Science.gov

Sample records for laboratory conditions similar

  1. Stimulus Similarity as a Determinant of Pavlovian Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rescorla, Robert A.; Furrow, David R.

    1977-01-01

    Three experiments carried out second-order Pavlovian conditioning using either similar or dissimilar first-and second-order stimuli. All three experiments were designed to identify the effects of similarity upon conditioning as distinct from its effects upon sensitization or stimulus generalization. (Editor/RK)

  2. Erratum: "Similarity criteria for the laboratory simulation of supernova hydrodynamics."

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Drake, R P; Kane, J; Liang, E; Remington, B A; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2009-04-03

    We have discovered an error in one of the numerical examples presented in Table 2 of our paper (p. 828). Specifically, the localization parameter l{sub c}/h for the laboratory experiment, presented in the right-most column of Table 2 should be equal to 2 x 10{sup -6}, and not to 1.1 x 10{sup -8}.

  3. Conditioning laboratory cats to handling and transport.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Margaret E; Thomson, Andrea E; Clary, Gillian P; Hamilton, Alexandra K; Hudson, Lola C; Meeker, Rick B; Sherman, Barbara L

    2013-10-01

    As research subjects, cats have contributed substantially to our understanding of biological systems, from the development of mammalian visual pathways to the pathophysiology of feline immunodeficiency virus as a model for human immunodeficiency virus. Few studies have evaluated humane methods for managing cats in laboratory animal facilities, however, in order to reduce fear responses and improve their welfare. The authors describe a behavioral protocol used in their laboratory to condition cats to handling and transport. Such behavioral conditioning benefits the welfare of the cats, the safety of animal technicians and the quality of feline research data. PMID:24051643

  4. On similarity of wind-waves spectral shapes in laboratory and in ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemer, Lev; Zavadsky, Andrey; Liberzon, Dan

    2012-11-01

    Wind-wave field evolving in a compact laboratory facility that consists of a wind tunnel capable of generating wind speed that may exceed 15 m/s atop of a 5 m long wave tank is studied. Surface elevation measurements were carried out at numerous positions along the test section and at different mean wind flow rates. For each experimental condition, the accumulated records were long enough to contain at least O(104) dominant waves; the wave power spectra computed from the recorded time series cover up to 5 decades. Similarity of the spectral shapes in the vicinity of the peak frequency fp obtained at various fetches and wind conditions was observed. This similarity manifests itself when normalized frequency deviation from the peak value is introduced. Detailed comparison is carried out of spectra obtained in the present measurements at all fetches and wind conditions, to the similarly normalized JONSWAP spectrum that represents field experiments. When estimating spectral tail behavior, care was taken to consider frequencies exceeding about 3.5fp to alleviate the effect of bound waves. The spectral tails dependence on frequency follows the power law f-n; the values of nbeing in the range 3 < n < 4 , depending on wave age. It thus can be concluded that the spectra of wind-waves in a small facility exhibit significant similarities to those obtained in field studies at much larger scales, as well as to theoretical estimates.

  5. Similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (editor)

    1990-01-01

    In this 'Project Mathematics! series, sponsored by the California Institute for Technology (CalTech), the mathematical concept of similarity is presented. he history of and real life applications are discussed using actual film footage and computer animation. Terms used and various concepts of size, shape, ratio, area, and volume are demonstrated. The similarity of polygons, solids, congruent triangles, internal ratios, perimeters, and line segments using the previous mentioned concepts are shown.

  6. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493.1403 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1403 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director....

  7. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493.1403 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1403 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director....

  8. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1403 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1403 Section 493...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for...

  12. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...frequency and the severity of injury they can cause. The phrase “working conditions” does not encompass...Determining similarity of working conditions. Generally, employees performing jobs requiring equal skill, effort...performing them under similar working conditions. However,...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1230 - Condition: General laboratory systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: General laboratory systems. 493.1230 Section... STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1230...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1230 - Condition: General laboratory systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: General laboratory systems. 493.1230 Section... STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1230...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1441 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. The laboratory must have...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1441 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. The laboratory must have...

  17. Scaling of Turbidity Currents and Riverine Flows for Laboratory Experiments: similarities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Riverine flows are commonly studies in the laboratory with the help of Froude scale models. While Froude scaling ensures similarity between model and prototype regarding flow velocity magnitude and distribution, the presence of a movable erodible bed makes it necessary to use another criterion to ensure similarity of sediment transport. This results in the need to use material that has a smaller specific gravity than the sediment in the protototype (e.g. crushed walnut shells, coal). Often times the model has to be "tilted" in order to have measurable flow depths and sediment transport. However, scale effects can still manifest themselves through the development of bedforms in the model that do not correspond to those observed in nature for the equivalent flow conditions. On the other hand, turbidity currents, capable of transporting sediment for very long distances in lakes, reservoirs and the ocean, have to be modeled with help of a densimetric Froude number or equivalently the Richardson number. Unlike the case of riverine flows, light weight materials can not be used to model turbidity currents since this would result in volumetric concentrations that are too large and make the suspension non-dilute. Examples of small scale models of the Tanana River in Alaska and lake sedimentation by turbidity currents generated by the disposal of mining tailing in Labrador, Canada, will be presented. Interpretation of physical modeling results and potential scale effects will be discussed together with some of the challenges associated with physical modeling of sediment transport phenomena.

  18. 42 CFR 493.1355 - Condition: Laboratories performing PPM procedures; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing PPM procedures; laboratory director. 493.1355 Section 493.1355...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1355 - Condition: Laboratories performing PPM procedures; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing PPM procedures; laboratory director. 493.1355 Section 493.1355...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived...

  20. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  1. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  2. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  3. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  4. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  5. 42 CFR 494.130 - Condition: Laboratory services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Patient Care § 494.130 Condition: Laboratory services. The dialysis facility must provide, or make available, laboratory services (other than tissue pathology and histocompatibility) to meet...

  6. 42 CFR 494.130 - Condition: Laboratory services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Patient Care § 494.130 Condition: Laboratory services. The dialysis facility must provide, or make available, laboratory services (other than tissue pathology and histocompatibility) to meet...

  7. 42 CFR 494.130 - Condition: Laboratory services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Patient Care § 494.130 Condition: Laboratory services. The dialysis facility must provide, or make available, laboratory services (other than tissue pathology and histocompatibility) to meet...

  8. Triangle Similarity. Geometry Module for Use in a Mathematics Laboratory Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Sheila; And Others

    This is one of a series of geometry modules developed for use by secondary students in a laboratory setting. The purpose of this module is to teach solution of proportions, concepts and theorems of triangle similarity, solution of the Pythagorean Theorem, solution of the isosceles right triangle, and concepts involving "rep-tile" figures as well…

  9. 9 CFR 327.19 - Specimens for laboratory examination and similar purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and similar purposes. 327.19 Section 327.19 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... Administrator under conditions specified by him in specific cases, including requirements of denaturing or other identification to deter their use for human food. Authorization will not be given for the importation of...

  10. 9 CFR 327.19 - Specimens for laboratory examination and similar purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and similar purposes. 327.19 Section 327.19 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... Administrator under conditions specified by him in specific cases, including requirements of denaturing or other identification to deter their use for human food. Authorization will not be given for the importation of...

  11. 9 CFR 327.19 - Specimens for laboratory examination and similar purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and similar purposes. 327.19 Section 327.19 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... Administrator under conditions specified by him in specific cases, including requirements of denaturing or other identification to deter their use for human food. Authorization will not be given for the importation of...

  12. 9 CFR 327.19 - Specimens for laboratory examination and similar purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and similar purposes. 327.19 Section 327.19 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... Administrator under conditions specified by him in specific cases, including requirements of denaturing or other identification to deter their use for human food. Authorization will not be given for the importation of...

  13. 9 CFR 327.19 - Specimens for laboratory examination and similar purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and similar purposes. 327.19 Section 327.19 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... Administrator under conditions specified by him in specific cases, including requirements of denaturing or other identification to deter their use for human food. Authorization will not be given for the importation of...

  14. Damage detection under varying environmental and operational conditions using Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima decay lines similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjirkallis, A.; Kyprianou, A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last three decades, there have been increasing demands to develop and deploy Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems for engineering structures in service. Since these structures are subjected to varying environmental and operational conditions, reliable SHM methodologies must be capable of not misattributing to damage changes due to environmental conditions. This paper presents a novel damage detection methodology based on the similarity between maxima decay lines of the continuous wavelet transform scalogram of the structural responses obtained under different operational and environmental conditions. The normalized cross correlation (NCC) is used as a measure of this similarity. In addition, the pointwise summation of similar Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM) decay lines is used to identify changes due to the presence of damage from different force realizations and/or varying environmental conditions. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is demonstrated using a simulated 3DOF system and an experimental cantilever beam.

  15. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  3. 42 CFR 493.807 - Condition: Reinstatement of laboratories performing nonwaived testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Condition: Reinstatement of laboratories performing nonwaived testing. 493... STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing §...

  4. 42 CFR 493.807 - Condition: Reinstatement of laboratories performing nonwaived testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Condition: Reinstatement of laboratories performing nonwaived testing. 493... STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Participation in Proficiency Testing for Laboratories Performing Nonwaived Testing §...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing...CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  7. Extension of laboratory-measured soil spectra to field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Weismiller, R. A.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Spectral responses of two glaciated soils, Chalmers silty clay loam and Fincastle silt loam, formed under prairie grass and forest vegetation, respectively, were measured in the laboratory under controlled moisture equilibria using an Exotech Model 20C spectroradiometer to obtain spectral data in the laboratory under artificial illumination. The same spectroradiometer was used outdoors under solar illumination to obtain spectral response from dry and moistened field plots with and without corn residue cover, representing the two different soils. Results indicate that laboratory-measured spectra of moist soil are directly proportional to the spectral response of that same field-measured moist bare soil over the 0.52 micrometer to 1.75 micrometer wavelength range. The magnitudes of difference in spectral response between identically treated Chalmers and Fincastle soils are greatest in the 0.6 micrometers to 0.8 micrometer transition region between the visible and near infrared, regardless of field condition or laboratory preparation studied.

  8. PULMONARY CELL POPULATIONS IN HAMSTERS MAINTAINED UNDER EGYPTIAN LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was conducted to obtain baseline values for pulmonary cells in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) bred and maintained under the laboratory conditions of Al-Azhar University in Egypt. An improvised technique is presented for measuring pulmonary cells obtained by lung...

  9. Reproductive traits of Monochamus galloprovincialis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Naves, P; de Sousa, E; Quartau, J A

    2006-06-01

    The pine sawyer Monochamus galloprovincialis (Olivier) is the vector of the introduced pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner & Bührer) Nickle in Portugal, and until recently was considered a secondary forest insect. Under laboratory conditions, a study of biological and reproductive traits of 37 insect pairs was conducted. The longevity of both sexes was similar, being 61.2+/-6.5 days for males and 64.0+/-6.3 days for females (mean+/-SE). Sixteen small-sized insects (22% of the population) died within 20 days and before starting to reproduce. The sexual maturation period (without egg laying) was 20.4+/-0.7 days (mean+/-SE), while the oviposition period lasted 54.0+/-4.2 days (mean+/-SE). The oviposition rate increased very quickly during the first weeks of life, peaking to almost two eggs per day during days 30-44, and gradually dropping in the following weeks. The females laid an average of 67.0+/-5.96 (mean+/-SE) eggs through their lives. The hatch rate was 92.6+/-1.0% (mean+/-SE). There were large individual variations in longevity and fecundity parameters, and principal component analysis based on 16 morphological and biological parameters separated the breeding insects into four distinct groups. Almost half of the reproducing beetles were large-sized insects, with high longevity and fecundity traits. Overall, the reproductive potential of the Portuguese population of M. galloprovincialis seems to be smaller than that described for other Monochamus vectors of the pine wood nematode both in North America and Japan. PMID:16768817

  10. Physiological responses of Corythucha ciliata adults to high temperatures under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Li, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Under high temperature conditions, insects can tolerate to survive through various physiological mechanisms, which have been well documented in laboratory studies. However, it is still unclear as to whether these laboratory data can scale up to those in the field. Here we studied dynamics of heat-induced metabolites in Corythucha ciliata adults under both laboratory and field conditions to examine their significance in thermal tolerance of the species. We compared the effects of controlled thermal treatments (2h at 33-43 °C at 2 °C intervals in the laboratory) and naturally increasing thermal conditions (10:00-14:00 at 2-h intervals (33.5-37.2 °C) on a hot summer day in a field in Shanghai, China) on water content and levels of water-soluble protein, triglycerides, mannitol, and sorbitol in the adult bodies. The results showed that water content significantly decreased and all other metabolic parameters significantly increased in response to temperature stresses with similar patterns in both the laboratory and field, although the respective threshold temperatures were different under the two conditions. The close linkage observed in the two conditions suggests that a short period of heat stress induces water loss and accumulation of thermal metabolites in C. ciliata adults. This heat-resistance provides a defense mechanism counteracting thermal damage in C. ciliata. PMID:25436946

  11. Seal formation in arid soil under natural and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarah, Pariente; Sachs, Eyal

    2013-04-01

    Runoff is of considerable importance in the functioning of a desert ecosystem. The hydrological characteristics of runoff developing on arid soil under natural field conditions and those of runoff occurring in laboratory-controlled rain simulation experiments using the same type of soil were investigated. Runoff and erosion measurements were carried out in small plots (0.2-0.8 m2) on a south-facing hillslope in the northern Negev, Israel (90 mm ave. annual rainfall). Soil from the area near to the runoff plots was collected for the rain simulation experiments conducted in the laboratory. The soil was collected from 0-1 cm and 1-5 cm depths, and then placed within boxes (1.16 m long and 0.55 m wide) in the laboratory in the same order as they had been in the field. Representative surface stones were collected in the field and scattered randomly on the soil surface in the laboratory boxes. In some of the laboratory experiments soil, 5 cm in depth, was placed on a geotechnical sheet on a metal screen, while in other experiments, soil of 5 cm depth was placed on a Terzaghi filter. Rain simulator used had a rotating disk with a tilted nozzle to simulate raindrop size dispersion and kinetic energy of natural rain. The sprinkling intensity was set at a rate of 18 mm/hour. Soil crusts in the field were more stable than those created in the lab for two standard tests: Emerson - immersion test, and the 'single water drop' test. Whereas weak activity of microphytes was found in the field there was no such activity in the lab. The rain depth until runoff in the field was less than under laboratory conditions, while the sediment yield was greater in the field than in the laboratory (8.64 g/m2 versus 0.58 g/m2). The rain simulator experiments that had included a Terzaghi filter showed significantly higher final infiltration rate (7.5 mm/h versus 4.2 mm/h), shorter accumulated watering depth until stabilization of soil seal formation (100-200 mm versus 50 mm), and smaller fraction of clay in the crust (4.2% versus 6.8%), than the experiments that done without this filter. Therefore, it is conceivable that there is a suction of thin material from the surface while capillary pressures are activated, result in sub-surface seal formation (washed-in layer). This can lead to differences between runoff-forming processes existing in the laboratory set-up and processes that occur under natural field conditions.

  12. Cable condition monitoring research activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, M.J.; Zigler, G.L.; Bustard, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is currently conducting long-term aging research on representative samples of nuclear power plant cables. The objectives of the program are to determine the suitability of these cables for extended life (beyond 40 year design basis) and to assess various cable condition monitoring techniques for predicting remaining cable life. The cables are being aged for long times at relatively mild exposure conditions with various condition monitoring techniques to be employed during the aging process. Following the aging process, the cables will be exposed to a sequential accident profile consisting of high dose rate irradiation followed by a simulated design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) steam exposure. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1421 Section 493.1421 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1421 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel....

  14. 42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... complexity testing; technical consultant. 493.1409 Section 493.1409 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1409 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant....

  15. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1421 Section 493.1421 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1421 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel....

  16. 42 CFR 493.1409 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... complexity testing; technical consultant. 493.1409 Section 493.1409 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1409 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; technical consultant....

  17. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... complexity testing; clinical consultant. 493.1415 Section 493.1415 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1415 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant....

  18. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor. The laboratory must have...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1459 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor. The laboratory must have...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor. The laboratory must have...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1459 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1459 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; general supervisor. The laboratory must have...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1453 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have...

  7. Theories and Similarity: Categorization under Speeded Conditions Christian C. Luhmann (christian.luhmann@vanderbilt.edu)

    E-print Network

    Palmeri, Thomas

    , Nashville, TN 37203 USA Abstract A largely accepted view in the categorization literature is that similarity in our lay theory of biology. Similarly, Medin and Shoben (1988) showed that people would rather accept literature, it has been argued that theory- based mechanisms cannot precede similarity-based mechanisms

  8. SIMILARITY BETWEEN MAN AND LABORATORY ANIMALS IN REGIONAL PULMONARY DEPOSITION OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicted pulmonary ozone (O3) dose curves obtained by model analysis of the transport and removal of O3 in the lungs of guinea pigs, rabbits, and man indicate that a general similarity exists among these species in the shapes of the dose curves. An overview of the major features...

  9. Morphometric changes of Triatoma flavida Neiva, 1911 (Hemiptera:Triatominae) in the transition from sylvatic to laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Rodríguez, Jinnay; Fuentes González, Omar; Nodarse, Jorge Fraga; Monzote Fidalgo, Lianet; Dujardin, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The one-generational metric changes occurring in Triatoma flavida (Hemiptera: Triatominae) when carried from its wild habitat (caves) to laboratory, were examined using traditional morphometric techniques. As for other species of Triatoma, Rhodnius or Panstrongylus studied in similar conditions, a significant reduction of head, thorax and wing size was observed. Sexual dimorphism of the wings, while present in the wild sample, was not detected anymore in the laboratory individuals. Biological significance and epidemiological importance are discussed. PMID:17505675

  10. Investigation of influence of hypomagnetic conditions closely similar to interplanetary magnetic filed on behavioral and vegetative reactions of higher mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Trukhanov, Kiril; Zamotshina, Tatyana; Zaeva, Olga; Khodanovich, Marina; Misina, Tatyana; Tukhvatulin, Ravil; Suhko, Valery

    To study the influence of long being under reduced magnetic field on behavioral and vegetative reactions of higher mammals the white rat males were put into the 700-1000 times reduced geomagnetic field (50-70 nT) for 25 days. Such field was obtained by using automatic compensation of the horizontal and vertical components of the GMF at a frequencies up to 10 Hz by means of solenoids of the experimental magnetic system. Control animals were located in the same room under usual laboratory GMF conditions (52 uT). Two days before the experiment the behavioral reactions were studied in the "open field" by means of a set of tests, characterizing the level of emotionality, moving and orientational-investigative activities of the animals under conditions of unimpeded behavior. 60 white underbred rat males with the initial body mass of 200 g were divided into three clusters. Animals with average indices were selected for the experiment. We have judged behavioral reaction disturbances of the rats under hypomagnetic conditions using videotape recordings carried out in the entire course of the chronic experiment. According to the obtained results during the period of maximum activity (from 230 to 330 a.m.) the number of interrelations between the individuals increased appreciably for experimental rats including interrelations with aggressive character. This was real during all 25 days of observation. We observed a certain dynamics of this index differed from that of the control group. We have also analyzed the final period of observation from the 21th to the 25th days. In this period we studied the 24 hours' dynamics of interrelations which were noted during 5 minutes in every hour around the clock. In the control group the number of interrelation was at a constantly low level. For experimental animals the number of interrelations was higher in the night hours than in the day ones. Moreover it exceeded the similar indexes observed from the 1st to the 20th day. For example from 300 to 305 a.m. on the 23th day we recorded 27 contacts of aggressive character between the individuals. So, in hypomagnetic field conditions the irritability of the animals' central nervous system grows, that expresses itself in the increase of contacts of aggressive and non-aggressive character between the individuals. Also we have carried out the Spirman correlation analysis between studied indices of moving activity and chemiluminescence of blood plasma and urine, electrolytic composition of urine and muscles. For control animals the quantity of correlation connections between electrolyte concentrations in studied substrata was higher than for experimental animals. The physiological sense of these correlation connections is discussed.

  11. The Design of Research Laboratories. Part I: A General Assessment. Part II: Air Conditioning and Conditioned Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legget, R. F.; Hutcheon, N. B.

    Design factors in the planning of research laboratories are described which include--(1) location, (2) future expansion, (3) internal flexibility, (4) provision of services, (5) laboratory furnishing, (6) internal traffic, (7) space requirements, and (8) building costs. A second part discusses air-conditioning and conditioned rooms--(1)…

  12. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty...

