of each assay varied under each test condition. PMID:25938476

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  6. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  7. The Anopheles punctulatus complex: DNA probes for identifying the Australian species using isotopic, chromogenic, and chemiluminescence detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.; Cooper, R.D.; Burkot, T.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Isotopic and enzyme-labeled species-specific DNA probes were made for the three known members of the Anopheles punctulatus complex of mosquitoes in Australia (Anopheles farauti Nos. 1, 2, and 3). Species-specific probes were selected by screening total genomic libraries made from the DNA of individual species with 32P-labeled DNA of homologous and heterologous mosquito species. The 32P-labeled probes for A. farauti Nos. 1 and 2 can detect less than 0.2 ng of DNA while the 32P-labeled probe for A. farauti No. 3 has a sensitivity of 1.25 ng of DNA. Probes were then enzyme labeled for chromogenic and chemiluminescence detection and compared to isotopic detection using 32P-labeled probes. Sequences of the probe repeat regions are presented. Species identifications can be made from dot blots or squashes of freshly killed mosquitoes or mosquitoes stored frozen, dried, and held at room temperature or fixed in isopropanol or ethanol with isotopic, chromogenic, or chemiluminescence detection systems. The use of nonisotopic detection systems will enable laboratories with minimal facilities to identify important regional vectors.

  8. Use of oligodeoxynucleotide signature probes for identification of physiological groups of methylotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, H.C.; Bratina, B.J.; Tsuji, K.; Hanson, R.S. )

    1990-09-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotide sequences that uniquely complemented 16S rRNAs of each group of methylotrophs were synthesized and used as hybridization probes for the identification of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine and ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathways for formaldehyde fixation. The specificity of the probes was determined by hybridizing radiolabeled probes with slot-blotted RNAs of methylotrophs and other eubacteria followed by autoradiography. The washing temperature was determined experimentally to be 50 and 52{degrees}C for 9-{alpha} (serine pathway) and 10-{gamma} (RuMP pathway) probes, respectively. RNAs isolated from serine pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 9-{alpha}, and RNAs from RuMP pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 10-{gamma}. Nonmethylotrophic eubacterial RNAs did not bind to either probe. The probes were also labeled with fluorescent dyes. Cells fixed to microscope slides were hybridized with these probes, washed, and examined in a fluorescence microscope equipped with appropriate filter sets. Cells of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine or RuMP pathway specifically bind probes designed for each group. Samples with a mixture of cells of type I and II methanotrophs were detected and differentiated with single probes or mixed probes labeled with different fluorescent dyes, which enabled the detection of both types of cells in the same microscopic field.

  9. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  10. Transformation of 17β-estradiol in humic acid solution by ε-MnO2 nanorods as probed by high-resolution mass spectrometry combined with (13)C labeling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Liang, Shangtao; Kang, Fuxing; Gao, Yanzheng; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-07-01

    Steroidal estrogens (SEs), widespread in aquatic systems, have a potential to disrupt the endocrine system of wildlife species and humans. In our experiments, the performance of ε-MnO2 nanorods in transforming 17β-estradiol (E2) was investigated, and the effect of humic acid (HA) on the reaction behaviors was systematically characterized. Reconfiguration of humic molecules was also investigated by high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Results indicated that ε-MnO2 nanomaterials ensured efficient removal of E2 from the aqueous solution. The presence of HA hindered the transformation of E2, while enhanced the cross-coupling between E2 and humic molecules. In particular, we used a mixture of un-labeled E2 and (13)C3-labeled E2 at a 1: 1 set ratio (w/w) to probe the reaction products via high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The combination of HRMS and (13)C3-labeling revealed the intermediate products including estrone (E1), and hydroxylated, quinone-like, and ring-opened species, as well as E2 dimer and trimer. More importantly, possible cross-coupling products between E2 and HA were also identified. A reaction mechanism including two-electron oxidation and single-electron oxidation was proposed. The applied analytical approach using HRMS along with (13)C3-labeling for reaction-product identification is crucial to understanding the role of HA in the transformation of SEs. PMID:27086077

  11. Genetically Anchored Fluorescent Probes for Subcellular Specific Imaging of Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiqian; Sizovs, Antons; Wang, Meng C.; Provost, Christopher R.; Huang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Imaging hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at the subcellular resolution will greatly improve the understanding of functions of this signaling molecule. Taking advantage of the protein labeling technologies, we report a general strategy for the development of organelle specific H2S probes, which enables sub-cellular H2S imaging essentially in any organelles of interest. PMID:26806071

  12. Benzimidazole covalent probes and the gastric H(+)/K(+)-ATPase as a model system for protein labeling in a copper-free setting.

    PubMed

    Paresi, Chelsea J; Liu, Qi; Li, Yue-Ming

    2016-05-24

    Affinity probes are useful tools for determining molecular targets and elucidating mechanism of action for novel, bioactive compounds. In the case of covalent inhibitors, activity based probes are particularly valuable for ensuring acceptable selectivity margins. However, there is a variety of bioorthogonal chemistry reactions available for modifying compounds of interest with clickable tags. Here, we describe a direct comparison of tetrazine ligation and strain promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition using benzimidazole based probes to bind their known target, the gastric proton pump, ATP4A. This study validates the use of chemical probes for target identification and illustrates the superior efficiency of tetrazine ligation for copper-free click systems. In addition, we have identified several novel binding partners of benzimidazole probes: Isoform 2 of deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) and three uncharacterized proteins. PMID:26952080

  13. Benzimidazole covalent probes and the gastric H+/K+-ATPase as a model system for protein labeling in a copper-free setting

    PubMed Central

    Paresi, Chelsea J.; Liu, Qi; Li, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Affinity probes are useful tools for determining molecular targets and elucidating mechanism of action for novel, bioactive compounds. In the case of covalent inhibitors, activity based probes are particularly valuable for ensuring acceptable selectivity margins. However, there is a variety of bioorthogonalchemisty reactions available for modifying compounds of interest with clickable tags. Here, we describe a direct comparison of tetrazine ligation and strain promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition using benzimidazole based probes to bind their known target, the gastric proton pump, ATP4A. This study validates the use of chemical probes for target identification and illustrates the superior efficiency of tetrazine ligation for copper-free click systems. In addition, we have identified several novel binding partners of benzimidazole probes: Isoform 2 of deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) and three uncharacterized proteins. PMID:26952080

  14. Luminescent Probes for Ultrasensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Marras, Salvatore A.E.; Kozlov, Maxim; Wirpsza, Laura; Mustaev, Arkady

    2010-01-01

    Novel amino-reactive derivatives of lanthanide-based luminescent labels of enhanced brightness and metal retention were synthesized and used for the detection of complementary DNA oligonucleotides by molecular beacons. Time-resolved acquisition of the luminescent signal that occurs upon hybridization of the probe to the target enabled the avoidance of short-lived background fluorescence, markedly enhancing the sensitivity of detection, which was less than 1 pM. This value is about 50 to 100 times more sensitive than the level achieved with conventional fluorescence-based molecular beacons, and is 10 to 60 times more sensitive than previously reported for other lanthanide-based hybridization probes. These novel luminescent labels should significantly enhance the sensitivity of all type of nucleic acid hybridization probes, and could dramatically improve the detection limit of other biopolymers and small compounds that are used in a variety of biological applications. PMID:20085336

  15. Using infrared spectroscopy of a nitrile labeled phenylalanine and tryptophan fluorescence to probe the α-MSH peptide's side-chain interactions with a micelle model membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Javier D.; Levonyak, Nicholas S.; Schneider, Sydney C.; Smith, Matthew J.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of α-MSH (Ac-SYSMEHFRWGKPV-NH2) side-chains were biophysically characterized with a micelle model membrane and in model intracellular bacterial conditions using infrared (IR) spectroscopy of a nitrile labeled α-MSH analogue, circular dichroism (CD), and tryptophan fluorescence. Local changes detected by the tryptophan and a nitrile-labeled phenylalanine using fluorescence and infrared spectroscopies, respectively, suggest that the Trp9 side-chain in the conserved core (HisPheArgTrp) of α-MSH is buried in an SDS micellar environment, while Phe(CN)7 does not appear to be buried.

  16. An oligonucleotide-based label-free luminescent switch-on probe for RNA detection utilizing a G-quadruplex-selective iridium(iii) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dik-Lung; Lin, Sheng; Leung, Ka-Ho; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Liu, Li-Juan; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Bourdoncle, Anne; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Wang, Hui-Min David; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-07-01

    We report herein the synthesis and application of a novel G-quadruplex-selective luminescent iridium(iii) complex for the construction of an oligonucleotide-based, label-free, rapid and convenient luminescent RNA detection platform.We report herein the synthesis and application of a novel G-quadruplex-selective luminescent iridium(iii) complex for the construction of an oligonucleotide-based, label-free, rapid and convenient luminescent RNA detection platform. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and spectral data. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00541d

  17. A label-free DNA-templated silver nanocluster probe for fluorescence on-off detection of endonuclease activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yunxia; Zhang, Yaodong; Lu, Lu; Cai, Yanan

    2014-01-15

    Endonuclease cleavage of DNA plays an important role in biological and medicinal chemistry. This study aimed to develop a reliable and sensitive method for nuclease activity assay by combining the high specificity of DNA cleavage reactions with ultrahigh fluorescence turn-on abilities of guanine-rich (G-rich) DNA sequences in proximity to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). The DNA-templated Ag NC (DNA-Ag NC) probe with endonuclease recognition sequence consists of NC and a G-rich probe. The NC probe was designed by adding Ag NC nucleation sequence at the 5'-end. The G-rich probe is the complementary DNA sequence modified by adding a G-rich overhang sequence at the 3'-end. Thus, the fluorescence of DNA-Ag NC probe was activated because of DNA hybridization. When these DNA-Ag NC probes were exposed to the targeted endonucleases, specific DNA cleavages occurred, and pieces of G-rich DNA fragments separated from Ag NCs, resulting in fluorescence turn-off. The endonuclease activity was quantified by monitoring the change in the fluorescence intensity. Detection was demonstrated by assaying EcoRI activity. Under optimized conditions, the fluorescence reduction efficiency was linear with the EcoRI concentration in the range of 5.0×10(-4) U μL(-1) to 3.0×10(-3) U μL(-1), with a detection limit of 3.5×10(-4) U μL(-1), which is much better than or at least comparable with that in previous reports. The potential application of the proposed method for screening endonuclease inhibitors was also demonstrated. The presented assay protocol proved to be convenient, effective, sensitive, and easy in preparing the fluorescent probe. PMID:24001584

  18. Semi-synthesis of labeled proteins for spectroscopic applications.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Lucia; Russomanno, Anna; Romanelli, Alessandra; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of SPPS by Merrifield in the 60s, peptide chemists have considered the possibility of preparing large proteins. The introduction of native chemical ligation in the 90s and then of expressed protein ligation have opened the way to the preparation of synthetic proteins without size limitations. This review focuses on semi-synthetic strategies useful to prepare proteins decorated with spectroscopic probes, like fluorescent labels and stable isotopes, and their biophysical applications. We show that expressed protein ligation, combining the advantages of organic chemistry with the easy and size limitless recombinant protein expression, is an excellent strategy for the chemical synthesis of labeled proteins, enabling a single protein to be functionalized at one or even more distinct positions with different probes. PMID:23282535

  19. CdTe/CdS-MPA quantum dots as fluorescent probes to label yeast cells: synthesis, characterization and conjugation with Concanavalin A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ilka T.; Santos, Camila C.; Benetti, Endi; Tenório, Denise P. L. A.; Cabral Filho, Paulo E.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Fontes, Adriana; Santos, Beate S.; Prates, Renato A.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2012-03-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent human opportunistic pathogenic fungus and one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. In fact, diagnosis of invasive candidiasis presents unique problems. The aim of this work was to evaluate, by fluorescence image analysis, cellular labeling of C. albicans with CdTe/CdS quantum dots conjugated or not to concanavalin A (ConA). Yeast cells were incubated with CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QD) stabilized with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) (emission peak at 530 nm) for 1 hour. In the overall study we observed no morphological alterations. The fluorescence microscopic analysis of the yeast cells showed that the non-functionalized QDs do not label C. albicans cells, while for the QD conjugated to ConA the cells showed a fluorescence profile indicating that the membrane was preferentially marked. This profile was expected since Concanavalin A is a protein that binds specifically to terminal carbohydrate residues at the membrane cell surface. The results suggest that the QD-labeled Candida cells represent a promising tool to open new possibilities for a precise evaluation of fungal infections in pathological conditions.

  20. Biopatterning for label-free detection.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Julie M; Mandal, Sudeep; Nugen, Sam R; Baeumner, Antje J; Erickson, David

    2010-03-01

    We present a biopatterning technique suitable for applications which demand a high degree of surface cleanliness, such as immobilization of biological recognition elements onto label-free biosensors. In the case of label-free biosensing, the mechanism of signal transduction is based on surface bound matter, making them highly sensitive to surface contamination including residues left during the biopatterning process. In this communication we introduce a simple, rapid processing step that removes 98% of the residues that often remain after standard parylene lift-off patterning. Residue-free parylene biopatterning is combined with microfluidics to localize biomolecule immobilization onto the sensing region and to enable multiplexed biopatterning. We demonstrate the applicability of this method to multiplexed label-free detection platforms by patterning nucleic acid capture probes corresponding to the four different serotypes of Dengue virus onto parallel 1D photonic crystal resonator sensors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to quantify surface cleanliness and uniformity. In addition to label-free biosensors, this technique is well suited to other nanobiotechnology patterning applications which demand a pristine, residue-free surface, such as immobilization of enzymes, antibodies, growth factors, or cell cultures. PMID:19939644

  1. Probing of exopolysaccharides with green fluorescence protein-labeled carbohydrate-binding module in Escherichia coli biofilms and flocs induced by bcsB overexpression.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Hong; Ojima, Yoshihiro; Sakka, Makiko; Sakka, Kazuo; Taya, Masahito

    2014-10-01

    Polysaccharides are major structural constituents to develop the three-dimensional architecture of Escherichia coli biofilms. In this study, confocal laser scanning microscopy was applied in combination with a fluorescent probe to analyze the location and arrangement of exopolysaccharide (EPSh) in microcolonies of E. coli K-12 derived strains, formed as biofilms on solid surfaces and flocs in the liquid phase. For this purpose, a novel fluorescent probe was constructed by conjugating a carbohydrate-binding module 3, from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus, with the green fluorescence protein (GFP-CBM3). The GFP-CBM3 fused protein exhibited strong affinity to microcrystalline cellulose. Moreover, GFP-CBM3 specifically bound to cell-dense microcolonies in the E. coli biofilms, and to their flocs induced by bcsB overexpression. Therefore, the fused protein presents as a novel marker for EPSh produced by E. coli cells. Overexpression of bcsB was associated with abundant EPSh production and enhanced E. coli biofilm formation, which was similarly detectable by GFP-CBM3 probing. PMID:24746734

  2. A label-free aptasensor based on polyethyleneimine wrapped carbon nanotubes in situ formed gold nanoparticles as signal probe for highly sensitive detection of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Azadbakht, Azadeh; Roushani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Amir Reza; Menati, Saeid; Derikvand, Zohreh

    2016-11-01

    Herein, a highly sensitive and selective aptamer biosensor for quantitative detection of a model target, dopamine (DA), was developed by using a gold (Au) electrode modified with highly dispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and acid-oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNTs-COOH) functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI). Amine-terminated12-mercaptureprobe (ssDNA1) as a capture probe and specific DA-aptamer (ssDNA2) as a detection probe was immobilized on the surface of a modified electrode via the formation of covalent amide bond and hybridization, respectively. Methylene blue (MB) was used as the redox probe, which was intercalated into the aptamer through the specific interaction with its guanine bases. In the presence of DA, the interaction between aptamer and DA displaced the MB from the electrode surface, rendering a lowered electrochemical signal attributed to decreased amount of adsorbed MB. The developed electrochemical DA aptasensor showed a good linear response to DA from 5 to 300nM with detection limit of 2.1nM. The biosensor also exhibited satisfactory selectivity and could be successfully used to detect DA in blood serum sample. PMID:27524058

  3. NanoSIMS analysis of an isotopically labelled organometallic ruthenium(II) drug to probe its distribution and state in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ronald F S; Escrig, Stéphane; Croisier, Marie; Clerc-Rosset, Stéphanie; Knott, Graham W; Meibom, Anders; Davey, Curt A; Johnsson, Kai; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-11-28

    The in vitro inter- and intra-cellular distribution of an isotopically labelled ruthenium(II)-arene (RAPTA) anti-metastatic compound in human ovarian cancer cells was imaged using nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Ultra-high resolution isotopic images of (13)C, (15)N, and Ru indicate that the phosphine ligand remains coordinated to the ruthenium(II) ion whereas the arene detaches. The complex localizes mainly on the membrane or at the interface between cells which correlates with its anti-metastatic effects. PMID:26426486

  4. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Erlanger, Bernard F.; Chen, Bi-Xing

    1999-01-01

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example, detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest, detecting a polypeptide such as those expressed by infectious agents, fungi or parasites.

  5. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, B.F.; Chen, B.

    1999-07-20

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example, detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest, detecting a polypeptide such as those expressed by infectious agents, fungi or parasites. 25 figs.

  6. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, Bernard F.; Chen, Bi-Xing

    1997-01-01

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest.

  7. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, B.F.; Chen, B.X.

    1997-07-22

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest. 8 figs.

  8. Thiazole orange as a fluorescent probe: Label-free and selective detection of silver ions based on the structural change of i-motif DNA at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bei Hua; Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Na; Shi, Yan; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-08-15

    Silver ions have been widely applied to many fields and have harmful effects on environments and human health. Herein, a label-free optical sensor for Ag(+) detection is constructed based on thiazole orange (TO) as a fluorescent probe for the recognition of i-motif DNA structure change at neutral pH. Ag(+) can fold a C-rich single stranded DNA sequence into i-motif DNA structure at neutral pH and that folding is reversible by chelation with cysteine (Cys). The DNA folding process can be indicated by the fluorescence change of TO, which is non-fluorescent in free molecule state and emits strong fluorescence after the incorporation with i-motif DNA. Thus, a rapid, sensitive, and selective method for the detection of Ag(+) and Cys is developed with a detection limit of 17 and 280nM, respectively. It is worth noting that the mechanism underlying the increase of the fluorescence of thiazole orange in the presence of i-motif structure is explained. Moreover, a fluorescent DNA logic gate is successfully designed based on the Ag(+)/Cys-mediated reversible fluorescence changes. The proposed detection strategy is label-free and economical. In addition, this system shows a great promise for i-motif/TO complex to analyze Ag(+) in the real samples. PMID:27260446

  9. LC-quadrupole/Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry enables stable isotope-resolved simultaneous quantification and ¹³C-isotopic labeling of acyl-coenzyme A thioesters.

    PubMed

    Frey, Alexander J; Feldman, Daniel R; Trefely, Sophie; Worth, Andrew J; Basu, Sankha S; Snyder, Nathaniel W

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesters are evolutionarily conserved, compartmentalized, and energetically activated substrates for biochemical reactions. The ubiquitous involvement of acyl-CoA thioesters in metabolism, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid degradation, and cholesterol metabolism highlights the broad applicability of applied measurements of acyl-CoA thioesters. However, quantitation of acyl-CoA levels provides only one dimension of metabolic information and a more complete description of metabolism requires the relative contribution of different precursors to individual substrates and pathways. Using two distinct stable isotope labeling approaches, acyl-CoA thioesters can be labeled with either a fixed [(13)C3(15)N1] label derived from pantothenate into the CoA moiety or via variable [(13)C] labeling into the acyl chain from metabolic precursors. Liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole/Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry using parallel reaction monitoring, but not single ion monitoring, allowed the simultaneous quantitation of acyl-CoA thioesters by stable isotope dilution using the [(13)C3(15)N1] label and measurement of the incorporation of labeled carbon atoms derived from [(13)C6]-glucose, [(13)C5(15)N2]-glutamine, and [(13)C3]-propionate. As a proof of principle, we applied this method to human B cell lymphoma (WSU-DLCL2) cells in culture to precisely describe the relative pool size and enrichment of isotopic tracers into acetyl-, succinyl-, and propionyl-CoA. This method will allow highly precise, multiplexed, and stable isotope-resolved determination of metabolism to refine metabolic models, characterize novel metabolism, and test modulators of metabolic pathways involving acyl-CoA thioesters. PMID:26968563

  10. A novel nanocatalytic SERS detection of trace human chorionic gonadotropin using labeled-free Vitoria blue 4R as molecular probe.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guiqing; Liang, Xiaojing; Liu, Qingye; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2016-11-15

    In pH 7.4 Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution containing the peptide probes for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were aggregated to big AgNPs clusters that exhibited very weak catalytic effect on the gold nanoparticle reaction of H2O2-HAuCl4. When hCG was present in the peptide probe solution, the AgNPs did not aggregate and it had strong catalytic effect on the gold nanoparticle reaction with a strong resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) peak at 370nm and a strong surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) peak at 1615cm(-1) in the presence of molecular probe of Victoria blue 4R (VB4R). With the increase of the hCG concentration, the catalysis enhanced due to the nanocatalyst of AgNPs increasing, and the RRS intensity increased at 370nm. The increased RRS intensity was linear to the hCG concentration in 0.05-10ng/mL, with a linear regression equation of ΔI370nm=409.8C +294. And the SERS intensity at 1615cm(-1) increased linearly with the hCG concentration in the range of 0.05-20ng/mL, with a linear regression equation of ΔI1615cm-1=142C+134. Based on this, two new methods of nanocatalytic SERS and RRS were proposed for the determination of trace hCG. PMID:27208477

  11. A potential fluorescent probe: Maillard reaction product from glutathione and ascorbic acid for rapid and label-free dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiang Xue; Song, Xiao Fang; Shi, Yan; Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Bang Lin; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-07-15

    Maillard reactions and their fluorescent products have drawn much attention in the fields of food and life science, however, the application of fluorescent products separated from the reaction as an indicator for detection of certain substances in sensor field has not been mentioned. In this article, we report on an easy-to-synthesize and water-soluble fluorescent probe separated from the typical Maillard reaction products of glutathione and ascorbic acid, with excellent stability and high quantum yield (18.2%). The further application of the probe has been explored for dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols including cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione, which is based on Hg(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching of the Maillard reaction fluorescent products (MRFPs) and the fluorescence recovery as the introduction of biothiols. This sensing system exhibits a good selectivity and sensitivity, and the linear ranges for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 0.05-12, 0.5-10, 0.3-20, and 0.3-20μM, respectively. The detection limits for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 22, 47, 96, and 30nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. Furthermore, the practical applications of this sensor for Hg(2+) and biothiols determination in water samples and human plasma sample have been demonstrated with satisfactory results. PMID:27015151

  12. A comparison of two methods for colorimetric in situ hybridization using paraffin-embedded tissue sections and digoxigenin-labeled hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marcino, Joe

    2013-06-01

    Two methods for colorimetric in situ DNA probe hybridization (CISH) assays on paraffin-embedded tissue sections were compared. The heated method used heat (90-100°C) to denature DNA in the sample prior to probe hybridization, while the unheated method used a standard hybridization temperature of 42°C. Both procedures were tested on tissue samples that harbored the mollusk protozoan pathogens Perkinsus marinus, P. chesapeaki, or Haplosporidium nelsoni, the protozoan and bacterial fish pathogens Myxobolus cerebralis (myxosporidean) or Renibacterium salmoninarum (bacterial), or the crab viral pathogen Callinectes sapidus reovirus. Samples were fixed in either formalin or Davidson's fixative and embedded in paraffin for histological examination. The heated method is labor intensive and highly prone to human error, while the unheated method is less labor intensive and can be completed in a shorter period of time. Both methods yielded similar hybridization results. The use of complex and expensive prehybridization buffers did not improve the performances of the tested CISH assays. Prehybridization heat denaturation of DNA in assayed samples increased both assay duration and loss of samples but did not improve hybridization signals. PMID:23697605

  13. Studies of inactivation, retardation and accumulation of viruses in porous media by a combination of dye labeled and native bacteriophage probes.

