Sample records for laboratory conditions similar

  1. Pathogenesis of malaria and clinically similar conditions.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ian A; Alleva, Lisa M; Mills, Alison C; Cowden, William B

    2004-07-01

    There is now wide acceptance of the concept that the similarity between many acute infectious diseases, be they viral, bacterial, or parasitic in origin, is caused by the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines initiated when the organism interacts with the innate immune system. This is also true of certain noninfectious states, such as the tissue injury syndromes. This review discusses the historical origins of these ideas, which began with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and spread from their origins in malaria research to other fields. As well the more established proinflammatory mediators, such as TNF, interleukin-1, and lymphotoxin, the roles of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, which are chiefly inhibitory, are discussed. The established and potential roles of two more recently recognized contributors, overactivity of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and the escape of high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1) protein from its normal location into the circulation, are also put in context. The pathogenesis of the disease caused by falciparum malaria is then considered in the light of what has been learned about the roles of these mediators in these other diseases, as well as in malaria itself. PMID:15258091

  2. Pathogenesis of Malaria and Clinically Similar Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian A.; Alleva, Lisa M.; Mills, Alison C.; Cowden, William B.

    2004-01-01

    There is now wide acceptance of the concept that the similarity between many acute infectious diseases, be they viral, bacterial, or parasitic in origin, is caused by the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines initiated when the organism interacts with the innate immune system. This is also true of certain noninfectious states, such as the tissue injury syndromes. This review discusses the historical origins of these ideas, which began with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and spread from their origins in malaria research to other fields. As well the more established proinflammatory mediators, such as TNF, interleukin-1, and lymphotoxin, the roles of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, which are chiefly inhibitory, are discussed. The established and potential roles of two more recently recognized contributors, overactivity of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and the escape of high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1) protein from its normal location into the circulation, are also put in context. The pathogenesis of the disease caused by falciparum malaria is then considered in the light of what has been learned about the roles of these mediators in these other diseases, as well as in malaria itself. PMID:15258091

  3. Similarity Criteria for the Laboratory Simulation of Supernova Hydrodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. D. Ryutov; R. P. Drake; J. Kane; E. Liang; B. A. Remington; W. M. Wood-Vasey

    1999-01-01

    The conditions for validity and the limitations of experiments intended to simulate astrophysical hydrodynamics are discussed, with application to some ongoing experiments. For systems adequately described by the Euler equations, similarity criteria required for properly scaled experiments are identified. The conditions for the applicability of the Euler equations are formulated, based on the analysis of localization, heat conduction, viscosity, and

  4. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1441 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory...

  5. Finding Images with Similar Lighting Conditions in Large Photo Collections

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    conditions. In that case, a human expert could retouch the images and force them to match illuminationFinding Images with Similar Lighting Conditions in Large Photo Collections Mauricio D´iaz1^one-Alpes, 38330 Montbonnot, France {Mauricio.Diaz,Peter.Sturm}@inrialpes.fr Abstract. When we look at images taken

  6. Postsecondary Reading and Study Skills Laboratories: Variations and Similarities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Joan C.; Moore, Janet R.

    In this report about reading and study skills laboratories in colleges and universities, the importance of considering the differing needs of each institution and knowing what has been successful in different situations is stressed. The report presents descriptions of five developmental skills laboratories, representing an urban community college,…

  7. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18 Section 1620...1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. ...required to be performed under similar working conditions. It should be noted...

  8. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18 Section 1620...1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. ...required to be performed under similar working conditions. It should be noted...

  9. Similarity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michelle Manes

    2003-01-01

    In this workshop session, elementary and middle school teachers explore scale drawing, similar triangles, and trigonometry in terms of ratios and proportion. Besides explanations and real-world problems, the unit includes video segments that show teachers investigating problems of similarity. To understand the ratios that underlie trigonometry, participants use an interactive activity provided online. This is session 8 of Learning Math: Geometry, a free online course.

  10. Similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (editor)

    1990-01-01

    In this 'Project Mathematics! series, sponsored by the California Institute for Technology (CalTech), the mathematical concept of similarity is presented. he history of and real life applications are discussed using actual film footage and computer animation. Terms used and various concepts of size, shape, ratio, area, and volume are demonstrated. The similarity of polygons, solids, congruent triangles, internal ratios, perimeters, and line segments using the previous mentioned concepts are shown.

  11. Similarity Parameter Evolution within a Magnetic Nozzle with Applications to Laboratory Plasmas

    E-print Network

    Choueiri, Edgar

    Laval nozzle.1 The applied field, typically formed using permanent magnets or electromagnetic coilsSimilarity Parameter Evolution within a Magnetic Nozzle with Applications to Laboratory Plasmas a magnetic nozzle is investigated within the context of present laboratory experiments. A review of the simi

  12. 42 CFR 494.130 - Condition: Laboratory services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Patient Care § 494.130 Condition: Laboratory services. The dialysis facility must provide, or make available, laboratory services (other than tissue pathology and histocompatibility) to meet...

  13. Triangle Similarity. Geometry Module for Use in a Mathematics Laboratory Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Sheila; And Others

    This is one of a series of geometry modules developed for use by secondary students in a laboratory setting. The purpose of this module is to teach solution of proportions, concepts and theorems of triangle similarity, solution of the Pythagorean Theorem, solution of the isosceles right triangle, and concepts involving "rep-tile" figures as well…

  14. 42 CFR 494.130 - Condition: Laboratory services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Patient Care § 494.130 Condition: Laboratory services. The dialysis facility must...

  15. Conditions for Teaching Laboratory Practical Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doran, Rodney L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes policies and practices found in each of the participant countries in the Second International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement Science Study that could foster development of practical laboratory process skills. Topics include (1) science curriculum; (2) science teacher; (3) science facilities; and (4) learning by…

  16. SIMILARITY PROPERTIES AND SCALING LAWS OF RADIATION HYDRODYNAMIC FLOWS IN LABORATORY ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Falize, E.; Bouquet, S. [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Michaut, C., E-mail: emeric.falize@cea.fr [Laboratoire Univers et Theories (LUTH), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris-Diderot, 92190 Meudon (France)

    2011-04-01

    The spectacular recent development of modern high-energy density laboratory facilities which concentrate more and more energy in millimetric volumes allows the astrophysical community to reproduce and to explore, in millimeter-scale targets and during very short times, astrophysical phenomena where radiation and matter are strongly coupled. The astrophysical relevance of these experiments can be checked from the similarity properties and especially scaling law establishment, which constitutes the keystone of laboratory astrophysics. From the radiating optically thin regime to the so-called optically thick radiative pressure regime, we present in this paper, for the first time, a complete analysis of the main radiating regimes that we encountered in laboratory astrophysics with the same formalism based on Lie group theory. The use of the Lie group method appears to be a systematic method which allows us to construct easily and systematically the scaling laws of a given problem. This powerful tool permits us to unify the recent major advances on scaling laws and to identify new similarity concepts that we discuss in this paper, and suggests important applications for present and future laboratory astrophysics experiments. All these results enable us to demonstrate theoretically that astrophysical phenomena in such radiating regimes can be explored experimentally thanks to powerful facilities. Consequently, the results presented here are a fundamental tool for the high-energy density laboratory astrophysics community in order to quantify the astrophysics relevance and justify laser experiments. Moreover, relying on Lie group theory, this paper constitutes the starting point of any analysis of the self-similar dynamics of radiating fluids.

  17. Similarity Properties and Scaling Laws of Radiation Hydrodynamic Flows in Laboratory Astrophysics

    E-print Network

    Emeric Falize; Claire Michaut; Serge Bouquet

    2011-03-06

    The spectacular recent development of modern high-energy density laboratory facilities which concentrate more and more energy in millimetric volumes allows the astrophysical community to reproduce and to explore, in millimeter-scale targets and during very short times, astrophysical phenomena where radiation and matter are strongly coupled. The astrophysical relevance of these experiments can be checked from the similarity properties and especially scaling laws establishment, which constitutes the keystone of laboratory astrophysics. From the radiating optically thin regime to the so-called optically thick radiative pressure regime, we present in this paper, for the first time, a complete analysis of the main radiating regimes that we encountered in laboratory astrophysics with the same formalism based on the Lie-group theory. The use of the Lie group method appears as systematic which allows to construct easily and orderly the scaling laws of a given problem. This powerful tool permits to unify the recent major advances on scaling laws and to identify new similarity concepts that we discuss in this paper and which opens important applications for the present and the future laboratory astrophysics experiments. All these results enable to demonstrate theoretically that astrophysical phenomena in such radiating regimes can be explored experimentally thanks to powerful facilities. Consequently the results presented here are a fundamental tool for the high-energy density laboratory astrophysics community in order to quantify the astrophysics relevance and justify laser experiments. Moreover, relying on the Lie-group theory, this paper constitutes the starting point of any analysis of the self-similar dynamics of radiating fluids.

  18. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1453 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing;...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1459 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel...Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing...

  4. Extension of laboratory-measured soil spectra to field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Weismiller, R. A.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Spectral responses of two glaciated soils, Chalmers silty clay loam and Fincastle silt loam, formed under prairie grass and forest vegetation, respectively, were measured in the laboratory under controlled moisture equilibria using an Exotech Model 20C spectroradiometer to obtain spectral data in the laboratory under artificial illumination. The same spectroradiometer was used outdoors under solar illumination to obtain spectral response from dry and moistened field plots with and without corn residue cover, representing the two different soils. Results indicate that laboratory-measured spectra of moist soil are directly proportional to the spectral response of that same field-measured moist bare soil over the 0.52 micrometer to 1.75 micrometer wavelength range. The magnitudes of difference in spectral response between identically treated Chalmers and Fincastle soils are greatest in the 0.6 micrometers to 0.8 micrometer transition region between the visible and near infrared, regardless of field condition or laboratory preparation studied.

  5. Method for determining solar collector thermal characteristics under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. N. Malevskii; Yu. L. Myshko; S. I. Smirnov; B. V. Tarnizhevskii

    1980-01-01

    A technique is presented for the experimental determination of the thermal characteristics of a flat-plate solar collector under laboratory conditions. The technique involves the determination of the heat removal coefficient, overall loss coefficient and effectiveness coefficient of a collector from measurements of the water temperatures at the collector inlet and outlet, the water flow rate through the collector, the ambient

  6. PULMONARY CELL POPULATIONS IN HAMSTERS MAINTAINED UNDER EGYPTIAN LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was conducted to obtain baseline values for pulmonary cells in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) bred and maintained under the laboratory conditions of Al-Azhar University in Egypt. An improvised technique is presented for measuring pulmonary cells obtained by lung...

  7. Reproductive traits of Monochamus galloprovincialis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Naves, P; de Sousa, E; Quartau, J A

    2006-06-01

    The pine sawyer Monochamus galloprovincialis (Olivier) is the vector of the introduced pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner & Bührer) Nickle in Portugal, and until recently was considered a secondary forest insect. Under laboratory conditions, a study of biological and reproductive traits of 37 insect pairs was conducted. The longevity of both sexes was similar, being 61.2+/-6.5 days for males and 64.0+/-6.3 days for females (mean+/-SE). Sixteen small-sized insects (22% of the population) died within 20 days and before starting to reproduce. The sexual maturation period (without egg laying) was 20.4+/-0.7 days (mean+/-SE), while the oviposition period lasted 54.0+/-4.2 days (mean+/-SE). The oviposition rate increased very quickly during the first weeks of life, peaking to almost two eggs per day during days 30-44, and gradually dropping in the following weeks. The females laid an average of 67.0+/-5.96 (mean+/-SE) eggs through their lives. The hatch rate was 92.6+/-1.0% (mean+/-SE). There were large individual variations in longevity and fecundity parameters, and principal component analysis based on 16 morphological and biological parameters separated the breeding insects into four distinct groups. Almost half of the reproducing beetles were large-sized insects, with high longevity and fecundity traits. Overall, the reproductive potential of the Portuguese population of M. galloprovincialis seems to be smaller than that described for other Monochamus vectors of the pine wood nematode both in North America and Japan. PMID:16768817

  8. Similarities of dielectric surface flashover under atmospheric conditions for pulsed unipolar and RF excitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Krile; G. Edmiston; K. Morales; A. Neuber; H. Krompholz; M. Kristiansen

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms in vacuum surface flashover caused by rf (f < 10 GHz) or unipolar voltages are virtually identical. Similarities between rf (representing high-power microwave window\\u000a breakdown on the high-pressure side) and unipolar surface flashover are expected in an atmospheric environment as well. Two\\u000a separate experimental setups were utilized to investigate both unipolar flashover and rf window flashover under atmospheric\\u000a conditions

  9. Gender similarities and differences in sexual arousal, desire, and orgasmic pleasure in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Laurel Q P; Jin, Ellie Shuo; Amsel, Rhonda; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2014-01-01

    Relatively little is known about gender differences in the orgasm experience. The objectives of this study were to compare men's and women's patterns of sexual arousal and desire before and after orgasm, and the predictors of their orgasmic pleasure. Using their typical technique, where masturbation enjoyment was similar to that experienced at home, 38 men and 38 women masturbated to orgasm in the laboratory. Physiological sexual arousal (genital temperature) and subjective sexual arousal and desire measurements were taken at baseline, after masturbation almost to orgasm, and immediately and 15 minutes after orgasm. In both genders, all measures increased significantly during masturbation, with a greater buildup leading to a more pleasurable orgasm. After orgasm, however, sexual arousal and desire decreased more quickly and consistently in men than in women, thereby replicating Masters and Johnson's (1966) observations. More men than women exhibited resolution of subjective sexual arousal and sexual satiation; their genital temperature also decreased more than women's but did not return to baseline. Women's orgasmic pleasure was related to a postorgasmic decrease in genital temperature but, unexpectedly, the maintenance of subjective sexual arousal and desire. Future studies should explore whether this pattern explains gender differences in the pursuit of additional orgasms. PMID:24588445

  10. Physiological responses of Corythucha ciliata adults to high temperatures under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Li, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Under high temperature conditions, insects can tolerate to survive through various physiological mechanisms, which have been well documented in laboratory studies. However, it is still unclear as to whether these laboratory data can scale up to those in the field. Here we studied dynamics of heat-induced metabolites in Corythucha ciliata adults under both laboratory and field conditions to examine their significance in thermal tolerance of the species. We compared the effects of controlled thermal treatments (2h at 33-43 °C at 2 °C intervals in the laboratory) and naturally increasing thermal conditions (10:00-14:00 at 2-h intervals (33.5-37.2 °C) on a hot summer day in a field in Shanghai, China) on water content and levels of water-soluble protein, triglycerides, mannitol, and sorbitol in the adult bodies. The results showed that water content significantly decreased and all other metabolic parameters significantly increased in response to temperature stresses with similar patterns in both the laboratory and field, although the respective threshold temperatures were different under the two conditions. The close linkage observed in the two conditions suggests that a short period of heat stress induces water loss and accumulation of thermal metabolites in C. ciliata adults. This heat-resistance provides a defense mechanism counteracting thermal damage in C. ciliata. PMID:25436946

  11. Seal formation in arid soil under natural and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarah, Pariente; Sachs, Eyal

    2013-04-01

    Runoff is of considerable importance in the functioning of a desert ecosystem. The hydrological characteristics of runoff developing on arid soil under natural field conditions and those of runoff occurring in laboratory-controlled rain simulation experiments using the same type of soil were investigated. Runoff and erosion measurements were carried out in small plots (0.2-0.8 m2) on a south-facing hillslope in the northern Negev, Israel (90 mm ave. annual rainfall). Soil from the area near to the runoff plots was collected for the rain simulation experiments conducted in the laboratory. The soil was collected from 0-1 cm and 1-5 cm depths, and then placed within boxes (1.16 m long and 0.55 m wide) in the laboratory in the same order as they had been in the field. Representative surface stones were collected in the field and scattered randomly on the soil surface in the laboratory boxes. In some of the laboratory experiments soil, 5 cm in depth, was placed on a geotechnical sheet on a metal screen, while in other experiments, soil of 5 cm depth was placed on a Terzaghi filter. Rain simulator used had a rotating disk with a tilted nozzle to simulate raindrop size dispersion and kinetic energy of natural rain. The sprinkling intensity was set at a rate of 18 mm/hour. Soil crusts in the field were more stable than those created in the lab for two standard tests: Emerson - immersion test, and the 'single water drop' test. Whereas weak activity of microphytes was found in the field there was no such activity in the lab. The rain depth until runoff in the field was less than under laboratory conditions, while the sediment yield was greater in the field than in the laboratory (8.64 g/m2 versus 0.58 g/m2). The rain simulator experiments that had included a Terzaghi filter showed significantly higher final infiltration rate (7.5 mm/h versus 4.2 mm/h), shorter accumulated watering depth until stabilization of soil seal formation (100-200 mm versus 50 mm), and smaller fraction of clay in the crust (4.2% versus 6.8%), than the experiments that done without this filter. Therefore, it is conceivable that there is a suction of thin material from the surface while capillary pressures are activated, result in sub-surface seal formation (washed-in layer). This can lead to differences between runoff-forming processes existing in the laboratory set-up and processes that occur under natural field conditions.

  12. Life cycle of tortoise tick Hyalomma aegyptium under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pavel Široký; Jan Erhart; Klára J. Petrželková; Martin Kamler

    2011-01-01

    The tortoise tick Hyalomma aegyptium has a typical three-host life-cycle. Whereas its larvae and nymphs are less host-specific feeding on a variety of tetrapods,\\u000a tortoises of the genus Testudo are principal hosts of adults. Ticks retained this trait also in our study under laboratory conditions, while adults were\\u000a reluctant to feed on mammalian hosts. Combination of feeding larvae and nymphs

  13. Laboratory simulations of NAT formation approaching stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, James; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1994-01-01

    Previous laboratory studies have established the stability conditions of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), of which type 1 polar stratospheric cloud (PSC 1) particles are thought to be composed. However, NAT samples in lab studies were almost always formed under conditions very different from those of the stratosphere. In order to better understand the in situ growth of PSC 1 particle populations, samples of water and nitric acid were deposited under conditions of temperature and pressure which more closely approximate the polar stratosphere. The compositions of the solids, measured shortly after deposition, depended on the H2O:HNO3 ratio in the vapor from which the solids were condensed. Solids formed from vapor mixtures that approached stratospheric contained significantly less HNO3 than the 25 mol percent expected of NAT.

  14. Waterflood oil recovery under mixed-wet conditions: laboratory observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanino, Y.; Blunt, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    As an aqueous phase displaces a non-aqueous phase in a uniformly water-wet porous medium, a portion of the latter becomes immobilized by capillary forces as discontinuous pore-scale ganglia. This phenomenon, known as capillary trapping, has received renewed attention in recent years as a mechanism through which injected CO_2 may be secured against advection in a geological storage site. Here, we consider the impact of wettability on capillary trapping in oil/brine/rock systems. In uniformly water-wet rock, it is well established that residual oil saturation increases monotonically with its initial saturation. In contrast, salient features of mixed-wet rock, in which parts of the pore surface are oil-wet while the rest is water-wet, are not well established. We present laboratory measurements of remaining oil saturation in a limestone in its original, water-wet state and under mixed-wet conditions established systematically using organic acid. Under water-wet conditions, the remaining oil saturation increases linearly with its initial saturation. Under mixed-wet conditions, the remaining saturation displays three distinct regimes: as the initial oil saturation increases from 0, the remaining saturation increases, decreases, and finally increases again. These observations may have important implications for enhanced oil recovery, groundwater remediation, and injection schemes at carbon storage sites where contact with injected CO_2 alters the wettability of the grain surface.

  15. Performance Evaluation of a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System under Conditions Similar to Daily Life

    PubMed Central

    Pleus, Stefan; Schmid, Christina; Link, Manuela; Zschornack, Eva; Klötzer, Hans-Martin; Haug, Cornelia; Freckmann, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed at evaluating and comparing the performance of a new generation of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system versus other CGM systems, under daily lifelike conditions. Methods A total of 10 subjects (7 female) were enrolled in this study. Each subject wore two Dexcom G4™ CGM systems in parallel for the sensor lifetime specified by the manufacturer (7 days) to allow assessment of sensor-to-sensor precision. Capillary blood glucose (BG) measurements were performed at least once per hour during daytime and once at night. Glucose excursions were induced on two occasions. Performance was assessed by calculating the mean absolute relative difference (MARD) between CGM readings and paired capillary BG readings and precision absolute relative difference (PARD), i.e., differences between paired CGM readings. Results Overall aggregate MARD was 11.0% (n = 2392). Aggregate MARD for BG <70 mg/dl was 13.7%; for BG between 70 and 180 mg/dl, MARD was 11.4%; and for BG >180 mg/dl, MARD was 8.5%. Aggregate PARD was 7.3%, improving from 11.6% on day 1 to 5.2% on day 7. Conclusions The Dexcom G4 CGM system showed good overall MARD compared with results reported for other commercially available CGM systems. In the hypoglycemic range, where CGM performance is often reported to be low, the Dexcom G4 CGM system achieved better MARD than that reported for other CGM systems in the hypoglycemic range. In the hyperglycemic range, the MARD was comparable to that reported for other CGM systems, whereas during induced glucose excursions, the MARD was similar or slightly worse than that reported for other CGM systems. Overall PARD was 7.3%, improving markedly with sensor life time. PMID:23911164

  16. The Design of Research Laboratories. Part I: A General Assessment. Part II: Air Conditioning and Conditioned Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legget, R. F.; Hutcheon, N. B.

    Design factors in the planning of research laboratories are described which include--(1) location, (2) future expansion, (3) internal flexibility, (4) provision of services, (5) laboratory furnishing, (6) internal traffic, (7) space requirements, and (8) building costs. A second part discusses air-conditioning and conditioned rooms--(1)…

  17. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar... (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs...

  18. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar... (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs...

  19. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar... (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs...

  20. A comparative analysis of Painleve, Lax pair, and similarity transformation methods in obtaining the integrability conditions of nonlinear Schroedinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Al Khawaja, U. [Department of Physics, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17551, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-05-15

    We derive the integrability conditions of nonautonomous nonlinear Schroedinger equations using the Lax pair and similarity transformation methods. We present a comparative analysis of these integrability conditions with those of the Painleve method. We show that while the Painleve integrability conditions restrict the dispersion, nonlinearity, and dissipation/gain coefficients to be space independent and the external potential to be only a quadratic function of position, the Lax Pair and the similarity transformation methods allow for space-dependent coefficients and an external potential that is not restricted to the quadratic form. The integrability conditions of the Painleve method are retrieved as a special case of our general integrability conditions. We also derive the integrability conditions of nonautonomous nonlinear Schroedinger equations for two- and three-spacial dimensions.

  1. Aspects of bulk atmospheric boundary layer similarity under free-convective conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilfried Brutsaert

    1999-01-01

    For many hydrologic and atmospheric dynamic purposes the turbulent surface fluxes of sensible and latent (or evaporative) energy and of momentum must be formulated over areas covering a wide range of spatial scales; these are characteristically the scales of river basins and of the grid sizes for integration in current atmospheric circulation models. The bulk atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) similarity

  2. DO TIE LABORATORY BASED METHODS REALLY REFLECT FIELD CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both interstitial waters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question ...

  3. Drought survival in Dactylis glomerata and Festuca arundinacea under similar rooting conditions in tubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Volaire; F. Lelièvre

    2001-01-01

    Drought survival in perennial forage plants involves different adaptative responses such as delay of dehydration through water uptake, limitation of water loss and tolerance of tissues to dessication. To compare the importance of these responses in contrasting cultivars of forage grasses at the whole plant level, we carried out two experiments under glasshouse conditions. Plants of cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata L.)

  4. Flat trachea syndrome: a rare condition with symptoms similar to obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Gani, Mohammed Akil D; Rogers, Vanessa J C; Sachak, Khalid H; Marzouk, Joseph F K

    2015-01-01

    Flat trachea syndrome, commonly known as 'tracheobronchomalacia', is a central airway disease characterised by excessive expiratory collapse of the tracheobronchial posterior membrane due to weakness in the airway walls. Patients present with symptoms such as chronic cough, dyspnoea and recurrent respiratory tract infections, which are often attributed to more common conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The term 'Flat Trachea Syndrome' was first proposed by Niranjan and Marzouk in 2010 following a retrospective study of 28 patients with the condition who underwent surgery for it. The authors advocated the term due to the primary abnormality being collapse of the posterior membranous wall of the central airways as opposed to softening of the tracheal cartilage (tracheobronchomalacia), which they proposed is a misnomer. We present a rare case of a patient with flat trachea syndrome on a history of COPD who initially presented with recurrent respiratory tract infections. PMID:25721828

  5. Exploring the nature of collisionless shocks under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Bret, A.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are pervasive in astrophysics and they are critical to understand cosmic ray acceleration. Laboratory experiments with intense lasers are now opening the way to explore and characterise the underlying microphysics, which determine the acceleration process of collisionless shocks. We determine the shock character – electrostatic or electromagnetic – based on the stability of electrostatic shocks to transverse electromagnetic fluctuations as a function of the electron temperature and flow velocity of the plasma components, and we compare the analytical model with particle-in-cell simulations. By making the connection with the laser parameters driving the plasma flows, we demonstrate that shocks with different and distinct underlying microphysics can be explored in the laboratory with state-of-the-art laser systems. PMID:24488212

  6. Exploring the nature of collisionless shocks under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Stockem, A; Fiuza, F; Bret, A; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2014-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are pervasive in astrophysics and they are critical to understand cosmic ray acceleration. Laboratory experiments with intense lasers are now opening the way to explore and characterise the underlying microphysics, which determine the acceleration process of collisionless shocks. We determine the shock character - electrostatic or electromagnetic - based on the stability of electrostatic shocks to transverse electromagnetic fluctuations as a function of the electron temperature and flow velocity of the plasma components, and we compare the analytical model with particle-in-cell simulations. By making the connection with the laser parameters driving the plasma flows, we demonstrate that shocks with different and distinct underlying microphysics can be explored in the laboratory with state-of-the-art laser systems. PMID:24488212

  7. Life cycle of Ornithodoros mimon (Acari: Argasidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Landulfo, Gabriel Alves; Pevidor, Luisa Vianna; Dos Santos Sampaio, Janio; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Onofrio, Valeria Castilho; Faccini, João Luiz Horácio; Barros-Battesti, Darci Moraes

    2012-09-01

    Ornithodoros mimon Kohls et al. is an argasid tick, originally described from larvae collected on bats from Bolivia and Uruguay. In Brazil the species is aggressive to humans and animals. Nymphs and adults of O. mimon were collected from the roof of a residence in Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil, whose residents were bitten by ticks. Once in the laboratory, they were fed on rabbits and maintained in biological oxygen demand incubator at 27 ± 1 °C and 90 ± 10 % relative humidity. The females, after mating, laid eggs that resulted in larvae that were identified by the original description and also by the paratypes examination (RML 50271-50274) deposited at the United State National Tick Collection, Georgia, GA, USA. The life cycle of this species was obtained through the acquisition of two generations of ticks (F1 and F2) in the laboratory using rodents and rabbits as hosts. The biological parameters of larva, nymph and adult stages of both generations were recorded from infestations of the laboratory hosts. Larvae showed a profile of feeding for days on the host, whereas the nymphs and adults fed only for few minutes. First nymphal instar (N1) molted to second nymphal instar (N2) without blood meal. The species life cycle was elucidated for the first time. PMID:22570058

  8. Impact of hairy vetch cover crop on herbicide transport under field and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, A M; Isensee, A R

    2001-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of hairy vetch cover crop residue on runoff losses of atrazine and metolachlor under both no-till corn field plots and from a laboratory runoff system. A 2-year field study was conducted in which losses of atrazine and metolachlor from vetch and non-vetch field plots were determined from the first runoff event after application (5 and 25 days after application in 1997 and 1998, respectively). A laboratory study was conducted using soil chambers, designed to simulate field soil, water, vegetation, and herbicide treatment conditions, subjected to simulated rain events of 5, 6, 20 and 21 days after application, similar to the rainfall pattern observed in the field study. Atrazine losses ranged from 1.2 to 7.2% and 0.01 to 0.08% and metolachlor losses ranged from 0.7 to 3.1% and 0.01 to 0.1% of the amount applied for the 1997 and 1998 runoff events, respectively. In the laboratory study, atrazine runoff losses ranged from 6.7 to 22.7% and 4.2 to 8.5% and metolachlor losses ranged from 3.6 to 9.8% and 1.1 to 4.7% of the amount applied for the 5-6 and 20-21 day events, respectively. The lower losses from the field study were due to smaller rainfall amounts and a series of small rains prior to the runoff event that likely washed herbicides off crop residue and into soil where adsorption could occur. Runoff losses of both herbicides were slightly higher from non-vetch than vetch field plots. Losses from the laboratory study were related to runoff volume rather than vegetation type. PMID:11444292

  9. Carbofuran promotes biochemical changes in carp exposed to rice field and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Bárbara; Leitemperger, Jossiele; Murussi, Camila; Pretto, Alexandra; Menezes, Charlene; Dalabona, Fabrícia; Marchezan, Enio; Adaime, Martha Bohrer; Zanella, Renato; Loro, Vania Lucia

    2014-03-01

    Effects of carbofuran commercial formulation on oxidative stress parameters were studied in carps (Cyprinus carpio) exposed to 50µg/L for 7 and 30 days under rice field and laboratory conditions. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels were increased in the brain of fish after 7 and 30 days under rice field and laboratory conditions. In the liver and muscle, TBARS levels increased after 7 and 30 days under laboratory conditions, whereas in rice field the levels increased only after 30 days. Protein carbonyl content in the liver increased after 7 and 30 days under both experimental conditions. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was decreased in the brain and muscle after 7 and 30 days under both experimental conditions evaluated. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased in the liver after 7 and 30 days under rice field condition, whereas under laboratory condition this enzyme increased only after 30 days. The catalase (CAT) activity in the liver decreased after 30 days under rice field condition, whereas no changes were observed under laboratory conditions. In rice field, glutathione S-transferase (GST) decreased after 7 days but increased after 30 days, whereas no change was observed in fish exposed to carbofuran under laboratory conditions. These results suggest that environmental relevant carbofuran concentrations may cause oxidative stress, affecting biochemical and enzymatic parameters on carps. Some parameters could be used as biomarkers to carbofuran exposure. PMID:24507130

  10. A laboratory acoustic emission experiment under in situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, S. D.; Young, R. P.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we revisit acoustic emission (AE) data from an in situ rock fracture experiment conducted at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Manitoba, Canada. The Mine-By experiment, a large-scale excavation response test, was undertaken at a depth of 420 m and involved the mechanical excavation of a cylindrical tunnel. During the experiment a small array of 16 Panametrics V103 AE sensors enclosed a 0.7 m × 0.7 m × 1.1 m rectangular prism of Lac du Bonnet granite located in the tunnel wall. The V103 sensors were later calibrated in the laboratory, and a source parameter analysis was undertaken using a spectral fitting method. Corner frequency and moment magnitude were found to be inside the ranges 250 kHz

  11. Test system of a small wind turbine under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dongxiang Jiang; Qian Huang; Liangyou Hong

    2009-01-01

    As a clean, renewable, widely distributed, non-polluting energy, wind power plays an important role in the world's renewable energy development. In order to ensure the stable operation of wind turbines using non-grid-connected wind power, as well as the efficient utilization of wind resources, a study of condition monitoring of wind turbines is necessary. A test system of wind turbines under

  12. Analyzing Fault Gouge Under Seismic Conditions in Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Lockner, D. A.; Young, J.; Eshkol, E.; Hamilton, M. E.; Fagan, J.

    2008-12-01

    The slip along a fault zone during an earthquake is associated with dense granular flow of the fault gouge. The gouge is a mixture of powder formed during prior slip as well as the dynamic rupture in the process zone of the propagating earthquake. Experimental tests of dense granular flow are usually conducted under low to moderate shear-rates and under low to vanishing normal stresses, and commonly without confinement. These experimental conditions do not match the conditions of natural earthquakes: slip of a few meters; normal stress of tens to hundreds MPa; slip velocity of ~1 m/s; rise time < 1 sec; and elevated, undrained fluid pressure. We build an apparatus for testing the mechanical behavior of fault gouge (and other dense granular materials) under these natural conditions. The apparatus has the following capabilities: (1) Control of fluid pore pressure in the gouge by leak-proof design for dry, wet, or partially saturated experiments, and control of pore pressure in wet experiments; (2) Continuously variable speed control 0.01- 1.5 m/s: (3) Cumulative slip up to 10 m; (4) Normal stress up to 30 MPa; (5) fast step-loading (short rise- time); and (6) Testing either gouge or solid rocks. We use this instrument to test weakening mechanisms during earthquake slip. Preliminary experimental results will be presented.

  13. Weathering rates of marble in laboratory and outdoor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yerrapragada, S.S.; Chirra, S.R.; Jaynes, J.H.; Bandyopadhyay, J.K.; Gauri, K.L. [Univ of Louisville, KY (United States); Li, S. [Metro Services Lab., Louisville, KY (United States)

    1996-09-01

    In the modern urban atmosphere SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} attack calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) in marble exposed at rain-sheltered surfaces creating largely gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) crusts that eventually exfoliate. In combination with CO{sub 2} these gases erode the marble at unsheltered surfaces. the authors report the development of mathematical models to predict the rate of growth of crust and the rate of surface recession. To determine the rate of growth of crust the kinetic rate constant, diffusion rate, and the order of reaction were determined by the application of the shrinking-core model applied to data generated in laboratory experiments. Based on these parameters /and average ambient levels of 10 parts per billion (ppb) SO{sub 2} and 25 ppb NO{sub 2} in Louisville, Ky., the rate of crust formation for this metro area was calculated to be 1.8 {micro}m in the first year. However, the rate of recession was modeled from data obtained by exposing marble slabs to rainfalls. A surface recession of 15 {micro}m/yr was calculated. The models predicted well the rate of growth of crust observed at several sites in Louisville and the predicted surface recession compared well with values reported in the literature.

  14. Laboratory Simulations of Physico-chemical Processes under Interstellar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.

    2015-03-01

    The accretion and desorption of gas molecules on cold dust grains play an important role in the evolution of dense clouds and circumstellar regions around YSOs. Some of the gas molecules detected in interstellar clouds were likely synthesized in icy dust grains and ejected to the gas. But in dark cloud interiors, with temperatures as low as 10-20 K, thermal desorption is negligible and a non-thermal mechanism like ice photodesorption is required. Reactions in the ice matrix are driven by energetic processing such as photon and ion irradiation. In circumstellar regions the photon flux (UV and X-rays) is expected to be significantly higher than in dense cloud interiors, icy grain mantles present in the outer parts will experience significant irradiation. The produced radicals lead to the formation of new species in the ice, some of them of prebiotic interest. Laboratory simulations of these processes are required for their understanding. The new ultra-high vacuum set-ups introduce some important improvements.

  15. Communities of different plant diversity respond similarly to drought stress: experimental evidence from field non-weeded and greenhouse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanta, Vojt?ch; Doležal, Ji?í; Zemková, Lenka; Lepš, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Accelerating rate of species loss has prompted researchers to study the role of species diversity in processes that control ecosystem functioning. Although negative impact of species loss has been documented, the evidence concerning its impact on ecosystem stability is still limited. Here, we studied the effects of declining species and functional diversity on plant community responses to drought in the field (open to weed colonization) and greenhouse conditions. Both species and functional diversity positively affected the average yields of field communities. However, this pattern was similar in both drought-stressed and control plots. No effect of diversity on community resistance, biomass recovery after drought and resilience was found because drought reduced biomass production similarly at each level of diversity by approximately 30 %. The use of dissimilarity (characterized by Euclidean distance) revealed higher variation under changing environments (drought-stressed vs. control) in more diverse communities compared to less species-rich assemblages. In the greenhouse experiment, the effect of species diversity affected community resistance, indicating that more diverse communities suffered more from drought than species-poor ones. We conclude that our study did not support the insurance hypothesis (stability properties of a community should increase with species richness) because species diversity had an equivocal effect on ecosystem resistance and resilience in an environment held under non-weeded practice, regardless of the positive relationship between sown species diversity and community biomass production. More species-rich communities were less resistant against drought-stressed conditions than species-poor ones grown in greenhouse conditions.

  16. Cross-polarization microwave radar return at severe wind conditions: laboratory model and geophysical model function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Abramov, Victor; Ermoshkin, Alexey; Zuikova, Emma; Kazakov, Vassily; Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexandr

    2014-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing is one of the main techniques of monitoring severe weather conditions over the ocean. The principal difficulty of the existing algorithms of retrieving wind based on dependence of microwave backscattering cross-section on wind speed (Geophysical Model Function, GMF) is due to its saturation at winds exceeding 25 - 30 m/s. Recently analysis of dual- and quad-polarization C-band radar return measured from satellite Radarsat-2 suggested that the cross-polarized radar return has much higher sensitivity to the wind speed than co-polarized back scattering [1] and conserved sensitivity to wind speed at hurricane conditions [2]. Since complete collocation of these data was not possible and time difference in flight legs and SAR images acquisition was up to 3 hours, these two sets of data were compared in [2] only statistically. The main purpose of this paper is investigation of the functional dependence of cross-polarized radar cross-section on the wind speed in laboratory experiment. Since cross-polarized radar return is formed due to scattering at small-scale structures of the air-sea interface (short-crested waves, foam, sprays, etc), which are well reproduced in laboratory conditions, then the approach based on laboratory experiment on radar scattering of microwaves at the water surface under hurricane wind looks feasible. The experiments were performed in the Wind-wave flume located on top of the Large Thermostratified Tank of the Institute of Applied Physics, where the airflow was produced in the flume with the straight working part of 10 m and operating cross section 0.40?0.40 sq. m, the axis velocity can be varied from 5 to 25 m/s. Microwave measurements were carried out by a coherent Doppler X-band (3.2 cm) scatterometer with the consequent receive of linear polarizations. Experiments confirmed higher sensitivity to the wind speed of the cross-polarized radar return. Simultaneously parameters of the air flow in the turbulent boundary layer (friction velocity and roughness height) were retrieved by velocity profiling and subsequent data processing based on self-similarity of the turbulent boundary layer and 10-m wind speed was calculated. The wind wave field parameters in the flume were measured by three wire gauges. The measured data on wind waves were used for estimation of the short wave spectra and slope probability density function for "long waves" within composite Bragg theory of microwave radar return. Estimations showed that for co-polarized radar returns the difference between measurements and the predictions of the model is about 1-2 dB and it can be explained by our poor knowledge about the short wave part of the spectrum. For cross-polarized return the difference exceeds 10 dB, and it indicates that some non-Bragg mechanisms (short-crested waves, foam, sprays, etc) are responsible for the depolarization of the returned signal. It seems reasonable then to suppose that the cross-polarized radar return in X- and C-bands will demonstrate similar dependence on wind speed. We compared the dependence of cross-polarized X-band radar cross-section on 10-m wind speed obtained in laboratory conditions with the similar dependence obtained in [2] from the field data for C-band radar cross-section and found out that the laboratory data follow the median of the field data with the constant bias -11 dB. Basing on laboratory data an empirical polynomial geophysical model function was suggested for retrieving wind speed up to 40 m/s from cross-polarized microwave return, which is in good agreement with the direct measurements. This work was carried out under financial support of the RFBR (project codes ¹ 13-05-00865, 12-05-12093) and by grant from the Government of the Russian Federation (project code 11.G34.31.0048). References [1] B. Zhang, W. Perrie Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 93, 531-541, 2012. [2] G.-J. van Zadelhoff, et.al. Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., 6, 7945-7984, doi:10.5194/amtd-6-7945-2013, 2013.

  17. Dielectric spectroscopic measurements on transformer oil-paper insulation under controlled laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Setayeshmehr; I. Fofana; C. Eichler; A. Akbari; H. Borsi; E. Gockenbach

    2008-01-01

    For reliable operation of power transformers, the condition of the insulation system is essential. This paper reports on a detailed study of the effect of ageing, temperature and moisture on frequency and time domain spectroscopic measurements carried out on oil-impregnated pressboard samples as well as on a distribution transformer under controlled laboratory conditions. Because field measurements are generally performed after

  18. Observations on the Nocturnal Activity and Feeding Behavior of Anguilla japonica Glass Eels Under Laboratory Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuo-Zeng Dou; Katsumi Tsukamoto

    2003-01-01

    Glass eels of the temperate anguillid species, Anguilla japonica, clearly showed a nocturnal activity rhythm under laboratory conditions. Light–dark cycle was a determinant factor affecting their photonegative behavior, nocturnal locomotor activity, and feeding behavior. Under natural light conditions, glass eels remained in shelters with little daytime feeding, but came out to forage during darkness. They moved and foraged actively in

  19. Can natural phenotypic variances be estimated reliably under homogeneous laboratory conditions?

    PubMed

    St Juliana, J R; Janzen, F J

    2007-07-01

    The phenotypic variance is assumed to be greater in a more heterogeneous environment. The validity of this assumption is important for microevolutionists to extrapolate results from the laboratory to field environments. We subjected clutches of eggs from common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) to a split-family design to evaluate the variability in incubation time and four size traits of neonates from eggs incubated in the laboratory and those left in situ. Mean size measurements were similar between the laboratory and the field, but incubation time was systematically longer in the field. We found no tendency among clutches for hatchlings resulting from eggs incubated in laboratory or field environments to demonstrate greater variability. Also contrary to expectation, clutches that experienced greater thermal variation in the field did not exhibit greater variation in phenotypic traits. Consequently, extrapolating results from the laboratory to the field may not always be problematic for microevolutionary analyses. PMID:17584235

  20. Similar, and similar concepts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lila R. Gleitman; Henry Gleitman; Carol Miller; Ruth Ostrin

    1996-01-01

    This paper analyzes English symmetrical predicates such as collide and match. Its point of departure is an analysis of the concept ‘similar’ from Tversky (1977) that appears to show that similarity is psychologically asymmetrical. One basis for this claim from Tversky is that the sentences North Korea is similar to Red China and Red China is similar to North Korea

  1. Similarities Between Cometary, Meteoritic, and Laboratory Analog Dust: Hints from the Attribution of the 10-micrometer Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Bussoletti, E.; Merluzzi, P.; Rotundi, A.; Palumbo, P.; di Marino, C.

    1993-07-01

    It is well known that the infrared emission of many comets is characterized by a broad feature at 10 micrometers, that has been attributed to a Si-O stretching resonance in amorphous and/or hydrated silicate grains. In the case of comets Halley [1,2], Bradfield [3] and Levy [4] two spectral components have been observed: the wide peak centered at 9.8 micrometers and a sharp feature at 11.3 micrometers. This last band has been interpreted with crystalline olivine silicatic grains [1,2,5]. However, recently, it has been pointed out [6] that the laboratory data frequently used in the fits refer to grains embedded in a matrix, which should produce a significant shift of the peak position, according to Mie computations. We have performed laboratory experiments on various silicatic samples with the perspective of determining their optical properties, to study experimentally the influence of matrix effects, and to use the final spectra to perform comparisons with observations. The samples are four terrestrial materials, olivine forsterite, jadeite pyroxene, andesite feldspar and impactite glass, and two meteoritic samples, chondrite (Zacatecas, Mexico) and pallasite (Atacama, Chile). Fine powders of the bulk materials were obtained by grinding calibrated mass amounts of the various samples in an agata mill. The morphological characterization of the samples was performed by means of S.E.M. (scanning electron microscopy) technique. EDX analysis was also performed to determine elemental composition. IR transmission spectra were obtained by using a double beam spectrophotometer that covers the spectral range 2.5-50 micrometers. The standard pellet technique was used by embedding dust samples in KBr or CsI matrices. For comparison, measurements were also performed by depositing small amounts of dust onto KBr windows. In this last case, dust-matrix interaction should be practically absent as grains are simply sitting onto the matrix. The data obtained from the spectroscopic analysis have allowed us to evidence the following main results. Matrix effects do not appear as relevant as suggested by computations performed by the Mie theory. In particular, the peak shift observed for crystalline olivine is from 11.3 micrometers in CsI (n(sub)o = 1.7) to 11.2 micrometers in vacuum (n(sun)o = 1.0). On the other hand, jadeite and andesite grains present main peaks around 10 micrometers, in contrast to cometary spectra. We can, therefore, conclude that crystalline olivine grains are good candidates to simulate the cometary 11.3 micrometer sharp feature, even when matrix effects are accounted for. The impactite sample presents a main broad band around 9.2 micrometers, due to its mainly amorphous composition. This band could resemble the broad 10 micron cometary band; however, its profile is rather broader than that observed for cometary dust. Concerning the meteoritic samples, both chondrite and pallasite show a well defined main peak at 11.3-11.4 micrometers, comparable to cometary spectra. Again, chondrite band profile is too broad. On the contrary, pallasite appears to be a good candidate to reproduce observations. This result appears reasonable if one considers that the sample is formed by small olivine crystals embedded in a iron matrix. In conclusion, the comparison between the spectra of olivine-rich meteoritic grains and cometary dust could suggest either a common origin of the two classes of materials or, at least, a similarity in the processes experienced by them during past evolution. This result appears very relevant because it could imply that the systematic study in the laboratory of meteoritic materials can provide information about the past history of comets. Acknowledgements: This work was partly supported by ASI, CNR, and MURST 40% and 60%. References: [1] Bregman J. D. et al. (1987) Astron. Astrophys., 187, 616. [2] Campins H. and Ryan E. V. (1989) Ap. J., 341, 1059. [3] Hanner M. S. et al. (1990) Ap. J., 348, 312. [4] Lynch D. K. et al. (1990) 22nd annual meeting of the division for planetary sciences, Charlottesville, Virgin

  2. Measurement of visible radiation transfer in water under laboratory and field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incropera, F. P.

    1981-09-01

    Solar radiation transfer in a body of water strongly influences thermal conditions and the growth of photosynthetic organisms. The development of methods for accurately predicting this transfer is investigated. The optical properties of natural waters and the distribution of radiation of water samples under laboratory conditions were measured. The results were compared with predictions. The distribution of radiation under field conditions were also measured. A complete set of optical property measurements were obtained from samples of water from the Wabash River.

  3. Hydrochemical differences between Carpathian streams with similar physico-geographical conditions of catchments (the Polish Flysch Carpathians)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buca?a, Anna; Wiejaczka, ?ukasz

    2014-05-01

    The study was conducted during one hydrological year (2012/2013) in two Jaszcze and Jamne catchments (11.39 km2 and 8.95 km2, respectively) located in the Gorce Mountains with environmental features representative for the Western Flysch Carpathians (in 2012/2013 hydrological year). The Jaszcze and Jamne streams (9.3 km and 6.4 km long, respectively), are left tributaries of the Ochotnica river. Both catchments are in the range of the Magura nappe of the Carpathian Flysch. The Jaszcze and Jamne valleys are located in two climatic vertical zones: 1) a temperate cold zone (of a mean annual temperature of 4-6 ºC) and 2) a cold zone (2-4ºC), above 1,100 m a.s.l. Mean annual precipitation for this region in the years 1958-2008 was 841 mm. The aim of the research was to determine differences in the physicochemical properties between streams, the valleys of which are characterised by similar physico-geographical conditions. The discussed valleys are alike because of their proximity, and the similarity manifests itself through the occurrence of the same geology, relief and exposure of both valleys, as well as inclination and soil cover. The climatic conditions and circulation of groundwater are also similar. In both valleys, forest is the dominant land use form (the Jaszcze catchment - 77% and the Jamne - 55%). The research showed that the Jaszcze stream is characterised by a higher discharge throughout the year than the Jamne stream. In spring, the mean water flow rate calculated for the entire longitudinal profile of the Jaszcze stream was 1.6 times higher than the rate obtained for the Jamne stream. In summer and autumn, this rate was respectively 1.8 and 2.2 times higher in the Jaszcze stream than in the Jamne stream. The mean annual temperature of water in the Jamne stream is higher by 0.8 °C than the temperature of water in the Jaszcze stream. This is caused by the higher temperature of groundwater (even by up to 2-3 °C) and the lower discharge (the temperature increases more quickly). The pH values in the Jaszcze and Jamne streams show only slight variation in the annual cycle and along the longitudinal profiles of the streams, and amount to 8.4-8.9. The Jamne stream, due to the lower discharge, is also characterised by greater conductivity of water in comparison to the Jaszcze stream. The mean value of conductivity of water in the Jamne stream is higher throughout year by around 60 microsiemens. During the 2012/2013 hydrological year, the total mineralization of water in the Jamne stream was greater than in the Jaszcze stream. The differences in the values ranged from 4.65 mg/l (in spring) to 13.88 mg/l (in autumn). The analysis of chemical composition showed that apart from the bicarbonate ions, the water in the Jaszcze and Jamne streams is rich in calcium and sulphates ions. The study also observed a relatively large percentage of iron ions in the overall chemical composition. The project is funded by the National Science Center (NN 306 659 940).

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sink capacity of amended soils evaluated under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Mondini; M. L. Cayuela; T. Sinicco; F. Cordaro; A. Roig; M. A. Sánchez-Monedero

    2007-01-01

    Soil sequestration of atmospheric CO2 through land application of organic residues may have beneficial effects as a strategy to offset the increase in the concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the atmosphere. The significance of different variables on GHG production and soil C sink capacity was investigated by monitoring CO2 and N2O fluxes from amended soils under laboratory conditions. In

  5. Essential oils toxicity related to Varroa destructor and Apis mellifera under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergio Ruffinengo; Matias Maggi; Claudia Faverin; Susana B. García; Predo Bailac; Judith Principal; Martin Eguaras

    Acaricidal effect of Tagetes minuta , Heterotheca latifolia , and Eucalyptus sp. essential oils against Varroa destructor and their toxicity for Apis mellifera L. were evaluated under laboratory conditions in t wo assays. In the first experiment, 10 mg of plant active principles were prepared in water solution with an emulsionant at 3, 4, and 5% concentrations. For each component

  6. Assessment of biodegradability of plastics under simulated composting conditions in a laboratory test system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Starnecker; Michael Menner

    1996-01-01

    An automated laboratory-scale test system was developed for measuring the aerobic biodegradability of degradable plastics under simulated composting conditions. Biodegradation was monitored by measuring microbial carbon dioxide formation and oxygen consumption. Completeness of biodegradation was assessed in an aquatic test by conducting a carbon mass balance. The percentage of plastic carbon degraded to carbon dioxide, biomass and water-soluble byproducts were

  7. Mating frequency of the male cactus moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae), under laboratory conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the number of times that males of the invasive cactus moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) mate under laboratory conditions. Virgin females were provided to each male at 24 h intervals until male death. Females removed from the containers were dissected to ascertain their mating ...

  8. Reproduction, development and habits of the large turkey louse Chelopistes meleagridis (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Maturano, R; Daemon, E

    2014-08-01

    The bionomy of Chelopistes meleagridis off the host was observed with the aim of better understanding the aspects of this species' life cycle. For this purpose, C. meleagridis adults were collected and maintained under controlled conditions to reproduce (35°C and RH > 80%), with turkey feathers as the food source. From the offspring of these lice, the development of 150 individuals was observed from the egg to the adult phase. These eggs were divided into two groups of 75 each. After hatching, one group was given a diet composed of feathers while the other received feathers plus skin of the host turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). The "feather + skin" diet resulted in the greatest number of adults, so this diet was given to the next generation of lice reared in vitro, starting from the first instar, to observe their fertility, fecundity and longevity. High reproduction rates were found in relation to other lice of the Ischnocera sub-order, particularly the number of eggs per day and number of eggs produced per female over the lifetime (means of 2.54 and 26.61 eggs, respectively, for wild females and 2.11 and 29.33 eggs for laboratory-reared females). The inclusion of skin in the diet was a determining factor for development to the adult stage, since 48% of the lice fed this diet reached that stage, versus 1.3% that reached maturity fed only with feathers. The development time of the males and females was similar (mean of 29.38 days), without any difference in the sexual proportion of the adults. PMID:25296223

  9. The effects of changing deposition conditions on the similarity of sputter-deposited fluorocarbon thin films to bulk PTFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandona, Philip

    Solid lubrication of space-borne mechanical components is essential to their survival and the continued human exploration of space. Recent discoveries have shown that PTFE when blended with alumina nanofillers exhibits greatly improved physical performance properties, with wear rates being reduced by several orders of magnitude. The bulk processes used to produce the PTFE-alumina blends are limiting. Co-sputter deposition of PTFE and a filler material overcomes several of these limitations by enabling the reduction of particle size to the atomic level and also by allowing for the even coating of the solid lubricant on relatively large areas and components. The goal of this study was to establish a baseline performance of the sputtered PTFE films as compared to the bulk material, and to establish deposition conditions that would result in the most bulk-like film possible. In order to coax change in the structure of the sputtered films, sputtering power and deposition temperature were increased independently. Further, post-deposition annealing was applied to half of the deposited film in an attempt to affect change in the film structure. Complications in the characterization process due to increasing film thickness were also examined. Bulk-like metrics for characterization processes the included Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray spectroscopy (XPS), nanoindentation via atomic force microscopy, and contact angle of water on surface measurements were established. The results of the study revealed that increasing sputtering power and deposition temperature resulted in an increase in the similarity between the fluorocarbon films and the bulk PTFE, at a cost of affecting the potential of the film thicknesses, either by affecting the deposition process directly, or by decreasing the longevity of the sputtering targets.