  14. Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 800 Area landfill is located on the western edge of ANL, just south of Westgate Road. It has been in operation since 1966 and has been used for the disposal of sanitary, general refuse. From 1969 through 1978, however, substantial quantities of liquid organic and inorganic wastes were disposed of in a French drain'' at the northeast corner of the landfill. The 800 Area landfill is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 45.6 m. Trace levels of organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. When this report was prepared, no chemical quality analysis have been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. Recommended actions include installation of five new well clusters and one background well, thorough record-keeping, sample collection and analysis during borehole drilling, slug testing to measure hydraulic conductivity, topographic mapping, continued monitoring of groundwater levels and quality, and monitoring of the unsaturated zone. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Amphetamine-induced sensitization and reward uncertainty similarly enhance incentive salience for conditioned cues.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mike J F; Anselme, Patrick; Suchomel, Kristen; Berridge, Kent C

    2015-08-01

    Amphetamine and stress can sensitize mesolimbic dopamine-related systems. In Pavlovian autoshaping, repeated exposure to uncertainty of reward prediction can enhance motivated sign-tracking or attraction to a discrete reward-predicting cue (lever-conditioned stimulus; CS+), as well as produce cross-sensitization to amphetamine. However, it remains unknown how amphetamine sensitization or repeated restraint stress interact with uncertainty in controlling CS+ incentive salience attribution reflected in sign-tracking. Here rats were tested in 3 successive phases. First, different groups underwent either induction of amphetamine sensitization or repeated restraint stress, or else were not sensitized or stressed as control groups (either saline injections only, or no stress or injection at all). All next received Pavlovian autoshaping training under either certainty conditions (100% CS-UCS association) or uncertainty conditions (50% CS-UCS association and uncertain reward magnitude). During training, rats were assessed for sign-tracking to the CS+ lever versus goal-tracking to the sucrose dish. Finally, all groups were tested for psychomotor sensitization of locomotion revealed by an amphetamine challenge. Our results confirm that reward uncertainty enhanced sign-tracking attraction toward the predictive CS+ lever, at the expense of goal-tracking. We also reported that amphetamine sensitization promoted sign-tracking even in rats trained under CS-UCS certainty conditions, raising them to sign-tracking levels equivalent to the uncertainty group. Combining amphetamine sensitization and uncertainty conditions did not add together to elevate sign-tracking further above the relatively high levels induced by either manipulation alone. In contrast, repeated restraint stress enhanced subsequent amphetamine-elicited locomotion, but did not enhance CS+ attraction. PMID:26076340

  16. Long-term health conditions and Disability Living Allowance: exploring ethnic differences and similarities in access.

    PubMed

    Salway, Sarah; Platt, Lucinda; Harriss, Kaveri; Chowbey, Punita

    2007-09-01

    Long-term health conditions affect a substantial proportion of working-age adults, often reducing their employment chances and their incomes. As a result, welfare benefits including those intended to off-set additional expenditure (primarily Disability Living Allowance [DLA]) can make an essential contribution towards maintaining living standards. Given the differences in rates of long-term health conditions for different ethnic groups, issues of access to relevant benefits may be particularly salient for certain communities. We lack, however, detailed examination of the factors that influence take-up of DLA across ethnic groups. In this paper, secondary analysis of Labour Force Survey data is combined with detailed new qualitative work, to examine patterns of receipt and issues of access to DLA across four ethnic groups. DLA receipt among individuals reporting long-term health conditions is low; but Bangladeshi, Pakistani and Black African individuals have significantly lower levels of receipt than White British respondents with comparable health and socioeconomic characteristics. Common factors that appeared to discourage DLA claims across the ethnic groups considered included: a desire to conceal impairment and a reluctance to assume a 'disabled' identity; limited benefit knowledge or specialist support; perceptions that the benefits system is complex and stressful; and concerns about the legitimacy of claiming. But our findings also suggest differences between the groups. For example, 'being' Ghanaian appeared to place particular constraints upon the assumption of a disabled identity. Ethnic identity also implied processes of inclusion and exclusion in social networks resulting in differential access to information and 'know-how' in relation to the benefits system. Policy clearly has a role in legitimising claiming and improving accurate information flows and thereby improving take-up of benefit among those in great need. PMID:17986022

  17. DO TIE LABORATORY BASED METHODS REALLY REFLECT FIELD CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) methods have been developed for both interstitial waters and whole sediments. These relatively simple laboratory methods are designed to identify specific toxicants or classes of toxicants in sediments; however, the question ...

  18. Optimization of growth conditions for laboratory and field assessments using immobilized benthic diatoms.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Tânia; Marques, Catarina; Abrantes, Nelson; Pereira, Joana Luísa; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Gonçalves, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    The availability of rapid and effective methodologies for assessing lotic systems with microphytobenthos is still quite scarce. Hence, the primary goal of this study was to optimize the growth conditions of the sensitive and ubiquous benthic diatom Navicula libonensis for laboratorial and field assessments. The effect of different conditions of temperature, photoperiod, initial cell density, test duration and cell encapsulation into calcium alginate beads was evaluated in a first set of experiments. There was a slight increase in the growth of free and immobilized cells at 23 °C, at lower initial cell densities and at the shortest experimental period (6 days). Through all the conditions, the growth profiles of free versus immobilized were fairly variable. A second experimental trial involved the validation of selected conditions, applied to the ecotoxicological testing of N. libonensis to two reference chemicals-3,5-dichlorophenol and potassium dichromate. A similar response of free and immobilized cells was observed between exposures to spiked stream water and synthetic medium, and through the conditions tested. This outcome suggests that N. libonensis may potentially provide reliable responses under direct in situ exposures. PMID:25354432

  19. Interoceptive conditioning with nicotine using extinction and re-extinction to assess stimulus similarity with bupropion

    PubMed Central

    Charntikov, Sergios; deWit, Nicole R.; Bevins, Rick A

    2014-01-01

    Bupropion is an atypical antidepressant that increases long-term quit rates of tobacco smokers. A better understanding of the relation between nicotine and this first-line medication may provide insight into improving treatment. For all experiments, rats first had nicotine (0.4 mg base/kg) and saline session intermixed; intermittent access to sucrose only occurred on nicotine session. Nicotine in this protocol comes to differentially control “anticipatory” dipper entries. To more closely examine the overlap in the interoceptive stimulus effects of nicotine and bupropion, we assessed whether subsequent prolonged and repeated non-reinforced (extinction) sessions with the bupropion stimulus could weaken responding to nicotine (i.e., transfer of extinction). We also examined whether retraining the discrimination after initial extinction and then conducting extinction again (i.e., re-extinction) with bupropion would affect responding. We found that bupropion (20 and 30 mg/kg) fully substituted for the nicotine stimulus in repeated 20-min extinction sessions. The extent of substitution in extinction did not necessarily predict performance in the transfer test (e.g., nicotine responding unchanged after extinction with 20 mg/kg bupropion). Generalization of extinction back to nicotine was not seen with 20 mg/kg bupropion even after increasing the number of extinction session from 6 to 24. Finally, there was evidence that learning in the initial extinction phase was retained in the re-extinction phase for nicotine and bupropion. These findings indicate that learning involving the nicotine stimuli are complex and that assessment approach for stimulus similarity changes conclusions regarding substitution by bupropion. Further research will be needed to identify whether such differences may be related to different facets of nicotine dependence and/or its treatment. PMID:25080073

  20. Exploring the nature of collisionless shocks under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Bret, A.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are pervasive in astrophysics and they are critical to understand cosmic ray acceleration. Laboratory experiments with intense lasers are now opening the way to explore and characterise the underlying microphysics, which determine the acceleration process of collisionless shocks. We determine the shock character – electrostatic or electromagnetic – based on the stability of electrostatic shocks to transverse electromagnetic fluctuations as a function of the electron temperature and flow velocity of the plasma components, and we compare the analytical model with particle-in-cell simulations. By making the connection with the laser parameters driving the plasma flows, we demonstrate that shocks with different and distinct underlying microphysics can be explored in the laboratory with state-of-the-art laser systems. PMID:24488212

  1. A Laboratory Study to Determine the Effect of Partially Saturated Conditions on Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, S.; Keating, K.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR, is a geophysical method that is sensitive to the quantity as well as the physical and chemical environments of hydrogen in porous media. In near-surface geophysics, NMR is used to determine water content and estimate pore size distribution in the top 100 m of the surface. The interpretation of NMR data in near-surface geophysics generally assumes fully saturated conditions exist in the measured volume; however, little is known about the effect partially saturated conditions have on the interpretation NMR data. In this laboratory study, we examine the effect of partially saturated conditions on measured NMR parameters. The NMR experiment consists of measuring a multi-exponential decay of magnetization after an oscillating magnetic field is applied to a sample. The multi-exponential decay is characterized by the initial amplitude, M0, and the mean log decay time, T2ml. The initial amplitude of this decay, M0, is proportional to the total water content present in a sample. In fully saturated conditions, the T2ml value is related to the surface-area-to-volume ratio. To understand the effect of partially saturated conditions on the interpretation of NMR data, we have collected NMR measurements on samples at different saturations during periods of wetting and drying and determined M0 and T2ml. We observe that T2ml increases with saturation, and M0 is linearly proportional to water content. In addition, the T2ml values at similar water contents were are shorter under drying than wetting conditions. We infer that the observed differences in the T2ml values are due to changes in the geometric distribution of water within the pore space of the sample. The results from this study will help to improve the interpretation of NMR measurements in partially saturated porous media.

  2. Resin-based composite light-cured properties assessed by laboratory standards and simulated clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ilie, N; Bauer, H; Draenert, M; Hickel, R

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The following parameters were varied: 1) irradiation technique: top and bottom polymerization according to the ISO standard, and polymerization from only the top, simulating clinical situations; 2) polymerization time: 5, 10, 20, and 40 seconds; 3) storage conditions: 24 hours in distilled water, thermocycling followed by storage for four weeks in artificial saliva or alcohol. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (Eflexural), indentation modulus (E), Vickers hardness (HV), and degree of conversion (DC) were measured. The laboratory results were similar to those measured by mimicking clinical conditions only at high polymerization times and mild storage conditions (20 seconds and 40 seconds and storage for 24 hours in water, and 40 seconds with aging and storing in saliva). Significantly higher DC values were measured on the top than on the bottom of a 2-mm layer for all polymerization times. Overall, 5-second and 10-second irradiation times induced significantly lower DC values compared to the currently recommended polymerization times of 20 and 40 seconds at both the top and bottom of the samples. The initial DC differences as a function of irradiation time are leveled at 24 hours of storage but seem to do well in predicting long-term material behavior. A minimum irradiation time of 20 seconds is necessary clinically to achieve the best mechanical properties with modern high-intensity light emitting diode (LED) units. PMID:22788727

  3. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and Earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often lead to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Steffes and Eshleman showed that under environmental conditions corresponding to the middle atmosphere of Venus, the microwave absorption due to atmospheric SO2 was 50 percent greater than that calculated from Van Vleck-Weiskopff theory. Similarly, the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 was found to be a factor of 7 greater than theoretically predicted for conditions of the Venus middle atmosphere. The recognition of the need to make such measurements over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the periapsis altitudes of radio occultation experiments, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements.

  4. Evaluation of Laboratory Conditioning Protocols for Warm-Mix Asphalt 

    E-print Network

    Yin, Fan 1990-

    2012-10-26

    : Chair of Committee, Amy Epps Martin Committee Members, Robert Lytton Charles Glover Head of Department, John Niedzwecki December 2012 Major Subject: Civil Engineering Copyright 2012 Fan Yin ii ABSTRACT Warm-Mix Asphalt (WMA) refers... as indicated by HWTT agree with those in a dry condition in MR testing. iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Firstly, I must give my high, respectful gratitude to my committee chair, Dr. Amy Epps Martin, for her great assistance in helping me with my thesis. I...

  5. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, B.; Thiele, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well.

  6. Weathering rates of marble in laboratory and outdoor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yerrapragada, S.S.; Chirra, S.R.; Jaynes, J.H.; Bandyopadhyay, J.K.; Gauri, K.L.; Li, S.

    1996-09-01

    In the modern urban atmosphere SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} attack calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) in marble exposed at rain-sheltered surfaces creating largely gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) crusts that eventually exfoliate. In combination with CO{sub 2} these gases erode the marble at unsheltered surfaces. the authors report the development of mathematical models to predict the rate of growth of crust and the rate of surface recession. To determine the rate of growth of crust the kinetic rate constant, diffusion rate, and the order of reaction were determined by the application of the shrinking-core model applied to data generated in laboratory experiments. Based on these parameters /and average ambient levels of 10 parts per billion (ppb) SO{sub 2} and 25 ppb NO{sub 2} in Louisville, Ky., the rate of crust formation for this metro area was calculated to be 1.8 {micro}m in the first year. However, the rate of recession was modeled from data obtained by exposing marble slabs to rainfalls. A surface recession of 15 {micro}m/yr was calculated. The models predicted well the rate of growth of crust observed at several sites in Louisville and the predicted surface recession compared well with values reported in the literature.

  7. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... testing; clinical consultant. 493.1453 Section 493.1453 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have a clinical consultant who meets the requirements of § 493.1455 of this subpart and provides...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... complexity testing; clinical consultant. 493.1415 Section 493.1415 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... § 493.1415 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have a clinical consultant who meets the qualification requirements of § 493.1417 of...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE....1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE....1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE....1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the...

  12. Vital Statistics of Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Under Laboratory Conditions: IV. Panstrongylus geniculatus.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Jorge Eduardo; Feliciangeli, M Dora

    2015-09-01

    A cohort of 100 eggs of Panstrongylus geniculatus (Latreille) was reared in the laboratory under constant conditions (temperature 26?±?1°C, 60?±?10% RH), with mortality and fecundity data recorded weekly. We calculated stage-specific development times, age-specific mortality and fecundity (18.4 eggs/?/wk), and stage-specific and total preadult mortality (31.6%), and the weekly intrinsic rate of natural increase (r(o)?=?0.096), the finite population growth rate (??=?1.109), the net reproductive rate (R(0)?=?60.45), and the generation time (T?=?46.34 wk). Elasticity analysis showed that the dominant life-history trait determining ? was survival (particularly the adult female's survival). Adult females dominated the stage-specific reproductive value, and the egg stage dominated the stable stage distribution (SSD). The damping ratio (??=?1.096) suggests a relatively rapid period of recovery to a disturbed SSD. Results were compared with one previous study and conform relatively well, considering that environmental conditions were not the same. We estimated the colonizing ability of P. geniculatus, using as a criterion the ro/b index, and obtained the value of 0.74, an indicator of a good colonizer, and similar to well-known invasive species such as Rhodnius prolixus and Triatoma infestans. The life history traits and demographic parameters here presented for P. geniculatus are discussed in terms of their usefulness for evolutionary studies and vector control activities. PMID:26336251

  13. SIMILARITY IN RESPONSES OF LABORATORY-REARED ANED FIELD-COLLECTED LONE STAR TICK (ACARI:IXODIDAE)NYMPHS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field testing tick repellents intended for use on human skin can be difficult, particularly when multiple concentrations of multiple repellents must be tested. Therefore, laboratory tests using laboratory reared ticks have been important. To address concerns that test results obtained with laborator...

  14. Cross-polarization microwave radar return at severe wind conditions: laboratory model and geophysical model function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Abramov, Victor; Ermoshkin, Alexey; Zuikova, Emma; Kazakov, Vassily; Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexandr

    2014-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing is one of the main techniques of monitoring severe weather conditions over the ocean. The principal difficulty of the existing algorithms of retrieving wind based on dependence of microwave backscattering cross-section on wind speed (Geophysical Model Function, GMF) is due to its saturation at winds exceeding 25 - 30 m/s. Recently analysis of dual- and quad-polarization C-band radar return measured from satellite Radarsat-2 suggested that the cross-polarized radar return has much higher sensitivity to the wind speed than co-polarized back scattering [1] and conserved sensitivity to wind speed at hurricane conditions [2]. Since complete collocation of these data was not possible and time difference in flight legs and SAR images acquisition was up to 3 hours, these two sets of data were compared in [2] only statistically. The main purpose of this paper is investigation of the functional dependence of cross-polarized radar cross-section on the wind speed in laboratory experiment. Since cross-polarized radar return is formed due to scattering at small-scale structures of the air-sea interface (short-crested waves, foam, sprays, etc), which are well reproduced in laboratory conditions, then the approach based on laboratory experiment on radar scattering of microwaves at the water surface under hurricane wind looks feasible. The experiments were performed in the Wind-wave flume located on top of the Large Thermostratified Tank of the Institute of Applied Physics, where the airflow was produced in the flume with the straight working part of 10 m and operating cross section 0.40?0.40 sq. m, the axis velocity can be varied from 5 to 25 m/s. Microwave measurements were carried out by a coherent Doppler X-band (3.2 cm) scatterometer with the consequent receive of linear polarizations. Experiments confirmed higher sensitivity to the wind speed of the cross-polarized radar return. Simultaneously parameters of the air flow in the turbulent boundary layer (friction velocity and roughness height) were retrieved by velocity profiling and subsequent data processing based on self-similarity of the turbulent boundary layer and 10-m wind speed was calculated. The wind wave field parameters in the flume were measured by three wire gauges. The measured data on wind waves were used for estimation of the short wave spectra and slope probability density function for "long waves" within composite Bragg theory of microwave radar return. Estimations showed that for co-polarized radar returns the difference between measurements and the predictions of the model is about 1-2 dB and it can be explained by our poor knowledge about the short wave part of the spectrum. For cross-polarized return the difference exceeds 10 dB, and it indicates that some non-Bragg mechanisms (short-crested waves, foam, sprays, etc) are responsible for the depolarization of the returned signal. It seems reasonable then to suppose that the cross-polarized radar return in X- and C-bands will demonstrate similar dependence on wind speed. We compared the dependence of cross-polarized X-band radar cross-section on 10-m wind speed obtained in laboratory conditions with the similar dependence obtained in [2] from the field data for C-band radar cross-section and found out that the laboratory data follow the median of the field data with the constant bias -11 dB. Basing on laboratory data an empirical polynomial geophysical model function was suggested for retrieving wind speed up to 40 m/s from cross-polarized microwave return, which is in good agreement with the direct measurements. This work was carried out under financial support of the RFBR (project codes ¹ 13-05-00865, 12-05-12093) and by grant from the Government of the Russian Federation (project code 11.G34.31.0048). References [1] B. Zhang, W. Perrie Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 93, 531-541, 2012. [2] G.-J. van Zadelhoff, et.al. Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., 6, 7945-7984, doi:10.5194/amtd-6-7945-2013, 2013.

  15. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory measurements were conducted to evaluate properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planets. A significant addition to this effort was the capability to make such measurements at millimeter wavelengths. Measurements should soon be completed on the millimeter wave absorption from ammonia under Jovian conditions. Also studied will be the feasibility of measuring the microwave and millimeter wave properties of phosphine (PH3) under simulated Jovian conditions. Further analysis and application of the laboratory results to microwave and millimeter wave absorption data for the outer planet, such as Voyager Radio Occultation experiments, will be pursued.

  16. Hydrologic conditions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, emphasis; 1974-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barraclough, Jack T.; Lewis, Barney D.; Jensen, Rodger G.

    1981-01-01

    Aqueous chemical and radioactive wastes have been discharged to shallow ponds and to shallow or deep wells on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since 1952 and has affected the quality of the ground water in the underlying Snake River Plain aquifer. Ongoing studies conducted from 1974 through 1978 have shown the perpetuation of a perched ground-water zone in the basalt underlying the waste disposal ponds at the INEL 's Test Reactor Area and of several waste plumes in the regional aquifer created by deep well disposal at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The perched zone contains tritium, chromium-51, cobalt-60, strontium-90, and several nonradioactive chemicals. Tritium has formed the largest waste plume south of the ICPP, and accounts for 95 percent of the total radioacticity disposed of through the ICPP disposal well. Waste plumes with similar configurations and flowpaths contain sodium, chloride, and nitrate. Strontium-90, iodine-129, and cesium-137 are also discharged through the well but they are sorbed from solution as they move through the aquifer or are discharged in very small quantities. Strontium-90 and iodine-129 have formed small waste plumes and cesium-137 is not detectable in ground-water samples. Radionuclide plume size and concentrations therein are controlled by aquifer flow conditions, the quantity discharged, radioactive decay, sorption, dilution by dispersion, and perhaps other chemical reactions. Chemical wastes are subject to the same processes except for radioactive decay. (USGS)

  17. Thermal stress on ZnO surge arresters in polluted conditions; Part I: Laboratory test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vitet, S. ); Stenstrom, L.; Lundquist, J )

    1992-10-01

    The thermal performance of ZnO surge arresters in polluted conditions were studied in the laboratory and the field. Part I of the paper deals with laboratory test methods such as the salt fog, solid layer, partial wetting, and slurry method. The thermal stress imposed on the arresters by the different test methods in terms of pollution severity and temperature rise, is discussed in this paper.

  18. Kinetics of Phase Separation in the Driven Lattice Gas: Self-Similar Pattern Growth under Anisotropic Nonequilibrium Conditions

    E-print Network

    Pablo I. Hurtado; J. Marro; Pedro L. Garrido; E. V. Albano

    2003-02-12

    The driven lattice gas (DLG) evolving at low temperature helps understanding the kinetics of pattern formation in unstable mixtures under anisotropic conditions. We here develop a simple theoretical description of kinetics in Monte Carlo simulations of the DLG. A Langevin continuum analog is also studied which is shown to exhibit the same behavior. We demonstrate that pattern growth is mainly a consequence of single-particle processes and that, after a short transient time, in which a surface evaporation/condensation mechanism is important, hole diffusion in the bulk becomes dominant. Consequently, there is a unique relevant length that behaves $l(t) \\sim t^{1/3}$ for macroscopic systems except at some very early (perhaps unobservable) time. This implies sort of self-similarity, namely, the spatial pattern looks alike, but for a (non-trivial) change of scale at different times. We also characterize the structure factor, in which we identify Guinier and Porod regions, and its scaling form with both time and size. The underlying anisotropy turns out to be essential in determining the macroscopically-emergent peculiar behavior.