    PubMed

    Gitis, Vitaly; Dlugy, Christina; Gun, Jenny; Lev, Ovadia

    2011-06-01

    Penetration of viruses through soils is governed by the processes of transport, reversible adsorption, accumulation and inactivation. Until now, it was difficult to decouple the latter two processes and accurately predict viral fate. The present work describes a novel method-tracer studies with a mixture of native and fluorescent-dyed bacteriophages-that facilitates parallel quantification of the two processes. When the native phages are experiencing both accumulation and inactivation, the labeled ones are inactivated already and therefore can only be accumulated. Thus the effect of inactivation is applicable to native bacteriophages only and depletion of phage concentration due to inactivation can be elucidated from a total phage balance. The novel approach is exemplified by batch and column studies of the effects of temperature, pH, and saturation, on inactivation of MS2 bacteriophage. A three-parameter model accounting for inactivation, reversible adsorption (i.e., retardation), and accumulation is implemented. PMID:21429617

  14. Bioconjugation of Antibodies and Enzyme Labels onto Magnetic Beads.

    PubMed

    Otieno, B A; Krause, C E; Rusling, J F

    2016-01-01

    Immunoassays employ antibodies and labels to capture and detect target macromolecular analytes, often from complex sample matrices such as serum, plasma, or saliva. The high affinity and specificity of antibody-antigen interactions makes immunoassays critically important analytical techniques for clinical diagnostics as well as other research applications in the areas of pharmaceutical and environmental analysis. Integration of magnetic beads (MBs) into immunoassays and other bioanalytical methodologies is a valuable approach to allow efficient target capture, enrichment, and convenient separation. In addition, large signal amplification can be achieved by preconcentration of the target and by attaching many thousands of enzyme labels to the MBs. These features have enabled MB-based biosensors to achieve ultra-low detection limits needed for advanced clinical diagnostics that are challenging or impossible using traditional immunoassays. MBs are employed either as mobile substrates for target analyte capture, as detection labels (or label carriers), or simultaneously as substrates and labels. For optimal assay performance, it is crucial to apply an easy, efficient, and robust bead-probe conjugation protocol, and to thoroughly characterize the bioconjugated products. Herein, we describe methods used in our laboratory to functionalize MBs with antibodies and enzyme labels for ultrasensitive detection of protein analytes. We also present detailed strategies for characterizing the MB bioconjugates. PMID:27112398

  15. A Fluorescence-Labeled Heptapeptide, (FITC)KP6, as an Efficient Probe for the Specific Detection of Oxidized and Minimally Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Ueda, Chiemi; Kimura, Ryu; Kobayashi, Chisato; Yamazaki, Yoji; Ebina, Keiichi

    2016-05-01

    Two oxidized forms of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) and minimally modified LDL (MM-LDL), are believed to play a major role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Recently, we reported that a heptapeptide (Lys-Trp-Tyr-Lys-Asp-Gly-Asp, KP6) coupled through the ε-amino group of N-terminus Lys to fluorescein isothiocyanate, (FITC)KP6, bound to ox-LDL but not to LDL. In the present study, we investigated whether (FITC)KP6 could be used as a fluorescent probe for the specific detection of MM-LDL and ox-LDL. Results from polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance proved that (FITC)KP6 could efficiently bind to MM-LDL as well as ox-LDL in a dose-dependent manner and with high affinity (K D = 3.16 and 3.54 ng/mL protein for MM-LDL and ox-LDL, respectively). (FITC) KP6 bound to lysophosphatidylcholine and oxidized phosphatidylcholine, both present abundantly in ox-LDL and MM-LDL, respectively. In vitro, (FITC)KP6 was detected on the surface and/or in the cytosol of human THP-1-derived macrophages incubated with ox-LDL and MM-LDL, but not LDL. These results suggest that (FITC)KP6 could be an efficient fluorescent probe for the specific detection of ox-LDL and MM-LDL and can therefore contribute to the identification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27063871

  16. Structure and pH-Induced Structural Rearrangements of the Putative Multidrug Efflux Pump EmrD in Liposomes Probed by Site-directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Trone, Kristin E.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2013-01-01

    EmrD is the only structurally characterized drug/H+ antiporter of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). It has been crystallized in a doubly-occluded conformation that is considered representative of an intermediate state in the transport cycle of MFS transporters. However, unexpected features of the crystal structure and the lack of functional information available for EmrD limit the utility of the structural data. To assess whether the crystal structure represents a stable state in a native-like environment, we used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the mobility and accessibility of spin labels at 76 positions in six transmembrane (TM) helices of EmrD reconstituted in liposomes. While the EPR data were mostly consistent with the crystal structure, they also revealed significant deviations from the predicted orientation and topology of TM helices at several locations. Additionally, we were unable to reproduce EmrD-dependent multidrug resistance phenotypes in vitro and in cell-based assays of drug transport. In spite of structural and functional discrepancies, we mapped a pH-dependent conformational change in which the cytoplasmic side of the N-terminal half opened locally in response to protonation. This conformational switch is consistent with the expected pH-dependent behavior of MFS H+-coupled antiporters. PMID:24148002

  17. Structural transitions in full-length human prion protein detected by xenon as probe and spin labeling of the N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sunilkumar Puthenpurackal; Nair, Divya Gopalakrishnan; Schaal, Daniel; Barbosa de Aguiar, Marisa; Wenzel, Sabine; Kremer, Werner; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fatal neurodegenerative disorders termed transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are associated with the accumulation of fibrils of misfolded prion protein PrP. The noble gas xenon accommodates into four transiently enlarged hydrophobic cavities located in the well-folded core of human PrP(23-230) as detected by [(1)H, (15)N]-HSQC spectroscopy. In thermal equilibrium a fifth xenon binding site is formed transiently by amino acids A120 to L125 of the presumably disordered N-terminal domain and by amino acids K185 to T193 of the well-folded domain. Xenon bound PrP was modelled by restraint molecular dynamics. The individual microscopic and macroscopic dissociation constants could be derived by fitting the data to a model including a dynamic opening and closing of the cavities. As observed earlier by high pressure NMR spectroscopy xenon binding influences also other amino acids all over the N-terminal domain including residues of the AGAAAAGA motif indicating a structural coupling between the N-terminal domain and the core domain. This is in agreement with spin labelling experiments at positions 93 or 107 that show a transient interaction between the N-terminus and the start of helix 2 and the end of helix 3 of the core domain similar to that observed earlier by Zn(2+)-binding to the octarepeat motif. PMID:27341298

  18. Probing of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cell using in situ aggregates of Au-NPs as SERS label created by plasmon exciting hybrid- TEM*11 laser mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Mehta, D. S.; Saraswati, S.; Shakher, C.

    2012-02-01

    Apart from commonly employed target-specific labeling/adsorption of antibodies over Au-NPs surface for the creation of localized aggregates, an alternative approach using optical tweezers (OT) driven by hybrid-TEM*11 mode has been devised and exploited for in vitro detection of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells (EAC) relying on enhanced scattering. Intra-cavity generated spatially featured asymmetric (SFA) laser beam (λ = 532 nm) has effected simultaneous trapping of mice-EAC cells and in-situ crowd/assembly of incubated Au-NPs/small gold nano-aggregates (created from two or more individual Au-NPs). Relatively larger focus spot created by tightly focused SFA beam than frequently employed Gaussian-mode in OT has offered an extended working area and hence dilute heating has taken care of EAC cells. GNA improves significantly the sensitivity of diagnostics relying on scattered light and the safety and efficacy of therapeutic nanotechnologies for the diseases of cancer and vascular system in medicine.

  19. Structural transitions in full-length human prion protein detected by xenon as probe and spin labeling of the N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sunilkumar Puthenpurackal; Nair, Divya Gopalakrishnan; Schaal, Daniel; Barbosa de Aguiar, Marisa; Wenzel, Sabine; Kremer, Werner; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fatal neurodegenerative disorders termed transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are associated with the accumulation of fibrils of misfolded prion protein PrP. The noble gas xenon accommodates into four transiently enlarged hydrophobic cavities located in the well-folded core of human PrP(23–230) as detected by [1H, 15N]-HSQC spectroscopy. In thermal equilibrium a fifth xenon binding site is formed transiently by amino acids A120 to L125 of the presumably disordered N-terminal domain and by amino acids K185 to T193 of the well-folded domain. Xenon bound PrP was modelled by restraint molecular dynamics. The individual microscopic and macroscopic dissociation constants could be derived by fitting the data to a model including a dynamic opening and closing of the cavities. As observed earlier by high pressure NMR spectroscopy xenon binding influences also other amino acids all over the N-terminal domain including residues of the AGAAAAGA motif indicating a structural coupling between the N-terminal domain and the core domain. This is in agreement with spin labelling experiments at positions 93 or 107 that show a transient interaction between the N-terminus and the start of helix 2 and the end of helix 3 of the core domain similar to that observed earlier by Zn2+-binding to the octarepeat motif. PMID:27341298

  20. A versatile toolbox for posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anupam A.; Tanpure, Arun A.; Mukherjee, Progya P.; Athavale, Soumitra; Kelkar, Ashwin; Galande, Sanjeev; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular RNA labeling strategies based on bioorthogonal chemical reactions are much less developed in comparison to glycan, protein and DNA due to its inherent instability and lack of effective methods to introduce bioorthogonal reactive functionalities (e.g. azide) into RNA. Here we report the development of a simple and modular posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging technique for RNA by using a novel toolbox comprised of azide-modified UTP analogs. These analogs facilitate the enzymatic incorporation of azide groups into RNA, which can be posttranscriptionally labeled with a variety of probes by click and Staudinger reactions. Importantly, we show for the first time the specific incorporation of azide groups into cellular RNA by endogenous RNA polymerases, which enabled the imaging of newly transcribing RNA in fixed and in live cells by click reactions. This labeling method is practical and provides a new platform to study RNA in vitro and in cells. PMID:26384420

  1. A versatile toolbox for posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging of RNA.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Anupam A; Tanpure, Arun A; Mukherjee, Progya P; Athavale, Soumitra; Kelkar, Ashwin; Galande, Sanjeev; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2016-01-29

    Cellular RNA labeling strategies based on bioorthogonal chemical reactions are much less developed in comparison to glycan, protein and DNA due to its inherent instability and lack of effective methods to introduce bioorthogonal reactive functionalities (e.g. azide) into RNA. Here we report the development of a simple and modular posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging technique for RNA by using a novel toolbox comprised of azide-modified UTP analogs. These analogs facilitate the enzymatic incorporation of azide groups into RNA, which can be posttranscriptionally labeled with a variety of probes by click and Staudinger reactions. Importantly, we show for the first time the specific incorporation of azide groups into cellular RNA by endogenous RNA polymerases, which enabled the imaging of newly transcribing RNA in fixed and in live cells by click reactions. This labeling method is practical and provides a new platform to study RNA in vitro and in cells. PMID:26384420

  2. A covalent approach for site-specific RNA labeling in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Fahui; Dong, Jianshu; Hu, Xiaosong; Gong, Weimin; Li, Jiasong; Shen, Jing; Tian, Huifang; Wang, Jiangyun

    2015-04-01

    Advances in RNA research and RNA nanotechnology depend on the ability to manipulate and probe RNA with high precision through chemical approaches, both in vitro and in mammalian cells. However, covalent RNA labeling methods with scope and versatility comparable to those of current protein labeling strategies are underdeveloped. A method is reported for the site- and sequence-specific covalent labeling of RNAs in mammalian cells by using tRNA(Ile2) -agmatidine synthetase (Tias) and click chemistry. The crystal structure of Tias in complex with an azide-bearing agmatine analogue was solved to unravel the structural basis for Tias/substrate recognition. The unique RNA sequence specificity and plastic Tias/substrate recognition enable the site-specific transfer of azide/alkyne groups to an RNA molecule of interest in vitro and in mammalian cells. Subsequent click chemistry reactions facilitate the versatile labeling, functionalization, and visualization of target RNA. PMID:25694369

  3. CLAVATA3 Dodecapeptide Modified CdTe Nanoparticles: A Biocompatible Quantum Dot Probe for In Vivo Labeling of Plant Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guanghui; Tan, Yanping; He, Xiangzhu; Qin, Yonghua; Liang, Jiangong

    2014-01-01

    CLAVATA3 (CLV3) dodecapeptides function in plant stem cell maintenance, but CLV3 function in cell-cell communication remains less clear. Here, we coupled CLV3 dodecapeptides to synthesized CdTe nanoparticles to track their bioactivity on stem cells in the root apical meristem. To achieve this, we first synthesized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) using a one-pot method, and then evaluated the cytotoxicity of the QDs in BY-2 cells. The results showed that QDs in plant cells must be used at low concentrations and for short treatment time. To make biocompatible probes to track stem cell fate, we conjugated CLV3 dodecapeptides to the QDs by the zero-coupling method; this modification greatly reduced the cytotoxicity of the QDs. Furthermore, we detected CLV3-QDs localized on the cell membrane, consistent with the known localization of CLV3. Our results indicate that using surface-modified QDs at low concentrations and for short time treatment can improve their utility for plant cell imaging. PMID:24586624

  4. Adaptive scanning probe microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Swartzentruber, B.S.; Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1997-02-01

    This work is comprised of two major sections. In the first section the authors develop multivariate image classification techniques to distinguish and identify surface electronic species directly from multiple-bias scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images. Multiple measurements at each site are used to distinguish and categorize inequivalent electronic or atomic species on the surface via a computerized classification algorithm. Then, comparison with theory or other suitably chosen experimental data enables the identification of each class. They demonstrate the technique by analyzing dual-polarity constant-current topographs of the Ge(111) surface. Just two measurements, negative- and positive-bias topography height, permit pixels to be separated into seven different classes. Labeling four of the classes as adatoms, first-layer atoms, and two inequivalent rest-atom sites, they find excellent agreement with the c(2 x 8) structure. The remaining classes are associated with structural defects and contaminants. This work represents a first step toward developing a general electronic/chemical classification and identification tool for multivariate scanning probe microscopy imagery. In the second section they report measurements of the diffusion of Si dimers on the Si(001) surface at temperatures between room temperature and 128 C using a novel atom-tracking technique that can resolve every diffusion event. The atom tracker employs lateral-positioning feedback to lock the STM probe tip into position above selected atoms with sub-Angstrom precision. Once locked the STM tracks the position of the atoms as they migrate over the crystal surface. By tracking individual atoms directly, the ability of the instrument to measure dynamic events is increased by a factor of {approximately} 1,000 over conventional STM imaging techniques.

  5. Label-free colorimetric biosensing of copper(II) ions with unimolecular self-cleaving deoxyribozymes and unmodified gold nanoparticle probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2010-05-01

    Using unimolecular copper(II)-dependent self-cleaving deoxyribozymes (DNAzymes), a label-free colorimetric biosensor for copper(II) ions (Cu2 + ) has been developed based on the sequence-length-dependent adsorption of single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) on unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In the presence of Cu2 + , the Cu2 + -dependent DNAzyme could be self-cleaved into short ssDNA fragments. The cleaved short ssDNA could adsorb rapidly onto the surface of the AuNPs. This enhanced the stability of the AuNPs against salt-induced aggregation, and thus the solution color remained red. In the absence of Cu2 + , however, uncleaved long ssDNA adsorbed relatively slowly onto the AuNPs and upon the addition of salt, the electrostatic repulsion between the AuNPs was screened, resulting in aggregation of the AuNPs which produced a red-to-blue color change. Thus, Cu2 + detection could be realized by monitoring the color change of the AuNPs. The calibration curve showed that the absorption ratio values at 520 and 620 nm increased linearly over the Cu2 + concentration range of 0.625-15 µM, with a limit of detection of 290 nM. The other environmentally relevant metal ions did not interfere with the determination of Cu2 + . Subsequently, the assay was employed to determine Cu2 + in several water samples, and the results were satisfactory. It is expected that the present colorimetric strategy will be possibly extended to the detection of cofactors of other in vitro-selected unimolecular self-cleaving DNAzymes, such as amino acids, nucleic acids, metal ions and small organic molecules.

  6. Silent, fluorescent labeling of native neuronal receptors.

    PubMed

    Vytla, Devaiah; Combs-Bachmann, Rosamund E; Hussey, Amanda M; Hafez, Ismail; Chambers, James J

    2011-10-21

    We have developed a minimally-perturbing strategy that enables labeling and subcellular visualization of endogenous dendritic receptors on live, wild-type neurons. Specifically, calcium-permeable non-NMDA glutamate receptors expressed in hippocampal neurons can be targeted with this novel synthetic tri-functional molecule. This ligand-directed probe was targeted towards AMPA receptors and bears an electrophilic group for covalent bond formation with an amino acid side chain on the extracellular side of the ion channel. This molecule was designed in such a way that the use-dependent, polyamine-based ligand accumulates the chemically-reactive group at the extracellular side of these polyamine-sensitive receptors, thereby allowing covalent bond formation between an electrophilic moiety on the nanoprobe and a nucleophilic amino acid sidechain on the receptor. Bioconjugation of this molecule results in a stable covalent bond between the nanoprobe and the target receptor. Subsequent photolysis of a portion of the nanoprobe may then be employed to effect ligand release allowing the receptor to re-enter the non-liganded state, all the while retaining the fluorescent beacon for visualization. This technology allows for rapid fluorescent labeling of native polyamine-sensitive receptors and further advances the field of fluorescent labeling of native biological molecules. PMID:21897969

  7. Modeling Formamide Denaturation of Probe-Target Hybrids for Improved Microarray Probe Design in Microbial Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, L. Safak; Loy, Alexander; Wright, Erik S.; Wagner, Michael; Noguera, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Application of high-density microarrays to the diagnostic analysis of microbial communities is challenged by the optimization of oligonucleotide probe sensitivity and specificity, as it is generally unfeasible to experimentally test thousands of probes. This study investigated the adjustment of hybridization stringency using formamide with the idea that sensitivity and specificity can be optimized during probe design if the hybridization efficiency of oligonucleotides with target and non-target molecules can be predicted as a function of formamide concentration. Sigmoidal denaturation profiles were obtained using fluorescently labeled and fragmented 16S rRNA gene amplicon of Escherichia coli as the target with increasing concentrations of formamide in the hybridization buffer. A linear free energy model (LFEM) was developed and microarray-specific nearest neighbor rules were derived. The model simulated formamide melting with a denaturant m-value that increased hybridization free energy (ΔG°) by 0.173 kcal/mol per percent of formamide added (v/v). Using the LFEM and specific probe sets, free energy rules were systematically established to predict the stability of single and double mismatches, including bulged and tandem mismatches. The absolute error in predicting the position of experimental denaturation profiles was less than 5% formamide for more than 90 percent of probes, enabling a practical level of accuracy in probe design. The potential of the modeling approach for probe design and optimization is demonstrated using a dataset including the 16S rRNA gene of Rhodobacter sphaeroides as an additional target molecule. The LFEM and thermodynamic databases were incorporated into a computational tool (ProbeMelt) that is freely available at http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu. PMID:22952791

  8. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  9. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  10. Enhanced vibrational spectroscopy, intracellular refractive indexing for label-free biosensing and bioimaging by multiband plasmonic-antenna array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Chang, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-10-15

    In this study, we report a multiband plasmonic-antenna array that bridges optical biosensing and intracellular bioimaging without requiring a labeling process or coupler. First, a compact plasmonic-antenna array is designed exhibiting a bandwidth of several octaves for use in both multi-band plasmonic resonance-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and refractive index probing. Second, a single-element plasmonic antenna can be used as a multifunctional sensing pixel that enables mapping the distribution of targets in thin films and biological specimens by enhancing the signals of vibrational signatures and sensing the refractive index contrast. Finally, using the fabricated plasmonic-antenna array yielded reliable intracellular observation was demonstrated from the vibrational signatures and intracellular refractive index contrast requiring neither labeling nor a coupler. These unique features enable the plasmonic-antenna array to function in a label-free manner, facilitating bio-sensing and imaging development. PMID:24836017

  11. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Anna M

    2013-01-18

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called diabodies, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  12. Fluorescent Analogue of Batimastat Enables Imaging of α-Secretase in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Leriche, Geoffray; Chen, Allen C; Kim, Sumin; Selkoe, Dennis J; Yang, Jerry

    2016-01-20

    The ADAM family of metalloproteases cleave a diverse range of transmembrane substrates, resulting in the release of their soluble ectodomains. This process of protein shedding, termed α-secretase processing, is involved in many facets of both normal and disease related cellular function. While the processing of substrates has been well documented, the regulation and trafficking of the ADAMs are less well understood. Tools that allow for the study of ADAMs under their native environment will allow for a better understanding of their regulation and activity. Here we describe the design and evaluation of a novel fluorescent analogue of a well-characterized ADAM inhibitor, Batimastat. This probe exhibited similar activity for inhibiting α-secretase processing in cells as did Batimastat. Importantly, this probe specifically labeled ADAMs fluorescently in both fixed and living cells, enabling the possibility to study the trafficking of α-secretase proteins in a dynamic environment. PMID:26559179

  13. Selective amine labeling of cell surface proteins guided by coiled-coil assembly.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yoshiaki; Furukawa, Nami; Ono, Satoshi; Takeda, Yuki; Matsuzaki, Katsumi

    2016-11-01

    Covalent labeling of target proteins in living cells is useful for both fluorescence live-cell imaging and the subsequent biochemical analyses of the proteins. Here, we report an efficient method for the amine labeling of membrane proteins on the cell surface, guided by a noncovalent coiled-coil interaction. A carboxyl sulfosuccinimidyl ester introduced at the C-terminus of the coiled-coil probe reacted with target proteins under mild labeling conditions ([probe] = 150 nM, pH 7.4, 25°C) for 20 min. Various fluorescent moieties with different hydrophobicities are available for covalent labeling with high signal/background labeling ratios. Using this method, oligomeric states of glycophorin A (GpA) were compared in mammalian CHO-K1 cells and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In the cell membranes, no significant self-association of GpA was detected, whereas SDS-PAGE suggested partial dimerization of the proteins. Membrane cholesterol was found to be an important factor that suppressed the dimerization of GpA. Thus, the covalent functionality enables direct comparison of the oligomeric state of membrane proteins under various conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 484-490, 2016. PMID:26285787

  14. Formative Assessment Probes: Labeling versus Explaining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2013-01-01

    In the elementary grades, the butterfly is a commonly used curricular context for children to learn about growth and development of organisms as they progress through their life cycle. "A Framework for K-12 Science Education's" life science core idea LS1.B, Growth and Development of Organisms, states that by the end of grade 5,…

  15. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    PubMed

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface. PMID:21133501

  16. Integrated microfluidic probe station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, C. M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Brastaviceanu, T.; Anderson, K.; Kabakibo, Y.; Juncker, D.