  10. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of microwave and millimeter wave properties of the simulated atmosphere of the outer planets and their satellites has continued. One of the focuses is on the development of a radiative transfer model of the Jovian atmosphere at wavelengths from 1 mm to 10 cm. This modeling effort led to laboratory measurements of the millimeter wave opacity of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) under simulated Jovian conditions. Descriptions of the modeling effort, the Laboratory experiment, and the observations are presented. Correlative studies of measurements with Pioneer-Venus radio occultation measurements with longer wavelength emission measurements have provided new ways for characterizing temporal and spatial variations in the abundance of both gases H2SO4 and SO2, and for modeling their roles in the subcloud atmosphere. Laboratory measurements were conducted on 1.35 cm (and 13 cm) opacity of gaseous SO2 and absorptivity of gaseous SO2 at the 3.2 mm wavelength under simulated Venus conditions. Laboratory measurements were completed on millimeter wave dielectric properties of liquid H2SO4, in order to model the effects of the opacity of the clouds of Venus onto millimeter wave emission spectrum.

  11. Detection of conspecific alarm cues by juvenile salmonids under neutral and weakly acidic conditions: laboratory and field tests.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Antoine O H C; Kelly, Jocelyn M; E Brown, Grant

    2004-04-01

    A variety of fishes possess damage-released chemical alarm cues, which play a critical role in the detection and avoidance of potential predation threats. Recently, we have demonstrated that the ability of fathead minnows ( Pimephales promelas) and finescale dace ( Phoxinus neogaeus) to detect and respond to conspecific alarm cues is significantly reduced under weakly acidic conditions (pH 6.0). Rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook charr ( Salvelinus fontinalis) possess an analogous alarm cue system. However, it is unknown if the trout alarm cue system is likewise affected by relatively small changes in pH. In addition, previous studies have not verified this phenomenon under natural conditions. We conducted laboratory and field trials to examine the potential effects of acute exposure to weakly acidic (pH 6.0) conditions on the detection and response of conspecific alarm cues by juvenile trout. Our laboratory results demonstrate that while juvenile rainbow trout exhibit significant increases in antipredator behaviour under normal pH conditions (pH 7.0-7.2), they do not respond to the presence of conspecific chemical alarm cues (i.e. response is not different from controls) under weakly acidic conditions. Similarly, a wild strain of brook charr in their natural streams near Sudbury, Ontario, failed to detect conspecific alarm cues in a weakly acidic stream (mean pH 6.11) while they responded to these cues in a neutral stream (mean pH of 6.88). This is the first demonstration that relatively small changes in ambient pH can influence alarm responses under natural conditions. These data suggest significant, sub-lethal effects of acid precipitation on natural waterways. PMID:14758533

  12. Conditioned Attraction, Similarity, and Evaluative Meaning. Language, Personality, Social, and Cross-Cultural Study and Measurement of the Human A-R-D (Motivational) System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalling, Richard B.

    Recent stimulus-response formulations have indicated that similarity between persons functions as an unconditioned stimulus (UCS) and that interpersonal attraction is a classically conditioned evaluative response. The thesis of this study is that similarity is a correlate of evaluative meaning and that the latter rather than the former is…

  13. Laboratory versus industrial cutting force sensor in tool condition monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwajka, K.

    2005-01-01

    Research works concerning the utilisation of cutting force measures in tool condition monitoring usually present results and deliberations based on laboratory sensors. These sensors are too fragile to be used in industrial practice. Industrial sensors employed on the factory floor are less accurate, and this must be taken into account when creating a tool condition monitoring strategy. Another drawback of most of these works is that constant cutting parameters are used for the entire tool life. This does not reflect industrial practice where the same tool is used at different feeds and depths of cut in sequential passes. This paper presents a comparison of signals originating from laboratory and industrial cutting force sensors. The usability of the sensor output was studied during a laboratory simulation of industrial cutting conditions. Instead of building mathematical models for the correlation between tool wear and cutting force, an FFBP artificial neural network was used to find which combination of input data would provide an acceptable estimation of tool wear. The results obtained proved that cross talk between channels has an important influence on cutting force measurements, however this input configuration can be used for a tool condition monitoring system.

  14. Some metabolical aspects of physical exercise under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Malomsoki, J; Ekes, E; Martos, E; Nemeskéri, V

    1990-01-01

    Parameters of exercise physiology were studied in nearly 300 subjects to resolve whether these indices were equally suitable under laboratory and field conditions to assess the level of physical fitness and optimum work load. Respiratory gas exchange, heart rate and exercise acidosis parameters were studied. The inference drawn on the basis of the obtained data has been that both the mode and the intensity of the imposed exercise exert significant influence on the variation of physiological parameters. During running either on the treadmill or in the field test, blood lactate levels were comparable, but performances related to these concentrations were not the same. When different modes of exercise were employed, also lactate levels differed between the laboratory and field studies. The performance of patients under or after exercise rehabilitation following acute myocardial infarction by using instrumental monitoring in the laboratory was found to excel that attained during rehabilitation exercise training. Any change in the level of physical fitness can only be reliably followed when physiological parameters are obtained with the same mode of exercise and intensity under the same environmental conditions. Modern training planning of sports and exercise should take into account the data derived from both the laboratory and the field studies concerning cardiorespiratory system and metabolism. PMID:2075827

  15. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for the Venus middle atmosphere (1 to 6 atm, temperatures from 500 to 575K) obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments (at 3.6 to 13.4 cm wavelengths) and earth-based radio astronomical observations (1 to 3 cm wavelength range) are compared to laboratory observations at the latter wavelength range under simulated Venus conditions to infer abundances of microwave-absorbing atmospheric constituents, i.e. H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere.

  16. Effects of Multiple Contexts and Context Similarity on the Renewal of Extinguished Conditioned Behaviour in an ABA Design with Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balooch, Siavash Bandarian; Neumann, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The ABA renewal procedure involves pairing a conditional stimulus (CS) and an unconditional stimulus (US) in one context (A), presenting extinction trials of the CS alone in a second context (B), and nonreinforced test trials of the CS in the acquisition context (A). The renewal of extinguished conditioned behaviour is observed during test. The…

  17. Anaerobic respiration and antioxidant responses of Corythucha ciliata (Say) adults to heat-induced oxidative stress under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Wei, He-Ping; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    High temperature often induces oxidative stress and antioxidant response in insects. This phenomenon has been well documented under controlled laboratory conditions, but whether it happens under fluctuating field conditions is largely unknown. In this study, we used an invasive lace bug (Corythucha ciliata) as a model species to compare the effects of controlled thermal treatments (2 h at 33-43 °C with 2 °C intervals in the laboratory) and naturally fluctuating thermal conditions (08:00-14:00 at 2-h intervals (29.7-37.2 °C) on a hot summer day in a field in Shanghai, China) on lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) was the marker) and anaerobic respiration (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was the marker), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), and glutathione reductase (GR). The results show that MDA concentration increased significantly in response to heat stresses with similar trend in the laboratory and field. LDH activities did not significantly vary across temperatures in the laboratory-exposed individuals, but they significantly increased by rising temperature in the field. The activities or concentrations of SOD, CAT, GSH, and GR all significantly increased with increasing temperature in the two populations. These findings indicate that high temperature induces oxidative stress, resulting in high anaerobic respiration and antioxidant defenses in C. ciliata under both the laboratory and field conditions, which likely provide a defense mechanism against oxidative damage due to the accumulation of ROS. PMID:23943359

  18. Biological cycle and preliminary data on vectorial competence of Triatoma boliviana in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Durán, Pamela; Siñani, Edda; Depickère, Stéphanie

    2014-12-01

    With more than 140 potential vectors of Chagas disease, it is important to better know the biology and especially the vectorial capacity of the triatomine species which live in the surroundings of human dwellings. In Bolivia where 17 triatomine species are reported, the principal vector is Triatoma infestans. In some valleys of the department of La Paz where T. infestans is not present, a new species (Triatoma boliviana) was described in 2007. This species lives in a sylvatic environment not far away from the dwellings, and occasionally some individuals are found inside the houses. This study was carried out to describe the biological cycle of T. boliviana and to determine its vectorial competence. The development of a cohort of 95 nymphs of first instar (N1) was followed through nymphal instars and adult stage until death in laboratory (22°C). They were fed twice a week on an immobilized mouse. The median egg-to-adult development time was 8.4 months. The mortality by nymphal instar was lower than 7% except for N1 (67%) and N5 (18%). All nymph instars needed at least two feedings to molt (until six feedings for N5). The differentiation of a nymph into a female or a male could not be detected until the fifth instar for which the food intake was greater for a nymph developing into a female. Adults fed about once a week. The adult life span was around 400 days. The fecundity was 4.2 eggs/female/week, with a hatching rate of 50% and a hatching time of 39 days. In the same conditions, T. infestans showed a similar fecundity but a greater hatching rate and hatching time. A trial for rearing the adults at a higher temperature (26°C) showed a drastic fall in the fecundity and in the hatching rate. The vectorial competence was analyzed for fifth instars and adults by three parameters: the ability to feed on human beings, the capacity to be infected by T. cruzi and the postfeeding defecation delay. Results showed a relatively high vectorial competence: (1) insects fed easily on the tested human being; (2) 100% of the specimens became infected by T. cruzi just by one infected meal; and (3) although the adults defecated after a median postfeeding delay greater than that of T. infestans, results on N5 suggest that they could be as good vectors as T. infestans males. PMID:25151046

  19. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Ambient Conditions, Soot Emissions, and Fuel Properties on Contrail Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Anderson, B. E.; Bulzan, D.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Tacina, K.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Wong, H.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    Contrail formation by aircraft can affect the global radiation budget and is the most uncertain component of aviation impacts on climate change. Field campaigns studying contrail formation have given insight into their formation pathways. However in order to improve simulations of contrail production, laboratory studies of the initial processes of contrail formation from aircraft-emitted soot are needed. As part of the Aviation Climate Change Research Initiative (ACCRI), laboratory studies of contrail formation from simulated aircraft emissions were performed at the particulate aerosol laboratory (PAL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The facility consists of a controlled soot source connected to a flow-through chamber which can simulate atmospheric conditions at altitudes up to 45,000 ft. Soot was made by a propane-fueled CAST generator and allowed to mix with water vapor and sulfuric acid to simulate aircraft emissions. Optical particle counters were employed at two distances from the nozzle tip that provided number concentration and size distributions of newly formed ice particles. The formation of ice particles is presented for chamber temperatures and pressures simulating altitudes between 15,000 and 40,000 feet. Initial results show the role of soot concentration, soot size, concentration of co-emitted pollutants and ambient conditions in ice particle formation.

  20. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1997-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements completed under this grant (NAGW-533), have shown that the opacity from, SO2 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different lineshape than was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  1. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    The recognition of the need to make laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressure which correspond to the altitudes probed by radio occultation experiments, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. Construction was completed of the outer planets simulator and measurements were conducted of the microwave absorption and refraction from nitrogen under simulated Titan conditions. The results of these and previous laboratory measurements were applied to a wide range of microwave opacity measurements, in order to derive constituent densities and distributions in planetary atmospheres such as Venus.

  2. The impact of soil preparation on the soil erosion rates under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi Darvishan, A.; Homayounfar, V.; Sadeghi, S. H. R.

    2015-03-01

    The use of laboratory methods in soil erosion studies causes soil disturbance, preparation and placement in experimental plots and has been recently considered more and more because of many advantages. However, different stages of soil removal, transfer, preparation and placement in laboratory plots cause significant changes in soil structure and subsequently, the results of runoff, sediment concentration and soil loss. Knowing the rate of changes in sediment concentration and soil loss variables with respect to the soil preparation for laboratory studies is therefore inevitable to generalize the laboratory results to field conditions. However, there has been less attention to evaluate the effects of soil preparation on sediment variables. The present study was therefore conducted to compare sediment concentration and soil loss in natural and prepared soil. To achieve the study purposes, 18 field 1 m × 1 m-plots were adopted in an 18% gradient slope with sandy-clay-loam soil in the Kojour watershed, Northern Iran. Three rainfall intensities of 40, 60 and 80 mm h-1 were simulated on both prepared and natural soil treatments with three replications. The sediment concentration and soil loss at five three-minute intervals after time-to-runoff were then measured. The results showed the significant (p ? 0.01) increasing effects of soil preparation on the average sediment concentration and soil loss. The increasing rates of runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss due to the study soil preparation method for laboratory soil erosion plots, were 179, 183 and 1050% (2.79, 2.83 and 11.50 times), respectively.

  3. Unification and extension of the similarity scaling criteria and mixing transition for studying astrophysics using high energy density laboratory experiments or numerial simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y

    2006-08-21

    The Euler similarity criteria for laboratory experiments and time-dependent mixing transition are important concepts introduced recently for application to prediction and analysis of astrophysical phenomena. However Euler scaling by itself provides no information on the distinctive spectral range of high Reynolds number turbulent flows found in astrophysics situations. On the other hand, time-dependent mixing transition gives no indication on whether a flow that just passed the mixing transition is sufficient to capture all of the significant dynamics of the complete astrophysical spectral range. In this paper, a new approach, based on additional insight gained from review of Navier-Stokes turbulence theory, is developed. It allows for revelations about the distinctive spectral scale dynamics associated with high Reynolds number astrophysical flows. From this perspective, we caution that the energy containing range of the turbulent flow measured in a laboratory setting must not be unintentionally contaminated in such a way that the interactive influences of this spectral scale range in the corresponding astrophysical situation cannot be faithfully represented. In this paper we introduce the concept of a minimum state as the lowest Reynolds number turbulent flow that a time-dependent mixing transition must achieve to fulfill this objective. Later in the paper we show that the Reynolds number of the minimum state may be determined as 1.6 x 10{sup 5}. Our efforts here can be viewed as a unification and extension of the concepts of both similarity scaling and transient mixing transition concepts. At the last the implications of our approach in planning future intensive laser experiments or massively parallel numerical simulations are discussed. A systematic procedure is outlined so that as the capabilities of the laser interaction experiments and supporting results from detailed numerical simulations performed in recently advanced supercomputing facilities increase progressively, a strategy can be devised so that more and more spectral range dynamic structures and their statistical influences on evolving astrophysical flows can be progressively extended in laboratory investigations.

  4. Laboratory modeling of air-sea interaction under severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vasiliy, Kazakov; Nicolay, Bogatov; Olga, Ermakova; Mikhail, Salin; Daniil, Sergeev; Maxim, Vdovin

    2010-05-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested by Emanuel (1995) on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field (Powell, Vickery, Reinhold, 2003, French et al, 2007, Black, et al, 2007) and laboratory (Donelan et al, 2004) experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed by Kudryavtsev & Makin (2007) and Kukulka,Hara Belcher (2007), the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange (Andreas, 2004; Makin, 2005; Kudryavtsev, 2006). The main objective of this work is investigation of factors determining momentum exchange under high wind speeds basing on the laboratory experiment in a well controlled environment. The experiments were carried out in the Thermo-Stratified WInd-WAve Tank (TSWIWAT) of the Institute of Applied Physics. The parameters of the facility are as follows: airflow 0 - 25 m/s (equivalent 10-m neutral wind speed U10 up to 60 m/s), dimensions 10m x 0.4m x 0.7 m, temperature stratification of the water layer. Simultaneous measurements of the airflow velocity profiles and wind waves were carried out in the wide range of wind velocities. Airflow velocity profile was measured by WindSonic ultrasonic wind sensor. The water elevation was measured by the three-channel wave-gauge. Top and side views of the water surface were fixed by CCD-camera. Wind friction velocity and surface drag coefficients were retrieved from the measurements by the profile method. Obtained values are in good agreement with the data of measurements by Donelan et al (2004). The directional frequency-wave-number spectra of surface waves were retrieved by the wavelet directional method (Donelan et al, 1996). The obtained dependencies of parameters of the wind waves indicate existing of two regimes of the waves with the critical wind speed Ucr about 30 m/s. For U10Ucr the dependencies of peak wave period, peak wavelength, significant wave height on the wind speed tend to saturation, in the same time the peak wave slope has the maximum at approximately Ucr and then decreases with the tendency to saturation. The surface drag also tends to saturation for U10>Ucr similarly to (Donelan et al, 2004). Video filming indicates onset of wave breaking with white-capping and spray generation at wind speeds approximately equal to Ucr. We compared the obtained experimental dependencies with the predictions of the quasi-linear model of the turbulent boundary layer over the waved water surface (Reutov&Troitskaya, 1995). Comparing shows that theoretical predictions give low estimates for the measured drag coefficient and wave fields. Taking into account momentum flux associated with the spray generation yields theoretical estimations in good agreement with the experimental data. Basing on the experimental data a possible physical mechanism of the drag is suggested. Tearing of the wave crests at severe wind conditions leads to the effective smoothing (decreasing wave slopes) of the water surface, which in turn reduces the aerodynamic roughnes

  5. Effects of management on survival and growth of Stage 2 juvenile freshwater signal crayfish ( Pacifastacus leniusculus Dana) under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María Sáez-Royuela; José Manuel Carral; Jesús Domingo Celada; Camino Muñoz

    1995-01-01

    Four experiments were carried out in order to evaluate survival and growth rates of Stage 2 juvenile Pacifastacus leniusculus under different management conditions: effects of offspring origin (artificial incubation, maternal incubation under laboratory conditions and maternal incubation under natural conditions), of different shelter availability, of water circulation systems (partially re-circulated and full flow-through), and effects of certain flow rates. Juveniles

  6. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    After long arduous work with the simulator, measurements of the refractivity and absorptivity of nitrogen under conditions similar to those for Titan were completed. The most significant measurements, however, were those of the microwave absorption from gaseous ammonia under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmospheres over wavelengths from 1.3 to 22 cm. The results of these measurements are critical in that they confirm the theoretical calculation of the ammonia opacity using the Ben-Reuven lineshape. The application of both these results, and results obtained previously, to planetary observations at microwave frequencies were especially rewarding. Applications of the results for ammonia to radio astronomical observations of Jupiter in the 1.3 to 20 cm wavelength range and the application of results for gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions are discussed.

  7. Dynamics of genetic variability in Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) during adaptation to laboratory rearing conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anastrepha fraterculus is one of the most important fruit fly plagues in the American continent and only chemical control is applied in the field to diminish its population densities. A better understanding of the genetic variability during the introduction and adaptation of wild A. fraterculus populations to laboratory conditions is required for the development of stable and vigorous experimental colonies and mass-reared strains in support of successful Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) efforts. Methods The present study aims to analyze the dynamics of changes in genetic variability during the first six generations under artificial rearing conditions in two populations: a) a wild population recently introduced to laboratory culture, named TW and, b) a long-established control line, named CL. Results Results showed a declining tendency of genetic variability in TW. In CL, the relatively high values of genetic variability appear to be maintained across generations and could denote an intrinsic capacity to avoid the loss of genetic diversity in time. Discussion The impact of evolutionary forces on this species during the adaptation process as well as the best approach to choose strategies to introduce experimental and mass-reared A. fraterculus strains for SIT programs are discussed. PMID:25471362

  8. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements performed by Fahd and Steffes have shown that the opacity from gaseous SO2 under simulated Venus conditions can be well described by the Van Vleck-Weisskopf lineshape at wavelengths shortward of 2 cm, but that the opacity of wavelengths greater than 2 cm is best described by a different lineshape that was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  9. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based or spacecraft-based radio astronomical (emission) observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or the use of laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions that are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements have shown that the centimeter-wavelength opacity from gaseous phosphine (PH3) under simulated conditions for the outer planets far exceeds that predicted from theory over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. This fundamentally changed the resulting interpretation of Voyager radio occultation data at Saturn and Neptune. It also directly impacts planning and scientific goals for study of Saturn's atmosphere with the Cassini Radio Science Experiment and the Rossini RADAR instrument. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter (or flyby) radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft- and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres,

  10. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1998-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements completed recently by Kolodner and Steffes (ICARUS 132, pp. 151-169, March 1998, attached as Appendix A) under this grant (NAGS-4190), have shown that the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different formalism than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter radio occultation experiments and by radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in such experiments, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  11. A Laboratory Exercise to Illustrate Increased Salivary Cortisol in Response to Three Stressful Conditions Using Competitive ELISA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mark F. Haussmann (Iowa State University Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology)

    2007-03-01

    Here, we outline a laboratory exercise that uses a competitive ELISA kit to illustrate the response of salivary cortisol concentrations to three stressful conditions: presentation stress, fasting stress, and competition stress

  12. The effect of conditioning rice during the laboratory milling process on the quality of the milled sample

    E-print Network

    Childers, Roy Eugene

    1972-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF CONDITIONING RICE DURING THE LABORATORY MILLING PROCESS ON THE QUALITY OF THE MILLED SAMPLE A Thesis by ROY EUGENE CHILDERS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering THE EFFECT OF CONDITIONING RICE DURING THE LABORATORY MILLING PROCESS ON THE I1UALITY OF THE MILLED SAMPLE A Thesis by ROY EUGENE CHILDERS, JR...

  13. Monoaromatic hydrocarbon transformation under anaerobic conditions at Seal Beach, California: Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, H.A.; Reinhard, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Western Region Hazardous Substance Research Center

    1996-02-01

    Anaerobic biotransformation of several aromatic hydrocarbons found in gasoline including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, p-xylene, and o-xylene (BTEX) was studied in batch anaerobic laboratory microcosms. Aquifer sediment and ground water were obtained from the site of a historic gasoline spill at Seal Beach, California. Sulfate is present in the site ground water at 80 mg/L, and sulfate-reducing activity appears to be the dominant intrinsic BTEX bioremediation process where nitrate is absent. In the laboratory, the microcosms were set up with different electron acceptors (sulfate and nitrate) in site ground water and various defined anaerobic media to estimate intrinsic biodegradation rates and to suggest conditions under which anaerobic bioremediation could be enhanced. In unamended microcosms, anaerobic biotransformation of toluene and m + p-xylene occurred at a rate of 7.2 and 4.1 {micro}g/liter hr, respectively, with sulfate as the apparent electron acceptor. Addition of nitrate stimulated nitrate-reducing conditions and increased rates of toluene and m + p-xylene biotransformation to 30.1 and 5.4 {micro}g/liter hr, respectively. The catabolic substrate range was altered to include ethylbenzene in the nitrate-amended microcosms, suggesting an apparent preferential use of different BTEX compounds depending on the electron acceptor available. Under all the conditions studied, more than twice the amount of nitrate or sulfate was used than could be accounted for by the observed BTEX degradation. The results of these experiments indicate that indigenous microorganisms from the Seal Beach aquifer have significant capability to degrade BTEX hydrocarbons and that intrinsic processes in the Seal Beach aquifer may remediate a portion of the hydrocarbon contamination in situ without intervention. However, the data also suggest that intervention by nitrate addition would enhance the rate and extent of anaerobic BTEX biotransformation.

  14. Measuring ignitability for in situ burning of oil spills weathered under Arctic conditions: from laboratory studies to large-scale field experiments.

    PubMed

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Brandvik, Per Johan

    2011-08-01

    This paper compares the ignitability of Troll B crude oil weathered under simulated Arctic conditions (0%, 50% and 90% ice cover). The experiments were performed in different scales at SINTEF's laboratories in Trondheim, field research station on Svalbard and in broken ice (70-90% ice cover) in the Barents Sea. Samples from the weathering experiments were tested for ignitability using the same laboratory burning cell. The measured ignitability from the experiments in these different scales showed a good agreement for samples with similar weathering. The ice conditions clearly affected the weathering process, and 70% ice or more reduces the weathering and allows a longer time window for in situ burning. The results from the Barents Sea revealed that weathering and ignitability can vary within an oil slick. This field use of the burning cell demonstrated that it can be used as an operational tool to monitor the ignitability of oil spills. PMID:21714974

  15. Biological degradation of VCCs and CFCs under simulated anaerobic landfill conditions in laboratory test digesters.

    PubMed

    Deipser, A; Stegmann, R

    1997-01-01

    The biological degradation of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons (chlorocarbons (VCCs) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)) was investigated under simulated conditions of landfills in laboratory test digesters. Fully halogenated VCCs (tetrachloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloromethane and dichloromethane) and CFCs (trichlorofluoromethane (R11), dichlorodifluoromethane (R12) and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (R113)) were degraded under anaerobic conditions in addition to the methanogenic bacteria in municipal solid waste (MSW) and organic wastes. These substances showed different degradation reactions in the simulated acid and methanephases of MSW landfills. It is assumed that R11 and R113 could be decomposed completely under methanogenic conditions. Dichlorofluoromethane (R21) was observed as the reductive degradation product of R11 and was further degraded during the methanephase, but hardly at all under acid conditions. Chlorodifluoromerhane (R22) as a degradation product of R12 was not degraded, even not in the methanephase. In the acidphase, R11 was the only CFC to be dechlorinated, although only in small quantities. The degradation products of tetrachloroethylene differed under the various environmental conditions. In the acidphase, 1,1-dichloroethylene was detected as the only dichloroethylene, whereas in particular cis-1,2-dichloroethylene but also trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride could be detected as metabolites in the methanephase. Dichloromethane and chloroethane, as metabolites of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, could hardly be degraded at all in the acidphase. The degradation of VCCs and CFCs is largely independent of the substrate used. The investigations have demonstrated that the measured biodegradation rates (0.3-15 mg/m(3) (material vol)./h) cannot be improved considerably since they are limited by the inhibiting effect of the substances and their degradation products. PMID:19005803

  16. Redox conditions and the efficiency of chlorinated ethene biodegradation: Laboratory studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    The potential for biodegradation of highly reduced groundwater contaminants is greatest under aerobic conditions and least under CO2-reducing (methanogenic) conditions. Laboratory studies conducted using [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride (VC) indicate the same pattern applies to the anaerobic oxidation of relatively reduced chloroethylenes. Recent studies, showing that CH4 can be a significant product of microbial degradation of VC under methanogenic conditions, clarified mechanisms underlying anaerobic VC mineralization and emphasized the redox dependence of this process. A microcosm study conducted with stream bed sediments demonstrated rapid degradation of [1,2-14C] VC and simultaneous production of 14CO2 and 14CH4. The results of acetate mineralization studies indicated that these sediments contained active acetotrophic methanogens. VC degradation involved an initial transformation to acetate via oxidative acetogenesis followed by acetotrophic methanogenesis to yield CO2 and CH4 as final products. Based on these recent results, a conceptual model for anaerobic microbial degradation of VC to non-chlorinated products can be proposed.

  17. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Sanford, James A.; Park, Jea H.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Champion, Boyd L.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and infection-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of over 30% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB, PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein location for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  18. Survival Potential and Photosynthetic Activity of Lichens Under Mars-Like Conditions: A Laboratory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Butina, Frederike; Lorek, Andreas; Wernecke, Roland; Ott, Sieglinde

    2010-03-01

    Lichens were repetitively exposed over 22 days to thermophysical Mars-like conditions at low-and mid-latitudes. The simulated parameters and the experimental setup are described. Natural samples of the lichen Xanthoria elegans were used to investigate their ability to survive the applied Mars-like conditions. The effects of atmospheric pressure, CO2 concentration, low temperature, water availability, and light on Mars were also studied. The results of these experiments indicate that - no significant decrease in the vitality of the lichen occurred after exposure to simulated martian conditions, which was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis, and - a 95% CO2 atmosphere with 100% humidity, low pressure (partial pressure of CO2 was 600 Pa), and low temperature has a balancing effect on photosynthetic activity as a function of temperature. This means a starting low photosynthetic activity at high CO2 concentrations with Earth-like pressure has a reduction of 60%. But, if the simulated atmospheric pressure is reduced to Mars-like conditions with the maintenance of the same Mars-like 95% CO2 concentration, the photosynthetic activity increases and again reaches similar values as those exhibited under terrestrial atmospheric pressure and concentration. Based on these results, we presume that, in any region on Mars where liquid water might be available, even for short periods of time, a eukaryotic symbiotic organism would have the ability to survive, at least over weeks, and to temporarily photosynthesize.

  19. Survival potential and photosynthetic activity of lichens under Mars-like conditions: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Butina, Frederike; Lorek, Andreas; Wernecke, Roland; Ott, Sieglinde

    2010-03-01

    Lichens were repetitively exposed over 22 days to thermophysical Mars-like conditions at low-and mid-latitudes. The simulated parameters and the experimental setup are described. Natural samples of the lichen Xanthoria elegans were used to investigate their ability to survive the applied Mars-like conditions. The effects of atmospheric pressure, CO(2) concentration, low temperature, water availability, and light on Mars were also studied. The results of these experiments indicate that no significant decrease in the vitality of the lichen occurred after exposure to simulated martian conditions, which was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis, and a 95% CO(2) atmosphere with 100% humidity, low pressure (partial pressure of CO(2) was 600 Pa), and low temperature has a balancing effect on photosynthetic activity as a function of temperature. This means a starting low photosynthetic activity at high CO(2) concentrations with Earth-like pressure has a reduction of 60%. But, if the simulated atmospheric pressure is reduced to Mars-like conditions with the maintenance of the same Mars-like 95% CO(2) concentration, the photosynthetic activity increases and again reaches similar values as those exhibited under terrestrial atmospheric pressure and concentration. Based on these results, we presume that, in any region on Mars where liquid water might be available, even for short periods of time, a eukaryotic symbiotic organism would have the ability to survive, at least over weeks, and to temporarily photosynthesize. PMID:20402583

  20. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. The goal of this investigation was to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  1. Testing shields in the Argonne National Laboratory fuel conditioning facility support areas.

    PubMed

    Courtney, J C; Klann, R T

    1997-01-01

    Testing has been completed for two lightly shielded areas that support operations in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Argonne National Laboratory site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Operational requirements dictated the use of a radiography source containing 0.44 TBq (12 Ci) of 192Ir to challenge reinforced concrete and steel shields that surround a decontamination, maintenance, and repair area for contaminated equipment used in hot cell operations. A more intense source containing 0.89 TBq (24 Ci) of 192Ir was used to test lead shot and steel shields around tanks in a radioactive liquid waste system and the boundaries of the room that contained it. Measurement procedures were developed to find design flaws and construction deficiencies while minimizing radiation exposure to test participants. While the shields are adequate to limit gamma ray deep dose equivalents to 10 mSv y(-1) (1 rem y(-1)) or less to facility personnel, several modifications were necessary to assure that the attenuation is adequate to keep dose rates less than 5 microSv h(-1) (0.5 mrem h(-1)) in normally occupied areas. PMID:8972837

  2. Repellency of aerosol and cream products containing fennel oil to mosquitoes under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon-Il; Chang, Kyu-Sik; Yang, Young-Cheol; Kim, Byung-Seok; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2004-11-01

    The repellency of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Miller)-containing products (5% aerosol and 8% cream) against mosquitoes was compared with those of citronella oil, geranium oil and deet, as well as three commercial repellents, Baby Keeper cream containing IR3535, MeiMei cream containing citronella and geranium oils, and Repellan S aerosol containing 19% N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (deet) under laboratory and field conditions. In a laboratory study with female Aedes aegypti (L), fennel oil exhibited good repellency in a release-in-cage test and repellency in skin and patch tests of the oil was comparable with those of citronella and geranium oils. In paddy field tests with five human volunteers, 5% and 8% fennel oil-containing aerosol and cream produced 84% and 70% repellency, respectively, at 90 min after exposure, whereas Baby Keeper cream and MeiMei cream gave 71% and 57% repellency at 90 min after exposure, respectively, and Repellan S aerosol gave 89% repellency at 210 min. The species and ratio of mosquitoes collected were the genera Culex (44.1%), Anopheles (42.2%), Aedes (7.8%) and Armigeres (5.9%). Fennel oil-containing products could be useful for protection from humans and domestic animals from vector-borne diseases and nuisance caused by mosquitoes. PMID:15532688

  3. Measured and calculated evaporation losses of two petroleum hydrocarbon herbicide mixtures under laboratory and field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N.; Kim, Y.

    1986-08-01

    Evaporation rates of two weed oils were measured under laboratory and field conditions. Rates were also calculated by assuming first-order evaporation of the oil components (represented by hydrocarbon references). Beacon selective and Chevron nonselective weed oils exhibited evaporation rates 1.4-1.9 and 0.9 times the calculated rates, respectively, for 8-10 mg/cm/sup 2/ on inert surfaces in the laboratory. The relative rates were increased to 3-15 (Beacon) and 1.6 (Chevron) under a slight breeze (0.43 m/s) with turbulence. The half-life of Beacon oil applied at 6-7 mg/cm/sup 2/ to moist soil in an unplanted field was 51 min (10-20/sup 0/C), while the calculated half-life was 57 min. In an alfalfa field, 90% of the Chevron oil from a deposit of 0.15-0.22 mg/cm/sup 2/ (20-40/sup 0/C) evaporated in 26-45 and 53-127 min from glass plates and paper filters, respectively; average calculated time was 40 min. Evaporation rates from alfalfa foliage and glass plates compared well. 15 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  4. Interpreting EChO's future data: biological laboratory extimates under M star's planetary surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erculiani, Marco S.; Claudi, Riccardo U.; Giro, Enrico; Galletta, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Maurizio; Farisato, Giancarlo; Lessio, Luigi; Micela, Giuseppina; Billi, Daniela

    2014-08-01

    The EChO Exoplanet Atmosphere Characterization mission will have in the midst of its main targets, planets that orbit M stars in their or very close to their habitable zone. In this framework at the Astronomical Observatory of Padova (INAF) we are going to perform experiments that will give us an idea about the possible modification of the atmosphere by photosynthetic biota present on the planet surface. In the framework of the project "Atmosphere In a Test Tube", planetary environmental conditions are being performed. The bacteria that are being studied are Acaryochloris marina, Chroococcidiopsis sp., Cyanidium Caldarium and Halomicronema hongdechloris and tests are being performed with LISA ambient simulator in the laboratory of the Padova Astronomical Observatory.

  5. Life tables and reproductive parameters of Lutzomyia spinicrassa (Diptera: Psychodidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Escovar, Jesús; Bello, Felio J; Morales, Alberto; Moncada, Ligia; Cárdenas, Estrella

    2004-10-01

    Lutzomyia spinicrassa is a vector of Leishmania braziliensis in Colombia. This sand fly has a broad geographical distribution in Colombia and Venezuela and it is found mainly in coffee plantations. Baseline biological growth data of L. spinicrassa were obtained under experimental laboratory conditions. The development time from egg to adult ranged from 59 to 121 days, with 12.74 weeks in average. Based on cohorts of 100 females, horizontal life table was constructed. The following predictive parameters were obtained: net rate of reproduction (8.4 females per cohort female), generation time (12.74 weeks), intrinsic rate of population increase (0.17), and finite rate of population increment (1.18). The reproductive value for each class age of the cohort females was calculated. Vertical life tables were elaborated and mortality was described for the generation obtained of the field cohort. In addition, for two successive generations, additive variance and heritability for fecundity were estimated. PMID:15558171

  6. Laboratory experiment on poroelastic behavior of Berea sandstone under two-phase fluid flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, H.; Aichi, M.; Tokunaga, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Ogawa, T.; Aoki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Coupled two-phase fluid flow and deformation of Berea sandstone was discussed through laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. In the experiment, a triaxial compression apparatus with flow pipes to pass fluids through a rock sample was used. The experimental procedures were as follows. Firstly, external stresses close to hydrostatic condition were applied to a water saturated cylindrical Berea sandstone sample. Then, compressed air was infiltrated from the bottom of the sample. During the experiment, both axial and circumferential strains at half the height of the sample and volumetric discharge of water at the outlet were measured. Both strains showed sudden extensions after a few seconds, and monotonically extended thereafter. The volumetric discharge of water showed that air breakthrough occurred in around 100 seconds after the commencement of the air injection. Numerical simulations based on thermodynamically consistent constitutive equations were conducted in order to quantitatively analyze the experimental results. In a simulation in which the material was assumed to be homogeneous isotropic, the axial strain at half the height of the sample and the volumetric discharge of water at the outlet were reproduced well by using reasonable parameters, while that was not the case with the circumferential strain at half the height of the sample. On the other hand, in a simulation in which anisotropy of the material was introduced, all experimental data were reproduced well by using reasonable parameters. This result is reasonable because Berea sandstone is well known to be anisotropic under such Terzaghi effective stress condition as used in our experiment, i.e., 3.0 MPa (Hart and Wang, 1999; Hart, 2000). Our results indicate that the theory of poroelasticity for two-phase fluid system can explain the strain behavior of porous media for two-phase fluid flow observed in laboratory experiments.

  7. Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

    2008-03-05

    Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P{sub 0} < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T{sub 0} < 580K, 18 < U{sub 0} < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

  8. Conditions Similar to Alcohol Impairment

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    impairment · Dementia / Delirium · Stroke · Drug Use · Electrolyte Imbalances · Behavioral / Psychological protruding through the skin · Unresponsiveness or coma · Drug overdose · Heat stroke · Drowning Calling 911

  9. Cryogenic trapping of atmospheric organic acids under laboratory and field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, U.; Weller, D.; Ammann, Ch.; Jork, E.; Kesselmeier, J.

    A new and easy to handle method for the sampling of atmospheric organic acids is presented. The acids are cryogenically cotrapped with atmospheric water, using a specially designed siliconised glass trap, constantly cooled to - 70°C. A constant air flow is chosen ranging between 2 and 8 l min -1 Samples are analysed by ion chromatography. With this method several acids may be detected, such as formic, acetic, lactic, oxalic, propionic and pyruvic acids. Sampling efficiency was tested for formic and acetic acid for different sample volumes, sampling times and flow rates, all performed under typical ambient conditions (relative humidity 67 ± 3°; temperature 25.5 ± 0.5°C; mixing ratios: 0.87 ± 0.015 and 1.07 ± 0.023 ppbv for acetic acid and formic acid, respectively). For both acids sampling efficiency was found to be 100 (± 3)%. Errors for parallel samples were 3% maximum. ZEFLUOR filters, used to separate particles from the gas stream, showed no impact on the composition and concentration of formic, acetic and propionic acids, whereas oxalic acid showed severe losses on the filter. Field measurements confirmed the reliability of the method. Under varying field conditions the relative accuracy seemed to be lower than in the laboratory tests but still lied in a satisfying range. Typical concentrations (averages of field measurements) yield relative errors of 6.4% for formic acid, 6.1% for acetic acid and 7.1% for propionic acid.

  10. The Life Cycle of the Antarctic Nematode Plectus murrayi Under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    de Tomasel, Cecilia Milano; Adams, Byron J; Tomasel, Fernando G; Wall, Diana H

    2013-03-01

    We study and describe the life cycle of Plectus murrayi, a free-living, bacterivorous soil nematode endemic to terrestrial Antarctica. The study was performed at 15°C, a temperature identified as optimal for growth rate studies in the laboratory. Under these conditions, we observed that the first molt occurs in the egg, and second-stage juveniles hatch 12 to 14 d after egg laying. Individuals undergo three subsequent molts to become adults 23 to 26 d after hatching with a final average length of 950 ?m. Egg-laying begins 41 to 43 d after hatching, resulting in an egg-to-egg life cycle ranging from 53 to 57 d under our experimental conditions. Considering that the average soil temperature during austral summers in the McMurdo Dry Valleys is only a few degrees above freezing, it is highly likely that many, if not most of these animals, require more than 1 yr to complete their entire life cycle. Our study supports other research that establishes P. murrayi as an important model organism for studying adaptation to extreme environmental stress. PMID:23589658

  11. The Life Cycle of the Antarctic Nematode Plectus murrayi Under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    de Tomasel, Cecilia Milano; Adams, Byron J.; Tomasel, Fernando G.; Wall, Diana H.

    2013-01-01

    We study and describe the life cycle of Plectus murrayi, a free-living, bacterivorous soil nematode endemic to terrestrial Antarctica. The study was performed at 15°C, a temperature identified as optimal for growth rate studies in the laboratory. Under these conditions, we observed that the first molt occurs in the egg, and second-stage juveniles hatch 12 to 14 d after egg laying. Individuals undergo three subsequent molts to become adults 23 to 26 d after hatching with a final average length of 950 ?m. Egg-laying begins 41 to 43 d after hatching, resulting in an egg-to-egg life cycle ranging from 53 to 57 d under our experimental conditions. Considering that the average soil temperature during austral summers in the McMurdo Dry Valleys is only a few degrees above freezing, it is highly likely that many, if not most of these animals, require more than 1 yr to complete their entire life cycle. Our study supports other research that establishes P. murrayi as an important model organism for studying adaptation to extreme environmental stress. PMID:23589658

  12. Consistency of Rain Splash Soil Erosion under Controlled Laboratory Flume Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Barry, D. Andrew; Sander, Graham G.; Parlange, J.-Yves

    2014-05-01

    Prediction of soil erosion is challenging due to the wide range of factors that can affect it. At the catchment scale, for instance, inconsistent soil erosion yields have been reported in numerous studies. Explanations involve nonlinearities in these contributing factors and their interactions (such as soil surface properties, precipitation characteristic, topography and land cover). Controlled laboratory flume experiments provide a means to improve our process physical understanding. Here, we report on experiments wherein the dependence of rain-splash soil erosion on the precipitation rate, area of soil exposed and initial soil conditions was investigated using laboratory flume experiments. The role of these factors on predicting experimental results was examined based on a prototype experiment and area-based approach. That is, we hypothesised that flume erosion can be predicted by a simple linear scaling of the different factors. Fourteen experiments were carried out in which we varied the precipitation rate (28, 60 and 74 mm/h), the fraction of surface rock fragments (20, 30, and 40%) and initial soil conditions (dry hand-cultivated, wet sealed-compacted and dry compacted). In addition, the influence of time was investigated by considering different experiment durations (2-5 h). In all experiments, we measured the discharge rate, the total sediment concentration and the sediment concentrations of the individual size classes at the flume exit. The presence of surface rock fragments on the soil surface prevents surface sealing and reduces the cross-sectional area available for flow, thereby affecting the development of steady-state equilibrium. Results revealed that, generally, estimates of the individual size classes' sediment concentrations, taking the exposed area into account, reproduce satisfactorily the measured data at steady state, independent of the initial conditions and rainfall intensity. Before steady state, however, the main feature in most sediment size classes is an early concentration peak, which was found not to be proportional to the area exposed and effective rainfall. Rather, results showed that the short time behaviour is mainly controlled by the soil antecedent and initial conditions, such as surface sealing, surface compaction and soil moisture. In addition, findings suggested that the larger size classes are more sensitive to prior soil conditions than the finer size classes. It was found, also, that this proportionality of erosion to area of exposed soil can be obtained for the entire erosive event under carefully controlled conditions. Steady state erosion rates, based on a prototype precipitation, were within a factor two of measured rates, for total and individual size classes. However, at short times, erosion due to raindrop splash is not proportionally controlled by the precipitation rate. Overall, the results thus indicate that, for a given soil, experimental data based on a given rainfall rate can be used as a rough estimator of the steady rate of erosion for a different rainfall rates.

  13. Assessment of metolachlor and diuron leaching in a tropical soil using undisturbed soil columns under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Dores, Eliana F G C; De Souza, Luana; Villa, Ricardo D; Pinto, Alicio Alves

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] and metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-metoxi-1-methylethyl)acetamide] leaching was studied in undisturbed soil columns collected in a cotton crop area in Mato Grosso State, Brazil. The pesticides were applied to the soil surface in dosages similar to those used in a cotton plantation. To assess the leaching process, soil columns were submitted to simulated rain under laboratory conditions at 25 ± 3°C, in the absence of wind and direct solar radiation. During the rain simulations, leachate solutions were collected and herbicide concentrations were determined. At the end of the experiment, the soil columns were cut into 10 cm sections to determine the remaining herbicide concentrations through the soil profile. Metolachlor was detected in all soil sections, and approximately 4% of the applied mass was leached. Diuron was detected only in the upper two soil sections and was not detected in the leachate. A linear correlation (r > 0.94) between the metolachlor soil concentrations and the organic contents of the soil sections was observed. Mass balance suggests that around 56% of diuron and 40% of metolachlor were degraded during the experiments. Measurements of the water table depth in the area where the samples were collected showed that it varied from 2 to 6 m and is therefore vulnerable to contamination by the studied herbicides, particularly metolachlor, which demonstrated a higher leaching potential. PMID:23305279

  14. Temperature management during semen processing: Impact on boar sperm quality under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Schulze, M; Henning, H; Rüdiger, K; Wallner, U; Waberski, D

    2013-12-01

    Freshly collected boar spermatozoa are sensitive to a fast reduction in temperature because of lipid phase transition and phase separation processes. Temperature management during semen processing may determine the quality of stored samples. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of isothermic and hypothermic semen processing protocols on boar sperm quality under laboratory and field conditions. In the laboratory study, ejaculates (n = 12) were first diluted (1:1) with Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS) at 32 °C, then processed either with isothermic (32 °C) or hypothermic (21 °C) BTS, stored at 17 °C, and assessed on days 1, 3, and 6. Temperature curves showed that 150 minutes after the first dilution, semen doses of both groups reached the same temperature. Two-step hypothermic processing resulted in lower sperm motility on days 1 and 6 (P < 0.05). Concomitantly, hypothermally processed samples contained less membrane intact sperm on days 3 and 6 (P < 0.05). Using AndroStar Plus extender instead of BTS reduced the negative effect of hypothermic processing. In the field study, 15 semen samples from each of 23 European artificial insemination studs were evaluated as part of an external quality control program. Semen quality based on motility, membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity, and a thermoresistance test was higher for stations using one-step isothermic dilutions (n = 7) compared with artificial insemination centers using two-step hypothermic protocols (n = 16). Both studies show that chilling injury associated with hypothermic dilution results in lower quality of stored boar semen compared with isothermic dilution and that the type of semen extender affects the outcomes. PMID:23987989

  15. The Formation of Sulfate and Elemental Sulfur Aerosols Under Varying Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, H. Langley; Hasenkopf, Christa A.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Farmer, Delphine K.; Jimenez, Jose L.; McKay, Christopher P.; Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of sulfur mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) in sediments more than 2.45 x 10(exp 9) years old is thought to be evidence for an early anoxic atmosphere. Photolysis of sulfur dioxide (SO2) by UV light with lambda < 220 nm has been shown in models and some initial laboratory studies to create a S-MIF; however, sulfur must leave the atmosphere in at least two chemically different forms to preserve any S-MIF signature. Two commonly cited examples of chemically different sulfur species that could have exited the atmosphere are elemental sulfur (S8) and sulfuric acid (H2S04) aerosols. Here, we use real-time aerosol mass spectrometry to directly detect the sulfur-containing aerosols formed when SO2 either photolyzes at wavelengths from 115 to 400 nm, to simulate the UV solar spectrum, or interacts with high-energy electrons, to simulate lightning. We found that sulfur-containing aerosols form under all laboratory conditions. Further, the addition of a reducing gas, in our experiments hydrogen (H2) or methane (CH4), increased the formation of S8. With UV photolysis, formation of S8 aerosols is highly dependent on the initial SO2 pressure; and S8 is only formed at a 2% SO2 mixing ratio and greater in the absence of a reductant, and at a 0.2% SO2 mixing ratio and greater in the presence of 1000 ppmv CH4. We also found that organosulfur compounds are formed from the photolysis of CH4 and moderate amounts of SO2, The implications for sulfur aerosols on early Earth are discussed.

  16. Performance of transient limiters under laboratory, simulated, and rocket-triggered lightning conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hasbrouck, R.T.; Johnson, J.P.; Breitmeier, J.

    1989-07-02

    We have designed and tested a prototype system that implements a lightning-protection method referred to as the ''fortress concept.'' The fortress, a structure similar to a Faraday cage, protects the critical system by surrounding it with a continuous metallic skin. Each electrical conductor that must enter the fortress is enclosed within a cable, which is, in turn, enclosed in a metallic shield that terminates at the entry point and is electrically bonded to the fortress' outer metallic surface. Within the fortress, each penetrating conductor is protected by a transient limiter. The system was tested by means of full-threat-level simulated lightning and actual lightening triggered by rockets. Several limited components were subsequently tested by using a laboratory-type surge generator to investigate certain anomalous responses. This paper reviews the fortress concept, discusses the operation of the limiters, and examines their performance. Explanations are offered for the anomalous responses, and several important design considerations and trade-offs are offered. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Laboratory measurements of basalts electrical resistivity under deep oceanic crustal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, M. E.; Gibert, B.; Azais, P.; Pezard, P. A.; Flovenz, O. G.; Asmundsson, R.

    2009-12-01

    For sixty years, electrical resistivity soundings have been used to explore geothermal resources in Iceland. They have generally revealed two zones of high electrical conductivity, one at shallow depths (Flovenz et al., 1985) and another at 10-30 km depth (Beblo and Björnsson, 1978). The interpretation of these conductive zones in terms of composition and in-situ physical conditions is often ambiguous, as various parameters can explain these observations like temperature, partial melting, change in minerals and type of pore fluid. Accurate interpretations of resistivity data needed for geothermal exploration require laboratory measurements of electrical conductivities performed on rock samples at different conditions. We present here a method to measure electrical conductivity of rocks under deep crustal conditions for oceanic crustal rock, i.e. at temperatures up to 600°C, confining pressures up to 200 MPa and pore fluid pressures up to 50 MPa. The method has been developed in a internally heated, gas pressure apparatus (Paterson press). Electrical conductivity is measured on large cylindrical samples (15 to 22 mm in diameter and 10 to 15 mm in length) in a two parallel electrodes geometry. Such experiments require that the fluid saturated sample is sleeved in an impermeable and deformable jacket serving to separate the confining pressure medium (high pressure argon) from the pore fluid saturated sample. At temperature above 200°C a metal sleeve must be used, although it induces high leakage currents that could affect electrical measurements. The leakage currents are reduced using addition of 2 guard-ring parallel electrodes (Glover, 1995). The electrical impedance of basalt has been measured over a frequency range from 10 -1 to 106 Hertz. Five different types of low porosity basalts were selected to cover a range in alteration grade, from albitic to granulite facies. Application of this method will provide data on electrical conductivity of fresh and altered saturated basalts at in-situ conditions. These data will facilitate the understanding of both transient electromagnetic and with magnetotelluric data together with logging data from oceanic crust. Beblo, M. and Björnsson, A. Magnetotelluric investigation of the lower crust and upper mantle beneath Iceland. Journal of Geophysics, 45, 1-16. 1978 Flovenz O.G., Georgsson L. S. and Arnason, Knutur. Resistivity Structure of the Upper Crust in Iceland. Journal of geophysical research, Vol.90 NO B12, Pages 10,136-10 150. 1985. Glover Paul W.J., Vine F.J.. Beyong KTB- Electrical Conductivity of the Deep Continental crust. Survey in Geophysics. Vol. 16, pages 47-62. 1995.

  18. Demographic fitness of Belminus ferroae (Hemiptera: Triatominae) on three different hosts under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Claudia Magaly; Medone, Paula; Nieves, Elsa Evelia; Jaimes, Diego Alexander; Ortiz, Nelcy; Rabinovich, Jorge Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Triatominae are widely recognised for their role as vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi. One of the main biological characteristics of this subfamily is their obligate haematophagous condition. However, previous studies on Belminus herreri and Belminus ferroae suggested that cockroaches are their principal hosts in domiciles. Due to this peculiar behaviour, the aim of this study was to analyse several demographic and reproductive parameters of B. ferroae fed on three different hosts (mice, cockroaches and Rhodnius prolixus) and relate B. ferroae fitness to these alternative hosts. The cohorts were reared under constant conditions. The egg hatching rate was similar for cohorts fed on cockroaches (69.4%) and R. prolixus (63.8%), but was much lower for the cohort fed on mice (16%). The development time from the nymph to adult stage and the average age of first reproduction (?) presented lower values in the cohort fed on cockroaches, which is consistent with the higher population growth rate associated with this host. Demographic parameters [intrinsic rate of natural increase, finite rate of population growth, net reproductive rate and damping ratio] showed statistically significant differences between the cohorts. Analysis of the life history of B. ferroae revealed a higher fitness related to the cockroach. The implications of these results for the origin of the subfamily are discussed. PMID:24141961

  19. [Assessment of parameters of human outside respiration by portative volumeter under field and laboratory conditions].

    PubMed

    Altukhov, N D; Volkov, N I

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of spirometric possibilities of lung usually happens possible only in laboratory to use of expensive equipment, besides thus it is necessary to use cycle ergometer or racetracks which make the contribution to violation of natural coordination of movements of the person. Thereof there is a desire to develop the portable device, which would measure key parameters of external breath of the person in field conditions with data recording possibility in the memory in a mode of breath-by-breath then to transfer them to the computer for the further analysis. We developed the portable device consisting of the easy and tiny sensor, fastening to a respiratory mask. The sensor incorporates by means of a cable to the tiny device to the liquid crystal screen on which serially at the choice of the operator values of pulmonary ventilation (Ve), volume of an exhalation (Vt) and frequency of breath in a mode of breath-by-breath are deduced. Metrological researches showed that the device error generally didn't exceed 5%. PMID:23885561

  20. Laboratory Measurements of the Millimeter-Wavelength Sulfur Dioxide Absorption Spectrum under Simulated Venus Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, Amadeo; Steffes, Paul G.