  19. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli protein secretion is induced in response to conditions similar to those in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, B; Abe, A; Stein, M; Finlay, B B

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenicity of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is associated with the expression and secretion of specific bacterial factors. EspB is one such secreted protein which is required to trigger host signaling pathways resulting in effacement of microvilli and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These events presumably contribute to the ensuing diarrhea associated with EPEC infections. EPEC encounters several environmental changes and stimuli during its passage from the external environment into the host gastrointestinal tract. In this paper we show that the secretion of EspB is subject to environmental regulation, and maximal secretion occurs under conditions reminiscent of those in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, secretion is maximal at 37 degrees C, pH 7, and physiological osmolarity. In addition, maximal secretion requires the presence of sodium bicarbonate and calcium and is stimulated by millimolar concentrations of Fe(NO3)3. The secretion of the four other EPEC-secreted proteins appears to be modulated in a manner similar to that of EspB. Our results also show that secretion is not dependent on CO2, as originally reported by Haigh et al. (FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 129: 63-67, 1995), but that CO2 more likely acts as a component of the medium buffering system, since CO2 dependence was abolished by the use of alternative buffers. PMID:9199427

  20. Interpreting EChO's future data: biological laboratory estimates under M star's planetary surface conditions

    E-print Network

    Micela, Giusi

    Interpreting EChO's future data: biological laboratory estimates under M star's planetary surface In a Test Tube", planetary environmental conditions are being performed. The bacteria that are being studied. INTRODUCTION EChO, the Exoplanet Characterization Observatory, is a mission concept specifically geared

  1. The Effect of SpeechEasy on Stuttering Frequency in Laboratory Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armson, Joy; Kiefte, Michael; Mason, Jessica; De Croos, Dayani

    2006-01-01

    The effect of SpeechEasy on stuttering frequency during speech produced in a laboratory setting was examined. Thirteen adults who stutter participated. Stuttering frequencies in two baseline conditions were compared to stuttering frequencies with the device fitted according to the manufacturer's protocol. The fitting protocol includes instructions…

  2. 42 CFR 416.49 - Condition for coverage-Laboratory and radiologic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Laboratory and radiologic services. 416.49 Section 416.49 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) AMBULATORY SURGICAL SERVICES...

  3. 42 CFR 416.49 - Condition for coverage-Laboratory and radiologic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Laboratory and radiologic services. 416.49 Section 416.49 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM AMBULATORY SURGICAL SERVICES Specific...

  4. Reproduction, development and habits of the large turkey louse Chelopistes meleagridis (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Maturano, R; Daemon, E

    2014-08-01

    The bionomy of Chelopistes meleagridis off the host was observed with the aim of better understanding the aspects of this species' life cycle. For this purpose, C. meleagridis adults were collected and maintained under controlled conditions to reproduce (35°C and RH > 80%), with turkey feathers as the food source. From the offspring of these lice, the development of 150 individuals was observed from the egg to the adult phase. These eggs were divided into two groups of 75 each. After hatching, one group was given a diet composed of feathers while the other received feathers plus skin of the host turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). The "feather + skin" diet resulted in the greatest number of adults, so this diet was given to the next generation of lice reared in vitro, starting from the first instar, to observe their fertility, fecundity and longevity. High reproduction rates were found in relation to other lice of the Ischnocera sub-order, particularly the number of eggs per day and number of eggs produced per female over the lifetime (means of 2.54 and 26.61 eggs, respectively, for wild females and 2.11 and 29.33 eggs for laboratory-reared females). The inclusion of skin in the diet was a determining factor for development to the adult stage, since 48% of the lice fed this diet reached that stage, versus 1.3% that reached maturity fed only with feathers. The development time of the males and females was similar (mean of 29.38 days), without any difference in the sexual proportion of the adults. PMID:25296223

  5. Longevity and survival curves of Rhinella icterica (Anura, Bufonidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lima, M S C S; Pederassi, J; Souza, C A S

    2014-05-01

    Life tables and survival curves of tadpoles from Rhinella icterica species were studied in the laboratory, under abiotic conditions controlled by a purification filter, a timer and a chiller. The survival curve for larval stage confirms a great mortality trend in the initial stages, which decreases when reaching the mature morphological condition (r = -0.94). Stages 37, 38, 39, 40 and 41 showed gradual values for their age structures, while stages 42, 43 and 44 presented high variations. Based on the results under laboratory conditions, it can be concluded that the maturity of R. icterica tadpoles development between 37 and 44 stages has a negative correlation and their predicted life expectancy is a logarithmic growth curve (y=-761.96Ln(x)+5298.5). PMID:25166328

  6. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of microwave and millimeter wave properties of the simulated atmosphere of the outer planets and their satellites has continued. One of the focuses is on the development of a radiative transfer model of the Jovian atmosphere at wavelengths from 1 mm to 10 cm. This modeling effort led to laboratory measurements of the millimeter wave opacity of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) under simulated Jovian conditions. Descriptions of the modeling effort, the Laboratory experiment, and the observations are presented. Correlative studies of measurements with Pioneer-Venus radio occultation measurements with longer wavelength emission measurements have provided new ways for characterizing temporal and spatial variations in the abundance of both gases H2SO4 and SO2, and for modeling their roles in the subcloud atmosphere. Laboratory measurements were conducted on 1.35 cm (and 13 cm) opacity of gaseous SO2 and absorptivity of gaseous SO2 at the 3.2 mm wavelength under simulated Venus conditions. Laboratory measurements were completed on millimeter wave dielectric properties of liquid H2SO4, in order to model the effects of the opacity of the clouds of Venus onto millimeter wave emission spectrum.

  7. GROSS N TRANSFORMATION RATES AND MICROBIAL POPULATION DYNAMICS UNDER FIELD AND LABORATORY CONDITIONS FROM TWO DIFFERENT ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Change of soil and environmental conditions can influence microbial activities and subsequent soil nitrogen (N) transformation processes. The objective of this study was to compare gross N transformation rates between field and laboratory incubation conditions using an old-field...

  8. Effects of Multiple Contexts and Context Similarity on the Renewal of Extinguished Conditioned Behaviour in an ABA Design with Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balooch, Siavash Bandarian; Neumann, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The ABA renewal procedure involves pairing a conditional stimulus (CS) and an unconditional stimulus (US) in one context (A), presenting extinction trials of the CS alone in a second context (B), and nonreinforced test trials of the CS in the acquisition context (A). The renewal of extinguished conditioned behaviour is observed during test. The…

  9. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and Earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorping properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurement of the microwave properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planets were conducted. Results of these measurements are discussed.

  10. Laboratory analysis of gas hydrate cores for evaluation of reservoir conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G.D.

    1984-06-01

    Methodology and procedures for the study of hydrate cores are detailed. Topics discussed are the (1) equipment and procedures for the formation and evaluation of hydrate cores in the laboratory, (2) the thermodynamic properties of gas hydrates, (3) the enthalpy of hydrate dissociation, (4) conditions in the earth where hydrates can form, (5) kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, and (6) heat transfer to gas hydrates. Empirical correlations for these properties and kinetic behavior are given. 24 references, 39 figures, 10 tables.

  11. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for the Venus middle atmosphere (1 to 6 atm, temperatures from 500 to 575K) obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments (at 3.6 to 13.4 cm wavelengths) and earth-based radio astronomical observations (1 to 3 cm wavelength range) are compared to laboratory observations at the latter wavelength range under simulated Venus conditions to infer abundances of microwave-absorbing atmospheric constituents, i.e. H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere.

  12. Laboratory Experiments and Investigations on the Reaction Rates of Mg-sulfates Under Mars Relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Freeman, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    Large deposits of hydrous Mg-sulfates was identified on Mars by orbital remote sensing (OMEGA on Mars Express and CRISM on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter). Kieserite (MgSO4.H2O) and a non-specific “polyhydrated sulfates” are among the most observed and widely distributed sulfates (Bibring et al., 2005, Murchie et al., 2007). They frequently co-exist (Gendrin et al., 2005) and sometimes occur in alternative stratigraphic layers (Roach et al., 2008). Mg-sulfates were suggested, by compositional correlations and mineral models, to exist in Meridiani outcrops (Clark et al., 2005) and in rocks and regolith at Gusev (Squyres et al., 2006, Haskin et al., 2005, Wang et al., 2006, 2008); but no information on the hydration state of these sulfates can be extracted. We have conducted 188 experiments to investigate the stability fields and phase transition pathways of hydrous Mg-sulfates (Wang et al., 2009). In addition, we can extract the information on the reaction rates of five important dehydration and rehydration processes involved in these experiments. Our experiments were done at four temperatures (50°C, 21°C, 5°C, and -10°C) and ten relative humidity levels, with five hydrous Mg-sulfate species as starting phases. The rate information was extracted from the mineral identifications of the intermediate reaction products, measured by non-invasive Raman spectroscopy at regular time intervals during the entire duration of experiments (tens’ thousands hours). The rates for five processes are all strongly controlled by temperatures. We found that the experimental results match Arrhenius equation very well, thus the rate constants for dehydration and rehydration processes of Mg-sulfates at lower temperatures (down to 180K) can be approximately estimated by using the experimentally derived pre-exponential factor(s) and activation energy(s). In this study, only the orders of magnitudes for reaction rate ratios at different temperatures were considered. The estimated reaction rate ratios at different temperatures for five important processes helped us to understand the stable, especially the metastable, Mg-sulfate species that could be seen at Mars surface in non-polar regions during a moderate obliquity period. Therefore in addition to exam the spectral similarity, we now can use the knowledge gained through the laboratory experiments on stability field, phase transition pathway, and reaction rate of Mg-sulfates to evaluate the realistic mineral candidates for “polyhydrated sulfates”, that were so widely observed on Mars by OMEGA and CRISM. Furthermore, we will be able to investigate the formation mechanism of alternative stratigraphic layers of sulfates on Mars and the paleo-climatic conditions that they may imply.

  13. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1997-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements completed under this grant (NAGW-533), have shown that the opacity from, SO2 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different lineshape than was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  14. Laboratory simulations of acid-sulfate weathering under volcanic hydrothermal conditions: Implications for early Mars

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Emma C; Hynek, Brian M

    2014-01-01

    We have completed laboratory experiments and thermochemical equilibrium models to investigate secondary mineral formation under conditions akin to volcanic, hydrothermal acid-sulfate weathering systems. Our research used the basaltic mineralogy at Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua, characterized by plagioclase, pyroxene, olivine, and volcanic glass. These individual minerals and whole-rock field samples were reacted in the laboratory with 1 molal sulfuric acid at varying temperatures (65, 150, and 200°C), fluid:rock weight ratios (1:1, 4:1, and 10:1), and durations (1–60?days). Thermochemical equilibrium models were developed using Geochemist's Workbench. To understand the reaction products and fluids, we employed scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The results of our experiments and models yielded major alteration minerals that include anhydrite, natroalunite, minor iron oxide, and amorphous Al-Si gel. We found that variations in experimental parameters did not drastically change the suite of minerals produced; instead, abundance, size, and crystallographic shape changed. Our results also suggest that it is essential to separate phases formed during experiments from those formed during fluid evaporation to fully understand the reaction processes. Our laboratory reacted and model predicted products are consistent with the mineralogy observed at places on Mars. However, our results indicate that determination of the formation conditions requires microscopic imagery and regional context, as well as a thorough understanding of contributions from both experiment precipitation and fluid evaporation minerals. PMID:26213665

  15. Laboratory simulations of acid-sulfate weathering under volcanic hydrothermal conditions: Implications for early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcucci, Emma C.; Hynek, Brian M.

    2014-03-01

    We have completed laboratory experiments and thermochemical equilibrium models to investigate secondary mineral formation under conditions akin to volcanic, hydrothermal acid-sulfate weathering systems. Our research used the basaltic mineralogy at Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua, characterized by plagioclase, pyroxene, olivine, and volcanic glass. These individual minerals and whole-rock field samples were reacted in the laboratory with 1 molal sulfuric acid at varying temperatures (65, 150, and 200°C), fluid:rock weight ratios (1:1, 4:1, and 10:1), and durations (1-60 days). Thermochemical equilibrium models were developed using Geochemist's Workbench. To understand the reaction products and fluids, we employed scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The results of our experiments and models yielded major alteration minerals that include anhydrite, natroalunite, minor iron oxide, and amorphous Al-Si gel. We found that variations in experimental parameters did not drastically change the suite of minerals produced; instead, abundance, size, and crystallographic shape changed. Our results also suggest that it is essential to separate phases formed during experiments from those formed during fluid evaporation to fully understand the reaction processes. Our laboratory reacted and model predicted products are consistent with the mineralogy observed at places on Mars. However, our results indicate that determination of the formation conditions requires microscopic imagery and regional context, as well as a thorough understanding of contributions from both experiment precipitation and fluid evaporation minerals.

  16. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Ambient Conditions, Soot Emissions, and Fuel Properties on Contrail Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Anderson, B. E.; Bulzan, D.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Tacina, K.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Wong, H.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    Contrail formation by aircraft can affect the global radiation budget and is the most uncertain component of aviation impacts on climate change. Field campaigns studying contrail formation have given insight into their formation pathways. However in order to improve simulations of contrail production, laboratory studies of the initial processes of contrail formation from aircraft-emitted soot are needed. As part of the Aviation Climate Change Research Initiative (ACCRI), laboratory studies of contrail formation from simulated aircraft emissions were performed at the particulate aerosol laboratory (PAL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The facility consists of a controlled soot source connected to a flow-through chamber which can simulate atmospheric conditions at altitudes up to 45,000 ft. Soot was made by a propane-fueled CAST generator and allowed to mix with water vapor and sulfuric acid to simulate aircraft emissions. Optical particle counters were employed at two distances from the nozzle tip that provided number concentration and size distributions of newly formed ice particles. The formation of ice particles is presented for chamber temperatures and pressures simulating altitudes between 15,000 and 40,000 feet. Initial results show the role of soot concentration, soot size, concentration of co-emitted pollutants and ambient conditions in ice particle formation.

  17. Ichthyotoxicity of the microalga Pseudochattonella farcimen under laboratory and field conditions in Danish waters.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Hansen, Per Juel; Engell-Sørensen, Kirsten; Nørremark, Louise Hjorth; Andersen, Per; Lorenzen, Ellen; Lorenzen, Niels

    2015-10-27

    Blooms of the marine dictyochophyte Pseudochattonella farcimen have been associated with fish kills, but attempts to verify ichthyotoxicity of this microalga under experimental conditions have not been successful. In the early spring of 2009 and 2011, P. farcimen bloomed in the inner Danish waters. The blooms occurred at a seawater temperature of ~2°C and correlated with extensive kills of farmed salmonid fish (2009) and wild populations (2011). Several strains of P. farcimen were isolated from the 2009 bloom. However, exposure of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to laboratory-grown P. farcimen cultures did not reveal any toxic effects. During the 2011 bloom, fish were exposed to bloom water under both laboratory and field conditions. While no clinical effect was observed on fish incubated in bloom water in the laboratory trial, a remarkable difference was seen in the field trial between rainbow trout kept in tanks supplied with a continuous flow of filtered versus non-filtered bloom water. Histological examination of the gill tissue revealed karyorrhexis and epithelial loosening in the affected fish. Microscopy analysis of algal cell morphology suggested that mucocysts detected on the cell surface only in freshly sampled bloom water might be associated with ichtyotoxicity. PMID:26503770

  18. Consequences of keeping Mytilus in the laboratory as assessed by different cellular condition indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajaraville, M. P.; Díez, G.; Marigómez, I. A.; Angulo, E.

    1991-12-01

    Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk. were maintained in the laboratory for three months in a semicontinuous water flow system. Animals were fed a commercial filter-feeder food and sampled after 0, 21, 35, 49, 77, and 91 days. In order to establish whether laboratory conditions and the food used were deleterious to mussels, their health status was assessed by quantifying different histological parameters of the digestive gland tissue. It was concluded that mussels kept for more than 35 days under the described laboratory conditions showed signs of stress presumably caused by the reproductive state of the mussels investigated. The food used and the nutrition-related health status of the animals were adequate, as shown by transmission electron microscopical studies after the 91-day maintenance period. A stress response was also evoked by a 10-day starvation period, which was reflected by an increased proportion of type I and type IV digestive tubules, and a reduced “Mean Epithelial Thickness” (MET). Finally, the results demonstrate the sensitivity of quantitative histological diagnosis in comparison to subjective tubule grading procedures in the assessment of the degree of stress experienced by mussels.

  19. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    In the first half of this grant year, laboratory measurements were conducted on the millimeter-wave properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planet. Significant improvements in the current system have made it possible to accurately characterize the opacity from gaseous NH3 at longer millimeter wavelengths (7 to 10 mm) under simulated Jovian conditions. In the second half of the grant year, it is hoped to extend such measurements to even shorter millimeter-wavelengths. Further analysis and application of the laboratory results to microwave and millimeter-wave absorption data for the outer planets, such as results from Voyager Radio Occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations will be continued. The analysis of available multispectral microwave opacity data from Venus, including data from the most recent radio astronomical ovservations in the 1.3 to 3.6 cm wavelength range and newly obtained Pioneer-Venus Radio Occulatation measurements at 13 cm, using the laboratory measurements as an interpretative tool will be pursued.

  20. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    The recognition of the need to make laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressure which correspond to the altitudes probed by radio occultation experiments, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. Construction was completed of the outer planets simulator and measurements were conducted of the microwave absorption and refraction from nitrogen under simulated Titan conditions. The results of these and previous laboratory measurements were applied to a wide range of microwave opacity measurements, in order to derive constituent densities and distributions in planetary atmospheres such as Venus.

  1. Evaluation of Cyantraniliprole and Other Commercial Fly Baits under Laboratory and Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Casey; Baldwin, Rebecca; Pereira, Roberto; Koehler, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory and field trials were performed to evaluate the attractiveness and efficacy of commercial baits (cyantraniliprole; methomyl + (Z)-9-tricosene; dinotefuran + (Z)-9-tricosene; imidacloprid granular + (Z)-9-tricosene; and imidacloprid liquid + (Z)-9-tricosene). In choice tests; flies were most attracted to cyantraniliprole bait > dinotefuran + (Z)-9 > methomyl + (Z)-9 bait > imidacloprid granular + (Z)-9 bait > imidacloprid liquid + (Z)-9 bait. Significant degradation in bait efficacy was observed after two weeks of aging excluding imidacloprid granular; which began to degrade in field conditions after one week. Cyantraniliprole; the new fly bait active ingredient in Zyrox(®); had the longest time to knockdown in the laboratory tests; but on susceptible flies; achieved 95%-100% knockdown within an hour of exposure. Zyrox(®) was resistant to weathering for a week; and was more attractive to flies in the field when compared to methomyl + (Z)-9 bait. PMID:26610575

  2. Evaluation of Cyantraniliprole and Other Commercial Fly Baits under Laboratory and Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Casey; Baldwin, Rebecca; Pereira, Roberto; Koehler, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory and field trials were performed to evaluate the attractiveness and efficacy of commercial baits (cyantraniliprole; methomyl + (Z)-9-tricosene; dinotefuran + (Z)-9-tricosene; imidacloprid granular + (Z)-9-tricosene; and imidacloprid liquid + (Z)-9-tricosene). In choice tests; flies were most attracted to cyantraniliprole bait > dinotefuran + (Z)-9 > methomyl + (Z)-9 bait > imidacloprid granular + (Z)-9 bait > imidacloprid liquid + (Z)-9 bait. Significant degradation in bait efficacy was observed after two weeks of aging excluding imidacloprid granular; which began to degrade in field conditions after one week. Cyantraniliprole; the new fly bait active ingredient in Zyrox®; had the longest time to knockdown in the laboratory tests; but on susceptible flies; achieved 95%–100% knockdown within an hour of exposure. Zyrox® was resistant to weathering for a week; and was more attractive to flies in the field when compared to methomyl + (Z)-9 bait. PMID:26610575

  3. Validity and reliability of the T-Scan(®) III for measuring force under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Cerna, M; Ferreira, R; Zaror, C; Navarro, P; Sandoval, P

    2015-07-01

    Although measuring bite force is an important indicator of the health of the masticatory system, few commercially available transducers have been validated for routine clinical use. T-Scan(®) III Occlusal Analysis System allows to record the bite force distribution, indicating its relative intensity and occlusal timing. Nevertheless, even fewer studies have evaluated the validity and reliability of the latest generation of the T-Scan(®) occlusal analysis system. To determine the validity and reliability of the T-Scan(®) III system when measuring total absolute bite force under laboratory conditions. Known forces were applied to 18 T-Scan(®) III sensors, which were classified into two groups differentiated by their production series. Both Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to assess the system's reliability and validity. Considering all the sensors studied, a substantial level (Lin's CCC 0·969) and a very good level of reliability (CCI 0·994) were obtained. When evaluating the validity of the system, a poor (Lin's CCC 0·530) and moderate (ICC 0·693) agreement were also obtained. The main factor that negatively influenced the validity of the T-Scan(®) III under these study conditions was the significant difference in the behaviour of the two sensor groups. The T-Scan(®) III showed a high degree of reliability when used to perform consecutive measurements. However, the system showed an insufficient degree of validity for measuring absolute force when estimating total occlusal force under laboratory conditions. PMID:25727489

  4. Scaling methane oxidation: From laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Abichou, Tarek; Mahieu, Koenraad; Chanton, Jeff; Romdhane, Mehrez; Mansouri, Imane

    2011-05-15

    Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, K{sub m}, to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

  5. Consistent null-energy-condition violation: Towards creating a universe in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubakov, V. A.

    2013-08-01

    The null energy condition (NEC) can be violated in a consistent way in models with unconventional kinetic terms, notably, in Galileon theories and their generalizations. We make use of one of these, the scale-invariant kinetic braiding model, to discuss whether a universe can in principle be created by manmade processes. We find that, even though the simplest models of this sort can have both healthy Minkowski vacuum and a consistent NEC-violating phase, there is an obstruction for creating a universe in a straightforward fashion. To get around this obstruction, we design a more complicated model and present a scenario for the creation of a universe in the laboratory.