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution—thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet—and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  17. DNA Stains as Surrogate Nucleobases in Fluorogenic Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Hövelmann, Felix; Seitz, Oliver

    2016-04-19

    The increasing importance assigned to RNA dynamics in cells and tissues calls for probe molecules that enable fluorescence microscopy imaging in live cells. To achieve this goal, fluorescence dyes are conjugated with oligonucleotides so as to provide strong emission upon hybridization with the target molecule. The impressive 10(3)-fold fluorescence intensification observed when DNA stains such as thiazole orange (TO) interact with double-stranded DNA is intriguing and prompted the exploration of oligonucleotide conjugates. However, nonspecific interactions of DNA stains with polynucleotides tend to increase background, which would affect the contrast achievable in live-cell imaging. This Account describes the development of DNA-stain-labeled hybridization probes that provide high signal-to-background. We focus on our contributions in context with related advances from other laboratories. The emphasis will be on the requirements of RNA imaging in live cells. To reduce background, intercalator dyes such as TO were appended to peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is less avidly recognized by DNA stains than DNA/RNA. Constraining the TO dye as a nucleobase surrogate in "forced intercalation (FIT) probes" improved the target specificity, presumably by helping to prevent unspecific interactions. The enforcement of TO intercalation between predetermined base pairs upon formation of the probe-target duplex provided for high brightness and enabled match/mismatch selectivity beyond stringency of hybridization. We show examples that highlight the use of PNA FIT probes in the imaging of mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA in living cells. The "FIT approach" was recently extended to DNA probes. Signal brightness can become limiting when low-abundance targets ought to be visualized over cellular autofluorescence. We discuss strategies that further the brightness of signaling by FIT probes. Multilabeling with identical dyes does not solve the brightness issue. To avoid self-quenching, we

  18. Functional investigations on embryonic stem cells labeled with clinically translatable iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Liqin; Cao, Jianbo; Huang, Yue; Lin, Yu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiuqin; Liu, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI correlated well with histological studies. These findings demonstrate that Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles have potential to be clinically translatable MRI probes and may enable non-invasive in vivo tracking of ESCs in experimental and clinical settings during cell-based therapies.Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI

  19. An easy-to-use single-molecule speckle microscopy enabling nanometer-scale flow and wide-range lifetime measurement of cellular actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy has been a powerful method to analyze actin dynamics in live cells by tracking single molecule of fluorescently labeled actin. Recently we developed a new SiMS method, which is easy-to-use for inexperienced researchers and achieves high spatiotemporal resolution. In this method, actin labeled with fluorescent DyLight dye on lysines is employed as a probe. Electroporation-mediated delivery of DyLight-actin (DL-actin) into cells enables to label cells with 100% efficiency at the optimal density. DL-actin labels cellular actin filaments including formin-based structures with improved photostability and brightness compared to green fluorescent protein-actin. These favorable properties of DL-actin extend time window of the SiMS analysis. Furthermore, the new SiMS method enables nanometer-scale displacement analysis with a low localization error of ±8-8.5 nm. With these advantages, our new SiMS microscopy method will help researchers to investigate various actin remodeling processes. In this chapter, we introduce the methods for preparation of DL-actin probes, electroporation to deliver DL-actin, the SiMS imaging and data analysis. PMID:25640423

  20. Relating species and functional diversity using stable isotope probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, J. I.; Rangel-Castro, J. I.; Mahmood, S.; Nicol, G.; Meharg, A. A.; Killham, K. S.

    2004-12-01

    Microbial communities play an essential role in biogeochemical cycles and analysis of laboratory cultures has provided much information on biochemical processes and physiological characteristics of functional groups of microorganisms responsible for these processes. However, the majority of microorganisms cannot be grown readily in laboratory culture and cultivation-independent molecular techniques are required for analysis of community structure and diversity. These techniques have demonstrated considerable microbial diversity in natural communities and have revealed the existence of abundant microorganisms belonging to novel, previously unsuspected microbial groups. Molecular analysis of natural communities typically provides little information on links between specific microorganisms and the biogeochemical processes that they carry out. We are therefore ignorant of the significance of microbial diversity for ecosystem processes and of the ecosystem function of uncultivated, but abundant microbial groups. Stable isotope probing enables identification of which members of a community are involved in the utilisation of specific substrates, particularly carbon substrates. It involves amendment of environmental samples, or field application with 13C-labelled carbon substrates and, after a period of exposure, extraction of nucleic acids and separation of 13C-labelled (heavy) and 12C-labelled (light) nucleic acid pools by density gradient centrifugation. The heavy nucleic acid pool will be derived only from organisms assimilating the labelled substrate.Molecular analysis of this pool provides information on identity and relative abundance of active members of the community. The technique therefore enables in situ functional analysis of microbial groups without the requirement for laboratory cultivation. Stable isotope probing has been used to determine which organisms are involved in the degradation of specific organic substrates, including recalcitrant compounds, and

  1. Quantitative microbial ecology through stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Hungate, Bruce A; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Morrissey, Ember M; Price, Lance B

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria grow and transform elements at different rates, and as yet, quantifying this variation in the environment is difficult. Determining isotope enrichment with fine taxonomic resolution after exposure to isotope tracers could help, but there are few suitable techniques. We propose a modification to stable isotope probing (SIP) that enables the isotopic composition of DNA from individual bacterial taxa after exposure to isotope tracers to be determined. In our modification, after isopycnic centrifugation, DNA is collected in multiple density fractions, and each fraction is sequenced separately. Taxon-specific density curves are produced for labeled and nonlabeled treatments, from which the shift in density for each individual taxon in response to isotope labeling is calculated. Expressing each taxon's density shift relative to that taxon's density measured without isotope enrichment accounts for the influence of nucleic acid composition on density and isolates the influence of isotope tracer assimilation. The shift in density translates quantitatively to isotopic enrichment. Because this revision to SIP allows quantitative measurements of isotope enrichment, we propose to call it quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP). We demonstrated qSIP using soil incubations, in which soil bacteria exhibited strong taxonomic variations in (18)O and (13)C composition after exposure to [(18)O]water or [(13)C]glucose. The addition of glucose increased the assimilation of (18)O into DNA from [(18)O]water. However, the increase in (18)O assimilation was greater than expected based on utilization of glucose-derived carbon alone, because the addition of glucose indirectly stimulated bacteria to utilize other substrates for growth. This example illustrates the benefit of a quantitative approach to stable isotope probing. PMID:26296731

  2. Synthesis and fluorescence characteristics of ATP-based FRET probes.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Norman; Hacker, Stephan M; Marx, Andreas

    2013-12-28

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogues labelled with two dyes suitable for undergoing Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) have the potential to be valuable tools to continuously study the enzymatic activity of ATP consuming enzymes. Here, we present a synthesis strategy that allows obtaining these ATP analogues in a straight-forward manner. Earlier studies indicate that modifying ATP at the O2'- and the γ-position is a very promising starting point for the design of these probes. We synthesized probes modified with five different combinations of dyes attached to these positions and investigated their fluorescence characteristics in the non-cleaved state as well as after enzymatic hydrolysis. All presented probes largely change their fluorescence characteristics upon cleavage. They include ratiometric FRET probes as well as dark quenched analogues. For typical in vitro applications a combination of the sulfonated polymethine dyes Sulfo-Cy3 and Sulfo-Cy5 seems to be most promising due to their excellent solubility in aqueous buffer and a large change of fluorescence characteristics upon cleavage. For this combination of dyes we also synthesized analogues modified at the γ- and the C2- or the O3'-position, respectively, as these attachment sites are also well accepted by certain ATP consuming enzymes. These analogues show comparably large changes in fluorescence characteristics. Overall, we present new ATP-based FRET probes that have the potential to enable monitoring the enzymatic activity of ATP consuming enzymes. PMID:24173528

  3. High-Resolution and Specific Detection of Bacteria on Complex Surfaces Using Nanoparticle Probes and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Nielsen, Shaun; Joseph, Stephen; Thomas, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interaction of bacteria with surfaces requires the detection of specific bacterial groups with high spatial resolution. Here, we describe a method to rapidly and efficiently add nanogold particles to oligonucleotide probes, which target bacterial ribosomal RNA. These nanogold-labeled probes are then used in an in situ hybridization procedure that ensures both cellular integrity and high specificity. Electron microscopy subsequently enables the visualization of specific cells with high local precision on complex surface structures. This method will contribute to an increased understanding of how bacteria interact with surface structures on a sub-micron scale. PMID:26018431

  4. New quinolone-based thiol-reactive lanthanide luminescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Wirpsza, Laura; Krasnoperov, Lev; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide ion complexes are distinguished by unique light emitting properties that enable both highly sensitive detection of lanthanide labels attached to biomolecules and contrast imaging of various micro objects (cells, nanoparticles, etc.). Previously, we synthesized amine-reactive cs124-based luminescent lanthanide chelates with improved brightness and metal retention. Here we report the synthesis of new thiol-reactive derivatives of the same compounds including bromoacetamido-, and maleimido- forms of cs124 and cs124CF3 fluorophores. Maleimido-compounds displayed exceptional reactivity instantaneously coupling to thiols at physiological conditions at micromolar probes concentrations. Surprisingly, they displayed strong quenching by adjacent maleimido-group, which was completely eliminated after reaction with thiols, thereby enabling their simple detection by monitoring the light emission of the reaction mixture. This reaction can be used for hyper-sensitive determination of biologically important sulphydryl compounds (e.g. glutathione, co-enzyme A, etc.) in time-resolved mode. PMID:23833545

  5. Review of methods to probe single cell metabolism and bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Single cell investigations have enabled unexpected discoveries, such as the existence of biological noise and phenotypic switching in infection, metabolism and treatment. Herein, we review methods that enable such single cell investigations specific to metabolism and bioenergetics. Firstly, we discuss how to isolate and immobilize individuals from a cell suspension, including both permanent and reversible approaches. We also highlight specific advances in microbiology for its implications in metabolic engineering. Methods for probing single cell physiology and metabolism are subsequently reviewed. The primary focus therein is on dynamic and high-content profiling strategies based on label-free and fluorescence microspectroscopy and microscopy. Non-dynamic approaches, such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, are also briefly discussed. PMID:25448400

  6. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  7. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  8. Synthesis and properties of acridone-labeled base-discriminating fluorescent (BDF) nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshio; Hanawa, Kazuo; Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Motegi, Kaori; Saito, Isao

    2006-01-01

    We have developed novel acridone-labelled BDF probe which showed its potential in recognizing opposite matched base from its target sequence via enhancement of fiuorescence intensity. This probe emit at a longer wavelength than previously reported pyrene-labelled BDF probe and thus can be used in DNA chip. PMID:17150877

  9. Morpholino-functionalized nanochannel array for label-free single nucleotide polymorphisms detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Li; Wang, Min; Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Wang, Chen; Wang, Kang; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2015-04-01

    The sensitive identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms becomes increasingly important for disease diagnosis, prevention, and practical applicability of pharmacogenomics. Herein, we propose a simple, highly selective, label-free single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) sensing device by electrochemically monitoring the diffusion flux of ferricyanide probe across probe DNA/morpholino duplex functionalized nanochannels of porous anodic alumina. When perfectly matched or mismatched target DNA flows through the nanochannels modified with probe DNA/morpholino duplex, it competes for the probe DNA from morpholino, resulting in a change of the surface charges. Thus, the diffusion flux of negatively charged electroactive probe ferricyanide is modulated since it is sensitive to the surface charge due to the electrostatic interactions in electric double layer-merged nanochannels. Monitoring of the change in diffusion flux of probe enables us to detect not only a single base or two base mismatched sequence but also the specific location of the mismatched base. As is demonstrated, SNPs in the PML/RARα fusion gene, known as a biomarker of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), have been successfully detected. PMID:25734499

  10. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-02-24

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  11. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1998-01-01

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods thereof based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays.

  12. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-09-29

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  13. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-07-21

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  14. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  15. Visualizing genomes with Oligopaint FISH probes

    PubMed Central

    Beliveau, Brian J.; Apostolopoulos, Nicholas; Wu, Chao-ting

    2014-01-01

    Oligopaint probes are fluorescently-labeled, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that can be used to visualize genomic regions ranging in size from tens of kilobases to many megabases. This unit details how Oligopaint probes can be synthesized using basic molecular biological techniques as well as provides protocols for FISH, 3D-FISH, and sample preparation. PMID:24510436

  16. Technology Enabled Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on technology-enabled learning and human resource development. Among results found in "Current State of Technology-enabled Learning Programs in Select Federal Government Organizations: a Case Study of Ten Organizations" (Letitia A. Combs) are the following: the dominant delivery method is traditional…

  17. Thiol Reactive Probes and Chemosensors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanjing; Chen, Weixuan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Hakuna, Lovemore; Strongin, Robert; Wang, Binghe

    2012-01-01

    Thiols are important molecules in the environment and in biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) play critical roles in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. The selective detection of thiols using reaction-based probes and sensors is very important in basic research and in disease diagnosis. This review focuses on the design of fluorescent and colorimetric probes and sensors for thiol detection. Thiol detection methods include probes and labeling agents based on nucleophilic addition and substitution, Michael addition, disulfide bond or Se-N bond cleavage, metal-sulfur interactions and more. Probes for H2S are based on nucleophilic cyclization, reduction and metal sulfide formation. Thiol probe and chemosensor design strategies and mechanism of action are discussed in this review. PMID:23202239

  18. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  19. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  20. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  1. Label-free molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Ruliang; Huang, Guoliang

    2014-03-01

    Optical microscopy technology has achieved great improvements in the 20th century. The detection limit has reached about twenty nanometers (with near-field optics, STED, PALM and STORM). But in the application areas such as life science, medical science, clinical treatment and especially in vivo dynamic measurement, mutual restrictions still exist between numeric aperture/magnification and working distance, fluorescent dependent, and between resolution and frame rate/field size, etc. This paper explores a hyperspectral scanning super-resolution label free molecules imaging method based on the white light interferometry. The vertical detection resolution was approximate to 1 nm which is the thickness of a single molecular layer and dynamic measuring range of thickness reaches to 10 μm. The spectrum-shifting algorithm is developed for robust restructure of images when the pixels are overlapped. Micro-biochip with protein binding and DNA amplification could be detected by using this spectral scanning super-resolution molecules imaging in label free. This method has several advantages as following: Firstly, the decoding and detecting steps are combined into one step. It makes tests faster and easier. Secondly, we used thickness-coded, minimized chips instead of a large microarray chip to carry the probes. This accelerates the interaction of the biomolecules. Thirdly, since only one kind of probes are attached to our thickness-coded, minimized chip, users can only pick out the probes they are interested in for a test without wasting unnecessary probes and chips.

  2. Automated data extraction from in situ protein-stable isotope probing studies.

    PubMed

    Slysz, Gordon W; Steinke, Laurey; Ward, David M; Klatt, Christian G; Clauss, Therese R W; Purvine, Samuel O; Payne, Samuel H; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2014-03-01

    Protein-stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism(s), a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities for short periods of time under natural conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large-scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large-scale extraction and visualization of data from short-term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on phototrophic bacterial mats isolated from Yellowstone National Park. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification. PMID:24467184

  3. Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies

    SciTech Connect

    Slysz, Gordon W.; Steinke, Laurey A.; Ward, David M.; Klatt, Christian G.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2014-01-27

    Protein stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism, a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities under conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large scale extraction and visualization of data from short term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on Yellowstone phototrophic bacterial mats. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification.

  4. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  5. Combining Perfluorocarbon and Superparamagnetic Iron-oxide Cell Labeling for Improved and Expanded Applications of Cellular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Liu, Li; Foley, Lesley M.; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ability to detect the migration of cells in living organisms is fundamental in understanding biological processes and important for the development of novel cell-based therapies to treat disease. MRI can be used to detect the migration of cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) or perfluorocarbon (PFC) agents. In this study, we explored combining these two cell-labeling approaches to overcome current limitations and enable new applications for cellular MRI. Methods We characterized 19F-NMR relaxation properties of PFC-labeled cells in the presence of SPIO and imaged cells both ex vivo and in vivo in a rodent inflammation model to demonstrate selective visualization of cell populations. Results We show that with UTE3D, RARE and FLASH 19F images one can uniquely identify PFC-labeled cells, co-localized PFC- and SPIO-labeled cells, and PFC/SPIO co-labeled cells. Conclusion This new methodology has the ability to improve and expand applications of MRI cell tracking. Combining PFC and SPIO strategies can potentially provide a method to quench PFC signal transferred from dead cells to macrophages, thereby eliminating false positives. In addition, combining these techniques could also be used to track two cell types simultaneously and probe cell-cell proximity in vivo with MRI. PMID:24478194

  6. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  7. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  8. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes. PMID:26990764

  9. Imaging Glycosylation In Vivo by Metabolic Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wainman, Yéléna A.; Wright, Alan; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Rodrigues, Tiago B.; McGuire, Sarah; Hu, De‐En; Bulat, Flaviu; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glycosylation is a ubiquitous post‐translational modification, present in over 50 % of the proteins in the human genome,1 with important roles in cell–cell communication and migration. Interest in glycome profiling has increased with the realization that glycans can be used as biomarkers of many diseases,2 including cancer.3 We report here the first tomographic imaging of glycosylated tissues in live mice by using metabolic labeling and a gadolinium‐based bioorthogonal MRI probe. Significant N‐azidoacetylgalactosamine dependent T 1 contrast was observed in vivo two hours after probe administration. Tumor, kidney, and liver showed significant contrast, and several other tissues, including the pancreas, spleen, heart, and intestines, showed a very high contrast (>10‐fold). This approach has the potential to enable the rapid and non‐invasive magnetic resonance imaging of glycosylated tissues in vivo in preclinical models of disease.

  10. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for each of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  11. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for ease of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  12. New integrative modules for multicolor-protein labeling and live-cell imaging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Malcova, Ivana; Farkasovsky, Marian; Senohrabkova, Lenka; Vasicova, Pavla; Hasek, Jiri

    2016-05-01

    Live-imaging analysis is performed in many laboratories all over the world. Various tools have been developed to enable protein labeling either in plasmid or genomic context in live yeast cells. Here, we introduce a set of nine integrative modules for the C-terminal gene tagging that combines three fluorescent proteins (FPs)-ymTagBFP, mCherry and yTagRFP-T with three dominant selection markers: geneticin, nourseothricin and hygromycin. In addition, the construction of two episomal modules for Saccharomyces cerevisiae with photostable yTagRFP-T is also referred to. Our cassettes with orange, red and blue FPs can be combined with other fluorescent probes like green fluorescent protein to prepare double- or triple-labeled strains for multicolor live-cell imaging. Primers for PCR amplification of the cassettes were designed in such a way as to be fully compatible with the existing PCR toolbox representing over 50 various integrative modules and also with deletion cassettes either for single or repeated usage to enable a cost-effective and an easy exchange of tags. New modules can also be used for biochemical analysis since antibodies are available for all three fluorescent probes. PMID:26994102

  13. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2014-06-23

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  14. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2012-07-02

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  15. Human papillomavirus 35 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 35 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 35 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 35 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  16. Human papillomavirus 56 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorinez, A.T.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes an HPV 56 hybridization probe. It comprises: a member selected from the group consisting of HPV 56 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and HPV 56 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  17. Human papillomavirus 44 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 44 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (1) HPV 44 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 44 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  18. Human papillomavirus 43 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 43 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 43 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 43 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  19. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  20. Mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Soleimanpour, Saeideh; Matile, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    This article assembles pertinent insights behind the concept of planarizable push-pull probes. As a response to the planarization of their polarized ground state, a red shift of their excitation maximum is expected to report on either the disorder, the tension, or the potential of biomembranes. The combination of chromophore planarization and polarization contributes to various, usually more complex processes in nature. Examples include the color change of crabs or lobsters during cooking or the chemistry of vision, particularly color vision. The summary of lessons from nature is followed by an overview of mechanosensitive organic materials. Although often twisted and sometimes also polarized, their change of color under pressure usually originates from changes in their crystal packing. Intriguing exceptions include the planarization of several elegantly twisted phenylethynyl oligomers and polymers. Also mechanosensitive probes in plastics usually respond to stretching by disassembly. True ground-state planarization in response to molecular recognition is best exemplified with the binding of thoughtfully twisted cationic polythiophenes to single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides. Molecular rotors, en vogue as viscosity sensors in cells, operate by deplanarization of the first excited state. Pertinent recent examples are described, focusing on λ-ratiometry and intracellular targeting. Complementary to planarization of the ground state with twisted push-pull probes, molecular rotors report on environmental changes with quenching or shifts in emission rather than absorption. The labeling of mechanosensitive channels is discussed as a bioengineering approach to bypass the challenge to create molecular mechanosensitivity and use biological systems instead to sense membrane tension. With planarizable push-pull probes, this challenge is met not with twistome screening, but with "fluorescent flippers," a new concept to insert large and bright monomers into oligomeric

  1. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  2. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Zayas; Michael, Derby; Patrick, Gilman; Ananthan, Shreyas; Lantz, Eric; Cotrell, Jason; Beck, Fredic; Tusing, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Leveraging this experience, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office has evaluated the potential for wind power to generate electricity in all 50 states. This report analyzes and quantifies the geographic expansion that could be enabled by accessing higher above ground heights for wind turbines and considers the means by which this new potential could be responsibly developed.