    2014-11-01

    Over 130 laboratory measurements of the 2-4 millimeter wavelength opacity of sulfur dioxide in a carbon dioxide atmosphere under simulated conditions for the upper Venus troposphere (temperatures between 308-343 K and pressures between 0.03- 2 bar) have been made. These measurements along with the centimeter wavelength measurements by Steffes et al. (Icarus, 2014, in press) have been used to empirically assess existing formalisms for sulfur dioxide opacity in a carbon dioxide atmosphere (Fahd and Steffes Icarus 97, 1992 and Suleiman et al. JGR 101, E2 1996). The Van Vleck and Weisskopf Model (VVW) used by Fahd and Steffes with the JPL rotational line catalog (Pickett, et al. JQSRT 60, 1998) was found to fit 85.88% of all 500 measurements within the 2-sigma uncertainty. This model was implemented in the new Georgia Tech Venus Radiative Transfer Model (GT-VRTM) which is capable of computing both disk-averaged and localized brightness temperatures of Venus. These are compared to observations. This work will improve retrievals of the atmospheric abundance of sulfur dioxide from observations of the Venus atmosphere. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under Grant NNX11AD66G.

  1. Effects of Mirazid® and myrrh volatile oil on adult Fasciola gigantica under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, AM; Shalaby, HA; El Khateeb, RM; Mahmoud, MS; Kutkat, MA

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of Mirazid® and myrrh volatile oil on adult Fasciola gigantica (F. gigantica ) under laboratory conditions. Methods The effects of oleoresin extract of myrrh (Mirazid®) and myrrh volatile oil on the surface morphology of adult F. gigantica following treatment in vitro had been determined by scanning electron microscopy. The results were compared with those observed in the fluke tegument following incubation in triclabendazole sulphoxide (TCBZ-SO), active form, (Fasinex®, Ciba-Geigy). Results Observations of the efficacy of Mirazid® oleoresin extract and myrrh volatile oil indicated that both products showed dose-dependent anthelmintic efficacy. The anterior half of the fluke was consistently more severely affected than the posterior half. The surface changes induced by Mirazid® oleoresin extract were less severe than those observed after exposure to either myrrh volatile oil or TCBZ-SO. Flukes showed swelling after these treatments, but its level and blebbing were much greater with myrrh volatile oil; in which patches of tegumental sloughing were observed in the apical cone and the posterior mid-body region of flukes. This was not observed after treatment with Mirazid® oleoresin extract. Conclusions The comparatively more disruption, observed in myrrh volatile oil exposed specimens, compared to that exposed to Mirazid® oleoresin extract might suggest that the anthelmintic activity of Mirazid® oleo resin extract was attributed to its content of volatile oil. So, increasing the concentration of myrrh volatile oil in Mirazid® might possibly help to developing its anthelmintic activity. PMID:23569864

  2. Photochemical degradation of a brominated flame retardant (tetrabromobisphenol A) in ice under field and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waligroski, G.; Grannas, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Studies of brominated flame retardants have raised awareness of their potential environmental impact as toxic compounds. Because these compounds are now globally distributed, including in the Polar Regions, it is important to assess their potential fate in the environment. It has been shown that active photochemistry occurs in sunlit snow and ice, but there is little information regarding potential photochemical degradation of brominated flame retardants in snow and ice. The purpose of this research is to investigate the direct and indirect photochemical transformation pathways of a widely used brominated flame retardant, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). We have conducted field-based experiments in Barrow, Alaska to investigate the potential photochemical degradation of TBBPA in snow and ice under environmentally-relevant conditions. Field-based results show that TBBPA is efficiently degraded under direct photolysis conditions in frozen aqueous samples under natural Barrow sunlight. In aqueous solution the light absorption properties of TBBPA are pH dependent. Therefore, the photodegradation of TBBPA in snow and ice will be highly pH dependent. Reactions that are pH dependent may be affected by the nature of the liquid-like layers in snow/ice as well as the presence of other solutes that may indirectly affect the local pH experienced by TBBPA in snow and ice samples. In order to establish how the effective pH of liquid-like regions in ice might impact the degradation of TBBPA, various salts (sodium chloride, sodium fluoride, sodium bromide, ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate and ammonium sulfate) were added to aqueous solutions of TBBPA. Upon freezing, these different salts will induce pH differences in the liquid-like regions of the sample due to a phenomenon known as the freezing potential. Observed reactivity differences upon addition of these salts will be evaluated and discussed. Additionally, the presence of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM), an effective environmentally-relevant photosensitizer, has the potential to cause indirect photochemical degradation of TBBPA and this degradation pathway was also evaluated under laboratory conditions. The potential for both commercially-derived DOM and DOM isolated from Arctic snow samples to photosensitize TBBPA degradation in liquid and ice will be evaluated and discussed.

  3. Amplified DNAs in laboratory stocks of Leishmania tarentolae: extrachromosomal circles structurally and functionally similar to the inverted-H-region amplification of methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo-Peixoto, M.L.; Beverley, S.M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1988-12-01

    We describe the structure of amplified DNA that was discovered in two laboratory stocks of the protozoan parasite Leishmania tarentolae. Restriction mapping and molecular cloning revealed that a region of 42 kilobases was amplified 8- to 30-fold in these lines. Southern blot analyses of digested DNAs or chromosomes separated by pulsed-field electrophoresis showed that the amplified DNA corresponded to the H region, a locus defined originally by its amplification in methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major. Similarities between the amplified DNA of the two species included (i) extensive cross-hybridization; (ii) approximate conservation of sequence order; (iii) extrachromosomal localization; (iv) an overall inverted, head-to-head configuration as a circular 140-kilobase tetrameric molecule; (v) two regions of DNA sequence rearrangement, each of which was closely associated with the two centers of the inverted repeats; (vi) association with methotrexate resistance; and (vii) phenotypically conservative amplification, in which the wild-type chromosomal arrangement was retained without apparent modification. Our data showed that amplified DNA mediating drug resistance arose in unselected L. tarentolae, although the pressures leading to apparently spontaneous amplification and maintenance of the H region are not known. The simple structure and limited extent of DNA amplified in these and other Leishmania lines suggests that the study of gene amplification in Leishmania spp. offers an attractive model system for the study of amplification in cultured mammalian cells and tumors. We also introduced a method for measuring the size of large circular DNAs, using gamma-irradiation to introduce limited double-strand breaks followed by sizing of the linear DNAs by pulsed-field electrophoresis.

  4. Influence of Temperature on the Effects of Artificially Enhanced UV-B Radiation on Aquatic Bryophytes Under Laboratory Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Núñez-Olivera; J. Martínez-Abaigar; R. Tomás; N. Beaucourt; M. Arróniz-Crespo

    2004-01-01

    We examined, under laboratory conditions, the influence of temperature (2 °C vs. 10 °C) on the physiological responses of two aquatic bryophytes from a mountain stream to artificially enhanced UV-B radiation for 82 d. These organisms may be exposed naturally to relatively low temperatures and high levels of UV-B radiation, and this combination is believed to increase the adverse effects

  5. Assessing biological control of Acarus siro by Cheyletus malaccensis under laboratory conditions: Effect of temperatures and prey density

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stano Pekár; Jan Hubert

    2008-01-01

    In stored grain, the predatory mite Cheyletus spp. may be used to control the pest mite Acarus siro. The efficiency of control depends on many factors, particularly ambient temperature. In this study we investigated the effects of temperature and initial prey density on the prey–predator system under laboratory conditions. Ratio–response models were fitted to estimate the efficiency of control for

  6. Triboelectric Charging of Fine Particles: Understanding Sample Transport Under Simulated Martian Conditions for the Mars Science Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Anderson; G. H. Peters; L. W. Beegle; K. S. Manatt; G. Fleming; L. Sollitt

    2008-01-01

    We report on the nature of fine particle (lees than 150 micron) transport under simulated Martian conditions, in order to better understand the Mars Science Laboratory's sample acquisition, processing and handling subsystem (SA\\/SPaH). We find that triboelectric charging due to particle movement may have to be controlled in order for successful transport of fines that are created within the drill,

  7. Scale effect on runoff and soil loss control using rice straw mulch under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Gholami, L.; Sharifi, E.; Khaledi Darvishan, A.; Homaee, M.

    2015-01-01

    Amendments can control the runoff and soil loss by protecting the soil surface. However, scale effects on runoff and soil loss control have not been considered yet. The present study has been formulated to determine the efficiency of two plot sizes of 6 and 0.25 m2 covered by 0.5 kg m-2 of straw mulch with regard to changing the time to runoff, runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss under laboratory conditions. The study used a sandy-loam soil taken from summer rangeland, Alborz Mountains, northern Iran, and was conducted under simulated rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 and in three replicates. The results of the study showed that the straw mulch had a more significant effect on reducing the runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss on a 0.25 m2 plot scale. The maximum effectiveness in time to runoff for both the scales was observed at a rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1. The maximum increasing and decreasing rates in time to runoff and runoff coefficient were observed at a rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1, with 367.92 and 96.71% for the 0.25 m2 plot and 110.10 and 15.08% for the 6 m2 plot. The maximum reduction in the runoff coefficient was in the 0.25 m2 plot for the two rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1, with rates of -89.34 and -96.71%. The maximum change in soil loss at the intensities of both 50 and 90 mm h-1 occurred in the 0.25 m2 plot, with 100%, whereas in the 6 m2 plot, decreasing rates of soil loss for the intensities of both 50 and 90 mm h-1 were 46.74 and 63.24%, respectively.

  8. Scale effect on runoff and soil loss control using rice straw mulch under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Gholami, L.; Sharifi Moghadam, E.; Khaledi Darvishan, A.

    2014-10-01

    Amendments can control the runoff and soil loss by protecting soil surface. However, scale effects on runoff and soil loss control has not been considered yet. The present study has been formulated to determine the efficiency of two plot sizes of 6 and 0.25 m2 covered by straw mulch with rate of 0.5 kg m-2 in changing the time to runoff, runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss under laboratory conditions. The study has been conducted for a sandy-loam soil taken from summer rangeland, Alborz Mountains, Northern Iran under simulated rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 and in 3 replicates. The results of the study showed that the straw mulch had more significant effect in in reducing runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss at 0.25 m2 plot scale. The maximum effectiveness in time to runoff for both the scales, observed in rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1. The maximum increasing and decreasing rates in time to runoff and runoff coefficient observed in the rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1 with the amounts of 367.92 and 96.71% for 0.25 m2 plot and the amounts of 110.10 and 15.08% for 6 m2 plot respectively. The maximum change of soil loss in both the intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 occurred at 0.25 m2 plot with the amount of 100% whereas at 6 m2 plot, decreasing rates of soil loss for in both the intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 were 46.74 and 63.24%, respectively.

  9. Annual cycle of spawning and molting in the red-claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Assaf Barki; Tal Levi; Gideon Hulata; Ilan Karplus

    1997-01-01

    The annual spawning and molting cycles of the Australian red-claw crayfish was studied in the laboratory over a period of 13 months. Sexually mature crayfish were maintained in 140-1 tanks, each containing four females and one male, under a constant temperature (26–28 °C) and either an ambient or a controlled (14 L:10 D) photoperiod. A similar annual pattern of spawning

  10. Similarities between inherited demyelinating neuropathies and Wallerian degeneration: an old repair program may cause myelin and axon perturbation under nonlesion conditions.

    PubMed

    Martini, Rudolf; Klein, Dennis; Groh, Janos

    2013-09-01

    Wallerian degeneration (WD) and inherited demyelinating neuropathies of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1) appear to represent completely distinct events. CMT1-like diseases are chronic disorders of peripheral nerves that are genetically caused and lead to secondary neurodegenerative events, resulting in usually non-treatable disabilities, whereas WD is an acute, usually transient, reaction on injuries, aiming to allow peripheral nerve regeneration. Despite these differences, there are some striking similarities regarding molecular characteristics of neural cells in the affected peripheral nerves. The most conspicuous similarities might comprise the inflammatory component in both situations, as identified in appropriate mouse models. However, although inflammation is a beneficial component in WD, leading to removal of regrowth-repellent myelin debris, inflammation in CMT1 mouse models causes damage of initially intact nerve fibers. We hypothesize that, in CMT1 models, molecular pathways are activated that are shared with an important repair program after peripheral nerve injury, but lead to neural perturbation when activated under nonlesion conditions, as is the case in CMT1. These novel insights into the pathogenesis of CMT1 might be instrumental for the development of new therapeutic options in humans. PMID:23831295

  11. Physiological rates in different classes of sizes of Perna perna (Linnaeus, 1758) submitted to experimental laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Resgalla, C; Brasil, E S; Salomão, L C

    2006-02-01

    Physiological studies of the mussel Perna perna in Brazil are almost 30 years behind those of other, more exhaustively investigated species, such as Mytilus edulis. Little is known about the variations in physiological rates due to size and the consequences of maintaining P. perna in laboratory conditions. This work investigated the variations in respiration, clearance, excretion and absorption efficiency rates of P. perna, classified by size and acclimatized in a laboratory, monitoring the mussels respiration rates and biometry over a period of 30 days, in laboratory conditions. The respiration, clearance and excretion rates presented an allometric relation with the dry weight of the organisms, with b values of 0.66, 0.48 and 0.91 respectively. On the other hand, these same rates, when considered by weight (specific rates) showed a relationship that was inverse to the size of the organisms. Only the absorption efficiency was independent of the weight of the mussel. In terms of acclimatization, it was observed that it takes 10 days for the respiration rate of the mussel P. perna to stabilize in laboratory conditions, after which it follows a routine metabolism. PMID:16710525

  12. Isotopic and chemical tracing of macropore flow in laboratory columns under simulated snowmelt conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. BUTTLE; D. G. LEIGH

    The influence of macropores on meltwater infiltration through the unsaturated zone was examined for a sandy loam using laboratory columns pretreated with water possessing a 180 signature of —8.7%o and 15 mg l\\

  13. PROTOCOL FOR LABORATORY TESTING OF CRUDE-OIL BIOREMEDIATION PRODUCTS IN FRESHWATER CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1993, the Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory (EPA, NRMRL), with the National Environmental Technology Application Center (NETAC), developed a protocol for evaluation of bioremediation products in marine environments. The marine proto...

  14. Assessing the Exposure and Relative Sensitivity of Native Freshwater Mussels to Environmental Stressors and Laboratory Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Expands the database for pesticide toxicity on native freshwater mussels. 2. Aids in determining any potential differences in toxic sensitivity of gravid female mussel attributed to age and laboratory holding times. 3. Aids in determining potential differences in juvenile ...

  15. Elevated Bacterial Abundance in Laboratory-Grown and Naturally Occurring Frost Flowers Under Late Winter Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, J. S.; Deming, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Sea ice has been identified as an important microbial habitat, with bacteria and other microbes concentrated in the brine inclusions between ice crystals. Frost flowers, thought to draw brine from underlying sea ice, have not been characterized from a microbial standpoint. To test whether frost flowers serve as an upward vector of bacteria contained within sea ice brines we grew frost flowers in a freezer laboratory (air temperature of -21°C) from saline water spiked with the mesophilic (and thus passive under experimental conditions) bacterium Halomonas pacifica. Salinity of melted samples was measured and bacterial abundance determined by epifluorescent microscopy. Bacterial counts scaled to ice-melt volume averaged 2.82 x 106 ml-1 for frost flowers, compared to 9.47 x 105 ml-1 for underlying ice (3 x higher). Bacterial counts also correlated significantly with salinity (maximum value of 62.5 psu) for frost flowers, brine skim, and ice (df = 17, r = 0.59, p < 0.0001). Segregation coefficients were calculated to describe the efficiency of transport of both cells and salt from the starting solution into frost flowers. From these coefficients an enrichment index was calculated to test for bacterial concentration into frost flowers at a different rate than salt. Analysis with a Student’s T-test (df = 24, t = 0.306, p = .76) indicated that cells and salt were not transported into frost flowers with a significantly different efficiency. To test these findings in the field we then collected frost flowers (and related samples) from new sea ice near Barrow, Alaska in April 2009. Bacterial counts were significantly elevated (again, a 3-fold increase) in natural frost flowers (mean = 2.73 x 105 ml-1) compared to underlying sea ice (mean = 8.46 x 104 cells ml-1). For all field samples collected (frost flowers, underlying brine skim and sea ice, as well as snow), bacterial abundance correlated significantly with salinity (maximum value 124 psu, df = 40, r = 0.60, p < 0.0001). The presence of elevated numbers of bacteria in frost flowers may have implications for the previously observed chemical reactions that take place in them, especially if microbial activity can be shown to occur in this unique low temperature, low water activity microbial habitat.

  16. Comparative performances, under laboratory conditions, of seven pyrethroid insecticides used for impregnation of mosquito nets.

    PubMed Central

    Hougard, Jean-Marc; Duchon, Stéphane; Darriet, Frédéric; Zaim, Morteza; Rogier, Christophe; Guillet, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of seven pyrethroid insecticides for impregnation of mosquito nets, six currently recommended by WHO and one candidate (bifenthrin), under laboratory conditions. METHODS: Tests were conducted using pyrethroid-susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant strains of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. Knock-down effect, irritancy and mortality were measured using standard WHO cone tests. Mortality and blood-feeding inhibition were also measured using a baited tunnel device. FINDINGS: For susceptible A. gambiae, alpha-cypermethrin had the fastest knock-down effect. For resistant A. gambiae, the knock- down effect was slightly slower with alpha-cypermethrin and much reduced following exposure to the other insecticides, particularly bifenthrin and permethrin. For susceptible C. quinquefasciatus, the knock-down effect was significantly slower than in A. gambiae, particularly with bifenthrin, and no knock-down effect was observed with any of the pyrethroids against the resistant strain. Bifenthrin was significantly less irritant than the other pyrethroids to susceptible and resistant A. gambiae but there was no clear ranking of pyrethroid irritancy against C. quinquefasciatus. In tunnels, all insecticides were less toxic against C. quinquefasciatus than against A. gambiae for susceptible strains. For resistant strains, mortality was significant with all the pyrethroids with A. gambiae but not with C. quinquefasciatus. Inhibition of blood-feeding was also high for susceptible strains of both species and for resistant A. gambiae but lower for resistant C. quinquefasciatus; bifenthrin had the greatest impact. CONCLUSIONS: Efficacy for impregnation of mosquito nets against A. gambiae was greatest with alpha-cypermethrin. Bifenthrin is likely to have a significant comparative advantage over other pyrethroids in areas with pyrethroid resistance because of its much stronger impact on the nuisance mosquito, C. quinquefasciatus, despite its slower knock-down effect and irritancy. Selection of pyrethroids for mosquito vector control and personal protection should take into account the different effects of these insecticides, the status of pyrethroid resistance in the target area, and the importance of nuisance mosquitoes, such as C. quinquefasciatus. PMID:12856050

  17. Response of Predatory Insect Scolothrips takahashii Toward Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles Under Laboratory and Field Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takeshi Shimoda; Junji Takabayashi; Wataru Ashihara; Akio Takafuji

    1997-01-01

    We studied the response of a predatory thrips, Scolothrips takahashii, towards herbivore-induced plant volatiles emitted by Lima bean plants infested by two-spotted spider mites Tetranychus urticae (green form). Tests were conducted with a Y-tube olfactometer in the laboratory and with traps under field conditions. The odor of artificially damaged and uninfested Lima bean leaves was not more attractive than clean

  18. Oven-dried mosses as tools for trace element detection in polluted waters: A preliminary study under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Cesa; A. Bizzotto; C. Ferraro; F. Fumagalli; P. Luigi Nimis

    2011-01-01

    The concentration of 11 trace elements, plus Ca, Mg, Na and K was measured in moss bags of living and dead (oven-dried at 105°C) Platyhypnidium riparioides after a 1-week exposure to tap water, and to 0.21, 1.0, 2.5 and 4.0 ?M solutions under laboratory conditions, with the aim of (1) observing the accumulation curves and (2) performing a statistical comparison in

  19. Influence of Water Hardness on Accumulation and Elimination of Cadmium in Two Aquatic Mosses Under Laboratory Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Gagnon; G. Vaillancourt; L. Pazdernik

    1998-01-01

    .   This study investigated the effect of water hardness on the accumulation and elimination of cadmium (Cd) by two aquatic\\u000a mosses, Fontinalis dalecarlica and Platyhypnidium riparioides, under laboratory conditions. The two mosses were exposed to nominal Cd concentrations of 0, 0.8, 2, and 10 ?g?·?L?1, which includes the concentration range generally found in nature. The influence of three levels of

  20. The effect of chemicals released by Gammarus lacustris on the depth distribution of Arctodiaptomus salinus in laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yegor S. Zadereev; Michael V. Gubanov

    2002-01-01

    The effect of treatment water containing chemicals released by Gammarus lacustris or crushed\\/injured Arctodiaptomus salinus induced changes in vertical distribution of Arctodiaptomus in laboratory conditions. With food concentration in the medium corresponding to the maximum of algae concentration in Shira lake, A. salinus in an experimental vessel was situated higher than in the control. Average population depth of A. salinus decreased as

  1. Chemical reactions involved in the deep fat frying of foods. I. A laboratory apparatus for frying under simulated restaurant conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Krishnamurthy; Tsukasa Kawada; S. S. Chang

    1965-01-01

    A laboratory apparatus has been designed which can be used to quantitatively collect the volatile decomposition products produced\\u000a during deep fat frying under simulated restaurant conditions. In order to study the chemical reactions of frying fat without\\u000a any inter-reaction with the food fried, moist cotton balls were fried in corn oil.\\u000a \\u000a The oil used for frying was shown to differ

  2. [The laboratory cultivation of Phlebotomus papatasi. The nature of the reaction of the sandflies to unfavorable environmental conditions].

    PubMed

    Valevich, T A; Dergacheva, T I

    1992-01-01

    The breeding of Phlebotomus papatasi in laboratory setting has been studied for 4 years. It has been found that in addition to the well-known factors such as temperature and humidity, sandfly development is affected by the features of reservoirs for their breeding, amount of nutrient substrate, duration of a diapause and developmental conditions of their parents. Ph. papatasi responds to deterioration of dwelling conditions with prolonged period of development, increased number of diapausing larvae and decreased number of emerged imagines, i.e. with development inhibition of different degree and movable transfer to diapause. PMID:1387189

  3. Behavioral responses of Aedes aegypti to DUETTM and its two components under laboratory conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DUETTM is an insecticide composed of two active ingredients (1% prallethrin and 5% sumithrin) that is applied as an ultra low volume (ULV) spray to kill adult mosquitoes. It has previously been shown to activate Culex quinquefasciatus females in the laboratory resulting in greater mortality. Formu...

  4. Mating frequency of the male cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), under laboratory conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of three constant temperatures (20°, 25° and 30°C) on the rate of development and life history of the invasive cactus moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg). Results from these laboratory experiments were used to predict C. cactorum rate of development in the field during...

  5. Conditions for Building a Community of Practice in an Advanced Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Paul W.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2014-01-01

    We use the theory of communities of practice and the concept of accountable disciplinary knowledge to describe how a learning community develops in the context of an upper-division physics laboratory course. The change in accountable disciplinary knowledge motivates students' enculturation into a community of practice. The enculturation…

  6. Laboratory evaluation of PDC drill bits under high speed and high wear conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, E.R.; Middleton, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    Recently six experimental polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit designs were tested in the laboratory at 100 and 500 rpm in three different types of rock: Nugget Sandstone, Crab Orchard Sandstone, and Sierra White Granite. This paper describes the testing procedures, summarizes the bits' performance and wear characteristics, and correlates these experimental results with specific design options such as rake angle and bit profile.

  7. Laboratory Evaluation of PDC Drill Bits Under High-Speed and High-Wear Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eddie Hoover; John Middleton

    1981-01-01

    Recently six experimental polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit designs were tested in the laboratory at 100 and 500 RPM in three different types of rock: Nugget Sandstone, Crab Orchard Sandstone, and Sierra White Granite. This paper describes the testing procedures, summarizes the bits' performance and wear characteristics, and correlates these experimental results with specific design options such as rake angle

  8. A COMPARISON OF ENTOMOPATHOGENIC NEMATODE LONGEVITY IN SOIL UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the laboratory, we compared the longevity of 11 entomopathogenic nematode species and 29 strains in soil. Substantial within species (strain) variation in longevity was observed in Steinernema carpocapsae with the Sal strain exhibiting the greatest survival. In contrast, little inter-species va...

  9. Life cycle and host specificity of Amblyomma triste (Acari: Ixodidae) under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcelo B. Labruna; Eric Y. M. Fugisaki; Adriano Pinter; José Maurício B. Duarte; Matias J. P. Szabó

    2003-01-01

    We report biological data of two generations of Amblyomma triste in laboratory and compared the suitability of different host species. Infestations by larval and nymphal stages were performed\\u000a on guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus), chickens (Gallus gallus), rats (Rattus norvegicus), rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), wild mice (Calomys callosus), dogs (Canis familiaris) and capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris). Infestations by adult ticks were performed on

  10. LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDIES ON BTEX BIODEGRADATION IN A FUEL-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER UNDER DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies were conducted in conjunction with a field demonstration project on nitrate-mediated biorestoration of a fuel-contaminated aquifer at a U.S. Coast Guard facility in Traverse City, MI. icrocosms were prepared under either aerobic or strictly anaerobic, denitrify...

  11. Development, growth and survival of the larvae of queen conch Strombus gigas under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy Brito-Manzano; Dalila Aldana Aranda

    2004-01-01

    The development, growth and survival of Strombus gigas (Linné, 1758) larvae were studied over a period of 30 days in laboratory culture. The fertilized egg masses used for the larval culture experiment were collected in Alacran's Reef from March to September. Experiments were conducted at 29±1 °C. Veligers were reared at 200 larvae l?1 in 4-l containers. Larvae were fed

  12. Methane hydrate behavior when exposed to a 23% carbon dioxide 77% nitrogen gas under conditions similar to the ConocoPhillips 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglin, S. E.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.

    2013-12-01

    In-situ replacement of methane hydrate by carbon dioxide hydrate is considered to be a promising technique for producing natural gas, while simultaneously sequestering greenhouse gas in deep geological formations. For effective application of this technique in the field, kinetic models of gas exchange rates in hydrate under a variety of environmental conditions need to be established, and the impact of hydrate substitution on geophysical (seismic) properties has to be quantified in order to optimize monitoring techniques. We performed a series of laboratory tests in which we monitored changes in methane hydrate-bearing samples while a nitrogen/carbon dioxide gas mixture was flowed through. These experiments were conducted to gain insights into data obtained from a field test in which the same mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen was injected into a methane hydrate-bearing unit beneath the north slope of the Brooks Range in northern Alaska (ConocoPhillips 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial). We have measured the kinetic gas exchange rate for a range of hydrate saturations and different test configurations, to provide an estimate for comparison to numerical model predictions. In our tests, the exchange rate decreased over time during the tests as methane was depleted from the system. Following the elution of residual gaseous methane, the exchange rate ranged from 3.8×10-7 moles methane/(mole water*s) to 5×10-8 moles methane/(mole water*s) (Note that in these rates, the moles of water refers to water originally held in the hydrate.). In addition to the gas exchange rate, we also monitored changes in permeability occurring due to the gas substitution. Further, we determined the seismic P and S wave velocities and attenuations using our Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar apparatus (e.g. Nakagawa, 2012, Rev. Sci. Instr.). In addition to providing geophysical signatures, changes in the seismic properties can also be related to changes in the mechanical strength of the hydrate-bearing sand resulting from exposure to the mixed gas. Upon introduction of the mixed gas, the sample became less stiff and wave attenuation increased, indicating the presence of liquid water between mineral grains and hydrate. Slow dissociation of hydrate conducted in this experiment showed a range of hydrate stability conditions as the gas composition changed from dissociation and dilution of the previously injected nitrogen.

  13. Measuring the influence of winter conditions on largemouth bass behaviour using both biotelemetry and laboratory studies

    E-print Network

    Cooke, Steven J.

    Measuring the influence of winter conditions on largemouth bass behaviour using both biotelemetry on the reaction of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) to winter conditions using both biotelemetry on winter habitat selection was investigated. Biotelemetry-obtained locations of largemouth bass were

  14. Spawning of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and rearing of veligers under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine

    1992-01-01

    The spawning cycle of the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, is amenable to laboratory manipulations. Techniques are presented that can be used to initiate spawning and rear veligers from fertilized egg to settlement stage. Spawning can be induced in sexually mature mussels by temperature flucuations or by the addition of ripe gametes. Embryonic survival is excellent until the straight-hinge stage when the first wave of mortality occurs, usually due to improper food. The second critical stage of development occurs just prior to settlement when mortality increases again. Veliger mortality averaged over 90% from egg to settlement. The results indicate that obtaining large numbers of veligers for laboratory experiments to be conducted year-round is difficult.

  15. Toxicity of Selected Chemicals to the Fairy Shrimp, Streptocephalus seali, under Laboratory and Field Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerry L. Moss

    1978-01-01

    Laboratory toxicity tests were conducted with six chemicals to determine their effect on fairy shrimp (Streptocephalus seali). Formalin (15 and 25 mg\\/1) and Diquat (0.25 to 2.0 mg\\/1) were not toxic to fairy shrimp. Paraquat (0.25 to 2.0 mg\\/1) and benzene hexachloride (0.10 and 0.25 mg\\/1) were moderately toxic. Dylox (0.10 and 0.25 mg\\/1) was highly toxic; mortality exceeded 82%

  16. Patterns of halite (NaCl) crystallisation in building stone conditioned by laboratory heating regimes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel Gomez-Heras; Rafael Fort

    2007-01-01

    The crystallisation of soluble salts within the pores of the stone is widely recognised as a major mechanism causing the deterioration\\u000a of the stone-built architectural heritage. Temperature, in turn, is one of the main controls on this process, including salt\\u000a precipitation, the pressure of crystallisation and the thermal expansion of salts. Most laboratory experiments on decay generated\\u000a by salts are

  17. Laboratory evaluation of PDC drill bits under high-speed and high-wear conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, E.R.; Middleton, J.N.

    1981-12-01

    Recently, five experimental polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit designs were tested in the laboratory at 100 and 500 rpm in three different types of rock: Nugget sandstone, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Sierra White granite. This study describes the testing procedures, summarizes bit performance and wear characteristics, and correlates these experimental results with specific design options such as rake angle, bit profile, and material selection. 4 refs.

  18. Social influences during song development in the song sparrow: a laboratory experiment simulating field conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Cully Nordby; S. Elizabeth Campbell; John M. Burt; Michael D. Beecher

    2000-01-01

    Oscine songbirds are exposed to many more songs than they keep for their final song repertoire and little is known about how a bird selects the particular song(s) to sing as an adult. We simulated in the laboratory the key variables of the natural song learning environment and examined the song selection process in nine hand-reared male song sparrows,Melospiza melodia

  19. Conditions for building a community of practice in an advanced physics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, Paul W.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2014-06-01

    We use the theory of communities of practice and the concept of accountable disciplinary knowledge to describe how a learning community develops in the context of an upper-division physics laboratory course. The change in accountable disciplinary knowledge motivates students' enculturation into a community of practice. The enculturation process is facilitated by four specific structural features of the course and supported by a primary instructional choice. The four structural features are "paucity of instructor time," "all in a room together," "long and difficult experiments," and "same experiments at different times." The instructional choice is the encouragement of the sharing and development of knowledge and understanding by the instructor. The combination of the instructional choice and structural features promotes the development of the learning community in which students engage in authentic practices of a physicist. This results in a classroom community that can provide students with the opportunity to have an accelerated trajectory towards being a more central participant of the community of a practice of physicists. We support our claims with video-based observations of laboratory classroom interactions and individual, semistructured interviews with students about their laboratory experiences and physics identity.

  20. Temporal variability in 13C of respired CO2 in a pine and a hardwood forest subject to similar climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, B.; Chanton, J. P.; Prater, J.; Oishi, C.; Oren, R.; Katul, G.

    2003-12-01

    The temporal variability in the 13C of ecosystem (äCr), soil (äCs) and foliage (äCf) respired CO2 were contrasted in a 18 m tall evenly aged loblolly pine forest and in a 35 m tall unevenly aged mature second growth deciduous mixed hardwood forest in North Carolina, USA, over a two year period. These two sites are located within a kilometer of each other and are subject to identical climatic and edaphic conditions. äCr varied in response to time lagged vapor pressure deficit (VPD) at both forests. However, the response of äCr to VPD was more dynamic at the pine relative to the hardwood. äCr at the pine forest varied from -31.0 to -26.4 per mill and at the hardwood forest from -26.0 to -27.0 permill during the growing season. äCr at the hardwood forest was 13C enriched during the growing season, on average, by 1.4 permill relative to äCr at the pine forest for the same time periods. Three factors influence these results. Canopy height and composition were different between the two sites, and also at the pine forest äCr values generally were more similar to äCf values, while at the hardwood forest, äCr values were more similar to äCs values. At the hardwood forest, the temporal variability in äCs was less that of äCf and buffered changes in the äCr. The results indicate that within a forest mosaic the vegetation structure needs to be considered for predicting realistic äCr values. Inclusion of a temporally and spatially variable äCr into the atmospheric inversion models will lead to a more realistic estimate of the partitioning of the global carbon uptake into oceanic and terrestrial sinks. Because äCr within each ecosystem varies in response to VPD in a predictable fashion, a variable äCr can be incorporated to better constrain atmospheric inversion models.

  1. Survival Potential and Photosynthetic Activity of Lichens Under Mars-Like Conditions: A Laboratory Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Pierre de Vera; Diedrich Möhlmann; Frederike Butina; Andreas Lorek; Roland Wernecke; Sieglinde Ott

    2010-01-01

    Lichens were repetitively exposed over 22 days to thermophysical Mars-like conditions at low-and mid-latitudes. The simulated parameters and the experimental setup are described. Natural samples of the lichen Xanthoria elegans were used to investigate their ability to survive the applied Mars-like conditions. The effects of atmospheric pressure, CO2 concentration, low temperature, water availability, and light on Mars were also studied.

  2. Improbability of void growth in aluminum via dislocation nucleation under typical laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L D; Warner, D H

    2012-01-20

    The rate at which dislocations nucleate from spherical voids subjected to shear loading is predicted from atomistic simulation. By employing the latest version of the finite temperature string method, a variational transition state theory approach can be utilized, enabling atomistic predictions at ordinary laboratory time scales, loads, and temperatures. The simulation results, in conjunction with a continuum model, show that the deformation and growth of voids in Al are not likely to occur via dislocation nucleation under typical loadings regardless of void size. PMID:22400757

  3. Organic intermediates in the anaerobic biodegradation of coal to methane under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Voytek, M.A.; Jones, E.J.; Lerch, H.E.; Bates, A.L.; Corum, M.D.; Warwick, P.D.; Clark, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Organic intermediates in coal fluids produced by anaerobic biodegradation of geopolymers in coal play a key role in the production of methane in natural gas reservoirs. Laboratory biodegradation experiments on sub-bituminous coal from Texas, USA, were conducted using bioreactors to examine the organic intermediates relevant to methane production. Production of methane in the bioreactors was linked to acetate accumulation in bioreactor fluid. Long chain fatty acids, alkanes (C19-C36) and various low molecular weight aromatics, including phenols, also accumulated in the bioreactor fluid and appear to be the primary intermediates in the biodegradation pathway from coal-derived geopolymers to acetate and methane. ?? 2010.

  4. Evaluation of efficacy of 18 strains of entomopathogenic nematodes (Rhabditida) against Planococcus citri (Risso, 1813) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Negrisoli, Carla Ruth de Carvalho; Negrisoli Júnior, Aldomario Santo; Botton, Marcos; Garcia, Mauro Silveira; Bernardi, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Planococcus citri (Risso, 1813) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) is an important plant virus vector in grapevine crops in Brazil and other countries. The mealybug grows in roots and leaves of the grapes. Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) are efficient control agents against insects associated to the soil and could be applied with the same equipment used for chemical insecticides. The aim of this study was to select effective EPNs for controlling P. citri females in laboratory conditions (25±1°C, UR 60±10%). We tested 17 native [Steinernema rarum (6 strains), Steinernema glaseri, Steinernema feltiae, Steinernema riobrave, Steinernema sp., Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (7 strains)] and only one exotic strain (Steinernema carpocapsae ALL). The bioassays were done on Petri dishes infested with females of P. citri, which were sprayed with EPNs juveniles. The strain with larger pathogenicity and virulence in laboratory was H. bacteriophora RS33 (from 69.0% to 92.2% of mortality), native of Rio Grande do Sul. PMID:23458234

  5. Conditionals

    E-print Network

    von Fintel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the classic accounts of the meaning of conditionals (material implication, strict implication, variably strict conditional) and discusses the difference between indicative and subjunctive/counterfactual ...

  6. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1989-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. Work performed has shown that laboratory measurements of the millimeter-wave opacity of ammonia between 7.5 mm and 9.3 mm and also at the 3.2 mm wavelength require a different lineshape to be used in the theoretical prediction for millimeter-wave ammonia opacity than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  7. Activity, aggression, and habitat use of ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) and round goby (Apollonia melanostoma) under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, J.F.; Riley, S.C.; Holuszko, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Potential negative ecological interactions between ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus and round goby Apollonia melanostoma (formerly Neogobius melanostomus) might affect the colonization dynamics of these invasive species where they are sympatric in the Great Lakes. In order to determine the potential for ecological interactions between these species, we examined the activity, aggression, and habitat use of round gobies and ruffe in single species and mixed species laboratory experiments. Trials included conditions in which food was concentrated (in light or darkness) or scattered. Results showed that ruffe were more active than gobies, particularly when food was scattered. Activity of both species was significantly lower during darkness. Round gobies were significantly more aggressive than ruffe, and total aggression was lower in mixed species trials. Habitat use by ruffe and round gobies overlapped considerably, but we observed significant differences between species in their use of specific habitats that depended on experimental conditions. Overall, ruffe used open habitats more often than did round gobies, primarily when food was scattered. Round gobies used rocks significantly more frequently than did ruffe, but their use of rock habitat decreased during dark conditions. Ruffe were found more often in plant habitats and less often near the wall of the pool in trials during daylight with concentrated food. Activity and habitat use of ruffe and round goby did not significantly differ between single and mixed species trials. Overall, we found little evidence for negative ecological interactions between ruffe and round goby in these laboratory experiments.

  8. Maintenance of previously uncultured freshwater archaea from anoxic waters under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Plasencia, Anna; Bañeras, Lluís; Llirós, Marc; Casamayor, Emilio O; Borrego, Carles

    2011-02-01

    Culture conditions for the maintenance of previously uncultured members of the Archaea thriving in anoxic water layers of stratified freshwater lakes are described. The proposed enrichment conditions, based on the use of defined medium composition and the maintenance of anoxia, have been proven effective for the maintenance of the archaeal community with virtually no changes over time for periods up to 6 months as revealed by a PCR-DGGE analysis. Phylotypes belonging to groups poorly represented in culture collections such as the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota (DHVE) and the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (MCG) were maintained and selectively enriched when compared to the correspondent indigenous planktonic archaeal community. PMID:20077005

  9. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Laboratory and Analytical Uses 1. Essential laboratory and analytical...substances are not considered essential under the global laboratory exemption: a. Testing of oil and grease and total petroleum...printing. Production for essential laboratory and...

  10. Assessing the Fate of Litter Mercury during Decomposition under Controlled Laboratory Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokharel, A. K.; Obrist, D.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of this research is to assess the fate of mercury (Hg) in forest litter during decomposition under controlled laboratory incubations and in the field. During decomposition, Hg may be lost to the atmosphere by gaseous elemental mercury evasion, may become soluble and subject to runoff, or may remain sequestered in the remaining litter pool. We are conducting a laboratory incubation study over 18 months to monitor total litter dry mass, carbon, nitrogen, and Hg mass and concentrations, and the respective stochiometric ratios, of 100 well characterized litter samples. Fresh surface litter samples (~ 30 g) of four different forest types (mixed deciduous, aspen, pine, and blue Oak) were incubated in acid-cleaned glass jars covered by Teflon filters to allow gas exchange while avoiding particulate and dust deposition. Litter samples were kept at 25 degree celcius in the dark and kept moist by occasional addition of Hg free water. Samples were also extracted for soluble Hg to assess how decomposition may affect aqueous-phase Hg mobility. Additional litter samples were placed in the field to compare laboratory results to in situ field decomposition. Initial results after six months of decomposition show that dry mass of the four litter types decreased by 2-8% after 3 months and 3-11% after 6 months as compared to initial dry mass. Total Hg mass showed inconsistent patterns after 3 months (+3% to -6% mass change), but started to show consistent decreases (from 2 to 16%) after 6 months of incubation. Total amounts of soluble Hg extracted from litter samples showed decreasing solubility of Hg with increasing duration of incubation. Hence, our results show that dry mass and C losses during decomposition (through losses of CO2) did not lead to equal losses of atmospheric Hg during initial stages of decomposition, but that some losses of Hg are becoming visible after six months, albeit strongly dependent on litter types. Decomposition of surface litter may hence be source of Hg to the atmosphere, thereby recycling atmospheric mercury previously fixed by leaves and deposited by litterfall.

  11. Placement of the radiochemical processing plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory into a safe standby condition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Holladay; C. D. Bopp; A. J. Farmer; J. K. Johnson; C. H. Miller; B. A. Powers; E. D. Collins

    1986-01-01

    Extensive upgrade, cleanup, and decontamination efforts are being conducted for appropriate areas in the Radiochemical Processing Plant (RPP) with the goal of achieving ''safe standby'' condition by the end of FY 1989. The ventilation system must maintain containment; thus, it is being upgraded via demolition and replacement of marginally adequate ductwork, fans, and control systems. Areas that are being decontaminated

  12. Snapping shrimp prefer natural as opposed to artificial materials as their habitat in laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Lai Kean; Ghazali, Shahriman M.

    2014-09-01

    This study analyzed the habitat selection behavior of the snapping shrimp, Alpheus spp., comparing natural shelters (Rocks with oysters attached on the surface Sh; rocks with smooth surface, Ro and coral rubble, Co with plastic bottle. Controlled laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the habitat preference, effect of photoperiod and shrimp orientation at shelter. The current study indicated that snapping shrimp preferred natural materials but rejected plastic bottle as their shelter. Among the natural shelters, coral rubble was the most preferred habitat followed by shell and rock. Photoperiod showed minimum effect on the shrimp where they spend most of the time inside and underneath the shelters. In conclusion the current study showed that snapping shrimp preferred coral rubble as opposed to other natural material and plastic bottle. The result also suggested that plastic debris in the marine environment is not an alternative habitat for snapping shrimp.

  13. Biological effects of pyrimethinal on aquatic worms (Tubifex tubifex) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Yahia Youssef; Mofeed, Jelan; Afifi, Mohamed; Almaghrabi, Omar A

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of different concentrations of pyrimethinal on protein contents, and some oxidative stress in Tubifex tubifex after an exposure of 2, 4, and 7 days. Residues of the fungicide were followed in water and in the worms. In water, pyrimethinal concentration decreased slowly (maximum -6.4 % ± 0.8 % after 2 days for 25 mg L(-1)). In the worms, it increased after 4 days and decreased thereafter. LC50 values were between 49.2 ± 0.58 and 39.5 ± 0.95 mg L(-1) depending on exposure time. The activity of catalase increased in response to the fungicide after 2 days of exposure to 25 mg L(-1) of pyrimethinal (+90 %). The highest decrease of glutathione-S-transferase activity (-29.7 %) was found after 7 days in the presence of 25 mg L(-1). PMID:24213591

  14. Egg-to-fry survival of two strains of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in stream incubators under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.

    2003-01-01

    Egg-to-fry survival of two strains of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) was evaluated under laboratory conditions in two commercial stream egg incubators. The survival was also examined based on egg developmental stage (i.e., green eggs, eyed egggs, advanced eggs). There was no significant difference in survival of eggs in the Jordan-Scotty and Whitlock-Vibert incubators. However, the survival of Sebago strain Atlantic slamon eggs was significantly higher than that of Penobscot stream eggs, and survival increased with advanced egg developmental stage.

  15. Efficacy of pesticide mixtures against the western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) under laboratory and greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Willmott, Amy L; Cloyd, Raymond A; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2013-02-01

    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande is a commonly encountered and economically important insect pest of greenhouses. Greenhouse producers typically apply pesticides as mixtures to mitigate western flower thrips populations; however, there is limited information available on the compatibility and efficacy of commonly used pesticide mixtures. This study assessed nine binary and three tertiary pesticide mixtures used in greenhouses which included pesticides containing abamectin, acephate, azadirachtin, bifenazate, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, imidacloprid, novaluron, pymetrozine, and spinosad. Compatibility was determined for the binary pesticide mixtures using jar tests. In addition, the binary mixtures were applied to nine horticultural plant species to determine phytotoxicity based on visual appearance assessed 7 d after treatment. Bean-dip bioassays were performed in a laboratory using green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to determine LC50 values for each individual pesticide and the mixtures to establish whether the mixtures were synergistic, antagonistic, or there was no effect. The mortality of western flower thrips was assessed after 24 h, and LC50 values were calculated. Furthermore, semifield bioassays were performed in greenhouses for binary and tertiary mixtures to evaluate the efficacy (based on percent mortality) of the pesticide mixtures against western flower thrips. Results indicated that all binary mixtures were visibly compatible, and not phytotoxic to any of the plant species evaluated. Combination index calculations based on laboratory results indicated most of the binary mixtures were synergistic; however, the mixture containing spinosad + bifenazate appeared to be antagonistic against western flower thrips. The semifield bioassays demonstrated significantly reduced efficacy associated with mixtures containing azadirachtin, however, all binary mixtures provided approximately 80% western flower thrips mortality. PMID:23448038

  16. Parametrization of turbulence models using 3DVAR data assimilation in laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbert, A. I.; Nash, S.; Ragnoli, E.; Hartnett, M.

    2013-12-01

    In this research the 3DVAR data assimilation scheme is implemented in the numerical model DIVAST in order to optimize the performance of the numerical model by selecting an appropriate turbulence scheme and tuning its parameters. Two turbulence closure schemes: the Prandtl mixing length model and the two-equation k-? model were incorporated into DIVAST and examined with respect to their universality of application, complexity of solutions, computational efficiency and numerical stability. A square harbour with one symmetrical entrance subject to tide-induced flows was selected to investigate the structure of turbulent flows. The experimental part of the research was conducted in a tidal basin. A significant advantage of such laboratory experiment is a fully controlled environment where domain setup and forcing are user-defined. The research shows that the Prandtl mixing length model and the two-equation k-? model, with default parameterization predefined according to literature recommendations, overestimate eddy viscosity which in turn results in a significant underestimation of velocity magnitudes in the harbour. The data assimilation of the model-predicted velocity and laboratory observations significantly improves model predictions for both turbulence models by adjusting modelled flows in the harbour to match de-errored observations. Such analysis gives an optimal solution based on which numerical model parameters can be estimated. The process of turbulence model optimization by reparameterization and tuning towards optimal state led to new constants that may be potentially applied to complex turbulent flows, such as rapidly developing flows or recirculating flows. This research further demonstrates how 3DVAR can be utilized to identify and quantify shortcomings of the numerical model and consequently to improve forecasting by correct parameterization of the turbulence models. Such improvements may greatly benefit physical oceanography in terms of understanding and monitoring of coastal systems and the engineering sector through applications in coastal structure design, marine renewable energy and pollutant transport.

  17. The impact of insecticides to local honey bee colony Apis cerana indica in laboratory condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Ramadhani E.; Permana, Agus D.; Nuriyah, Syayidah

    2014-03-01

    Heavy use of insecticides considered as one of common practice at local farming systems. Even though many Indonesian researchers had stated the possible detrimental effect of insecticide on agriculture environment and biodiversity, researches on this subject had been neglected. Therefore, our purpose in this research is observing the impact of insecticides usage by farmer to non target organisme like local honey bee (Apis cerana indica), which commonly kept in area near agriculture system. This research consisted of field observations out at Ciburial, Dago Pakar, Bandung and laboratory tests at School of Life Sciences and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung. The field observations recorded visited agriculture corps and types of pollen carried by bees to the nest while laboratory test recorderd the effect of common insecticide to mortality and behavior of honey bees. Three types of insecticides used in this research were insecticides A with active agent Chlorantraniliprol 50 g/l, insecticide B with active agent Profenofos 500 g/l, and insecticides C with active agent Chlorantraniliprol 100 g/l and ?-cyhalotrin 50g/l. The results show that during one week visit, wild flower, Wedelia montana, visited by most honey bees with average visit 60 honey bees followed by corn, Zea mays, with 21 honey bees. The most pollen carried by foragers was Wedelia montana, Calliandra callothyrsus, and Zea mays. Preference test show that honeybees tend move to flowers without insecticides as the preference to insecticides A was 12.5%, insecticides B was 0%, and insecticides was C 4.2%. Mortality test showed that insecticides A has LD50 value 0.01 ?g/?l, insecticide B 0.31 ?g/?l, and insecticides C 0.09 ?g/?l which much lower than suggested dosage recommended by insecticides producer. This research conclude that the use of insecticide could lower the pollination service provide by honey bee due to low visitation rate to flowers and mortality of foraging bees.

  18. Significance of soil depth on nitrogen transformations in flooded and nonflooded systems under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tejinder S. Khera; Milkha S. Aulakh; John W. Doran

    1999-01-01

    The influence of different depths of repacked soil cores on changes in N transformation processes was studied with a subtropical semi-arid soil amended with 100 mg N kg-1 of Sesbania green manure (GM) or fertilizer (NH4)2SO4 for 35 days under flooded and nonflooded conditions. Shallow soil depth enhanced the rate of nitrification, particularly where aeration was impeded in flooded soils.

  19. Functional response analysis of Anisops sardea (Hemiptera: Notonectidae) against Culex quinquefasciatus in laboratory condition

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Rajendra Prasad; Ghosh, Anupam; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasis; Chandra, Goutam

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Culex quinquefasciatus is the principal vector of lymphatic filariasis (LF). Application of alternative vector control methodologies are aimed at reduction of mosquito breeding sites and biting activity through the use of biological control methods. In the present study, functional response of aquatic Hemipteran backswimmer, Anisops sardea was assessed against Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae in laboratory bioassay. Methods: The functional respons of A. sardea was assessed against IIIrd instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Respective handling times and coefficient of attack rates were determined by a non linear polynomeal regression equation. Results: The results of rates of predation in variable prey densities exhibited a ‘linear rise to plateau curve’, associated with ‘Type -II’ functional response. The logistic regression estimated a significant negative linear parameter (P1<0) which also supported the same observation. Associated ‘attack rates’ and ‘handling times’ were also calculated using the Holling Disc Equation. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of present experiments indicate that A. sardea can be used as a biocontrol agent against the larval forms of Cx. quinquefasciatus in temporarily available breeding places of mosquito with relatively clear water. However, a detailed field study has to be done to confirm these findings. PMID:25488451

  20. The efficacy of four avermectins on the synanthropic mite Lepidoglyphus destructor under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Rybansky, Jakub; Hubert, Jan

    2012-09-01

    The effect of four avermectins on the population growth of pest mite Lepidoglyphus destructor was tested in laboratory experiments. The avermectins (abamectin, doramectin, emamectin-benzoate and ivermectin) of analytical purity were incorporated into an experimental diet at the same molar concentrations, ranging from 0.16 to 8 nmol/3 g of diet. Using an initial population of 50 mites, the population growth was recorded after 21 days at 85 % relative humidity and 25 °C; 12 repeats were performed per avermectin concentration and control. The diets containing the avermectins successfully suppressed the population growth of L. destructor. The EC(50) recalculated to ng of substance per g of diet showed different suppressive effects of the avermectins: doramectin (181 ng/g diet), abamectin (299 ng/g diet), emamectin-benzoate (812 ng/g diet) and ivermectin (992 ng/g diet). Of the tested avermectins, abamectin is registered for the control of phytophagous mites and ivermectin against parasitic mites, i.e., Psoroptes ovis. Although emamectin-benzoate and ivermectin were less effective on L. destructor, all of the tested avermectins are highly suitable compounds for the control of synanthropic mites. PMID:22527833

  1. Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas Rafinesque, under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Snarski, Virginia M.

    1990-01-01

    Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were studied in laboratory exposures to two commercial formulations, Vectobac-G and Mosquito Attack. Mortality among fatheads exposed to 2.0 × 106 to 6.5 × 106 CFU/ml with both formulations was attributed to severe dissolved oxygen depletion due to formulation ingredients rather than to direct toxicity from the parasporal crystal. No adverse effects were observed at 6.4 × 105 CFU/ml and below. Fathead minnows rapidly accumulated high numbers of spores with 1 h of exposure to 2.2 × 105 CFU of Mosquito Attack per ml, producing whole-body counts of 4.0 × 106 CFU per fish. Comparison of counts on gastrointestinal tract samples and whole-body samples and high numbers of spores in feces indicated that ingestion was the major route of exposure. B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spore counts decreased rapidly after transfer of fish to clean water, with a drop of over 3 orders of magnitude in 1 day. Spores were rarely detected in fish after 8 days but were detectable in feces for over 2 weeks. These findings suggest that fish could influence the dissemination of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, and possibly other microbial agents, in the aquatic environment. PMID:16348271

  2. [Observations on the development of Phlebotomus papatasi Scop. under laboratory conditions].