  6. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    After long arduous work with the simulator, measurements of the refractivity and absorptivity of nitrogen under conditions similar to those for Titan were completed. The most significant measurements, however, were those of the microwave absorption from gaseous ammonia under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmospheres over wavelengths from 1.3 to 22 cm. The results of these measurements are critical in that they confirm the theoretical calculation of the ammonia opacity using the Ben-Reuven lineshape. The application of both these results, and results obtained previously, to planetary observations at microwave frequencies were especially rewarding. Applications of the results for ammonia to radio astronomical observations of Jupiter in the 1.3 to 20 cm wavelength range and the application of results for gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions are discussed.

  7. Wear Independent Similarity.

    PubMed

    Steele, Adam; Davis, Alexander; Kim, Joohyung; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S

    2015-06-17

    This study presents a new factor that can be used to design materials where desired surface properties must be retained under in-system wear and abrasion. To demonstrate this factor, a synthetic nonwetting coating is presented that retains chemical and geometric performance as material is removed under multiple wear conditions: a coarse vitrified abradant (similar to sanding), a smooth abradant (similar to rubbing), and a mild abradant (a blend of sanding and rubbing). With this approach, such a nonwetting material displays unprecedented mechanical durability while maintaining desired performance under a range of demanding conditions. This performance, herein termed wear independent similarity performance (WISP), is critical because multiple mechanisms and/or modes of wear can be expected to occur in many typical applications, e.g., combinations of abrasion, rubbing, contact fatigue, weathering, particle impact, etc. Furthermore, these multiple wear mechanisms tend to quickly degrade a novel surface's unique performance, and thus many promising surfaces and materials never scale out of research laboratories. Dynamic goniometry and scanning electron microscopy results presented herein provide insight into these underlying mechanisms, which may also be applied to other coatings and materials. PMID:26018058

  8. Reproductive characteristics of the Yangtze vole (Microtus fortis calamorum) under laboratory feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiwen; Han, Qunhua; Shen, Guo; Wang, Yong; Li, Bo; Guo, Cong; Zhou, Xunjun

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive characteristics of a laboratory population of the vole Microtus fortis calamorum were examined. Voles were allowed to breed under laboratory feeding conditions. Over a period of 3 months, 61.82% of the 110 vole pairs examined produced 3 or 4 litters. There were 1-9 voles in each litter and the mean litter size was 4.67±0.28 (mean±SE). Most litters included 3-7 young voles, accounting for 83.62% of all litters. The mean farrowing interval was 25.9 days (range from 19 to 95 days), and the most farrowing intervals were 20-25 days, accounting for 79.9% of the total. When based on litter size, the reproductive index was 6.23, but was 3.42 when based on pup survival. The survival rate of offspring to weaning was 55.03%. The high rate of infanticide that occurred after removal of males from cages indicates that, in the laboratory, both parents need to be present prior to weaning. PMID:26617078

  9. New Laboratory Measurements of the Centimeter-Wavelength Properties of Ammonia Under Deep Jovian Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaraj, Kiruthika; Steffes, P. G.

    2010-10-01

    Over 800 measurements of the opacity of ammonia have been made in the 5-20 cm wavelength range at pressures ranging from 0.05-96 bars, temperatures from 330-450K, and mixing ratios from 0.05-100% in a hydrogen-helium atmosphere using an ultra-high pressure system. An ammonia absorptivity model that is accurate under very high pressure conditions is necessary for the Juno microwave radiometer (MWR) to successfully retrieve the deep abundance profile of Jupiter. Current and future measurements of the opacity of ammonia under simulated deep jovian conditions, and an estimation of compressibility of ammonia under the same conditions will be used to create a new model that more accurately characterizes the centimeter-wavelength properties of ammonia in support of the Juno MWR. Furthermore, at least one laboratory measurement study indicates that water vapor can efficiently broaden the 572 GHz rotational transition of ammonia (Belov et al., 1983), and this could be true for the inversion transitions of ammonia as well. Future work will involve laboratory measurements of the opacity of mixtures of ammonia and water vapor under simulated jovian conditions using the ultra-high pressure system. These measurements will directly improve our understanding of centimeter-wavelength absorption by ammonia in the jovian planets, and improve retrievals from the Juno MWR at Jupiter. This work was supported by NASA Contract NNM06AA75C from the Marshall Space Flight Center supporting the Juno Mission Science Team, under Subcontract 699054X from the South-west Research Institute

  10. Dynamics of genetic variability in Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) during adaptation to laboratory rearing conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anastrepha fraterculus is one of the most important fruit fly plagues in the American continent and only chemical control is applied in the field to diminish its population densities. A better understanding of the genetic variability during the introduction and adaptation of wild A. fraterculus populations to laboratory conditions is required for the development of stable and vigorous experimental colonies and mass-reared strains in support of successful Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) efforts. Methods The present study aims to analyze the dynamics of changes in genetic variability during the first six generations under artificial rearing conditions in two populations: a) a wild population recently introduced to laboratory culture, named TW and, b) a long-established control line, named CL. Results Results showed a declining tendency of genetic variability in TW. In CL, the relatively high values of genetic variability appear to be maintained across generations and could denote an intrinsic capacity to avoid the loss of genetic diversity in time. Discussion The impact of evolutionary forces on this species during the adaptation process as well as the best approach to choose strategies to introduce experimental and mass-reared A. fraterculus strains for SIT programs are discussed. PMID:25471362

  11. Effects of Rain Intensity and Initial Soil Moisture on Hydrological Responses in Laboratory Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvishan, Abdulvahed Khaledi; Banasik, Kazimierz; Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza; Gholami, Leila; Hejduk, Leszek

    2015-04-01

    Although the possibility of measuring and analysing all parts of the rainfall, infiltration, runoff, and erosion process as a natural hydrologic cycle in field conditions is still one of the more unattainable goals in the hydrological sciences, it can be accomplished in laboratory conditions as a way to understand the whole process. The initial moisture content is one of the most effective factors on soil infiltration, runoff, and erosion responses. The present research was conducted on a 2 m2 laboratory plot at a slope of 9% on a typical sandy-loam soil. The effects of the initial soil moisture content on the infiltration, runoff, and erosion processes were studied at four levels of initial soil moisture content (12, 25, 33, and 40 volumetric percentage) and two rainfall intensities (60 and 120 mm h-1). The results showed a significant (p ? 0.05) correlation between rainfall intensity and downstream splash, with r = 0.87. The results reflected the theory of hydrological responses, showing significant (p ? 0.05) correlations with r =-0.93, 0.98, -0.83, 0.88, and 0.73 between the initial soil moisture content and the time-to-runoff, runoff coefficient, drainage as a part of the infiltrated water, downstream splash, and total outflow sediment, respectively.

  12. Laboratory measurements of microwave absorption from gaseous atmospheric constituents under conditions for the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1986-01-01

    Quite often the interpretive work on the microwave and millimeter-wave absorption profiles, which are inferred from radio occultation measurements or radio astronomical observations of the outer planets, employs theoretically-derived absorption coefficients to account for contributions to the observed opacity from gaseous constituents. Variations of the actual absorption coefficients from those which are theoretically derived, especially under the environmental conditions characteristic of the outer planets, can result in significant errors in the inferred abundances of the absorbing constituents. The recognition of the need to make laboratory measurements of the absorptivity of gases such as NH3, CH4, and H2O in a predominantly H2 atmosphere, under temperature and pressure conditions simulating the outer planets' atmospheres, and at wavelengths corresponding to both radio occultation and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility capable of making such measurements at Georgia Tech. The laboratory measurement system, the measurement techniques, and the proposed experimental regimen for Winter 1985 are described.

  13. The sleep of the baboon, Papio papio, under natural conditions and in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bert, J; Balzamo, E; Chase, M; Pegram, V

    1975-12-01

    The sleep pattern of sixteen baboons (Papio papio) was studied under two very different conditions: (1) in a laboratory at Marseilles, the monkey being immobilized in a restraining chair in a soundproof cubicle; (2) in an African reserve, the monkey being housed in a large cage placed in its natural environment. Some very marked differences emerged. Sleep in the laboratory was longer (by 24 min) and richer in stage 3 and paradoxical sleep. In Africa, however, the sleep showed much more stage 1, was more fragmented and stages 2 and 3 and paradoxical sleep episodes were of shorter duration. Records made in Africa indicate that sleep is independent of slight environmental changes (day length, brightness of the moon, variations in temperature, calls of predators). But the comparison of the two series of results reveals the reorganization which occurs when the monkey is exposed to such different conditions. This adaptation to the environment affects, unequally, the various slow sleep stages and paradoxical sleep. In fact, the major modifications occur in stages 1 and 3 of slow sleep and in paradoxical sleep, while stage 2 appears to constitute the stable, unmodifiable nucleus of sleep. PMID:53145

  14. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2005-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth- based or spacecraft-based radio astronomical (emission) observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or the use of laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions that are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, new laboratory measurements completed recently by Mohammed and Steffes (2003 and 2004) under this grant (NAG5-12122,5/1/02-4/30/05), have shown that the millimeter-wavelength opacities from both gaseous phosphine (PH3) and gaseous ammonia ("3) under simulated conditions for the outer planets vary significantly from that predicted by theory over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. These results have directly impacted planning and scientific goals for study of Saturn's atmosphere with the Cassini Radio Science Experiment, as discussed below. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter (or flyby) radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  15. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements performed by Fahd and Steffes have shown that the opacity from gaseous SO2 under simulated Venus conditions can be well described by the Van Vleck-Weisskopf lineshape at wavelengths shortward of 2 cm, but that the opacity of wavelengths greater than 2 cm is best described by a different lineshape that was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  16. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based or spacecraft-based radio astronomical (emission) observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or the use of laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions that are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements have shown that the centimeter-wavelength opacity from gaseous phosphine (PH3) under simulated conditions for the outer planets far exceeds that predicted from theory over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. This fundamentally changed the resulting interpretation of Voyager radio occultation data at Saturn and Neptune. It also directly impacts planning and scientific goals for study of Saturn's atmosphere with the Cassini Radio Science Experiment and the Rossini RADAR instrument. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter (or flyby) radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft- and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres,

  17. Feeding and breeding aspects of Stomoxys calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae) under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Salem, A.; Franc, M.; Jacquiet, P.; Bouhsira, E.; Liénard, E.

    2012-01-01

    Bionomic aspects of Stomoxys calcitrans (Linnaeus, 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae) were studied under laboratory conditions. For this reason, laboratory-rearing techniques were optimized at the National Veterinary School of Toulouse. The colony was maintained at 25 ± 2 °C, 50 ± 10% RH under a 12-hour light cycle and observed daily. The size of each adult cage is 30 x 30 x 30 cm and designed to house about 500-1,000 flies. The average cycle from egg to adult was 19.2 ± 1.7 days. The mean longevity of imagos was 9.3 ± 5.8 days and not significantly different between sexes. Stable flies were split into two groups; the first was fed with blood, honey and water, and the second was fed only with honey and water. The mean weight of a blood meal was 11.1 ± 3.8 mg with no significant differences between males and females. The mean longevity of non-blood fed flies was found to be significantly higher (10.4 ± 3.9 days) than those fed with blood. The maximum lifespan was shorter for non-blood fed males (17 days) and females (18 days) than for those fed with blood (females: 24 days, males: 23 days). Under these laboratory conditions, S. calcitrans rearing was successfully established. In the end, the number of expected generations of S. calcitrans and the net reproduction rate were estimated to be 11.8 generations/year and 16.2 living females per female respectively. PMID:23193515

  18. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1998-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements completed recently by Kolodner and Steffes (ICARUS 132, pp. 151-169, March 1998, attached as Appendix A) under this grant (NAGS-4190), have shown that the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different formalism than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter radio occultation experiments and by radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in such experiments, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  19. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant. 493.1453 Section 493...Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have a clinical consultant who meets the requirements...

  20. Redox conditions and the efficiency of chlorinated ethene biodegradation: Laboratory studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    The potential for biodegradation of highly reduced groundwater contaminants is greatest under aerobic conditions and least under CO2-reducing (methanogenic) conditions. Laboratory studies conducted using [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride (VC) indicate the same pattern applies to the anaerobic oxidation of relatively reduced chloroethylenes. Recent studies, showing that CH4 can be a significant product of microbial degradation of VC under methanogenic conditions, clarified mechanisms underlying anaerobic VC mineralization and emphasized the redox dependence of this process. A microcosm study conducted with stream bed sediments demonstrated rapid degradation of [1,2-14C] VC and simultaneous production of 14CO2 and 14CH4. The results of acetate mineralization studies indicated that these sediments contained active acetotrophic methanogens. VC degradation involved an initial transformation to acetate via oxidative acetogenesis followed by acetotrophic methanogenesis to yield CO2 and CH4 as final products. Based on these recent results, a conceptual model for anaerobic microbial degradation of VC to non-chlorinated products can be proposed.

  1. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Sanford, James A.; Park, Jea H.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Champion, Boyd L.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and infection-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of over 30% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB, PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein location for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  2. Survival potential and photosynthetic activity of lichens under Mars-like conditions: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Butina, Frederike; Lorek, Andreas; Wernecke, Roland; Ott, Sieglinde

    2010-03-01

    Lichens were repetitively exposed over 22 days to thermophysical Mars-like conditions at low-and mid-latitudes. The simulated parameters and the experimental setup are described. Natural samples of the lichen Xanthoria elegans were used to investigate their ability to survive the applied Mars-like conditions. The effects of atmospheric pressure, CO(2) concentration, low temperature, water availability, and light on Mars were also studied. The results of these experiments indicate that no significant decrease in the vitality of the lichen occurred after exposure to simulated martian conditions, which was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis, and a 95% CO(2) atmosphere with 100% humidity, low pressure (partial pressure of CO(2) was 600 Pa), and low temperature has a balancing effect on photosynthetic activity as a function of temperature. This means a starting low photosynthetic activity at high CO(2) concentrations with Earth-like pressure has a reduction of 60%. But, if the simulated atmospheric pressure is reduced to Mars-like conditions with the maintenance of the same Mars-like 95% CO(2) concentration, the photosynthetic activity increases and again reaches similar values as those exhibited under terrestrial atmospheric pressure and concentration. Based on these results, we presume that, in any region on Mars where liquid water might be available, even for short periods of time, a eukaryotic symbiotic organism would have the ability to survive, at least over weeks, and to temporarily photosynthesize. PMID:20402583

  3. Measured and calculated evaporation losses of two petroleum hydrocarbon herbicide mixtures under laboratory and field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N.; Kim, Y.

    1986-08-01

    Evaporation rates of two weed oils were measured under laboratory and field conditions. Rates were also calculated by assuming first-order evaporation of the oil components (represented by hydrocarbon references). Beacon selective and Chevron nonselective weed oils exhibited evaporation rates 1.4-1.9 and 0.9 times the calculated rates, respectively, for 8-10 mg/cm/sup 2/ on inert surfaces in the laboratory. The relative rates were increased to 3-15 (Beacon) and 1.6 (Chevron) under a slight breeze (0.43 m/s) with turbulence. The half-life of Beacon oil applied at 6-7 mg/cm/sup 2/ to moist soil in an unplanted field was 51 min (10-20/sup 0/C), while the calculated half-life was 57 min. In an alfalfa field, 90% of the Chevron oil from a deposit of 0.15-0.22 mg/cm/sup 2/ (20-40/sup 0/C) evaporated in 26-45 and 53-127 min from glass plates and paper filters, respectively; average calculated time was 40 min. Evaporation rates from alfalfa foliage and glass plates compared well. 15 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  4. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. The goal of this investigation was to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  5. Effects of cell culture and laboratory conditions on type 2 dengue virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Manning, J S; Collins, J K

    1979-01-01

    The stability of type 2 dengue virus to exposure to a variety of laboratory conditions was determined. Suckling mouse brain passage virus was adapted for growth in BHK-21 cells, and plaque assays were performed using a tragacanth gum overlay. A three- to fourfold increase in plaque size could be obtained if monolayers were subconfluent at time of inoculation. Incubation of virus for 24 h at 37 degrees C, pH 6.5, or in buffer containing 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate considerably reduced virus infectivity as compared with virus incubated for the same period at 4 degrees C, pH 8.0, or in buffer with or without 1 mM CaCl2 and 1 mM MgCl2. Multiple freezing and thawing of virus tissue culture medium containing 10% fetal calf serum did not reduce virus infectivity. Images PMID:41848

  6. Fate of thiodicarb and its metabolite methomyl in sandy loam soil under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Sushma; Chauhan, Reena; Kumari, Beena; Singh, Rajvir

    2015-07-01

    Fate of thiodicarb and its major metabolite in sandy loam soil were studied by applying thiodicarb (Larvin 75 WP) at 500 and 1000 g a.?i.?ha(-1) under laboratory conditions. Samples drawn periodically were analysed on GC-FTD equipped with capillary column. The average initial deposits of total thiodicarb (thiodicarb and methomyl) were 0.025 and 0.035 mg kg(-1) at single and double dosages, respectively. Residues of thiodicarb reached below the determination level (BDL) of 0.005 mg kg(-1) after 15 days. Half-life periods for total thiodicarb were calculated to be 5.90 and 8.29 days at two doses, respectively, following first-order kinetics. PMID:26070994

  7. Increase in developmental instability in a field-collected chironomus population maintained under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Arambourou, Hélène; Branchu, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    In order to be a relevant indicator of exposure towards teratogenic stressors, morphological defects should not be passed on to the next generation. In this study, we compare morphological variations in Chironomids collected from a contaminated river stretch with those of their progeny, reared in uncontaminated sediment under laboratory conditions. We focused on mentum defects (deformities, fluctuating asymmetry and mean shape change), measured by geometric morphometrics. We observed no significant variation in deformity rate between the parental generation and its progeny. On the contrary, we observed a significant increase in fluctuating asymmetry and a significant decrease in mentum centroid size in the offspring. Our results suggest that shape defects are not caused by direct exposure to teratogenic stressors alone. We propose four hypotheses to explain this: (a) teratogenic contaminants are present in egg-clutches, (b) contaminants at the sampling site have mutagenic effects, PMID:25749504

  8. Fate of plasticised PVC products under landfill conditions: a laboratory-scale landfill simulation reactor study.

    PubMed

    Mersiowsky, I; Weller, M; Ejlertsson, J

    2001-09-01

    The long-term behaviour of plasticised PVC products was investigated in laboratory-scale landfill simulation reactors. The examined products included a cable material and a flooring with different combinations of plasticisers. The objective of the study was to assess whether a degradation of the PVC polymer or a loss of plasticisers occurred under landfill conditions. A degradation of the polymer matrix was not observed. The contents of plasticisers in aged samples was determined and compared to the respective original products. The behaviour of the various plasticisers was found to differ significantly. Losses of DEHP and BBP from the flooring were too low for analytical quantification. No loss of DIDP from the cable was detectable, whereas DINA in the same product showed considerable losses of up to 70% compared to the original contents. These deficits were attributable to biodegradation rather than leaching. There was no equivalent release of plasticisers into the leachate. PMID:11487101

  9. Conditions Similar to Alcohol Impairment

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    the position of the patient · Do not leave someone who is very drunk to fall asleep alone. Stay in the room the patient's airway; the chin is well up to keep the epiglottis opened. Arms and legs are locked to stabilize

  10. Laboratory experiment on poroelastic behavior of Berea sandstone under two-phase fluid flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, H.; Aichi, M.; Tokunaga, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Ogawa, T.; Aoki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Coupled two-phase fluid flow and deformation of Berea sandstone was discussed through laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. In the experiment, a triaxial compression apparatus with flow pipes to pass fluids through a rock sample was used. The experimental procedures were as follows. Firstly, external stresses close to hydrostatic condition were applied to a water saturated cylindrical Berea sandstone sample. Then, compressed air was infiltrated from the bottom of the sample. During the experiment, both axial and circumferential strains at half the height of the sample and volumetric discharge of water at the outlet were measured. Both strains showed sudden extensions after a few seconds, and monotonically extended thereafter. The volumetric discharge of water showed that air breakthrough occurred in around 100 seconds after the commencement of the air injection. Numerical simulations based on thermodynamically consistent constitutive equations were conducted in order to quantitatively analyze the experimental results. In a simulation in which the material was assumed to be homogeneous isotropic, the axial strain at half the height of the sample and the volumetric discharge of water at the outlet were reproduced well by using reasonable parameters, while that was not the case with the circumferential strain at half the height of the sample. On the other hand, in a simulation in which anisotropy of the material was introduced, all experimental data were reproduced well by using reasonable parameters. This result is reasonable because Berea sandstone is well known to be anisotropic under such Terzaghi effective stress condition as used in our experiment, i.e., 3.0 MPa (Hart and Wang, 1999; Hart, 2000). Our results indicate that the theory of poroelasticity for two-phase fluid system can explain the strain behavior of porous media for two-phase fluid flow observed in laboratory experiments.