  3. Bedrails: restraints or enablers?

    PubMed

    Mullette, Betty; Zulkowski, Karen

    2004-08-01

    Bedrails presently are used as both mobility restraints and enablers in long-term care facilities. As enablers, bedrails facilitate movement and may reduce the risk of pressure ulcer development. As restraints, they impede movement and may increase risk of ulcer development. Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act regulations on restraint use have led to confusion for state Medicare surveyors and facilities regarding the definition of appropriate bedrail use and need for supportive documentation. Consequently, some facilities receive deficiency citations for inappropriate use or documentation while others do not. The purpose of this survey was to compare responses of Directors of Nursing in long-term care facilities and Medicare state surveyors to determine how each interprets the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act bedrail language for use and documentation. Questionnaires on bedrail use and documentation were sent to state surveyors and Directors of Nursing. One hundred, three (103) Directors of Nursing in 45 states and 65 surveyors from 39 states participated in the survey (response rate 61%). Study results demonstrated general acceptance of bedrail use as an enabler but not as a restraint by both Directors of Nursing and state surveyors. Four percent (4%) of Directors of Nursing reported receiving a citation for bedrail use and 59% of surveyors reported issuing citations for bedrail use. Significant differences were noted between the two groups regarding appropriate bedrail use and necessary documentation. The intent of Medicare guidelines and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is to standardize care for nursing home residents in the United States; yet, current regulations are open to individual interpretation by state surveyors and confusion exists between the intent of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act and the daily operations of nursing homes. Educating clinicians about the risks and benefits of bedrail use, either as restraint or enabler, and

  4. Activity-Based Probe for Histidine Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Kaelyn E.; Francis, Samson; Carlson, Erin E.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are signaling pathways composed of two proteins, a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). Upon stimulation, the HK autophosphorylates at a conserved histidine. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to an aspartate on a RR, eliciting an adaptive response, often up- or downregulation of gene expression. TCS signaling controls many functions in bacteria including development, virulence and antibiotic resistance, making the proteins involved in these systems potential therapeutic targets. Efficient methods for the profiling of HKs are currently lacking. For direct readout of HK activity, we sought to design a probe that enables detection of the phosphotransfer event; however, analysis of the phosphohistidine species is made difficult by the instability of the P-N bond. We anticipated that use of a γ-thiophosphorylated ATP analog, which would yield a thiophosphorylated histidine intermediate, could overcome this challenge. We determined that the fluorophore-conjugated probe, ATPγS-BODIPY, labels active HK proteins and is competitive for the ATP-binding site. This activity-based probe provides a new strategy for analysis of TCSs and other HK-mediated processes and will facilitate both functional studies and inhibitor identification. PMID:22606938

  5. Highly bright avidin-based affinity probes carrying multiple lanthanide chelates.

    PubMed

    Wirpsza, Laura; Pillai, Shyamala; Batish, Mona; Marras, Salvatore; Krasnoperov, Lev; Mustaev, Arkady

    2012-11-01

    Lanthanide ion luminescence has a long lifetime enabling highly sensitive detection in time-gated mode. The sensitivity can be further increased by using multiple luminescent labels attached to a carrier molecule, which can be conjugated to an object of interest. We found that up to 30 lanthanide chelates can be attached to avidin creating highly bright constructs. These constructs with Eu(3+) chelates display synergistic effect that enhance the brightness of heavily modified samples, while the opposite effect was observed for Tb(3+) chelates thereby significantly reducing their light emission. This undesirable quenching of Tb(3+) luminophores was completely suppressed by the introduction of an aromatic spacer between the chelate and the protein attachment site. The estimated detection limit for the conjugates is in the 10(-14)-10(-15) M range. We demonstrated a high sensitivity for the new probes by using them to label living cells of bacterial and mammalian origin. PMID:23018156

  6. Quantitative approaches to monitor protein–nucleic acid interactions using fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, John M.; Clingman, Carina C.; Ryder, Sean P.

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific recognition of nucleic acids by proteins is required for nearly every aspect of gene expression. Quantitative binding experiments are a useful tool to measure the ability of a protein to distinguish between multiple sequences. Here, we describe the use of fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide probes to quantitatively monitor protein/nucleic acid interactions. We review two complementary experimental methods, fluorescence polarization and fluorescence electrophoretic mobility shift assays, that enable the quantitative measurement of binding affinity. We also present two strategies for post-synthetic end-labeling of DNA or RNA oligonucleotides with fluorescent dyes. The approaches discussed here are efficient and sensitive, providing a safe and accessible alternative to the more commonly used radio-isotopic methods. PMID:21098142

  7. Tethered Spectroscopic Probes Estimate Dynamic Distances with Subnanometer Resolution in Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jarecki, Brian W.; Zheng, Suqing; Zhang, Leili; Li, Xiaoxun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Qiang; Tang, Weiping; Chanda, Baron

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of inter- and intramolecular distances are important for monitoring structural changes and understanding protein interaction networks. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and functionalized chemical spacers are the two predominantly used strategies to map short-range distances in living cells. Here, we describe the development of a hybrid approach that combines the key advantages of spectroscopic and chemical methods to estimate dynamic distance information from labeled proteins. Bifunctional spectroscopic probes were designed to make use of adaptable-anchor and length-varied spacers to estimate molecular distances by exploiting short-range collisional electron transfer. The spacers were calibrated using labeled polyproline peptides of defined lengths and validated by molecular simulations. This approach was extended to estimate distance restraints that enable us to evaluate the resting-state model of the Shaker potassium channel. PMID:24359744

  8. A fully enzymatic method for site-directed spin labeling of long RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lebars, Isabelle; Vileno, Bertrand; Bourbigot, Sarah; Turek, Philippe; Wolff, Philippe; Kieffer, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling is emerging as an essential tool to investigate the structural and dynamical features of RNA. We propose here an enzymatic method, which allows the insertion of a paramagnetic center at a specific position in an RNA molecule. The technique is based on a segmental approach using a ligation protocol with T4 RNA ligase 2. One transcribed acceptor RNA is ligated to a donor RNA in which a thio-modified nucleotide is introduced at its 5′-end by in vitro transcription with T7 RNA polymerase. The paramagnetic thiol-specific reagent is subsequently attached to the RNA ligation product. This novel strategy is demonstrated by introducing a paramagnetic probe into the 55 nucleotides long RNA corresponding to K-turn and Specifier Loop domains from the Bacillus subtilis tyrS T-Box leader RNA. The efficiency of the coupling reaction and the quality of the resulting spin-labeled RNA were assessed by Mass Spectrometry, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). This method enables various combinations of isotopic segmental labeling and spin labeling schemes, a strategy that will be of particular interest to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of large RNA complexes by NMR and EPR spectroscopies. PMID:24981512

  9. Probe-rotating atomic force microscopy for determining material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a probe-rotating atomic force microscope that enables scan in an arbitrary direction in the contact imaging mode, which is difficult to achieve using a conventional atomic force microscope owing to the orientation-dependent probe and the inability to rotate the probe head. To enable rotation of the probe about its vertical axis, we employed a compact and light probe head, the sensor of which is made of an optical disk drive pickup unit. Our proposed mechanical configuration, operating principle, and control system enables axial and lateral scan in various directions.

  10. Total internal reflection plasmonic scattering-based fluorescence-free nanoimmunosensor probe for ultra-sensitive detection of cancer antigen 125.

    PubMed

    Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Zhang, Peng; Ahn, Sujin; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-07-15

    Highly sensitive detection of cancer antigen 125 (CA125) on nanoarray chips was carried out by means of total internal reflection (TIR) microscopy based on fluorescent labeling (i.e., TIR fluorescence microscopy; TIRFM) and fluorescent-free labeling (TIR scattering microscopy; TIRSM). TIR plasmonic scattering of nanoparticles (NPs) as a fluorescence-free immunosensor probe potentially superior to fluorescent probes was applied to quantify CA125 on a nanoarray chip. NP-labeled CA125 (NP-CA125) was immunoreacted on chips, and the TIR scattering illumination of NP-CA125 allowed quantitative TIRSM measurement of wavelength-dependent plasmonic scattering detection of CA125. In addition, Alexafluor 488-labeled CA125 was immunoreacted on the same chips for comparison of detection sensitivity. TIRSM showed less photobleaching and higher photostability and detection sensitivity than TIRFM, as well as a lower limit of detection (LOD), 0.0018U/mL. This LOD was ~144 times lower than that of previously reported detection methods. These results demonstrated that the wavelength-dependent TIR plasmon NPs can be used as an enhanced nanoimmunosensor probe, providing ultra-sensitive fluorescence-free biomolecule detection to enable earliest-stage disease diagnosis. PMID:26913504

  11. Development and Application of Multiple-Probe Scanning Probe Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Kubo, O.; Shingaya, Y.; Higuchi, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Jiang, C. S.; Okuda, T.; Kuwahara, Y.; Takami, K.; Aono, M.

    2012-04-03

    the research of advanced materials based on nanoscience and nanotechnology, it is often desirable to measure nanoscale local electrical conductivity at a designated position of a given sample. For this purpose, multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs), in which two, three or four scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are operated independently, have been developed. Each probe in an MP-SPM is used not only for observing high-resolution STM or AFM images but also for forming an electrical contact enabling nanoscale local electrical conductivity measurement. The world's first double-probe STM (DP-STM) developed by the authors, which was subsequently modified to a triple-probe STM (TP-STM), has been used to measure the conductivities of one-dimensional metal nanowires and carbon nanotubes and also two-dimensional molecular films. A quadruple-probe STM (QP-STM) has also been developed and used to measure the conductivity of two-dimensional molecular films without the ambiguity of contact resistance between the probe and sample. Moreover, a quadruple-probe AFM (QP-AFM) with four conductive tuning-fork-type self-detection force sensing probes has been developed to measure the conductivity of a nanostructure on an insulating substrate. A general-purpose computer software to control four probes at the same time has also been developed and used in the operation of the QP-AFM. These developments and applications of MP-SPMs are reviewed in this paper.

  12. Label free redox capacitive biosensing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Flávio C Bedatty; Góes, Márcio S; Davis, Jason J; Bueno, Paulo R

    2013-12-15

    A surface confined redox group contributes to an interfacial charging (quantifiable by redox capacitance) that can be sensitively probed by impedance derived capacitance spectroscopy. In generating mixed molecular films comprising such redox groups, together with specific recognition elements (here antibodies), this charging signal is able to sensitively transduce the recognition and binding of specific analytes. This novel transduction method, exemplified here with C-reactive protein, an important biomarker of cardiac status and general trauma, is equally applicable to any suitably prepared interfacial combination of redox reporter and receptor. The assays are label free, ultrasensitive, highly specific and accompanied by a good linear range. PMID:23896524

  13. LabeledIn: cataloging labeled indications for human drugs.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ritu; Li, Jiao; Lu, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    and treatment of diseases. These 250 drugs corresponded to more than 8000 drug labels (500 unique) in DailyMed in which 2950 candidate indications were pre-tagged by an automatic tool. After being reviewed independently by two experts, 1618 indications were selected, and additional 97 (missed by computer) were manually added, with an inter-annotator agreement of 88.35% as measured by the Kappa coefficient. Our final annotation results in LabeledIn consist of 7805 drug-disease treatment relationships where drugs are represented as a triplet of ingredient, dose form, and strength. A systematic comparison of LabeledIn with an existing computer-derived resource revealed significant discrepancies, confirming the need to involve humans in the creation of such a resource. In addition, LabeledIn is unique in that it contains detailed textual context of the selected indications in drug labels, making it suitable for the development of advanced computational methods for the automatic extraction of indications from free text. Finally, motivated by the studies on drug nomenclature and medication errors in EMRs, we adopted a fine-grained drug representation scheme, which enables the automatic identification of drugs with indications specific to certain dose forms or strengths. Future work includes expanding our coverage to more drugs and integration with other resources. The LabeledIn dataset and the annotation guidelines are available at http://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/lu/LabeledIn/. PMID:25220766

  14. Enhanced Fluorescence Imaging of Live Cells by Effective Cytosolic Delivery of Probes

    PubMed Central

    Massignani, Marzia; Canton, Irene; Sun, Tao; Hearnden, Vanessa; MacNeil, Sheila; Blanazs, Adam; Armes, Steven P.; Lewis, Andrew; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Background Microscopic techniques enable real-space imaging of complex biological events and processes. They have become an essential tool to confirm and complement hypotheses made by biomedical scientists and also allow the re-examination of existing models, hence influencing future investigations. Particularly imaging live cells is crucial for an improved understanding of dynamic biological processes, however hitherto live cell imaging has been limited by the necessity to introduce probes within a cell without altering its physiological and structural integrity. We demonstrate herein that this hurdle can be overcome by effective cytosolic delivery. Principal Findings We show the delivery within several types of mammalian cells using nanometre-sized biomimetic polymer vesicles (a.k.a. polymersomes) that offer both highly efficient cellular uptake and endolysomal escape capability without any effect on the cellular metabolic activity. Such biocompatible polymersomes can encapsulate various types of probes including cell membrane probes and nucleic acid probes as well as labelled nucleic acids, antibodies and quantum dots. Significance We show the delivery of sufficient quantities of probes to the cytosol, allowing sustained functional imaging of live cells over time periods of days to weeks. Finally the combination of such effective staining with three-dimensional imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy allows cell imaging in complex three-dimensional environments under both mono-culture and co-culture conditions. Thus cell migration and proliferation can be studied in models that are much closer to the in vivo situation. PMID:20454666

  15. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-10-15

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  17. Enable, mediate, advocate.

    PubMed

    Saan, Hans; Wise, Marilyn

    2011-12-01

    The authors of the Ottawa Charter selected the words enable, mediate and advocate to describe the core activities in what was, in 1986, the new Public Health. This article considers these concepts and the values and ideas upon which they were based. We discuss their relevance in the current context within which health promotion is being conducted, and discuss the implications of changes in the health agenda, media and globalization for practice. We consider developments within health promotion since 1986: its central role in policy rhetoric, the increasing understanding of complexities and the interlinkage with many other societal processes. So the three core activities are reviewed: they still fit well with the main health promotion challenges, but should be refreshed by new ideas and values. As the role of health promotion in the political arena has grown we have become part of the policy establishment and that is a mixed blessing. Making way for community advocates is now our challenge. Enabling requires greater sensitivity to power relations involved and an understanding of the role of health literacy. Mediating keeps its central role as it bridges vital interests of parties. We conclude that these core concepts in the Ottawa Charter need no serious revision. There are, however, lessons from the last 25 years that point to ways to address present and future challenges with greater sensitivity and effectiveness. We invite the next generation to avoid canonizing this text: as is true of every heritage, the heirs must decide on its use. PMID:22080073

  18. Carbon Nanoparticle-based Fluorescent Bioimaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Saha, Arindam; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Ray, Sekhar C.; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticle-based imaging probes have advanced current labelling technology and are expected to generate new medical diagnostic tools based on their superior brightness and photostability compared with conventional molecular probes. Although significant progress has been made in fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystal-based biological labelling and imaging, the presence of heavy metals and the toxicity issues associated with heavy metals have severely limited the application potential of these nanocrystals. Here, we report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based, alternative, nontoxic imaging probe that is suitable for biological staining and diagnostics. We have developed a chemical method to synthesise highly fluorescent carbon nanoparticles 1–10 nm in size; these particles exhibit size-dependent, tunable visible emission. These carbon nanoparticles have been transformed into various functionalised nanoprobes with hydrodynamic diameters of 5–15 nm and have been used as cell imaging probes. PMID:23502324

  19. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  20. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  1. Visual-Inspection Probe For Cryogenic Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, Steve; Valenzuela, James; Yoshinaga, Jay

    1990-01-01

    Visual-inspection probe that resembles borescope enables observer at ambient temperature to view objects immersed in turbulent flow of liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen, or other cryogenic fluid. Design of probe fairly conventional, except special consideration given to selection of materials and to thermal expansion to provide for expected range of operating temperatures. Penetrates wall of cryogenic chamber to provide view of interior. Similar probe illuminates scene. View displayed on video monitor.

  2. Distance-Dependent Emission from Dye-Labeled Oligonucleotides on Striped Au/Ag Nanowires: Effect of Secondary Structure and Hybridization Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer, Rebecca L.; Keating, Christine D.

    2010-01-01

    When fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides are located near metal surfaces, their emission intensity is impacted by both electromagnetic effects (i.e., quenching and/or enhancement of emission) and the structure of the nucleic acids (e.g., random coil, hairpin, or duplex). We present experiments exploring the effect of label position and secondary structure in oligonucleotide probes as a function of hybridization buffer, which impacts the percentage of double-stranded probes on the surface after exposure to complementary DNA. Nanowires containing identifiable patterns of Au and Ag segments were used as the metal substrates in this work, which enabled us to directly compare different dye positions in a single multiplexed experiment and differences in emission for probes attached to the two metals. The observed metal–dye separation dependence for unstructured surface-bound oligonucleotides is highly sensitive to hybridization efficiency, due to substantial changes in DNA extension from the surface upon hybridization. In contrast, fluorophore labeled oligonucleotides designed to form hairpin secondary structures analogous to solution-phase molecular beacon probes are relatively insensitive to hybridization efficiency, since the folded form is quenched and therefore does not appreciably impact the observed distance-dependence of the response. Differences in fluorescence patterning on Au and Ag were noted as a function of not only chromophore identity but also metal–dye separation. For example, emission intensity for TAMRA-labeled oligonucleotides changed from brighter on Ag for 24-base probes to brighter on Au for 48-base probes. We also observed fluorescence enhancement at the ends of nanowires and at surface defects where heightened electromagnetic fields affect the fluorescence. PMID:17017805

  3. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  4. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Ohta, Taisuke; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Gutierrez, Carlos; Nolen, C. M.; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; McCarty, Kevin F.; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D electronic material amenable to the planar semiconductor fabrication processing, possesses tunable electronic material properties potentially far superior to metals and other standard semiconductors. Despite its phenomenal electronic properties, focused research is still required to develop techniques for depositing and synthesizing graphene over large areas, thereby enabling the reproducible mass-fabrication of graphene-based devices. To address these issues, we combined an array of growth approaches and characterization resources to investigate several innovative and synergistic approaches for the synthesis of high quality graphene films on technologically relevant substrate (SiC and metals). Our work focused on developing the fundamental scientific understanding necessary to generate large-area graphene films that exhibit highly uniform electronic properties and record carrier mobility, as well as developing techniques to transfer graphene onto other substrates.

  5. Preparation of base-modified nucleosides suitable for non-radioactive label attachment and their incorporation into synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Haralambidis, J; Chai, M; Tregear, G W

    1987-01-01

    A very mild and efficient procedure has been developed for the preparation of C-5 substituted deoxyuridines. The substituent carries a masked primary aliphatic amino group. These compounds are readily converted into their phosphoramidites and can be used to prepare oligonucleotides carrying one or more aliphatic amino groups. Fluorescein isothiocyanate coupled to these compounds gives oligonucleotide probes carrying multiple fluorescein labels. These compounds have a free 5'-hydroxy group enabling additional 5'- end radioactive labelling for evaluation of their hybridization characteristics. It was found that oligonucleotides carrying a long (11 atom) linker arm to the fluorescein hybridize more efficiently to mRNA than those carrying a short (4 atom) arm. The long linker arm derivatives are comparable to underivatized oligonucleotides in hybridizing to mRNA. Images PMID:3110740

  6. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  7. Study of alternative probe technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A number of implied technologies for a deep probe mission was examined; i.e., one that would provide the capability to scientifically examine planetary atmospheres at the 1000 bar level. Conditions imposed by current Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus atmospheric models were considered. The major thrust of the measurements was to determine lower atmosphere composition, even to trace constituents of one part per billion. Two types of instruments having the necessary accuracy to meet the science objectives were considered and integrated into a deep probe configuration. One deep probe option that resulted was identified as a Minimum Technology Development approach. The significant feature of this option is that only three technology developments are required to enable the mission, i.e., (1) science instrument development, (2) advanced data processing, and (3) external high pressure/thermal insulation. It is concluded that a probe designed for a Jupiter mission could, with minor changes, be used for a Saturn or Uranus mission.