    PubMed

    Valevich, T A; Dergachev, T I

    1999-01-01

    The development of Phlebotomus papatasi Scop., 1786 was observed at a laboratory of the Martsinovski? Institute of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Medicine in 1988-1994. There was a flight of 9,809 imagoes. Among the mosquitoes developed from spring (May-June) clutches, most imagoes (as high as 98.9% of the total number of the flying imagoes) flew out in summer. As high as 6.7% flew out in autumn and up to 16.8 & of the total number did after diapause, i.e. the following spring. The paper shows it possible to interrupt the diapause on exposure larvae to elevated temperatures and light. However, mosquitoes of different strains are responsive to light in varying degrees. P. papatasi from Turkmenistan developed in the dark best al all, which is natural for them since in nature their breeding mainly occurs in the Arenaria burrows. The mosquitoes of mixed strains (females from Arabia, males from Turkmenistan) most frequently flew out in day and night light. PMID:10414044

  3. Induction to maturation of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Joxe Mikel; Menchaca, Iratxe; Belzunce, María Jesús; Franco, Javier; Revilla, Marta

    2009-12-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out over two different periods, with the aim of investigating and utilizing the induction to gonadal maturation of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. The final objective was to obtain viable gametes outside the period of natural spawning in the environment; which would allow the utilization of ecotoxicological bioassays with sea urchin larvae at any time of the year. The experiment consisted of maintaining some sea urchins in tanks and providing them with a natural photoperiod, unlimited food and a constant temperature of 20 degrees C. During days 0, 30, 60 and 90, gonads from 15 of these sea urchins were compared with those collected simultaneously in the natural environment. The gametes obtained were used to carry out fecundations, in order to check their viability. The final results obtained were clearly influenced by the gonadal state of the sea urchins at the initial stage of the experiment. The best results were obtained within a time period of 60 days and when the initial gonad index was low. PMID:20088209

  4. Effect of soil invertebrates on the formation of humic substances under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouz, J.; Li, X.; Brune, A.; Pizl, V.; Abakumov, E. V.

    2011-08-01

    The complete polymerization of phenols and proteins (one of the processes involved in the formation of humic substances) was explained. It was shown that fly ( Bibio marci) larvae and earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa) participate in the complete polymerization of phenols and proteins. In a laboratory experiment, invertebrates participated in the degradation of organic matter and the synthesis of humic substances, which was proved in experiments with 14C-labeled phenols and proteins. The same organic substances (phenols and proteins) without the impact of invertebrates were used as the control substances. The distributions of the 14C isotope in alkaline extracts separated by solubility in acids (humic and fulvic acids) was compared to those of the control substances. The portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids in the excrements of Bibio marci was higher than that in the control substances. The content of 14C-labeled humic substances in the excrements of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa exceeded the control values only in the experiment with proteins. When clay material was added to the organic substances, the portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids increased in both experiments with phenols and proteins. When these substrates passed through the digestive tracts of the invertebrates, the polymerization of organic substances and the inclusion of proteins and phenols into humic acids occurred.

  5. The importance of environmental conditions in reflectance spectroscopy of laboratory analogs for Mars surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J.; Murchie, S.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Pieters, C.

    1993-01-01

    Reflectance spectra are presented here for a variety of particulate, ferric-containing analogs to Martian soil (Fe(3+)-doped smectites and palagonites) to facilitate interpretation of remotely acquired spectra. The analog spectra were measured under differing environmental conditions to evaluate the influence of exposure history on water content and absorption features due to H2O in these samples. Each of these materials contains structural OH bonded to metal cations, adsorbed H2O, and bound H2O (either in a glass, structural site, or bound to a cation). Previous experiments involving a variety of Mars analogs have shown that the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of palagonites is more resistant to drying than the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of montmorillonites. Other experiments have shown that spectra of ferrihydrite and montmorillonites doped with ferric sulfate also contain sufficient bound H2O to retain a strong 3 micron band under dry conditions. Once the effects of the environment on bound water in clays, oxides, and salts are better understood, the hydration bands measured via reflectance spectroscopy can be used to gain information about the chemical composition and moisture content of real soil systems. Such information would be especially useful in interpreting observations of Mars where subtle spatial variations in the strengths of metal-OH and H2O absorptions have been observed in telescopic and ISM spectra. We measured bidirectional reflectance spectra of several Mars soil analogs under controlled environmental conditions to assess the effects of moisture content on the metal-OH and H2O absorptions. The samples analyzed include chemically altered montmorillonites, ferrihydrite. and palagonites from Hawaii and Iceland. Procedures for preparation of the cation-exchanged montmorillonites, ferric-salt doped montmorillonites, and ferric oxyhydroxides are described in detail elsewhere.

  6. Similar names for similar biologics.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Nicole; Felix, Thomas; Strober, Bruce E; Warnock, David G

    2014-10-01

    Approval of the first biosimilar in the USA may occur by the end of 2014, yet a naming approach for biosimilars has not been determined. Biosimilars are highly similar to their biologic reference product but are not identical to it, because of their structural complexity and variations in manufacturing processes among companies. There is a need for a naming approach that can distinguish a biosimilar from its reference product and other biosimilars and ensure accurate tracing of adverse events (AEs) to the administered product. In contrast, generic small-molecule drugs are identical to their reference product and, therefore, share the same nonproprietary name. Clinical trials required to demonstrate biosimilarity for approval may not detect rare AEs or those occurring after prolonged use, and the incidence of such events may differ between a biosimilar and its reference product. The need for precise biologic identification is further underscored by the possibility of biosimilar interchangeability, a US designation that will allow substitution without prescriber intervention. For several biologics, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has used a naming approach that adds a prefix to a common root nonproprietary name, enabling healthcare providers to distinguish between products, avoid medication errors, and facilitate pharmacovigilance. We recommend that the FDA implement a biosimilars naming policy that likewise would add a distinguishable prefix or suffix to the root nonproprietary name of the reference product. This approach would ensure that a biosimilar could be distinguished from its reference product and other biosimilars in patient records and pharmacovigilance databases/reports, facilitating accurate attribution of AEs. PMID:25001080

  7. Differences in span task performance recorded in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) simulator compared to a standard laboratory condition 

    E-print Network

    Harcourt-Brown, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Forty-eight participants completed a working memory span task in a functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) simulator and laboratory. Differences in performance between the two conditions were investigated. The trends in the ...

  8. Impacts of Bt rice expressing Cry1C or Cry2A protein on the performance of nontarget leafhopper, Nephotettix cincticeps (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z B; Tian, J C; Wang, W; Xu, H X; Hu, C; Guo, Y Y; Peng, Y F; Ye, G Y

    2014-02-01

    Transgenic rice expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) protein can effectively control target insects including stem borers and leaf folders. However, the potential effects of Bt rice on nontarget organisms including nontarget herbivores have not been fully evaluated. In the current study, ecological fitness parameters of the nontarget herbivore, Nephotettix cincticeps (Uhler) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), fed on T1C-19 (Cry1C) or T2A-1 (Cry2A) rice were compared with non-Bt rice (MH63) under laboratory conditions. A 2-yr field trial was also conducted to monitor the population dynamics of N. cincticeps in the Bt and control rice plots using the vacuum-suction machine and yellow sticky card traps. Laboratory results showed that there were no significant differences in some of biological parameters including egg developmental duration, adult fresh weight, adult longevity, and oviposition period when N. cincticeps fed on Bt or non-Bt rice was compared. However, the survival rate of N. cincticeps nymphs fed on T2A-1 Bt rice plants was significantly higher than that on the control. When N. cincticeps fed on T1C-19 Bt rice plants, its nymphal duration was significantly longer and fecundity significantly lower compared with those fed on both T2A-1 Bt and non-Bt rice plants; the preoviposition period of N. cincticeps fed on T1C-19 and T2A-1 Bt rice was also significantly shorter than those on non-Bt rice. Nonetheless, both seasonal density and population dynamics of N. cincticeps adults and nymphs were similar between Bt (T1C-19 and T2A-1) and non-Bt rice plots under field conditions. In conclusion, our results indicate that our two tested Bt rice lines would not lead to higher population of N. cincticeps. Long-term experiments to monitor the population dynamics of N. cincticeps at large scale need to be carried out to confirm the current results. PMID:24472210

  9. Laboratory simulations of the interaction between ozone and chloroacetic acids in the conditions close to stratospheric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strokova, N. E.; Savilov, S. V.; Morozov, I. I.; Yagodovskaya, T. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between ozone and mono-, di-, and trichloroacetic acids are studied using a flow vacuum gas discharge setup in a regime close to stratospheric conditions (in the temperature range of 77 to 250 K, at pressures of 10-3 to 0 Torr, and in the presence of ice). The interaction between ozone and trichloroacetic acid starts at 77 K, while interaction with monochloroacetic acid begins when the temperature is raised to 200 K. The reactions are assumed to proceed via different mechanisms: chlorine oxides of different composition are the reaction products, as is shown using low-temperature IR spectroscopy. Preliminary adsorption of the acids on a surface of ice raises the temperature of interaction to 190 K.

  10. Optimal conditions for high current proton irradiations at the university of Wisconsin's ion beam laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetteland, C. J.; Field, K. G.; Eiden, T. J.; Gerczak, T. J.; Maier, B. R.; Albakri, O.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-04-01

    The National Electrostatics Corporation's (NEC) Toroidal Volume Ion Source (TORVIS) source is known for exceptionally high proton currents with minimal service downtime as compared to traditional sputter sources. It has been possible to obtain over 150?A of proton current from the source, with over 70?A on the target stage. However, beam fluxes above ˜1×1017/m2-s may have many undesirable effects, especially for insulators. This may include high temperature gradients at the surface, sputtering, surface discharge, cracking or even disintegration of the sample. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the role of high current fluxes in a suite of ceramics and insulating materials. Results will show the optimal proton irradiation conditions and target mounting strategies needed to minimize unwanted macro-scale damage, while developing a procedure for conducting preliminary radiation experiments.

  11. Vegetation-derived cues for the selection of oviposition substrates by Anopheles albimanus under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Torres-Estrada, José Luis; Meza-Alvarez, R Amanda; Cibrián-Tovar, Juan; Rodríguez-López, Mario H; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Rojas-Leon, Julio C

    2005-12-01

    Oviposition response of gravid Anopheles albimanus Wiedemman (Diptera: Culicidae) females to water containing Brachiaria mutica, Cynodon dactylon, Jouvea straminea, Fimbristylis spadicea, and Ceratophyllum demersum was investigated. Gravid An. albimanus females deposited similar egg numbers in cups containing natural plants in water from natural breeding sites and in cups containing natural plants in distilled water. Gravid mosquitoes deposited significantly more eggs in cups containing natural plants in water from natural breeding sites than in cups containing artificial plants in water from the corresponding natural breeding sites. These results were confirmed in experiments conducted in a wind tunnel, indicating that female response is mediated by chemical cues from plants. Bioassays with organic extracts of all 5 plant species indicated that these extracts at 100%, 10%, and 1% concentrations had an oviposition repellent effect, while attractiveness was observed at 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001%. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis of the organic extracts found in all 5 plants showed a mixture of terpenoid and alcohol compounds, among them: guaiacol, phenol, isoeugenol, longifolene, caryophyllene, phenyl ethyl alcohol, and p-cresol. These results suggest that middle-range volatiles from plants may function as chemical cues for the female's oviposition response in this mosquito species. PMID:16506557

  12. Factors affecting growth and survival of the asiatic clam Corbicula sp. under controlled laboratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Double, D.D.; Daly, D.S.; Abernethy, C.S.

    1983-04-01

    Growth of Corbicula sp. was determined in relation to food supply, water temperature, and clam size as an aid to researchers conducting chronic effects toxicity studies. Water temperatures for the two 84-day test series were 10, 20, and 30/sup 0/C. Linear models provided good relationships (r/sup 2/ > 0.90) between clam shell length (SL), total weight (TW), and wet/dry tissue weights. Clam growth was minimal during low phytoplankton densities (approx. 300 cells/ml), and all three size groups lost weight at 20 and 30/sup 0/C. Mortality of small clams at 30/sup 0/C was 100% after 71 days. At phytoplankton densities > 1000 cells/ml, overall differences in growth with respect to clam size and temperature were detectable at p < 0.01; growth of all clam groups was greatest at 30/sup 0/C. Small clams exhibited the greatest absolute increase in mean shell length at all test temperatures, and weight gains were similar to those of medium and large clams.

  13. Placement of the radiochemical processing plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory into a safe standby condition

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, D.W.; Bopp, C.D.; Farmer, A.J.; Johnson, J.K.; Miller, C.H.; Powers, B.A.; Collins, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive upgrade, cleanup, and decontamination efforts are being conducted for appropriate areas in the Radiochemical Processing Plant (RPP) with the goal of achieving ''safe standby'' condition by the end of FY 1989. The ventilation system must maintain containment; thus, it is being upgraded via demolition and replacement of marginally adequate ductwork, fans, and control systems. Areas that are being decontaminated and stripped of various services (e.g., piping, ductwork, and process tanks) include hot cells, makeup rooms, and pipe tunnels. Operating equipment that is being decontaminated includes glove boxes and hoods. Replacement of the ventilation system and removal of equipment from pipe tunnels, cells, and makeup rooms are accomplished by contact labor by workers using proper attire, safety rules, and shielding. Removal of contaminated ductwork and piping is conducted with containment enclosures that are strategically located at breakpoints, and methods of separation are chosen to conform with health physics requirements. The methods of cutting contaminated piping and ductwork include portable reciprocating saws, pipe cutters, burning, and plasma torch. Specially designed containment enclosures will be used to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination while maintaining adequate ventilation. 6 figs.

  14. Leaching of biocides used in façade coatings under laboratory test conditions.

    PubMed

    Schoknecht, Ute; Gruycheva, Jana; Mathies, Helena; Bergmann, Hannelore; Burkhardt, Michael

    2009-12-15

    The European Biocidal Products Directive 98/8/EC requires a risk assessment concerning possible effects of active ingredients on the environment. Biocides can be leached from treated materials exposed to outdoor use. These emissions have to be estimated and evaluated during the authorization procedure. Different immersion and irrigation tests were performed to investigate leaching of biocides from façade coatings. Several marketed formulations of textured coatings and paints spiked with a mixture of commonly used active ingredients (OIT, DCOIT, IPBC, carbendazim, isoproturon, diuron, terbutryn, and Irgarol 1051) were investigated. The emission process can be described by time-dependent functions that depend on the test conditions. The results of all test procedures confirm that leachability is related to water solubility and n-octanol-water partition coefficient of the active ingredients and that leaching of biocides from façade coatings is mainly a diffusion controlled process. Other factors like the composition of the product, availability and transport of water, concentration of active ingredients in the coatings, as well as UV-exposure of the coatings influence biocide emissions. PMID:19928801

  15. Effect of thermal shock on the decomposition of rocks under controlled laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasanin-Grubin, Milica; Vezmar, Tijuana; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2013-04-01

    The major factor determining the rate of weathering of a given rock are the climatic conditions of the surrounding environment, most notably type and amount of precipitation and temperature. For the latter, average annual temperature and where applicable, the frequency of freezing and thawing are often considered to be relevant for weathering. The rate of temperature change is mostly ignored. However, a rapid change in temperature, referred to as thermal shock could have more severe consequences of rock deterioration then gradual heating and cooling of rocks is gradual. Thermal shock induces a stress of such a magnitude that the material is unable to adjust fast enough and so it breaks down. The aim of this study is to examine the importance of mechanical decomposition of rocks when treated with thermal shock by freezing. The rate of decomposition of rocks of various sizes was measured based on their weight loss. In addition, they were immersed in water after freezing and the electrical conductivity and pH of the water were measured as an index for thermal-shock induced micro-fracturing. Samples of three rock types were chosen for the experiment: limestone, tuffaceous rock and basalt. Samples were examined in two separate cycles: (i) 24h immersion in ultra-clean water followed by 24h drying at 30o and (ii) 24h immersion, 24h temperature shock by freezing at -20?C and 6h thawing. Each cycle was repeated approximately 20 times. In each cycle three different sizes of rock were examined: <16mm, 16-8mm and 8-5mm. Limestone mass decreased for both cycles, although more distinctly after repeated thermal shocks. Furthermore, the rate of decay decreased with increasing rock size. Tuffaceous rock exposed to cycle (i) also showed a significant weight loss. Somewhat surprisingly, the mass of the tuffaceous rock exposed to thermal shock increased by about 13% in all sample size groups. It is possible that pore volume increased during experiment and that the rocks became capable of absorbing more water, but the rock was elastic enough not to break under stress. On the basalt, as expected, the rate of weight loss was the smallest. Cylce (ii) samples also showed more intensive mass reduction. Electrical conductivity and pH of the immersion water were constant throughout the experiment and did not change with the number of cycles. This implies that no significant chemical disintegration occurred. The results show that thermal shock can have a rock type-specific effect on physical weathering. The lacking effect on chemical weathering is expected due to the design of the experiment. Under natural conditions, with non-pH neutral water, the declining rock stability, indicated by the loss of mass, especially of the limestone, will mostly likely also enhance leaching and thus chemical weathering.

  16. Laboratory study of microbial cleaning of oil spills under Saudi environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sayed, A.A.H.; Shebl, A.M.; Ramadan, M.A. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01

    An active strain of Pseudomonas sp. isolated from oil-contaminated soil at the Arabian Gulf was able to utilize the crude oil at a concentration of 5 mg/ml added to sterile Gulf water. microbial growth and gas chromatographic analysis of the remaining oil were used as a criteria for oil degradation by this strain. The bacteria at a cell density of 10{sup 5} CFU/ml was able to degrade the crude oil at concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 15 mg/ml in Gulf water samples. At low concentration (2.5 mg/ml), about 70% of crude oil had disappeared within 7 days. At high concentration (15 mg/ml), the extent of oil degradation decreased, where only 50% of the added oil had disappeared. The rate of degradation by the inoculated bacteria was slightly increased by the addition of inorganic nutrients, mainly P or N to the Gulf water. The degradative capacity of Pseudomonas sp. was optimum when the bacteria was incubated at 25 C, where 47% of the added oil has disappeared within 5 days of incubation. Low cell density (10{sup 3} CFU/ml) of the degrading bacteria required a long lag period before initiation of oil degradation, whereas high cell density (10{sup 6} CFU/ml) rapidly degraded oil with a short lag period under the same conditions. This strain could be useful in decontamination of spilled oil in Gulf water if it acts well under field trial test and survived for a reasonable period sufficient for oil biodegradation.

  17. Laboratory Test Methods to Determine the Degradation of Plastics in Marine Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tosin, Maurizio; Weber, Miriam; Siotto, Michela; Lott, Christian; Degli Innocenti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In this technology report, three test methods were developed to characterize the degradation of plastic in marine environment. The aim was to outline a test methodology to measure the physical and biological degradation in different habitats where plastic waste can deposit when littered in the sea. Previously, research has focused mainly on the conditions encountered by plastic items when floating in the sea water (pelagic domain). However, this is just one of the possible habitats that plastic waste can be exposed to. Waves and tides tend to wash up plastic waste on the shoreline, which is also a relevant habitat to be studied. Therefore, the degradation of plastic items buried under sand kept wet with sea water has been followed by verifying the disintegration (visual disappearing) as a simulation of the tidal zone. Most biodegradable plastics have higher densities than water and also as a consequence of fouling, they tend to sink and lay on the sea floor. Therefore, the fate of plastic items lying on the sediment has been followed by monitoring the oxygen consumption (biodegradation). Also the effect of a prolonged exposure to the sea water, to simulate the pelagic domain, has been tested by measuring the decay of mechanical properties. The test material (Mater-Bi) was shown to degrade (total disintegration achieved in less than 9?months) when buried in wet sand (simulation test of the tidal zone), to lose mechanical properties but still maintain integrity (tensile strength at break?=??66% in 2?years) when exposed to sea water in an aquarium (simulation of pelagic domain), and substantially biodegrade (69% in 236?days; biodegradation relative to paper: 88%) when located at the sediment/sea water interface (simulation of benthic domain). This study is not conclusive as the methodological approach must be completed by also determining degradation occurring in the supralittoral zone, on the deep sea floor, and in the anoxic sediment. PMID:22737147

  18. Comparison of longevity between a laboratory strain and a natural population of Anastrepha Fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) under field cage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Cendra, P.; Vilardi, J. [Depto. Ecologia, Genetica y Evolucion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Segura, D.; Cladera, J. [Instituto de Genetica, INTA Castelar, CC25, (1712), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Allinghi, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-03-15

    The South American fruit fly Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) is one of the most destructive fruit pests in this region, infesting major fruit crops. Implementation of the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of an area-wide integrated approach against this species requires information on the survival of mass-reared and sterilized insects in the field and their ability to mate with wild females. The survival rates in field cages of both non-irradiated and irradiated laboratory flies were compared with that of wild flies. Both types of laboratory flies survived longer than their wild counterparts over the 8 days under the experimental conditions. The irradiation dose (70 Gy) did not affect survival of the laboratory reared flies. Our results improve the prospect of integrating the SIT into the control of A. fraterculus populations in Argentina. (author) [Spanish] Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann), la mosca sudamericana de la fruta, es una de las plagas mas destructivas en la region que infesta a los principales cultivos de frutas. La implementacion de la Tecnica del Insecto Esteril (TIE) como parte de un manejo integrado en areas extensivas contra esta especie requiere ensayos que demuestren que los insectos producidos en forma masiva y esterilizados son capaces de sobrevivir en el campo y aparearse con las hembras silvestres. Se comparo la supervivencia de individuos de una linea de laboratorio, tanto irradiados como no irradiados con la de individuos de una poblacion natural. Los dos tratamientos de moscas de laboratorio sobrevivieron mas tiempo que las salvajes durante los 8 dias y en las condiciones ensayadas. La dosis de radiacion (70 Gy.) no afecto la supervivencia de las moscas criadas en laboratorio. Nuestros resultados mejoran las perspectivas de integrar la TIE en el control de las poblaciones argentinas de A. fraterculus. (author)

  19. Investigation on some biological aspects of Chrysoperla lucasina (Chrysopidae: Neuroptera) on Bemisia tabaci in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, A; Sharifi, F; Mirmoayedi, A

    2012-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci is one of the most important key pests of many types of cultivated plants. Lacewings (Chrysopidae: Neuroptera) are predatory insects, widely used in biological control programs. Between them green lacewing is a promising biological control agent of pests in green houses and crop fields. In this study, gravid females of the green lacewing Chrysoperla lucasina (Lacroix) were captured from Sarepolzahab ( altitude 540m, latitude 34 degrees ,14' N 46 degrees, 9' E) in western part of Iran. Collected insects were reared in a growth chamber, under experimental conditions (25 +/- 1 degrees C, 70 +/- 5% RH and a photoperiod of 16:8 L: D). Different diets were offered to larvae which consisted of a whitefly species B. tabaci, an aphid Myzus persica and also lyophilized powder of drone honeybee (Apis melifera). As different foods were used to nurish larvae, so for each diet, mean larval period were calculated, and finally means were compared to each other. Anova in MSTAT-C was used for analysis of variance, and Duncan multiple range test (DMRT) to compare between means. The results showed that larvae had maximum duration of 27 +/- 0.33 days when fed on honeybee lyophilized powder and the minimum value was 17.9 +/- 0.3 days for B. tabaci. 25 +/- 0.27 day recorded for M. persicae. Food preference of the 3rd instar larvae of green lacewing was surveyed, they showed a food preference to M. persicae, to compare with B. tabaci, as the former has a bigger body size, so more easily to be captured by the predator larvae. The 3rd instar larvae of lacewing were more voracious on preys, than the 1st or the 2nd instar larvae. Statistically speaking, there were a significantly difference when mean of different preys consumed by predator larvae were compared. We found, that when the predator larvae have fed on B. tabaci, their development time was shorter, and when arrived to adult stage, the adults showed, an improved fertility. The results indicated that the suitable prey not only can increase the rate of through accelerating developmental stages of the predator and by means of an increase in its pupal body weight consequently promoting the fecundity of resulting adults, but also can alter predators population density in relation to own production numbers. PMID:23885430

  20. Setup for laboratory studies of the environmental conditions influence on the fixed charge state in silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Mikhaylov, Vasily

    2015-02-01

    The position sensitive detectors operate in high intensity radiation field of the collider experiment [1]. Important task is to estimate the influence of different radiation effects on properties of the detector. We focus on the laboratory studies to estimate the reliability of different types of silicon detectors. We use the simple test structures produced by standard technology for the silicon detectors. We give the primary attention to the case when the depth of active detector region varies from 10 to 20 ? m because it leads to the most significant influence of SiO2-Si interface on processes in silicon bulk. We present the experimental results of long term irradiation test with Am241 (one year). Influence of the environmental conditions on the fixed charge states in silicon dioxide was investigated using developed simple model.

  1. Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Doug

    ., & Verfaillie, K. (2009). Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes. Journal of Vision, 9Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes Laboratory of Experimental on postsaccadic perception do indeed occur. We presented subjects with highly similar artificial shapes, preceded

  2. Influence of the redox condition dynamics on the removal efficiency of a laboratory-scale constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Wiessner, A; Kappelmeyer, U; Kuschk, P; Kästner, M

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory reactor planted with Juncus effusus treating an artificial wastewater was used to investigate the short-term and long-term variations and interactions in the redox conditions as well as the removal efficiency of C and the N turnover. The permanent circulation of the process water enabled the micro-gradient processes to be evaluated for an operating period of 20 months. Steady-state conditions were achieved throughout the operating period with high mean removal efficiencies of 92.7% total organic carbon, 82.0% ammonia and 97.6% nitrate. Daily variations in the redox state of the rhizosphere of a few hundred mV were observed, ranging from about -200 to oxidized conditions of about +200 mV and driven by daylight. Variations in pH associated with changes in light and redox were linked to the dynamics of the fates of organic and inorganic carbon species. The ammonia removal processes were found to be firmly established, including for moderately reduced redox conditions with high efficiencies for E(h)>-50 mV. The enrichment of ammonia (up to 13 mg l(-1)) closely linked to the light, particularly during summertime, indicates the existence of hitherto unconsidered additional N turnover pathways in the rhizoplane involving N(2) produced by microbes or released by plants. C turnover was strongly related to the seasonal variation in illumination with minimum efficiencies during the dark season. In addition, it was characterized by oscillation with periods of approximately 1 month. The relationships found are dominant for biofilms on the rhizoplane and decisive for the removal efficiency of especially simple constructed and natural wetlands. The results highlight the importance of helophytes and their physiological specifics for removal processes. PMID:15607183

  3. Kinematic Self-Similarity

    E-print Network

    A. A. Coley

    1996-10-25

    Self-similarity in general relativity is briefly reviewed and the differences between self-similarity of the first kind and generalized self-similarity are discussed. The covariant notion of a kinematic self-similarity in the context of relativistic fluid mechanics is defined. Various mathematical and physical properties of spacetimes admitting a kinematic self-similarity are discussed. The governing equations for perfect fluid cosmological models are introduced and a set of integrability conditions for the existence of a proper kinematic self-similarity in these models is derived. Exact solutions of the irrotational perfect fluid Einstein field equations admitting a kinematic self-similarity are then sought in a number of special cases, and it is found that; (1) in the geodesic case the 3-spaces orthogonal to the fluid velocity vector are necessarily Ricci-flat and (ii) in the further specialisation to dust the differential equation governing the expansion can be completely integrated and the asymptotic properties of these solutions can be determined, (iii) the solutions in the case of zero-expansion consist of a class of shear-free and static models and a class of stiff perfect fluid (and non-static) models, and (iv) solutions in which the kinematic self-similar vector is parallel to the fluid velocity vector are necessarily Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) models.

  4. Modeling of salt-water migration through spod-podzolic soils under the field and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhina, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of highly mineralized water influence on soils is an important issue in the contemporary world. Various regions with different conditions are exposed to salt-affected soils forming. Salinization of soils is a complex process of the chemical and physical properties changes. Therefore the chain of the laboratory and field experiments should be done in order to assess the main factors promoting highly mineralized water migration. In addition to it modelling is a good way to understand and evaluate main chemical and physical transformations in soils. The chain of experiments was done to assess salt water movement in spod-podzolic soils under field and laboratory conditions. The main goals were to evaluate the rate of salt water movement through soils and to estimate velocity of the desalinization process. Field experiment was conducted on spod-podzolic soils of Kaliningrad region. There were 4 sites measuring 20*25 cm watering with salt water in amount of 5 liters per each area. The mineralization of the solution was 100 g/l. In addition to the salt affected sites, 2 non polluted grounds were assessed too. Soils samples were collected in the period of 1 week, 1 month, 3 month and 1 year after the spill had been done. The samples were taken each 10 cm 110 cm deep and in double repeatability. Main chemical and physical parameters, such as volume water content, pH, conductivity, amount of calcium ion, magnesium, sodium, and chlorite in soils etc. were measured in each sample. The second experiment was conducted to evaluate the rate of soils solutions transformation under the laboratory conditions. Organic horizon was taken from the field and was stuffed in columns with 1.0 g/cm3 density. There were 16 columns with 4 cm diameter. 14 columns were showered with salt water with the same mineralization as in the field experiment. The amount of salt water injected in columns was 104 mm per one sample which is equal to the salt water volume spilled per one area in the previous experiment. Also there were 2 columns as a verification variant contained pure soil. Each column was washed off with different amount of distilled water. The total volume of the pure solution was equal to the mean amount of the annual precipitation in the region of the field experiment. The main physical and chemical properties were measured in soils samples as well in the first experiment. In addition to it the complex assessment of soil's water were made. The experiments revealed the fast rate of salinization-desalinization processes in spod-podzolic soils of the coniferous areas in Kaliningrad region. The maximum values of conductivity were observed at the end of 1 week period and made up more than 2000 mSm/cm in top soils horizons. Furthermore the desalinization of the soils took place in both field and laboratory experiments a year after the spill. The reported study was partially supported by RFBR, research project No 12-05-31088 mol_a.

  5. Similar quartz crystallographic textures in rocks of continental earth's crust (by neutron diffraction data): III. Relation of quartz texture types with means and conditions of texture formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. N., E-mail: nikitin@nf.jinr.ru; Ivankina, T. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ullemeyer, K. [Universitaet Kiel, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften (Germany); Vasin, R. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-15

    Examples of different rocks collected in different regions of the continental earth's crust are presented. Groups of quartz crystallographic textures of the same type are selected for these rocks. The relationship between the types of textures and the physical means and conditions of their formation is analyzed. The effect of the {alpha}-{beta} phase transition in quartz on the texture transformations in rocks is considered.

  6. Effects of greenhouse pesticides on the soil-dwelling predatory mite Stratiolaelaps scimitus (Acari: Mesostigmata: Laelapidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Ana R; Cloyd, Raymond A; Zaborski, Edmond R

    2004-06-01

    Knowledge of the effects of pesticides on biological control agents is required for the successful implementation of integrated pest management (IPM) programs in greenhouse production systems. Laboratory assays were conducted to assess the effects of an acaricide (dicofol), two insecticides (chlorpyrifos and pyriproxyfen), and two fungicides (fosetyl-Al and mefenoxam) on Stratiolaelaps scimitus (Womersley), a soil-dwelling predatory mite widely marketed in North America under the name Hypoaspis miles (Berlese) as a biological control agent of dark-winged fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.). Eggs, larvae, protonymphs, deutonymphs, and adult male and female mites were first assayed using dicofol, an acaricide used in the experiments as a positive control, applied to filter paper in an enclosed arena. Protonymphs were assayed for lethal and sublethal effects against the remaining pesticides at maximum label-recommended rates applied to filter paper, by using dicofol as a positive control and water as a negative control. The larva and protonymph were the life stages most susceptible to dicofol, with estimated 24-h LC50 values of 9 and 26 mg m(-2), respectively. Chlorpyrifos was highly toxic to the protonymphs of S. scimitus, causing >95% mortality after 24-h exposure and 100% mortality after 48 h. In contrast, the insect growth regulator (IGR) pyriproxyfen was much less toxic to protonymphs of S. scimitus; pyriproxyfen caused no significant mortality, compared with <5% mortality in the water control. Mortality caused by the fungicides was also relatively low; 72-h exposure to fosetyl-Al and mefenoxam resulted in 17.4 and 27.5% mortality, respectively. The IGR and fungicides increased the duration of the protonymphal stage by 1.2-1.8-fold, but they had no effect on the duration of subsequent life stages, nor on the duration of preoviposition, oviposition, and postoviposition periods of adult females. Total numbers and viability of eggs laid by mites exposed to the IGR and fungicides did not differ from the negative control, although the average rate of egg production during the oviposition of mites exposed to fosetyl-Al was increased. Pyriproxyfen, fosetyl-Al, and mefenoxam are likely to be compatible with S. scimitus under field conditions, because these pesticides caused little mortality of protonymphs, and they did not negatively affect the development and reproduction of S. scimitus under extreme laboratory conditions. In contrast, the use of chlorpyrifos in conjunction with S. scimitus is not recommended unless more comprehensive testing under semifield or field conditions demonstrates compatibility. PMID:15279255

  7. Under What Conditions Does Caseworker-Caregiver Racial/Ethnic Similarity Matter for Housing Service Provision? An Application of Representative Bureaucracy Theory

    PubMed Central

    McBeath, Bowen; Chuang, Emmeline; Bunger, Alicia; Blakeslee, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine child welfare caseworkers’ housing-related service strategies when they serve culturally similar versus culturally dissimilar clients. Testing hypotheses drawn from representative bureaucracy theory and using data from the second cohort of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, we find that when non-Caucasian caseworkers share the same racial/ethnic background as caregivers, caseworkers use more active strategies to connect caregivers to needed housing services. The relationship between racial/ethnic matching and frontline workers’ repertoire of service strategies is most pronounced when the need for housing has been registered formally via referrals and case plans and thus legitimated institutionally. These results reinforce basic tenets of representative bureaucracy theory and provide evidence of the benefits of racial and ethnic diversity in the human service workforce. Our findings also highlight the need for research identifying institutional and frontline organizational factors that enhance the quality of service provision. PMID:25745270

  8. Depth-resolved simplified characterization of collagen depletion in dermis with polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography applicable to non-laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tougbaev, Vitali; Eom, Tae Joong; Shin, Woojin; Lee, Yeung Lak; Yu, Bong-Ahn; Kee, Chul-Sik; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Lee, Jongmin

    2007-07-01

    A further insight into the prior concept of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography system intended for non-laboratory conditions is brought forward and an experimental proof-of-concept is presented. A phenomenological model is adopted from the theory of light depolarization in crystalline polymers and modified to yield a simplified algorithm for mapping depolarization ratio in dermis. The algorithm could distinguish between dermal layers with depleted collagen content and normal dermis of normal perilesional skin. Dermis is simulated by bireringent lamellae of collagen arranged chaotically in multiple layers parallel to the skin surface. Both the design concept and the model imply the sub-millimeter tumor thickness as a proofed prognostic factor and an important criterion for complementary functional diagnostics of skin cancers at their early phase of vertical growth. Choice of the model is inspired by similarity of structural and optical properties between liquid-crystal collagen fibers in dermis and birefringent crystalline lamellae in polymer materials. The numerical computation based on the model allowing for real characteristics of dermis gives plausible interpreting of depolarization peculiarities caused by collagen depletion. Feasibility is discussed of exploiting fiber optic analogs of achromatic retarders. Fabrication of the fiber retarders is shown to be realistic by making use of the photonics technology possessed by the authors.

  9. No evidence for memory interference across sessions in food hoarding marsh tits Poecile palustris under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Urhan, A Utku; Brodin, Anders

    2015-05-01

    Scatter hoarding birds are known for their accurate spatial memory. In a previous experiment, we tested the retrieval accuracy in marsh tits in a typical laboratory set-up for this species. We also tested the performance of humans in this experimental set-up. Somewhat unexpectedly, humans performed much better than marsh tits. In the first five attempts, humans relocated almost 90 % of the caches they had hidden 5 h earlier. Marsh tits only relocated 25 % in the first five attempts and just above 40 % in the first ten attempts. Typically, in this type of experiment, the birds will be caching and retrieving many times in the same sites in the same experimental room. This is very different from the conditions in nature where hoarding parids only cache once in a caching site. Hence, it is possible that memories from previous sessions will disturb the formation of new memories. If there is such proactive interference, the prediction is that success should decay over sessions. Here, we have designed an experiment to investigate whether there is such memory interference in this type of experiment. We allowed marsh tits and humans to cache and retrieve in three repeated sessions without prior experience of the arena. The performance did not change over sessions, and on average, marsh tits correctly visited around 25 % of the caches in the first five attempts. The corresponding success in humans was constant across sessions, and it was around 90 % on average. We conclude that the somewhat poor performance of the marsh tits did not depend on proactive memory interference. We also discuss other possible reasons for why marsh tits in general do not perform better in laboratory experiments. PMID:25573290

  10. Two initial vaccinations with the Bm86-based Gavacplus vaccine against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus induce similar reproductive suppression to three initial vaccinations under production conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, affects livestock production in many regions of the world. Up to now, the widespread use of chemical acaricides has led to the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and to environmental contamination. Gavacplus is a subunit vaccine based on the recombinant Bm86 tick antigen expressed in yeast, capable to control infestations of R. microplus under controlled and production conditions. The vaccine constitutes the core element of broad control programs against this ectoparasite, in which acquired immunity in cattle to Bm86 is combined with a rational use of acaricides. At present, the conventional vaccine scheme consists of three doses that should be administered at weeks 0, 4 and 7, followed by a booster every six months. Results In this study we assayed a reduction in the number of the initial doses of Gavacplus, evaluated the time course and the level of bovine anti-Bm86 antibodies elicited, and analyzed the vaccine effect on ticks engorging on immunized cattle under production conditions. Following three different immunization schemes, the bovines developed a strong and specific immune response characterized by elevated anti-Bm86 IgG titers. A reduction in the weight of engorging female ticks, in the weight of the eggs laid and also in R. microplus viable eggs percentage was obtained by using only two doses of Gavacplus administered at weeks 0 and 4, followed by a booster six months later. This reduction did not differ from the results obtained on ticks engorging on cattle immunized at weeks 0, 4 and 7. It was also demonstrated that anti-Bm86 antibody titers over 1:640, measured in bovines immunized at weeks 0 and 4, were sufficient to affect weight and reproductive potential of female ticks as compared with ticks engorging on unvaccinated animals. In addition, no statistically significant differences were detected in the average weight of eggs laid by ticks engorged on immunized cattle that showed anti-Bm86 specific titers in the range of 1:640 to 1:81920. Conclusion The administration of two initial doses of Gavacplus containing 100 ?g of Bm86 antigen to non-immunized cattle under production conditions is sufficient to affect the weight and the reproductive capacity of R. microplus engorging females. According to these results, cattle herds' manipulation and vaccine costs could be potentially reduced with a positive impact on the implementation of integrated control programs against R. microplus. PMID:20846415

  11. In search of water vapor on Jupiter: Laboratory measurements of the microwave properties of water vapor under simulated jovian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpowicz, Bryan M.; Steffes, Paul G.

    2011-03-01

    Detection and measurement of atmospheric water vapor in the deep jovian atmosphere using microwave radiometry has been discussed extensively by Janssen et al. (Janssen, M.A., Hofstadter, M.D., Gulkis, S., Ingersoll, A.P., Allison, M., Bolton, S.J., Levin, S.M., Kamp, L.W. [2005]. Icarus 173 (2), 447-453.) and de Pater et al. (de Pater, I., Deboer, D., Marley, M., Freedman, R., Young, R. [2005]. Icarus 173 (2), 425-447). The NASA Juno mission will include a six-channel microwave radiometer system (MWR) operating in the 1.3-50 cm wavelength range in order to retrieve water vapor abundances from the microwave signature of Jupiter (see, e.g., Matousek, S. [2005]. The Juno new frontiers mission. Tech. Rep. IAC-05-A3.2.A.04, California Institute of Technology). In order to accurately interpret data from such observations, nearly 2000 laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity of H2O vapor in a H2/He atmosphere have been conducted in the 5-21 cm wavelength range (1.4-6 GHz) at pressures from 30 mbars to 101 bars and at temperatures from 330 to 525 K. The mole fraction of H2O (at maximum pressure) ranged from 0.19% to 3.6% with some additional measurements of pure H2O. These results have enabled development of the first model for the opacity of gaseous H2O in a H2/He atmosphere under jovian conditions developed from actual laboratory data. The new model is based on a terrestrial model of Rosenkranz et al. (Rosenkranz, P.W. [1998]. Radio Science 33, 919-928), with substantial modifications to reflect the effects of jovian conditions. The new model for water vapor opacity dramatically outperforms previous models and will provide reliable results for temperatures from 300 to 525 K, at pressures up to 100 bars and at frequencies up to 6 GHz. These results will significantly reduce the uncertainties in the retrieval of jovian atmospheric water vapor abundances from the microwave radiometric measurements from the upcoming NASA Juno mission, as well as provide a clearer understanding of the role deep atmospheric water vapor may play in the decimeter-wavelength spectrum of Saturn.

  12. Pathogenicity of the Entomopathogenic Fungus, Lecanicillium muscarium , against the Sweetpotato Whitefly Bemisia tabaci under Laboratory and Glasshouse Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew G. S. Cuthbertson; Keith F. A. Walters

    2005-01-01

    The potential for using the entomopathogenic fungus Lecanicillium muscarium to control the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci has been established in the laboratory by other studies. Laboratory studies however frequently overestimate the level of control achieved by biological control agents in the glasshouse. Before full-scale commercial or field development is considered, glasshouse trials are required to confirm laboratory results. Under both

  13. Examination of food reward and energy intake under laboratory and free-living conditions in a trait binge eating subtype of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Michelle; Blundell, John; Finlayson, Graham S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims: Trait binge eating has been proposed as a “hedonic subtype” of obesity characterized by enhanced food liking and wanting, and a preference for high-fat sweet foods in the laboratory. The current study examined the influence of trait binge eating in overweight or obese women on eating behavior under laboratory and free-living conditions over a 48-h period. Methods: In a matched pairs design, 24 overweight or obese females (BMI: 30.30 ± 2.60 kg/m2; Age: 25.42 ± 3.65 years) with high or low scores on the Binge Eating Scale (BSE) were divided into one of two groups; Obese Binge (O-B) and Obese Non-binge (O-NB). Energy intake was assessed using combined laboratory energy intake measures and 24-h dietary recall procedures. Liking and wanting were assessed using the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire (LFPQ). Results: There was a significant association between overall energy consumed, and energy consumed from snack foods under laboratory and free-living conditions. O-B exhibited a greater preference for sweet snack foods in their laboratory and free-living eating behavior. These findings were supported by greater laboratory-based measures of wanting and craving for this food type in O-B. In addition, O-B consumed significantly more energy than their estimated daily energy requirements in the laboratory suggesting that they over-consumed compared to O-NB. Conclusions: The measurement concordance between laboratory and free-living based energy intake supports the validity of laboratory-based test meal methodologies Variation in trait binge eating was associated with increased craving and wanting for high-fat sweet foods and overconsumption in the laboratory. These findings support the use of trait binge eating as a common hedonic subtype of obesity and extend the relevance of this subtype to habitual patterns of energy intake. PMID:24155732

  14. Value of Laboratory Tests in Employer-Sponsored Health Risk Assessments for Newly Identifying Health Conditions: Analysis of 52,270 Participants

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Harvey W.; Williams, Fred R.; Odeh, Mouneer A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Employer-sponsored health risk assessments (HRA) may include laboratory tests to provide evidence of disease and disease risks for common medical conditions. We evaluated the ability of HRA-laboratory testing to provide new disease-risk information to participants. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional analysis of HRA-laboratory results for participating adult employees and their eligible spouses or their domestic partners, focusing on three common health conditions: hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. HRA with laboratory results of 52,270 first-time participants were analyzed. Nearly all participants had access to health insurance coverage. Twenty-four percent (12,392) self-reported one or more of these medical conditions: 21.1% (11,017) self-identified as having hyperlipidemia, 4.7% (2,479) self-identified as having diabetes, and 0.7% (352) self-identified as having chronic kidney disease. Overall, 36% (n?=?18,540) of participants had laboratory evidence of at least one medical condition newly identified: 30.7% (16,032) had laboratory evidence of hyperlipidemia identified, 1.9% (984) had laboratory evidence of diabetes identified, and 5.5% (2,866) had laboratory evidence of chronic kidney disease identified. Of all participants with evidence of hyperlipidemia 59% (16,030 of 27,047), were newly identified through the HRA. Among those with evidence of diabetes 28% (984 of 3,463) were newly identified. The highest rate of newly identified disease risk was for chronic kidney disease: 89% (2,866 of 3,218) of participants with evidence of this condition had not self-reported it. Men (39%) were more likely than women (33%) to have at least one newly identified condition (p<0.0001). Among men, lower levels of educational achievement were associated with modestly higher rates of newly identified disease risk (p<0.0001); the association with educational achievement among women was unclear. Even among the youngest age range (20 to 29 year olds), nearly 1 in 4 participants (24%) had a newly identified risk for disease. Conclusions/Significance These results support the important role of employer-sponsored laboratory testing as an integral element of HRA for identifying evidence of previously undiagnosed common medical conditions in individuals of all working age ranges, regardless of educational level and gender. PMID:22163283

  15. Comparative biology of two populations of Lutzomyia umbratilis (Diptera: Psychodidae) of Central Amazonia, Brazil, under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Justiniano, S C B; Chagas, A C; Pessoa, F A C; Queiroz, R G

    2004-05-01

    Lutzomyia umbratilis is the main vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania guyanensis in northern South America. It has been found naturally infected with this species of Leishmania only east of the Rio Negro and north of the Rio Amazonas. However, populations of this sand fly species are also present in areas south of the Amazon river system, which may act as a geographical barrier to the Leishmania guyanensis cycle. With the aim of looking for possible biological differences between populations of L. umbratilis from each side of this river system, their biology in the laboratory was investigated. Progenitors collected on tree bases in Manaus and Manacapuru (east and west, respectively, of the Rio Negro) were reared in the laboratory. Results from observations of the life cycle, fecundity, fertility, and adult longevity at 27 degrees C and 92% RH were analyzed by descriptive statistics and z, t, U, and chi2 tests. Although the Manaus and Manacapuru colonies showed a longer developmental time than most Lutzomyia species reared at similar temperatures, length of time of egg and 4th instar larva of the two populations differed significantly (p < 0.01). Females of the latter retained significantly (p < 0.001) less mature oocytes, and the general productivity (% adults from a known number of eggs) of the colony was significantly (p < 0.01) higher than that of the former. These results show that the L. umbratilis population of Manaus is more productive, and thus a better candidate for future mass-rearing attempts. The two populations differ in their life cycle, fecundity, fertility, adult longevity, and emergence. These differences may reflect some divergence of intrinsic biological features evolved as a result of their geographical isolation by the Rio Negro. It is expected that further investigations on morphometry, cuticular hydrocarbon, isoenzyme, molecular and chromossomal analyses, infection, and cross-mating experiments with these and other allopatric populations of both margins of the Amazon river system will help reveal whether or not L. umbratilis has genetically diverged into two or more reproductively isolated populations of vectors or non-vectors of Leishmania guyanensis. PMID:15462295

  16. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mature lymphoid malignancies after reduced-intensity conditioning regimen: similar outcomes with umbilical cord blood and unrelated donor peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Celso Arrais; Rocha, Vanderson; Dreger, Peter; Brunstein, Claudio; Sengeloev, Henrik; Finke, Jürgen; Mohty, Mohamad; Rio, Bernard; Petersen, Eefke; Guilhot, François; Niederwieser, Dietger; Cornelissen, Jan J; Jindra, Pavel; Nagler, Arnon; Fegueux, Nathalie; Schoemans, Hélène; Robinson, Stephen; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gluckman, Eliane; Canals, Carmen; Sureda, Anna

    2014-02-01

    We have reported encouraging results of unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with lymphoid malignancies. Whether those outcomes are comparable to matched unrelated donor transplants remains to be defined. We studied 645 adult patients with mature lymphoid malignancies who received an allogeneic unrelated donor transplant using umbilical cord blood (n=104) or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (n=541) after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Unrelated cord blood recipients had more refractory disease. Median follow-up time was 30 months. Neutrophil engraftment (81% vs. 97%, respectively; P<0.0001) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (26% vs. 52%; P=0.0005) were less frequent after unrelated cord blood than after matched unrelated donor, whereas no differences were observed in grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (29% vs. 32%), non-relapse mortality (29% vs. 28%), and relapse or progression (28% vs. 35%) at 36 months. There were also no significant differences in 2-year progression-free survival (43% vs. 58%, respectively) and overall survival (36% vs. 51%) at 36 months. In a multivariate analysis, no differences were observed in the outcomes between the two stem cell sources except for a higher risk of neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio=2.12; P<0.0001) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio 2.10; P=0.0002) after matched unrelated donor transplant. In conclusion, there was no difference in final outcomes after transplantation between umbilical cord blood and matched unrelated donor transplant. Umbilical cord blood is a valuable alternative for patients with lymphoid malignancies lacking an HLA-matched donor, being associated with lower risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:23935024

  17. Triboelectric Charging of Fine Particles: Understanding Sample Transport Under Simulated Martian Conditions for the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Peters, G. H.; Beegle, L. W.; Manatt, K. S.; Fleming, G.; Sollitt, L.

    2008-12-01

    We report on the nature of fine particle (lees than 150 micron) transport under simulated Martian conditions, in order to better understand the Mars Science Laboratory's sample acquisition, processing and handling subsystem (SA/SPaH). We find that triboelectric charging due to particle movement may have to be controlled in order for successful transport of fines that are created within the drill, processed through the sample handing system (CHIMERA), and delivered to the SAM and CheMin instruments. These fines will be transferred to the portioner, a 3 mm diameter, 8 mm deep distribution center where they will drop ~ 2 cm to the instrument inlet funnels. In our experiments, charging of the simulant (Mars Mojave Simulant - MMS) resulted in 1.5 to 3 nanocoulombs of charge for a 3g aliquot. Due to electrostatics, this process may result in clumping or charge repulsion of fines, which can result in particle sorting. Both of these results can potentially result in an inaccurate sample analysis for the onboard instruments.

  18. Dynamic similarity in erosional processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheidegger, A.E.

    1963-01-01

    A study is made of the dynamic similarity conditions obtaining in a variety of erosional processes. The pertinent equations for each type of process are written in dimensionless form; the similarity conditions can then easily be deduced. The processes treated are: raindrop action, slope evolution and river erosion. ?? 1963 Istituto Geofisico Italiano.

  19. Gamma butyrolactone (GBL) and gamma valerolactone (GVL): similarities and differences in their effects on the acoustic startle reflex and the conditioned enhancement of startle in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, Laureen J; Leavell, Bonita J; Jones, Calleen M; Hepler, Bradford R; Isenschmid, Daniel S; Commissaris, Randall L

    2012-06-01

    Gamma butyrolactone (GBL) is metabolized to gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the body. GHB is a DEA Schedule 1 compound; GBL is a DEA List 1 chemical. Gamma valerolactone (GVL) is the 4-methyl analog of GBL; GVL is metabolized to 4-methyl-GHB; GVL is NOT metabolized to GBL or GHB. The effects of GBL (18.75-150 mg/kg), GVL (200-1600 mg/kg) or vehicle on the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), and the classically-conditioned enhancement of startle, the Startle Anticipated Potentiation of Startle (SAPS) response were studied in male rats. Both compounds produced a dose-dependent reduction of ASR, with GBL 5-7 times more potent than GVL. In contrast, GBL treatment significantly reduced SAPS at doses that exerted only moderate effects on ASR, whereas GVL exerted little or no effect on the SAPS, except at doses that produced pronounced reductions in Noise Alone ASR. In a second experiment, rats were tested for Noise Alone ASR behavior following treatment with a single mid-range dose of GBL (75 mg/kg), GVL (400mg/kg) or vehicle; immediately following startle testing the animals were sacrificed and their brains and blood were collected for determination of GHB, 4-methyl-GHB, GBL and GVL. GHB was found in measurable concentrations in all of the blood specimens and 6 (of 8) of the brain specimens from the GBL-treated subjects. 4-Methyl-GHB was found in measurable concentrations in all of the blood and brain specimens of the GVL-treated subjects; the change in startle amplitude was inversely correlated to the brain concentrations of these compounds. These findings confirm the differences in the metabolic fate of GBL and GVL as pro-drugs for the formation of GHB and 4-methyl-GHB, respectively. Moreover, the dissimilarity in effect profile for GBL and GVL on ASR versus SAPS behaviors suggests that different receptor(s) may be involved in mediating these behavioral effects. PMID:22349589

  20. LABORATORY STUDY FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) USING SODIUM METABISULFITE UNDER ACIDIC CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAM JB; GUTHRIE MD; LUECK KJ; AVILA M

    2007-07-18

    This report describes the results from RPP-PLAN-32738, 'Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome(VI) to Chrome(I1I) in the Secondary Waste Stream', using sodium metabisulfite. Appendix A presents the report as submitted by the Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) to CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The CLS carried out the laboratory effort under Contract Number 21065, release Number 30. This report extracts the more pertinent aspects of the laboratory effort.