  11. Quantifying soil surface photolysis under conditions simulating water movement in the field: a new laboratory test design.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Nichols, Carol; Kuet, Sui F; Oliver, Robin G; Harbourt, Christopher M; El-Naggar, Essam M

    2015-10-01

    Soil surface photolysis can be a significant dissipation pathway for agrochemicals under field conditions, although it is assumed that such degradation ceases once the agrochemical is transported away from the surface following rainfall or irrigation and subsequent drainage of soil porewater. However, as both downward and upward water movements occur under field conditions, relatively mobile compounds may return to the surface, prolonging exposure to ultraviolet light and increasing the potential for degradation by photolysis. To test this hypothesis, a novel experimental system was used to quantify the contribution of photolysis to the overall dissipation of a new herbicide, bicyclopyrone, under conditions that mimicked field studies more closely than the standard laboratory test guidance. Soil cores were taken from 3 US field study sites, and the surfaces were treated with [(14) C]-bicyclopyrone. The radioactivity was redistributed throughout the cores using a simulated rainfall event, following which the cores were incubated under a xenon-arc lamp with continuous provision of moisture from below and a wind simulator to induce evaporation. After only 2 d, most of the test compound had returned to the soil surface. Significantly more degradation was observed in the irradiated samples than in a parallel dark control sample. Degradation rates were very similar to those observed in both the thin layer photolysis study and the field dissipation studies and significantly faster than in the soil metabolism studies conducted in the dark. Thus, for highly soluble, mobile agrochemicals, such as bicyclopyrone, photolysis is not terminated permanently by rainfall or irrigation but can resume following transport to the surface in evaporating water. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:2236-2243. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26010776

  12. Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

    2008-03-05

    Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P{sub 0} < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T{sub 0} < 580K, 18 < U{sub 0} < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

  13. Laboratory investigation of spray generation mechanism in wind-wave interaction under strong wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the reduction of sea surface aerodynamic drag coefficient at hurricane conditions [1]. In this paper the mechanism of generation of spray in the near-surface layer of the atmosphere in a strong wind through the mechanism of «bag-breakup instability» was investigated in laboratory conditions with the help of high-speed video shooting. The laboratory experiments were performed on the Thermostratified Wind-Wave Channel of the IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) [2]. Experiments were carried out for the wind speeds from 14 to 22 m/s. In this range spray generation characteristics change dramatically from almost no spray generation to so called catastrophic regime with multiple cascade breakups on each crest. Shooting was performed with High-speed digital camera NAC Memrecam HX-3 in two different setups to obtain both statistical data and detailed spray generation mechanism overview. In first setup bright LED spotlight with mate screen the side of a channel was used for horizontal shadow-method shooting. Camera was placed in semi-submerged box on the opposite side of the channel. Shooting was performed at the distance of 7.5 m from the beginning of the working section. Series of short records of the surface evolution were made at 10 000 fps with 55 to 119 µm/px scale revealed the dominant mechanism of spray generation - bag-breakup instability. Sequences of high resolution images allowed investigating the details of this "bags" evolution. Shadow method provided better image quality for such conditions than side illumination and fluorescence methods. To obtain statistical data on "bags" sizes and densities vertical shadow method was used. Submerged light box was created with two 300 W underwater lamps and mate screen places at the fetch of 6.5 m. Long records (up to 8 seconds) were made with 4500 fps at 124-256 µm/px scales. Specially developed software allowed finding "bags" of the records and analyzing its geometrical characteristics. Significant increase of the number of bags was observed at equivalent wind velocities exceeding 25 m/s corresponding to change of regime of surface drag dependency on wind speed. Distributions of sizes, velocities and time of life of "bags" found were obtained for wind speeds up to 22 m/s. This work was supported by the RFBR grants (13-05-00865, 14-05-91767, 13-05-12093, 14-05-31415, 15-35-20953), RSF grant 14-17-00667 and by President grant for young scientists MK-3550.2014.5. References: 1. Andreas, E. L. and K. A. Emanuel, (2001): Effects of sea spray on tropical cyclone intensity. J. Atmos. Sci., Vol. 58, No 24, p. 3741-3751. 2. Yu. I. Troitskaya, D.A. Sergeev, A.A. Kandaurov, G.A Baidakov, M.A. Vdovin, V.I. Kazakov Laboratory and theoretical modeling of air-sea momentum transfer under severe wind conditions // JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 117, C00J21, 13 PP., 2012 doi:10.1029/2011JC007778

  14. Protocol for laboratory testing of crude-oil bioremediation products in freshwater conditions.

    PubMed

    Haines, J R; Koran, K M; Holder, E L; Venosa, A D

    2003-02-01

    In 1993, the Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory (EPA, NRMRL), with the National Environmental Technology Application Center (NETAC), developed a protocol for evaluation of bioremediation products in marine environments [18]. The marine protocol was adapted for application in freshwater environments by using a chemically defined medium and an oil-degrading consortium as a positive control. Four products were tested using the modified protocol: two with nutrients and an oleophilic component; one with nutrients, sorbent, and organisms; and one microbial stimulant. A separate experiment evaluated the use of HEPES and MOPSO buffers as replacements for phosphate buffer. The oleophilic nutrient products yielded oil degradation similar to the positive control, with an average alkane removal of 97.1+/-2.3% and an aromatic hydrocarbon removal of 64.8+/-1.2%. The positive control, which received inoculum plus nutrients, demonstrated alkane degradation of 98.9+/-0.1% and aromatic degradation of 52.9+/-0.1%. The sorbent-based product with inoculum failed to demonstrate oil degradation, while the microbial stimulant showed less oil degradation than the positive control. Replacement of phosphate buffer with other buffers had no significant effect on one product's performance. Differences in product performance were easily distinguishable using the protocol, and performance targets for alkane and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation are suggested. PMID:12612785

  15. The Formation of Sulfate and Elemental Sulfur Aerosols Under Varying Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, H. Langley; Hasenkopf, Christa A.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Farmer, Delphine K.; Jimenez, Jose L.; McKay, Christopher P.; Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of sulfur mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) in sediments more than 2.45 x 10(exp 9) years old is thought to be evidence for an early anoxic atmosphere. Photolysis of sulfur dioxide (SO2) by UV light with lambda < 220 nm has been shown in models and some initial laboratory studies to create a S-MIF; however, sulfur must leave the atmosphere in at least two chemically different forms to preserve any S-MIF signature. Two commonly cited examples of chemically different sulfur species that could have exited the atmosphere are elemental sulfur (S8) and sulfuric acid (H2S04) aerosols. Here, we use real-time aerosol mass spectrometry to directly detect the sulfur-containing aerosols formed when SO2 either photolyzes at wavelengths from 115 to 400 nm, to simulate the UV solar spectrum, or interacts with high-energy electrons, to simulate lightning. We found that sulfur-containing aerosols form under all laboratory conditions. Further, the addition of a reducing gas, in our experiments hydrogen (H2) or methane (CH4), increased the formation of S8. With UV photolysis, formation of S8 aerosols is highly dependent on the initial SO2 pressure; and S8 is only formed at a 2% SO2 mixing ratio and greater in the absence of a reductant, and at a 0.2% SO2 mixing ratio and greater in the presence of 1000 ppmv CH4. We also found that organosulfur compounds are formed from the photolysis of CH4 and moderate amounts of SO2, The implications for sulfur aerosols on early Earth are discussed.

  16. A design of optical measurement laboratory for space-based illumination condition emulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Zhao, Fei; Yang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    Space Objects Identification(SOI) and related technology have aroused wide attention from spacefaring nations due to the increasingly severe space environment. Multiple ground-based assets have been employed to acquire statistical survey data, detect faint debris, acquire photometric and spectroscopic data. Great efforts have been made to characterize different space objects using the statistical data acquired by telescopes. Furthermore, detailed laboratory data are needed to optimize the characterization of orbital debris and satellites via material composition and potential rotation axes, which calls for a high-precision and flexible optical measurement system. A typical method of taking optical measurements of a space object(or model) is to move light source and sensors through every possible orientation around it and keep the target still. However, moving equipments to accurate orientations in the air is difficult, especially for those large precise instruments sensitive to vibrations. Here, a rotation structure of "3+1" axes, with a three-axis turntable manipulating attitudes of the target and the sensor revolving around a single axis, is utilized to emulate every possible illumination condition in space, which can also avoid the inconvenience of moving large aparatus. Firstly, the source-target-sensor orientation of a real satellite was analyzed with vectors and coordinate systems built to illustrate their spatial relationship. By bending the Reference Coordinate Frame to the Phase Angle plane, the sensor only need to revolve around a single axis while the other three degrees of freedom(DOF) are associated with the Euler's angles of the satellite. Then according to practical engineering requirements, an integrated rotation system of four-axis structure is brought forward. Schemetic diagrams of the three-axis turntable and other equipments show an overview of the future laboratory layout. Finally, proposals on evironment arrangements, light source precautions and sensor selections are provided. Comparing to current methods, this design shows better effects on device simplication, automatic control and high-precision measurement.

  17. Hydrological conditions at the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, based on these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 317/319 Area is located between Meridian Road and the southern border of ANL. The 317 Area was commissioned in the late 1940s for the temporary storage of radioactive waste. Low- and high-level solid radioactive waste is stored in partially buried concrete vaults. Low-level radioactive waste awaiting shipment for off-site disposal is stored in aboveground steel bins north of the vaults. The 319 Area is an inactive landfill, located east of the 317 Area that was used for the disposal of general refuse, demolition debris, and laboratory equipment. Fluorescent light bulbs, chemical containers, and suspect waste were also placed in the landfill. Liquid chemical wastes were disposed of at each site in gravel-filled trenches called French drains.'' The 317/319 Area is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 19.5m. Organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. At the time of this report, no chemical quality analyses had been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. 14 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Demographic fitness of Belminus ferroae (Hemiptera: Triatominae) on three different hosts under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Claudia Magaly; Medone, Paula; Nieves, Elsa Evelia; Jaimes, Diego Alexander; Ortiz, Nelcy; Rabinovich, Jorge Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Triatominae are widely recognised for their role as vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi. One of the main biological characteristics of this subfamily is their obligate haematophagous condition. However, previous studies on Belminus herreri and Belminus ferroae suggested that cockroaches are their principal hosts in domiciles. Due to this peculiar behaviour, the aim of this study was to analyse several demographic and reproductive parameters of B. ferroae fed on three different hosts (mice, cockroaches and Rhodnius prolixus) and relate B. ferroae fitness to these alternative hosts. The cohorts were reared under constant conditions. The egg hatching rate was similar for cohorts fed on cockroaches (69.4%) and R. prolixus (63.8%), but was much lower for the cohort fed on mice (16%). The development time from the nymph to adult stage and the average age of first reproduction (?) presented lower values in the cohort fed on cockroaches, which is consistent with the higher population growth rate associated with this host. Demographic parameters [intrinsic rate of natural increase, finite rate of population growth, net reproductive rate and damping ratio] showed statistically significant differences between the cohorts. Analysis of the life history of B. ferroae revealed a higher fitness related to the cockroach. The implications of these results for the origin of the subfamily are discussed. PMID:24141961

  19. Amplified DNAs in laboratory stocks of Leishmania tarentolae: extrachromosomal circles structurally and functionally similar to the inverted-H-region amplification of methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo-Peixoto, M.L.; Beverley, S.M. )

    1988-12-01

    We describe the structure of amplified DNA that was discovered in two laboratory stocks of the protozoan parasite Leishmania tarentolae. Restriction mapping and molecular cloning revealed that a region of 42 kilobases was amplified 8- to 30-fold in these lines. Southern blot analyses of digested DNAs or chromosomes separated by pulsed-field electrophoresis showed that the amplified DNA corresponded to the H region, a locus defined originally by its amplification in methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major. Similarities between the amplified DNA of the two species included (i) extensive cross-hybridization; (ii) approximate conservation of sequence order; (iii) extrachromosomal localization; (iv) an overall inverted, head-to-head configuration as a circular 140-kilobase tetrameric molecule; (v) two regions of DNA sequence rearrangement, each of which was closely associated with the two centers of the inverted repeats; (vi) association with methotrexate resistance; and (vii) phenotypically conservative amplification, in which the wild-type chromosomal arrangement was retained without apparent modification. Our data showed that amplified DNA mediating drug resistance arose in unselected L. tarentolae, although the pressures leading to apparently spontaneous amplification and maintenance of the H region are not known. The simple structure and limited extent of DNA amplified in these and other Leishmania lines suggests that the study of gene amplification in Leishmania spp. offers an attractive model system for the study of amplification in cultured mammalian cells and tumors. We also introduced a method for measuring the size of large circular DNAs, using gamma-irradiation to introduce limited double-strand breaks followed by sizing of the linear DNAs by pulsed-field electrophoresis.

  20. Effects of PCB contamination on the reproduction of the DAB Limanda limanda L. under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonds, Mark; Casal, Elizabeth; Schweizer, Dominik; Boon, Jan P.; Van der Veer, Henk W.

    The effect of PCB contamination on the reproduction of female dab was studied under laboratory conditions. Females were contaminated during gonad maturation by multiple oral administration of capsules containing the technical PCB mixture Clophen A40. PCB contamination resulted in increased levels in the eggs, with concentrations of selected PCB congeners of 35 to 86 ?g·g -1 lipid for PCB-exposed fish, 10 ?g·g -1 lipid for eggs from fish fed with mussel meat and fish fed with shrimp. A statistically significant dose-effect relationship was found between the PCB content of the eggs and the PCB dose ingested by the fish. For eggs from the PCB-treated fish the mean fertilization rate was 61% and mean hatching 45%, compared to 67% fertilization and 59% hatching for eggs from untreated fish. Rate of development and survival of the eggs and mortality of the larvae after hatching were mainly related to incubation temperature. No statistically significant differences between untreated and PCB-treated fish could be found in egg production, egg quality, fertilization rate, hatching rate and survival of larvae.

  1. Life history of the sand fly vector Lutzomyia cruciata in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Castillo, A; Serrano, A K; Mikery, O F; Pérez, J

    2015-12-01

    Lutzomyia cruciata Coquillet (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) is a potential vector of Leishmania sp.; its geographical distribution in Mexico is widespread, but its life history is unknown. The present study gives relevant information on the life cycle, morphology, survival and reproduction of Lu. cruciata observed over successive generations under laboratory conditions. Seven successive generations were produced. A total of 975 adults were obtained in a sexual proportion of 1.1 : 1 (female : male). Each Lu. cruciata female produced 20.7 eggs and 1.9 adults, approximately, with a proportion of eggs per female of 2.7% (first generation) and 21.3% (second generation). The life cycle of Lu. cruciata, from egg to adult, occurred in 52.7 ± 0.52 days. The largest percentage of mortality occurred during the egg stage (48.5%) and the first larval instar (26.5%), whereas in the pupal stage mortality was the lowest (9.1%). Lutzomyia cruciata exhibits sexual dimorphism based on size, which is exhibited as of the second larval instar, males being smaller than females. The maximum survival of females and males was 10 and 15 days, respectively. An overview of the immature stages of the species made with an electronic scanning microscope is included. This paper contributes basic information on aspects of Lu. cruciata that were previously unknown related to its life history. PMID:26147368

  2. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant. 493.1415 Section 493...performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have a clinical consultant who meets the qualification...

  3. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i) similar effect direction and (ii) similar effect magnitude. Methods 7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR) and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD) with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph. Results Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected. Conclusion Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials. PMID:26168274

  4. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical Uses G Appendix G to Subpart A of Part 82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production...

  5. Corrosion of aluminum and copper thin films under simulated atmospheric conditions in laboratory tests

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Raman, A.; Diwan, R.; Bhattacharya, P.K.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion characteristics of Al and Cu thin films have been studied in cyclic fog tests using tap water fog and fog created with 0.1% NaCl solution in tap water. Likewise, their corrosion features have been analyzed in continuous immersion testing in the laboratory in distilled water, tap water, in 0.1% NaCl and 3.5% NaCl solutions in distilled water. The corrosion potentials and the corrosion currents of these thin films change and reach steady state values after some time. However, steady state is not realized in 3.5% NaCl solutions. The corrosion current density data have been used to calculate lifetime of 1 {mu}m thick thin films of Al and Cu in the various tests, and assuming that the fog test data would hold under normal exposure conditions, life spans for these thin film sensor elements in actual exterior exposure have also been calculated. According to estimates, an Al-TF of about 1 {mu}m would last about 9 months in exterior exposure in chloride containing atmospheres, such as in the coastal regions, but would survive nearly 2 years in normal atmospheres not having acidic or chloride pollutants. On the contrary, 1 {mu}m thick Cu-TF would last only for about 2.5 months in chloride-laden environments, but would last for about 2 years in normal atmospheres. However, Cu-TF would be corroded off faster in slightly alkaline atmospheric condensate under total immersion situation. Lifetime estimates are presented and discussed.

  6. Pre-processing of Xeva-XS imagery for determining spectral reflectance coefficients in laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczykowski, P.; Orych, A.; Kedzierski, M.; Fryskowska, A.

    2014-11-01

    There are two different methodologies which can be used to acquire imagery from which it would be possible to obtain spectral reflectance characteristics - the first based on images of a scene in which a reference panel had been included, and the second based on precisely selected exposure parameters. This paper is concerned with the first of these two methods based on experiments conducted using a 14bit XEVA XS-1.7.320 infrared sensor. The paper firstly describes the effect of different exposure settings on the accuracy with which we can later determine the spectral reflectance coefficients. The next step when working with such imagery in laboratory conditions is to eliminate the effect of the uneven distribution of illumination. In the paper we present two proposed methods for eliminating the uneven distribution of illumination - an additive method and a quotient method. After that it is essential to stretch the DN values. Once again we investigated two possible methods of doing this - firstly, by stretching the data using only the white reference panel, adjusting the maxDN value of the image of the surface of the reference panel to 95%. The second method additionally adds a second reference point - a black reference panel which reflects 5% of incident radiation. The spectral reflectance coefficients of chosen samples acquired using all of the above mentioned methods are compared with reference data obtained using a spectroradiometer. Establishing the most optimal methodologies will greatly increase the accuracy of obtained spectral response coefficients, which at the same time will increase the accuracy with which, in this case, water pollutants will be identified.

  7. Scale effect on runoff and soil loss control using rice straw mulch under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Gholami, L.; Sharifi, E.; Khaledi Darvishan, A.; Homaee, M.

    2015-01-01

    Amendments can control the runoff and soil loss by protecting the soil surface. However, scale effects on runoff and soil loss control have not been considered yet. The present study has been formulated to determine the efficiency of two plot sizes of 6 and 0.25 m2 covered by 0.5 kg m-2 of straw mulch with regard to changing the time to runoff, runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss under laboratory conditions. The study used a sandy-loam soil taken from summer rangeland, Alborz Mountains, northern Iran, and was conducted under simulated rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 and in three replicates. The results of the study showed that the straw mulch had a more significant effect on reducing the runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss on a 0.25 m2 plot scale. The maximum effectiveness in time to runoff for both the scales was observed at a rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1. The maximum increasing and decreasing rates in time to runoff and runoff coefficient were observed at a rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1, with 367.92 and 96.71% for the 0.25 m2 plot and 110.10 and 15.08% for the 6 m2 plot. The maximum reduction in the runoff coefficient was in the 0.25 m2 plot for the two rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1, with rates of -89.34 and -96.71%. The maximum change in soil loss at the intensities of both 50 and 90 mm h-1 occurred in the 0.25 m2 plot, with 100%, whereas in the 6 m2 plot, decreasing rates of soil loss for the intensities of both 50 and 90 mm h-1 were 46.74 and 63.24%, respectively.

  8. Scale effect on runoff and soil loss control using rice straw mulch under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Gholami, L.; Sharifi Moghadam, E.; Khaledi Darvishan, A.

    2014-10-01

    Amendments can control the runoff and soil loss by protecting soil surface. However, scale effects on runoff and soil loss control has not been considered yet. The present study has been formulated to determine the efficiency of two plot sizes of 6 and 0.25 m2 covered by straw mulch with rate of 0.5 kg m-2 in changing the time to runoff, runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss under laboratory conditions. The study has been conducted for a sandy-loam soil taken from summer rangeland, Alborz Mountains, Northern Iran under simulated rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 and in 3 replicates. The results of the study showed that the straw mulch had more significant effect in in reducing runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss at 0.25 m2 plot scale. The maximum effectiveness in time to runoff for both the scales, observed in rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1. The maximum increasing and decreasing rates in time to runoff and runoff coefficient observed in the rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1 with the amounts of 367.92 and 96.71% for 0.25 m2 plot and the amounts of 110.10 and 15.08% for 6 m2 plot respectively. The maximum change of soil loss in both the intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 occurred at 0.25 m2 plot with the amount of 100% whereas at 6 m2 plot, decreasing rates of soil loss for in both the intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 were 46.74 and 63.24%, respectively.

  9. Control of Tick Infestations in Oryctolagus cuniculus (Lagomorpha: Leporidae) With Spinosad Under Laboratory and Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    ValcÁrcel, Félix; SÁnchez, J L Pérez; Jaime, J M Tercero; Basco-Basco, P I; Guajardo, S C Cota; Cutuli, M T; GonzÁlez, J; Olmeda, A S

    2015-03-01

    Because of great economic loss in the world's livestock industry, and the serious risks to human health, the control of ticks and tick-borne diseases is one of the most important health management issues today. Current methodology involves integrated tick control for preventing the development of resistance. Rabbits are hosts for immature stages of the three-host tick Hyalomma lusitanicum Koch; so, we focus on this host as a strategy to interrupt the tick life cycle. Spinosad is an insecticide-acaricide, produced by the fermentation of metabolites of the actinomycete bacterium Saccharopolyspora spinosa. We administered spinosad orally by force-feeding naturally and artificially infested rabbits, and under field conditions by administering treated food via a hopper during the period of peak infestation and reinfestation risk for rabbits. No living larvae were recovered from treated laboratory rabbits. In naturally infested rabbits, the number of live ticks collected from treated rabbits (mean = 0.62 ticks per ear) was significantly lower than those recovered from untreated rabbits (mean?=?7.27; P?

  10. Laboratory study of CH4-N2 clathrate hydrates applied to Titan's surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nna Mvondo, D.; Tobie, G.; Le Menn, E.; Bollengier, O.; Grasset, O.