  8. Imaging and force probing RNA by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schön, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In the past 30years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become a true enabling platform in the life sciences opening entire novel avenues for structural and dynamic studies of biological systems. It enables visualization, probing and manipulation across the length scales, from single molecules to living cells in buffer solution under physiological conditions without the need for labeling or staining of the specimen. In particular, for structural studies of nucleic acids and assemblies thereof, the AFM has matured into a routinely used tool providing nanometer spatial resolution. This includes ssRNA, dsRNA and nucleoprotein complexes thereof, as well as RNA aggregates and 2D RNA assemblies. By AFM unique information can be obtained on RNA based assemblies which are becoming increasingly important as novel unique building blocks in the emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. In addition, the AFM is of fundamental relevance to study biological relevant RNA interactions and dynamics. In this short review first the basic functioning principles of commonly used AFM modes including AFM based force spectroscopy will be briefly described. Next a brief overview will be given on structural studies that have been done related to AFM topographic imaging of RNA, RNA assemblies and aggregates. Finally, an overview on AFM beyond imaging will be provided. This includes force spectroscopy of RNA under physiological conditions in aqueous buffer to probe RNA interaction with proteins and ligands as well as other AFM tip based RNA probing. The main intention of this short review to give the reader a flavor of what AFM contributes to RNA research and engineering. PMID:27222101

  9. Stable isotope probing in the metagenomics era: a bridge towards improved bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Leewis, Mary-Cathrine; Strejcek, Michal; Musilova, Lucie; Mackova, Martina; Leigh, Mary Beth; Macek, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biodegradation and biotransformation reactions are essential to most bioremediation processes, yet the specific organisms, genes, and mechanisms involved are often not well understood. Stable isotope probing (SIP) enables researchers to directly link microbial metabolic capability to phylogenetic and metagenomic information within a community context by tracking isotopically labeled substances into phylogenetically and functionally informative biomarkers. SIP is thus applicable as a tool for the identification of active members of the microbial community and associated genes integral to the community functional potential, such as biodegradative processes. The rapid evolution of SIP over the last decade and integration with metagenomics provides researchers with a much deeper insight into potential biodegradative genes, processes, and applications, thereby enabling an improved mechanistic understanding that can facilitate advances in the field of bioremediation. PMID:23022353

  10. Label-free detection of DNA single-base mismatches using a simple reflectance-based optical technique.

    PubMed

    Nava, G; Ceccarello, E; Giavazzi, F; Salina, M; Damin, F; Chiari, M; Buscaglia, M; Bellini, T; Zanchetta, G

    2016-05-21

    Rapid and quantitative detection of the binding of nucleic acids to surface-immobilized probes remains a challenge in many biomedical applications. We investigated the hybridization of a set of fully complementary and defected 12-base long DNA oligomers by using the Reflective Phantom Interface (RPI), a recently developed multiplexed label-free detection technique. Based on the simple measurement of reflected light intensity, this technology enables to quantify the hybridization directly as it occurs on the surface with a sensitivity of 10 pg mm(-2). We found a strong effect of single-base mismatches and of their location on hybridization kinetics and equilibrium binding. In line with previous studies, we found that DNA-DNA binding is weaker on a surface than in the bulk. Our data indicate that this effect is a consequence of weak nonspecific binding of the probes to the surface. PMID:27122358

  11. Kinetic controlled affinity labeling of target enzyme with thioester chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tomohiro, Takenori; Nakabayashi, Masahiro; Sugita, Yuka; Morimoto, Shota

    2016-08-01

    High specificity has been an important feature in affinity labeling for target profiling. Especially, to label targets via rapidly progressing reactions with consumption of ligand (probe), high specificity of reaction with common functional groups of target protein should be achieved without reactions with similar groups of non-target proteins. Herein, we demonstrate the kinetic controlled affinity labeling of acyl CoA synthetase using a fatty acid analogue containing a phenylthioester linkage. High specificity was attained by accelerating the labeling rate in the binding pocket. This approach could be useful for profiling a series of target enzymes and transporters in signal transduction pathways. PMID:27298000

  12. Enabling distributed petascale science.

    SciTech Connect

    Baranovski, A.; Bharathi, S.; Bresnahan, J.; chervenak, A.; Foster, I.; Fraser, D.; Freeman, T.; Gunter, D.; Jackson, K.; Keahey, K.; Kesselman, C.; Konerding, D. E.; Leroy, N.; Link, M.; Livny, M.; Miller, N.; Miller, R.; Oleynik, G.; Pearlman, L.; Schopf, J. M.; Schuler, R.; Tierney, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; FNL; Univ. of Southern California; Univ. of Chicago; LBNL; Univ. of Wisconsin

    2007-01-01

    Petascale science is an end-to-end endeavour, involving not only the creation of massive datasets at supercomputers or experimental facilities, but the subsequent analysis of that data by a user community that may be distributed across many laboratories and universities. The new SciDAC Center for Enabling Distributed Petascale Science (CEDPS) is developing tools to support this end-to-end process. These tools include data placement services for the reliable, high-performance, secure, and policy-driven placement of data within a distributed science environment; tools and techniques for the construction, operation, and provisioning of scalable science services; and tools for the detection and diagnosis of failures in end-to-end data placement and distributed application hosting configurations. In each area, we build on a strong base of existing technology and have made useful progress in the first year of the project. For example, we have recently achieved order-of-magnitude improvements in transfer times (for lots of small files) and implemented asynchronous data staging capabilities; demonstrated dynamic deployment of complex application stacks for the STAR experiment; and designed and deployed end-to-end troubleshooting services. We look forward to working with SciDAC application and technology projects to realize the promise of petascale science.

  13. Enabling immersive simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Josh; Mateas, Michael; Hart, Derek H.; Whetzel, Jonathan; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Glickman, Matthew R.; Abbott, Robert G.

    2009-02-01

    The object of the 'Enabling Immersive Simulation for Complex Systems Analysis and Training' LDRD has been to research, design, and engineer a capability to develop simulations which (1) provide a rich, immersive interface for participation by real humans (exploiting existing high-performance game-engine technology wherever possible), and (2) can leverage Sandia's substantial investment in high-fidelity physical and cognitive models implemented in the Umbra simulation framework. We report here on these efforts. First, we describe the integration of Sandia's Umbra modular simulation framework with the open-source Delta3D game engine. Next, we report on Umbra's integration with Sandia's Cognitive Foundry, specifically to provide for learning behaviors for 'virtual teammates' directly from observed human behavior. Finally, we describe the integration of Delta3D with the ABL behavior engine, and report on research into establishing the theoretical framework that will be required to make use of tools like ABL to scale up to increasingly rich and realistic virtual characters.

  14. Grid-Enabled Measures

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Richard P.; Hesse, Bradford W.; Shaikh, Abdul R.; Courtney, Paul; Morgan, Glen; Augustson, Erik; Kobrin, Sarah; Levin, Kerry; Helba, Cynthia; Garner, David; Dunn, Marsha; Coa, Kisha

    2011-01-01

    Scientists are taking advantage of the Internet and collaborative web technology to accelerate discovery in a massively connected, participative environment —a phenomenon referred to by some as Science 2.0. As a new way of doing science, this phenomenon has the potential to push science forward in a more efficient manner than was previously possible. The Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database has been conceptualized as an instantiation of Science 2.0 principles by the National Cancer Institute with two overarching goals: (1) Promote the use of standardized measures, which are tied to theoretically based constructs; and (2) Facilitate the ability to share harmonized data resulting from the use of standardized measures. This is done by creating an online venue connected to the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) where a virtual community of researchers can collaborate together and come to consensus on measures by rating, commenting and viewing meta-data about the measures and associated constructs. This paper will describe the web 2.0 principles on which the GEM database is based, describe its functionality, and discuss some of the important issues involved with creating the GEM database, such as the role of mutually agreed-on ontologies (i.e., knowledge categories and the relationships among these categories— for data sharing). PMID:21521586

  15. Azetidines. 5. Reaction of 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl- and 1-benzyl-1,3,3-trimethylazetidinium ions with butyllithium and phenyllithium. Deuterium labeling as a mechanistic probe

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, M.T.; Wills, I.E.; Von Dollen, L.; Butler, B.L.; Porter, J.

    1980-06-06

    The reactions of 1,1,3,3-tetramethylazetidinium iodide (1) and 1-benzyl-1,3,3-trimethylazetidinium bromide (7) with butyllithium and with phenyllithium were studied in ether. The products from the reaction of 1 with butyllithium were 1,3,3-trimethylpyrrolidine (2), 3,3-dimethyl-4-(methylamino)-1-butene (3), 1-(dimethylamino)-2,2-dimethylheptane (4), neopentylpyrrolidine (5), and 1-(dimethylamino)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane (6). With phenyllithium, 1 gave 2 and 1-(dimethylamino)-2,2-dimethyl-3-phenylpropane (11). With butyllithium, 7 gave 2-phenyl-1,4,4-trimethylpyrrolidine (8), 1-benzyl-3,3-dimethylpyrrilidine (9), and 1-neopentyl-2-phenylpyrrolidine (10). The reaction of phenyllithium with 7 gave only 8 and 9. Mechanistic information was obtained by labeling 1 with deuterium in three different ways: N-methyl-d/sub 3/,2,2-d/sub 2/, and N-methyl-d/sub 3/-2,2-d/sub 2/. A primary kinetic isotope effect of 9.4 was found for the formation of 2 from 1-N-methyl-d/sub 3/. When 2 was formed from 1-2,2-d/sub 2/, a secondary kinetic isotope effect of 1.17 was measured. The formation of 4 from 1-2,2-d/sub 2/ was accompanied by a primary kinetic isotope effect of 4.7, suggesting a carbene intermediate. Ylide carbanions involving decomposition to a carbene carbanion in the formation of 3 and an azomethine ylide in the formation of 5 and 9 are probable intermediates. It is postulated that the azomethine ylides react with ethylene formed from the reaction of butyllithium with the solvent ether by means of a concerted (4 + 2) cycloaddition reaction. A primary kinetic isotope effect of 20 was found for the formation of pentylbenzene from dibenzyldimethylammonium bromide and butyllithium.

  16. Enabling cleanup technology transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmars, J. D.

    2002-08-12

    Technology transfer in the environmental restoration, or cleanup, area has been challenging. While there is little doubt that innovative technologies are needed to reduce the times, risks, and costs associated with the cleanup of federal sites, particularly those of the Departments of Energy (DOE) and Defense, the use of such technologies in actual cleanups has been relatively limited. There are, of course, many reasons why technologies do not reach the implementation phase or do not get transferred from developing entities to the user community. For example, many past cleanup contracts provided few incentives for performance that would compel a contractor to seek improvement via technology applications. While performance-based contracts are becoming more common, they alone will not drive increased technology applications. This paper focuses on some applications of cleanup methodologies and technologies that have been successful and are illustrative of a more general principle. The principle is at once obvious and not widely practiced. It is that, with few exceptions, innovative cleanup technologies are rarely implemented successfully alone but rather are implemented in the context of enabling processes and methodologies. And, since cleanup is conducted in a regulatory environment, the stage is better set for technology transfer when the context includes substantive interactions with the relevant stakeholders. Examples of this principle are drawn from Argonne National Laboratory's experiences in Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Programs (ASAPs), Precise Excavation, and the DOE Technology Connection (TechCon) Program. The lessons learned may be applicable to the continuing challenges posed by the cleanup and long-term stewardship of radioactive contaminants and unexploded ordnance (UXO) at federal sites.

  17. Pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy: Principle of operation and resolution limits

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, J.; Graupner, T.; Milde, P. Raupach, R.; Zerweck-Trogisch, U.; Eng, L. M.

    2015-10-21

    Knowledge on surface potential dynamics is crucial for understanding the performance of modern-type nanoscale devices. We describe an electrical pump-probe approach in Kelvin-probe force microscopy that enables a quantitative measurement of dynamic surface potentials at nanosecond-time and nanometer-length scales. Also, we investigate the performance of pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy with respect to the relevant experimental parameters. We exemplify a measurement on an organic field effect transistor that verifies the undisturbed functionality of our pump-probe approach in terms of simultaneous and quantitative mapping of topographic and electronic information at a high lateral and temporal resolution.

  18. Probing small non-coding RNAs structures.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Jean-Vincent; Ayadi, Lilia; Branlant, Christiane; Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The diverse roles of RNAs depend on their ability to fold so as to form biologically functional structures. Thus, understanding the function of a given RNA molecule often requires experimental analysis of its secondary structure by in vitro RNA probing, which is more accurate than using prediction programs only. This chapter presents in vitro RNA probing protocols that we routinely use, from RNA transcript production and purification to RNA structure determination using enzymatic (RNases T1, T2, and V1) and chemical (DMS, CMCT, kethoxal, and Pb(2+)) probing performed on both unlabeled and end-labeled RNAs. PMID:25791596

  19. RNA–Stable-Isotope Probing Shows Utilization of Carbon from Inulin by Specific Bacterial Populations in the Rat Large Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Blair; Munro, Karen; Sims, Ian M.; Lee, Julian; Butts, Christine A.; Roy, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the trophisms that underpin bowel microbiota composition is required in order to understand its complex phylogeny and function. Stable-isotope (13C)-labeled inulin was added to the diet of rats on a single occasion in order to detect utilization of inulin-derived substrates by particular members of the cecal microbiota. Cecal digesta from Fibruline-inulin-fed rats was collected prior to (0 h) and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 h following provision of the [13C]inulin diet. RNA was extracted from these cecal specimens and fractionated in isopycnic buoyant density gradients in order to detect 13C-labeled nucleic acid originating in bacterial cells that had metabolized the labeled dietary constituent. RNA extracted from specimens collected after provision of the labeled diet was more dense than 0-h RNA. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from cDNA obtained from these fractions showed that Bacteroides uniformis, Blautia glucerasea, Clostridium indolis, and Bifidobacterium animalis were the main users of the 13C-labeled substrate. Culture-based studies of strains of these bacterial species enabled trophisms associated with inulin and its hydrolysis products to be identified. B. uniformis utilized Fibruline-inulin for growth, whereas the other species used fructo-oligosaccharide and monosaccharides. Thus, RNA–stable-isotope probing (RNA-SIP) provided new information about the use of carbon from inulin in microbiota metabolism. PMID:24487527

  20. Kinetics of thin filament activation probed by fluorescence of N-((2-(Iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-labeled troponin I incorporated into skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle: implications for regulation of muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B; Chalovich, JM

    1999-01-01

    Making use of troponin with fluorescently labeled troponin I subunit (N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-troponin I, IANBD-TnI) that had previously been described in solution studies as a probe for thin filament activation (. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 77:7209-7213), we present a new approach that allows the kinetics of thin filament activation to be studied in skinned muscle fibers. After the exchange of native troponin for fluorescently labeled troponin, the fluorescence intensity is sensitive to both changes in calcium concentration and actin attachment of cross-bridges in their strong binding states (. Biophys. J. 77:000-000). Imposing rapid changes in the fraction of strongly attached cross-bridges, e.g., by switching from isometric contraction to high-speed shortening, causes changes in thin filament activation at fixed Ca(2+) concentrations that can be followed by recording fluorescence intensity. Upon changing to high-speed shortening we observed small (<20%) changes in fluorescence that became faster at higher Ca(2+) concentrations. At all Ca(2+) concentrations, these changes are more than 10-fold faster than force redevelopment subsequent to the period of unloaded shortening. We interpret this as an indication that equilibration among different states of the thin filament is rapid and becomes faster as Ca(2+) is raised. Fast equilibration suggests that the rate constant of force redevelopment is not limited by changes in the activation level of thin filaments induced by the isotonic contraction before force redevelopment. Instead, our modeling shows that, in agreement with our previous proposal for the regulation of muscle contraction, a rapid and Ca(2+)-dependent equilibration among different states of the thin filament can fully account for the Ca(2+) dependence of force redevelopment and the fluorescence changes described in this study. PMID:10545369

  1. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  2. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  3. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological tunnels of sensors (the tunnels of truth), (5) curved benches with blast proof walls or backs, (6

  4. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  5. Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Greetham, G. M.; Sole, D.; Clark, I. P.; Parker, A. W.; Pollard, M. R.; Towrie, M.

    2012-10-15

    Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy combines optical, electronic, and data acquisition capabilities to enable measurement of picosecond to millisecond time-resolved spectra within a single experiment, using a single activation pulse. This technology enables a wide range of dynamic processes to be studied on a single laser and sample system. The technique includes a 1 kHz pump, 10 kHz probe flash photolysis-like mode of acquisition (pump-probe-probe-probe, etc.), increasing the amount of information from each experiment. We demonstrate the capability of the instrument by measuring the photolysis of tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO){sub 6}) monitored by IR absorption spectroscopy, following picosecond vibrational cooling of product formation through to slower bimolecular diffusion reactions on the microsecond time scale.

  6. Direct Communication to Earth from Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, Scott J.; Folkner, William M.; Abraham, Douglas S.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on outer planetary probe communications to Earth is shown. The topics include: 1) Science Rational for Atmospheric Probes to the Outer Planets; 2) Controlling the Scientific Appetite; 3) Learning more about Jupiter before we send more probes; 4) Sample Microwave Scan From Juno; 5) Jupiter s Deep Interior; 6) The Square Kilometer Array (SKA): A Breakthrough for Radio Astronomy; 7) Deep Space Array-based Network (DSAN); 8) Probe Direct-to-Earth Data Rate Calculations; 9) Summary; and 10) Enabling Ideas.

  7. Development of ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine chemical probes for cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lovitt, Carrie J; Hilko, David H; Avery, Vicky M; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-09-15

    A common method of evaluating cellular proliferation is to label DNA with chemical probes. 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a widely utilized chemical probe for labeling DNA, and upon incorporation, EdU treatment of cells is followed by a reaction with a small molecule fluorescent azide to allow detection. The limitations when using EdU include cytotoxicity and a reliance on nucleoside active transport mechanisms for entry into cells. Here we have developed six novel EdU pro-labels that consist of EdU modified with variable lipophilic acyl ester moieties. This pro-label:chemical probe relationship parallels the prodrug:drug relationship that is employed widely in medicinal chemistry. EdU and EdU pro-labels were evaluated for their labeling efficacy and cytotoxicity. Several EdU pro-label analogues incorporate into DNA at a similar level to EdU, suggesting that nucleoside transporters can be bypassed by the pro-labels. These EdU pro-labels also had reduced toxicity compared to EdU. PMID:27460697

  8. Enhanced ratio of signals enables digital mutation scanning for rare allele detection.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2015-05-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence. PMID:25772705

  9. Photoaffinity labeling in target- and binding-site identification

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ewan; Collins, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling (PAL) using a chemical probe to covalently bind its target in response to activation by light has become a frequently used tool in drug discovery for identifying new drug targets and molecular interactions, and for probing the location and structure of binding sites. Methods to identify the specific target proteins of hit molecules from phenotypic screens are highly valuable in early drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the principles of PAL including probe design and experimental techniques for in vitro and live cell investigations. We emphasize the need to optimize and validate probes and highlight examples of the successful application of PAL across multiple disease areas. PMID:25686004

  10. Photoactive yellow protein-based protein labeling system with turn-on fluorescence intensity.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuichiro; Ueno, Hideki; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2009-11-25

    Protein labeling provides significant information about protein function. In this research, we developed a novel protein labeling technique by utilizing photoactive yellow protein (PYP). PYP is a small protein (14 kDa) derived from purple bacteria and binds to 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid as well as to a natural ligand, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, through a thioester bond with Cys69. Based on the structure and fluorescence property of this coumarin derivative, we designed two fluorescent probes that bind to PYP. One has an azido moiety, which allows stepwise labeling by click chemistry, and the other is a fluorogenic probe. The live-cell imaging and specific labeling of PYP were achieved by using both probes. The flexibility of the probe design and the small size of the tag protein are great advantages of this system against the existing methods. This novel labeling technique can be used in a wide variety of applications for biological research. PMID:19877615

  11. Affinity labeling of the ribosomal P site in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    North, D.

    1987-01-01

    Several recent studies have probed the peptidyl transferase region of the Drosophila ribosome via the use of reactive site specific analogues (affinity labels). P site proteins adjacent to the 3' end of the amino acid bearing tRNA strand were labeled with modified tRNA fragments. Drugs affecting the binding of these agents were used to further clarify the nature of the region. The nascent peptide region of the P site was not labeled in previous experiments. To label that region radioactive Bromoacetylphenylalanyl-tRNA (BrAcphe-tRNA) was synthesized. The alpha-bromoacetyl group of this analogue is potentially reactive with nucleophiles present in either proteins or RNAs. Charged tRNAs and tRNA analogues bearing a peptide bond on the N-terminus of their amino acid are recognized as having affinity for the ribosomal P site. Specific labeling of the P site by BrAcphe-tRNA was confirmed by its ability to radioactively label proteins indirectly. As many as 8 ribosomal proteins may be labeled under these conditions, however, the majority of the bound label is associated with 3 large subunit proteins and 2 small subunit proteins. Overlaps between the proteins labeled by BrAcphe-tRNA and those labeled by other affinity labels are examined and a model of the peptidyl transferase region of Drosophila ribosomes is presented.

  12. Colloidal gold: a pluripotent receptor probe.

    PubMed

    Handley, D A; Chien, S

    1983-10-01

    Colloidal gold is an electron-dense, lyophobic colloid that readily forms a stable electrostatic interaction with a variety of macromolecules. Monodispersed colloids ranging from 3-150 nm in diameter can be produced to provide the researcher with flexibility in selecting the optimally sized probe. Gold labeling of antibodies and lectins has been extensively used to study surface antigens and cell components. Recently, the use of gold labeling has been extended to study receptor-ligand binding, enzyme-substrate reactions, and transcellular pathways. Published applications include gold labeling of metabolites (low-density lipoproteins), enzymes (DNAase and RNAase, RNA polymerase, thrombin, collagenase, elastase), hormones (insulin, epidermal growth factor, glucagon), circulating plasma proteins (asialoglycoprotein, alpha 2-macroglobulin, factor VIII-von Willebrand factor), and endotoxins (tetanus toxin, cholera toxin). This broad spectrum of applications emphasizes the versatility and usefulness of colloidal gold as a probe in areas of cell biology related to receptors, endocytosis, transport, and functions of proteins. PMID:6356133

  13. Arrayed imaging reflectometry for inexpensive and label-free protein arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striemer, Christopher C.; Mace, Charles R.; Carter, Jared A.; Mehta, Sourabh D.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2009-02-01

    Highly sensitive optical techniques, capable of detecting very small quantities of specific proteins in a label-free format, offer great promise for pathogen detection because they avoid the complexity, expense, and process time associated with the use of secondary reporter elements. Arrayed Imaging Reflectometry (AIR) is one of the simplest label-free methodologies, combining laser reflectance imaging of a thermally oxidized silicon chip with standard microarray printing technology to create a platform with the potential to identify and quantify 100's of target proteins in a matter of minutes. This technique exploits a reflectance zero condition that is formed when s-polarized light strikes the surface of a silicon wafer with a single-layer oxide coating. In the vicinity of this deep reflectance minimum, picometer-scale variations in film thickness (surface relief) can be imaged directly in a reflected laser signal imaged with a CCD camera. By directly arraying probe molecules onto this substrate, minute changes in the optical thickness of each spot, corresponding to binding of the target of interest, can be measured. Array size is limited only by the resolution of the imaging system and the array printer, enabling complex protein signatures, indicative of specific pathogens or disease states to be measured in a biosample. The cost-effectiveness of a low-complexity substrate and reader, combined with the short assay times associated with label-free detection make AIR a promising new technology for pathogen and toxic exposure assessment.

  14. A Label-free Technique for the Spatio-temporal Imaging of Single Cell Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, Deepa; Christodoulides, Joseph A.; Delehanty, James B.; Byers, Jeff M.; Raphael, Marc P.