  1. [Conditioning studies in the Pavlov's laboratory during 75 years of its existence (on the 150th birthday of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov)].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, N F; Vo?lokova, N L

    1999-01-01

    The paper reviews experimental and clinical data obtained on physiology and pathology of the higher nervous system by the Laboratory founded by I. P. Pavlov during 75 years of its existence: the principle of systemic organisation of the brain structures activity, the role of separate subcortical structures in organisation of behaviour, theoretical development of experimental pathology problems, inner inhibition, the role of sympathetic nervous system in conditioning, possible neurophysiological and neurochemical mechanisms of conditioning. PMID:10641258

  2. Field and laboratory studies of the fate and enantiomeric enrichment of venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gasser, G; Pankratov, I; Elhanany, S; Werner, P; Gun, J; Gelman, F; Lev, O

    2012-06-01

    The stereoselectivity of R,S-venlafaxine and its metabolites R,S-O-desmethylvenlafaxine, N-desmethylvenlafaxine, O,N-didesmethylvenlafaxine, N,N-didesmethylvenlafaxine and tridesmethylvenlafaxine was studied in three processes: (i) anaerobic and aerobic laboratory scale tests; (ii) six wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operating under different conditions; and (iii) a variety of wastewater treatments including conventional activated sludge, natural attenuation along a receiving river stream and storage in operational and seasonal reservoirs. In the laboratory and field studies, the degradation of the venlafaxine yielded O-desmethylvenalfaxine as the dominant metabolite under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Venlafaxine was almost exclusively converted to O-desmethylvenlafaxine under anaerobic conditions, but only a fraction of the drug was transformed to O-desmethylvenlafaxine under aerobic conditions. Degradation of venlafaxine involved only small stereoisomeric selectivity. In contrast, the degradation of O-desmethylvenlafaxine yielded remarkable S to R enrichment under aerobic conditions but none under anaerobic conditions. Determination of venlafaxine and its metabolites in the WWTPs agreed well with the stereoselectivity observed in the laboratory studies. Our results suggest that the levels of the drug and its metabolites and the stereoisomeric enrichment of the metabolite and its parent drug can be used for source tracking and for discrimination between domestic and nondomestic wastewater pollution. This was indeed demonstrated in the investigations carried out at the Jerusalem WWTP. PMID:22445391

  3. Pathogenicity of Beauveria bassiana isolated from Moroccan Argan forests soil against larvae of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Imoulan, Abdessamad; Elmeziane, Abdellatif

    2014-03-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the major tephritid pest in Morocco. This pest survives in Moroccan forests Argania spinosa and continually invades the nearest agricultural areas. Entomopathogenic fungi are an interesting tool for fruit fly control and hold a useful alternative to conventional insecticides. However, primary selection of effective pathogens should be taken in laboratory condition prior to applying them in the field. Here, we used third late instar larvae of C. capitata to investigate the effectiveness of 15 local Beauveria bassiana isolates. Results showed that all isolates were able to infect the larval stage, producing a large mortality rate in puparia ranging from 65 to 95 % and caused significant reduction in adult emergence. The fungal treatments revealed that the mycosis occurred also in adults escaping infection as pupariating larvae. The percentage of mycosed puparia was highest in strain TAM6.2 (95 %) followed by ERS4.16 (90 %), therefore they were the most virulent. Median lethal concentration (LC??) was studied for five isolates at four concentrations ranging from 10? to 10? conidia ml?¹. The results showed that the slopes of regression lines for B. bassiana ERS4.16 (slope = 0.386) and TAM6.2 (slope = 0.41) were the most important and had the lowest LC?? values (2.85 × 10³ and 3.16 × 10³ conidia ml?¹ respectively). This investigation suggests that the soil of Argan forests contains pathogenic B. bassiana isolates and highlights for the first time their potential as biological control toward C. capitata larval stage in Morocco. PMID:24122125

  4. Testing Insecticidal Activity of Novel Chemically Synthesized siRNA against Plutella xylostella under Laboratory and Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liang; Chen, Yong; Hu, Zhen; Hu, Meiying

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last 60 years, synthetic chemical pesticides have served as a main tactic in the field of crop protection, but their availability is now declining as a result of the development of insect resistance. Therefore, alternative pest management agents are needed. However, the demonstration of RNAi gene silencing in insects and its successful usage in disrupting the expression of vital genes opened a door to the development of a variety of novel, environmentally sound approaches for insect pest management. Methodology/Principal Findings Six small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were chemically synthesized and modified according to the cDNA sequence of P. xylostella acetylcholine esterase genes AChE1 and AChE2. All of them were formulated and used in insecticide activity screening against P. xylostella. Bioassay data suggested that Si-ace1_003 and Si-ace2_001 at a concentration of 3 µg cm?2 displayed the best insecticidal activity with 73.7% and 89.0%, mortality, respectively. Additional bioassays were used to obtain the acute lethal concentrations of LC50 and LC90 for Si-ace2_001, which were 53.66 µg/ml and 759.71 µg/ml, respectively. Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to confirm silencing and detected that the transcript levels of P. xylostella AChE2 (PxAChE2) were reduced by 5.7-fold compared to the control group. Consequently, AChE activity was also reduced by 1.7-fold. Finally, effects of the siRNAs on treated plants of Brassica oleracea and Brassica alboglabra were investigated with different siRNA doses. Our results showed that Si-ace2_001 had no negative effects on plant morphology, color and growth of vein under our experimental conditions. Conclusions The most important finding of this study is the discovery that chemically synthesized and modified siRNA corresponding to P. xylostella AChE genes cause significant mortality of the insect both under laboratory and field conditions, which provides a novel strategy to control P. xylostella and to develop bio-pesticides based on the RNA interference technology. PMID:23667556

  5. Laboratory insights into the chemical and kinetic evolution of several organic molecules under simulated Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, O.; Kaci, S.; Stalport, F.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P.

    2014-11-01

    The search for organic carbon at the surface of Mars, as clues of past habitability or remnants of life, is a major science goal of Mars' exploration. Understanding the chemical evolution of organic molecules under current martian environmental conditions is essential to support the analyses performed in situ. What molecule can be preserved? What is the timescale of organic evolution at the surface? This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations dedicated to monitor the evolution of organic molecules when submitted to simulated Mars surface ultraviolet radiation (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K) and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) conditions. Experiments are done with the MOMIE simulation setup (for Mars Organic Molecules Irradiation and Evolution) allowing both a qualitative and quantitative characterization of the evolution the tested molecules undergo (Poch, O. et al. [2013]. Planet. Space Sci. 85, 188-197). The chemical structures of the solid products and the kinetic parameters of the photoreaction (photolysis rate, half-life and quantum efficiency of photodecomposition) are determined for glycine, urea, adenine and chrysene. Mellitic trianhydride is also studied in order to complete a previous study done with mellitic acid (Stalport, F., Coll, P., Szopa, C., Raulin, F. [2009]. Astrobiology 9, 543-549), by studying the evolution of mellitic trianhydride. The results show that solid layers of the studied molecules have half-lives of 10-103 h at the surface of Mars, when exposed directly to martian UV radiation. However, organic layers having aromatic moieties and reactive chemical groups, as adenine and mellitic acid, lead to the formation of photoresistant solid residues, probably of macromolecular nature, which could exhibit a longer photostability. Such solid organic layers are found in micrometeorites or could have been formed endogenously on Mars. Finally, the quantum efficiencies of photodecomposition at wavelengths from 200 to 250 nm, determined for each of the studied molecules, range from 10-2 to 10-6 molecule photon-1 and apply for isolated molecules exposed at the surface of Mars. These kinetic parameters provide essential inputs for numerical modeling of the evolution of Mars' current reservoir of organic molecules. Organic molecules adsorbed on martian minerals may have different kinetic parameters and lead to different endproducts. The present study paves the way for the interpretation of more complex simulation experiments where organics will be mixed with martian mineral analogs.

  6. The effect of metals on condition and pathologies of European eel (Anguilla anguilla): in situ and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Consuelo; Alcaide, Elena; Ureña, Rocio

    2012-03-01

    Forty-nine wild eels (Anguilla anguilla) caught in the Albufera Lake (Spain), measuring 24.0-75.0 cm in length and 25.0-637.7 g in weight, were examined for metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn), condition (CI and HSI indices), as well as for diseases (Anguillicola infestation; bacterial infections). Total metal load significantly increased in eel liver tissue parallel to total length and body weight (log), while silvering females (W(B) > 200 g; L ? 500 mm) exhibited the highest amounts of Co, Cu, Hg, Se and Zn. Diverse effects may be expected in these big eels due to long-term metal exposure. In fact, IMBI (individual mean (multi-metal) bioaccumulation index) and copper load (Ln) in particular, were significantly related with a decrease in the HSI, reflecting lower eel fitness. In addition, most silvering females (75%) showed a CI below 0.2, and this size group presented the highest prevalence of chronic diseases, at significant levels, that are non-lethal in the short term, but degenerative in the long term. Amounts of hepatic iron were not correlated with eel size; however, a significant, strong negative correlation between this metal (Ln) and HSI and CI was found for wild eels suffering from diseases of any aetiology. This also included small eels (W(B) <67 g; L < 350 mm), as this size group presented a significant prevalence of acute diseases caused by single virulent bacterial pathogens (i.e. Edwardsiella tarda and Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2). To assess the effect of metals on susceptibility to disease, yellow eels were maintained and exposed to iron, copper, and pathogens, in captivity under laboratory conditions. Co-exposure of eels to iron (9 ?g of Fe/g of fish) and bacterial pathogens by intraperitoneal injection (IP), yielded a hundred-fold reduction in the LD50 of all bacteria assayed (i.e. E. tarda, V. vulnificus, and motile Aeromonas), and also the time taken to cause eel death. Short-term aqueous exposure of eels to 0.4, 0.7, 1.7 and 3.9 ?M of copper, yielded increasing mortality among eels IP challenged by a single dose of 1.90 × 10(6) E. tarda cells, and this effect was significant for 1.7 ?M of copper. These results suggest a synergistic interaction among copper and iron, and bacterial disease agents, with respect to their effect on eel health, considering sublethal levels of metals that are currently found in natural waters. PMID:22030412

  7. A review of hydrologic and geologic conditions related to the radioactive solid-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Solid waste contaminated by radioactive matter has been buried in the vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory since 1944. By 1973, an estimated six million cubic feet of such material had been placed in six burial grounds in two valleys. The practice initially was thought of as a safe method for permanently removing these potentially hazardous substances from man's surroundings, but is now que.3tionable at this site because of known leaching of contaminants from the waste, transport in ground water, and release to the terrestrial and fluvial environments. This review attempts to bring together in a single document information from numerous published and unpublished sources regarding the past criteria used for selecting the Oak Ridge burial-ground sites, the historical development and conditions of these facilities as of 1974, the geologic framework of the Laboratory area and the movement of water and water-borne contaminants in that area, the effects of sorption and ion exchange upon radionuclide transport, and a description and evaluation of the existing monitoring system. It is intended to assist Atomic Energy Commission (now Energy Research and Development Administration) officials in the formulation of managerial decisions concerning the burial grounds and present monitoring methods. Sites for the first three burial grounds appear to have been chosen during and shortly after World War II on the basis of such factors as safety, security, and distance from sources of waste origin. By 1950, geologic criteria had been introduced, and in the latter part of that decade, geohydrologic criteria were considered. While no current criteria have been defined, it becomes evident from the historical record that the successful containment of radionuclides below land surface for long periods of time is dependent upon a complex interrelationship between many geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical controls, and any definition of criteria must include consideration of these factors. For the most part, the burial grounds have been developed by a simple cut and fill procedure similar to the operation of a municipal landfill. Low permeability of the residuum, high rainfall, shallow depth to ground water, the excavation of trenches below the water table, and other practices, have contributed to a condition of waste leaching in probably all of the burial grounds. Despite these conditions, only very small concentrations of radionuclides have been found in wells or otherwise attributed to the initial three, small sites in Bethel Valley. This fact, however, may be due in part to the scant extent of site monitoring of those burial grounds for transport of radionuclides in ground water, and to the discharge of liquid radioactive waste to the drainage in concentrations that probably would have masked the presence of contaminants derived from these burial grounds. In comparison to the Bethel Valley sites, larger amounts of radioactive contaminants have been found in wells, seeps, trench overflow, and the drainages that drain Burial Grounds 4 and 5 in Melton Valley. The movement of radionuclides from the trenches to the drainages show that the latter sites are not suitable for the retention of all contaminants under existing conditions, and invalidates the operational concept of long-term or permanent retention of all radionuclides in the geologic environment. The transport of many radioactive ions leached from the waste has been retarded by the very high sorptive and ion exchange capacity of the residuum with which the radionuclides have had contact. Not all radionuclides, though, will be retained in the subsurface by adsorption, absorption, or ion exchange. Among those radioactive contaminants that may be problematical with respect to trench burial at Oak Ridge are tritium and other negatively-charged nuclides, positively-charged radionuclides included in some of the complexed molecules, radioactive ions that have chemical properties si

  8. Good Practice Recommendations in the Field of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning for Health Related Research Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laboratory Design Notes, 1966

    1966-01-01

    A collection of laboratory design notes to set forth minimum criteria required in the design of basic medical research laboratory buildings. Recommendations contained are primarily concerned with features of design which affect quality of performance and future flexibility of facility systems. Subjects of economy and safety are discussed where…

  9. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Testing of oil and grease and total petroleum hydrocarbons in water; b. Testing of tar in road-paving materials; and c. Forensic finger printing. Production for essential laboratory and analytical purposes is authorized provided that these...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Testing of oil and grease and total petroleum hydrocarbons in water; b. Testing of tar in road-paving materials; and c. Forensic finger printing. Production for essential laboratory and analytical purposes is authorized provided that these...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Testing of oil and grease and total petroleum hydrocarbons in water; b. Testing of tar in road-paving materials; and c. Forensic finger printing. Production for essential laboratory and analytical purposes is authorized provided that these...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Testing of oil and grease and total petroleum hydrocarbons in water; b. Testing of tar in road-paving materials; and c. Forensic finger printing. Production for essential laboratory and analytical purposes is authorized provided that these...

  13. Similarity and Self Similarity in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, J.

    1. Introduction 2. Similarity and Dimensional Analysis 2.1 Geometrical similarity 2.2 Scaling laws 2.2.1 The theorem of Pithagoras 2.2.2 The formula for the surface of an ellipse as a consequence of affinity 2.3 Physical similarity 2.4 Application: the motion of a body in a fluid 2.5 Two astronomical examples 2.5.1 The gravitational bending of light by the Sun 2.5.2 The advance of the perihelion of Mercury 3. The Concept of Self Similarity 3.1 The diffusion of heat 3.2 The laminar boundary layer 4. Self Similarity and Intermediate Asymptotics 4.1 Flow past a wedge: self similarity of the second kind 4.2 The modified heat diffusion problem 4.3 Complete and incomplete self similarity

  14. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  15. Assessment of Pichia anomala (strain K) efficacy against blue mould of apples when applied pre- or post-harvest under laboratory conditions and in orchard trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachid Lahlali; Sébastien Massart; Deborah De Clercq; M. Najib Serrhini; Piet Creemers; M. Haïssam Jijakli

    2009-01-01

    The yeast Pichia anomala strain K was selected in Belgium from the apple surface for its antagonistic activity against post-harvest diseases of apples.\\u000a The efficacy of this strain against P. expansum was evaluated in the laboratory in three scenarios designed to mimic practical conditions, with different periods of incubation\\u000a between biological treatment, wounding of fruit surface, and pathogen inoculation. Higher

  16. Valve movement response of the mussel Dreissena polymorpha -- the influence of pH and turbidity on the acute toxicity of pentachlorophenol under laboratory and field conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOST Borcherding; BRIGITTE Jantz

    1997-01-01

    The Dreissena-Monitor is a biological early warning system for the continuous monitoring of water quality, based on the computer assessment of valve movements in two groups of 42 zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha). In the laboratory, two series of toxicity tests were conducted with PCP. (1) At neutral pH conditions only the concentration of PCP was altered. The dose--response relationship revealed

  17. Water and sodium balances and metabolic physiology of house mice ( Mus domesticus ) and short-tailed mice ( Leggadina lakedownensis ) under laboratory conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Moro; S. D. Bradshaw

    1999-01-01

    A laboratory study investigated the metabolic physiology, and response to variable periods of water and sodium supply, of\\u000a two arid-zone rodents, the house mouse (Mus domesticus) and the Lakeland Downs short-tailed mouse (Leggadina lakedownensis) under controlled conditions. Fractional water fluxes for M. domesticus (24?±?0.8%) were significantly higher than those of L. lakedownensis (17?±?0.7%) when provided with food ad libitum. In

  18. A Laboratory Exercise to Illustrate Increased Salivary Cortisol in Response to Three Stressful Conditions Using Competitive ELISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haussmann, Mark F.; Vleck, Carol M; Farrar, Eugenia S.

    2007-01-01

    Perceived stress activates the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, resulting in the release of glucocorticoids into the systemic circulation. Glucocorticoids cause the elevation of blood glucose, providing the necessary energy for the organism to cope with stress. Here, we outline a laboratory exercise that uses a competitive ELISA kit to…

  19. Conidial Discharge and Transmission Efficiency of Neozygites floridana, an Entomopathogenic Fungus Infecting Two-Spotted Spider Mites under Laboratory Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. C. Brown; R. Hasibuan

    1995-01-01

    Transmission efficiency of the entomopathogenic fungus, Neozygites floridana, was studied in laboratory populations of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae. Infected mites were placed in chambers with 80, 90, or 100% RH, and conidia were counted every 12 hr for 4 days. Conidial production was strongly affected by humidity, but the conidial release rate (conidia\\/hr) was not. The effect of

  20. In situ and laboratory studies on the fate of specific organic compounds in an anaerobic landfill leachate plume, 1. Experimental conditions and fate of phenolic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Per H.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Heron, Gorm; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1995-11-01

    The transformation of specific organic compounds was investigated by in situ and laboratory experiments in an anaerobic landfill leachate pollution plume at four different distances from the landfill. This paper presents the experimental conditions in the in situ microcosm and laboratory batch microcosm experiments performed and the results on the fate of 7 phenolic compounds. Part 2 of this series of papers, also published in this issue, presents the results on the fate of 8 aromatic compounds and 4 chlorinated aliphatic compounds. The redox conditions in the plume were characterized as methanogenic, Fe(III)-reducing and NO 3--reducing by the redox sensitive species present in groundwater and sediment and by bioassays. With a few exceptions the aquifer redox conditions were maintained throughout the experiments as monitored by redox sensitive species present in groundwater during the experiments, by redox sensitive species present in the sediment after the experiments and by bioassays performed after the experiments. Transformation of nitrophenol was very fast close to the landfill in strongly reducing conditions, while transformation was slower in the more oxidized part of the plume. Lag phases for the nitrophenols were short (maximum 10 days). Phenol was only transformed in the more distant part of the plume in experiments where NO 3-, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction was dominant. Lag phases for phenol were either absent or lasted up to 2 months. Dichlorophenols were only transformed in experiments representing strongly reducing, presumably methanogenic, redox conditions close to the landfill after lag phases of up to 3 months. Transformation of o-cresol was not observed in any of the experiments throughout the plume. Generally, there was good accordance between the results obtained by in situ and laboratory experiments, both concerning redox conditions and the fate of the phenolic compounds. However, for phenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, transformation was observed in some in situ experiments but not in the corresponding laboratory experiments. In some experiments, this coul be explained by differences in the redox conditions developing during the experiments. Nitrophenols were apparently transformed abiotically in the most reduced part of the plume, at 2 m from the landfill.

  1. Population-level effects of spinosad and Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna: comparison of laboratory and field microcosm exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Duchet, Claire; Coutellec, Marie-Agnès; Franquet, Evelyne; Lagneau, Christophe; Lagadic, Laurent

    2010-10-01

    Because exposure to toxicants not only results in mortality but also in multiple sublethal effects, the use of life-table data appears particularly suitable to assess global effects on exposed populations. The present study uses a life table response approach to assess population-level effects of two insecticides used against mosquito larvae, spinosad (8 ?g/l) and Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti, 0.5 ?l/l), on two non target species, Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Cladocera), under laboratory versus field microcosms conditions. Population growth rates were inferred from life table data and Leslie matrices under a model with resource limitation (ceiling). These were further used to estimate population risks of extinction under each tested condition, using stochastic simulations. In laboratory conditions, analyses performed for each species confirmed the significant negative effect of spinosad on survival, mean time at death, and fecundity as compared to controls and Bti-treated groups; for both species, population growth rate ? was lower under exposure to spinosad. In field microcosms, 2 days after larvicide application, differences in population growth rates were observed between spinosad exposure conditions, and control and Bti exposure conditions. Simulations performed on spinosad-exposed organisms led to population extinction (minimum abundance = 0, extinction risk = 1), and this was extremely rapid (time to quasi-extinction = 4.1 one-week long steps, i.e. one month). Finally, D. magna was shown to be more sensitive than D. pulex to spinosad in the laboratory, and the effects were also detectable through field population demographic simulations. PMID:20552396

  2. Soil structure, colloids, and chemical transport as affected by short-term reducing conditions: a laboratory study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland soils in the Midwestern US often undergo reducing conditions when soils are temporally flooded during the spring and remain water saturated for days or weeks. Short-term reducing conditions change the chemistry of the soil and may affect soil structure and solution chemical transport. The eff...

  3. Composed Computational Verb Similarities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tao Yang

    2009-01-01

    Computational verb similarities are used to measure the degree of similarities between two waveforms. Since the similarities of waveforms might be measured based on their distance, trends, frequencies and many other factors, it is easy to consider the contributions of these factors to computational verb similarities separately and then combine them into composed computational verb similarities. In this paper, different

  4. Similarities and differences between Behçet's disease and Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaz?s?z, Veli

    2014-01-01

    Behçet’s disease (BD) is a chronic inflammatory condition with multisystem involvement. Approximately 10%-15% of patients present with gastrointestinal involvement. Involved sites and the endoscopic view usually resemble Crohn’s disease (CD). In addition to intestinal involvement, oral mucosa, the eyes, skin, and joints are commonly affected. No pathognomonic laboratory test is available for the diagnosis of either disease. Management approaches are also similar in various aspects. Differentiating BD from CD is highly challenging. In this article, the similarities and differences between BD and CD in terms of epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, clinical and imaging findings, and histopathological and therapeutic approaches are reviewed. PMID:25133025

  5. Genetics of local adaptation in the laboratory: flowering time quantitative trait loci under geographic and seasonal conditions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Roycewicz, Peter; Smith, Evadne; Borevitz, Justin O

    2006-01-01

    Flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana is controlled by a large number of genes and various environmental factors, such as light and temperature. The objective of this study was to identify flowering time quantitative trait loci (QTL) under growth conditions simulating seasonal conditions from native geographic locations. Our growth chambers were set to simulate the spring conditions in Spain and Sweden, with appropriate changes in light color, intensity and day length, as well as temperature and relative humidity. Thus the Sweden-like spring conditions changed more dramatically compared to Spain-like spring conditions across the duration of our experiment. We have used these conditions to map QTL responsible for flowering time in the Kas-1/Col-gl1 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) across two replicate blocks. A linkage map from 96 RILs was established using 119 markers including 64 new SNPs markers. One major QTL, mapping to the FRIGIDA (FRI) locus, was detected on the top of chromosome 4 that showed significant gene x seasonal environment interactions. Three other minor QTL also were detected. One QTL mapping near FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM) showed an epistatic interaction with the QTL at FRI. These QTLxenvironment and QTL x QTL interactions suggest that subtle ecologically relevant changes in light, temperature, and relative humidity are differentially felt by alleles controlling flowering time and may be responsible for adaptation to regional environments. PMID:17205109

  6. Similar Triangle Proof Theorems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Neubert

    2011-01-01

    This lesson will teach you three theorems that are used to prove two triangles similar to each other. Now that you understand similarity, you need some additional tools (or theorems) to PROVE that two triangles are similar to each other. Take notes on the following lesson: Similar Triangle Proof Notes Here is an interactive site that will help to solidify your understanding of proving triangles similar: Similar Triangle Proofs Class Zone Activity Here are some "real life" applications of these ...

  7. ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

    2012-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

  8. On-road and laboratory investigations on non-exhaust ultrafine particles from the interaction between the tire and road pavement under braking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jihyun; Lee, Sunyoup; Lee, Seokhwan

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the physical and chemical characteristics of non-exhaust ultrafine particles from on-road driving and laboratory measurements using a mobile sampling vehicle. The on-road driving and laboratory measurements during constant speed conditions revealed no enhancement of ultrafine particles. Under braking events, the total number concentrations of tire particles (TPs) sampled 90 mm above the road surface was 6 times higher with broader mode diameters when compared to 40 mm above the road surface. In contrast to braking events, under cornering conditions, the total number concentrations of TPs sampled 40 mm above the road surface were 50 times higher relative to 90 mm above the road surface. From the morphological and elemental analyses, it is likely that the ultrafine particles generated from the interaction between the tire and the road surface under braking conditions might originated from sulfur-containing materials or anti-oxidants which are contained in TPs, and/or graphite and solid lubricants which are mainly present in brake particles (BPs). However, Zn which was a distinguishing elemental marker of tire wear particles didn't show in EDS spectra. Further research would be required as to the exact emission source of ultrafine particles.

  9. The relationship of Hexamita sp. to mortalities of the Texas commerical oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin), maintained under laboratory conditions

    E-print Network

    Schlicht, Frank Glovis

    1963-01-01

    , with the occasional exception of Sunday, were made of all tanks for cluckers (weakened oysters) and gapers. Oysters in either condition were removed, opened and checked for abscess and edema of the mantles, general body condition, i. e. , fat or thin, whether...) were noted 1n ten smears' Sloughed epi+nelial cells ware no+ observed in the smears. earance of the Dead and D in 0 sters Data derived from gross examination of gapers are given in table III, Edema and abscess of the mantle were noted in 12...

  10. Similarity spectra analysis of high-performance jet aircraft noise.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Tracianne B; Gee, Kent L; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2013-04-01

    Noise measured in the vicinity of an F-22A Raptor has been compared to similarity spectra found previously to represent mixing noise from large-scale and fine-scale turbulent structures in laboratory-scale jet plumes. Comparisons have been made for three engine conditions using ground-based sideline microphones, which covered a large angular aperture. Even though the nozzle geometry is complex and the jet is nonideally expanded, the similarity spectra do agree with large portions of the measured spectra. Toward the sideline, the fine-scale similarity spectrum is used, while the large-scale similarity spectrum provides a good fit to the area of maximum radiation. Combinations of the two similarity spectra are shown to match the data in between those regions. Surprisingly, a combination of the two is also shown to match the data at the farthest aft angle. However, at high frequencies the degree of congruity between the similarity and the measured spectra changes with engine condition and angle. At the higher engine conditions, there is a systematically shallower measured high-frequency slope, with the largest discrepancy occurring in the regions of maximum radiation. PMID:23556581

  11. Survival, metabolism and growth of Ulva lactuca under winter conditions: a laboratory study of bottlenecks in the life cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Vermaat; K. Sand-Jensen

    1987-01-01

    Photosynthesis and growth in low light and survival under simulated winter conditions were studied in the freefloating green alga Ulva lactuca L., collected in Roskilde Fjord, Denmark during late autumn and maintained in stock in natural water. It adapts efficiently to low light by increasing chlorophyll concentration and light absorption and continues to grow at the lowest irradiance tested, 0.6

  12. Laboratory Study of Chemical Speciation of Mercury in Lake Sediment and Water under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Regnell, Olof; Tunlid, Anders

    1991-01-01

    Chemical speciation and partitioning of radiolabeled HgCl2 were studied in model aquatic systems consisting of undisturbed eutrophic lake sediment and water in plastic cylinders. The cylinders were either gradually made anaerobic by a gentle flow of N2-CO2 or kept aerobic by air flow. The proportion of methylated 203Hg was significantly higher, in both water and sediment, in the anaerobic systems than in the aerobic systems. The composition and total concentration of fatty acids originating from bacterial phospholipids, as well as the concentration of vitamin B12, including related cobalamins, were similar in sediments from the anaerobic and aerobic systems. Bacterial cell numbers were, on average, 3.6 times higher in the anaerobic water columns than in the aerobic ones. Volatilization of 203Hg occurred in all systems except in an autoclaved control and was of similar magnitudes in the anaerobic and aerobic systems. Incorporation of 203Hg into the sediment was significantly faster in the aerobic systems than in the anaerobic systems. These results suggest that episodes of anoxia in bottom waters and sediment cause an increase in net mercury methylation and, hence, an increase in bioavailable mercury. PMID:16348444

  13. The influence of rainfall on the coastal slope deformation of the rivers in permafrost conditions (laboratory simulation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsuk, I. I.; Debolskaya, E. I.; Maslikova, O. Ja.; Zamjatina, E. V.

    2012-04-01

    In the laboratory experiment there were studied the interaction between the river runoff and frozen soil under the change of the thermal (warming) and mechanical (impact of rain) external influences. We studied the time of thawing of soil, infiltration in soil, sediment transport in the channel under the influence of the slope flows, caused by the permafrost thawing and storm flows. The mathematical model for predicting the dynamics of river channels in the permafrost under the influence of external factors was proposed. A system of equations, fully describing the motion of soil on the slopes in permafrost zone, taking into account the intensity of rain in a time-varying ice content of the soil is proposed. It was established experimentally that capacity of the soil is less at a higher initial iciness. As the thawing of the soil capacity is increased, thereby reducing the share of the slope flow. At a constant rate of infiltration ice content and the flow depend only on the intensity of rain. At a low intensity there is no time to saturate the soil and runoff is absent. The experimental data agree well with calculations by the proposed system of equations. This work was supported by RFBR (grants No. 11-05-00393, 11-08-00202).

  14. Effect of density on larval development and female productivity of Tisbe holothuriae (Copepoda, Harpacticoida) under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Uhlig, G.

    1993-06-01

    The harpacticoid copepod Tisbe holothuriae has been cultivated in the Helgoland laboratory for more than 20 years. The effects of density on the larval development and the female productivity were studied by comparing two culture systems: (1) enclosed system, and (2) running-water system. In both systems, a nutritious mixed diet of Dunaliella tertiolecta, Skeletonema costatum, and granulated Mytilus edulis was offered. Larval mortality, larval development and female productivity are found to be significantly dependent on both the population density and specificity of the culture system. Increasing density causes higher larval mortality, longer larval development time, and a reduction in female productivity. In comparison with the enclosed system, the running-water system shows decisive advantages: larval mortality is about 20% lower, the rate of larval development is about two days shorter, and there is a very high rate of nauplii production. The sex ratio exhibits high variations, but in general, there is no clear relationship between sex ratio and population density. Nevertheless, when reared in the running-water system, a relatively high percentage of females (>45%) was found at lower densities.

  15. Performance of a laboratory-scale membrane bioreactor consisting mixed liquor with aquatic worms under toxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Navaratna, Dimuth; Shu, Li; Jegatheesan, Veeriah

    2014-03-01

    A laboratory scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) consisting of worms was operated for 214days. The objective was to evaluate the treatment and operating performance of the MBR with and without the addition of Ametryn which is a toxic and persistent herbicide. Removal of Ametryn was doubled (up to 80%) in the MBR when the worms were present. Increased rate (2.5kPa/day) of trans-membrane pressure (TMP) and low concentration of MLSS (5.5g/L) were recorded when the worm population was high (80-100 worms per 70?L). Short-term critical flux values were increased from 7.5 to 15 and then to 30L/m(2)/h when the worm numbers decreased from 90 to 35 and then to 18 per 70?L of mixed liquor respectively. Further, high levels of carbohydrate concentration of soluble microbial products (SMP) and smaller sludge floc-sizes were found when the worm numbers were high. PMID:24413480

  16. Isoform-specific quantification of metallothionein in the terrestrial gastropod Helix pomatia. II. A differential biomarker approach under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Dallinger, Reinhard; Chabicovsky, Monika; Lagg, Bernhard; Schipflinger, Rouven; Weirich, Harald G; Berger, Burkhard

    2004-04-01

    The two function-specific metallothionein (MT) isoforms characterized from the midgut gland and mantle tissue of Helix pomatia differ substantially in their metal-binding preferences, as well as molecular and biochemical features. These differences make them potential candidates for biomarker studies based on a differential, isoform-specific approach. To prove this hypothesis, induction experiments with two metals (Cd and Cu) that are normally bound by the two isoforms were compared with a range of organic chemicals and physical stressors under laboratory conditions to test the responsiveness of the two isoforms to the stressors applied. In addition, field studies were conducted with Roman snails and substrate samples collected from different metal-contaminated sites in Austria to test the suitability of the two isoforms as biomarkers under field conditions. The results of these combined laboratory and field studies confirmed the validity of the biomarker approach with the two metal- and tissue-specific isoforms. It is demonstrated that the Cd-binding MT specifically and exclusively responds to Cd exposure by increasing concentrations, whereas the Cu-binding MT isoform decreases in its concentration upon exposure to physical stress (X-ray irradiation and cold). This suggests researchers should adopt, under certain preconditions, a dual biomarker approach by combining the simultaneous quantification of Cd-MT concentrations in the midgut gland as a biomarker for Cd pollution and of Cu-MT concentration in the mantle as a biomarker for the impairment of snails by additional physical stressors. PMID:15095885

  17. Similar Figures and Triangles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Neubert

    2011-01-01

    This lesson will teach the basics of similarity, and how a unit ratios can describe the relationship between the two figures. Congruence of triangles and figures has already been introduced. But what if two triangles are exactly the same shape, but not the same size? This is called Similarity of Figures. Take notes on the following lesson: Similar Triangles Lesson Now that you have some concept of similarity, here is how the ratio between two ...

  18. The Gender Similarities Hypothesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet Shibley Hyde

    2005-01-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses support the gender similarities hypothesis. Gender differences can vary

  19. Short-term evaluation of visible implant alpha tags in juveniles of three fish species under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Turek, K C; Pegg, M A; Pope, K L

    2014-04-01

    Visible implant alpha (VI alpha) tag-induced changes in mortality and condition, as well as tag retention and readability, were examined during a 4-week period for juveniles of three fish species: tiger muskellunge Esox masquinongy × Esox lucius (91?±?7?mm total length, L(T), mean?±?s.d.), Snake River cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki behnkei (84?±?8?mm) and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (85?±?5?mm). Mortality and condition did not differ between tagged fish and control fish for any species and overall tag retention rates were high (92% for E. masquinongy × E. lucius, 91% for O. c. behnkei and 100% for O. mykiss). Short-term readability of VI alpha tags was low in juvenile E. masquinongy × E. lucius and juvenile O. c. behnkei. Therefore, it is not recommend to use VI alpha tags in juvenile E. masquinongy × E. lucius or juvenile O. c. behnkei for periods >2?weeks, but VI alpha tags seem to be suitable for juvenile O. mykiss for a period of at least 4?weeks. PMID:24689672

  20. Intercomparison exercise on external gamma dose rate under field conditions at the laboratory of natural radiation (Saelices el Chico, Spain).

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Villanueva, J L; Sainz-Fernández, C; Fuente-Merino, I; Sáez-Vergara, J C; Correa-Garcés, E; Quindos-Poncela, L S

    2013-08-01

    The last nuclear accident in Fukushima nuclear power plant has increased the necessity for measuring radiation in the environment. Therefore, radiation monitors providing results traceable throughout the country become essential and it is very important to test them under the same environmental conditions. The first intercomparison of natural radioactivity under field conditions was held in Saelices el Chico (Salamanca, Spain) in May 2011, including an exercise on environmental dose rate. This article presents the results achieved by 19 instruments belonging to 12 institutions from 7 different countries. The tested detectors are proportional counters, ionisation chambers, Geiger-Müller and scintillators measuring dose rate in three stations with reference values from 110 to 1800 nGy h(-1). All the results were given in terms of air kerma (nGy h(-1)) and the measurements show agreement within 25 % in all the sites. Evaluation criteria based on accuracy and statistical uncertainty were also carried out and 25 % of participants passed the test in all sites. PMID:23413092

  1. Laboratory measurements of the microwave properties of H2S under simulated Jovian conditions with an application to Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboer, David R.; Steffes, Paul G.

    1994-01-01

    H2S opacity may significantly affect the brightness temperatures of Uranus and Neptune due to possible depletion of ammonia in the tropospheres of those planets (de Pater et al. 1991). Though the rotational line centers of H2S are in the millimeter wavelengths region, significant absorption is also present at centimeter wavelengths due to pressure broadening of the lines. Accordingly, the properties of H2S under Jovian conditions have been measured in order to constrain further the constituents' abundances on these planets. These absorptivity measurements show values that are significantly greater than values predicted by the Van Vleck-Weisskopf models traditionally used at centimeter wavelengths. In order to better model the opacity due to H2S under Jovian conditions a Ben-Reuven lineshape formalism has therefore been developed and is presented. This formalism provides a possible constraint on the relative abundances of H2S and NH3 on Neptune based on Voyager 2 radio occultation results (Lindal 1992).

  2. Effect of triflumuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, on Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to traditional insecticides represents a threat to the control of disease vectors. The insect growth regulators (IGR) are a potential alternative to control mosquitoes, including resistant populations. The chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSI) are IGRs, which interfere with the insect molting process and represent one major class of compounds against Aedes aegypti populations resistant to the larvicide organophosphate temephos. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of the CSI triflumuron on Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes albopictus and against several Ae. aegypti field populations. Methods The efficacy of triflumuron, against Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus was evaluated with laboratory strains through dose–response assays. Additionaly, this CSI was tested against seven Ae. aegypti field populations exhibiting distinct resistance levels to both temephos and the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Aedes aegypti populations were exposed to both a dose that inhibits 99% of the adult emergence of mosquitoes from the susceptible reference strain, Rockefeller, (EI99?=?3.95??g/L) and the diagnostic dose (DD), corresponding to twice the EI99. Results Our results indicate that triflumuron was effective in emergence inhibition (EI) of Cx. quinquefasciatus (EI50= 5.28??g/L; EI90= 12.47??g/L) and Ae. albopictus (EI50= 1.59??g/L; EI90= 2.63??g/L). Triflumuron was also effective against seven Ae. aegypti Brazilian populations resistant to both temephos and deltamethrin. Exposure of all the Ae. aegypti populations to the triflumuron EI99 of the susceptible reference strain, Rockefeller, resulted in complete inhibition of adult emergence, suggesting no cross-resistance among traditional insecticides and this CSI. However, a positive correlation between temephos resistance and tolerance to triflumuron was observed. Conclusion The results suggest that triflumuron represents a potential tool for the control of disease vectors in public health. Nevertheless, they point to the need of constant monitoring of the susceptibility status of vector populations to CSIs. PMID:23557173

  3. Eta Carinae: An Astrophysical Laboratory to Study Conditions During the Transition Between a Pseudo-Supernova and a Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Darren; Gull, T. R.; Madura, T.

    2014-01-01

    A major puzzle in the studies of supernovae is the pseudo-supernova, or the near-supernovae state. It has been found to precede, in timespans ranging from months to years, a number of recently-detected distant supernovae. One explanation of these systems is that a member of a massive binary underwent a near-supernova event shortly before the actual supernova phenomenon. Luckily, we have a nearby massive binary, Eta Carinae, that provides an astrophysical laboratory of a near-analog. The massive, highly-eccentric, colliding-wind binary star system survived a non-terminal stellar explosion in the 1800's, leaving behind the incredible bipolar, 10"x20" Homunculus nebula. Today, the interaction of the binary stellar winds 1") is resolvable by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Using HST/STIS, several three-dimensional (3D) data cubes (2D spatial, 1D velocity) have been obtained at selected phases during Eta Carinae's 5.54-year orbital cycle. The data cubes were collected by mapping the central 1-2" at 0.05" intervals with a 52"x0.1" aperture. Selected forbidden lines, that form in the colliding wind regions, provide information on electron density of the shocked regions, the ionization by the hot secondary companion of the primary wind and how these regions change with orbital phase. By applying various analysis techniques to these data cubes, we can compare and measure temporal changes due to the interactions between the two massive winds. The observations, when compared to current 3D hydrodynamic models, provide insight on Eta Carinae's recent mass-loss history, important for determining the current and future states of this likely nearby supernova progenitor.

  4. Effect of farm and simulated laboratory cold environmental conditions on the performance and physiological responses of lactating dairy cows supplemented with bovine somatotropin (BST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, B. A.; Johnson, H. D.; Li, R.; Collier, R. J.

    1990-09-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of bovine somatotropin (BST) supplementation in twelve lactating dairy cows maintained in cold environmental conditions. Six cows were injected daily with 25 mg of BST; the other six were injected with a control vehicle. Cows were maintained under standard dairy management during mid-winter for 30 days. Milk production was recorded twice daily, and blood samples were taken weekly. Animals were then transferred to environmentally controlled chambers and exposed to cycling thermoneutral (15° to 20° C) and cycling cold (-5° to +5° C) temperatures for 10 days in a split-reversal design. Milk production, feed and water intake, body weights and rectal temperatures were monitored. Blood samples were taken on days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 10 of each period and analyzed for plasma triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), cortisol, insulin and prolactin. Under farm conditions, BST-treated cows produced 11% more milk than control-treated cows and in environmentally controlled chambers produced 17.4% more milk. No differences due to BST in feed or water intake, body weights or rectal temperatures were found under laboratory conditions. Plasma T3 and insulin increased due to BST treatment while no effect was found on cortisol, prolactin or T4. The results showed that the benefits of BST supplementation in lactating dairy cows were achieved under cold environmental conditions.

  5. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of NiTi dental wires: a comparison of laboratory experiments and clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Toker, S M; Canadinc, D

    2014-07-01

    Effects of intraoral environment on the surface degradation of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy orthodontic wires was simulated through ex situ static immersion experiments in artificial saliva. The tested wires were compared to companion wires retrieved from patients in terms of chemical changes and formation of new structures on the surface. Results of the ex situ experiments revealed that the acidic erosion effective at the earlier stages of immersion led to the formation of new structures as the immersion period approached 30 days. Moreover, comparison of these results with the analysis of wires utilized in clinical treatment evidenced that ex situ experiments are reliable in terms predicting C-rich structure formation on the wire surfaces. However, the formation of C pileups at the contact sites of arch wires and brackets could not be simulated with the aid of static immersion experiments, warranting the simulation of the intraoral environment in terms of both chemical and physical conditions, including mechanical loading, when evaluating the biocompatibility of NiTi orthodontic arch wires. PMID:24857476

  6. Effect of Commercial Cyanobacteria Products on the Growth and Antagonistic Ability of Some Bioagents under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    El-Mougy, Nehal S.; Abdel-Kader, Mokhtar M.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of blue-green algal compounds against the growth of either pathogenic or antagonistic microorganisms as well as their effect on the antagonistic ability of bioagents was studied under in vitro conditions. The present study was undertaken to explore the inhibitory effect of commercial algal compounds, Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix, against some soil-borne pathogens. In growth medium supplemented with these algal compounds, the linear growth of pathogenic fungi decreased by increasing tested concentrations of the two algal compounds. Complete reduction in pathogenic fungal growth was observed at 2% of both Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix. Gradual significant reduction in the pathogenic fungal growth was caused by the two bioagents and by increasing the concentrations of algal compounds Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix. The present work showed that commercial algal compounds, Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix, have potential for the suppression of soil-borne fungi and enhance the antagonistic ability of fungal, bacterial, and yeast bio-agents. PMID:24307948

  7. Practice with Similarity Proofs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Donna Roberts

    2000-01-01

    In this worksheet of eight questions, students practice their knowledge of similarity proofs. In the first four questions, students determine which postulate or theorem works to prove triangle similarity - AA, SAS, or SSS. In the last four questions, students are asked to work through the proof of various problems. The answers are embedded in the page, and this is a helpful resource for students to work with similarity proofs.

  8. Laboratory-scale interaction between CO2-rich brine and limestone and sandstone under supercritical CO2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rios, Maria; Cama, Jordi; Luquot, Linda; Soler, Josep

    2014-05-01

    A test site for a prospective CO2 geological storage is situated in Hontomín (Burgos, northern Spain) with a reservoir rock that is composed of limestone (calcite) and sandstone (66 wt.% calcite, 28 wt.% quartz and 6 wt.% microcline). During and after CO2 injection, the resulting CO2-rich acid brine will likely promote the dissolution of carbonate minerals (calcite) and aluminosilicates (microcline). Since the reservoir Hontomín brine contains sulfate, gypsum (or anhydrite at depth) may precipitate. These coupled dissolution and precipitation reactions may induce changes in porosity and pore structure of the repository rocks. Percolations experiments with mechanically fractured cores (8.6 mm in diameter and 18 mm length) were performed under CO2 supercritical conditions (Pfluid = 150 bar; pCO2 ? 90 bar and T = 60 ºC) in order to evaluate and quantify variations in fracture permeability, preferential path formation and fracture volume. The brine sulfate content and the flow rate were varied. Regarding limestone, as the synthetic brines circulated through the fracture, the fracture permeability initially increased slowly, to thereafter increase rapidly. This change was due to a localized dissolution process (wormhole formation) along the core that occurred regardless gypsum precipitation. Nonetheless, the originated fracture volume in the sulfate-rich brine experiments was a factor of two smaller than that in sulfate-free brine experiments. Also, an increase in flow rate from 0.2 to 60 mL/h increased the volume of both dissolved calcite and precipitated gypsum. Regarding sandstone, permeability increased gradually with time. Nonetheless, this increase was not always continuous due to eventual fracture clogging. Formation of wormholes was observed. Acknowledgements This study was financed by CIUDEN (Ciudad de la Energía), the Compostilla OXYCFB300 project and the PANACEA project (European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement number 282900).

  9. Effect of probiotic adult diets on fitness components of sterile male Mediterranean fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) under laboratory and field cage conditions.

    PubMed

    Niyazi, Nuri; Lauzon, Carol R; Shelly, Todd E

    2004-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of probiotic adult diets, i.e., adult diets containing viable symbiotic intestinal bacteria, on the pheromone-calling activity, mating success, life expectancy, and survival of mass-reared male Mediterranean fruit flies, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), as an avenue for improving the field performance of sterile males in release programs to eradicate, suppress, or prevent spread of wild populations. The effect of inoculation of two standard adult diets (sugar-yeast granulate [SY] and sugar agar [s]) and two experimental formulations (yeast-reduced granulate [Sy] and yeast-enhanced sugar agar [sy]) with Enterobacter agglomerans and Klebsiella pneumoniae (typically occurring in the gut of wild flies) on the different fitness components was assessed in the laboratory and on field-caged host trees. We found that, in the laboratory, males reared on the probiotic yeast-enhanced agar, sy, had a significant mating advantage over competitors fed the standard s agar (probiotic and control) or noninoculated sy agar; no effect of probiotic enrichment (or lowering the yeast content) was found with the granular diets. Mating test results obtained in the field were inconsistent with laboratory data in that no differences in the numbers of matings were observed between males reared on any of the probiotic and control agar diets (or the SY granulate), whereas males feeding on the probiotic modified granulate, Sy, scored significantly more matings than their control competitors. The pheromone-calling activity of males maintained on the granular diets was not affected by probiotic enrichment on any of the seven observation days. Agar-fed males, however, "called" more frequently on days 6 and 7 (but not on days 1-5) when their diet contained the probiotic load. Laboratory survival of granulate-fed males was found to be significantly prolonged with probiotic inoculation and lowering the yeast content of the standard SY granulate (but not with probiotic inoculation of sy). Similarly, males reared on the probiotic and control modified agars (sy) survived significantly longer than those feeding on the standard s agars (inoculated and control). Again, the results obtained in the field were inconsistent, because no differences between treated and control males were found for any of the diets. The findings are discussed in the light of other published studies on adult nutrition and behavioral ecology in C. capitata. PMID:15568345

  10. Effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on survival, development, growth and sex ratios of wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles. II: agriculturally relevant exposures to Roundup WeatherMax® and Vision® under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lanctôt, C; Navarro-Martín, L; Robertson, C; Park, B; Jackman, P; Pauli, B D; Trudeau, V L

    2014-09-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are currently the most commonly used herbicides in the world. They have been shown to affect survival, growth, development and sexual differentiation of tadpoles under chronic laboratory exposures but this has not been investigated under more environmentally realistic conditions. The purpose of this study is (1) to determine if an agriculturally relevant exposure to Roundup WeatherMax®, a relatively new and understudied formulation, influences the development of wood frog tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus) through effects on the mRNA levels of genes involved in the control of metamorphosis; (2) to compare results to the well-studied Vision® formulation (containing the isopropylamine salt of glyphosate [IPA] and polyethoxylated tallowamine [POEA] surfactant) and to determine which ingredient(s) in the formulations are responsible for potential effects on development; and (3) to compare results to recent field studies that used a similar experimental design. In the present laboratory study, wood frog tadpoles were exposed to an agriculturally relevant application (i.e., two pulses) of Roundup WeatherMax® and Vision® herbicides as well as the active ingredient (IPA) and the POEA surfactant of Vision®. Survival, development, growth, sex ratios and mRNA levels of genes involved in tadpole metamorphosis were measured. Results show that Roundup WeatherMax® (2.89 mg acid equivalent (a.e.)/L) caused 100% mortality after the first pulse. Tadpoles treated with a lower concentration of Roundup WeatherMax® (0.21 mg a.e./L) as well as Vision® (2.89 mg a.e./L), IPA and POEA had an increased condition factor (based on length and weight measures in the tadpoles) relative to controls at Gosner stage (Gs) 36/38. At Gs42, tadpoles treated with IPA and POEA had a decreased condition factor. Also at Gs42, the effect on condition factor was dependent on the sex of tadpoles and significant treatment effects were only detected in males. In most cases, treatment reduced the normal mRNA increase of key genes controlling development in tadpoles between Gs37 and Gs42, such as genes encoding thyroid hormone receptor beta in brain, glucocorticoid receptor in tail and deiodinase enzyme in brain and tail. We conclude that glyphosate-based herbicides have the potential to alter mRNA profiles during metamorphosis. However, studies in natural systems have yet to replicate these negative effects, which highlight the need for more ecologically relevant studies for risk assessment. PMID:24912403

  11. Comparison of cyanobacterial microcystin synthetase (mcy) E gene transcript levels, mcy E gene copies, and biomass as indicators of microcystin risk under laboratory and field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Felexce F; Madramootoo, Chandra A; Jabaji, Suha

    2014-01-01

    Increased incidences of mixed assemblages of microcystin-producing and nonproducing cyanobacterial strains in freshwater bodies necessitate development of reliable proxies for cyanotoxin risk assessment. Detection of microcystin biosynthetic genes in water blooms of cyanobacteria is generally indicative of the presence of potentially toxic cyanobacterial strains. Although much effort has been devoted toward elucidating the microcystin biosynthesis mechanisms in many cyanobacteria genera, little is known about the impacts of co-occurring cyanobacteria on cellular growth, mcy gene expression, or mcy gene copy distribution. The present study utilized conventional microscopy, qPCR assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study how competition between microcystin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa CPCC 299 and Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA 126 impacts mcyE gene expression, mcyE gene copies, and microcystin concentration under controlled laboratory conditions. Furthermore, analyses of environmental water samples from the Missisquoi Bay, Quebec, enabled us to determine how the various potential toxigenic cyanobacterial biomass proxies correlated with cellular microcystin concentrations in a freshwater lake. Results from our laboratory study indicated significant downregulation of mcyE gene expression in mixed cultures of M. aeruginosa plus P. agardhii on most sampling days in agreement with depressed growth recorded in the mixed cultures, suggesting that interaction between the two species probably resulted in suppressed growth and mcyE gene expression in the mixed cultures. Furthermore, although mcyE gene copies and McyE transcripts were detected in all laboratory and field samples with measureable microcystin levels, only mcyE gene copies showed significant positive correlations (R2 > 0.7) with microcystin concentrations, while McyE transcript levels did not. These results suggest that mcyE gene copies are better indicators of potential risks from microcystins than McyE transcript levels or conventional biomass proxies, especially in water bodies comprising mixed assemblages of toxic and nontoxic cyanobacteria. PMID:24838591

  12. Susceptibility of Culicoides species biting midges to deltamethrin-treated nets as determined under laboratory and field conditions in the Balearic Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Del Río, R; Barceló, C; Paredes-Esquivel, C; Lucientes, J; Miranda, M A

    2014-12-01

    Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of several arboviruses, including bluetongue virus (BTV) and African horse sickness virus (AHSV), which cause diseases in, respectively, sheep and cattle, and horses, and have economic repercussions mainly as a result of trade restrictions. Insecticides can be used to reduce vector populations and hence the spread of disease. Despite the economic importance of these diseases, relatively few studies have evaluated the efficacy of commercially available insecticides and the effectiveness of treated nets against Culicoides species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the insecticidal effect of commercially available polyethylene nets (ZeroVector(®) ) treated with deltamethrin (4.4?g/kg?±?15%) on Culicoides species. Laboratory and field trials were conducted in Culicoides populations collected in Majorca in the Balearic Islands, Spain. The present study shows that deltamethrin-treated nets provoke high and rapid mortality (90-100%) in Culicoides midges under laboratory conditions and increase mortality by 13% when deployed in the field. PMID:24890642

  13. Wirtanen At 3au An Experimental Program In The Laboratory Under Simulated Space-conditions, Accompanying The Rosetta Space-mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, H.; Richter, L.; Möhlmann, D.; Drescher, J.; Seidensticker, K. J.; Tokano, T.