    2013-12-01

    It is proposed that clathrate hydrates may be present at the surface of Titan (Choukroun et al., 2013, 2010). At Titan's surface pressure, pure methane and ethane hydrate (as well as other guests) could exist in the sI structure and nitrogen hydrate as sII structure. The large reservoir of several guest compounds in Titan's atmosphere is expected to result in the formation of multicomponent (compound) clathrate hydrates, as sII or sH structures, stable relative to water ice on the surface of Titan, and with faster expected growth kinetics relative to pure hydrate (Osegovic et al., 2005). Compound hydrate could be a likely sink for many chemicals occurring on Titan's surface. We note that experimental studies on the formation and thermodynamics of the methane-water system, at low and high pressures applied to Titan have been carried out (Lunine and Stevenson; 1985; Choukroun et al., 2013, 2010 and references therein). However, laboratory work on mixing of methane with other compounds in the clathrate phase (ethane, N2, CO2, etc...) applied to Titan conditions (and other icy moons) has still to be addressed. In this context, we have studied the formation and spectral signatures of CH4-N2 clathrate hydrates at temperature and pressure conditions relevant for Titan's surface. Clathrate hydrates samples have been synthesized in an autoclave combined with a cooling system and a multi-gas mixer. Few ml of deionized water was introduced in the autoclave and pressurized with the N2 and CH4 gaseous species for a couple of days, at controlled low temperature and low pressure of the formation and stability of clathrate hydrates. Their formation has been monitored by gas chromatography. Their spectral characterization at low temperature was performed by infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was also used to give constraints on the composition, structure and cage occupancy of the formed clathrates. Here we present the results obtained for different mixing ratios of CH4:N2 clathrate hydrates.

  11. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Mikell, John L.; Waller, Edmund K.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael; Hall, William A.; Langston, Amelia A.; Esiashvili, Natia; Khoury, H. Jean; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between all patients undergoing riTBI and those undergoing mTBI, despite older age and potential increased comorbidity of riTBI patients. riTBI regimens were associated with shorter length of hospital stay, fewer intensive care unit admissions, and similar rates of nonrelapse survival, which may reflect reduced toxicity. Prospective trials comparing riTBI and mTBI are warranted.

  12. Settling and Ovipositional Behavior of Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae) on Solanaceous Hosts Under Field and Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Thinakaran, Jenita; Pierson, E A; Longnecker, M; Tamborindeguy, C; Munyaneza, J E; Rush, C M; Henne, D C

    2015-06-01

    Potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc), is a seasonal insect pest in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas, where it transmits the bacterial pathogen "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" that causes zebra chip disease of potato. Studies were conducted to evaluate host preference of B. cockerelli adults for different plant species, and plant size and density. Settling and oviposition behavior of B. cockerelli was studied on its wild and cultivated solanaceous hosts, including potato, tomato, pepper, eggplant, and silverleaf nightshade, under both field and laboratory conditions. Naturally occurring B. cockerelli were used to evaluate host preference under open field conditions throughout the growing season. Settling and oviposition preference studies in the laboratory were conducted as cage-release experiments using pairs of plants, and observations were recorded over a 72-h period. Results of field trials indicated that naturally occurring B. cockerelli preferred potato and tomato equally for settling and oviposition, but settled on pepper, eggplant, and silverleaf nightshade only in the absence of potato and tomato. Under laboratory conditions, B. cockerelli adults preferred larger host plants, regardless of the species tested. Results also showed that movement of B. cockerelli was minimal after initial landing and settling behavior was influenced by host plant density. Lone plants attracted the most psyllids and can be used as sentinel plants to monitor B. cockerelli activity. Information from both field and laboratory studies demonstrated that not only host plant species determined host selection behavior of B. cockerelli adults, but also plant size and density. PMID:26470210

  13. Laboratory simulations under martian environmental conditions: water vs. brine flowing over a sloping substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Susan; Gourronc, Marrine; Patel, Manish

    2013-04-01

    There are many observations that indicate that liquid water has been recently flowing on Mars' surface: for example at the present day 10m-scale lobate flows have been observed to occur each spring, termed "recurring slope linae" [1] and kilometre-scale gullies [2] are known to have been active in the recent past (<5 Ma) [3-4]. However, the temperature and pressure are too low, at present for liquid water to be stable, and similar conditions are thought to extend into the recent past. A possible solution to this paradox is that these flows are not pure water, but brines, that are stable under much lower temperature conditions. The static behaviour of brines at low pressure and low temperature has already been investigated [e.g. 5]; however the interaction of such brines flowing over sediment has not yet been explored. In this suite of experiments we aim to repeat the experiments performed by Conway et al. [6], in which a fixed volume of pure water was passed over an unstaturated, cold (-25°C) sediment bed (1x0.5m) at low pressure (7 mbar), but with brines of different concentrations. Our aims are to answer the following questions: 1.Are different quantities of water required to produce flows with the same runout length (measurable from orbit) but mediated by water or brine? 2. Do flows mediated by brine produce any distinctive behaviour or morphology that we could recognise at the martian surface? The suite of experiments are ongoing, but our initial experiments have already shown that for a given quantity of water, brine-flows are able to flow for much greater distances than pure water. Brine mediated flows are more than 4 times wider than their pure water counterparts. Once the flows are complete they freeze - this leaves a trace that has the same tone as the surrounding sediment in the case of water. In the case of brine there are both darker and lighter toned areas depending on the position in the flow-trace. Future analysis includes quantifying the amount of erosion and deposition, and assessing the impact of fluid viscosity on infiltration rate. References cited: [1] McEwan et al. (2011) Science, 333, 740-743. [2] Malin and Edgett (2000) Science, 288, 2330-2335. [3] Reiss et al. (2004) JGR, doi:10.1029/2004JE002251 [4] Schon et al. (2009) Geology, 37, 207-210. [5] Chevrier et al. (2009) JGR, doi :10.1029/2009JE003376 [6] Conway et al. (2011) Icarus, 211, 443-457.

  14. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the qualification requirements of § 493.1469 of this subpart, and provides supervision in accordance with § 493.1471 of this...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    The laboratory must have a sufficient number of individuals who meet the qualification requirements of § 493.1423, to perform the functions specified in § 493.1425 for the volume and complexity of tests...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    The laboratory has a sufficient number of individuals who meet the qualification requirements of § 493.1489 of this subpart to perform the functions specified in § 493.1495 of this subpart for the volume and complexity of testing...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1361 - Condition: Laboratories performing PPM procedures; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    The laboratory must have a sufficient number of individuals who meet the qualification requirements of § 493.1363 to perform the functions specified in § 493.1365 for the volume and complexity of testing...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    The laboratory must have a sufficient number of individuals who meet the qualification requirements of § 493.1423, to perform the functions specified in § 493.1425 for the volume and complexity of tests...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1361 - Condition: Laboratories performing PPM procedures; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    The laboratory must have a sufficient number of individuals who meet the qualification requirements of § 493.1363 to perform the functions specified in § 493.1365 for the volume and complexity of testing...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the qualification requirements of § 493.1469 of this subpart, and provides supervision in accordance with § 493.1471 of this...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    The laboratory has a sufficient number of individuals who meet the qualification requirements of § 493.1489 of this subpart to perform the functions specified in § 493.1495 of this subpart for the volume and complexity of testing...

  2. Moving from the laboratory to the field: Adding natural environmental conditions to toxicology testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    While laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective and readily interpreted, they have been criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive. To ...

  3. Light Reflection from Water Waves: Suitable Setup for a Polarimetric Investigation under Controlled Laboratory Conditions

    E-print Network

    , Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey HANS EIDE Laboratory, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030

  4. Assessing the Exposure and Relative Sensitivity of Native Freshwater Mussels to Environmental Stressors and Laboratory Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Expands the database for pesticide toxicity on native freshwater mussels. 2. Aids in determining any potential differences in toxic sensitivity of gravid female mussel attributed to age and laboratory holding times. 3. Aids in determining potential differences in juvenile ...

  5. PROTOCOL FOR LABORATORY TESTING OF CRUDE-OIL BIOREMEDIATION PRODUCTS IN FRESHWATER CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1993, the Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory (EPA, NRMRL), with the National Environmental Technology Application Center (NETAC), developed a protocol for evaluation of bioremediation products in marine environments. The marine proto...

  6. Historically, laboratory studies of fish locomotion have focused on steady swimming under micro-turbulent conditions

    E-print Network

    Lauder, George V.

    Historically, laboratory studies of fish locomotion have focused on steady swimming under micro across swimming speeds and modes. Still, fish biologists acknowledge that steady swimming through low differences, flow over inanimate structures, and vorticity generated by moving organisms. Fishes swimming

  7. Comparative performances, under laboratory conditions, of seven pyrethroid insecticides used for impregnation of mosquito nets.

    PubMed Central

    Hougard, Jean-Marc; Duchon, Stéphane; Darriet, Frédéric; Zaim, Morteza; Rogier, Christophe; Guillet, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of seven pyrethroid insecticides for impregnation of mosquito nets, six currently recommended by WHO and one candidate (bifenthrin), under laboratory conditions. METHODS: Tests were conducted using pyrethroid-susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant strains of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. Knock-down effect, irritancy and mortality were measured using standard WHO cone tests. Mortality and blood-feeding inhibition were also measured using a baited tunnel device. FINDINGS: For susceptible A. gambiae, alpha-cypermethrin had the fastest knock-down effect. For resistant A. gambiae, the knock- down effect was slightly slower with alpha-cypermethrin and much reduced following exposure to the other insecticides, particularly bifenthrin and permethrin. For susceptible C. quinquefasciatus, the knock-down effect was significantly slower than in A. gambiae, particularly with bifenthrin, and no knock-down effect was observed with any of the pyrethroids against the resistant strain. Bifenthrin was significantly less irritant than the other pyrethroids to susceptible and resistant A. gambiae but there was no clear ranking of pyrethroid irritancy against C. quinquefasciatus. In tunnels, all insecticides were less toxic against C. quinquefasciatus than against A. gambiae for susceptible strains. For resistant strains, mortality was significant with all the pyrethroids with A. gambiae but not with C. quinquefasciatus. Inhibition of blood-feeding was also high for susceptible strains of both species and for resistant A. gambiae but lower for resistant C. quinquefasciatus; bifenthrin had the greatest impact. CONCLUSIONS: Efficacy for impregnation of mosquito nets against A. gambiae was greatest with alpha-cypermethrin. Bifenthrin is likely to have a significant comparative advantage over other pyrethroids in areas with pyrethroid resistance because of its much stronger impact on the nuisance mosquito, C. quinquefasciatus, despite its slower knock-down effect and irritancy. Selection of pyrethroids for mosquito vector control and personal protection should take into account the different effects of these insecticides, the status of pyrethroid resistance in the target area, and the importance of nuisance mosquitoes, such as C. quinquefasciatus. PMID:12856050

  8. Laboratory experiments to explore the sediment transport capacity of carbon dioxide sublimation under martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvest, Matthew; Conway, Susan; Patel, Manish; Dixon, John; Barnes, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Every spring, the solid carbon dioxide deposited over the martian high latitudes sublimates. Several, unusual surface features, including dark spots and flows on sand dunes, as well as recent activity in martian gullies, have been associated with this CO2 sublimation. Water and/or brines have also been proposed as potential agents for these events, but the timing of these phenomena suggest CO2 sublimation is more likely. However, the exact mechanism by which CO2 sublimation moves sediment is not fully understood, and this understanding is required to validate the CO2 hypothesis. Here we present the results of the first ever laboratory simulations of this process under martian conditions, and show that significant quantities of loose sediment can be transported. The centrepiece of the apparatus is a 1m diameter, 2m long Mars simulation chamber, housed at The Open University, UK. JSC Mars-1A regolith simulant was formed into a slope, inside a box, ~30 cm long, 23 cm wide by 12 cm deep. The box is constructed of coiled, copper tubing to allow cooling of the regolith by liquid nitrogen. The experimental procedure consists of four stages: 1) establishment of a dry atmosphere in the chamber, 2) cooling the regolith sufficiently to support condensation of CO2 frost at reduced pressure, 3) introduction of cooled CO2 gas above the regolith to deposit as frost, and 4) video recording the surface evolution under radiant heating (~100 mins). Two High Definition digital video cameras were mounted above the box and image pairs taken from the videos were then used to create digital elevation models (DEMs) in Agisoft Photoscan at regular intervals. In our initial experiments we performed four experimental runs where the slope was set at or near the angle of repose (~30°). In each case we observed mass wasting events triggered by the sublimation of the deposited CO2 over the whole duration of the insolation. The highest levels of activity occurred in the first third of the run (approx. 30 mins); however, activity was detected, with sporadic peaks, throughout each run. The total volume of regolith moved ranged from 164 to 216 cm3 over the four experimental runs (an average of 0.3-0.4 cm depth over the whole surface).

  9. Life cycle of the tick Haemaphysalis leporis-palustris (Acari: Ixodidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Labruna, M B; Leite, R C; Faccini, J L; Ferreira, F

    2000-01-01

    The life cycles of two separate populations (colonies A and B) of the rabbit tick, Haemaphysalis leporis-palustris, were studied under laboratory conditions. Domestic New Zealand rabbits, Oryctolagus cuniculus, and wild rabbits, Sylvilagus brasiliensis, were used as hosts for ticks from colony B and only O. cuniculus rabbits were used as hosts for ticks from colony A. Developmental periods were observed in an incubator at 27+/-1 degrees C and RH 90+/-5%. Larvae from colonies A and B fed for 8.0+/-3.7 days and 8.5+/-1.3 days, respectively, on O. cuniculus. On S. brasiliensis larvae from colony B fed for 7.2+/-1.3 days. Nymphs from colony A fed for 8.1+/-1.4 days on O. cuniculus and nymphs from colony B fed for 8.1+/-1.0 days on S. brasiliensis. Only one engorged nymph from colony B was recovered from O. cuniculus. Females from colony A fed for 20.9+/-5.9 days on O. cuniculus and females from colony B fed for 18.6+/-2.4 days on O. cuniculus and 18.7+/-3.7 days on S. brasiliensis. Engorged larvae from colony A required 13.7+/-3.7 days to molt while engorged larvae from colony B required 11.8+/-3.0 and 11.5+/-1.8 days to molt, after having fed on O. cuniculus and S. brasiliensis, respectively. Engorged nymphs from colonies A and B required 16.3+/-1.9 days and 14.7+/-1.4 days to molt, respectively. Engorged females from colonies A and B required 4-7 and 3-5 days, respectively, to start oviposition. Mean egg incubation periods lasted for 33-34 days. For ticks from colony B, host species accounted for significant differences (p < 0.05) in larval and nymphal feeding periods, oviposition weights and CEIs. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between the two colonies when ticks fed on O. cuniculus were observed for larval and nymphal feeding and premolt periods, engorged female and oviposition weights and conversion efficiency indexes (CEI). S. brasiliensis were always a more suitable host for H. leporis-palustris than O. cuniculus. Significantly more larvae and nymphs engorged and molted when fed on S. brasiliensis (p < 0.001). Females fed S. brasiliensis were more successful to lay fertile eggs and showed the highest engorged and egg mass weights, and the highest CEIs. Data of H. leporis-palustris fed on wild rabbits (one of its natural host species) are reported for the first time. PMID:11227826

  10. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The key activity for this grant year has continued to be laboratory measurements of the microwave and millimeter-wave properties of the simulated atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites. A Fabry-Perot spectrometer system capable of operation from 32 to 41 GHz was developed. Initially this spectrometer was used to complete laboratory measurements of the 7.5 to 9.3 mm absorption spectrum of ammonia. Laboratory measurements were begun at wavelengths near 3.2 mm, where a large number of observations of the emission from the outer planets were made. A description of this system is presented.

  11. Mating frequency of the male cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), under laboratory conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of three constant temperatures (20°, 25° and 30°C) on the rate of development and life history of the invasive cactus moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg). Results from these laboratory experiments were used to predict C. cactorum rate of development in the field during...

  12. Magnesium isotope fractionation during precipitation of inorganic calcite under laboratory conditions

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Clark M.

    Magnesium isotope fractionation during precipitation of inorganic calcite under laboratory Available online 25 May 2012 Keywords: Mg isotope Mg-calcite carbonate isotope fractionation free fractionation factors between Mg-bearing calcite and aqueous Mg (Mg/Ca molar ratio between 3:1 and 13:1) from 20

  13. Behavioral responses of Aedes aegypti to DUETTM and its two components under laboratory conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DUETTM is an insecticide composed of two active ingredients (1% prallethrin and 5% sumithrin) that is applied as an ultra low volume (ULV) spray to kill adult mosquitoes. It has previously been shown to activate Culex quinquefasciatus females in the laboratory resulting in greater mortality. Formu...

  14. LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDIES ON BTEX BIODEGRADATION IN A FUEL-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER UNDER DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies were conducted in conjunction with a field demonstration project on nitrate-mediated biorestoration of a fuel-contaminated aquifer at a U.S. Coast Guard facility in Traverse City, MI. icrocosms were prepared under either aerobic or strictly anaerobic, denitrify...

  15. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SUBSP. ISRAELENSIS AND FATHEAD MINNOWS, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS RAFINESQUE, UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were studied in laboratory exposures to two commercial formulations, Vectobac-G and Mosquito Attack. ortality among fatheads exposed to 2.0 x 10 6 to 6.5 x 10 6 CFU/ml with bo...

  16. Teaching the Principles of Operant Conditioning through Laboratory Experience: The Rat Olympics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Paul R.; Morse, David L.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses using rat olympics in helping psychology students to overcome their reluctance to condition rats. Working in groups, students enter rats in a number of behaviors (events) which can be shaped using operant conditioning methods and which rats can perform with varying degrees of proficiency. (Author/KC)

  17. Laboratory Measurements on Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Water Vapor on Meteor Smoke Particle Analogues under Conditions of the Mesopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duft, D.; Nachbar, M.; Wilms, H.; Rapp, M.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water vapor on charged nanometer sized (radius< 2nm) meteor smoke particles (MSP) is believed to be the dominating nucleation process in the mesopause region leading to the formation of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC). However, application of classical nucleation theory to the cold conditions of the polar summer mesopause comprises large uncertainties giving rise to strongly variant model predictions of PMC formation. To reduce these uncertainties laboratory measurements of nucleation and growth rates are required. We use an electrodynamic trap to investigate the nucleation and growth of water vapor on singly charged sub-3nm MSP analogues in the laboratory under mesospheric conditions typical during PMC growth initiation. The particles are created in a microwave plasma particle source and stored in a quadrupole ion trap under mesospheric pressure and temperature, where they are subjected to the high supersaturation necessary for nucleation and growth on nanometer sized particles. The particle mass and mass change by water accretion is monitored with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer as a function of residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this contribution we present for the first time measurements of nucleation and growth rates of water vapor on MSP analogues with an initial radius between 1.5nm and 3 nm. Contact parameter, sticking coefficient as well as charge effects on vapor pressure of small particles at mesospheric conditions are presented. These parameters are essential for the microphysical understanding and further global model calculations of PMC formation.

  18. Response of the green alga Oophila sp., a salamander endosymbiont, to a PSII-inhibitor under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan; Brain, Richard; Rodriguez-Gil, Jose Luis; Hosmer, Alan; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2014-08-01

    In a rare example of autotroph-vertebrate endosymbiosis, eggs of the yellow-spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) are colonized by a green alga (Oophila sp.) that significantly enhances salamander development. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for impacts to the salamander embryo when growth of the algae is impaired by exposure to herbicides. To further investigate this relationship, the authors characterized the response of the symbiotic algae (Oophila sp.) alone to the photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor atrazine under controlled laboratory conditions. After extraction of the alga from A. maculatum eggs and optimization of culturing conditions, 4 toxicity assays (96 h each) were conducted. Recovery of the algal population was also assessed after a further 96 h in untreated media. Average median effective concentration (EC50) values of 123 µg L(-1) (PSII yield), 169 µg L(-1) (optical density), and 299 µg L(-1) (growth rate) were obtained after the 96-h exposure. Full recovery of exposed algal populations after 96 h in untreated media was observed for all endpoints, except for optical density at the greatest concentration tested (300 µg L(-1) ). Our results show that, under laboratory conditions, Oophila sp. is generally less sensitive to atrazine than standard test species. Although conditions of growth in standard toxicity tests are not identical to those in the natural environment, these results provide an understanding of the tolerance of this alga to PSII inhibitors as compared with other species. PMID:24782078

  19. Spawning of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and rearing of veligers under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine

    1992-01-01

    The spawning cycle of the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, is amenable to laboratory manipulations. Techniques are presented that can be used to initiate spawning and rear veligers from fertilized egg to settlement stage. Spawning can be induced in sexually mature mussels by temperature flucuations or by the addition of ripe gametes. Embryonic survival is excellent until the straight-hinge stage when the first wave of mortality occurs, usually due to improper food. The second critical stage of development occurs just prior to settlement when mortality increases again. Veliger mortality averaged over 90% from egg to settlement. The results indicate that obtaining large numbers of veligers for laboratory experiments to be conducted year-round is difficult.

  20. Conditionals

    E-print Network

    von Fintel, Kai

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the classic accounts of the meaning of conditionals (material implication, strict implication, variably strict conditional) and discusses the difference between indicative and subjunctive/counterfactual ...