    2015-01-01

    Inter-cellular communication is an integral part of a complex system that helps in maintaining basic cellular activities. As a result, the malfunctioning of such signaling can lead to many disorders. To understand cell-to-cell signaling, it is essential to study the spatial and temporal nature of the secreted molecules from the cell without disturbing the local environment. Various assays have been developed to study protein secretion, however, these methods are typically based on fluorescent probes which disrupt the relevant signaling pathways. To overcome this limitation, a label-free technique is required. In this paper, we describe the fabrication and application of a label-free localized surface plasmon resonance imaging (LSPRi) technology capable of detecting protein secretions from a single cell. The plasmonic nanostructures are lithographically patterned onto a standard glass coverslip and can be excited using visible light on commercially available light microscopes. Only a small fraction of the coverslip is covered by the nanostructures and hence this technique is well suited for combining common techniques such as fluorescence and bright-field imaging. A multidisciplinary approach is used in this protocol which incorporates sensor nanofabrication and subsequent biofunctionalization, binding kinetics characterization of ligand and analyte, the integration of the chip and live cells, and the analysis of the measured signal. As a whole, this technology enables a general label-free approach towards mapping cellular secretions and correlating them with the responses of nearby cells. PMID:26650542

  15. In situ identification of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge using fluorescent rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Schuppler, M; Wagner, M; Schön, G; Göbel, U B

    1998-01-01

    Hitherto, few environmental samples have been investigated by a 'full cycle rRNA analysis'. Here the results of in situ hybridization experiments with specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes developed on the basis of new sequences derived from a previously described comparative 16S rRNA analysis of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge are reported. Application of the specific probes enabled identification and discrimination of the distinct populations of nocardioform actinomycetes in activated sludge. One of the specific probes (DLP) detected rod-shaped bacteria which were found in 13 of the 16 investigated sludge samples from various wastewater treatment plants, suggesting their importance in the wastewater treatment process. Another probe (GLP2) hybridized with typically branched filaments of nocardioforms mainly found in samples from enhanced biological phosphorus removal plants, suggesting that these bacteria are involved in sludge foaming. The combination of in situ hybridization with fluorescently labelled rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and confocal laser scanning microscopy improved the detection of nocardioform actinomycetes, which often showed only weak signals inside the activated-sludge flocs. PMID:9467916

  16. Introducing cymantrene labels into scattering scanning near-field infrared microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Ilona; N'Dongo, Harmel W Peindy; Ballout, Fouad; Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Bründermann, Erik; Havenith, Martina

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we investigate metal-organic compounds as infrared (IR) active labels by scattering scanning near-field infrared microscopy (IR s-SNOM, often also abbreviated as s-SNIM) with a lateral resolution of 90 × 90 nm(2). Tailor-made IR spectroscopic probes based on cymantrene (CpMn(CO)(3) with Cp = η(5)-C(5)H(5)) conjugated to a cysteine-modified pseudoneurotensin (pNT-Cys-OH) peptide were prepared by automated microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and characterized by HPLC, ESI-MS and IR. Well-defined patterned self-assembled monolayers on a gold surface were prepared by microcontact printing of 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) followed by additional incubation in ethanolic solution of the cymantrene-peptide derivative. The self-assembled monolayers have been evidenced by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and AFM. CO laser source radiation was tuned (1944, 1900, 1798 and 1658 cm(-1)) for imaging contrast with good matching correlation between spectroscopic and topographic patterns at specific characteristic metal carbonyl and amide bands (1944 cm(-1) (λ = 5.14 μm) and 1658 cm(-1) (λ = 6.03 μm)). Cymantrene probes provide an attractive method to tag a unique spectroscopic feature on any bio(macro)molecule. Introducing such probes into super-resolution IR s-SNOM will enable molecular tracking and distribution studies even in complex biological systems. PMID:22966486

  17. ADAPT, a Novel Scaffold Protein-Based Probe for Radionuclide Imaging of Molecular Targets That Are Expressed in Disseminated Cancers.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Lindbo, Sarah; Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Buijs, Jos; Sandström, Mattias; Honarvar, Hadis; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Hober, Sophia

    2015-10-15

    Small engineered scaffold proteins have attracted attention as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. One class of these imaging probes, termed ABD-Derived Affinity Proteins (ADAPT), has been created using the albumin-binding domain (ABD) of streptococcal protein G as a stable protein scaffold. In this study, we report the development of a clinical lead probe termed ADAPT6 that binds HER2, an oncoprotein overexpressed in many breast cancers that serves as a theranostic biomarker for several approved targeting therapies. Surface-exposed amino acids of ABD were randomized to create a combinatorial library enabling selection of high-affinity binders to various proteins. Furthermore, ABD was engineered to enable rapid purification, to eradicate its binding to albumin, and to enable rapid blood clearance. Incorporation of a unique cysteine allowed site-specific conjugation to a maleimido derivative of a DOTA chelator, enabling radionuclide labeling, ¹¹¹In for SPECT imaging and ⁶⁸Ga for PET imaging. Pharmacologic studies in mice demonstrated that the fully engineered molecule (111)In/⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-(HE)3-ADAPT6 was specifically bound and taken up by HER2-expressing tumors, with a high tumor-to-normal tissue ratio in xenograft models of human cancer. Unbound tracer underwent rapid renal clearance followed by high renal reabsorption. HER2-expressing xenografts were visualized by gamma-camera or PET at 1 hour after infusion. PET experiments demonstrated feasibility for discrimination of xenografts with high or low HER2 expression. Our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of ADAPT probes for noninvasive in vivo imaging. PMID:26297736

  18. Robust statistical fusion of image labels.

    PubMed

    Landman, Bennett A; Asman, Andrew J; Scoggins, Andrew G; Bogovic, John A; Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L

    2012-02-01

    Image labeling and parcellation (i.e., assigning structure to a collection of voxels) are critical tasks for the assessment of volumetric and morphometric features in medical imaging data. The process of image labeling is inherently error prone as images are corrupted by noise and artifacts. Even expert interpretations are subject to subjectivity and the precision of the individual raters. Hence, all labels must be considered imperfect with some degree of inherent variability. One may seek multiple independent assessments to both reduce this variability and quantify the degree of uncertainty. Existing techniques have exploited maximum a posteriori statistics to combine data from multiple raters and simultaneously estimate rater reliabilities. Although quite successful, wide-scale application has been hampered by unstable estimation with practical datasets, for example, with label sets with small or thin objects to be labeled or with partial or limited datasets. As well, these approaches have required each rater to generate a complete dataset, which is often impossible given both human foibles and the typical turnover rate of raters in a research or clinical environment. Herein, we propose a robust approach to improve estimation performance with small anatomical structures, allow for missing data, account for repeated label sets, and utilize training/catch trial data. With this approach, numerous raters can label small, overlapping portions of a large dataset, and rater heterogeneity can be robustly controlled while simultaneously estimating a single, reliable label set and characterizing uncertainty. The proposed approach enables many individuals to collaborate in the construction of large datasets for labeling tasks (e.g., human parallel processing) and reduces the otherwise detrimental impact of rater unavailability. PMID:22010145

  19. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy of the urinary tract: the technique.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy C; Liu, Jen-Jane; Liao, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is an emerging optical imaging technology that enables real-time in vivo microscopy of mucosal surfaces during standard endoscopy. With applications currently in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, CLE has also been explored in the urinary tract for bladder cancer diagnosis. Cellular morphology and tissue microarchitecture can be resolved with micron scale resolution in real time, in addition to dynamic imaging of the normal and pathological vasculature. The probe-based CLE system (Cellvizio, Mauna Kea Technologies, France) consists of a reusable fiberoptic imaging probe coupled to a 488 nm laser scanning unit. The imaging probe is inserted in the working channels of standard flexible and rigid endoscopes. An endoscope-based CLE system (Optiscan, Australia), in which the confocal endomicroscopy functionality is integrated onto the endoscope, is also used in the gastrointestinal tract. Given the larger scope diameter, however, application in the urinary tract is currently limited to ex vivo use. Confocal image acquisition is done through direct contact of the imaging probe with the target tissue and recorded as video sequences. As in the gastrointestinal tract, endomicroscopy of the urinary tract requires an exogenenous contrast agent-most commonly fluorescein, which can be administered intravenously or intravesically. Intravesical administration is a well-established method to introduce pharmacological agents locally with minimal systemic toxicity that is unique to the urinary tract. Fluorescein rapidly stains the extracellular matrix and has an established safety profile. Imaging probes of various diameters enable compatibility with different caliber endoscopes. To date, 1.4 and 2.6 mm probes have been evaluated with flexible and rigid cystoscopy. Recent availability of a < 1 mm imaging probe opens up the possibility of CLE in the upper urinary tract during ureteroscopy. Fluorescence cystoscopy (i

  20. Where Has All the Inhibition Gone? Insights from Electrophysiological Measures into Negative Priming without Probe Distractors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groh-Bordin, Christian; Frings, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Responses to probe targets that have been distractors in a prime display are slower than responses to unrepeated stimuli, a finding labeled negative priming (NP). However, without probe distractors the NP effect usually diminishes. The present study is the first to investigate ERP correlates of NP without probe distractors to shed light on the…

  1. Subwavelength optical probes for sensitive analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weihong; Bang, Leng; Cordek, Julia; Liu, Xiaojing

    1998-04-01

    Near-field optics has been utilized for a variety of applications. Using near-field optical probe and microscopy, we have devised a method to introduce a near-field probe into live cultured vascular smooth muscle cell and NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells. We have effectively monitored cellular responses, with excellent spatial and fast temporal resolutions, to drug stimulation. Near-field optical probes enable the visualization of functional response in living cells. We have also nanofabricated the first single molecule optical probe. A single dye molecule, carbocyanine dye C18, is immobilized on a near-field optical probe by physical immobilization. We are able to control the preparation process by selecting the dye molecule concentrations and the interaction times of the probe with the DiI solution. The single DiI molecule probe's optical and spectroscopic properties have been characterized. Photobleaching of a single DiI molecule probe occurs as a discrete and total extinction of its fluorescence. We have also developed ultrasensitive detection schemes using near-field optical probes. Biomolecule immobilization has been carried out on optical fiber probes. Ultrasensitive biochemical sensors for glutamate and lactate have been prepared and characterized.

  2. Advanced surface-enhanced Raman gene probe systems and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2001-01-01

    The subject invention is a series of methods and systems for using the Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER)-labeled Gene Probe for hybridization, detection and identification of SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material comprising the steps of immobilizing SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material on a support means, wherein the SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material comprise a SER label attached either to a target oligonucleotide of unknown sequence or to a gene probe of known sequence complementary to the target oligonucleotide sequence, the SER label is unique for the target oligonucleotide strands of a particular sequence wherein the SER-labeled oligonucleotide is hybridized to its complementary oligonucleotide strand, then the support means having the SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material adsorbed thereon is SERS activated with a SERS activating means, then the support means is analyzed.

  3. Fluorogenic Label for Biomolecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lavis, Luke D.; Chao, Tzu-Yuan; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional small-molecule fluorophores are always fluorescent. That attribute can obscure valuable information in biological experiments. Here, we report on a versatile “latent” fluorophore that overcomes this limitation. At the core of the latent fluorophore is a derivative of rhodamine in which one nitrogen is modified as a urea. That modification enables rhodamine to retain half of its fluorescence while facilitating conjugation to a target molecule. The other nitrogen of rhodamine is modified with a “trimethyl lock”, which enables fluorescence to be unmasked fully by a single user-designated chemical reaction. An esterase-reactive latent fluorophore was synthesized in high yield and attached covalently to a cationic protein. The resulting conjugate was not fluorescent in the absence of esterases. The enzymatic activity of esterases in endocytic vesicles and the cytosol educed fluorescence, enabling the time-lapse imaging of endocytosis into live human cells and thus providing unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of this process. The modular design of this “fluorogenic label” enables the facile synthesis of an ensemble of small-molecule probes for the illumination of numerous biochemical and cell biological processes. PMID:17163679

  4. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of a Low-Molecular-Weight (11)C-Labeled Tetrazine for Pretargeted PET Imaging Applying Bioorthogonal in Vivo Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Denk, Christoph; Svatunek, Dennis; Mairinger, Severin; Stanek, Johann; Filip, Thomas; Matscheko, Dominik; Kuntner, Claudia; Wanek, Thomas; Mikula, Hannes

    2016-07-20

    A low-molecular-weight tetrazine labeled with the short-lived positron emitter carbon-11 was developed as a bioorthogonal PET probe for pretargeted imaging. A method for efficient and fast synthesis of this imaging agent is presented using radiolabeling of a readily available precursor. High reactivity with trans-cyclooctenes was observed and in vivo investigations including PET/MR scanning showed homogeneous biodistribution, good metabolic stability, and rapid excretion in naive mice. These properties are key to the success of bioorthogonal (11)C-PET imaging, which has been shown in a simple pretargeting experiment using TCO-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Overall, this (11)C-labeled tetrazine represents a highly versatile and advantageous chemical tool for bioorthogonal PET imaging and enables pretargeting approaches using carbon-11 for the first time. PMID:27308894

  5. Bar Code Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    American Bar Codes, Inc. developed special bar code labels for inventory control of space shuttle parts and other space system components. ABC labels are made in a company-developed anodizing aluminum process and consecutively marketed with bar code symbology and human readable numbers. They offer extreme abrasion resistance and indefinite resistance to ultraviolet radiation, capable of withstanding 700 degree temperatures without deterioration and up to 1400 degrees with special designs. They offer high resistance to salt spray, cleaning fluids and mild acids. ABC is now producing these bar code labels commercially or industrial customers who also need labels to resist harsh environments.

  6. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  7. Label-Embedding for Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Akata, Zeynep; Perronnin, Florent; Harchaoui, Zaid; Schmid, Cordelia

    2016-07-01

    Attributes act as intermediate representations that enable parameter sharing between classes, a must when training data is scarce. We propose to view attribute-based image classification as a label-embedding problem: each class is embedded in the space of attribute vectors. We introduce a function that measures the compatibility between an image and a label embedding. The parameters of this function are learned on a training set of labeled samples to ensure that, given an image, the correct classes rank higher than the incorrect ones. Results on the Animals With Attributes and Caltech-UCSD-Birds datasets show that the proposed framework outperforms the standard Direct Attribute Prediction baseline in a zero-shot learning scenario. Label embedding enjoys a built-in ability to leverage alternative sources of information instead of or in addition to attributes, such as, e.g., class hierarchies or textual descriptions. Moreover, label embedding encompasses the whole range of learning settings from zero-shot learning to regular learning with a large number of labeled examples. PMID:26452251

  8. Nanoplasmon-enabled macroscopic thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Gustav Edman; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    In numerous applications of energy harvesting via transformation of light into heat the focus recently shifted towards highly absorptive nanoplasmonic materials. It is currently established that noble metals-based absorptive plasmonic platforms deliver significant light-capturing capability and can be viewed as super-absorbers of optical radiation. Naturally, approaches to the direct experimental probing of macroscopic temperature increase resulting from these absorbers are welcomed. Here we derive a general quantitative method of characterizing heat-generating properties of optically absorptive layers via macroscopic thermal imaging. We further monitor macroscopic areas that are homogeneously heated by several degrees with nanostructures that occupy a mere 8% of the surface, leaving it essentially transparent and evidencing significant heat generation capability of nanoplasmon-enabled light capture. This has a direct bearing to a large number of applications where thermal management is crucial.

  9. Nanoplasmon-enabled macroscopic thermal management

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Gustav Edman; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    In numerous applications of energy harvesting via transformation of light into heat the focus recently shifted towards highly absorptive nanoplasmonic materials. It is currently established that noble metals-based absorptive plasmonic platforms deliver significant light-capturing capability and can be viewed as super-absorbers of optical radiation. Naturally, approaches to the direct experimental probing of macroscopic temperature increase resulting from these absorbers are welcomed. Here we derive a general quantitative method of characterizing heat-generating properties of optically absorptive layers via macroscopic thermal imaging. We further monitor macroscopic areas that are homogeneously heated by several degrees with nanostructures that occupy a mere 8% of the surface, leaving it essentially transparent and evidencing significant heat generation capability of nanoplasmon-enabled light capture. This has a direct bearing to a large number of applications where thermal management is crucial. PMID:24870613

  10. Toward genome-enabled mycology.

    PubMed

    Hibbett, David S; Stajich, Jason E; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-enabled mycology is a rapidly expanding field that is characterized by the pervasive use of genome-scale data and associated computational tools in all aspects of fungal biology. Genome-enabled mycology is integrative and often requires teams of researchers with diverse skills in organismal mycology, bioinformatics and molecular biology. This issue of Mycologia presents the first complete fungal genomes in the history of the journal, reflecting the ongoing transformation of mycology into a genome-enabled science. Here, we consider the prospects for genome-enabled mycology and the technical and social challenges that will need to be overcome to grow the database of complete fungal genomes and enable all fungal biologists to make use of the new data. PMID:23928422

  11. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  12. Label-Free Impedance Biosensors: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Jonathan S.; Pourmand, Nader

    2007-01-01

    Impedance biosensors are a class of electrical biosensors that show promise for point-of-care and other applications due to low cost, ease of miniaturization, and label-free operation. Unlabeled DNA and protein targets can be detected by monitoring changes in surface impedance when a target molecule binds to an immobilized probe. The affinity capture step leads to challenges shared by all label-free affinity biosensors; these challenges are discussed along with others unique to impedance readout. Various possible mechanisms for impedance change upon target binding are discussed. We critically summarize accomplishments of past label-free impedance biosensors and identify areas for future research. PMID:18176631

  13. Programmable oligonucleotide probes design and applications for in situ and in vivo RNA imaging in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheglakov, Zoya

    Unequal spreading of mRNA is a frequent experience observed in varied cell lines. The study of cellular processes dynamics and precise localization of mRNAs offers a vital toolbox to target specific proteins in precise cytoplasmic areas and provides a convenient instrument to uncover their mechanisms and functions. Latest methodological innovations have allowed imaging of a single mRNA molecule in situ and in vivo. Today, Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methods allow the studying of mRNA expression and offer a vital toolbox for accurate biological models. Studies enable analysis of the dynamics of an individual mRNA, have uncovered the multiplex RNA transport systems. With all current approaches, a single mRNA tracking in the mammalian cells is still challenging. This thesis describes mRNA detection methods based on programmable fluorophore-labeled DNA structures complimentary to native targets providing an accurate mRNA imaging in mammalian cells. First method represents beta-actin (ACTB) transcripts in situ detection in human cells, the technique strategy is based on programmable DNA probes, amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA). The method reports precise localization of molecule of interest with an accuracy of a single-cell. Visualization and localization of specific endogenous mRNA molecules in real-time in vivo has the promising to innovate cellular biology studies, medical analysis and to provide a vital toolbox in drugs invention area. Second method described in this thesis represents miR-21 miRNA detection within a single live-cell resolution. The method using fluorophore-labeled short synthetic DNAs probes forming a stem-loop shape and generating Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) as a result of target-probes hybridization. Catalytic nucleic acid (DNAzymes) probes are cooperative tool for precise detection of different mRNA targets. With assistance of a complementary fluorophore-quencher labeled substrate, the DNAzymes provide

  14. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  15. Synthesis of labeled meropenem for the analysis of M. tuberculosis transpeptidases

    PubMed Central

    Kastrinsky, David B.; Barry, Clifton E.

    2009-01-01

    A concise synthesis of 14C labeled meropenem prepared from 14C dimethylamine hydrochloride is described. Using a similar reaction sequence, the meropenem nucleus was also attached to biotin providing a probe for protein interaction studies. PMID:20161438

  16. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  17. OR Specimen Labeling.

    PubMed

    Zervakis Brent, Mary Ann

    2016-02-01

    Mislabeled surgical specimens jeopardize patient safety and quality care. The purpose of this project was to determine whether labeling surgical specimens with two patient identifiers would result in an 80% reduction in specimen labeling errors within six months and a 100% reduction in errors within 12 months. Our failure mode effects analysis found that the lack of two patient identifiers per label was the most unsafe step in our specimen handling process. We piloted and implemented a new process in the OR using the Plan-Do-Check-Act conceptual framework. The audit process included collecting data and making direct observations to determine the sustainability of the process change; however, the leadership team halted the direct observation audit after four months. The total number of surgical specimen labeling errors was reduced by only 60% within six months and 62% within 12 months; therefore, the goal of the project was not met. However, OR specimen labeling errors were reduced. PMID:26849982

  18. Application of rRNA-based probes for observing marine nanoplanktonic protists.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, E L; Amaral, L A; Caron, D A; DeLong, E F

    1993-01-01

    The use of small-subunit rRNA-based oligonucleotides as probes for detecting marine nanoplanktonic protists was examined with a ciliate (an Uronema sp.), a flagellate (a Cafeteria sp.), and mixed assemblages of protists from enrichment cultures and natural seawater samples. Flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that hybridizations employing fluorescein-labeled, eukaryote-specific probes intensely stained logarithmically growing protists, whereas these same protist strains in late stationary growth were barely detectable. The fluorescence intensity due to probe binding was significantly enhanced by the use of probes end labeled with biotin, which were detected by fluorescein-labeled avidin. The degree of signal amplification ranged from two- to fivefold for cultured protists in both logarithmic and stationary growth phases. Mixed assemblages of heterotrophic protists from enrichment cultures were also intensely labeled by rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes by the biotin-avidin detection system. Protists in late stationary growth phase and natural assemblages of protists that were otherwise undetectable when hybridized with fluorescein-labeled probes were easily visualized by this approach. In the latter samples, hybridization with multiple, biotin-labeled probes was necessary for detection of naturally occurring marine protists by epifluorescence microscopy. The signal amplification obtained with the biotin-avidin system should increase the utility of rRNA-targeted probes for identifying protists and facilitate characterization of the population structure and distribution of protists in aquatic environments. Images PMID:8517756

  19. A new probe for super-resolution imaging of membranes elucidates trafficking pathways

    PubMed Central

    Revelo, Natalia H.; Truckenbrodt, Sven; Wong, Aaron B.; Reuter-Jessen, Kirsten; Reisinger, Ellen; Moser, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The molecular composition of the organelles involved in membrane recycling is difficult to establish as a result of the absence of suitable labeling tools. We introduce in this paper a novel probe, named membrane-binding fluorophore-cysteine-lysine-palmitoyl group (mCLING), which labels the plasma membrane and is taken up during endocytosis. It remains attached to membranes after fixation and permeabilization and can therefore be used in combination with immunostaining and super-resolution microscopy. We applied mCLING to mammalian-cultured cells, yeast, bacteria, primary cultured neurons, Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junctions, and mammalian tissue. mCLING enabled us to study the molecular composition of different trafficking organelles. We used it to address several questions related to synaptic vesicle recycling in the auditory inner hair cells from the organ of Corti and to investigate molecular differences between synaptic vesicles that recycle actively or spontaneously in cultured neurons. We conclude that mCLING enables the investigation of trafficking membranes in a broad range of preparations. PMID:24862576

  20. Nanovehicles based Bioassay Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Lin, Ying-Ying; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we review recent advances of our group in nanoparticle labels based bioassay. Apoferritin and silica nanoparticles have been used as nanovehicles to load large amount of markers for highly sensitive bioassay. Markers loaded apoferritin, apoferritin-templated metallic phosphate nanoparticles, and poly [guanine] coated silica nanoparticles have been prepared, characterized and used as labels for highly sensitive bioassay of protein and DNA. Dissociation and reconstitution characteristics at different pH as well as the special cavity structure of apoferritin nanovehicle provides a simple and convenient route to prepare versatile nanoparticle labels and avoid the complicated and tedious synthesis process of conventional nanoparticle labels. The optical and electrochemical characteristics of the prepared nanoparticle labels are easily controlled by loading different optical or electrochemical markers. Additionally, the use of apoferritin nanovehicle as template for synthesis of metallic phosphate nanoparticle labels offers fast route to prepare uniform-size metallic nanoparticle labels for electrochemical bioassay and avoids the traditional harsh dissolution conditions to dissolve metallic nanoparticle tags (that is, the strong-acid dissolution of quantum dots and gold nanoparticles) during the stripping analysis step. Silica nanoparticle has also been used as nanovehicle to carry thousands of poly [guanine] tracers, which was used to enhance the oxidation current of Ru(bpy)32+, resulting in enhanced sensitivity of electrochemical immunoassay. The new nanovehicle-based labels have been used for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and protein biomarkers, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). The high sensitivity and selectivity make these labels a useful addition to the armory of nanoparticle-based bioassay. The new nanovehicles based labels hold great promise for multiplex protein and DNA detection and for enhancing the sensitivity

  1. NeuroMEMS: Neural Probe Microtechnologies

    PubMed Central

    HajjHassan, Mohamad; Chodavarapu, Vamsy; Musallam, Sam

    2008-01-01

    Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain. Neural probes are currently used in many clinical settings for diagnosis of brain diseases such as seizers, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's, and dementia. We find these devices assisting paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. In recent years, probe technologies were assisted by rapid advancements in microfabrication and microelectronic technologies and thus are enabling highly functional and robust neural probes which are opening new and exciting avenues in neural sciences and brain machine interfaces. With a wide variety of probes that have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date, this review aims to provide an overview of the advances and recent progress in the microfabrication techniques of neural probes. In addition, we aim to highlight the challenges faced in developing and implementing ultra-long multi-site recording probes that are needed to monitor neural activity from deeper regions in the brain. Finally, we review techniques that can improve the biocompatibility of the neural probes to minimize the immune response and encourage neural growth around the electrodes for long term implantation studies.