    Simulated Space-Conditions in an earth laboratory, e.g. in a specially designed vacuum chamber with an adjusted insolation source cannot only support the development and qualification of space mission experiment hardware, but also an "in situ" investigation of the surface-near planetary phenomena. This was already demonstrated in the comet simulation program KOSI, performed in the DLR Space Simulator from 1986 to 1993 after the successful GIOTTO Space Mission to Comet P´Halley in 1986. The results of the simulation experiments have been helpful in understanding the recorded phenomena. Based on the experiences gathered in KOSI, we are now facing the ROSETTA space mission to Comet P´Wirtanen in 2003 with an extremely long hibernation phase till 2011. At this time the ROSETTA spacecraft will meet the cometary nucleus. Laboratory Experiments with different cometary analogous materials (CAM) and with different insolation periods will be performed in the DLR-PLANETARY SIMULATION FACILITY. This chamber, automatically cooled by liquid nitrogen (77K) has an internal space for experiments of 1.5m in diameter and 1.8m in height. Gas-dust interaction phenomena, and the thermal behaviour can be studied as well as the crustal and mantle formation and the structural change of the CAM by sintering and recondensation. We invite colleagues to join this program with ideas, models and hardware.

  14. Similarity and Group Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civettini, Nicole H. W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects that different patterns of similarity among group members have on a group's performance on a problem-solving task. I discuss and test hypotheses on the effects of similarity on group performance derived from two literatures: balance theory and research on homophily. In an experiment I found that the relative…

  15. Generalization of interpersonal similarity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Stotland; A. Zander; T. Natsoulas

    1961-01-01

    Ss were led to believe that their preferences (among eight pairs of tunes) were similar to those of 1 of 2 other individual's preferences. Subsequently, it was discovered that S tended to show similar preference for other stimuli (nonsense syllables, pairs of girl's names) to those of the individual with whom they initially agreed. The results were interpreted in terms

  16. Similarity and Congruence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Daniel L.

    This instructional unit is an introduction to the common properties of similarity and congruence. Manipulation of objects leads to a recognition of these properties. The ASA, SAS, and SSS theorems are not mentioned. Limited use is made in the application of the properties of size and shape preserved by similarity or congruence. A teacher's guide…

  17. Exploring the similarity space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Justin Zobel; Alistair Moffat

    1998-01-01

    Ranked queries are used to locate relevant documents in text databases. In a ranked query a list of terms is specified, then the documents that most closely match the query are returned---in decreasing order of similarity---as answers. Crucial to the efficacy of ranked querying is the use of a similarity heuristic, a mechanism that assigns a numeric score indicating how

  18. The Gender Similarities Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2005-01-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses…

  19. Accuracy of uploadable pedometers in laboratory, overground, and free-living conditions in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of uploadable pedometers to accurately count steps during treadmill (TM) and overground (OG) walking, and during a 24 hour monitoring period (24 hr) under free living conditions in young and older adults. Methods One hundred and two participants (n=53 aged 20–49 yrs; n=49 aged 50–80 yrs) completed a TM protocol (53.6, 67.0, 80.4, 93.8, and 107.2 m/min, five minutes for each speed) and an OG walking protocol (self-determined “< normal”, “normal”, and “> normal” walking speeds) while wearing two waist-mounted uploadable pedometers (Omron HJ-720ITC [OM] and Kenz Lifecorder EX [LC]). Actual steps were manually tallied by a researcher. During the 24 hr period, participants wore a New Lifestyles-1000 (NL) pedometer (standard of care) attached to a belt at waist level over the midline of the left thigh, in addition to the LC on the belt over the midline of the right thigh. The following day, the same procedure was conducted, replacing the LC with the OM. One-sample t-tests were performed to compare measured and manually tallied steps during the TM and OG protocols, and between steps quantified by the NL with that of the OM and LC during the 24 hr period. Mean error step scores (MES, criterion – device) and 95% Limits of Agreement (LoA) were calculated. Results There were no significant differences between the OM and tallied steps for any of the TM speeds for either the young or older adult groups. The LC significantly underestimated steps for the young adult group during the 53.6 m/min TM speed (MES 31.4 [14.5, 48.3]) and during the OG < normal walking speed (MES 12.0 [0.9, 23.1] (p<0.01 for both age groups). The LC also significantly underestimated steps for the older adult group during the TM speeds of 53.6 m/min (MES 64.5 [45.6, 83.4]), 67.0 m/min (MES 15.1 [6.1, 24.0]), and 80.4 m/min (MES 3.2 [0.6, 5.9]) (p<0.01 for all speeds), in addition to the OG < normal walking speed (MES 14.7 [?13.3, 42.6] (p<0.01). The OM reported significantly lower steps during the 24 hr period for the young adult group by 949.1 steps (t=6.111, p<0.025) and for the older adult group by 612.9 steps (t=2.397, p<0.025). Conclusion Both the OM and LC pedometers were more accurate as TM and OG walking speed increased. The OM significantly underestimated steps during the 24 hr compared with a standard of care evaluation. Overall, both uploadable pedometers appear acceptable to use in young or old age groups to measure walking behavior. PMID:23232036

  20. High-resolution monitoring of root water uptake dynamics in laboratory conditions using full-wave inversion of near-field radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourmeaux, Nicolas; Meunier, Félicien; Tran, Phuong Anh; Draye, Xavier; Lambot, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Root water uptake dynamics at local scale can be studied in laboratory conditions by growing plants in rhizotron containing sand and by imaging the water content evolution of the medium using light transmission. This technique allows to retrieve the water content with high resolution but cannot be applied in opaque media such as leaf-mold or clay, which is a major limitation for more realistic applications. Recently, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has proven to be one of the most promising techniques for high-resolution digital soil mapping at the field scale. Particularly, by using full-wave inverse modeling of near-field GPR data with a high frequency antenna, the electrical properties of soil and their correlated water content can be reconstructed with a high spatiotemporal resolution. In this study, we applied the approach by using an ultra-wideband frequency-domain radar with a transmitting and receiving horn antenna operating in the frequency range 3-6 GHz for imaging, in near-field conditions, a rhizotron containing sand subject to different water content conditions. Synthetic radar data were also generated to examine the well-posedness of the full-waveform inverse problem at high frequencies. Finally, we compared the water content obtained by GPR and light transmission measurements. The results have shown that the near-field modeled and measured GPR data match very well in the frequency and time domains for both dry and wet sands. In the case of the dry sand, the estimated water content based on GPR and light transmission data was retrieved with small differences. This research shows the potential of the GPR system and near-field full-wave antenna-medium model to accurately estimate the water content of soils with a high spatial resolution. Future studies will focus on the use of GPR to monitor root water uptake dynamics of plants in field conditions. This abstract is of interest for COST Action TU1208.

  1. Models for the Centimeter-Wavelength Opacity of Sulfur Dioxide and Carbon Dioxide based on Laboratory Measurements Conducted under Simulated Conditions for the Deep Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Shahan, P. M.

    2013-10-01

    In the past two decades, multiple observations of Venus have been made at X band (3.6 cm) using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), and maps have been created of the 3.6 cm emission from Venus. Since the emission morphology is related both to surface features and to deep atmospheric absorption from CO2 and SO2 (see, e.g., Butler et al., Icarus 154, 2001), knowledge of the microwave absorption properties of sulfur dioxide in a carbon dioxide atmosphere under conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus is required for proper interpretation. Initial measurements of the centimeter-wavelength (3.7-20 cm) of SO2 and CO2 under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus, conducted using a new high-pressure system operating at 430 K and at pressures up to 92 Bars, were presented by Steffes and Barisich (DPS-2012, B.A.A.S., v.44, p.241). Over the past year, we have completed this measurement campaign for temperatures up to 550 K, so as to better understand the effects of SO2 and CO2 on the microwave emission from the Venus boundary layer. Results indicate that the model for the centimeter-wavelength opacity from pure CO2 (developed over 40 years ago -- Ho et al., JGR 71, 1966), is valid over the entire centimeter-wavelength range under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus. Additionally, the laboratory results indicate that the model for the centimeter-wavelength opacity of SO2 in a CO2 atmosphere from Suleiman et al. (JGR-Planets, 101, Feb. 1996) can reliably be used under conditions of the deep atmosphere of Venus with the modifications described in this paper . This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under Grant NNX11AD66G.

  2. Laboratory and field studies on BTEX biodegradation in a fuel-contaminated aquifer under denitrifying conditions. Book chapter, May 88-Dec 92

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, S.R.; Wilson, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks are a major source of groundwater contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons. Of the approximately 1.4 million underground tanks storing gasoline in the United States, some petroleum experts estimate that 75,000 to 100,000 are leaking (Feliciano 1984). Gasoline and other fuels contain benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (collectively known as BTEX), which are hazardous compounds regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1977). Laboratory studies were conducted in conjunction with a field demonstration project on nitrate-mediated biorestoration of a fuel-contaminated aquifer at a U.S. Coast Guard facility in Traverse City, MI. Microcosms were prepared under either aerobic or strictly anaerobic, denitrifying conditions using core samples aseptically obtained from the aquifer. The microcosms were spiked with aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) and incubated as 12 C. Virtually all of the aromatic hydrocarbons, including benzene, were degraded to below detection limits within seven days under aerobic conditions, although o-xylene was somewhat more recalcitrant. Under denitrifying conditions, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were also degraded to below detection limits, although this occurred between two to three weeks. o-Xylene was only slowly degraded and benzene was recalcitrant under denitrifying conditions. In the field demonstration project, an infiltration gallery was used to recirculate water at a rate sufficient to create a water table mound encompassing the contaminated interval. After hydraulic equilbrium was achieved nitrate and nutrients were added to the recharge water. Benzene removal occurred before nitrate addition; mass balances indicated that sufficient oxygen was recirculated to account for complete biodegradation aerobically.

  3. Similarity searching using BLAST.

    PubMed

    Menlove, Kit J; Clement, Mark; Crandall, Keith A

    2009-01-01

    Similarity searches are an essential component of most bioinformatic applications. They form the bases of structural motif identification, gene identification, and insights into functional associations. With the rapid increase in the available genetic data through a wide variety of databases, similarity searches are an essential tool for accessing these data in an informative and productive way. In this chapter, we provide an overview of similarity searching approaches, related databases, and parameter options to achieve the best results for a variety of applications. We then provide a worked example and some notes for consideration. PMID:19378137

  4. Laboratory measurements of the 3.7-20 cm wavelength opacity of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Shahan, Patrick; Christopher Barisich, G.; Bellotti, Amadeo

    2015-01-01

    In the past two decades, multiple observations of Venus have been made at X-Band (3.6 cm) using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), and maps have been created of the 3.6 cm emission from Venus (see, e.g., Devaraj, K. [2011]. The Centimeter- and Millimeter-Wavelength Ammonia Absorption Spectra under Jovian Conditions. PhD Thesis, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA). Since the emission morphology is related both to surface features and to deep atmospheric absorption from CO2 and SO2 (see, e.g., Butler, B.J., Steffes, P.G., Suleiman, S.H., Kolodner, M.A., Jenkins, J.M. [2001]. Icarus 154, 226-238), knowledge of the microwave absorption properties of sulfur dioxide in a carbon dioxide atmosphere under conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus is required for proper interpretation. Except for a single measurement campaign conducted at a single wavelength (3.2 cm) over 40 years ago (Ho, W., Kaufman, I.A., Thaddeus, P. [1966]. J. Geophys. Res. 71, 5091-5108), no measurements of the centimeter-wavelength properties of any Venus atmospheric constituent have been conducted under conditions characteristic of the deep atmosphere (pressures from 10 to 92 bars and temperatures from 400 to 700 K). New measurements of the microwave properties of SO2 and CO2 at wavelengths from 3.7 to 20 cm have been conducted under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus, using a new high-pressure system. Results from this measurement campaign conducted at temperatures from 430 K to 560 K and at pressures up to 92 bars are presented. Results indicate that the model for the centimeter-wavelength opacity from pure CO2 (Ho, W., Kaufman, I.A., Thaddeus, P. [1966]. J. Geophys. Res. 71, 5091-5108), is valid over the entire centimeter-wavelength range under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus. Additionally, the laboratory results indicate that both of the models for the centimeter-wavelength opacity of SO2 in a CO2 atmosphere from Suleiman et al. (Suleiman, S.H., Kolodner, M.A., Steffes, P.G. [1996]. J. Geophys. Res. 101, 4623-4635) and from Fahd and Steffes (Fahd, A.K., Steffes, P.G. [1992]. Icarus 97, 200-210) can reliably be used under conditions of the deep atmosphere of Venus.

  5. Gender similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2014-01-01

    Whether men and women are fundamentally different or similar has been debated for more than a century. This review summarizes major theories designed to explain gender differences: evolutionary theories, cognitive social learning theory, sociocultural theory, and expectancy-value theory. The gender similarities hypothesis raises the possibility of theorizing gender similarities. Statistical methods for the analysis of gender differences and similarities are reviewed, including effect sizes, meta-analysis, taxometric analysis, and equivalence testing. Then, relying mainly on evidence from meta-analyses, gender differences are reviewed in cognitive performance (e.g., math performance), personality and social behaviors (e.g., temperament, emotions, aggression, and leadership), and psychological well-being. The evidence on gender differences in variance is summarized. The final sections explore applications of intersectionality and directions for future research. PMID:23808917

  6. Graph similarity and matching

    E-print Network

    Zager, Laura (Laura A.)

    2005-01-01

    Measures of graph similarity have a broad array of applications, including comparing chemical structures, navigating complex networks like the World Wide Web, and more recently, analyzing different kinds of biological data. ...

  7. A Laboratory Test Setup for in Situ Measurements of the Dielectric Properties of Catalyst Powder Samples under Reaction Conditions by Microwave Cavity Perturbation: Set up and Initial Tests

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Markus; Rauch, Dieter; Porch, Adrian; Moos, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOX) depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia. PMID:25211199

  8. Laboratory Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Jonathan

    The need for flexibility in science research facilities is discussed, with emphasis on the effect of that need on the design of laboratories. The relationship of office space, bench space, and special equipment areas, and the location and distribution of piping and air conditioning, are considered particularly important. This building type study…

  9. Laboratory measurements of the W band (3.2 mm) properties of phosphine (PH3) and ammonia (NH3) under simulated conditions for the outer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Steffes, Paul G.

    2004-07-01

    A model, based on the Van Vleck-Weisskopf line shape, was developed for the centimeter-wavelength opacity of PH3, which provides an order of magnitude improvement over previous models [Hoffman et al., 2001]. New laboratory measurements indicate that the model is also accurate at 94 GHz (3.2 mm) under conditions for the outer planets. Measurements of the opacity and refractivity of PH3 in a hydrogen/helium (H2/He) atmosphere were conducted at 94 GHz (3.2 mm) at pressures of 0.5 and 2 bars and at temperatures of 293 K and 213 K. Additionally, new high-precision laboratory measurements of the opacity and refractivity of NH3 in an H2/He atmosphere were conducted at the same frequency at pressures from 0.5 to 2 bars and at temperatures of 204 K, 211 K, and 290 K. Results show that existing models, which predict NH3 opacity in an H2/He environment, understate the absorption due to the pressure broadened rotational lines. A new model is proposed for use at 94 GHz (3.2 mm) which uses a Ben-Reuven line shape [Ben-Reuven, 1966] for the inversion lines and a Kinetic line shape [Gross, 1955] for the rotational lines. Results of measurements of both PH3 and NH3 can be used to better interpret maps of Saturn's emission at this wavelength and can potentially be used to deduce spatial variations in the abundances of both gases in the atmosphere of Saturn.

  10. Laboratory and field-based calibration study for the use of freshwater bivalve shells as an archive of environmental and climatic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lartaud, F.; Le Callonnec, L.; de Rafelis, M.; Emmanuel, L.; Missang, E.; Castrec-Rouelle, M.; Mouchel, J. M.; Segalen, L.

    2009-04-01

    The accretionary growth of mollusc shells makes it possible to obtain recordings of the life history of these organisms. Freshwater bivalves are common inhabitant of past and present rivers and lakes. The wide latitudinal distribution of the Unionidae allows their shells to be used as an archive of environmental variations. Physical and chemical record of the shells contains precious information on water temperature, rainfall or metal concentrations. We developed a coupled laboratory and field-based calibration study on freshwater bivalve shells to determine the ability to track water oxygen isotopes composition (?18Ow), dissolved metal and temperature changes at a decadal to infra-annual time scale. A genetically homogenous population of Anodonta cygnea and Corbicula fluminea have been cultured in the Seine River and in laboratory, under controlled conditions. Daily temperatures and semi-monthly ?18Ow and trace metals (Mn, Cu, Zn, Cd, As, Pb, …) were measured during the experiment. For the micro-sampling strategy, we have to establish a chronological time scale in the shell growth. Thus each month, an experimental 4 hours Mn2+ staining was performed to have a precise temporal marking during shell growth. Additionally, wild stocks of European and African Unionidae shells were analysed under microscopy and geochemical study. Mn2+ markings can be recognized under cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis of cross section along the growth axis of the shells. Their identification on the two distinct groups (in vivo and in vitro experiments) helps us to determine the cyclicity of the natural fluctuations of the luminescence and the shell growth rate. The counting of annual growth increments reveals a life span over ten years, but micro-CL rhythms are also identified. This sclerochronologic approach is used to confront water physico-chemical changes with the biogenic carbonate geochemical records. First results show a latitudinal gradient (from France to South Africa) of ?18O and ?13C shells in respect with the climatic conditions (temperature and humidity). This study contributes to fixe the interest of freshwater bivalve shells analyses for hydrological management (i.e. tracking of natural or anthropogenic dissolved metal pollution) as well as (paleo)climatic investigations.

  11. Laboratory and Field Performance of Buried Steel-Reinforced High Density Polyethylene (SRHDPE) Pipes in a Ditch Condition under a Shallow Cover

    E-print Network

    Khatri, Deep Kumar

    2014-05-31

    the performance of SRHDPE pipes in the laboratory including the laboratory tests conducted by Khatri (2012). To investigate the performance of the pipe with various backfills, in addition to the laboratory tests conducted by Khatri (2012) with the sand backfill, a...

  12. PDC Bit Performance Under Simulated Borehole Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. E. Andersen; J. J. Azar

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory drilling tests were used to investigate the effects of pressure on polycrystalline-diamond-compact (PDC) drill-bit performance. Catoosa shale core samples were drilled with PDC and roller-cone bits at up to 1,750-psi confining pressure. All tests were conducted in a controlled environment with a full-scale laboratory drilling system. Test results indicate, that under similar operating conditions, increases in confining pressure reduce

  13. Additive similarity trees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shmuel Sattath; Amos Tversky

    1977-01-01

    Similarity data can be represented by additive trees. In this model, objects are represented by the external nodes of a tree, and the dissimilarity between objects is the length of the path joining them. The additive tree is less restrictive than the ultrametric tree, commonly known as the hierarchical clustering scheme. The two representations are characterized and compared. A computer

  14. The Google Similarity Distance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rudi L. Cilibrasi; Paul M. B. Vitányi

    2007-01-01

    Words and phrases acquire meaning from the way they are used in society, from their relative semantics to other words and phrases. For computers the equivalent of 'society' is 'database,' and the equivalent of 'use' is 'way to search the database.' We present a new theory of similarity between words and phrases based on information distance and Kolmogorov complexity. To

  15. (Bioinformatics) DNA (Similarity) (Homology)

    E-print Network

    Lee, Keun Woo

    research and it compares a query sequence against the libraries of known sequences in order to investigate99 (Bioinformatics) DNA DNA (Similarity) (Homology) . (Development of Local Animal BLAST Search Animal BLAST Web (http://bioinfo.kohost.net) PC Cluster . : , DB, Local Animal BLAST, PC Abstract

  16. Similarity and Discrimination Learning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward S. Redhead; John M. Pearce

    1995-01-01

    The role played by similarity in discrimination learning was examined in four experiments using compound stimuli. In Experiment 1, pigeons received training in which food was presented after stimulus A, compound AB, but not compound ABC—A+ BC+ ABCo. The A+ ABCo discrimination was acquired more readily than was the BC+ ABCo discrimination. In the remaining experiments, training was of the

  17. The influence of host fruit and temperature on the body size of adult Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Campos, C; Martínez-Ferrer, M T; Campos, J M; Fibla, J M; Alcaide, J; Bargues, L; Marzal, C; Garcia-Marí, F

    2011-08-01

    The adult body size of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), varies in natural conditions. Body size is an important fitness indicator in the Mediterranean fruit fly; larger individuals are more competitive at mating and have a greater dispersion capacity and fertility. Both temperature during larval development and host fruit quality have been cited as possible causes for this variation. We studied the influence of host fruit and temperature during larval development on adult body size (wing area) in the laboratory, and determined body size variation in field populations of the Mediterannean fruit fly in eastern Spain. Field flies measured had two origins: 1) flies periodically collected throughout the year in field traps from 32 citrus groves, during the period 2003-2007; and 2) flies evolved from different fruit species collected between June and December in 2003 and 2004. In the lab, wing area of male and female adults varied significantly with temperature during larval development, being larger at the lowest temperature. Adult size also was significantly different depending on the host fruit in which larvae developed. The size of the flies captured at the field, either from traps or from fruits, varied seasonally showing a gradual pattern of change along the year. The largest individuals were obtained during winter and early spring and the smallest during late summer. In field conditions, the size of the adult Mediterannean fruit fly seems apparently more related with air temperature than with host fruit. The implications of this adult size pattern on the biology of C. capitata and on the application of the sterile insect technique are discussed. PMID:22251694

  18. Average velocity field of the air flow over the water surface in a laboratory modeling of storm and hurricane conditions in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurov, A. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Sergeev, D. A.; Vdovin, M. I.; Baidakov, G. A.

    2014-07-01

    Laboratory experiments on studying the structure of the turbulent air boundary layer over waves were carried out at the Wind-Wave Channel of the Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS), in conditions modeling the near-water boundary layer of the atmosphere under strong and hurricane winds and the equivalent wind velocities from 10 to 48 m/s at the standard height of 10 m. A modified technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to obtain turbulent pulsation averaged velocity fields of the air flow over the water surface curved by a wave and average profiles of the wind velocity. The measurements showed that the logarithmic part of the velocity profile of the air flow in the channel was observed in the immediate vicinity from the water surface (at a distance of 30 mm) and could be detected only using remote methods (PIV). According to the measured velocity profiles, dependences of aerodynamic drag factors of the water surface on the wind velocity at a height of 10 m were retrieved; they were compared with results of contact measurements carried out earlier on the same setup. It is shown that they agree with an accuracy of up to 20%; at moderate and strong wind velocities the coincidence falls within the experimental accuracy.

  19. Dispersal and Survival of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Phages In Vivo in Rainbow Trout and In Vitro under Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Their Use in Phage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, Sif K.; Dalsgaard, Inger; Middelboe, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Attention has been drawn to phage therapy as an alternative approach for controlling pathogenic bacteria such as Flavobacterium psychrophilum in salmonid aquaculture, which can give rise to high mortalities, especially in rainbow trout fry. Recently, phages have been isolated with a broad host range and a strong lytic potential against pathogenic F. psychrophilum under experimental conditions. However, little is known about the fate of phages at environmental conditions. Here, we quantified the dispersal and fate of F. psychrophilum phages and hosts in rainbow trout fry after intraperitoneal injection. Both phages and bacteria were isolated from the fish organs for up to 10 days after injection, and coinjection with both bacteria and phages resulted in a longer persistence of the phage in the fish organs, than when the fish had been injected with the phages only. The occurrence of both phage and bacterium was most prevalent in the kidney and spleen, with only minor occurrence in the brain. The experiment showed that injected phages were rapidly spread in the internal organs of the fish, also in the absence of bacteria. Parallel examination of the regulation of bacteriophage infectivity in controlled laboratory experiments at various environmental conditions showed that pH had only minor effects on long-term (3 months) phage infectivity within a pH range of 4.5 to 7.5, whereas phage infectivity was immediately lost at pH 3. In the absence of host cells, phage infectivity decreased by a factor of 10,000 over 55 days in untreated pond water, while the sterilization and removal of particles caused a 100-fold increase in phage survival relative to the control. In addition, F. psychrophilum-specific phages maintained their infectivity for ?2 months in glycerol at ?80°C, whereas infectivity decreased by a factor 10 when kept in a buffer at 20°C. Only a very small degradation in infectivity was seen when bacteriophages were added and dried on fish feed pellets. Together, these results indicate that application of bacteriophages represents a promising approach for the control of F. psychrophilum infections in trout and suggest fish feed as a potential delivery method. PMID:23747702

  20. Reconsolidation of Crushed Salt to 250°C Under Hydrostatic and Shear Stress Conditions Scott Broome, Frank Hansen, and SJ Bauer Sandia National Laboratories, Geomechanics Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broome, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    Design, analysis and performance assessment of potential salt repositories for heat-generating nuclear waste require knowledge of thermal, mechanical, and fluid transport properties of reconsolidating granular salt. Mechanical properties, Bulk (K) and Elastic (E) Moduli and Poisson's ratio (?) are functions of porosity which decreases as the surrounding salt creeps inward and compresses granular salt within the rooms, drifts or shafts. To inform salt repository evaluations, we have undertaken an experimental program to determine K, E, and ? of reconsolidated granular salt as a function of porosity and temperature and to establish the deformational processes by which the salt reconsolidates. The experiments will be used to populate the database used in the reconsolidation model developed by Callahan (1999) which accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent on effective stress to account for the effects of porosity. Mine-run salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Program (WIPP) was first dried at 105 °C for a few days. Undeformed right-circular cylindrical sample assemblies of unconsolidated granular salt with an initial porosity of ~ 40%, nominally 10 cm in diameter and 17.5 cm in length, are jacketed in lead. Samples are placed in a pressure vessel and kept at test temperatures of 100, 175 or 250 °C; samples are vented to the atmosphere during the entire test procedure. At these test conditions the consolidating salt is always creeping, the creep rate increases with increasing temperature and stress and decreases as porosity decreases. In hydrostatic tests, confining pressure is increased to 20 MPa with periodic unload/reload loops to determine K. Volume strain increases with increasing temperature. In shear tests at 2.5 and 5 MPa confining pressure, after confining pressure is applied, the crushed salt is subjected to a differential stress, with periodic unload/reload loops to determine E and ?. At predetermined differential stress levels the stress is held constant and the salt consolidates. Displacement gages mounted on the samples show little lateral deformation until the samples reach a porosity of ~10%. Interestingly, vapor is vented in tests at 250°C and condenses at the vent port. Release of water is not observed in the lower two test temperatures. It is hypothesized that the water originates from fluid inclusions, which were made accessible by intragranular deformational processes including decrepitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. SIMILARITY NETWORK FOR SEMANTIC WEB SERVICES SUBSTITUTION

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SIMILARITY NETWORK FOR SEMANTIC WEB SERVICES SUBSTITUTION Chantal Cherifi LE2I Laboratory, Burgundy is performed on a benchmark of semantically annotated Web services. Results show that this approach allows a more detailed analysis of substitutable Web services. Keywords - Semantic Web services, Functional

  2. NCBI More Information: Similarity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Center for Biotechnology Information

    This page summarizes the basic concept and vocabulary of sequence similarity searching. It is included for those new to the field who may not appreciate the importance of this technique in biology, who lack the vocabulary to understand the BLAST guide and tutorial or who require a basic rather than a sophisticated understanding of the methods involved. Sections include introduction, premise, terms, general approach, the BLAST algorithm, quantification, gaps, significance, and databases. Users can link to BLAST, BLAST tutorial, and additional BLAST information from this page.

  3. Similarities in Acute Temperature Preferences of Freshwater Fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dilip Mathur; Robert M. Schutsky; Edmund J. Purdy Jr; Carl A. Silver

    1981-01-01

    A statistical analysis of new and published laboratory data revealed strong geographic similarities in acute (up to 4-hour) temperature preferences for several freshwater fishes. Regression models developed from our laboratory studies predicted acute temperature preferences of species from other geographic areas. Species within a family (three cyprinids, two ictalurids, and six centrarchids were tested) have similar acute preferenda, except that

  4. Similarities in acute temperature preferences of freshwater fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DILIP MATHUR; ROBERT M. SCHUTSKY; EDMUND J. PURDY; CARL A. SILVER

    1981-01-01

    A statistical analysis of new and published laboratory data revealed strong geographic similarities in acute (up to 4-h) temperature preferences for several freshwater fishes. Regression models developed from our laboratory studies predicted acute temperature preferences of species from other geographic areas. Species within a family (three cyprinids, two ictalurids, and six centrarchids were tested) have similar acute preferenda, except that

  5. Manganese and trace-metal mobility under reducing conditions following in situ oxidation of TCE by KMnO4: a laboratory column experiment.

    PubMed

    Loomer, Diana B; Al, Tom A; Banks, Vernon J; Parker, Beth L; Mayer, K Ulrich

    2011-01-25

    The stability of Mn oxides, and the potential for mobilization of associated trace metals, were assessed by simulating the onset of microbially-mediated reducing conditions in a continuous-flow column experiment. The column had previously been used for an in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) experiment in which trichloroethylene was reacted with permanganate in the presence of aqueous trace metals, which produced Mn oxyhydroxides (MnO(x)) that sequestered the trace metals and coated the column sand. The column influent solution represented the incursion of ambient groundwater containing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into an ISCO treatment zone. The influx of DOC-containing groundwater initiated a series of cation-exchange, surface-complexation and reductive-dissolution reactions that controlled the release of aqueous metals from the system. Peak concentrations in the effluent occurred in the order Na, Mo, Cr, Zn, K, Mn, Fe, Pb, Mg, Ni, Cu and Ca. Manganese release from the column was controlled by a combination of cation exchange, reductive dissolution and precipitation of rhodochrosite. The trend in Fe concentrations was similar to that of Mn, and also resulted from a combination of reductive dissolution and cation exchange. Cation exchange and/or surface-complexation were the primary mechanisms controlling Cu, Ni, Mo and Pb release to solution, while Zn and Cr concentrations did not display coherent trends. Although metal release from the treatment zone was evident in the data, concentrations of trace metals remained below 0.05 mg L(-1) with the exception of Mo which reached concentrations on the order of 1 mg L(-1). The establishment of anaerobic conditions in ISCO-treated aquifers may result in a prolonged flux of aqueous Mn(II), but with the exception of MoO(4)(2-), it is unlikely that trace metals sequestered with MnO(x) during ISCO will be released to the groundwater in elevated concentrations. PMID:20889229

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of the Effect of HNO3 Uptake on Frost Point Hygrometer Measurement of Water Vapor under UT/LS Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T.; Gierczak, T.; Gao, R.; Voemel, H.; Watts, L.; Burkholder, J. B.; Fahey, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Chilled mirror hygrometers (CMH) are widely used to measure water vapor in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from balloon-borne sondes. Systematic discrepancies among in situ water vapor instruments have been observed at low water vapor mixing ratios (< 5 ppm) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). Understanding the source of the measurement discrepancies is important for a more accurate and reliable determination of water vapor abundance in this region. We have conducted a laboratory study to investigate the potential interference of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3) with the measurement of frost point temperature, and consequently the water vapor mixing ratio, determined by CMH under conditions representative of operation in the UT/LS. No detectable interference in the measured frost point temperature was found for HNO3 mixing ratios of up to 2 ppb for exposure times up to 150 minutes. HNO3 was observed to co-condense on the mirror frost, with the adsorbed mass increasing linearly with time at constant exposure levels. Over the duration of a typical balloon sonde ascent (90-120 min), the maximum accumulated HNO3 amounts were comparable to monolayer coverage of the geometric mirror surface area, which likely corresponds to small fractional coverage of the actual frost layer surface area. This small amount of co-condensed HNO3 is consistent with the observed lack of HNO3 interference in the frost point measurement because the CMH utilizes significant reductions (>10%) in surface reflectivity by the condensate for the determination of H2O.

  7. Exploration Laboratory Analysis FY13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael; Perusek, Gail P.; Fung, Paul P.; Shaw, Tianna, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, which is stated as the Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), and to perform human research studies on the International Space Station (ISS) that are supported by the Human Health and Countermeasures (HHC) element. Since there are significant similarities in the research and medical operational requirements, ELA hardware development has emerged as a joint effort between ExMC and HHC. In 2012, four significant accomplishments were achieved towards the development of exploration laboratory analysis for medical diagnostics. These achievements included (i) the development of high priority analytes for research and medical operations, (ii) the development of Level 1 functional requirements and concept of operations documentation, (iii) the selection and head-to-head competition of in-flight laboratory analysis instrumentation, and (iv) the phase one completion of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects under the topic Smart Phone Driven Blood-Based Diagnostics. To utilize resources efficiently, the associated documentation and advanced technologies were integrated into a single ELA plan that encompasses ExMC and HHC development efforts. The requirements and high priority analytes was used in the selection of the four in-flight laboratory analysis performers. Based upon the competition results, a down select process will be performed in the upcoming year. Looking ahead, this unified effort has positioned each element for an in-flight lab analysis demonstration of select diagnostics measurements in the 2015 timeframe.

  8. Numerical analysis of the concept of a laboratory experiment on the demonstration of runaway electron breakdown under normal conditions at high overvoltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsyk, I. M.; Babich, L. P.; Donskoi, E. N.; Bochkov, E. I.

    2012-08-01

    A numerical Monte Carlo experiment has been performed simulating the concept of a laboratory experiment on the demonstration of runaway electron breakdown of air at high overvoltages. The pronounced second peak of a picosecond runaway-electron pulse, which was observed in the laboratory experiment and interpreted as runaway electron avalanche initiated by the first peak of the pulse, is very slightly manifested in the numerical experiment. Only the initial stage of runaway electron avalanche can be observed in the laboratory experiment, but the fraction of secondary runaway electrons is too small to significantly affect the development of the breakdown.

  9. Self-Similar Modes of Coherent Diffusion

    E-print Network

    O. Firstenberg; P. London; D. Yankelev; R. Pugatch; M. Shuker; N. Davidson

    2010-08-16

    Self-similar solutions of the coherent diffusion equation are derived and measured. The set of real similarity solutions is generalized by the introduction of a nonuniform phase surface, based on the elegant Gaussian modes of optical diffraction. In an experiment of light storage in a gas of diffusing atoms, a complex initial condition is imprinted, and its diffusion dynamics is monitored. The self-similarity of both the amplitude and the phase pattern is demonstrated, and an algebraic decay associated with the mode order is measured. Notably, as opposed to a regular diffusion spreading, a self-similar contraction of a special subset of the solutions is predicted and observed.

  10. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover and carbon content of a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleeem Abbasi, M.; Tahir, M. Mahmood; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2015-02-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in soil-plant systems. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water-filled pore space) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues, i.e., the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata, incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed a wide variation in total N, C, lignin, polyphenols and C / N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of Glycine max and the shoot and root of Trifolium repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% recovery of N that had been released from these added resources. The roots of Glycine max and Zea mays and the shoot of Zea mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation. After an initial immobilization, leaves of Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively, and representing a 16, 32 and 33% N recovery, respectively. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01) and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ? 0.01), C / N ratio (r = -0.69; p ? 0.05), lignin / N ratio (r = -0.68; p ? 0.05), polyphenol / N ratio (r = -0.73; p ? 0.05) and (lignin + polyphenol) : N ratio (r = -0.70; p ? 0.05) indicating a significant role of residue chemical composition and quality in regulating N transformations and cycling in soil. The present study indicates that incorporation of plant residues strongly modifies the mineralization-immobilization turnover (MIT) of soil that can be taken into account to develop synchronization between net N mineralization and crop demand in order to maximize N delivery and minimize N losses.

  11. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on carbon-nitrogen content and nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover in a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M. K.; Tahir, M. M.; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2014-10-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, soil properties improvement and plant growth promotion. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water filled pore space (WFPS)) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues i.e. the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Poplus euramericana, Rubinia pseudoacacia and Elagnus umbellate incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed wide variation in total N, carbon, lignin, polyphenols and C/N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of G. max and the shoot and root of T. repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% of added N being released from these resources. The roots of G. max and Z. mays and the shoot of Z. mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation showing net immobilization. After an initial immobilization, leaves of P. euramericana, R. pseudoacacia and E. umbellate exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively and representing a 16, 32 and 33% of added N being released. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ? 0.01), and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ? 0.01), C/N ratio (r = -0.69; p ? 0.05), lignin/N ratio (r = -0.68; p ? 0.05), polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.73; p ? 0.05) and ligin + polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.70; p ? 0.05) indicating a significant role of residue chemical composition and quality in regulating N transformations and cycling in soil. The present study indicates that incorporation of plant residues strongly modify the mineralization-immobilization turnover (MIT) of soil that can be taken into account to develop synchronization between net N mineralization and crop demand in order to maximize N delivery and minimize N losses.

  12. Contextual correlates of semantic similarity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George A. Miller; Walter G. Charles

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between semantic and contextual similarity is investigated for pairs of nouns that vary from high to low semantic similarity. Semantic similarity is estimated by subjective ratings; contextual similarity is estimated by the method of sorting sentential contexts. The results show an inverse linear relationship between similarity of meaning and the discriminability of contexts. This relation, is obtained for

  13. Similarity and social interaction: when similarity fosters implicit behavior toward a stranger.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas; Martin, Angélique; Meineri, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    People interact more readily with someone whom they think they have something in common with. At a pedestrian crossing, confederates asked participants for the time and, in one condition, said she/he had the same watch as the participant. The amount of time that participants lingered near a confederate was used as the dependent variable. Participants in the similarity condition spent significantly more time near the confederate than when no similarity was manipulated. The results showed that similarity fosters implicit behavior, adding to the growing body of data on the positive effects of similarity and its role in social interaction. PMID:22208106

  14. Similarity increases altruistic punishment in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mussweiler, Thomas; Ockenfels, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Humans are attracted to similar others. As a consequence, social networks are homogeneous in sociodemographic, intrapersonal, and other characteristics—a principle called homophily. Despite abundant evidence showing the importance of interpersonal similarity and homophily for human relationships, their behavioral correlates and cognitive foundations are poorly understood. Here, we show that perceived similarity substantially increases altruistic punishment, a key mechanism underlying human cooperation. We induced (dis)similarity perception by manipulating basic cognitive mechanisms in an economic cooperation game that included a punishment phase. We found that similarity-focused participants were more willing to punish others’ uncooperative behavior. This influence of similarity is not explained by group identity, which has the opposite effect on altruistic punishment. Our findings demonstrate that pure similarity promotes reciprocity in ways known to encourage cooperation. At the same time, the increased willingness to punish norm violations among similarity-focused participants provides a rationale for why similar people are more likely to build stable social relationships. Finally, our findings show that altruistic punishment is differentially involved in encouraging cooperation under pure similarity vs. in-group conditions. PMID:24218611

  15. Similarity increases altruistic punishment in humans.

    PubMed

    Mussweiler, Thomas; Ockenfels, Axel

    2013-11-26

    Humans are attracted to similar others. As a consequence, social networks are homogeneous in sociodemographic, intrapersonal, and other characteristics--a principle called homophily. Despite abundant evidence showing the importance of interpersonal similarity and homophily for human relationships, their behavioral correlates and cognitive foundations are poorly understood. Here, we show that perceived similarity substantially increases altruistic punishment, a key mechanism underlying human cooperation. We induced (dis)similarity perception by manipulating basic cognitive mechanisms in an economic cooperation game that included a punishment phase. We found that similarity-focused participants were more willing to punish others' uncooperative behavior. This influence of similarity is not explained by group identity, which has the opposite effect on altruistic punishment. Our findings demonstrate that pure similarity promotes reciprocity in ways known to encourage cooperation. At the same time, the increased willingness to punish norm violations among similarity-focused participants provides a rationale for why similar people are more likely to build stable social relationships. Finally, our findings show that altruistic punishment is differentially involved in encouraging cooperation under pure similarity vs. in-group conditions. PMID:24218611

  16. A similar shot to the previous image, this photograph, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A similar shot to the previous image, this photograph, looking northwest, provides a closer image of the brick penthouse and other devices - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Electronics Laboratory Building (E Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  17. Molecular similarity in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald; Vogt, Martin; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-04-24

    Similarity is a subjective and multifaceted concept, regardless of whether compounds or any other objects are considered. Despite its intrinsically subjective nature, attempts to quantify the similarity of compounds have a long history in chemical informatics and drug discovery. Many computational methods employ similarity measures to identify new compounds for pharmaceutical research. However, chemoinformaticians and medicinal chemists typically perceive similarity in different ways. Similarity methods and numerical readouts of similarity calculations are probably among the most misunderstood computational approaches in medicinal chemistry. Herein, we evaluate different similarity concepts, highlight key aspects of molecular similarity analysis, and address some potential misunderstandings. In addition, a number of practical aspects concerning similarity calculations are discussed. PMID:24151987

  18. An update of hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, Emphasis 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Linda C.

    2006-01-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds, evaporation ponds, and disposal wells at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer underlying the INL. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, maintains ground-water monitoring networks at the INL to determine hydrologic trends, and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from wells in the USGS ground-water monitoring networks during 1999-2001. Water in the Snake River Plain aquifer moves principally through fractures and interflow zones in basalt, generally flows southwestward, and eventually discharges at springs along the Snake River. The aquifer is recharged principally from infiltration of irrigation water, infiltration of streamflow, ground-water inflow from adjoining mountain drainage basins, and infiltration of precipitation. Water levels in wells rose in the northern and west-central parts of the INL by 1 to 3 feet, and declined in the southwestern parts of the INL by up to 4 feet during 1999-2001. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INL generally decreased or remained constant during 1999-2001. Decreases in concentrations were attributed to decreased rates of radioactive-waste disposal, radioactive decay, changes in waste-disposal methods, and dilution from recharge. Tritium concentrations in water samples decreased as much as 8.3 picocuries per milliliter (pCi/mL) during 1999-2001, ranging from 0.43?0.14 to 13.6?0.6 pCi/mL in October 2001. Tritium concentrations in five wells near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) increased a few picocuries per milliliter from October 2000 to October 2001. Strontium-90 concentrations decreased or remained constant during 1999-2001, ranging from 2.1?0.6 to 42.4?1.4 pCi/L in October 2001. During 1999-2001, concentrations of cesium-137, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239, -240 (undivided) were less than the reporting level in water samples from all wells sampled at the INL. The concentration of americium-241 in one sample was 0.003?0.001 pCi/L, the reporting level for that constituent. Cobalt-60 was not detected in any samples collected during 1999-2001. Changes in detectable concentrations of nonradioactive chemical constituents in water from the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INL varied during 1999-2001. In October 2001, water from one well south of the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC) [known as the Test Reactor Area (TRA) until 2005] contained 139 micrograms per liter (?g/L) of chromium, a decrease from the concentration of 168 ?g/L detected in October 1998. Other water samples contained from less than 16.7 to 21.3 ?g/L of chromium. In October 2001, concentrations of sodium in water samples from most of the wells in the southern part of the INL were larger than the background concentration of 10 mg/L, but were similar to or slightly less than October 1998 concentrations. The largest sodium concentration was 75 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in water from well USGS 113. In 2001, chloride concentrations in most water samples from the INTEC and the Central Facilities Area (CFA) exceeded ambient concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/L, respectively. Chloride concentrations in water from wells near the RTC were less than 20 mg/L. At the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), chloride concentrations in water from wells USGS 88, 89, and 120 were 81, 40, and 23 mg/L, respectively. Concentrations of chloride in all other wells near the RWMC were less than 19 mg/L. During 2001, concentrations of sulfate in water from two wells near the RTC, two wells near the RWMC, and one well near the CFA exceeded 40 mg/L, the estimated background concentration of sulfate in the Snake River

  19. Prey selection under laboratory conditions by pond-bred Trematocranus placodon (Regan, 1922), a molluscivorous cichlid from Lake Mala?i

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander S. Kefi; Henry Madsen; Jeremy S. Likongwe; Wilson Jere; Jay R. Stauffer Jr

    2012-01-01

    Trematocranus placodon, a predator of freshwater snails in Lake Mala?i, has been recommended for the control of schistosome intermediate hosts in aquaculture ponds. Fish from Lake Mala?i were introduced into a pond close to Lilongwe and we attempted to elucidate whether pond-raised F1 retain their ability to consume snails. In laboratory experiments, small fish (70–80?mm total length) preyed only on

  20. Anatoxin-a concentration in Anabaena and Aphanizomenon under different environmental conditions and comparison of growth by toxic and non-toxic Anabaena -strains — a laboratory study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jarkko Rapala; Kaarina Sivonen; Raija Luukkainen; Seppo I. Niemelä

    1993-01-01

    Anatoxin-a-concentration in cells ofAnabaena- andAphanizomenon-strains and in their growth media were studied in the laboratory in batch cultures at different temperatures, light fluxes, orthophosphate and nitrate concentrations and with different nitrogen sources for growth. Toxin concentrations were detected by HPLC. Also, the growth of the toxicAnabaena-strains was compared to that of a non-toxic one. The non-toxicAnabaena was never found to

  1. Homology-dependent DNA Transfer from Plants to a Soil Bacterium Under Laboratory Conditions: Implications in Evolution and Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Tepfer; Rolando Garcia-Gonzales; Hounayda Mansouri; Martina Seruga; Brigitte Message; Francesca Leach; Mirna Curkovic Perica

    2003-01-01

    DNA transfer was demonstrated from six species of donor plants to the soil bacterium, Acinetobacter spp. BD413, using neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) as a marker for homologous recombination. These laboratory results are compatible with, but do not prove, DNA transfer in nature. In tobacco carrying a plastid insertion of nptII, transfer was detected with 0.1 g of disrupted leaves and in

  2. Learning task-specific similarity

    E-print Network

    Shakhnarovich, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The right measure of similarity between examples is important in many areas of computer science. In particular it is a critical component in example-based learning methods. Similarity is commonly defined in terms of a ...

  3. Self-Similar Abe Karplus

    E-print Network

    Karplus, Kevin

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------References! 27 ~2~ #12;Introduction For my science fair project I am studying fractals. SeveralSelf-Similar Sierpinski Fractals Abe Karplus Science Fair 2008 ~1~ #12;Self-Similar Sierpinski

  4. Acoustic Similarity and Dichotic Listening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Peter

    1978-01-01

    An experiment tests conjectures that right ear advantage (REA) has an auditory origin in competition or interference between acoustically similar stimuli and that feature-sharing effect (FSE) has its origin in assignment of features of phonetically similar stimuli. No effect on the REA for acoustic similarity, and a clear effect of acoustic…

  5. Learning kernels from indefinite similarities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yihua Chen; Maya R. Gupta; Benjamin Recht

    2009-01-01

    Similarity measures in many real applications generate indenite similarity matrices. In this paper, we consider the problem of clas- sication based on such indenite similari- ties. These indenite kernels can be prob- lematic for standard kernel-based algorithms as the optimization problems become non- convex and the underlying theory is inval- idated. In order to adapt kernel methods for similarity-based learning,

  6. Applicability of Similarity Principles to Structural Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodier, J N; Thomson, W T

    1944-01-01

    A systematic account is given in part I of the use of dimensional analysis in constructing similarity conditions for models and structures. The analysis covers large deflections, buckling, plastic behavior, and materials with nonlinear stress-strain characteristics, as well as the simpler structural problems. (author)

  7. Hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected radiochemical and chemical constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1992 through 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Tucker, B.J.; Ackerman, D.J.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1997-04-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds and disposal wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, maintains a monitoring network at the INEL to determine hydrologic trends and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from the Snake River Plain aquifer during 1992--95.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer turbulence intensity similarity formulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Gary; Marusic, Ivan

    2003-11-01

    High Reynolds number data obtained in the surface layer of the atmospheric boundary layer at the SLTEST facility are used to analyze and further develop turbulence intensity similarity laws. The analysis of these similarity laws leads to implications concerning the interaction of the inner- and outer-portions of the boundary layer. Namely, the model used to extended formulations across the entire turbulent boundary layer suggests the outer portion of the flow does affect the inner portion of the flow. This seems to indicate that turbulence in the near-wall region is not autonomous as suggested by other work. The data were obtained in both `fully' rough and `transitionally' rough boundary layers, and are found to be consistent with the implications of the attached eddy hypothesis as well as Townsend's Reynolds number similarity hypothesis. The latter is in disagreement with recent laboratory studies which suggest roughness does affect the energy-containing motions in the outer portion of the layer. From comparisons with high Reynolds number data, an explanation for this disagreement is given, as are results from new laboratory data.

  9. Predation and control efficacies of Misgurnus mizolepis (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae) toward Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae) and fish toxicity of temephos in laboratory and septic tank conditions.

    PubMed

    Chae, Seong Chun; Kwon, Young Hyun; Min, Kyung Il; Kim, Hyung Soo; Kim, Nam-Jin; Kim, Jun-Ran; Son, Bong Gi; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2014-07-01

    Culex pipiens molestus Forskal (Diptera: Culicidae) is the dominant mosquito species in septic tanks in South Korea. An assessment was made of the biological control potential of mud loaches, Misgurnus mizolepis Günther (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae), toward Cx. p. molestus larvae in laboratory and septic tanks. Results were compared with those of temephos 20% emulsifiable concentrate. In laboratory tests, all mud loaches survived on sedimentation chamber- and effluent chamber-collected water of aerobic septic tanks (ASTs), whereas all mud loaches died within 3-12 h after introduction into sedimentation chamber- and effluent chamber-collected water of anaerobic septic tanks, Gill hyperplasia and hemorrhages at the bases of pectoral fins were detected in all dead mud loaches. These appeared to have been caused by bacterial disease, rather than the physical and chemical characteristics of the septic tank water. A mud loach consumed an average range of 1,072-1,058 larvae of Cx. p. molestus in the AST water at 24 h. At the manufacturer's recommended rate (10 ml/ton) in the AST water, the temephos formulation did not cause fish mortality. In the AST experiment, predation of mosquito larvae by mud loaches at a release rate of one fish per 900 mosquito larvae resulted in complete mosquito control from the third day after treatment throughout the 18-wk survey period, compared with temephos 20% emulsifiable concentrate-treated AST water (reduction rate, 40% at 28 days after treatment). Reasonable mosquito control in aerobic septic tanks can be achieved by mosquito breeding season stocking of a rate of one mud loach per 900 mosquito larvae. PMID:25118414

  10. Enhanced repellency of binary mixtures of Zanthoxylum armatum seed oil, vanillin, and their aerosols to mosquitoes under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyung Wook; Kim, Soon-Il; Chang, Kyu-Sik; Clark, J Marshall; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2011-01-01

    The repellency of Zanthoxylum armatum seed oil (ZA-SO), alone or in combination with vanillin (VA), its six major constituents, and another four major previously known Zanthoxylum piperitum fruit oil constituents, as well as aerosol products containing 5 or 10% ZA-SO and 5% VA, was evaluated against female Aedes aegypti in laboratory and field studies. Results were then compared with those of N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) as a standard. Hand in cage laboratory tests showed that 0.2, 0.1, and 0.05 mg/cm2 ZA-SO resulted in > 92% protection through 30-min postexposure and was not significantly different than 0.05 mg/cm2 DEET. Skin treated with linalool and limonene (from Z. armatum) provided > 80% repellency to female Ae. aegypti at 10-min exposure, whereas cuminaldehyde, citronellal, geranyl acetate, and cuminyl alcohol (from Zanthoxylum piperitum) provided > 90% protection during this same time period. Only cuminaldehyde and citronellal provided complete protection comparable to DEET at 10-min postexposure. After that time, repellency of all plant constituents to mosquitoes was considerably decreased (< approximately 65%). An increase in repellency and duration of effectiveness was produced by a binary 1:4 mixture of ZA-SO and VA (0.05:0.2 mg/cm2) that was significantly more effective than 0.05 mg/cm2 DEET through 90 min. In field tests, an aerosol formulation containing 5 or 10% ZA-SO plus 5% VA gave 100% repellency at 60-min postexposure. Although these formulations were equal to the level of protection afforded by 10% DEET, repellency to the binary ZA-SO aerosol formulations at 90 min was significantly less effective than DEET. However, mixtures formulated from ZA-SO and VA merit further study as potential repellents for protection of humans and domestic animals from biting and nuisance caused by mosquitoes. PMID:21337949

  11. Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

  12. Optimal dynamic discrimination of similar quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baiqing

    2005-07-01

    The techniques for identifying and separating similar molecules have always been very important to chemistry and other branches of science and engineering. Similar quantum systems share comparable Hamiltonians, so their eigenenergy levels, transition dipole moments, and therefore their ordinary observable properties are alike. Traditional analytical methods have mostly been restricted by working with the subtle differences in the physical and chemical properties of the similar species. Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) aims at magnifying the dissimilarity of the agents by actively controlling their quantum evolution, drawing on the extremely rich information embedded in their dynamics. ODD is developed based on the tremendous flexibility of Optimal Control Theory (OCT) and on the practical implementation of closed-loop learning control, which has become a more and more indispensable tool for controlling quantum processes. The ODD experimental paradigm is designed to combat a number of factors that are detrimental to the discrimination of similar molecules: laser pulse noise, signal detection errors, finite time resolution in the signals, and environmental decoherence effects. It utilizes either static signals or time series signal, the latter capable of providing more information. Simulations are performed in this dissertation progressing from the wave function to the density matrix formulation, in order to study the decoherence effects. Analysis of the results reveals the roles of the adverse factors, unravels the underlying mechanisms of ODD, and provides insights on laboratory implementation. ODD emphasizes the incorporation of algorithmic development and laboratory design, and seeks to bridge the gap between theoretical/computational chemistry and experimental chemistry, with the help from applied mathematics and computer science.