  1. Accumulation and Elimination of Enrofloxacin and Ciprofloxacin in Tissues of Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei under Laboratory and Farm Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Miranda, Brisa Marisol; Espinosa-Plascencia, Angelica; Gómez-Jiménez, Silvia; López-Zavala, Alonso Alexis; González-Carrillo, Haydé Hayamaí; Bermúdez-Almada, María del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the accumulation and elimination of Enrofloxacin (ENRO) and Ciprofloxacin (CIPRO) in cultivated Litopenaeus vannamei under controlled laboratory and farm conditions. Laboratory- and farm-raised shrimp were given feed supplemented with 200?mg/kg ENRO for 14 days, followed by a 16-day diet without antibiotics. The levels of ENRO and CIPRO were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). In the laboratory, ENRO concentrations in the muscle and hepatopancreas reached a maximum (Cmax) of 0.54 ± 0.26??g/g and 3.52 ± 1.9??g/g, respectively; Cmax values for CIPRO in the laboratory were 0.18 ± 0.13??g/g (muscle) and 1.05 ± 0.20??g/g (hepatopancreas). In farmed shrimp, Cmax values for ENRO were 0.36 ± 0.17??g/g muscle and 1.60 ± 0.82??g/g in the hepatopancreas; CIPRO Cmax values were 0.03 ± 0.02??g/g (muscle) and 0.36 ± 0.08??g/g (hepatopancreas). Two to fourteen days were necessary to eliminate both antibiotics from muscular tissue and four to more fourteen days for complete elimination of the antibiotics from the hepatopancreas. These results should be considered in terms of minimum concentrations necessary to inhibit Vibrio bacteria to determine whether the current use of this antibiotic is effective in controlling disease. PMID:22779008

  2. Evaluating Membrane Processes for Air Conditioning; Highlights in Research and Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This NREL Highlight discusses a recent state-of-the-art review of membrane processes for air conditioning that identifies future research opportunities. This highlight is being developed for the June 2015 S&T Alliance Board meeting.

  3. Microbial bioavailability of pyrene in three laboratory-contaminated soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravecek, Tasha L.; Christman, Russell F.; Pfaender, Frederic K.

    2006-06-01

    Changes in bioavailability of pyrene in three uncontaminated soils were examined under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Three soils were aerobically aged with pyrene and [ 14C]pyrene for 63 days, then incubated with water, nitrate, or sulfate under aerobic or anaerobic conditions for one year. Under aerobic conditions, microorganisms in two soils mineralized 58-82% of the added [ 14C]pyrene. The two soils amended with nitrate were seen to have enhanced aerobic mineralization rates. In one of these soils, non-extractable pyrene was seen to decrease over the course of the study due to desorption and mineralization, nitrate amendment enhanced this effect. Under anaerobic conditions, generated with a N 2 : CO 2(g) headspace, two soils with nitrate or sulfate amendment showed an increase in extractable [ 14C]pyrene at 365 days relative to inhibited controls, presumably due to microbially mediated oxidation-reduction potential and pH alteration of the soil environment. These observations in different soils incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions have important implications relative to the impact of microbial electron acceptors on bioavailability and transport of non-polar organic compounds in the environment suggesting that, given enough time, under the appropriate environmental conditions, non-extractable material becomes bioavailable. This information should be considered when assessing site specific exposure risks at PAH contaminated locations.

  4. Activity, aggression, and habitat use of ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) and round goby (Apollonia melanostoma) under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, J.F.; Riley, S.C.; Holuszko, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Potential negative ecological interactions between ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus and round goby Apollonia melanostoma (formerly Neogobius melanostomus) might affect the colonization dynamics of these invasive species where they are sympatric in the Great Lakes. In order to determine the potential for ecological interactions between these species, we examined the activity, aggression, and habitat use of round gobies and ruffe in single species and mixed species laboratory experiments. Trials included conditions in which food was concentrated (in light or darkness) or scattered. Results showed that ruffe were more active than gobies, particularly when food was scattered. Activity of both species was significantly lower during darkness. Round gobies were significantly more aggressive than ruffe, and total aggression was lower in mixed species trials. Habitat use by ruffe and round gobies overlapped considerably, but we observed significant differences between species in their use of specific habitats that depended on experimental conditions. Overall, ruffe used open habitats more often than did round gobies, primarily when food was scattered. Round gobies used rocks significantly more frequently than did ruffe, but their use of rock habitat decreased during dark conditions. Ruffe were found more often in plant habitats and less often near the wall of the pool in trials during daylight with concentrated food. Activity and habitat use of ruffe and round goby did not significantly differ between single and mixed species trials. Overall, we found little evidence for negative ecological interactions between ruffe and round goby in these laboratory experiments.

  5. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1989-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. Work performed has shown that laboratory measurements of the millimeter-wave opacity of ammonia between 7.5 mm and 9.3 mm and also at the 3.2 mm wavelength require a different lineshape to be used in the theoretical prediction for millimeter-wave ammonia opacity than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  6. Enhanced sludge conditioning by enzyme pre-treatment: comparison of laboratory and pilot scale dewatering results.

    PubMed

    Dursun, D; Turkmen, M; Abu-Orf, M; Dentel, S K

    2006-01-01

    The effect of enzyme pre-treatment on dewaterability of anaerobically digested sludge was investigated at both laboratory and pilot scale. Our results revealed a significant increase in cake solid content (27% cake solids compared to 18% without enzyme pre-treatment), using an enzyme dose of only 20 mg/L. In order to assess practical application, enzyme pre-treatment was applied at the Wilmington, Delaware (U.S.) wastewater treatment plant, using a pilot-scale centrifuge. However, the efficiency reached in laboratory scale could not be obtained in pilot scale, where the final cake solids content did not exceed 20%. Centrifuge and belt filter press (simulated by Crown Press) dewatering were compared in terms of the process efficiencies in the absence and presence of enzyme pre-treatment. Possible factors that might cause the differences were tested by experimental and statistical comparisons. Results indicated that the higher shear applied in centrifugation is responsible for the lack of improved cake solids. The network strength of sludge determined by rheological measurements revealed that enzymatic treatment weakens the gel structure of the sludge floc through the hydrolysis of extracellular polymeric substances; this allows improved dewatering by filtration processes, but leads to floc deterioration when subjected to high shear during centrifugation. PMID:17087367

  7. Laboratory evaluation of 10 heat and moisture exchangers using simulated aeromedical evacuation conditions.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Huda S; Fecura, Stephen E; Baskin, Jonathan; Kalns, John E

    2011-06-01

    Heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs) are used for airway humidification in mechanically ventilated patients and have been evaluated only under hospital conditions. U.S. Air Force aeromedical evacuation transports are performed under rugged conditions further complicated by the cold and dry environment in military aircrafts, and HMEs are used to provide airway humidification for patients. This study evaluated 10 commercial HMEs using a test system that simulated aeromedical evacuation conditions. Although the American National Standards Institute recommends inspired air to be at an absolute humidity value of > or = 30 mg/L for mechanically ventilated patients, the highest absolute humidity by any HME was approximately 20 mg/L. Although none of the HMEs were able to maintain a temperature high enough to achieve the humidity standard of the American National Standards Institute, the clinical significance of this standard may be less important than the relative humidity maintained in the respired air, especially on evacuation flights of short duration. PMID:21702383

  8. Egg-to-fry survival of two strains of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in stream incubators under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.

    2003-01-01

    Egg-to-fry survival of two strains of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) was evaluated under laboratory conditions in two commercial stream egg incubators. The survival was also examined based on egg developmental stage (i.e., green eggs, eyed egggs, advanced eggs). There was no significant difference in survival of eggs in the Jordan-Scotty and Whitlock-Vibert incubators. However, the survival of Sebago strain Atlantic slamon eggs was significantly higher than that of Penobscot stream eggs, and survival increased with advanced egg developmental stage.

  9. Laboratory measurements of the 7.5-9.38-mm absorption of gaseous ammonia (NH3) under simulated Jovian conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Steffes, Paul G.; Jenkins, Jon M.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt is made to infer the abundance and distribution of ammonia from RF emission measurements more accurately than heretofore, on the basis of the results of laboratory measurements for the mm-wave opacity of gaseous ammonia under simulated Jovian atmosphere conditions. The measurements were conducted at various frequencies in the 32-40 GHz range at 2 atm and 203 K; the atmospheric mixture was 88.34 percent H2, 9.81 percent He, and 1.85 percent NH3. Experimental results are found to be readily modeled by the Gross (1955) line-shape factor, rather than that of Van Vleck and Weisskopf (1945).

  10. Marks caused by the scavenging activity of Necrobia rufipes (Coleoptera: Cleridae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Noelia I; Visciarelli, Elena C; Centeno, Néstor D

    2015-07-01

    Insects are an important group involved in carrion consumption and are thus of forensic interest. In the laboratory we studied the taphonomic marks that Necrobia rufipes (Cleridae) can produce. Pig trotters were exposed to adult beetles at 21 ± 3 °C and 12:12 h day/night cycle. We made observations and took photographs every 4-5 days for 12 months. Marks were noted after a month. We found scratches, pits, holes, and tunnels in several kinds of tissue such as integumental, connective and muscular. This work contributes preliminary data of significant application in biology, ecology, anthropology and forensics. Until now, no study has provided taphonomic information with N. rufipes. PMID:26048510

  11. Parametrization of turbulence models using 3DVAR data assimilation in laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbert, A. I.; Nash, S.; Ragnoli, E.; Hartnett, M.

    2013-12-01

    In this research the 3DVAR data assimilation scheme is implemented in the numerical model DIVAST in order to optimize the performance of the numerical model by selecting an appropriate turbulence scheme and tuning its parameters. Two turbulence closure schemes: the Prandtl mixing length model and the two-equation k-? model were incorporated into DIVAST and examined with respect to their universality of application, complexity of solutions, computational efficiency and numerical stability. A square harbour with one symmetrical entrance subject to tide-induced flows was selected to investigate the structure of turbulent flows. The experimental part of the research was conducted in a tidal basin. A significant advantage of such laboratory experiment is a fully controlled environment where domain setup and forcing are user-defined. The research shows that the Prandtl mixing length model and the two-equation k-? model, with default parameterization predefined according to literature recommendations, overestimate eddy viscosity which in turn results in a significant underestimation of velocity magnitudes in the harbour. The data assimilation of the model-predicted velocity and laboratory observations significantly improves model predictions for both turbulence models by adjusting modelled flows in the harbour to match de-errored observations. Such analysis gives an optimal solution based on which numerical model parameters can be estimated. The process of turbulence model optimization by reparameterization and tuning towards optimal state led to new constants that may be potentially applied to complex turbulent flows, such as rapidly developing flows or recirculating flows. This research further demonstrates how 3DVAR can be utilized to identify and quantify shortcomings of the numerical model and consequently to improve forecasting by correct parameterization of the turbulence models. Such improvements may greatly benefit physical oceanography in terms of understanding and monitoring of coastal systems and the engineering sector through applications in coastal structure design, marine renewable energy and pollutant transport.

  12. The impact of insecticides to local honey bee colony Apis cerana indica in laboratory condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Ramadhani E.; Permana, Agus D.; Nuriyah, Syayidah

    2014-03-01

    Heavy use of insecticides considered as one of common practice at local farming systems. Even though many Indonesian researchers had stated the possible detrimental effect of insecticide on agriculture environment and biodiversity, researches on this subject had been neglected. Therefore, our purpose in this research is observing the impact of insecticides usage by farmer to non target organisme like local honey bee (Apis cerana indica), which commonly kept in area near agriculture system. This research consisted of field observations out at Ciburial, Dago Pakar, Bandung and laboratory tests at School of Life Sciences and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung. The field observations recorded visited agriculture corps and types of pollen carried by bees to the nest while laboratory test recorderd the effect of common insecticide to mortality and behavior of honey bees. Three types of insecticides used in this research were insecticides A with active agent Chlorantraniliprol 50 g/l, insecticide B with active agent Profenofos 500 g/l, and insecticides C with active agent Chlorantraniliprol 100 g/l and ?-cyhalotrin 50g/l. The results show that during one week visit, wild flower, Wedelia montana, visited by most honey bees with average visit 60 honey bees followed by corn, Zea mays, with 21 honey bees. The most pollen carried by foragers was Wedelia montana, Calliandra callothyrsus, and Zea mays. Preference test show that honeybees tend move to flowers without insecticides as the preference to insecticides A was 12.5%, insecticides B was 0%, and insecticides was C 4.2%. Mortality test showed that insecticides A has LD50 value 0.01 ?g/?l, insecticide B 0.31 ?g/?l, and insecticides C 0.09 ?g/?l which much lower than suggested dosage recommended by insecticides producer. This research conclude that the use of insecticide could lower the pollination service provide by honey bee due to low visitation rate to flowers and mortality of foraging bees.

  13. Laboratory evaluation of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The microwave absorbing properties of gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) under Venus atmospheric conditions are investigated. The results are applied to measurements from Mariner 5, Mariner 10, and Pioneer/Venus Radio Occultation experiments, to determine abundancies of gaseous sulfuric acid in the Venus atmosphere. The microwave properties of the vapors accompanying liquid H2SO4 are studied to estimate the vapor pressure in an atmospheric model.

  14. Effect of temperature on the effectiveness of artificial reproduction of dace [Cyprinidae (Leuciscus leuciscus (L.))] under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Nowosad, Joanna; Targo?ska, Katarzyna; Chwaluczyk, Rafa?; Kaszubowski, Rafa?; Kucharczyk, Dariusz

    2014-10-01

    This study sought to determine the effect of water temperature on the effectiveness of artificial reproduction of dace brooders under laboratory and field conditions. Three temperatures were tested in the laboratory: 9.5, 12 and 14.5 °C (± 0.1 °C). The water temperature under field conditions was 11.0 ± 0.3 °C (Czarci Jar Fish Farm) and 13.2 ± 1.4 °C (Janowo Fish Farm). The study showed that artificial reproduction of dace is possible in all the temperature ranges under study and an embryo survival rate of over 87% can be achieved. Dace has also been found to be very sensitive to rapid temperature changes, even within the temperature ranges optimal for the species. Such changes have an adverse effect on the outcome of the reproduction process, such as a decrease in the percentage of reproducing females, a decrease in the pseudo-gonado-somatic index (PGSI) and a decrease in the embryo survival rate. PMID:25436952

  15. Comparison of linuron degradation in the presence of pesticide mixtures in soil under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Swarcewicz, Maria; Gregorczyk, Andrzej; Sobczak, Justyna

    2013-10-01

    It is widely recognised that complex interactions occur between chemicals in mixtures. In many agricultural situations, the use of tank mixes and complex spray programs is a common practice. Insecticides, fungicides and a herbicide being applied in potato protection were used in this research. Interactions between linuron and insecticides, such as thiamethoxam or clothianidin, and fungicides, such as mancozeb or chlorothalonil, were examined in soil. The degradation rate of linuron in soil during laboratory incubation in six treatments was studied. Mixtures of linuron with mancozeb in sandy loam and clay loam soils had a significant effect on the persistence of this herbicide. For example, for the same herbicide, t 1/2 values for linuron were from 37 days in sandy loam to 44 days in clay loam. These values changed (64-67 days) when thiamethoxam and mancozeb were in soil. When mancozeb was added only, the half-life values were from 59 to 62 days, respectively. Other mixtures with chlorothalonil, thiamethoxam and clothianidin did not have any effect. In order to compare linuron degradation rates in soils, a single first-order model and expanded statistical analysis were used. PMID:23525775

  16. Copper-binding proteins in liver of bluegills exposed to increased soluble copper under field and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, F L; Lam, J R

    1986-01-01

    Livers from bluegills exposed to increased soluble copper (Cu) under field and laboratory conditions were analyzed to determine the concentration and distribution of Cu in metalloproteins of different molecular size. Analyses were performed on bluegills collected from the impoundment of the H. B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant (Florence, SC) near the effluent discharge from the power plant, near the water intake to the cooling system, and from a control pond as well as on bluegills exposed under controlled laboratory conditions. Metalloproteins were separated into low molecular weight (LMW), intermediate molecular weight (IMW), and high molecular weight (HMW) fractions by using high-performance liquid chromatography. In the field-exposed bluegills, Cu concentrations in the LMW, IMW, and HMW fractions were highest in bluegills from the discharge site and lowest in those from the control pond. In the laboratory-exposed bluegills, Cu concentrations in the fractions increased with exposure concentration and time. Concentrations of Cu in the LMW protein fraction and pellet of bluegills exposed to 160 micrograms Cu/L appeared to plateau with long exposure times, whereas those in the HMW fraction continued to increase. Bluegills maintained in 80 micrograms Cu/L water at pH 5.5 accumulated lower concentrations of Cu in the LMW and pellet fractions and higher amounts in the HMW than in those maintained in 80 micrograms Cu/L at pH 7.0. Mortality was dependent on exposure concentration and duration and was higher in bluegills maintained in water at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.0. PMID:3709431

  17. The importance of environmental conditions in reflectance spectroscopy of laboratory analogs for Mars surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J.; Murchie, S.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Pieters, C.

    1993-01-01

    Reflectance spectra are presented here for a variety of particulate, ferric-containing analogs to Martian soil (Fe(3+)-doped smectites and palagonites) to facilitate interpretation of remotely acquired spectra. The analog spectra were measured under differing environmental conditions to evaluate the influence of exposure history on water content and absorption features due to H2O in these samples. Each of these materials contains structural OH bonded to metal cations, adsorbed H2O, and bound H2O (either in a glass, structural site, or bound to a cation). Previous experiments involving a variety of Mars analogs have shown that the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of palagonites is more resistant to drying than the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of montmorillonites. Other experiments have shown that spectra of ferrihydrite and montmorillonites doped with ferric sulfate also contain sufficient bound H2O to retain a strong 3 micron band under dry conditions. Once the effects of the environment on bound water in clays, oxides, and salts are better understood, the hydration bands measured via reflectance spectroscopy can be used to gain information about the chemical composition and moisture content of real soil systems. Such information would be especially useful in interpreting observations of Mars where subtle spatial variations in the strengths of metal-OH and H2O absorptions have been observed in telescopic and ISM spectra. We measured bidirectional reflectance spectra of several Mars soil analogs under controlled environmental conditions to assess the effects of moisture content on the metal-OH and H2O absorptions. The samples analyzed include chemically altered montmorillonites, ferrihydrite. and palagonites from Hawaii and Iceland. Procedures for preparation of the cation-exchanged montmorillonites, ferric-salt doped montmorillonites, and ferric oxyhydroxides are described in detail elsewhere.

  18. The importance of environmental conditions in reflectance spectroscopy of laboratory analogs for Mars surface materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J.; Murchie, S.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Pieters, C.

    Reflectance spectra are presented here for a variety of particulate, ferric-containing analogs to Martian soil (Fe(3+)-doped smectites and palagonites) to facilitate interpretation of remotely acquired spectra. The analog spectra were measured under differing environmental conditions to evaluate the influence of exposure history on water content and absorption features due to H2O in these samples. Each of these materials contains structural OH bonded to metal cations, adsorbed H2O, and bound H2O (either in a glass, structural site, or bound to a cation). Previous experiments involving a variety of Mars analogs have shown that the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of palagonites is more resistant to drying than the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of montmorillonites. Other experiments have shown that spectra of ferrihydrite and montmorillonites doped with ferric sulfate also contain sufficient bound H2O to retain a strong 3 micron band under dry conditions. Once the effects of the environment on bound water in clays, oxides, and salts are better understood, the hydration bands measured via reflectance spectroscopy can be used to gain information about the chemical composition and moisture content of real soil systems. Such information would be especially useful in interpreting observations of Mars where subtle spatial variations in the strengths of metal-OH and H2O absorptions have been observed in telescopic and ISM spectra. We measured bidirectional reflectance spectra of several Mars soil analogs under controlled environmental conditions to assess the effects of moisture content on the metal-OH and H2O absorptions. The samples analyzed include chemically altered montmorillonites, ferrihydrite. and palagonites from Hawaii and Iceland. Procedures for preparation of the cation-exchanged montmorillonites, ferric-salt doped montmorillonites, and ferric oxyhydroxides are described in detail elsewhere.

  19. A Comparison of the Availability and Failure Modes of the BaBar Superconducting Solenoid with Similar Magnets at Other High Energy Physics Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Knodel, Mallory

    2003-09-05

    One of the key technologies in the BaBar detector is the 1.5 T superconducting solenoid. It is imperative that this device operate reliably at its nominal current to allow data taking. While this system is available for physics 98.8% of the time, further improvements are desirable. The object of this project is to survey similar magnet systems, for example those at KEK (Belle), Fermilab (D0 and CDF), DESY (H1 and ZEUS), and CERN (ALEPH and DELPHI), to see how often such magnets stop functioning properly and what the root causes of the failures are. A survey was carried out via e-mail and telephone calls. Information was obtained regarding the operation of superconducting magnets, specifically the BaBar magnet and its ancillary systems, as well as an overview of the use of other such magnets both in the US and overseas. In this work, failure modes will be investigated and compared to the BaBar operational experience. Future investigations can now assess the feasibility of reducing the time the BaBar magnet is nonoperational and unavailable for physics research.

  20. New laboratory measurements of CH 4 in Titan's conditions and a reanalysis of the DISR near-surface spectra at the Huygens landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemart, D.; Lellouch, E.; Bézard, B.; de Bergh, C.; Coustenis, A.; Lacome, N.; Schmitt, B.; Tomasko, M.

    2008-04-01

    Laboratory spectra of methane-nitrogen mixtures have been recorded in the near-infrared range (1.0-1.65 ?m) in conditions similar to Titan's near surface, to facilitate the interpretation of the DISR/DLIS (DISR - Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer) spectra taken during the last phase of the descent of the Huygens Probe, when the surface was illuminated by a surface-science lamp. We used a 0.03 cm -1 spectral resolution, adequate to resolve the lines at high pressure ( p˜1.5 bar). By comparing the laboratory spectra with synthetic calculations in the well-studied ?2+2 ?3 band (7515-7620 cm -1), we determine a methane absorption column density of 178±20 cm atm and a temperature of 118±10 K in our experiment. From this, we derive the methane absorption coefficients over 1.0-1.65 ?m with a 0.03 cm -1 sampling, allowing for the extrapolation of the results to any other methane column density under the relevant pressure and temperature conditions. We then revisit the calibration and analysis of the Titan "lamp-on" DLIS spectra. We infer a 5.1±0.8% methane-mixing ratio in the first 25 m of Titan's atmosphere. The CH 4 mixing ratio measured 90 s after landing from a distance of 45 cm is found to be 0.92±0.25 times this value, thus showing no post-landing outgassing of methane in excess of ˜20%. Finally, we determine the surface reflectivity as seen between 25 m and 45 cm and find that the 1500 nm absorption band is deeper in the post-landing spectrum as compared to pre-landing.