  2. SERS gene probe for DNA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, David L.; Allain, Leonardo R.; Isola, Narayana R.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-07-01

    We describe the development of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering gene (SERGen) probe technology for rapid screening for diseases and pathogens through DNA hybridization assays. The technology combines the use of gene probes labeled with SERS-active markers, and nanostructured metallic platforms for inducing the SERS effect. As a result, SERGen-based methods can offer the spectral selectivity and sensitivity of SERS as well as the molecular specificity of DNA sequence hybridization. Furthermore, these new probe s preclude the use of radioactive labels. As illustrated herein, SERGen probes have been used as primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications of specific DNA sequences, hence further boosting the sensitivity of the technology. We also describe several approaches to developing SERS-active DNA assay platforms, addressing the challenges of making the SERGen technology accessible and practical for clinical settings. The usefulness of the SERGen approach has been demonstrated in the detection of HIV, BRCA1 breast cancer, and BAX genes. There is great potential for the use of numerous SERGen probes for multiplexed detection of multiple biological targets.

  3. Nanoscale Label-free Bioprobes to Detect Intracellular Proteins in Single Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wooyoung; Liang, Feng; Schaak, Diane; Loncar, Marko; Quan, Qimin

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescent labeling techniques have been widely used in live cell studies; however, the labeling processes can be laborious and challenging for use in non-transfectable cells, and labels can interfere with protein functions. While label-free biosensors have been realized by nanofabrication, a method to track intracellular protein dynamics in real-time, in situ and in living cells has not been found. Here we present the first demonstration of label-free detection of intracellular p53 protein dynamics through a nanoscale surface plasmon-polariton fiber-tip-probe (FTP).

  4. Computer Security Systems Enable Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Gary

    1989-01-01

    A good security system enables access and protects information from damage or tampering, but the most important aspects of a security system aren't technical. A security procedures manual addresses the human element of computer security. (MLW)

  5. Enabling Space Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, William J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation on enabling space science and exploration covers the following topics: 1) Today s Deep Space Network; 2) Next Generation Deep Space Network; 3) Needed technologies; 4) Mission IT and networking; and 5) Multi-mission operations.

  6. Optimized RNA ISH, RNA FISH and protein-RNA double labeling (IF/FISH) in Drosophila ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Sandra G; Peters, Nathaniel C; Altaras, Ariel E; Berg, Celeste A

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a powerful technique for detecting nucleic acids in cells and tissues. Here we describe three ISH procedures that are optimized for Drosophila ovaries: whole-mount, digoxigenin-labeled RNA ISH; RNA fluorescent ISH (FISH); and protein immunofluorescence (IF)–RNA FISH double labeling (IF/FISH). Each procedure balances conflicting requirements for permeabilization, fixation and preservation of antigenicity to detect RNA and protein expression with high resolution and sensitivity. The ISH protocol uses alkaline phosphatase–conjugated digoxigenin antibodies followed by a color reaction, whereas FISH detection involves tyramide signal amplification (TSA). To simultaneously preserve antigens for protein detection and enable RNA probe penetration for IF/FISH, we perform IF before FISH and use xylenes and detergents to permeabilize the tissue rather than proteinase K, which can damage the antigens. ISH and FISH take 3 d to perform, whereas IF/FISH takes 5 d. Probe generation takes 1 or 2 d to perform. PMID:24113787

  7. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version How to Read Drug ... read drug labels How to read a prescription drug label View a text version of this picture. ...

  8. Nutrition Facts: Reading the Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Nutrition Facts: Reading the Label Reading labels can help ... of information on their labels or packaging about nutrition and food safety. Product dates . You might see ...

  9. Noise labeling in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, Marco A. N.; Massarani, Paulo M.; de Azevedo, Jose A. J.; Gerges, Samir N. Y.

    2002-11-01

    The Brazilian Silence Program, created in 1990 by the Brazilian Ministry of Environment, advocates the production and use of equipment with lower noise level. The subcommittee of Noise Labeling of the Brazilian Committee of Certification is composed of INMETRO acoustic specialists to organize and implement the Brazilian Labeling Program. This subcommittee elaborated the label form and test procedure. The noise-labeling program will first concentrate on the following household devices, both manufactured in Brazil or imported from abroad; mixers, blenders, hairdryers, refrigerators, and vacuum cleaners. The label should contain the sound-power level in dBA. INMETRO or other credited laboratories are responsible for the measurements. The ISO 4871, 3740 (1 to 5), ISO 8960, and IEC 704 (1 to 4) and also the equivalent Brazilian standards are used for the measurements, such as ABNT NBR 13910-1. The main objective of the label is to inform the consumer about the emitted noise level. The label offers the noise parameter to be used by the consumer when comparing devices, considering price, performance, and now also noise. No restriction for noise level was established.

  10. Synthesis of nucleic acid probes on membrane supports: A procedure for the removal of unincorporated precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    We have used DNA bound to small pieces of nylon membrane for the synthesis of radioactive probes. The DNA to be used for generating the probe(s) is first bound to nylon membranes and then introduced into the reaction mix. The labeling reaction takes place on the membrane and therefore allows easy removal of unincorporated precursors by simple washing for 1-2 min. The clean labeled probe is eluted from the membrane in formamide or in water and is ready for use. This DNA-membrane can be stored for reuse. Synthesis of probes on a solid support such as nylon membrane thus circumvents problems associated with chromatographic manipulations needed for the separation of labeled DNA from unicorporated precursors. Probes synthesized in this manner are as efficient in detecting nucleic acid sequences as those synthesized in solution.

  11. Preparation of Complex DNA Probe Sets for 3D FISH with up to Six Different Fluorochromes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan; Neusser, Michaela; Köhler, Daniela; Cremer, Marion

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONDNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be generated and labeled by various methods. This protocol describes the conjugation of dUTPs with haptens or fluorochromes, as well as the generation and labeling of DNA probes using those modified dUTPs. Sources of probe DNA include genomic DNA, DNA from flow-sorted chromosomes, bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), and cosmids. DNA amplification and labeling procedures involving degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and multiple displacement amplification (MDA) are provided. Advice is given for setting up complex probe pools, such as those containing large pools of BAC probes. Also included is a method for probe precipitation and preparation of a hybridization mix ready to be used for 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. PMID:21357075

  12. Synthesis of nucleic acid probes on membrane supports: a procedure for the removal of unincorporated precursors.

    PubMed

    Bhat, S P

    1990-01-01

    We have used DNA bound to small pieces of nylon membrane for the synthesis of radioactive probes. The DNA to be used for generating the probe(s) is first bound to nylon membranes and then introduced into the reaction mix. The labeling reaction takes place on the membrane and therefore allows easy removal of unincorporated precursors by simple washing for 1-2 min. The clean labeled probe is eluted from the membrane in formamide or in water and is ready for use. This DNA-membrane can be stored for reuse. Synthesis of probes on a solid support such as nylon membrane thus circumvents problems associated with chromatographic manipulations needed for the separation of labeled DNA from unicorporated precursors. Probes synthesized in this manner are as efficient in detecting nucleic acid sequences as those synthesized in solution. PMID:2321760

  13. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  14. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  15. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1985-11-12

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label. 5 figs.

  16. Unkind Words: Ethnic Labeling from "Redskin" to "WASP."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Irving Lewis

    This book, a cultural, thematic, and sociolinguistic study of ethnic labeling in American popular speech and usage, probes for the source of the modern ethnic slur. Providing insight into the social workings of American society and culture, the book examines the history of popular speech--a rich source of information about the American collective…

  17. Detection of supercoiled hepatitis B virus DNA and related forms by means of molecular hybridization to an oligonucleotide probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.J.; Chung, H.T.; Lai, C.L.; Leong, S.; Tam, O.S. )

    1989-12-01

    A novel assay for supercoiled and other fully double-stranded forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood is presented that utilizes molecular hybridisation to a radiophosphorous-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The probe (5'-d(ACGTGCAGAGGTGAAGCGA)) is complementary to the S(+)-strand sequence furthest downstream, at the end of the gap. We examined blood specimens from 137 healthy HBsAg-positive individuals, applying the probe to dots representing 2-3.5 ml serum or plasma. We found that supercoiled HBV is present in many HBV DNA-positive blood specimens albeit in small quantities. Of the 104 specimens that were positive for HBV DNA of any form, 53 annealed to the probe. Serial specimens from the same subject taken over a period of months showed that the proportion of supercoil to other HBV DNA forms was variable. The presence of supercoil HBV DNA was not closely correlated with the level of serum HBV DNA polymerase. The supercoil is an HBV DNA form that can persist in the liver in the presence or absence of other replicative intermediates. This assay may enable further characterization of the status of HBV infection.

  18. Label transfer by measuring compactness.

    PubMed

    Varga, Robert; Nedevschi, Sergiu

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a new automatic image annotation algorithm. First, we introduce a new similarity measure between images: compactness. This uses low level visual descriptors for determining the similarity between two images. Compactness shows how close test image features lie to training image feature cluster centers. The measure provides the core for a k-nearest neighbor type image annotation method. Afterward, a formalism for defining different transfer techniques is devised and several label transfer techniques are provided. The method as whole is evaluated on four image annotation benchmarks. The results on these sets validate the accuracy of the approach, which outperforms many state-of-the-art annotation methods. The method presented here requires a simple training process, efficiently combines different feature types and performs better than complex learning algorithms, even in this incipient form. The main contributions of this paper are the usage of compactness as a similarity measure that enables efficient low level feature comparison and an annotation algorithm based on label transfer. PMID:23955754

  19. Cytochemical Labeling for Fungal and Host Components in Plant Tissues Inoculated with Fungal Wilt Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, G. B.; Baayen, R. P.; Chamberland, H.; Simard, M.; Rioux, D.; Charest, P. M.

    2004-08-01

    Antibodies to detect pectin in present investigations attached to distinct fibrils in vessel lumina. In carnation infected with an isolate of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., labeling of pathogen cells also occurred; in a resistant cultivar (cv.), it was coincident with proximate pectin fibrils and linked to altered fungal walls, which was the opposite in the susceptible cv., indicating that hindrance of pathogen ability to degrade pectin may be related to resistance. Labeling of the fungus in culture was nil, except in media containing pectin, showing that pectin is not native to the pathogen. Labeling of fungal walls for cellulose in elm (inoculated with Ophiostoma novo-ulmi) and carnation also occurred, linked to adsorbed host wall components. The chitin probe often attached to dispersed matter, in vessel lumina, traceable to irregularly labeled fungal cells and host wall degradation products. With an anti-horseradish peroxidase probe, host and fungal walls were equally labeled, and with a glucosidase, differences of labeling between these walls were observed, depending on pH of the test solution. Fungal extracellular matter and filamentous structures, present in fungal walls, predominantly in another elm isolate (Phaeotheca dimorphospora), did not label with any of the probes used. However, in cultures of this fungus, extracellular material labeled, even at a distance from the colony margin, with an anti-fimbriae probe.

  20. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  1. Imaging bacterial peptidoglycan with near-infrared fluorogenic azide probes

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Peyton; Siegrist, M. Sloan; Cullen, Andrew J.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent probes designed for activation by bioorthogonal chemistry have enabled the visualization of biomolecules in living systems. Such activatable probes with near-infrared (NIR) emission would be ideal for in vivo imaging but have proven difficult to engineer. We present the development of NIR fluorogenic azide probes based on the Si-rhodamine scaffold that undergo a fluorescence enhancement of up to 48-fold upon reaction with terminal or strained alkynes. We used the probes for mammalian cell surface imaging and, in conjunction with a new class of cyclooctyne d-amino acids, for visualization of bacterial peptidoglycan without the need to wash away unreacted probe. PMID:24706769

  2. Statistical label fusion with hierarchical performance models

    PubMed Central

    Asman, Andrew J.; Dagley, Alexander S.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Label fusion is a critical step in many image segmentation frameworks (e.g., multi-atlas segmentation) as it provides a mechanism for generalizing a collection of labeled examples into a single estimate of the underlying segmentation. In the multi-label case, typical label fusion algorithms treat all labels equally – fully neglecting the known, yet complex, anatomical relationships exhibited in the data. To address this problem, we propose a generalized statistical fusion framework using hierarchical models of rater performance. Building on the seminal work in statistical fusion, we reformulate the traditional rater performance model from a multi-tiered hierarchical perspective. This new approach provides a natural framework for leveraging known anatomical relationships and accurately modeling the types of errors that raters (or atlases) make within a hierarchically consistent formulation. Herein, we describe several contributions. First, we derive a theoretical advancement to the statistical fusion framework that enables the simultaneous estimation of multiple (hierarchical) performance models within the statistical fusion context. Second, we demonstrate that the proposed hierarchical formulation is highly amenable to the state-of-the-art advancements that have been made to the statistical fusion framework. Lastly, in an empirical whole-brain segmentation task we demonstrate substantial qualitative and significant quantitative improvement in overall segmentation accuracy. PMID:24817809

  3. Development of passive CLARITY and immunofluorescent labelling of multiple proteins in human cerebellum: understanding mechanisms of neurodegeneration in mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Jonathan; Laude, Alex; Lightowlers, Robert; Morris, Chris M.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Lax, Nichola Z.

    2016-01-01

    CLARITY enables immunofluorescent labelling and imaging of large volumes of tissue to provide a better insight into the three dimensional relationship between cellular morphology and spatial interactions between different cell types. In the current study, we optimise passive CLARITY and immunofluorescent labelling of neurons and mitochondrial proteins in mouse and human brain tissues to gain further insights into mechanisms of neurodegeneration occurring in mitochondrial disease. This is the first study to utilise human cerebellum fixed in paraformaldehyde and cryoprotected in conjunction with formalin-fixed tissues opening up further avenues for use of archived tissue. We optimised hydrogel-embedding and passive clearance of lipids from both mouse (n = 5) and human (n = 9) cerebellum as well as developing an immunofluorescent protocol that consistently labels different neuronal domains as well as blood vessels. In addition to visualising large structures, we were able to visualise mitochondrial proteins in passively cleared tissues to reveal respiratory chain deficiency associated with mitochondrial disease. We also demonstrate multiple use of tissues by stripping antibodies and re-probing the cerebellum. This technique allows interrogation of large volumes intact brain samples for better understanding of the complex pathological changes taking place in mitochondrial disease. PMID:27181107

  4. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off. PMID:21539053

  5. Stable isotope labeling strategy based on coding theory.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Takuma; Koshiba, Seizo; Yokoyama, Jun; Kigawa, Takanori

    2015-10-01

    We describe a strategy for stable isotope-aided protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, called stable isotope encoding. The basic idea of this strategy is that amino-acid selective labeling can be considered as "encoding and decoding" processes, in which the information of amino acid type is encoded by the stable isotope labeling ratio of the corresponding residue and it is decoded by analyzing NMR spectra. According to the idea, the strategy can diminish the required number of labelled samples by increasing information content per sample, enabling discrimination of 19 kinds of non-proline amino acids with only three labeled samples. The idea also enables this strategy to combine with information technologies, such as error detection by check digit, to improve the robustness of analyses with low quality data. Stable isotope encoding will facilitate NMR analyses of proteins under non-ideal conditions, such as those in large complex systems, with low-solubility, and in living cells. PMID:26293126

  6. A novel scheme of SONET/SDH label assignment in GMPLS-controlled MSTN network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingzhi; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jun; Xie, Guowu; Jin, Yaohui; Sun, Weiqiang; Guo, Wei; Hu, Weisheng

    2007-11-01

    Because SONET/SDH technology which includes contiguous concatenation and virtual concatenation is used in GMPLS-Controlled Multi-services Transport Platform (MSTP) Network, it is more complex when we consider the label assignment when setting up a Label Switch Path (LSP). It is very imperative to use a method which could use the limited labels effectively. In this paper, we study the structure of the label space and different label algorithm to allocate SONET/SDH labels, which include virtual concatenation labels and contiguous concatenation labels in GMPLS-Controlled MSTP Network. We proposed a minimum Contiguous Labels Algorithm (min-CLA) to solve the problem of using the limited label space on each interface at the most degree. Different from the previous schemes worked on Route Wavelength Assignment (RWA) in the Wavelength-Division-Multiplex (WDM) networks, our scheme finds out the primary and easy method based on SONET/SDH label which has virtual concatenation labels and contiguous concatenation labels used for different kinds of needs. Because of taking the multiple services requirements into account, the proposed algorithm finds out more efficient feasible solution requiring less network resources and even find a feasible solution which will enable some label assignment failed in other label assignment algorithm and we will compare our scheme and the Fist Fit Scheme.

  7. Bioassay Labels Based on Apoferritin Nanovehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Lea, Alan S.; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-09-04

    Here we report a nanoparticle label based on apoferritin nanovehicle loaded internally with markers for sensitive electrochemical DNA detection. The central cavity structure, the dissociation and reconstitute properties at different pHs of apoferritin provide a facile method to load and release markers. Hexacynoferrate(III) was used as model marker to load into the cavity of apoferritin protein cage. The loaded nanoparticle surface was functionalized with amino-modified DNA probe. Electrochemical DNA hybridization assay based on the hexacynoferrate loaded apoferritin nanovehicle could detect 23 atmol DNA targets in 50 ul sample solution. The concept could be readily extended to load other redox and fluorescence markers for bioassay applications. The new nanoparticle labels hold great promise for multi-target detection (in connection to nanoparticles loaded with different markers) and for enhancing the sensitivity of other bioassays.

  8. Nanoscale imaging of paramagnetic spin labels using a single spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Myers, Bryan; Pelliccione, Matthew; Jayich, Ania

    Spin-labeling molecules with paramagnetic species is a powerful technique for probing molecular structure. However, current techniques are ensemble measurements, inherently lacking the sensitivity to detect a single spin or the conformational properties of a single biomolecule. In this talk, we demonstrate an imaging technique that has the promise of single-spin imaging and ultimately molecular structure imaging. We present two-dimensional nanoscale imaging of a monolayer of gadolinium (Gd) atomic spin labels at ambient conditions. The sensing element is a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. A patterned monolayer of Gd atoms self-assembled on a Si atomic force microscopy tip is controllably interacted with and detected by the NV center. The fluctuating magnetic field generated by GHz-scale Gd spin flips relaxes the NV center in a manner that depends strongly on the Gd-NV separation. Using this technique, we demonstrate a Gd-induced reduction of the T1 relaxation time of the NV center with nm spatial resolution. Our results indicate that nanometer-scale imaging of individual electronic spins at ambient conditions is within reach. This will ultimately enable the study of structural and functional studies of single biomolecules in their native, folded state.