  13. Thermal adaptation in Drosophila serrata under conditions linked to its southern border: Unexpected patterns from laboratory selection suggest limited evolutionary potential

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andréa Magiafoglou; Ary Hoffmann

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the ability ofDrosophila serrata to adapt to thermal conditions over winter at the species southern border, replicate lines from three source locations were\\u000a held as discrete generations over three years at either 19‡C (40 generations) or temperatures fluctuating between 7‡C and\\u000a 18?C (20 generations). Populations in the fluctuating environment were maintained either with an adult 0‡C cold shock

  14. Multivariate Time Series Similarity Searching

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jimin; Zhu, Yuelong; Li, Shijin; Wan, Dingsheng; Zhang, Pengcheng

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate time series (MTS) datasets are very common in various financial, multimedia, and hydrological fields. In this paper, a dimension-combination method is proposed to search similar sequences for MTS. Firstly, the similarity of single-dimension series is calculated; then the overall similarity of the MTS is obtained by synthesizing each of the single-dimension similarity based on weighted BORDA voting method. The dimension-combination method could use the existing similarity searching method. Several experiments, which used the classification accuracy as a measure, were performed on six datasets from the UCI KDD Archive to validate the method. The results show the advantage of the approach compared to the traditional similarity measures, such as Euclidean distance (ED), cynamic time warping (DTW), point distribution (PD), PCA similarity factor (SPCA), and extended Frobenius norm (Eros), for MTS datasets in some ways. Our experiments also demonstrate that no measure can fit all datasets, and the proposed measure is a choice for similarity searches. PMID:24895665

  15. Hydrologic Conditions and Distribution of Selected Constituents in Water, Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1996 through 1998

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. Bartholomay; B. J. Tucker; L. C. Davis; M. R. Greene

    2000-09-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds and disposal wells at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, maintains a monitoring network at the INEEL to determine hydrologic trends and to delineate the movement to radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from the Snake River Plain aquifer during 1996-98. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEEL decreased or remained constant during 1996-98. Decreased concentrations are attributed to reduced rates of radioactive-waste disposal, sorption process, radioactive decay, and changes in waste-disposal practices. Detectable concentrations of chemical constituents in water from the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEEL were variable during 1996-98.

  16. Nontarget effect of entomopathogenic nematodes on larvae of twospotted lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and green lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Rojht, Helena; Kac, Milica; Trdan, Stanislav

    2009-08-01

    The nontarget effect of Steinernema feltiae, Steinernema carpocapsae, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, and three mixed suspensions of two species of entomopathogenic nematodes on the larvae of the twospotted lady beetle, Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and on the larvae of the lacewing Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), were studied in a laboratory bioassay. The assay was performed at three temperature (15, 20, and 25 degrees C) and at three different concentrations of the suspension (500, 2,500, and 5,000 infective juveniles [IJs]/ml). The larvae of A. bipunctata were more susceptible to nematode attack than the larvae of C. carnea. Four days after treatment, significantly the lowest mortality of A. bipunctata and C. carnea larvae was recorded at 15 degrees C, whereas no significant differences were noted between 20 and 25 degrees C. At 500 IJs/ml, the nematodes had significantly the lowest nontarget effect on the larvae of both aphid predators, whereas no significant differences in this regard were established between 2,500 and 5,000 IJs/ml. We conclude that the entomopathogenic nematodes under investigation exhibit a pronounced nontarget effect on the larvae of both predators mentioned. PMID:19736754

  17. Physiological and psychological responses to outdoor vs. laboratory cycling.

    PubMed

    Mieras, Molly E; Heesch, Matthew W S; Slivka, Dustin R

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the physiological and psychological responses to laboratory vs. outdoor cycling. Twelve recreationally trained male cyclists participated in an initial descriptive testing session and 2 experimental trials consisting of 1 laboratory and 1 outdoor session, in a randomized order. Participants were given a standardized statement instructing them to give the same perceived effort for both the laboratory and outdoor 40-km trials. Variables measured include power output, heart rate (HR), core temperature, skin temperature, body weight, urine specific gravity (USG), Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE), attentional focus, and environmental conditions. Wind speed was higher in the outdoor trial than in the laboratory trial (2.5 ± 0.6 vs. 0.0 ± 0.0 m·s-1, p = 0.02) whereas all other environmental conditions were similar. Power output (208.1 ± 10.2 vs. 163.4 ± 11.8 W, respectively, p < 0.001) and HR (152 ± 4 and 143 ± 6 b·min-1, respectively, p = 0.04) were higher in the outdoor trial than in the laboratory trial. Core temperature was similar, whereas skin temperature was cooler during the outdoor trial than during the laboratory trial (31.4 ± 0.3 vs. 33.0 ± 0.2° C, respectively, p < 0.001), thus creating a larger thermal gradient between the core and skin outdoors. No significant differences in body weight, USG, RPE, or attentional focus were observed between trials. These data indicate that outdoor cycling allows cyclists to exercise at a higher intensity than in laboratory cycling, despite similar environmental conditions and perceived exertion. In light of this, cyclists may want to ride at a higher perceived exertion in indoor settings to acquire the same benefit as they would from an outdoor ride. PMID:24476776

  18. Laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity and vapor pressure of sulfuric acid vapor under simulated conditions for the middle atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave absorption measurements at wavelengths of 13.4 and 3.6 cm were made in gaseous H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere under simulated conditions for the Venus middle atmosphere. The results suggest that abundances of gaseous H2SO4 on the order of 15-30 ppm could account for the absorption observed by radio occultation measurements at these wavelengths. They also imply that such abundances would correspond to saturation vapor pressure existing at or above the 46-48-km range, which correlates with the observed cloud base.

  19. Renewing the respect for similarity

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Shimon; Shahbazi, Reza

    2012-01-01

    In psychology, the concept of similarity has traditionally evoked a mixture of respect, stemming from its ubiquity and intuitive appeal, and concern, due to its dependence on the framing of the problem at hand and on its context. We argue for a renewed focus on similarity as an explanatory concept, by surveying established results and new developments in the theory and methods of similarity-preserving associative lookup and dimensionality reduction—critical components of many cognitive functions, as well as of intelligent data management in computer vision. We focus in particular on the growing family of algorithms that support associative memory by performing hashing that respects local similarity, and on the uses of similarity in representing structured objects and scenes. Insofar as these similarity-based ideas and methods are useful in cognitive modeling and in AI applications, they should be included in the core conceptual toolkit of computational neuroscience. In support of this stance, the present paper (1) offers a discussion of conceptual, mathematical, computational, and empirical aspects of similarity, as applied to the problems of visual object and scene representation, recognition, and interpretation, (2) mentions some key computational problems arising in attempts to put similarity to use, along with their possible solutions, (3) briefly states a previously developed similarity-based framework for visual object representation, the Chorus of Prototypes, along with the empirical support it enjoys, (4) presents new mathematical insights into the effectiveness of this framework, derived from its relationship to locality-sensitive hashing (LSH) and to concomitant statistics, (5) introduces a new model, the Chorus of Relational Descriptors (ChoRD), that extends this framework to scene representation and interpretation, (6) describes its implementation and testing, and finally (7) suggests possible directions in which the present research program can be extended in the future. PMID:22811664

  20. Selection of USSR foreign similarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disler, J. M. (principal investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The similarity regions in the United States and Canada were selected to parallel the conditions that affect labeling and classification accuracies in the U.S.S.R. indicator regions. In addition to climate, a significant condition that affects labeling and classification accuracies in the U.S.S.R. is the proportion of barley and wheat grown in a given region (based on sown areas). The following regions in the United States and Canada were determined to be similar to the U.S.S.R. indicator regions: (1) Montana agrophysical unit (APU) 104 corresponds to the Belorussia high barley region; (2) North Dakota and Minnesota APU 20 and secondary region southern Manitoba and Saskatchewan correspond to the Ural RSFSR barley and spring wheat region; (3) Montana APU 23 corresponds to he North Caucasus barley and winter wheat region. Selection criteria included climates, crop type, crop distribution, growth cycles, field sizes, and field shapes.

  1. Emissions and climate-relevant optical properties of pollutants emitted from a three-stone fire and the Berkeley-Darfur stove tested under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Preble, Chelsea V; Hadley, Odelle L; Gadgil, Ashok J; Kirchstetter, Thomas W

    2014-06-01

    Cooking in the developing world generates pollutants that endanger the health of billions of people and contribute to climate change. This study quantified pollutants emitted when cooking with a three-stone fire (TSF) and the Berkeley-Darfur Stove (BDS), the latter of which encloses the fire to increase fuel efficiency. The stoves were operated at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory testing facility with a narrow range of fuel feed rates to minimize performance variability. Fast (1 Hz) measurements of pollutants enabled discrimination between the stoves' emission profiles and development of woodsmoke-specific calibrations for the aethalometer (black carbon, BC) and DustTrak (fine particles, PM2.5). The BDS used 65±5% (average±95% confidence interval) of the wood consumed by the TSF and emitted 50±5% of the carbon monoxide emitted by the TSF for an equivalent cooking task, indicating its higher thermal efficiency and a modest improvement in combustion efficiency. The BDS reduced total PM2.5 by 50% but achieved only a 30% reduction in BC emissions. The BDS-emitted particles were, therefore, more sunlight-absorbing: the average single scattering albedo at 532 nm was 0.36 for the BDS and 0.47 for the TSF. Mass emissions of PM2.5 and BC varied more than emissions of CO and wood consumption over all tests, and emissions and wood consumption varied more among TSF than BDS tests. The international community and the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves have proposed performance targets for the highest tier of cookstoves that correspond to greater reductions in fuel consumption and PM2.5 emissions of approximately 65% and 95%, respectively, compared to baseline cooking with the TSF. Given the accompanying decrease in BC emissions for stoves that achieve this stretch goal and BC's extremely high global warming potential, the short-term climate change mitigation from avoided BC emissions could exceed that from avoided CO2 emissions. PMID:24684487

  2. Investigations on the efficacy of surface disinfection and surface cleaning procedures. 2. Laboratory testing of the efficacy under conditions simulating those of real-life.

    PubMed

    Werner, H P

    1975-08-01

    Using a standardised method (impression method by means of 'Rodac' plates and glass as well as ceramic surfaces as germ carriers) we tested for the efficacy of 3 surface disinfectants (aldehydes, aldehydes + detergent substances, phenol derivatives) and 3 disinfectant cleaning agents (aldehydes + detergent substances + wax) and 2 per cent soft soap solution on Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Sarcina lutea. The method enabled us to calculate the actual germ count reduction and also took account of the natural dying-rate of the test organisms. Their resistance to the different types of active substances varied greatly. Thus the 3 disinfectants had a better effect on Klebsiellae and Staphylococci than on Sarcinae. 2 of the 3 disinfectant cleaning agents, on the other hand, turned out to be less suitable for the elimination of Klebsiellae. It thus follows that Sarcina cannot be used as test organism for in-use tests (see Communication 1) unless the resistance of Staphylococci and Klebsiellae to the test preparation has first been established in laboratory experiments. The general question, namely whether in-use tests provide meaningful and accurate results remain to be elucidated. On the basis of our test results, the exclusive use of soap for cleaning floors, as a substitute of disinfection, should definitely be ruled out. Although soap reduces Gram-positive cocci well in actual practice, it is almost ineffective against problem germs such as Klebsiellae. What should be stipulated is the use of broad-spectrum disinfectants, i.e. they should, if possible, act equally well against different types of germs. From the commercially-available preparations that were tested, a phenol-base product gave the best results. On the basis of these results we venture to doubt that the use of aldehyde preparations which is customary at the moment, is the right approach to fight hospital infections. PMID:1106069

  3. Biological effects of the anti-parasitic chemotherapeutant emamectin benzoate on a non-target crustacean, the spot prawn (Pandalus platyceros Brandt, 1851) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Ikonomou, Michael G; Buday, Craig; Jordan, Jameson; Rehaume, Vicki; Cabecinha, Melissa; Dubetz, Cory; Chamberlain, Jon; Pittroff, Sabrina; Vallée, Kurtis; van Aggelen, Graham; Helbing, Caren C

    2012-02-01

    The potential impact of commercial salmon aquaculture along the coast of British Columbia on the health of non-target marine wildlife is of growing concern. In the current initiative, the biological effects on gene expression within spot prawn (Pandalus platyceros) exposed to the sea lice controlling agent, emamectin benzoate (EB; 0.1-4.8 mg/kg sediment), were investigated. A mean sediment/water partitioning coefficient (K(p)) was determined to be 21.81 and significant levels of EB were detected in the tail muscle tissue in all exposed animals. Animals selected for the experiment did not have eggs and were of similar weight. Significant mortality was observed within 8 days of EB treatment at concentrations between 0.1 and 0.8 mg/kg and there was no effect of EB on molting. Twelve spot prawn cDNA sequences were isolated from the tail muscle either by directed cloning or subtractive hybridization of control versus EB exposed tissues. Three of the transcripts most affected by EB exposure matched sequences encoding the 60S ribosomal protein L22, spliceosome RNA helicase WM6/UAP56, and the intracellular signal mediator histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 suggesting that translation, transcription regulation, and apoptosis pathways were impacted. The mRNA encoding the molting enzyme, ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase, was not affected by EB treatment. However, the expression of this transcript was extremely variable making it unsuitable for effects assessment. The results suggest that short-term exposure to EB can impact biological processes within this non-target crustacean. PMID:22088864

  4. Strain localization in olivine aggregates at high temperature: A laboratory comparison of constant-strain-rate and constant-stress boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. N.; Zimmerman, M. E.; Dillman, A. M.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    We performed high-strain torsion experiments on aggregates of Fo50 olivine to test the influence of imposed boundary conditions on localizing deformation. We deformed both solid and thin-walled cylinders of Fo50 either at constant strain rate or at constant stress. Samples deformed in constant-strain-rate experiments reached a peak stress followed by weakening at a continually decreasing weakening rate. In contrast, samples deformed in constant-stress experiments weakened at an accelerating weakening rate. Localization is manifested in samples deformed at constant stress as irregularities along strain markers, S-C foliations, and torsional buckling of thin-walled cylinders. In contrast, samples deformed at constant strain rate deformed homogeneously. Grain-boundary maps created with electron-backscatter-diffraction data indicate that high-strain regions in constant-stress samples correlate with finer grain sizes and stronger crystallographic fabrics. Since the dominant deformation mechanism is grain-size sensitive, heterogeneous recrystallization leads to strain localization in finer-grained regions. However, variations in strength are not large enough to initiate localization in constant-strain-rate experiments. The magnitude of grain-size heterogeneity remains relatively constant with increasing strain, implying that shear zones are maintained throughout the experiments even as non-localizing regions recrystallize. Based on our results, we propose that deformation driven at constant stress in Earth's lithosphere will easily localize even if structural heterogeneities are not initially present.

  5. Sibling similarity in family formation.

    PubMed

    Raab, Marcel; Fasang, Anette Eva; Karhula, Aleksi; Erola, Jani

    2014-12-01

    Sibling studies have been widely used to analyze the impact of family background on socioeconomic and, to a lesser extent, demographic outcomes. We contribute to this literature with a novel research design that combines sibling comparisons and sequence analysis to analyze longitudinal family-formation trajectories of siblings and unrelated persons. This allows us to scrutinize in a more rigorous way whether sibling similarity exists in family-formation trajectories and whether siblings' shared background characteristics, such as parental education and early childhood family structure, can account for similarity in family formation. We use Finnish register data from 1987 through 2007 to construct longitudinal family-formation trajectories in young adulthood for siblings and unrelated dyads (N = 14,257 dyads). Findings show that family formation is moderately but significantly more similar for siblings than for unrelated dyads, also after controlling for crucial parental background characteristics. Shared parental background characteristics add surprisingly little to account for sibling similarity in family formation. Instead, gender and the respondents' own education are more decisive forces in the stratification of family formation. Yet, family internal dynamics seem to reinforce this stratification such that siblings have a higher probability to experience similar family-formation patterns. In particular, patterns that correspond with economic disadvantage are concentrated within families. This is in line with a growing body of research highlighting the importance of family structure in the reproduction of social inequality. PMID:25367282

  6. Turning Laboratory \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Brent Jenkins

    Sometimes, a student laboratory exercise will fail. Our normal approach to such an event is to work to prevent its occurrence. Students frequently get frustrated when laboratory results differ from their expectations, and instructors may be embarrassed, disappointed, or even panic-stricken by the outcomes. Laboratory failures can provide excellent learning opportunities for students, however, if they are handled properly. Unexpected

  7. Similarity retrieval of cardiac reports.

    PubMed

    Syeda-Mahmood, Tanveer

    2010-01-01

    Mining medical reports can reveal important information correlating diagnosis with raw measurements helping in decision support. In this paper we address the problem of finding similar measurement reports for aiding clinical decision support. Specifically, we present a new approach to generating document class models for measurement reports using a multi-scale feature-value kernel. The class models serve as natural feature selection mechanism as well as indexes to large report collections. A document retrieval algorithm based on document class models is presented to enable similarity retrieval of pre-diagnosed reports. Collaborative filtering-guided assembly of associated disease labels is used to achieve clinical decision support. PMID:21096324

  8. An update of hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer and perched groundwater zones, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, emphasis 2006-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1952, radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged to infiltration ponds (also called percolation ponds), evaporation ponds, and disposal wells at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has affected water quality in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and perched groundwater zones underlying the INL. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, maintains groundwater monitoring networks at the INL to determine hydrologic trends, and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer and in perched groundwater zones. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from aquifer and perched groundwater wells in the USGS groundwater monitoring networks during 2006-08. Water in the Snake River Plain aquifer primarily moves through fractures and interflow zones in basalt, generally flows southwestward, and eventually discharges at springs along the Snake River. The aquifer primarily is recharged from infiltration of irrigation water, infiltration of streamflow, groundwater inflow from adjoining mountain drainage basins, and infiltration of precipitation. From March-May 2005 to March-May 2008, water levels in wells generally remained constant or rose slightly in the southwestern corner of the INL. Water levels declined in the central and northern parts of the INL. The declines ranged from about 1 to 3 feet in the central part of the INL, to as much as 9 feet in the northern part of the INL. Water levels in perched groundwater wells around the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATRC) also declined. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INL generally decreased or remained constant during 2006-08. Decreases in concentrations were attributed to decreased rates of radioactive-waste disposal, radioactive decay, changes in waste-disposal methods, and dilution from recharge and underflow. In April or October 2008, reportable concentrations of tritium in groundwater ranged from 810 ? 70 to 8,570 ? 190 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), and the tritium plume extended south-southwestward in the general direction of groundwater flow. Tritium concentrations in water from wells completed in shallow perched groundwater at the ATRC were less than the reporting levels. Tritium concentrations in deep perched groundwater exceeded the reporting level in 11 wells during at least one sampling event during 2006-08 at the ATRC. Tritium concentrations from one or more zones in each well were reportable in water samples collected at various depths in six wells equipped with multi-level WestbayTM packer sampling systems. Concentrations of strontium-90 in water from 24 of 52 aquifer wells sampled during April or October 2008 exceeded the reporting level. Concentrations ranged from 2.2 ? 0.7 to 32.7 ? 1.2 pCi/L. Strontium-90 has not been detected within the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer beneath the ATRC partly because of the exclusive use of waste-disposal ponds and lined evaporation ponds rather than using the disposal well for radioactive-wastewater disposal at ATRC. At the ATRC, the strontium-90 concentration in water from one well completed in shallow perched groundwater was less than the reporting level. During at least one sampling event during 2006-08, concentrations of strontium-90 in water from nine wells completed in deep perched groundwater at the ATRC were greater than reporting levels. Concentrations ranged from 2.1?0.7 to 70.5?1.8 pCi/L. At the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), the reporting level was exceeded in water from two wells completed in deep perched groundwater. During 2006-08, concentrations of cesium-137, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239, -240 (undivided), and americium-241 were less than the reporting level in water samples from all wells and all zones in wells equipped with multi-level WestbayTM packer sampling systems

  9. Water Chemistry Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, David; And Others

    This manual of laboratory experiments in water chemistry serves a dual function of illustrating fundamental chemical principles of dilute aqueous systems and of providing the student with some familiarity with the chemical measurements commonly used in water and wastewater analysis. Experiments are grouped in categories on the basis of similar

  10. Learning Summarization by Using Similarities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capus, Laurence; Tourigny, Nicole

    1998-01-01

    Discusses a research project aimed at designing a computer-based system to help students learn to summarize French texts by using a method called Case-Based Reasoning (CBR). Such a system uses previous, similar situations to make a new summary by reusing and adapting the same summarization rules. The rationale underlying the learning of text…

  11. Crowdsourced Trace Similarity with Smartphones

    E-print Network

    Zeinalipour, Demetris

    1 Crowdsourced Trace Similarity with Smartphones Demetrios Zeinalipour-Yazti, Member, IEEE Gunopulos Member, IEEE Abstract--Smartphones are nowadays equipped with a number of sensors, such as WiFi, GPS, accelerometers, etc. This capability allows smartphone users to easily engage in crowdsourced

  12. Active Browsing using Similarity Pyramids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jau-Yuen Chen; Charles A. Bouman; John C. Dalton

    In this paper, we describe a new approach to managing large image databases which we call active browsing. Active browsing integrates relevance feedback into the browsing environment, so that users can modify the database's organization to suit the desired task. Our method is based on a similarity pyramid data structure which hierarchically organizes the database so that it can be

  13. Technical note: On estimating conditions for simulating velocity-sensitive corrosion in the rotating cylinder electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.C.

    1999-12-01

    Simulation of velocity-sensitive corrosion in the laboratory for predicting similar corrosion in the field is of ongoing interest. Such an approach seems to be especially practical when corrosion is controlled by the rate of mass transport to or from the surface. Such control, when measured under appropriate conditions in the laboratory, should be observed in the field. The present research goal was to review equations that allow the corrosion practitioner to estimate easily velocities in the laboratory that would simulate flow conditions in other geometries.

  14. What causes similarity in catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    One of the biggest issues in hydrology is how to handle the heterogeneity of catchment properties at different scales. But is this really such a big issue? Is this problem not merely the consequence of how we conceptualise and how we model catchments? Is there not far more similarity than we observe. Maybe we are not looking at the right things or at the right scale to see the similarity. The identity of catchments is largely determined by: the landscape, the ecosystem living on the landscape, and the geology, in that order. Soils, which are often seen as a crucial aspect of hydrological behaviour, are far less important, as will be demonstrated. The main determinants of hydrological behaviour are: the landscape composition, the rooting depth and the phenology. These determinants are a consequence of landscape and ecosystem evolution, which, in turn, are the manifestations of entropy production. There are striking similarities between catchments. The different runoff processes from hillslopes are linked and similar in different environments (McDonnell, 2013). Wetlands behave similarly all over the world. The key is to classify landscapes and to link the ecosystems living on them to climate. The ecosystem then is the main controller of hydrological behaviour. Besides phenology, the rooting depth is key in determining runoff behaviour. Both are strongly linked to climate and much less to soil properties. An example is given of how rooting depth is determined by climate, and how rooting depth can be predicted without calibration, providing a strong constraints on the prediction of rainfall partitioning and catchment runoff.

  15. Evaluating gender similarities and differences using metasynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zell, Ethan; Krizan, Zlatan; Teeter, Sabrina R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the common lay assumption that males and females are profoundly different, Hyde (2005) used data from 46 meta-analyses to demonstrate that males and females are highly similar. Nonetheless, the gender similarities hypothesis has remained controversial. Since Hyde's provocative report, there has been an explosion of meta-analytic interest in psychological gender differences. We utilized this enormous collection of 106 meta-analyses and 386 individual meta-analytic effects to reevaluate the gender similarities hypothesis. Furthermore, we employed a novel data-analytic approach called metasynthesis (Zell & Krizan, 2014) to estimate the average difference between males and females and to explore moderators of gender differences. The average, absolute difference between males and females across domains was relatively small (d = 0.21, SD = 0.14), with the majority of effects being either small (46%) or very small (39%). Magnitude of differences fluctuated somewhat as a function of the psychological domain (e.g., cognitive variables, social and personality variables, well-being), but remained largely constant across age, culture, and generations. These findings provide compelling support for the gender similarities hypothesis, but also underscore conditions under which gender differences are most pronounced. PMID:25581005

  16. Active browsing using similarity pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jau-Yuen; Bouman, Charles A.; Dalton, John C.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach to managing large image databases, which we call active browsing. Active browsing integrates relevance feedback into the browsing environment, so that users can modify the database's organization to suit the desired task. Our method is based on a similarity pyramid data structure, which hierarchically organizes the database, so that it can be efficiently browsed. At coarse levels, the similarity pyramid allows users to view the database as large clusters of similar images. Alternatively, users can 'zoom into' finer levels to view individual images. We discuss relevance feedback for the browsing process, and argue that it is fundamentally different from relevance feedback for more traditional search-by-query tasks. We propose two fundamental operations for active browsing: pruning and reorganization. Both of these operations depend on a user-defined relevance set, which represents the image or set of images desired by the user. We present statistical methods for accurately pruning the database, and we propose a new 'worm hole' distance metric for reorganizing the database, so that members of the relevance set are grouped together.

  17. Emergency Procedure Training for Reactor Operators at the High Flux Beam Reactor for Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyer, Ronald

    A project was conducted to analyze, design, develop, implement, and evaluate an instructional unit intended to improve the diagnostic skills of operating personnel in responding to abnormal and emergency conditions at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Research was conducted on the occurrence of emergencies at similar

  18. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors can affect test results, including: sex age race medical history general health specific foods drugs you are taking how closely your follow preparatory instructions variations in laboratory ...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  10. General sound classification and similarity in MICHAEL CASEY

    E-print Network

    Casey, Michael

    General sound classification and similarity in MPEG-7 MICHAEL CASEY MERL Cambridge Research Laboratory, Cambridge, USA E-mail: casey@merl.com We introduce a system for generalised sound classification of environmental sounds, musical instruments, music genre and human speakers. In addition to classification

  11. BAYESIAN ALIGNMENT OF SIMILARITY SHAPES

    PubMed Central

    Mardia, Kanti V.; Fallaize, Christopher J.; Barber, Stuart; Jackson, Richard M.; Theobald, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian model for the alignment of two point configurations under the full similarity transformations of rotation, translation and scaling. Other work in this area has concentrated on rigid body transformations, where scale information is preserved, motivated by problems involving molecular data; this is known as form analysis. We concentrate on a Bayesian formulation for statistical shape analysis. We generalize the model introduced by Green and Mardia for the pairwise alignment of two unlabeled configurations to full similarity transformations by introducing a scaling factor to the model. The generalization is not straight-forward, since the model needs to be reformulated to give good performance when scaling is included. We illustrate our method on the alignment of rat growth profiles and a novel application to the alignment of protein domains. Here, scaling is applied to secondary structure elements when comparing protein folds; additionally, we find that one global scaling factor is not in general sufficient to model these data and, hence, we develop a model in which multiple scale factors can be included to handle different scalings of shape components. PMID:24052809

  12. Conceptual Similarity Promotes Generalization of Higher Order Fear Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; White, Allison J.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that conceptual similarity promotes generalization of conditioned fear. Using a sensory preconditioning procedure, three groups of subjects learned an association between two cues that were conceptually similar, unrelated, or mismatched. Next, one of the cues was paired with a shock. The other cue was then reintroduced to…

  13. Asymptotic similarity in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Richard D.

    The turbulent boundary layer is one of the most fundamental and important applications of fluid mechanics. Despite great practical interest and its direct impact on frictional drag among its many important consequences, no theory absent of significant inference or assumption exists. Numerical simulations and empirical guidance are used to produce models and adequate predictions, but even minor improvements in modeling parameters or physical understanding could translate into significant improvements in the efficiency of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic vehicles. Classically, turbulent boundary layers and fully-developed turbulent channels and pipes are considered members of the same "family," with similar "inner" versus "outer" descriptions. However, recent advances in experiments, simulations, and data processing have questioned this, and, as a result, their fundamental physics. To address a full range of pressure gradient boundary layers, a new approach to the governing equations and physical description of wall-bounded flows is formulated, using a two variable similarity approach and many of the tools of the classical method with slight but significant variations. A new set of similarity requirements for the characteristic scales of the problem is found, and when these requirements are applied to the classical "inner" and "outer" scales, a "similarity map" is developed providing a clear prediction of what flow conditions should result in self-similar forms. An empirical model with a small number of parameters and a form reminiscent of Coles' "wall plus wake" is developed for the streamwise Reynolds stress, and shown to fit experimental and numerical data from a number of turbulent boundary layers as well as other wall-bounded flows. It appears from this model and its scaling using the free-stream velocity that the true asymptotic form of u'2 may not become self-evident until Retheta ? 275,000 or delta+ ? 105, if not higher. A perturbation expansion made possible by the novel inclusion of the scaled streamwise coordinate is used to make an excellent prediction of the shear Reynolds stress in zero pressure gradient boundary layers and channel flows, requiring only a streamwise mean velocity profile and the new similarity map. Extension to other flows is promising, though more information about the normal Reynolds stresses is needed. This expansion is further used to infer a three layer structure in the turbulent boundary layer, and modified two layer structure in fully-developed flows, by using the classical inner and logarithmic profiles to determine which portions of the boundary layer are dominated by viscosity, inertia, or turbulence. A new inner function for U+ is developed, based on the three layer description, providing a much more simplified representative form of the streamwise mean velocity nearest the wall.

  14. Laboratory formularies.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratories face increasing costs along with increased expectation to ensure appropriate use of diagnostic tests by physicians. One administrative mechanism that has been used successfully for this purpose is the laboratory formulary. Modeled after drug formularies, this is simply a list of diagnostic tests approved for use in a particular setting, possibly including additional restrictions regarding who may order a particular test and under what circumstances. This brief review summarizes the principles underlying laboratory formularies and suggests strategies for using them effectively. PMID:24091098

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hot spot mobile laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Buddemeier

    1999-01-01

    Gross alpha\\/beta\\/tritium liquid The Hot Spot Mobile Laboratory is an asset used to analyze samples (some high hazard) from the field. Field laboratories allow the quick turnaround of samples needed to establish weapon condition and hazard assessment for the protection of responders and the public. The Hot Spot Lab is configured to fly anywhere in the world and is staffed

  16. Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions

    E-print Network

    in habitat conditions. Stream flows, water temperatures, substrate characteristics and other combined watershed processes and human activities that influence flow, water quality, upland and riparian conditions feet in one mile The watershed includes approximately 760 miles of perennial streams and 1,440 miles

  17. Self-similarity in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timashev, S. F.

    2000-02-01

    A general phenomenological approach to the analysis of experimental temporal, spatial and energetic series for extracting truly physical non-model parameters ("passport data") is presented, which may be used to characterize and distinguish the evolution as well as the spatial and energetic structure of any open nonlinear dissipative system. This methodology is based on a postulate concerning the crucial information contained in the sequences of non-regularities of the measured dynamic variable (temporal, spatial, energetic). In accordance with this approach, multi-parametric formulas for dynamic variable power spectra as well as for structural functions of different orders are identical for every spatial-temporal-energetic level of the system under consideration. In effect, this entails the introduction of a new kind of self-similarity in Nature. An algorithm has been developed for obtaining as many "passport data" as are necessary for the characterization of a dynamic system. Applications of this approach in the analysis of various experimental series (temporal, spatial, energetic) demonstrate its potential for defining adequate phenomenological parameters of different dynamic processes and structures.

  18. Rethinking Laboratories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mark J. Volkmann

    2003-09-01

    Although research demonstrates the value of inquiry-based science, many curriculum materials are still based on traditional approaches that fail to engage students in inquiry. Using an example of a typical cookbook laboratory--the "rusty nail," this article describes an inquiry analysis tool and adaptation principles that were created to help teachers evaluate and adapt laboratory instructional materials to be more inquiry-oriented.

  19. Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-05-01

    Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

  20. Similarity facilitates relationships on social networks: a field experiment on facebook.

    PubMed

    Martin, Angélique; Jacob, Céline; Guéguen, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    People interact more readily with someone with whom they think they have something in common, but the effect of an incidental similarity has never been examined on social networks. Facebook users were contacted by a stranger who also possessed a Facebook page and who asked them to become his friend. The request message contained one item of similarity, two items of similarity, or none. Compliance to the request was the dependent variable. Increased compliance to the request was found when comparing the two similarity conditions with the control no-similarity condition. However, no difference was found between the two similarity conditions. Similarity appears to foster relationships on social networks. PMID:24340812

  1. Top-k Set Similarity Joins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chuan Xiao; Wei Wang; Xuemin Lin; Haichuan Shang

    2009-01-01

    Similarity join is a useful primitive operation un- derlying many applications, such as near duplicate Web page detection, data integration, and pattern recognition. Traditiona l similarity joins require a user to specify a similarity threshold. In this paper, we study a variant of the similarity join, termed top-k set similarity join. It returns the top-k pairs of records ranked by

  2. Similarity Scaling Over a Steep Alpine Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Daniel F.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Higgins, Chad W.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the validity of similarity scaling over a steep mountain slope (30-41^circ ). The results are based on eddy-covariance data collected during the Slope Experiment near La Fouly (SELF-2010); a field campaign conducted in a narrow valley of the Swiss Alps during summer 2010. The turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum are found to vary significantly with height in the first few metres above the inclined surface. These variations exceed by an order of magnitude the well-accepted maximum 10 % required for the applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in the surface layer. This could be due to a surface layer that is too thin to be detected or to the presence of advective fluxes. It is shown that local scaling can be a useful tool in these cases when surface-layer theory breaks down. Under convective conditions and after removing the effects of self-correlation, the normalized standard deviations of slope-normal wind velocity, temperature and humidity scale relatively well with z/\\varLambda , where z is the measurement height and \\varLambda (z) the local Obukhov length. However, the horizontal velocity fluctuations are not correlated with z/\\varLambda under all stability regimes. The non-dimensional gradients of wind velocity and temperature are also investigated. For those, the local scaling appears inappropriate, particularly at night when shallow drainage flows prevail and lead to negative wind-speed gradients close to the surface.

  3. Dependency Similarity, Attraction and Perceived Happiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Janak

    1978-01-01

    Subjects were asked to evaluate either a similar personality or a dissimilar personality. Subjects rated similar others more positively than dissimilar others and, additionally, perceived similar others as more helpful and sympathetic than dissimilar others. (Author)

  4. Laboratory modeling of pulsed regimes of electron cyclotron instabilities in a mirror confined plasma produced by ECR discharge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergey Golubev; Dmitry Mansfeld; Alexander Vodopyanov; Andrei Demekhov; Alexander Shalashov

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a laboratory setup based on a magnetic mirror trap with plasma sustained by a gyrotron radiation under the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions for investigation of the cyclotron instabilities similar to the ones which take place in space plasmas. Three regimes of the cyclotron instability are studied. The first regime is related to quasi-periodic pulsed

  5. Similarities in acute temperature preferences of freshwater fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, D. (Muddy Run Ecological Lab., Drumore, PA); Schutsky, R.M.; Purdy, E.J. Jr.; Silver, C.

    1981-01-01

    A statistical analysis of new and published laboratory data revealed strong geographic similarities in acute (up to 4-h) temperature preferences for several freshwater fishes. Regression models developed from our laboratory studies predicted acute temperature preferences of species from other geographic areas. Species within a family (three cyprinids, two ictalurids, and six centrarchids were tested) have similar acute preferenda, except that white crappie (Pomoxis annularis) differs from other centrarchids. For the species analyzed, acclimation temperature is the only significant variable affecting acute preferenda and accounted for up to 82% of the total variation. These emerging generalities should minimize the need for further site-specific studies of acute temperature preference for individual species and thus should result in substantial savings in money and time.

  6. Cross-reactivity of steroid hormone immunoassays: clinical significance and two-dimensional molecular similarity prediction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunoassays are widely used in clinical laboratories for measurement of plasma/serum concentrations of steroid hormones such as cortisol and testosterone. Immunoassays can be performed on a variety of standard clinical chemistry analyzers, thus allowing even small clinical laboratories to do analysis on-site. One limitation of steroid hormone immunoassays is interference caused by compounds with structural similarity to the target steroid of the assay. Interfering molecules include structurally related endogenous compounds and their metabolites as well as drugs such as anabolic steroids and synthetic glucocorticoids. Methods Cross-reactivity of a structurally diverse set of compounds were determined for the Roche Diagnostics Elecsys assays for cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate, estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone. These data were compared and contrasted to package insert data and published cross-reactivity studies for other marketed steroid hormone immunoassays. Cross-reactivity was computationally predicted using the technique of two-dimensional molecular similarity. Results The Roche Elecsys Cortisol and Testosterone II assays showed a wider range of cross-reactivity than the DHEA sulfate, Estradiol II, and Progesterone II assays. 6-Methylprednisolone and prednisolone showed high cross-reactivity for the cortisol assay, with high likelihood of clinically significant effect for patients administered these drugs. In addition, 21-deoxycortisol likely produces clinically relevant cross-reactivity for cortisol in patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, while 11-deoxycortisol may produce clinically relevant cross-reactivity in 11?-hydroxylase deficiency or following metyrapone challenge. Several anabolic steroids may produce clinically significant false positives on the testosterone assay, although interpretation is limited by sparse pharmacokinetic data for some of these drugs. Norethindrone therapy may impact immunoassay measurement of testosterone in women. Using two-dimensional similarity calculations, all compounds with high cross-reactivity also showed a high degree of similarity to the target molecule of the immunoassay. Conclusions Compounds producing cross-reactivity in steroid hormone immunoassays generally have a high degree of structural similarity to the target hormone. Clinically significant interactions can occur with structurally similar drugs (e.g., prednisolone and cortisol immunoassays; methyltestosterone and testosterone immunoassays) or with endogenous compounds such as 21-deoxycortisol that can accumulate to very high concentrations in certain disease conditions. Simple similarity calculations can help triage compounds for future testing of assay cross-reactivity. PMID:25071417

  7. Mice and men: Making the most of our similarities

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, J.

    1994-12-31

    Because a big chunk of the genetic information that goes into building a mouse is also needed to put together a human, mice are often employed in the laboratory as genetic stunt doubles for man. In fact, the similarities between sections of human and mouse DNA enable researchers working with mouse genes to make surprisingly accurate predictions about the location and function of their human counterparts. For over 40 years, ORNL researchers have been studying the nuances of the genetic relationship between mice and humans, sometimes with considerable fanfare, other times in relative obscurity, but always with the goals of increasing the understanding of the subtle language of genetics and improving human lives. Some of the laboratory`s latest research in this area is described in this article.

  8. Exploring perceptually similar cases with multi-dimensional scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Yongyi; Wernick, Miles N.; Nishikawa, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    Retrieving a set of known lesions similar to the one being evaluated might be of value for assisting radiologists to distinguish between benign and malignant clustered microcalcifications (MCs) in mammograms. In this work, we investigate how perceptually similar cases with clustered MCs may relate to one another in terms of their underlying characteristics (from disease condition to image features). We first conduct an observer study to collect similarity scores from a group of readers (five radiologists and five non-radiologists) on a set of 2,000 image pairs, which were selected from 222 cases based on their images features. We then explore the potential relationship among the different cases as revealed by their similarity ratings. We apply the multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) technique to embed all the cases in a 2-D plot, in which perceptually similar cases are placed in close vicinity of one another based on their level of similarity. Our results show that cases having different characteristics in their clustered MCs are accordingly placed in different regions in the plot. Moreover, cases of same pathology tend to be clustered together locally, and neighboring cases (which are more similar) tend to be also similar in their clustered MCs (e.g., cluster size and shape). These results indicate that subjective similarity ratings from the readers are well correlated with the image features of the underlying MCs of the cases, and that perceptually similar cases could be of diagnostic value for discriminating between malignant and benign cases.

  9. Laboratory diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the first major goals of the microbiology laboratory is to isolate or detect clinically significant microorganisms from an affected site and, if more than one type of microorganism is present, to isolate them in approximately the same ratio as occurs in vivo. Whether an isolate is “clinically...

  10. Appalachian Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education opportunities, and seminars. Also features information on the other UMCES laboratories.

  11. Measuring Similarity between Flamenco Rhythmic Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Guastavino; Francisco Gómez; Godfried Toussaint; Fabrice Marandola; Emilia Gómez

    2009-01-01

    Music similarity underlies a large part of a listener's experience, as it relates to familiarity and associations between different pieces or parts. Rhythmic similarity has received scant research attention in comparison with other aspects of music similarity such as melody or harmony. Mathematical measures of rhythmic similarity have been proposed, but none of them has been compared to human judgments.

  12. Laboratory Rodent Welfare: Thinking Outside the Cage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Balcombe

    2010-01-01

    This commentary presents the case against housing rats and mice in laboratory cages; the commentary bases its case on their sentience, natural history, and the varied detriments of laboratory conditions. The commentary gives 5 arguments to support this position: (a) rats and mice have a high degree of sentience and can suffer, (b) laboratory environments cause suffering, (c) rats and

  13. Lunar laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  14. Laboratory accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1998-08-01

    Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

  15. The Behavior Of Matter Under Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerels, F.; Méndez, M.; Agueros, M.; Baring, M.; Barret, D.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Cackett, E.; Cottam, J.; Diaz Trigo, M.; Fox, D.; Garcia, M.; Gotthelf, E.; Hermsen, W.; Ho, W.; Hurley, K.; Konker, P.; Juett, A.; Kaaret, P.; Kargaltsev, O.; Lattimer, J.; Matt, G.; Özel, F.; Pavlov, G.; Rutledge, R.; Smith, R.; Stella, L.; Strohmayer, T.; Tananbaum, H.; Uttley, P.; van Kerkwijk, M.; Weisskopf, M.; Zane, S.

    The cores of neutron stars harbor the highest matter densities known to occur in nature, up to several times the densities in atomic nuclei. Similarly, magnetic field strengths can exceed the strongest fields generated in terrestrial laboratories by ten orders of magnitude. Hyperon-dominated matter, deconfined quark matter, superfluidity, even superconductivity are predicted in neutron stars. Similarly, quantum electrodynamics predicts that in strong magnetic fields the vacuum becomes birefringent. The properties of matter under such conditions is governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and Quantum Electrodynamics (QED), and the close study of the properties of neutron stars offers the unique opportunity to test and explore the richness of QCD and QED in a regime that is utterly beyond the reach of terrestrial experiments. Experimentally, this is almost virgin territory.

  16. A Distance and Angle Similarity Measure Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin; Korfhage, Robert R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses similarity measures that are used in information retrieval to improve precision and recall ratios and presents a combined vector-based distance and angle measure to make similarity measurement more scientific and accurate. Suggests directions for future research. (LRW)

  17. Ngram similarity and distance Grzegorz Kondrak

    E-print Network

    Kondrak, Greg

    names, it is helpful to recognize that the similarity between Toradol and Tegretol is greater than the similarity between Toradol and Inderal. The problem of measuring string simi­ larity occurs in a variety

  18. Classical Conditioning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Palacios, Miss Miller, Mr. Rowser

    2008-04-01

    !!Classical Conditioning!! Classical conditioning is the use of Pavlovian conditioning procedures where a neutral stimulus becomes capable of evoking a response through pairing with an unconditioned stimulus. Click the link below to get an introduction into classical conditioning. Introduction to Classical Conditioning Now that you\\'ve been introduced to classical conditioning, view the clip at the link below, ...

  19. Archimedes Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Proving that geometry can be more fun than a barrel of monkeys, Archimedes Laboratory is "an 'intuitive' puzzle site with fewer formulas and more visuals, which may encourage students learning this science or just constitute a platform for reflection." Probably the most strictly educational section of the site is Math to Discover, which contains discussions of the history of numbers and mathematical patterns, to name a few. Also of interest are the Puzzles to Make and Puzzles to Solve sections. Visitors can follow online instructions to create geometrical curiosities or browse a small selection of impossible object images.

  20. Distances and Similarities of Saturated Computational Verbs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tao Yang

    2006-01-01

    The distance and similarity between two computa- tional verbs are very important to many applications involving the comparison of computational verbs. For example, in computa- tional verb inferences, the similarities among computational verbs decide the firing levels of computational verb rules. In this paper, the comprehensive definitions of verb distance and similarity were given based on the saturated evolving functions

  1. Tsunamis and meteorological tsunamis: similarities and differences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. B. Rabinovich; S. Monserrat

    2003-01-01

    Destructive seiche oscillations occasionally generated in certain bays and inlets are mainly associated with two natural forcing phenomena: Seismic activity (tsunamis), and atmospheric disturbances (meteotsunamis). Despite their different origin, both types are modified and amplified by topography in a similar way and produce similar catastrophic effects in coastal areas. Due to these similarities, it is often difficult to distinguish between

  2. Phonetic alignment and similarity Grzegorz Kondrak

    E-print Network

    Kondrak, Greg

    Phonetic alignment and similarity Grzegorz Kondrak Department of Computing Science University@cs.ualberta.ca April 4, 2003 Abstract. The computation of the optimal phonetic alignment and the phonetic similarity be that employs a scoring scheme for computing phonetic similarity between phonetic segments on the basis

  3. Music Similarity Measures: What's the use?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-julien Aucouturier; François Pachet

    2002-01-01

    Electronic Music Distribution (EMD) is in demand of robust, automatically extracted music descriptors. We introduce a timbral similarity measures for comparing music titles. This measure is based on a Gaussian model of cepstrum coefficients. We describe the timbre extractor and the corresponding timbral similarity relation. We describe experiments in assessing the quality of the similarity relation, and show that the

  4. Introduction Speech and non-speech exhibit similar spectrally contrastive

    E-print Network

    Holt, Lori L.

    in 3 noise conditions Perception of coarticulated speech with contrastively enhanced spectrotemporal Conclusions General, non-speech-specific contrast enhancement can benefit recognition of coarticulated speechIntroduction Speech and non-speech exhibit similar spectrally contrastive context effects on speech

  5. Accurate Learning of Word Usage: Differentiating Semantically Similar Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adachi, Takanori

    2003-01-01

    Sought to determine optimal conditions for learning accurate word usage in Japanese from limited exposure to exemplars. Results indicate that having varied type exemplars that show clear distinctions among semantically similar words promotes accuracy of usage, as measured by learners' ability to extend a word's core meaning to more abstract or…

  6. Geoengineering characterization of welded tuffs from laboratory and field investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Nimick, F.B.; Board, M.P.

    1984-12-31

    Welded tuff beneath Yucca Mountain adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is being considered for development as a high-level radioactive waste repository by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Because access into Yucca Mountain has been limited to borehole explorations, early geoengineering materials characterizations have been derived from laboratory tests on cores from Yucca Mountain and from laboratory and field tests on welded tuffs located in G-Tunnel on the NTS. G-Tunnel contains welded tuffs that have similar properties and stress states to those at Yucca Mountain and has been the location for in situ rock mechanics testing. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the geoengineering material property data obtained to date and to compare appropriate laboratory and field data from G-Tunnel to findings from Yucca Mountain. Geomechanical and thermal data are provided and are augmented by limited geological and hydrological data. A comparison of results of laboratory measurements on tuffs from Yucca Mountain and G-Tunnel indicates good agreement between the bulk densities, saturations, moduli of elasticity, Poisson`s ratios, and P-wave velocities. The G-Tunnel tuff has slightly lower thermal conductivity, tensile strength, compressive strength and slightly higher matrix permeability than does the welded tuff near the proposed repository horizon at Yucca Mountain. From a laboratory-to-field scaling perspective, the modulus of deformation shows the most sensitivity to field conditions because of the presence of the joints found in the field. 14 references, 1 table.

  7. Geoengineering characterization of welded tuffs from laboratory and field investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Nimick, F.B.; Board, M.P.

    1984-12-31

    Welded tuff beneath Yucca Mountain adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is being considered for development as a high-level radioactive waste repository by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Because access into Yucca Mountain has been limited to borehole explorations, early geoengineering materials characterizations have been derived from laboratory tests on cores from Yucca Mountain and from laboratory and field tests on welded tuffs located in G-Tunnel on the NTS. G-Tunnel contains welded tuffs that have similar properties and stress states to those at Yucca Mountain and has been the location for in situ rock mechanics testing. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the geoengineering material property data obtained to date and to compare appropriate laboratory and field data from G-Tunnel to findings from Yucca Mountain. Geomechanical and thermal data are provided and are augmented by limited geological and hydrological data. A comparison of results of laboratory measurements on tuffs from Yucca Mountain and G-Tunnel indicates good agreement between the bulk densities, saturations, moduli of elasticity, Poisson`s ratios, and P-wave velocities. The G-Tunnel tuff has slightly lower thermal conductivity, tensile strength, compressive strength and slightly higher matrix permeability than does the welded tuff near the proposed repository horizon at Yucca Mountain. From a laboratory-to-field scaling perspective, the modulus of deformation shows the most sensitivity to field conditions because of the presence of joints found in the field. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Self-similar continued root approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluzman, S.; Yukalov, V. I.

    2012-12-01

    A novel method of summing asymptotic series is advanced. Such series repeatedly arise when employing perturbation theory in powers of a small parameter for complicated problems of condensed matter physics, statistical physics, and various applied problems. The method is based on the self-similar approximation theory involving self-similar root approximants. The constructed self-similar continued roots extrapolate asymptotic series to finite values of the expansion parameter. The self-similar continued roots contain, as a particular case, continued fractions and Padé approximants. A theorem on the convergence of the self-similar continued roots is proved. The method is illustrated by several examples from condensed-matter physics.

  9. Laboratory spectroscopy of HED meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, M.; Coradini, A.; Carli, C.; Ammannito, E.; Consolmagno, G.; De sanctis, M.; Di Iorio, T.; Turrini, D.

    2011-12-01

    4 Vesta is one of the largest and the most massive asteroid in the Main Asteroid Belt. This asteroid possesses a basaltic surface and apparently formed and differentiated very early in the history of the solar system. There are strong evidences that indicate Vesta as the parent body of Howardites, Diogenites and Eucrites (HEDs). HED meteorites are a subgroup of achondrite meteorites and they are a suite of rocks that formed at high temperature and experienced igneous processing similar to the magmatic rocks found on Earth. The visible and near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectra of Vesta's surface show high similarity with the laboratory spectra of HED meteorites. Vesta and HEDs spectra have two crystal field absorption bands close to 0.9 ?m and 1.9 ?m indicative of the presence of ferrous iron in pyroxenes. The HEDs differ from each other primarily based on variation in pyroxene composition and the pyroxene-plagioclase ratio as well as rocks texture characteristics (e.g., size of crystals). These differences suggest that a combined VNIR spectra studies of Vesta and HED meteorites might reveal the different characteristics of the surface compositions and shed new light on the origin and the thermal history of Vesta. Moreover the link between Vesta and HEDs could provide a test bed to understand the short-lived radionuclide-driven differentiation of planetary bodies. Here we present preliminary result of a study of spectral characteristics of different HED samples, provided to us by the Vatican Observatory. Bidirectional reflectance spectra of slabs of meteorites are performed in the VNIR, between (0.35/2.50) ?m, using a Fieldspec spectrometer mounted on a goniometer, in use at the SLAB (Spectroscopy laboratory, INAF, Rome). The spectra are acquired in standard conditions with an incidence angle i=30o and an emission angle e=0o, measuring a spot with a diameter of 5 mm. Different Howardite, Diogenite and Eucrite samples are "mapped" considering several spots on the surface of the slabs to define their spectral variability between samples representing the different types of HEDs and to describe the spectral heterogeneity for each samples. A preliminary comparison with mineralogical and petrographic characteristics has been done describing hand samples and their thin sections. These data will be incorporated in a spectral library that could be an useful tool for the interpretation of data acquired by the Dawn mission in orbit on Vesta.

  10. A Laboratory Prototype and Simulation of Ground Constant Measurement of Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. M.; Bhalja, B. R.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a new method of finding ground constant of circuit breaker in the power system laboratory. Experimental set up has been implemented in a laboratory environment and results are found to be satisfactory. The proposed set up in the laboratory has been conceived, designed and implemented through senior design project, which leads to a very innovative design, similar to an actual circuit breaker in the transmission line. This gives the students, who subsequently performed the experiments as a part of their coursework, a real life feel of a power system. The proposed set up has been tested for different fault conditions along with various neutral and grounding system conditions. Also, a simulation of the proposed set up has been carried out in MATLAB environment. At the end, a comparative evaluation has been done on both the practical and the simulated results. It has been observed that practical value closely matches with the simulation results.

  11. Noncontiguous atom matching structural similarity function.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana L; Falcao, Andre O

    2013-10-28

    Measuring similarity between molecules is a fundamental problem in cheminformatics. Given that similar molecules tend to have similar physical, chemical, and biological properties, the notion of molecular similarity plays an important role in the exploration of molecular data sets, query-retrieval in molecular databases, and in structure-property/activity modeling. Various methods to define structural similarity between molecules are available in the literature, but so far none has been used with consistent and reliable results for all situations. We propose a new similarity method based on atom alignment for the analysis of structural similarity between molecules. This method is based on the comparison of the bonding profiles of atoms on comparable molecules, including features that are seldom found in other structural or graph matching approaches like chirality or double bond stereoisomerism. The similarity measure is then defined on the annotated molecular graph, based on an iterative directed graph similarity procedure and optimal atom alignment between atoms using a pairwise matching algorithm. With the proposed approach the similarities detected are more intuitively understood because similar atoms in the molecules are explicitly shown. This noncontiguous atom matching structural similarity method (NAMS) was tested and compared with one of the most widely used similarity methods (fingerprint-based similarity) using three difficult data sets with different characteristics. Despite having a higher computational cost, the method performed well being able to distinguish either different or very similar hydrocarbons that were indistinguishable using a fingerprint-based approach. NAMS also verified the similarity principle using a data set of structurally similar steroids with differences in the binding affinity to the corticosteroid binding globulin receptor by showing that pairs of steroids with a high degree of similarity (>80%) tend to have smaller differences in the absolute value of binding activity. Using a highly diverse set of compounds with information about the monoamine oxidase inhibition level, the method was also able to recover a significantly higher average fraction of active compounds when the seed is active for different cutoff threshold values of similarity. Particularly, for the cutoff threshold values of 86%, 93%, and 96.5%, NAMS was able to recover a fraction of actives of 0.57, 0.63, and 0.83, respectively, while the fingerprint-based approach was able to recover a fraction of actives of 0.41, 0.40, and 0.39, respectively. NAMS is made available freely for the whole community in a simple Web based tool as well as the Python source code at http://nams.lasige.di.fc.ul.pt/. PMID:24044748

  12. Surgical Planning Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As a laboratory within the Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) does research and development in image processing algorithms, software systems, and medical applications. While visitors with an interest in these matters will appreciate the sections of this site that provide details on this work, visitors from the health sciences will also appreciate the educational materials offered in the "Resources" area even more. In the "Training and Tutorials" area, visitors can learn more about medical imaging through a self-paced tutorial. Moving on, the "Image Gallery" area contains over forty medical images that can be useful for those who are looking to learn about identifying various neurological conditions. Finally, the site also has a database of publications created by members of the research team at the SPL.

  13. The snowmaker: nature identical snow production in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleef, S.; Jaggi, M.; Loewe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2013-12-01

    Using natural snow for laboratory experiments can be tricky due to shortage of winter periods and snowfall, difficulties of sample casting and transport, and the great variability of natural snow due to the varying conditions of crystal growth in the clouds. This hinders repeatable laboratory experiments with reproducible specimen and microstructural characteristics. To minimize experimental uncertainties we designed an improved machine called snowmaker, which enables us to produce nature-identical snow in a cold laboratory under well defined conditions. The snowmaker is based on well-known principles: warm humid air from a heated water basin is advected into a cold nucleation chamber where the vapor resublimates on stretched Nylon wires. Crystals are automatically harvested by a motor driven brush rack and collected in a box, thereby several kilograms of snow can be produced per day with minimum maintenance. The excess vapor is collected in a moisture trap to avoid frost in the laboratory. The entire construction is designed as a rolling, modular assembly system which can easily carried out of the laboratory for defrosting. In addition to previous attempts we focus on the reproducibility of the samples and the comparison to natural snow down to the microscale. We show that the settings of water temperature and cold laboratory temperature facilitates the production of different crystal shapes like dendrites and needles in a reproducible way. Besides photography, we analyzed the microstructure of snowmaker crystals in aggregated specimen by X-ray microtomography. Depending on the settings we can create reproducible samples with density of 50-170 kg/m3 and specific surface areas of 50-80 mm-1. We briefly touch similarities between artificial and natural snow samples with respect to crystal habit, microstructural parameters and short-time metamorphism.

  14. China's Qaidam Basin Landscape Similar with Mars

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Geologist, sedimentation expert and Mars Science Laboratory team member David Rubin of the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center investigates longitudinal dunes in China's Qaidam Basin. He comments:

  15. THE OCCURRENCE IN VIRGINIA OF GREEN.GILLED OYSTERS SIMILAR TO THOSE OF MARENNES

    E-print Network

    THE OCCURRENCE IN VIRGINIA OF GREEN.GILLED OYSTERS SIMILAR TO THOSE OF MARENNES By Philip H IN VIRGINIA OF GREEN.GILLED OYSTERS SIMILAR TO THOSE OF MARENNES. .:/-' By PHILIP H. MITCHELL and RAYMOND L- logical Laboratory of Brown University. INTRODUCTION. The appearance of green-gilled oysters in Lynnhaven

  16. Regularities in transient modes in the seismic process according to the laboratory and natural modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. B. Smirnov; A. V. Ponomarev; P. Benard; A. V. Patonin

    2010-01-01

    Regularities in the excitation and relaxation of rock failure were revealed in a series of laboratory experiments. Similar\\u000a regularities are found also in natural conditions. A physical idea and its mathematical description are suggested for explaining\\u000a the obtained experimental data. The aim of the experiments was to understand the character of excitation of the failure, triggered\\u000a by the external impact,

  17. Virtual Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-04-27

    The website for the Virtual Laboratory contains a bold and direct statement: "Conventional teaching all too often accepts memorization and pattern recognition as true learning" After reading this statement, it makes sense that the goal of this site is "to help students to recognize, confront, correct, and expand their understanding of subject or a technique." The site contains five different sets of course materials that use interactive materials, short quizzes, and embedded demonstrations to assist students and teachers alike. One set of materials that should not be missed is in the Teaching & Learning Biology area. Here visitors will find links, fact sheets, and pedagogical suggestions for teaching a college-level biology course. Moving on, the Chemistry, Life, the Universe and Everything section contains a new perspective on how to reform the garden-variety general chemistry course.

  18. Laboratory investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ray W.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies related to cometary grains and the nuclei of comets can be broken down into three areas which relate to understanding the spectral properties, the formation mechanisms, and the evolution of grains and nuclei: (1) Spectral studies to be used in the interpretation of cometary spectra; (2) Sample preparation experiments which may shed light on the physical nature and history of cometary grains and nuclei by exploring the effects on grain emissivities resulting from the ways in which the samples are created; and (3) Grain processing experiments which should provide insight on the interaction of cometary grains with the environment in the immediate vicinity of the cometary nucleus as the comet travels from the Oort cloud through perihelion, and perhaps even suggestions regarding the relationship between interstellar grains and cometary matter. A summary is presented with a different view of lab experiments than is found in the literature, concentrating on measurement techniques and sample preparations especially relevant to cometary dust.

  19. These results are similar to previous measures of tethered flight distances for drones. The great-

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    These results are similar to previous measures of tethered flight distances for drones. The great climatic conditions. Under tropical conditions drones flew the shortest distances (mean of 556.9 ± 71 m

  20. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493...493.1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493...493.1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493...493.1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493...493.1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493...493.1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493.1220... § 493.1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  12. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  13. Teaching In The Laboratory A laboratory exercise to illustrate increased salivary cortisol in response to

    E-print Network

    Vleck, Carol

    Teaching In The Laboratory A laboratory exercise to illustrate increased salivary cortisol. A laboratory exercise to illustrate increased salivary cortisol in response to three stressful conditions using into the systemic circulation. Glucocorticoids cause the elevation of blood glucose, providing the necessary energy

  14. Similarity and categorization of environmental sounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Gygi; Gary R. Kidd; Charles S. Watson

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the acoustical correlates of similarity and categorization judgments of environmental sounds.\\u000a In Experiment 1, similarity ratings were obtained from pairwise comparisons of recordings of 50 environmental sounds. A three-dimensional\\u000a multidimensional scaling (MDS) solution showed three distinct clusterings of the sounds, which included harmonic sounds, discrete\\u000a impact sounds, and continuous sounds. Furthermore, sounds from similar sources tended to

  15. Self-similar traffic and network dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ASHOK ERRAMILLI; MATTHEW ROUGHAN; DARRYL VEITCH; WALTER WILLINGER

    2002-01-01

    One of the most significant findings of traffic measurement studies over the last decade has been the observed self-similarity in packet network traffic. Subsequent research has focused on the origins of this self-similarity, and the network engineering significance of this phenomenon. This paper reviews what is currently known about network traffic self-similarity and its significance. We then consider a matter

  16. Generalized Quantum Similarity Index: Applications in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvrie, P. A.; Antolín, J.; Angulo, J. C.

    2011-04-01

    A Generalized Quantum Similarity Index is defined, quantifying the similarity among density functions. The generalization includes, as new features (i) comparison among an arbitrary number of functions, (ii) its ability to modify the relative contribution of different regions within the domain, and (iii) the possibility of assigning different weights to each function according to its relevance on the comparative procedure. The similarity among atomic one-particle densities in both conjugated spaces, and neutral-cation similarity in ionization processes are analyzed. The results are interpreted attending to shell-filling patterns, and also in terms of experimentally accessible quantities of relevance in ionization processes.

  17. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  18. Similar mandibular osseous lesions in Tyrannosaurus rex and man.

    PubMed

    Neiburger, E J

    2005-01-01

    This report identifies several cases of similar-appearing multiple lesions in the mandibles of both humans and the dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex (T. rex). A diagnosis and potential etiologies are discussed. The appearance of these lesions in prehistoric fossils suggests that this pathology is an ancient affliction which predates humans and our mammalian ancestors. Lytic lesions of the oral structures have occurred in man and higher animals throughout time. The causes range from congenital anomalies, trauma, and infections to benign and metastatic neoplasms. Not only mammals suffer from these conditions; reptiles and birds experience similar diseases. PMID:16350345

  19. Environment, dispersal and patterns of species similarity

    E-print Network

    Nathan, Ran

    distance on species similarity decreased with increasing geographical distance, indicating that the two the combined effects of geographical distance and environmental distance on patterns of species similarity and analysed with respect to corresponding matrices of geographical distance and rainfall distance (defined

  20. Measuring similarity between dynamic ensembles of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Salmon, Loïc; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2014-05-01

    We present a simple and general approach termed REsemble for quantifying population overlap and structural similarity between ensembles. This approach captures improvements in the quality of ensembles determined using increasing input experimental data--improvements that go undetected when conventional methods for comparing ensembles are used--and reveals unexpected similarities between RNA ensembles determined using NMR and molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24705474

  1. Effective similarity search on voxelized CAD objects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans-Peter Kriegel; P. Kroger; Zahi Mashael; Martin Pfeifle; M. Potke; Thomas Seidl

    2003-01-01

    Similarity search in database systems is becoming an increasingly important task in modern application domains such as multimedia, molecular biology, medical imaging and many others. Especially for CAD applications, suitable similarity models and a clear representation of the results can help to reduce the cost of developing and producing new parts by maximizing the reuse of existing parts. In this

  2. Fingerprint Matching Based on Global Comprehensive Similarity

    E-print Network

    Tian, Jie

    Fingerprint Matching Based on Global Comprehensive Similarity Yuliang He, Jie Tian, Senior Member in the representation of a fingerprint. Finally, we model the relationship between transformation and the comprehensive similarity between two fingerprints in terms of histogram for initial parameter estimation. Through

  3. Similarity between semi-structured data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodrigo Goncalves

    Research about similarity between semi- structured documents (particularly for XML documents) has produced many works in the areas of Database Systems, Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining. In this work we introduce a brief survey about it. At first we introduce some basic concepts like similarity types and algorithms. After that, some works are reviewed, highlighting their particularities and general approach.

  4. Automatic Retrieval and Clustering of Similar Words

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dekang Lin

    1998-01-01

    Bootstrapping semantics from text is one of the greatest challenges in natural language learning. We first define a word similarity measure based on the distributional pattern of words. The similarity measure allows us to construct a thesaurus using a parsed corpus. We then present a new evaluation methodology for the automatically constructed thesaurus. The evaluation results show that the thesaurus

  5. A quantitative principle of qualitative similarity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gösta Ekman; Trygg Engen; Teodor Kunnapas; Ralf Lindman

    1964-01-01

    On the basis of previous investigations of the mechanism of similarity in unidimensional continua, a hypothetical equation has been derived for the general multidimensional case of a simultaneous variation with regard to both subjective intensity and subjective quality. The special case of purely qualitative similarity was submitted to experimental test in 4 experiments, in which subjective intensity was kept approximately

  6. Turbulent boundary layer turbulence intensity similarity formulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary Kunkel; Ivan Marusic

    2003-01-01

    High Reynolds number data obtained in the surface layer of the atmospheric boundary layer at the SLTEST facility are used to analyze and further develop turbulence intensity similarity laws. The analysis of these similarity laws leads to implications concerning the interaction of the inner- and outer-portions of the boundary layer. Namely, the model used to extended formulations across the entire

  7. Manipula math with Java : similar figures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    IES, Inc

    2003-01-01

    Teachers can use this applet to give a visual demonstration of the idea of similar triangles or transformations. The applet could be used in whole class demonstrations to introduce the topic or provide varied examples of how different similar triangles can be.

  8. On spaced seeds for similarity search

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uri Keich; Ming Li; Bin Ma; John Tromp

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Genomics studies routinely depend on similarity searches based on the strategy of finding short seed matches (contiguous k bases) which are then extended The particular choice of the seed length, k , is determined by the tradeoff between search speed (larger k reduces chance hits) and sensitiv - ity (smaller k finds weaker similarities) A novel idea of using

  9. Novel image quality metric based on similarity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lina Jin; Nikolay Ponomarenko; Karen Egiazarian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to image quality metric taking into account degradation of contrast and brightness as well as block similarity. The metric is achieved by performing of the following steps: 1) reducing contrast and brightness in distorted image, 2) using block-matching (BM) to group similar 2D image fragments into 3D data arrays in original image

  10. Efficient and tumble similar set retrieval

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aristides Gionis; Dimitrios Gunopulos; Nick Koudas

    2001-01-01

    Set value attributes are a concise and natural way to model complex data sets. Modern Object Relational systems support set value attributes and allow various query capabilities on them. In this paper we initiate a formal study of indexing techniques for set value attributes based on similarity, for suitably defined notions of similarity between sets. Such techniques are necessary in

  11. On similarity in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zbigniew Sorbjan

    1986-01-01

    A similarity theory for the atmospheric boundary layer is presented. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for the surface layer is a particular case of this new theory, for the case of z ? 0. Universal functions which are in agreement with empirical data are obtained for the stable and convective regimes.

  12. Perceived Similarity, Proactive Adjustment, and Organizational Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammeyer-Mueller, John D.; Livingston, Beth A.; Liao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores how perceived demographic and attitudinal similarity can influence proactive behavior among organizational newcomers. We propose that newcomers who perceive themselves as similar to their co-workers will be more willing to seek new information or build relationships, which in turn will lead to better long-term…

  13. Information filtering based on transferring similarity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Duo; Zhou, Tao; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Run-Ran; Jia, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2009-07-01

    In this Brief Report, we propose an index of user similarity, namely, the transferring similarity, which involves all high-order similarities between users. Accordingly, we design a modified collaborative filtering algorithm, which provides remarkably higher accurate predictions than the standard collaborative filtering. More interestingly, we find that the algorithmic performance will approach its optimal value when the parameter, contained in the definition of transferring similarity, gets close to its critical value, before which the series expansion of transferring similarity is convergent and after which it is divergent. Our study is complementary to the one reported in [E. A. Leicht, P. Holme, and M. E. J. Newman, Phys. Rev. E 73, 026120 (2006)], and is relevant to the missing link prediction problem. PMID:19658838

  14. Inquiring Scaffolds in Laboratory Tasks: An Instance of a "Worked Laboratory Guide Effect"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt-Borcherding, Florian; Hänze, Martin; Wodzinski, Rita; Rincke, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The study explores if established support devices for paper-pencil problem solving, namely worked examples and incremental scaffolds, are applicable to laboratory tasks. N?=?173 grade eight students solved in dyads a physics laboratory task in one of three conditions. In condition A (unguided problem solving), students were asked to determine the…

  15. PHYSIOLAB: A cardiovascular laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauquil, D.; Laffaye, C.; Camus, A. L.; Weerts, G.; Gratchev, V.; Alferova, I.; Kotovskaya, A.

    PHYSIOLAB is a cardio-vascular laboratory designed by CNES in cooperation with IMBP, with double scientific and medical goals: • a better understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in blood pressure and heart rate regulation, in order to predict and control the phenomenon of cardio-vascular deconditionning. • a real-time monitoring of cosmonauts during functionnal tests. Launched to the MIR station in 1996, this laboratory was set up and used for the first time by Claudie André-Deshays during the French mission ? Cassiopeia ?. The scientific program is performed pre, post and in-flight to study phenomena related to the transition to microgravity as well as the return to the earth conditions. Particular emphasis was placed on the development of the real-time telemetry to monitor LBNP test. This function was successfull during the Cassiopeia mission, providing the medical team at TSOUP (MIR Control Center in Moscow) with efficient means to control the physiological state of the cosmonaut. Based on the results of this first mission, IMBP and CNES will go on using Physiolab with Russian crews. CNES will take advantage of the upcoming French missions on MIR to improve the system, and intends to develop a new laboratory for the International Space Station.

  16. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S; Veers, P.

    2011-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring based on presentations from a condition monitoring workshop organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2009 and on additional references.

  17. Conditions for the validity of Faraday's law of induction and their experimental confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Ramos, A.; Menéndez, J. R.; Piqué, C.

    2008-09-01

    This paper, as its main didactic objective, shows the conditions needed for the validity of Faraday's law of induction. Inadequate comprehension of these conditions has given rise to several paradoxes about the issue; some are analysed and solved in this paper in the light of the theoretical deduction of the induction law. Furthermore, an experimental set-up, in which such conditions are experimentally tested, is included. The experiment is not complicated and the method we use, and similar methods used elsewhere, is widely considered as suitable laboratory practice for students of first university courses in physics and engineering.

  18. Similar genes discovery system (SGDS): Application for predicting possible pathways by using GO semantic similarity measure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jung-hsien Chiang; Shing-hua Ho; Wen-hung Wang

    2008-01-01

    This research analyzes the gene relationship according to their annotations. We present here a similar genes discovery system (SGDS), based upon semantic similarity measure of gene ontology (GO) and Entrez gene, to identify groups of similar genes. In order to validate the proposed measure, we analyze the relationships between similarity and expression correlation of pairs of genes. We explore a

  19. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  20. Schistosomiasis: collaboration in laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Girgis, S; Anis, M H; Shafeek, H A; Moody, H A

    1994-09-01

    Harpur Memorial Hospital in Menouf and the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in London have shared a development program through the laboratories for eight years to develop laboratory facilities and organize a diploma course in medical laboratory technical training, in Egypt, with the help of an annual visit by a senior laboratory medical scientist from London. The laboratory in Egypt has been upgraded while the Hospital for Tropical Diseases has benefitted by obtaining valuable teaching material for its training programs in the UK and worldwide. Schistosomiasis is a major health problem in Egypt, with both S. haematobium and S. mansoni common in the Menoufaya district of the Nile delta, requiring significant laboratory time for diagnosis. This article describes the diagnostic procedures used in Harpur Memorial Hospital serving an area of acute schistosomiasis infection with consideration of whether diagnostic tests used in Egypt require further development. The laboratory in London sees mainly expatriate patients with a range of schistosomiasis conditions and has a wider range of diagnostic procedures available. In Menouf, stool and urine samples of all outpatients are routinely examined, with rectal biopsies performed on a proportion of patients with good clinical indication of schistosomiasis. Serodiagnosis for Schistosoma is not currently available at the hospital. Rectal biopsy has, however, proved to be a reliable method of diagnosing schistosomiasis in the difficult cases when urine and stool examinations were negative, with the introduction of the formol ether technique for concentration of faeces having greatly improved the initial detection of ova. PMID:12345655

  1. Adaptive Similarity Measures for Material Identification in Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bue, Brian D.

    Remotely-sensed hyperspectral imagery has become one the most advanced tools for analyzing the processes that shape the Earth and other planets. Effective, rapid analysis of high-volume, high-dimensional hyperspectral image data sets demands efficient, automated techniques to identify signatures of known materials in such imagery. In this thesis, we develop a framework for automatic material identification in hyperspectral imagery using adaptive similarity measures. We frame the material identification problem as a multiclass similarity-based classification problem, where our goal is to predict material labels for unlabeled target spectra based upon their similarities to source spectra with known material labels. As differences in capture conditions affect the spectral representations of materials, we divide the material identification problem into intra-domain (i.e., source and target spectra captured under identical conditions) and inter-domain (i.e., source and target spectra captured under different conditions) settings. The first component of this thesis develops adaptive similarity measures for intra-domain settings that measure the relevance of spectral features to the given classification task using small amounts of labeled data. We propose a technique based on multiclass Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) that combines several distinct similarity measures into a single hybrid measure capturing the strengths of each of the individual measures. We also provide a comparative survey of techniques for low-rank Mahalanobis metric learning, and demonstrate that regularized LDA yields competitive results to the state-of-the-art, at substantially lower computational cost. The second component of this thesis shifts the focus to inter-domain settings, and proposes a multiclass domain adaptation framework that reconciles systematic differences between spectra captured under similar, but not identical, conditions. Our framework computes a similarity-based mapping that captures structured, relative relationships between classes shared between source and target domains, allowing us apply a classifier trained using labeled source spectra to classify target spectra. We demonstrate improved domain adaptation accuracy in comparison to recently-proposed multitask learning and manifold alignment techniques in several case studies involving state-of-the-art synthetic and real-world hyperspectral imagery.

  2. Similarity laws of lunar and terrestrial volcanic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsu, Y.; Okeefe, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model of a one dimensional, steady duct flow of a mixture of a gas and small solid particles (rock) was analyzed and applied to the lunar and the terrestrial volcanic flows under geometrically and dynamically similar conditions. Numerical results for the equilibrium two phase flows of lunar and terrestrial volcanoes under similar conditions are presented. The study indicates that: (1) the lunar crater is much larger than the corresponding terrestrial crater; (2) the exit velocity from the lunar volcanic flow may be higher than the lunar escape velocity but the exit velocity of terrestrial volcanic flow is much less than that of the lunar case; and (3) the thermal effects on the lunar volcanic flow are much larger than those of the terrestrial case.

  3. Computer-Assisted Laboratory Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, William J., Hanyak, Michael E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the advantages and features of computer-assisted laboratory stations for use in a chemical engineering program. Also describes a typical experiment at such a station: determining the response times of a solid state humidity sensor at various humidity conditions and developing an empirical model for the sensor. (JN)

  4. [Optimization of healthcare expenditures, centralization of laboratory determinations and laboratory information accessibility].

    PubMed

    Men'shikov, V V

    2014-04-01

    The optimization of money expenditure for healthcare is leading to the reorganization of the structure of medical organizations, to reducing of small establishments, to centralization of laboratory analyses with cessation of their performing in some hospitals and out patient offices. This tendency is based on medical (enlargement of laboratory tests spectrum) and economical (high productivity, relative reducing of net cost of laboratory determinations) reasons. But the repercussions of switch-over to centralization of laboratory analyses performance must be evaluated from the position of laboratory information accessibility tacking in account the need in express analyses for patient, situated on territories outlying from the centralized laboratory. Using of the portative analytical devices and therefore the possibility to perform the urgent analyses by non-laboratory personal in point of care and by patients themselves as a matter of self-testing can help to solve the problem of accessibility of laboratory tests in conditions of laboratory centralization in some regions. PMID:25080804

  5. Multifractal spectrum of self-similar measures with overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Cameron; Hare, Kathryn E.; Mak, Cheuk Yu

    2014-02-01

    It is well known that the multifractal spectrum of a self-similar measure satisfying the open set condition is a closed interval. Recently, there has been interest in the overlapping case and it is known that in this case there can be isolated points. We prove that for an interesting class of self-similar measures with overlap the spectrum consists of a closed interval union together with at most two isolated points. In the case of convolutions of uniform Cantor measures we determine the end points of the interval and the isolated points. We also give an example of a related self-similar measure where the spectrum is a union of two disjoint intervals. In contrast, we prove that if one considers quotient measures of this class on the quotient group [0, 1], rather than the real line, the multifractal spectrum is a closed interval.

  6. Comparative laboratory evolution of ordered and disordered enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, Cindy; Stark, Yvonne; Künzle, Matthias; Hilvert, Donald

    2015-04-10

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are ubiquitous in nature. To assess potential evolutionary advantages and disadvantages of structural disorder under controlled laboratory conditions, we directly compared the evolvability of weakly active ordered and disordered variants of dihydrofolate reductase by genetic selection. The circularly permuted Escherichia coli enzyme, which exists as a molten globule in the absence of ligands, and a well folded deletion mutant of the Bacillus stearothermophilus enzyme served as starting points. Both scaffolds evolved at similar rates and to similar extents, reaching near-native activity after three rounds of mutagenesis and selection. Surprisingly, however, the starting structural properties of the two scaffolds changed only marginally during optimization. Although the ordered and disordered proteins accumulated distinct sets of mutations, the changes introduced likely improved catalytic efficiency indirectly in both cases by bolstering the network of dynamic conformational fluctuations that productively couple into the reaction coordinate. PMID:25697360

  7. Laboratory simulations of Mars evaporite geochemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey M. Moore; Mark A. Bullock; Horton Newsom; Melissa Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Evaporite-rich sedimentary deposits on Mars were formed under chemical conditions quite different from those on the Earth. Their unique chemistries record the chemical and aqueous conditions under which they were formed and possibly subsequent conditions to which they were subjected. We have produced evaporite salt mineral suites in the laboratory under two simulated Martian atmospheres: (1) present-day and (2) a

  8. Comparing methods for single paragraph similarity analysis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Benjamin; Dennis, Simon; Kwantes, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this paper is two-fold. First, similarities generated from six semantic models were compared to human ratings of paragraph similarity on two datasets-23 World Entertainment News Network paragraphs and 50 ABC newswire paragraphs. Contrary to findings on smaller textual units such as word associations (Griffiths, Tenenbaum, & Steyvers, 2007), our results suggest that when single paragraphs are compared, simple nonreductive models (word overlap and vector space) can provide better similarity estimates than more complex models (LSA, Topic Model, SpNMF, and CSM). Second, various methods of corpus creation were explored to facilitate the semantic models' similarity estimates. Removing numeric and single characters, and also truncating document length improved performance. Automated construction of smaller Wikipedia-based corpora proved to be very effective, even improving upon the performance of corpora that had been chosen for the domain. Model performance was further improved by augmenting corpora with dataset paragraphs. PMID:25164176

  9. Self-similarity in Laplacian growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zabrodin, Anton [ITEP, MOSCOW, RUSSIA; Abanov, Artem [TEXAS A & M

    2008-01-01

    We consider Laplacian Growth of self-similar domains in different geometries. Self-similarity determines the analytic structure of the Schwarz function of the moving boundary. The knowledge of this analytic structure allows us to derive the integral equation for the conformal map. It is shown that solutions to the integral equation obey also a second-order differential equation which is the 1D Schroedinger equation with the sinh{sup -2}-potential. The solutions, which are expressed through the Gauss hypergeometric function, characterize the geometry of self-similar patterns in a wedge. We also find the potential for the Coulomb gas representation of the self-similar Laplacian growth in a wedge and calculate the corresponding free energy.

  10. Learning content similarity for music recommendation

    E-print Network

    McFee, Brian; Lanckriet, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Many tasks in music information retrieval, such as recommendation, and playlist generation for online radio, fall naturally into the query-by-example setting, wherein a user queries the system by providing a song, and the system responds with a list of relevant or similar song recommendations. Such applications ultimately depend on the notion of similarity between items to produce high-quality results. Current state-of-the-art systems employ collaborative filter methods to represent musical items, effectively comparing items in terms of their constituent users. While collaborative filter techniques perform well when historical data is available for each item, their reliance on historical data impedes performance on novel or unpopular items. To combat this problem, practitioners rely on content-based similarity, which naturally extends to novel items, but is typically out-performed by collaborative filter methods. In this article, we propose a method for optimizing contentbased similarity by learning from a sa...

  11. HYPOTHESIS TESTING WITH THE SIMILARITY INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mulltilocus DNA fingerprinting methods have been used extensively to address genetic issues in wildlife populations. Hypotheses concerning population subdivision and differing levels of diversity can be addressed through the use of the similarity index (S), a band-sharing coeffic...

  12. Evaluating Similarity Measures for Brain Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Razlighi, Q. R.; Kehtarnavaz, N.; Yousefi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of similarity measures for image registration is a challenging problem due to its complex interaction with the underlying optimization, regularization, image type and modality. We propose a single performance metric, named robustness, as part of a new evaluation method which quantifies the effectiveness of similarity measures for brain image registration while eliminating the effects of the other parts of the registration process. We show empirically that similarity measures with higher robustness are more effective in registering degraded images and are also more successful in performing intermodal image registration. Further, we introduce a new similarity measure, called normalized spatial mutual information, for 3D brain image registration whose robustness is shown to be much higher than the existing ones. Consequently, it tolerates greater image degradation and provides more consistent outcomes for intermodal brain image registration. PMID:24039378

  13. Bioinformatics Workshop #3 Database Similarity Searching

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    for particular patterns, which may reflect some potential function of the molecule. But, what about comparisonsBioinformatics Workshop #3 Database Similarity Searching: What's available -- the algorithms algorithm, symbol comparison tables, dot matrices, motifs, hashing, and heuristics. What do database

  14. Spatiotemporal neural pattern similarity supports episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Wang, Changming; Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui

    2015-03-16

    Formal computational models of human memory posit a central role of feature representations in episodic memory encoding and retrieval [1-4]. Correspondingly, fMRI studies have found that, in addition to activity level [5, 6], the neural activation pattern similarity across repetitions (i.e., self-similarity) was greater for subsequently remembered than forgotten items [7-9]. This self-similarity has been suggested to reflect pattern reinstatement due to study-phase retrieval [7, 10, 11]. However, the low temporal resolution of fMRI measures could determine neither the temporal precision of study-phase reinstatement nor the processing stage at which the reinstatement supported subsequent memory [12]. Meanwhile, although self-similarity has been shown to correlate with the activity level in the left lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) [10, 13], a causal link between left LPFC function and pattern similarity remains to be established. Combining transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and EEG, we found that greater spatiotemporal pattern similarity (STPS) across repetitions of the same item (i.e., self-STPS) during encoding predicted better subsequent memory. The self-STPS located in the right frontal electrodes occurred approximately 500 ms after stimulus onset, reflected item-specific encoding, and contributed to memory above and beyond the effects of ERP amplitude and global pattern similarity (i.e., similarity to all other items in memory space). Anodal stimulation over the left LPFC specifically enhanced memory performance and item-specific STPS in the right frontal electrodes. These results support a causal role of LPFC in enhancing STPS and memory and contribute to a mechanistic understanding of memory formation. PMID:25728695

  15. The Similarity Index and DNA Fingerprinting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Lynch

    DNA-fingerprint similarity is being used increasingly to make inferences about levels of genetic variation within and between natural populations. It is shown that the similarity index-the average fraction of shared restriction fragments-provides upwardly biased estimates of population homozygosity but nearly unbiased estimates of the average identity-in-state for random pairs of individuals. A method is suggested for partitioning the DNA-fingerprint dissimilarity

  16. Marital satisfaction and occupational interest similarity

    E-print Network

    Rouse, Lawrence W

    1980-01-01

    MARITAL SATISFACTION AND OCCUPATIONAL INTEREST SIMILARITY A Thesis by IAWRENCE W. ROUSE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1980 Major... Subject: Educational Psychology MARITAL SATISFACTION AND OCC UPATIONAL INTEREST SIMILARITY A Thesis by LAWRENCE W. ROUSE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Me er) ember) (Head of Department) May 1980 ABSTRACT Marital...

  17. Mechanisms for similarity matching in disparity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Goutcher, Ross; Hibbard, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Early neural mechanisms for the measurement of binocular disparity appear to operate in a manner consistent with cross-correlation-like processes. Consequently, cross-correlation, or cross-correlation-like procedures have been used in a range of models of disparity measurement. Using such procedures as the basis for disparity measurement creates a preference for correspondence solutions that maximize the similarity between local left and right eye image regions. Here, we examine how observers’ perception of depth in an ambiguous stereogram is affected by manipulations of luminance and orientation-based image similarity. Results show a strong effect of coarse-scale luminance similarity manipulations, but a relatively weak effect of finer-scale manipulations of orientation similarity. This is in contrast to the measurements of depth obtained from a standard cross-correlation model. This model shows strong effects of orientation similarity manipulations and weaker effects of luminance similarity. In order to account for these discrepancies, the standard cross-correlation approach may be modified to include an initial spatial frequency filtering stage. The performance of this adjusted model most closely matches human psychophysical data when spatial frequency filtering favors coarser scales. This is consistent with the operation of disparity measurement processes where spatial frequency and disparity tuning are correlated, or where disparity measurement operates in a coarse-to-fine manner. PMID:24409163

  18. Novel laboratory simulations of astrophysical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Parrish Clawson

    This thesis was motivated by the promise that some physical aspects of astrophysical jets and collimation processes can be scaled to laboratory parameters through hydrodynamic scaling laws. The simulation of astrophysical jet phenomena with laser-produced plasmas was attractive because the laser- target interaction can inject energetic, repeatable plasma into an external environment. Novel laboratory simulations of astrophysical jets involved constructing and using the YOGA laser, giving a 1064 nm, 8 ns pulse laser with energies up to 3.7 + 0.2 J . Laser-produced plasmas were characterized using Schlieren, interferometry and ICCD photography for their use in simulating jet and magnetosphere physics. The evolution of the laser-produced plasma in various conditions was compared with self-similar solutions and HYADES computer simulations. Millimeter-scale magnetized collimated outflows were produced by a centimeter scale cylindrically symmetric electrode configuration triggered by a laser-produced plasma. A cavity with a flared nozzle surrounded the center electrode and the electrode ablation created supersonic uncollimated flows. This flow became collimated when the center electrode changed from an anodeto a cathode. The plasma jets were in axially directed permanent magnetic fields with strengths up to 5000 Gauss. The collimated magnetized jets were 0.1-0. 3 cm wide, up to 2.0 cm long, and had velocities of ~4.0 × 10 6 cm/s. The dynamics of the evolution of the jet were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with fluxtube simulations from Bellan's formulation [6] giving a calculated estimate of ~2.6 × 10 6 cm/s for jet evolution velocity and evidence for jet rotation. The density measured with interferometry was 1.9 ± 0.2 × 10 17 cm -3 compared with 2.1 × 10 16 cm -3 calculated with Bellan's pressure balance formulation. Kinks in the jet column were produced consistent with the Kruskal-Shafranov condition which allowed stable and symmetric jets to form with the background magnetic fields. The Euler number for the laboratory jet was 9 compared with an estimate of 40 for young stellar object jets [135] which demonstrated adequate scaling between the two frames. A second experiment was performed concerning laboratory simulations of magnetospheres with plasma winds impinging on permanent magnetic dipoles. The ratio of the magnetopause measured with ICCD photography to the calculated magnetopause standoff distance was ~2.

  19. Coupled attribute similarity learning on categorical data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Can; Dong, Xiangjun; Zhou, Fei; Cao, Longbing; Chi, Chi-Hung

    2015-04-01

    Attribute independence has been taken as a major assumption in the limited research that has been conducted on similarity analysis for categorical data, especially unsupervised learning. However, in real-world data sources, attributes are more or less associated with each other in terms of certain coupling relationships. Accordingly, recent works on attribute dependency aggregation have introduced the co-occurrence of attribute values to explore attribute coupling, but they only present a local picture in analyzing categorical data similarity. This is inadequate for deep analysis, and the computational complexity grows exponentially when the data scale increases. This paper proposes an efficient data-driven similarity learning approach that generates a coupled attribute similarity measure for nominal objects with attribute couplings to capture a global picture of attribute similarity. It involves the frequency-based intra-coupled similarity within an attribute and the inter-coupled similarity upon value co-occurrences between attributes, as well as their integration on the object level. In particular, four measures are designed for the inter-coupled similarity to calculate the similarity between two categorical values by considering their relationships with other attributes in terms of power set, universal set, joint set, and intersection set. The theoretical analysis reveals the equivalent accuracy and superior efficiency of the measure based on the intersection set, particularly for large-scale data sets. Intensive experiments of data structure and clustering algorithms incorporating the coupled dissimilarity metric achieve a significant performance improvement on state-of-the-art measures and algorithms on 13 UCI data sets, which is confirmed by the statistical analysis. The experiment results show that the proposed coupled attribute similarity is generic, and can effectively and efficiently capture the intrinsic and global interactions within and between attributes for especially large-scale categorical data sets. In addition, two new coupled categorical clustering algorithms, i.e., CROCK and CLIMBO are proposed, and they both outperform the original ones in terms of clustering quality on UCI data sets and bibliographic data. PMID:25794382

  20. A search for structurally similar cellular internal ribosome entry sites

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Stephen D.; Lewis, Stephen M.; Turcotte, Marcel; Holcik, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) allow ribosomes to be recruited to mRNA in a cap-independent manner. Some viruses that impair cap-dependent translation initiation utilize IRES to ensure that the viral RNA will efficiently compete for the translation machinery. IRES are also employed for the translation of a subset of cellular messages during conditions that inhibit cap-dependent translation initiation. IRES from viruses like Hepatitis C and Classical Swine Fever virus share a similar structure/function without sharing primary sequence similarity. Of the cellular IRES structures derived so far, none were shown to share an overall structural similarity. Therefore, we undertook a genome-wide search of human 5?UTRs (untranslated regions) with an empirically derived structure of the IRES from the key inhibitor of apoptosis, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), to identify novel IRES that share structure/function similarity. Three of the top matches identified by this search that exhibit IRES activity are the 5?UTRs of Aquaporin 4, ELG1 and NF-kappaB repressing factor (NRF). The structures of AQP4 and ELG1 IRES have limited similarity to the XIAP IRES; however, they share trans-acting factors that bind the XIAP IRES. We therefore propose that cellular IRES are not defined by overall structure, as viral IRES, but are instead dependent upon short motifs and trans-acting factors for their function. PMID:17591613

  1. The future of the national?laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Linda R.; Noll, Roger G.

    1996-01-01

    The end of the Cold War has called into question the activities of the national laboratories and, more generally, the level of support now given to federal intramural research in the United States. This paper seeks to analyze the potential role of the laboratories, with particular attention to the possibility, on the one hand, of integrating private technology development into the laboratory’s menu of activities and, on the other hand, of outsourcing traditional mission activities. We review the economic efficiency arguments for intramural research and the political conditions that are likely to constrain the activities of the laboratories, and analyze the early history of programs intended to promote new technology via cooperative agreements between the laboratories and private industry. Our analysis suggests that the laboratories are likely to shrink considerably in size, and that the federal government faces a significant problem in deciding how to organize a downsizing of the federal research establishment. PMID:8917479

  2. Visceral versus Somatic Pain: Similarities and Differences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernando Cervero

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome are conditions characterized by chronic pain that generates persistent, hyperalgesic states in many regions of the body. It is difficult to explain the pain of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome by extrapolating directly from what is known about the mechanisms of somatic pain. Visceral and somatic pain

  3. Perceptual and Neural Olfactory Similarity in Honeybees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernando Guerrieri; Marco Schubert; Jean-Christophe Sandoz; Martin Giurfa

    2005-01-01

    The question of whether or not neural activity patterns recorded in the olfactory centres of the brain correspond to olfactory perceptual measures remains unanswered. To address this question, we studied olfaction in honeybees Apis mellifera using the olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response. We conditioned bees to odours and tested generalisation responses to different odours. Sixteen odours were used,

  4. Similarity Metrics for Closed Loop Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Yang, Lee C.; Bedrossian, Naz; Hall, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent and in what ways can two closed-loop dynamic systems be said to be "similar?" This question arises in a wide range of dynamic systems modeling and control system design applications. For example, bounds on error models are fundamental to the controller optimization with modern control design methods. Metrics such as the structured singular value are direct measures of the degree to which properties such as stability or performance are maintained in the presence of specified uncertainties or variations in the plant model. Similarly, controls-related areas such as system identification, model reduction, and experimental model validation employ measures of similarity between multiple realizations of a dynamic system. Each area has its tools and approaches, with each tool more or less suited for one application or the other. Similarity in the context of closed-loop model validation via flight test is subtly different from error measures in the typical controls oriented application. Whereas similarity in a robust control context relates to plant variation and the attendant affect on stability and performance, in this context similarity metrics are sought that assess the relevance of a dynamic system test for the purpose of validating the stability and performance of a "similar" dynamic system. Similarity in the context of system identification is much more relevant than are robust control analogies in that errors between one dynamic system (the test article) and another (the nominal "design" model) are sought for the purpose of bounding the validity of a model for control design and analysis. Yet system identification typically involves open-loop plant models which are independent of the control system (with the exception of limited developments in closed-loop system identification which is nonetheless focused on obtaining open-loop plant models from closed-loop data). Moreover the objectives of system identification are not the same as a flight test and hence system identification error metrics are not directly relevant. In applications such as launch vehicles where the open loop plant is unstable it is similarity of the closed-loop system dynamics of a flight test that are relevant.

  5. Damaging earthquakes: A scientific laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hays, Walter W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the principal lessons learned from multidisciplinary postearthquake investigations of damaging earthquakes throughout the world during the past 15 years. The unique laboratory provided by a damaging earthquake in culturally different but tectonically similar regions of the world has increased fundamental understanding of earthquake processes, added perishable scientific, technical, and socioeconomic data to the knowledge base, and led to changes in public policies and professional practices for earthquake loss reduction.

  6. Nanocrystal energetics via quantum similarity measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törehan Balta, M. ?.; K?l?ç, Çetin

    2014-03-01

    We first develop a descriptor-based representation of atomic environments by devising two local similarity indices defined from an atom-partitioned quantum-chemical descriptor. Then, we employ this representation to explore the size-, shape- and composition-dependent nanocrystal energetics. For this purpose, we utilize an energy difference ? that is related to the atomic chemical potential, which enables one to characterize energetic heterogeneities. Employing first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory for a set of database systems, namely unary atomic clusters in the shape of regular polyhedra and the bulk solids of C, Si, Pd and Pt, we explore the correlations between the energy difference ? and similarity indices. We find that there exists an interconnection between nanocrystal energetics and quantum similarity measures. Accordingly, we develop a means for computing total energy differences from the similarity indices via interpolation, and utilize a test set comprising a variety of unary nanocrystals and binary nanoalloys/nanocompounds for validation. Our findings indicate that the similarity-based energies could be utilized in computer-aided design of nanoparticles.

  7. Self-Similar Compressible Free Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonEllenrieder, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lie group methods are used to find both exact and numerical similarity solutions for compressible perturbations to all incompressible, two-dimensional, axisymmetric vortex reference flow. The reference flow vorticity satisfies an eigenvalue problem for which the solutions are a set of two-dimensional, self-similar, incompressible vortices. These solutions are augmented by deriving a conserved quantity for each eigenvalue, and identifying a Lie group which leaves the reference flow equations invariant. The partial differential equations governing the compressible perturbations to these reference flows are also invariant under the action of the same group. The similarity variables found with this group are used to determine the decay rates of the velocities and thermodynamic variables in the self-similar flows, and to reduce the governing partial differential equations to a set of ordinary differential equations. The ODE's are solved analytically and numerically for a Taylor vortex reference flow, and numerically for an Oseen vortex reference flow. The solutions are used to examine the dependencies of the temperature, density, entropy, dissipation and radial velocity on the Prandtl number. Also, experimental data on compressible free vortex flow are compared to the analytical results, the evolution of vortices from initial states which are not self-similar is discussed, and the energy transfer in a slightly-compressible vortex is considered.

  8. Malignant blue nevus: clinicopathologically similar to melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kachare, Swapnil Dilip; Agle, Steven C; Englert, Zachary P; Zervos, Emmanuel E; Vohra, Nasreen A; Wong, Jan H; Fitzgerald, Timothy L

    2013-07-01

    Malignant blue nevus (MBN) is a rare melanocytic lesion and controversy exists whether it is a melanoma or a unique entity. We sought to establish clinical behavior using a large national registry. All patients with MBN and melanoma from 1973 to 2008 were identified in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results tumor registry. We performed comparative and survival analysis among the two tumor types. A total of 228,038 patients were identified (227,986 with melanoma and 52 with MBN). The mean age was 57.7 years. Both lesions had similar age of presentation (55.8 vs 55.7 years, P = 0.527), sex (male 50 vs 55%, P = 0.44), and nodal positivity rate (9.6 vs 5.4%, P = 0.22). MBNs were more likely to be nonwhite (11.8 vs 1.6%, P < 0.0001) and present with metastatic disease (15.2 vs 4%, P = 0.0028). MBN and melanoma had a similar survival (264 vs 240 months, P = 0.78) and remained similar when stratified by race (264 vs 242 months, P = 0.99) and stage (264 vs 256 months, P = 0.83). This is the largest study to date demonstrating similar clinical behavior and survival between patients with MBN and those with melanoma. We believe MBN is a variant of melanoma and suggest using a similar treatment algorithm as that of melanoma. PMID:23815995

  9. An Alfven wave maser in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Maggs, J.E.; Morales, G.J.; Carter, T.A. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A frequency selective Alfven wave resonator results from the application of a locally nonuniform magnetic field to a plasma source region between the cathode and anode in a large laboratory device. When a threshold in the plasma discharge current is exceeded, selective amplification produces a highly coherent ({delta}{omega}/{omega}<5x10{sup -3}), large amplitude shear Alfven wave that propagates out of the resonator, through a semitransparent mesh anode, into the adjacent plasma column where the magnetic field is uniform. This phenomenon is similar to that encountered in the operation of masers/lasers at microwave and optical frequencies. The current threshold for maser action is found to depend upon the confinement magnetic field strength B{sub 0}. Its scaling is consistent with the condition for matching the drift speed of the bulk plasma electrons with the phase velocity of the mode in the resonator. The largest spontaneously amplified signals are obtained at low B{sub 0} and large plasma currents. The magnetic fluctuations {delta}B associated with the Alfven maser can be as large as {delta}B/B{sub 0}{approx_equal}1.5% and are observed to affect the plasma current. Steady-state behavior leading to coherent signals lasting until the discharge is terminated can be achieved when the growth conditions are well-above threshold. The maser is observed to evolve in time from an initial m=0 mode to an m=1 mode structure in the transition to the late steady state. The laboratory phenomenon reported is analogous to the Alfven wave maser proposed to exist in naturally occurring, near-earth plasmas.

  10. Relational model of data over domains with similarities: An extension for similarity queries and knowledge extraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Radim Belohlávek; Vilém Vychodil

    2006-01-01

    We present an extension of Codd's relational model of data. Our extension is motivated by similarity-based querying. It consists in equipping each domain of attribute values with a similarity relation and in modifying the classical relational model in order to account for issues generated by adding similarities. As a counterpart to data tables over a set of domains of Codd's

  11. Econo-ESA in semantic text similarity.

    PubMed

    Rahutomo, Faisal; Aritsugi, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Explicit semantic analysis (ESA) utilizes an immense Wikipedia index matrix in its interpreter part. This part of the analysis multiplies a large matrix by a term vector to produce a high-dimensional concept vector. A similarity measurement between two texts is performed between two concept vectors with numerous dimensions. The cost is expensive in both interpretation and similarity measurement steps. This paper proposes an economic scheme of ESA, named econo-ESA. We investigate two aspects of this proposal: dimensional reduction and experiments with various data. We use eight recycling test collections in semantic text similarity. The experimental results show that both the dimensional reduction and test collection characteristics can influence the results. They also show that an appropriate concept reduction of econo-ESA can decrease the cost with minor differences in the results from the original ESA. PMID:24790807

  12. Biosequence Similarity Search on the Mercury System

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Praveen; Buhler, Jeremy; Chamberlain, Roger; Franklin, Mark; Gyang, Kwame; Jacob, Arpith; Lancaster, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Biosequence similarity search is an important application in modern molecular biology. Search algorithms aim to identify sets of sequences whose extensional similarity suggests a common evolutionary origin or function. The most widely used similarity search tool for biosequences is BLAST, a program designed to compare query sequences to a database. Here, we present the design of BLASTN, the version of BLAST that searches DNA sequences, on the Mercury system, an architecture that supports high-volume, high-throughput data movement off a data store and into reconfigurable hardware. An important component of application deployment on the Mercury system is the functional decomposition of the application onto both the reconfigurable hardware and the traditional processor. Both the Mercury BLASTN application design and its performance analysis are described. PMID:18846267

  13. Inferring gene ontologies from pairwise similarity data

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Michael; Dutkowski, Janusz; Yu, Michael; Bafna, Vineet; Ideker, Trey

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: While the manually curated Gene Ontology (GO) is widely used, inferring a GO directly from -omics data is a compelling new problem. Recognizing that ontologies are a directed acyclic graph (DAG) of terms and hierarchical relations, algorithms are needed that: analyze a full matrix of gene–gene pairwise similarities from -omics data;infer true hierarchical structure in these data rather than enforcing hierarchy as a computational artifact; andrespect biological pleiotropy, by which a term in the hierarchy can relate to multiple higher level terms. Methods addressing these requirements are just beginning to emerge—none has been evaluated for GO inference. Methods: We consider two algorithms [Clique Extracted Ontology (CliXO), LocalFitness] that uniquely satisfy these requirements, compared with methods including standard clustering. CliXO is a new approach that finds maximal cliques in a network induced by progressive thresholding of a similarity matrix. We evaluate each method’s ability to reconstruct the GO biological process ontology from a similarity matrix based on (a) semantic similarities for GO itself or (b) three -omics datasets for yeast. Results: For task (a) using semantic similarity, CliXO accurately reconstructs GO (>99% precision, recall) and outperforms other approaches (<20% precision, <20% recall). For task (b) using -omics data, CliXO outperforms other methods using two -omics datasets and achieves ?30% precision and recall using YeastNet v3, similar to an earlier approach (Network Extracted Ontology) and better than LocalFitness or standard clustering (20–25% precision, recall). Conclusion: This study provides algorithmic foundation for building gene ontologies by capturing hierarchical and pleiotropic structure embedded in biomolecular data. Contact: tideker@ucsd.edu PMID:24932003

  14. Similarity Based Semantic Web Service Match

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hui; Niu, Wenjia; Huang, Ronghuai

    Semantic web service discovery aims at returning the most matching advertised services to the service requester by comparing the semantic of the request service with an advertised service. The semantic of a web service are described in terms of inputs, outputs, preconditions and results in Ontology Web Language for Service (OWL-S) which formalized by W3C. In this paper we proposed an algorithm to calculate the semantic similarity of two services by weighted averaging their inputs and outputs similarities. Case study and applications show the effectiveness of our algorithm in service match.

  15. Some more similarities between Peirce and Skinner

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2002-01-01

    C. S. Peirce is noted for pioneering a variety of views, and the case is made here for the similarities and parallels between his views and B. F. Skinner's radical behaviorism. In addition to parallels previously noted, these similarities include an advancement of experimental science, a behavioral psychology, a shift from nominalism to realism, an opposition to positivism, a selectionist account for strengthening behavior, the importance of a community of selves, a recursive approach to method, and the probabilistic nature of truth. Questions are raised as to the extent to which Skinner's radical behaviorism, as distinguished from his S-R positivism, may be seen as an extension of Peirce's pragmatism. PMID:22478387

  16. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 LASP: A Brief History of work undertaken by the Laboratory, it has been clear for some time that more office and laboratory

  17. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...only the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests, or laboratory analyses...phase of the facility permit, conditions...conducting the field tests or laboratory...

  18. Financial Counseling and Planning: Similarities and Distinctions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virginia B. Langrehr

    Establishing academic training, professional standards, and criteria for certification in the area of financial counseling requires that financial counseling be differentiated from financial planning. Those attending the 1983 Consortium on Financial Counseling and Planning attempted to define similarities and differences between financial counseling and financial planning. Those selecting a name for the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education (AFCPE)

  19. Connected Substructure Similarity Search Haichuan Shang

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xuemin

    .4 [Database Management]: Systems General Terms Algorithms, Experimentation, Performance Keywords Graph Database, Similarity Search 1. INTRODUCTION Graphs have a wide range of applications including bioin, and analyzing graph databases, in- cluding graph pattern discovery [12, 15, 18, 22], structure- based graph

  20. Substructure similarity search in graph databases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xifeng Yan; Philip S. Yu; Jiawei Han

    2005-01-01

    Advanced database systems face a great challenge raised by the emergence of massive, complex structural data in bioinformatics, chem-informatics, and many other applications. The most fundamental support needed in these applications is the efficient search of complex structured data. Since exact matching is often too restrictive, similarity search of complex structures becomes a vital operation that must be supported efficiently.In