  9. A label-free electrochemiluminescent sensor for ATP detection based on ATP-dependent ligation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Lin, Chunshui; Yao, Qiuhong; Chen, Xi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we describe a new label-free, sensitive and highly selective strategy for the electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of ATP at the picomolar level via ATP-induced ligation. The molecular-beacon like DNA probes (P12 complex) are self-assembled on a gold electrode. The presence of ATP leads to the ligation of P12 complex which blocks the digestion by Exonuclease III (Exo III). The protected P12 complex causes the intercalation of numerous ECL indicators (Ru(phen)3(2+)) into the duplex DNA grooves, resulting in significantly amplified ECL signal output. Since the ligating site of T4 DNA ligase and the nicking site of Exo III are the same, it involves no long time of incubation for conformation change. The proposed strategy combines the amplification power of enzyme and the inherent high sensitivity of the ECL technique and enables picomolar detection of ATP. The developed strategy also shows high selectivity against ATP analogs, which makes our new label-free and highly sensitive ligation-based method a useful addition to the amplified ATP detection arena. PMID:27154705

  10. Site-specific Labeling of a Protein Lysine Residue By Novel Kinetic Labeling Combinatorial Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Krantz, Allen; Hanel, Arthur M; Strug, Ivona; Wilczynski, Andrzej; Wolff, Jeremy J; Huang, Wolin; Huang, Linda H; Settineri, Tina; Holmes, Darren L; Hardy, Margaret C; Bridon, Dominique P

    2014-01-01

    The first example of a kinetic labeling library designed to enable the discovery of affinity labels is presented. Each library component (1) consists of a variable peptidyl component linked to a biotinyl moiety by a 4-mercaptobenzoyl linker in thioester format. We demonstrate that an affinity label can be uncovered by measuring reaction rates between library pools and the protein target, human serum albumin (HSA) and identifying significant outliers. By choosing peptide functionality compatible with a potentially reactive thioester labeling entity, libraries can be screened in pools. It is noteworthy that a limited subset of amino acids (R, S, E, F, Y, l, M, W, and Q) that compose the affinity moiety is sufficient to produce rate variances that guide the discovery process. After two rounds of deconvolution, J-FLYEE-NH2 (7-E) emerges as a bona fide affinity label of HSA. Unlike known affinity labels, the affinity moiety is not retained in the protein product, but is extruded upon acylation of the protein. This feature affords a method of introducing various payloads, without extraneous elements, onto protein frameworks. PMID:24757504

  11. Site-specific Labeling of a Protein Lysine Residue By Novel Kinetic Labeling Combinatorial Libraries.

    PubMed

    Krantz, Allen; Hanel, Arthur M; Strug, Ivona; Wilczynski, Andrzej; Wolff, Jeremy J; Huang, Wolin; Huang, Linda H; Settineri, Tina; Holmes, Darren L; Hardy, Margaret C; Bridon, Dominique P

    2014-01-01

    The first example of a kinetic labeling library designed to enable the discovery of affinity labels is presented. Each library component (1) consists of a variable peptidyl component linked to a biotinyl moiety by a 4-mercaptobenzoyl linker in thioester format. We demonstrate that an affinity label can be uncovered by measuring reaction rates between library pools and the protein target, human serum albumin (HSA) and identifying significant outliers. By choosing peptide functionality compatible with a potentially reactive thioester labeling entity, libraries can be screened in pools. It is noteworthy that a limited subset of amino acids (R, S, E, F, Y, l, M, W, and Q) that compose the affinity moiety is sufficient to produce rate variances that guide the discovery process. After two rounds of deconvolution, J-FLYEE-NH2 (7-E) emerges as a bona fide affinity label of HSA. Unlike known affinity labels, the affinity moiety is not retained in the protein product, but is extruded upon acylation of the protein. This feature affords a method of introducing various payloads, without extraneous elements, onto protein frameworks. PMID:24757504

  12. Fluorescent triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides labeled with a thiazole orange dimer unit

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Yuki, Mizue; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent probes for the detection of a double-stranded DNA were prepared by labeling a triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotide with a thiazole orange (TO) dimer unit. They belong to ECHO (exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide) probes which we have previously reported. The excitonic interaction between the two TO molecules was expected to effectively suppress the background fluorescence of the probes. The applicability of the ECHO probes for the detection of double-stranded DNA was confirmed by examining the thermal stability and photophysical and kinetic properties of the DNA triplexes formed by the ECHO probes. PMID:23445822

  13. Analysis of proteome dynamics in mice by isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Ghaemmaghami, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry and in vivo isotopic labeling have enabled proteome-wide analyses of protein turnover in complex organisms. Here, we describe a protocol for analyzing protein turnover rates in mouse tissues by comprehensive (15)N labeling. The procedure involves the complete isotopic labeling of blue green algae (Spirulina platensis) with (15)N and utilizing it as a source of dietary nitrogen for mice. We outline a detailed protocol for in-house production of (15)N-labeled algae, labeling of mice, and analysis of isotope incorporation kinetics by mass spectrometry. The methodology can be adapted to analyze proteome dynamics in most murine tissues and may be particularly useful in the analysis of proteostatic disruptions in mouse models of disease. PMID:24791984

  14. Enable: Developing Instructional Language Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Beth

    The program presented in this manual provides a structure and activities for systematic development of effective listening comprehension in typical and atypical children. The complete ENABLE kit comes with pictures, cut-outs, and puppets to illustrate the directives, questions, and narrative activities. The manual includes an organizational and…

  15. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Off-label Drug Use What is off-label drug use? In the United States new drugs are ... unapproved use of a drug. Is off-label drug use legal? The off-label use of FDA- ...

  16. Clearing and Labeling Techniques for Large-Scale Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jinyoung; Choe, Minjin; Kim, Sung-Yon

    2016-01-01

    Clearing and labeling techniques for large-scale biological tissues enable simultaneous extraction of molecular and structural information with minimal disassembly of the sample, facilitating the integration of molecular, cellular and systems biology across different scales. Recent years have witnessed an explosive increase in the number of such methods and their applications, reflecting heightened interest in organ-wide clearing and labeling across many fields of biology and medicine. In this review, we provide an overview and comparison of existing clearing and labeling techniques and discuss challenges and opportunities in the investigations of large-scale biological systems. PMID:27239813

  17. Clearing and Labeling Techniques for Large-Scale Biological Tissues.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jinyoung; Choe, Minjin; Kim, Sung-Yon

    2016-06-30

    Clearing and labeling techniques for large-scale biological tissues enable simultaneous extraction of molecular and structural information with minimal disassembly of the sample, facilitating the integration of molecular, cellular and systems biology across different scales. Recent years have witnessed an explosive increase in the number of such methods and their applications, reflecting heightened interest in organ-wide clearing and labeling across many fields of biology and medicine. In this review, we provide an overview and comparison of existing clearing and labeling techniques and discuss challenges and opportunities in the investigations of large-scale biological systems. PMID:27239813

  18. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. Probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations.

  19. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1991-07-02

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. The probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations. No Drawings

  20. Detection and classification of Trypanosoma cruzi by DNA hybridization with nonradioactive probes.

    PubMed

    Solari, A; Venegas, J; Gonzalez, E; Vasquez, C

    1991-01-01

    Total or kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) from 72 isolates and clones of Trypanosoma cruzi as well as from nine related trypanosomatids were analyzed by dot hybridization using nonradioactive kDNA or cloned minicircle fragments as probes. Biotinylated-kDNA probes generated by nick-translation proved reliable for distinguishing Zymodeme 1 and Zymodeme 2bol of T. cruzi parasites. In contrast, digoxigenin-labeled kDNA obtained by random-priming did not distinguish among T. cruzi isolates but did distinguish among New World leishmanias. Cloned minicircle fragments labeled with digoxigenin gave the same results as digoxigenin-labeled kDNA, except for a 10-fold decrease in sensitivity. Digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes proved useful in unambiguously detecting T. cruzi from different geographic regions of America. However, T. rangeli and T. cruzi marinkellei were not distinguished by these probes. PMID:1667933

  1. When cells divide: Label-free multimodal spectral imaging for exploratory molecular investigation of living cells during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Fang; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Shigeto, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, molecular-level investigation of cytokinesis, the climax of the cell cycle, not only deepens our understanding of how life continues, but it will also open up new possibilities of diagnosis/prognosis of cancer cells. Although fluorescence-based methods have been widely employed to address this challenge, they require a fluorophore to be designed for a specific known biomolecule and introduced into the cell. Here, we present a label-free spectral imaging approach based on multivariate curve resolution analysis of Raman hyperspectral data that enables exploratory untargeted studies of mammalian cell cytokinesis. We derived intrinsic vibrational spectra and intracellular distributions of major biomolecular components (lipids and proteins) in dividing and nondividing human colon cancer cells. In addition, we discovered an unusual autofluorescent lipid component that appears predominantly in the vicinity of the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. This autofluorescence signal could be utilized as an endogenous probe for monitoring and visualizing cytokinesis in vivo. PMID:26632877

  2. When cells divide: Label-free multimodal spectral imaging for exploratory molecular investigation of living cells during cytokinesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Fang; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Shigeto, Shinsuke

    2015-12-01

    In vivo, molecular-level investigation of cytokinesis, the climax of the cell cycle, not only deepens our understanding of how life continues, but it will also open up new possibilities of diagnosis/prognosis of cancer cells. Although fluorescence-based methods have been widely employed to address this challenge, they require a fluorophore to be designed for a specific known biomolecule and introduced into the cell. Here, we present a label-free spectral imaging approach based on multivariate curve resolution analysis of Raman hyperspectral data that enables exploratory untargeted studies of mammalian cell cytokinesis. We derived intrinsic vibrational spectra and intracellular distributions of major biomolecular components (lipids and proteins) in dividing and nondividing human colon cancer cells. In addition, we discovered an unusual autofluorescent lipid component that appears predominantly in the vicinity of the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. This autofluorescence signal could be utilized as an endogenous probe for monitoring and visualizing cytokinesis in vivo.

  3. Individualized grid-enabled mammographic training system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, M. H.; Gale, A. G.

    2009-02-01

    The PERFORMS self-assessment scheme measures individuals skills in identifying key mammographic features on sets of known cases. One aspect of this is that it allows radiologists' skills to be trained, based on their data from this scheme. Consequently, a new strategy is introduced to provide revision training based on mammographic features that the radiologist has had difficulty with in these sets. To do this requires a lot of random cases to provide dynamic, unique, and up-to-date training modules for each individual. We propose GIMI (Generic Infrastructure in Medical Informatics) middleware as the solution to harvest cases from distributed grid servers. The GIMI middleware enables existing and legacy data to support healthcare delivery, research, and training. It is technology-agnostic, data-agnostic, and has a security policy. The trainee examines each case, indicating the location of regions of interest, and completes an evaluation form, to determine mammographic feature labelling, diagnosis, and decisions. For feedback, the trainee can choose to have immediate feedback after examining each case or batch feedback after examining a number of cases. All the trainees' result are recorded in a database which also contains their trainee profile. A full report can be prepared for the trainee after they have completed their training. This project demonstrates the practicality of a grid-based individualised training strategy and the efficacy in generating dynamic training modules within the coverage/outreach of the GIMI middleware. The advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed together with future plans.

  4. Probing soil C metabolism in response to temperature: results from experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; Dalder, J.; Blankinship, J.; Selmants, P. C.; Schwartz, E.; Koch, G. W.; Hart, S.; Hungate, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    C use efficiency (CUE) is one of the least understood aspects of soil C cycling, has a very large effect on soil respiration and C sequestration, and decreases with elevated temperature. CUE is directly related to substrate partitioning over energy production and biosynthesis. The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We have developed a new stable isotope approach using position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers to measure these fundamental metabolic processes in intact soil communities (1). We use this new approach, combined with models of soil metabolic flux patterns, to analyze the response of microbial energy production, biosynthesis, and CUE to temperature. The method consists of adding small but precise amounts of position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is iteratively solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and information on microbial precursor demand under different temperatures. This new method enables direct study of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, C use efficiency, and soil organic matter formation in response to temperature. (1) Dijkstra P, Blankinship JC, Selmants PC, Hart SC, Koch GW, Schwarz E and Hungate BA. Probing metabolic flux patterns of soil microbial communities using parallel position-specific tracer labeling. Soil Biology and Biochemistry (accepted)

  5. Capture-Tag-Release: A Strategy for Small Molecule Labeling of Native Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Aaron R; Etemad, Lily S; Vessicchio, Michael J; Naclerio, George A; Jedson, Victoria

    2016-09-01

    A strategy for labeling native enzymes in a manner that preserves their activity is reported: capture-tag-release (CTR). Key to this approach is the small molecule CTR probe that contains an enzyme inhibitor, benzophenone crosslinker, and aryl phosphine ester. After UV-derived capture of the enzyme, addition of an azide-containing tag triggers a Staudinger ligation that labels the enzyme. A further consequence of the Staudinger ligation is fragmentation of the CTR probe, thus releasing the inhibitor and restoring enzymatic activity. As a proof-of-principle, the CTR strategy was applied to the hydrolase β-galactosidase. The enzyme was efficiently labeled with biotin, and the kinetic data for the biotinylated enzyme were comparable to those for unlabeled β-galactosidase. The CTR probe exhibits excellent targeting specificity, as it selectively labeled β-galactosidase in a complex protein mixture. PMID:27305312

  6. Multiplexed DNA sequencing and diagnostics by hybridization with enriched stable isotope labels

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinghaus, H.F.; Kwoka, M.N.; Guo, X.Q.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1997-04-15

    A new DNA diagnostic and sequencing system has been developed that uses time-of-flight resonance ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-RIMS) to provide a rapid method of analyzing stable isotope-labeled oligonucleotides in form 1 sequencing by hybridization (SBH). With form 1, the DNA is immobilized on a nylon membrane and enriched isotope-labeled individual oligonucleotide probes are free to seek out complementary DNAs during hybridization. The major advantage of this new approach is that multiple oligonucleotides can be labeled with different enriched isotopes and can all be simultaneously hybridized to the genosensor matrix. The probes can then be simultaneously detected with TOF-RIMS with high selectivity, sensitivity, and efficiency. By using isotopically enriched tin labels, up to 10 labeled oligonucleotides could be examined in a single hybridization to the DNA matrix. Greater numbers of labels are available if rare earth isotopes are employed. In the present study, matrices containing three different DNAs were prepared and simultaneously hybridized with two different probes under a variety of conditions. The results show that DNAs, immobilized on nylon surfaces, can be specifically hybridized to probes labeled with different enriched tin isotopes. Discrimination between complementary and noncomplementary sites of better than 100 was obtained in multiplexed samples. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Molecular beacons: Probes that fluoresce upon hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, S.; Kramer, F.R.

    1996-03-01

    We have developed novel nucleic acid probes that recognize and report the presence of specific nucleic acids in homogeneous solutions. These probes undergo a spontaneous fluorogenic conformational change when they hybridize to their targets. Only perfectly complementary targets elicit this response, as hybridization does not occur when the target contains a mismatched nucleotide or a deletion. The probes are particularly suited for monitoring the synthesis of specific nucleic acids in real time. When used in nucleic acid amplification assays, gene detection is homogeneous and sensitive, and can be carried out in a sealed tube. When introduced into living cells, these probes should enable the origin, movement, and fate of specific mRNAs to be traced. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Open access chemical probes for epigenetic targets

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Peter J; Müller, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background High attrition rates in drug discovery call for new approaches to improve target validation. Academia is filling gaps, but often lacks the experience and resources of the pharmaceutical industry resulting in poorly characterized tool compounds. Discussion The SGC has established an open access chemical probe consortium, currently encompassing ten pharmaceutical companies. One of its mandates is to create well-characterized inhibitors (chemical probes) for epigenetic targets to enable new biology and target validation for drug development. Conclusion Epigenetic probe compounds have proven to be very valuable and have not only spurred a plethora of novel biological findings, but also provided starting points for clinical trials. These probes have proven to be critical complementation to traditional genetic targeting strategies and provided sometimes surprising results. PMID:26397018

  9. A new model to simulate and analyze proliferating cell populations in BrdU labeling experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents a novel model for proliferating cell populations in labeling experiments. It is especially tailored to the technique of Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), which is taken up by dividing cells and thus accumulates with increasing division number during uplabeling. The study of the evolving label intensities of BrdU labeled cell populations is aimed at quantifying proliferation properties such as division and death rates. Results In contrast to existing models, our model considers a labeling efficacy that follows a distribution, rather than a uniform value. It thereby allows to account for noise as well as possibly space-dependent heterogeneity in the effective label uptake of the individual cells in a population. Furthermore, it enables more informative comparison with experimental data: The population-level label distribution is provided as a model output, thereby increasing the information content compared to existing models that give the fraction of labeled cells or the mean label intensity. We employ our model to study some naturally arising examples of heterogeneity in label uptake, which are not covered by existing models. With simulations of noisy and spacially heterogeneous label uptake, we demonstrate that our model contributes a more realistic quantitative description of labeling experiments. Conclusion The presented model is to our knowledge the first one that predicts the full label distribution for BrdU labeling experiments. Thus, it can exploit more information, namely the full intensity distribution, from labeling measurements, and thereby opens up new quantitative insights into cell proliferation. PMID:24268033

  10. Proteomic analysis of peptides tagged with dimedone and related probes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S

    2014-04-01

    Owing to its labile nature, a new role for cysteine sulfenic acid (-SOH) modification has emerged. This oxidative modification modulates protein function by acting as a redox switch during cellular signaling. The identification of proteins that undergo this modification represents a methodological challenge, and its resolution remains a matter of current interest. The development of strategies to chemically modify cysteinyl-containing peptides for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis has increased significantly within the past decade. The method of choice to selectively label sulfenic acid is based on the use of dimedone or its derivatives. For these chemical probes to be effective on a proteome-wide level, their reactivity toward -SOH must be high to ensure reaction completion. In addition, the presence of an adduct should not interfere with electrospray ionization, the efficiency of induced dissociation in MS/MS experiments or with the identification of Cys-modified peptides by automated database searching algorithms. Herein, we employ a targeted proteomics approach to study the electrospray ionization and fragmentation effects of different -SOH specific probes and compared them to commonly used alkylating agents. We then extend our study to a whole proteome extract using shotgun proteomic approaches. These experiments enable us to demonstrate that dimedone adducts do not interfere with electrospray by suppressing the ionization nor impede product ion assignment by automated search engines, which detect a + 138 Da increase from unmodified peptides. Collectively, these results suggest that dimedone can be a powerful tool to identify sulfenic acid modifications by high-throughput shotgun proteomics of a whole proteome. PMID:24719340

  11. Exogenous Attention Enables Perceptual Learning

    PubMed Central

    Szpiro, Sarit F. A.; Carrasco, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Practice can improve visual perception, and these improvements are considered to be a form of brain plasticity. Training-induced learning is time-consuming and requires hundreds of trials across multiple days. The process of learning acquisition is understudied. Can learning acquisition be potentiated by manipulating visual attentional cues? We developed a protocol in which we used task-irrelevant cues for between-groups manipulation of attention during training. We found that training with exogenous attention can enable the acquisition of learning. Remarkably, this learning was maintained even when observers were subsequently tested under neutral conditions, which indicates that a change in perception was involved. Our study is the first to isolate the effects of exogenous attention and to demonstrate its efficacy to enable learning. We propose that exogenous attention boosts perceptual learning by enhancing stimulus encoding. PMID:26502745

  12. Spectral Label Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wachinger, Christian; Golland, Polina

    2012-01-01

    We present a new segmentation approach that combines the strengths of label fusion and spectral clustering. The result is an atlas-based segmentation method guided by contour and texture cues in the test image. This offers advantages for datasets with high variability, making the segmentation less prone to registration errors. We achieve the integration by letting the weights of the graph Laplacian depend on image data, as well as atlas-based label priors. The extracted contours are converted to regions, arranged in a hierarchy depending on the strength of the separating boundary. Finally, we construct the segmentation by a region-wise, instead of voxel-wise, voting, increasing the robustness. Our experiments on cardiac MRI show a clear improvement over majority voting and intensity-weighted label fusion. PMID:23286157

  13. Microelectrode miRNA sensors enabled by enzymeless electrochemical signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tanyu; Viennois, Emilie; Merlin, Didier; Wang, Gangli

    2015-08-18

    Better detections of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) as disease biomarkers could advance diseases diagnosis and treatment. Current analysis methods or sensors for research and applications are challenged by the low concentrations and wide dynamic range (from aM to nM) of miRNAs in a physiological sample. Here, we report a one-step label-free electrochemical sensor comprising a triple-stem DNA-redox probe structure on a gold microelectrode. A new signal amplification mechanism without the need of a redox enzyme is introduced. The novel strategy overcomes the fundamental limitations of microelectrode DNA sensors that fail to generate detectable current, which is primarily due to the limited amount of redox probes in response to the target analyte binding. By employing a reductant, tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP) in the detection buffer solution, each redox molecule on the detection probe is cyclically oxidized at the electrode and reduced by the reductant; thus, the signal is amplified in situ during the detection period. The combined merits in the diagnosis power of cyclic voltammetry and the high sensitivity of pulse voltammetry enable parallel analysis for method validation and optimization previously inaccessible. As such, the detection limit of miRNA-122 was 0.1 fM via direct readout, with a wide detection range from sub fM to nM. The detection time is within minutes, which is a significant improvement over other macroscopic sensors and other relevant techniques such as quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The high selectivity of the developed sensors is demonstrated by the discrimination against two most similar family sequences: miR-122-3p present in serum and 2-mismatch synthetic RNA sequence. Interference such as nonspecific adsorption, a common concern in sensor development, is reduced to a negligible amount by adopting a multistep surface modification strategy. Importantly, unlike qRT-PCR, the

  14. Nanofluidics: enabling processes for biotech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmanella, Umberto; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2001-10-01

    The advance of micro and nanodevice manufacturing technology enables us to carry out biological and chemical processes in a more efficient manner. In fact, fluidic processes connect the macro and the micro/nano worlds. For devices approaching the size of the fluid molecules, many physical phenomena occur that are not observed in macro flows. In this brief review, we discuss a few selected topics which of are interest for basic research and are important for applications in biotechnology.

  15. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    A recently proposed concept of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two laser modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation in a relativistic beam. This seeding technique holds promise of a one-stage soft x-ray FEL that radiates not only transversely but also longitudinally coherent pulses. Currently, an experimental verification of the concept is being conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory aimed at the demonstration of the EEHG.

  16. Technologies for Networked Enabled Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B.; Levine, J.

    2005-01-01

    Current point-to-point data links will not scale to support future integration of surveillance, security, and globally-distributed air traffic data, and already hinders efficiency and capacity. While the FAA and industry focus on a transition to initial system-wide information management (SWIM) capabilities, this paper describes a set of initial studies of NAS network-enabled operations technology gaps targeted for maturity in later SWIM spirals (201 5-2020 timeframe).

  17. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  18. New Generation Sensor Web Enablement

    PubMed Central

    Bröring, Arne; Echterhoff, Johannes; Jirka, Simon; Simonis, Ingo; Everding, Thomas; Stasch, Christoph; Liang, Steve; Lemmens, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Many sensor networks have been deployed to monitor Earth’s environment, and more will follow in the future. Environmental sensors have improved continuously by becoming smaller, cheaper, and more intelligent. Due to the large number of sensor manufacturers and differing accompanying protocols, integrating diverse sensors into observation systems is not straightforward. A coherent infrastructure is needed to treat sensors in an interoperable, platform-independent and uniform way. The concept of the Sensor Web reflects such a kind of infrastructure for sharing, finding, and accessing sensors and their data across different applications. It hides the heterogeneous sensor hardware and communication protocols from the applications built on top of it. The Sensor Web Enablement initiative of the Open Geospatial Consortium standardizes web service interfaces and data encodings which can be used as building blocks for a Sensor Web. This article illustrates and analyzes the recent developments of the new generation of the Sensor Web Enablement specification framework. Further, we relate the Sensor Web to other emerging concepts such as the Web of Things and point out challenges and resulting future work topics for research on Sensor Web Enablement. PMID:22163760

  19. 'Ethos' Enabling Organisational Knowledge Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsudaira, Yoshito

    This paper examines knowledge creation in relation to improvements on the production line in the manufacturing department of Nissan Motor Company and aims to clarify embodied knowledge observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation will be clarified. For that purpose, this study adopts an approach that adds a first, second, and third-person's viewpoint to the theory of knowledge creation. Embodied knowledge, observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation, is the continued practice of 'ethos' (in Greek) founded in Nissan Production Way as an ethical basis. Ethos is knowledge (intangible) assets for knowledge creating companies. Substantiated analysis classifies ethos into three categories: the individual, team and organisation. This indicates the precise actions of the organisational members in each category during the knowledge creation process. This research will be successful in its role of showing the indispensability of ethos - the new concept of knowledge assets, which enables knowledge creation -for future knowledge-based management in the knowledge society.

  20. Spin labeling EPR.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has emerged as an efficient tool to elucidate the structure and conformational dynamics of biomolecules under native-like conditions. This article summarizes the basics as well as recent progress of site-directed spin labeling. Continuous wave EPR spectra analyses and pulse EPR techniques are reviewed with special emphasis on applications to the sensory rhodopsin-transducer complex mediating the photophobic response of the halophilic archaeum Natronomonas pharaonis and the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. PMID:19728138