  1. Differences in span task performance recorded in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) simulator compared to a standard laboratory condition 

    E-print Network

    Harcourt-Brown, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Forty-eight participants completed a working memory span task in a functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) simulator and laboratory. Differences in performance between the two conditions were investigated. The trends in the ...

  2. The Rearing and Biology of the Desert Beetle, Microdera punctipennis, Under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Xiaoning; Zhao, Jia; Rexili, Kelaimu; Ma, Ji

    2011-01-01

    Microdera punctipennis Kasz (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) is a unique species that lives in the desert region of Central Asia and has adopted a nocturnal habit to survive the desert environment. Female adults are larger in size than male adults. The female/male ratio was 1.04:1. A rearing method using reused plastic bottles was used. The rearing conditions were 30 ± 0.5°C, 30 ± 6% relative humidity (RH), and 16:8 L:D photoperiod. Cabbage was provided as food. Cannibalism was avoided by rearing one larva in a bottle. A complete life cycle was obtained under these conditions. The viability of eggs, larvae, prepupae, pupae, and teneral adults was 93.54%, 83.71%, 84.76%, 87.64%, and 93.59%, respectively. Embryogenesis took 7.35 days on average. The larval duration in each instar was 2.25 days. The mean duration of the larvae, prepupae, pupae, and teneral adult was 49.27, 7.05, 9.95, and 10.12 days, respectively. The coloration of each developmental stage gradually changed from creamy white to light brownish or black. Females commenced oviposition when their body color became black. On average, each female produced 568 eggs. PMID:21529250

  3. Evaluation of the Ott Hydromet Qliner for measuring discharge in laboratory and field conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McVay, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the University of Iowa IIHR – Hydroscience and Engineering, evaluated the use of the Ott Hydromet Qliner using laboratory flume tests along with field validation tests. Analysis of the flume testing indicates the velocities measured by the Qliner at a 40-second exposure time results in higher dispersion of velocities from the mean velocity of data collected with a 5-minute exposure time. The percent data spread from the mean of a 100-minute mean of Qliner velocities for a 40-second exposure time averaged 16.6 percent for the entire vertical, and a 5-minute mean produced a 6.2 percent data spread from the 100-minute mean. This 16.6 percent variation in measured velocity would result in a 3.32 percent variation in computed discharge assuming 25 verticals while averaging 4 bins in each vertical. The flume testing also provided results that indicate the blanking distance of 0.20 meters is acceptable when using beams 1 and 2, however beam 3 is negatively biased near the transducer and the 0.20-meter blanking distance is not sufficient. Field testing included comparing the measured discharge by the Qliner to the discharge measured by a Price AA mechanical current meter and a Teledyne RDI Rio Grande 1200 kilohertz acoustic Doppler current profiler. The field tests indicated a difference between the discharges measured with the Qliner and the field reference discharge between -14.0 and 8.0 percent; however the average percent difference for all 22 field comparisons was 0.22, which was not statistically significant.

  4. Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Doug

    Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes Laboratory of Experimental on postsaccadic perception do indeed occur. We presented subjects with highly similar artificial shapes, preceded., & Verfaillie, K. (2009). Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes. Journal of Vision, 9

  5. Vegetation-derived cues for the selection of oviposition substrates by Anopheles albimanus under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Torres-Estrada, José Luis; Meza-Alvarez, R Amanda; Cibrián-Tovar, Juan; Rodríguez-López, Mario H; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Rojas-Leon, Julio C

    2005-12-01

    Oviposition response of gravid Anopheles albimanus Wiedemman (Diptera: Culicidae) females to water containing Brachiaria mutica, Cynodon dactylon, Jouvea straminea, Fimbristylis spadicea, and Ceratophyllum demersum was investigated. Gravid An. albimanus females deposited similar egg numbers in cups containing natural plants in water from natural breeding sites and in cups containing natural plants in distilled water. Gravid mosquitoes deposited significantly more eggs in cups containing natural plants in water from natural breeding sites than in cups containing artificial plants in water from the corresponding natural breeding sites. These results were confirmed in experiments conducted in a wind tunnel, indicating that female response is mediated by chemical cues from plants. Bioassays with organic extracts of all 5 plant species indicated that these extracts at 100%, 10%, and 1% concentrations had an oviposition repellent effect, while attractiveness was observed at 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001%. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis of the organic extracts found in all 5 plants showed a mixture of terpenoid and alcohol compounds, among them: guaiacol, phenol, isoeugenol, longifolene, caryophyllene, phenyl ethyl alcohol, and p-cresol. These results suggest that middle-range volatiles from plants may function as chemical cues for the female's oviposition response in this mosquito species. PMID:16506557

  6. Optimal conditions for high current proton irradiations at the university of Wisconsin's ion beam laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetteland, C. J.; Field, K. G.; Eiden, T. J.; Gerczak, T. J.; Maier, B. R.; Albakri, O.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-04-01

    The National Electrostatics Corporation's (NEC) Toroidal Volume Ion Source (TORVIS) source is known for exceptionally high proton currents with minimal service downtime as compared to traditional sputter sources. It has been possible to obtain over 150?A of proton current from the source, with over 70?A on the target stage. However, beam fluxes above ˜1×1017/m2-s may have many undesirable effects, especially for insulators. This may include high temperature gradients at the surface, sputtering, surface discharge, cracking or even disintegration of the sample. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the role of high current fluxes in a suite of ceramics and insulating materials. Results will show the optimal proton irradiation conditions and target mounting strategies needed to minimize unwanted macro-scale damage, while developing a procedure for conducting preliminary radiation experiments.

  7. Optimal conditions for high current proton irradiations at the university of Wisconsin's ion beam laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wetteland, C. J.; Field, K. G.; Gerczak, T. J.; Eiden, T. J.; Maier, B. R.; Albakri, O.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-04-19

    The National Electrostatics Corporation's (NEC) Toroidal Volume Ion Source (TORVIS) source is known for exceptionally high proton currents with minimal service downtime as compared to traditional sputter sources. It has been possible to obtain over 150{mu}A of proton current from the source, with over 70{mu}A on the target stage. However, beam fluxes above {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}/m2-s may have many undesirable effects, especially for insulators. This may include high temperature gradients at the surface, sputtering, surface discharge, cracking or even disintegration of the sample. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the role of high current fluxes in a suite of ceramics and insulating materials. Results will show the optimal proton irradiation conditions and target mounting strategies needed to minimize unwanted macro-scale damage, while developing a procedure for conducting preliminary radiation experiments.

  8. Laboratory program to examine effects of layup conditions on pitting of Alloy 600. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, D.D.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of various layup conditions on pitting of Alloy 600 tubing for steam generators was studied in beaker tests at 40/sup 0/C (104/sup 0/F). In addition, several methods to inhibit pitting were studied. The pitting solutions studied were copper chloride or seawater plus simulated sludge containing copper, copper oxide and magnetite. Results show that the pitting of Alloy 600 initiated in less than three weeks in the copper chloride solution with about 700 ppM chloride present. The same results were obtained in the seawater solution with about 6000 ppM chloride present. Retardation of pitting was achieved in three different ways: (1) decreasing the oxygen content of the solution, (2) decreasing the copper content of the solution, and (3) increasing the pH of the solution.

  9. Selectivity switch in the catalytic functionalization of nonprotected carbohydrates: selective synthesis in the presence of anomeric and structurally similar carbohydrates under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Wataru; Takemoto, Yuki

    2013-03-15

    A catalytic process for the chemo- and regioselective functionalization of nonprotected carbohydrates has been developed. This novel process allows selective thiocarbonylation, acylation, and sulfonylation of a particular hydroxy group in a particular carbohydrate in the simultaneous presence of structurally similar carbohydrates such as anomers. In addition, the chemoselectivity can be switched by regulating only the length of the alkyl chain in the organotin catalyst. PMID:23360236

  10. Laboratory studies in planetary science and quantitative analysis of evaporation rates under current Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Shauntae

    2005-12-01

    Laboratory measurements have been performed that are intended to shed light on several problems in planetary science. Thermoluminescence measurements of ordinary chondrites have been performed as part of an effort to identify the most primitive materials in the solar system. Experiments to study the fractionation of metal and silicate grains on asteroid surfaces have been performed on NASA's microgravity facility because of its relevance to meteorite origins and the exploration of asteroids by robotic spacecraft. The results of these studies are presented in this thesis as a conference presentation whose summary appeared in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science and a paper that appeared in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The rest of the thesis describes measurements on the stability of water on the surface of Mars and is submitted in normal thesis format, although at the time of submission some of this work has appeared in Geophysical Research Letters and some has been submitted to the journal Astrobiology. The thermoluminescence studies were used to derive petrologic classifications for several type 3 ordinary chondrites from North Africa, some of which are very low and have the potential to provide new insights to the early solar system and its formation. The metal-silicate fractionation work suggests that the differences in composition observed among the major chondrite groups, the H, L and LL chondrites, could be the result of processes occurring on the surface of the meteorite parent body, probably an asteroid. They also suggest that minor disturbances of the surface will cause separation of components in the asteroid regolith and this should be borne in mind in robotics exploration of asteroids. The stability of water on Mars was investigated by measuring the evaporation rate of liquid water in a Mars-like environment produced in a large chamber on Earth. The evaporation rates measured are in good agreement with model-dependent theoretical treatments described in the literature in which Fick's Law is adjusted to allow for the greater buoyancy of water relative to carbon dioxide, the major constituent of the martian atmosphere. The results have implications for possible locations of water on Mars.

  11. Combined physical and chemical methods to control lesser mealworm beetles under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jônatas; Potrich, Michele; Lozano, Everton R; Gouvea, Alfredo; Pegorini, Carla S

    2015-06-01

    The lesser mealworm beetle, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is an important insect pest. The insect acts as a disease vector and reservoir, negatively affecting the health of birds and humans, and harming poultry husbandry. Controlling the lesser mealworm is generally based on using synthetic chemical insecticides, which are sometimes ineffective, and is limited due to market concerns regarding the toxicity of chemical residues in food products. In this context, the present study aimed to evaluate the potential for the combination of physical and chemical methods to control A. diaperinus. Bioassays were conducted using poultry bedding and known populations of beetle adults and larvae. The treatments consisted of the isolated application of 400 g/m2 hydrated lime; 20% added moisture (distilled water); temperature increase to 45°C; an insecticide composed of cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, and citronellal; and a combination of these factors. Beetle mortality was measured at 7 and 10 d of treatment. The hydrated lime and moisture treatments alone did not control A. diaperinus. Raising the temperature of the poultry bedding to 45°C effectively controlled both larvae (90±6%) and adults (90±4%). The use of insecticide provided adequate control of A. diaperinus in the conditions of the bioassay (93±2% and 68±5% for adults and larvae, respectively). The combination of the studied factors led to the total control of larvae and adults after 7 d of treatment. PMID:25834245

  12. Placement of the radiochemical processing plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory into a safe standby condition

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, D.W.; Bopp, C.D.; Farmer, A.J.; Johnson, J.K.; Miller, C.H.; Powers, B.A.; Collins, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive upgrade, cleanup, and decontamination efforts are being conducted for appropriate areas in the Radiochemical Processing Plant (RPP) with the goal of achieving ''safe standby'' condition by the end of FY 1989. The ventilation system must maintain containment; thus, it is being upgraded via demolition and replacement of marginally adequate ductwork, fans, and control systems. Areas that are being decontaminated and stripped of various services (e.g., piping, ductwork, and process tanks) include hot cells, makeup rooms, and pipe tunnels. Operating equipment that is being decontaminated includes glove boxes and hoods. Replacement of the ventilation system and removal of equipment from pipe tunnels, cells, and makeup rooms are accomplished by contact labor by workers using proper attire, safety rules, and shielding. Removal of contaminated ductwork and piping is conducted with containment enclosures that are strategically located at breakpoints, and methods of separation are chosen to conform with health physics requirements. The methods of cutting contaminated piping and ductwork include portable reciprocating saws, pipe cutters, burning, and plasma torch. Specially designed containment enclosures will be used to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination while maintaining adequate ventilation. 6 figs.

  13. Effect of thermal shock on the decomposition of rocks under controlled laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasanin-Grubin, Milica; Vezmar, Tijuana; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2013-04-01

    The major factor determining the rate of weathering of a given rock are the climatic conditions of the surrounding environment, most notably type and amount of precipitation and temperature. For the latter, average annual temperature and where applicable, the frequency of freezing and thawing are often considered to be relevant for weathering. The rate of temperature change is mostly ignored. However, a rapid change in temperature, referred to as thermal shock could have more severe consequences of rock deterioration then gradual heating and cooling of rocks is gradual. Thermal shock induces a stress of such a magnitude that the material is unable to adjust fast enough and so it breaks down. The aim of this study is to examine the importance of mechanical decomposition of rocks when treated with thermal shock by freezing. The rate of decomposition of rocks of various sizes was measured based on their weight loss. In addition, they were immersed in water after freezing and the electrical conductivity and pH of the water were measured as an index for thermal-shock induced micro-fracturing. Samples of three rock types were chosen for the experiment: limestone, tuffaceous rock and basalt. Samples were examined in two separate cycles: (i) 24h immersion in ultra-clean water followed by 24h drying at 30o and (ii) 24h immersion, 24h temperature shock by freezing at -20?C and 6h thawing. Each cycle was repeated approximately 20 times. In each cycle three different sizes of rock were examined: <16mm, 16-8mm and 8-5mm. Limestone mass decreased for both cycles, although more distinctly after repeated thermal shocks. Furthermore, the rate of decay decreased with increasing rock size. Tuffaceous rock exposed to cycle (i) also showed a significant weight loss. Somewhat surprisingly, the mass of the tuffaceous rock exposed to thermal shock increased by about 13% in all sample size groups. It is possible that pore volume increased during experiment and that the rocks became capable of absorbing more water, but the rock was elastic enough not to break under stress. On the basalt, as expected, the rate of weight loss was the smallest. Cylce (ii) samples also showed more intensive mass reduction. Electrical conductivity and pH of the immersion water were constant throughout the experiment and did not change with the number of cycles. This implies that no significant chemical disintegration occurred. The results show that thermal shock can have a rock type-specific effect on physical weathering. The lacking effect on chemical weathering is expected due to the design of the experiment. Under natural conditions, with non-pH neutral water, the declining rock stability, indicated by the loss of mass, especially of the limestone, will mostly likely also enhance leaching and thus chemical weathering.

  14. Laboratory Test Methods to Determine the Degradation of Plastics in Marine Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tosin, Maurizio; Weber, Miriam; Siotto, Michela; Lott, Christian; Degli Innocenti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In this technology report, three test methods were developed to characterize the degradation of plastic in marine environment. The aim was to outline a test methodology to measure the physical and biological degradation in different habitats where plastic waste can deposit when littered in the sea. Previously, research has focused mainly on the conditions encountered by plastic items when floating in the sea water (pelagic domain). However, this is just one of the possible habitats that plastic waste can be exposed to. Waves and tides tend to wash up plastic waste on the shoreline, which is also a relevant habitat to be studied. Therefore, the degradation of plastic items buried under sand kept wet with sea water has been followed by verifying the disintegration (visual disappearing) as a simulation of the tidal zone. Most biodegradable plastics have higher densities than water and also as a consequence of fouling, they tend to sink and lay on the sea floor. Therefore, the fate of plastic items lying on the sediment has been followed by monitoring the oxygen consumption (biodegradation). Also the effect of a prolonged exposure to the sea water, to simulate the pelagic domain, has been tested by measuring the decay of mechanical properties. The test material (Mater-Bi) was shown to degrade (total disintegration achieved in less than 9?months) when buried in wet sand (simulation test of the tidal zone), to lose mechanical properties but still maintain integrity (tensile strength at break?=??66% in 2?years) when exposed to sea water in an aquarium (simulation of pelagic domain), and substantially biodegrade (69% in 236?days; biodegradation relative to paper: 88%) when located at the sediment/sea water interface (simulation of benthic domain). This study is not conclusive as the methodological approach must be completed by also determining degradation occurring in the supralittoral zone, on the deep sea floor, and in the anoxic sediment. PMID:22737147

  15. The biology and some population parameters of the grasshopper, Ronderosia bergi, under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Mariottini, Yanina; de Wysiecki, Maria Laura; Lange, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Some biological and population parameters of Ronderosia bergi (Stål) (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Melanoplinae) were estimated by monitoring five cohorts of the first generation (F1) of individuals born in captivity from grasshoppers collected in the South of Misiones province, northeastern Argentina, and held under controlled conditions (30 degrees C, 14:10 L:D, 40% RH). The mean embryonic development time was 40.6 +/- 1.7 days. Five nymphal instars were recorded. Total duration of nymphal development was 30.8 +/- 0.54 days. The mean lifespan of cohorts was 22.6 +/- 0.7 weeks. The number of egg-pods per female was 7.6 +/- 1.44, and the amount of eggs per egg-pod was 16.45 +/- 0.85. Mean fecundity was 125 +/- 5.83 eggs per female with an oviposition rate of 1.55 +/- 0.57 eggs/female/day. Survivorship curves showed that mortality was concentrated in the final weeks of adulthood, and the life expectancy curve decreased accordingly. The population parameters estimated gave the following values: the net rate of reproduction (R(0)) was 46.75 +/- 11.2, generation time (T) was 18.87 +/- 1.67 weeks, duplication time (D) was 3.31 +/- 0.34, the intrinsic rate of population growth (r(m)) was 0.21 +/- 0.021 and the finite rate of population increase (lambda) was 1.24 +/- 0.026. The reproductive values (V(x)) indicated that the largest contribution of females to the subsequent generation was between weeks 15 and 25. PMID:20673116

  16. Laboratory test methods to determine the degradation of plastics in marine environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Tosin, Maurizio; Weber, Miriam; Siotto, Michela; Lott, Christian; Degli Innocenti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In this technology report, three test methods were developed to characterize the degradation of plastic in marine environment. The aim was to outline a test methodology to measure the physical and biological degradation in different habitats where plastic waste can deposit when littered in the sea. Previously, research has focused mainly on the conditions encountered by plastic items when floating in the sea water (pelagic domain). However, this is just one of the possible habitats that plastic waste can be exposed to. Waves and tides tend to wash up plastic waste on the shoreline, which is also a relevant habitat to be studied. Therefore, the degradation of plastic items buried under sand kept wet with sea water has been followed by verifying the disintegration (visual disappearing) as a simulation of the tidal zone. Most biodegradable plastics have higher densities than water and also as a consequence of fouling, they tend to sink and lay on the sea floor. Therefore, the fate of plastic items lying on the sediment has been followed by monitoring the oxygen consumption (biodegradation). Also the effect of a prolonged exposure to the sea water, to simulate the pelagic domain, has been tested by measuring the decay of mechanical properties. The test material (Mater-Bi) was shown to degrade (total disintegration achieved in less than 9?months) when buried in wet sand (simulation test of the tidal zone), to lose mechanical properties but still maintain integrity (tensile strength at break?=?-66% in 2?years) when exposed to sea water in an aquarium (simulation of pelagic domain), and substantially biodegrade (69% in 236?days; biodegradation relative to paper: 88%) when located at the sediment/sea water interface (simulation of benthic domain). This study is not conclusive as the methodological approach must be completed by also determining degradation occurring in the supralittoral zone, on the deep sea floor, and in the anoxic sediment. PMID:22737147

  17. Role of macropores in solute transport under ponded water condition produced by laboratory simulated intense storms.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M Z

    1999-01-01

    Soil macropores are widely studied because they are known to serve as avenues for rapid contaminant transport. Currently, it is understood that a macroporous medium develops regions of mobile and immobile water during flow. Consequently, solutes in the mobile phase bypass a considerable portion of the medium, thus limiting their natural attenuation. It is, however, not adequately documented in the literature what role the macropores play during intense rain events that result in variable ponding depths. Macropore flow under ponded water conditions was studied on two undisturbed soil columns taken from the loam soils of northeastern Iowa, U.S. The columns were placed on a four-segment outflow collector system. A slug of water labeled with Br was applied to the columns followed by simulation of 58 mm of rain on column 1 and 53.6 mm on column 2, in one hour, 30 minute, and 15 minute events. During the highest intensity rain event (15 minutes), the total volume of water that exited through the bottom of segments 1,2, 3, and 4 were 21.6%, 34.5%, 28.5%, and 15.4% in column 1, and 1.3%, 15.9%, 72.2%, and 10.5% in column 2, respectively. As the intensity of rain was increased from one hour to the 15 minute event, the total bromide mass recovery increased from 45% (29.2 mg) to 57% (36.9 mg) of the total application (65 mg) for column 1, and from 51 % (33.2 mg) to 59% (38.2 mg) for column 2, respectively. Finally, an examination of dye-stained high flow regions in column 1 demonstrated that macro-porosities made approximately 20% of the total cross-sectional area of the column. These results suggest that solute transport behavior in macroporous soils can be impacted by ponding depths, and intense rain events can severely restrict contaminant degradation in soils. PMID:19125920

  18. Laboratory study of microbial cleaning of oil spills under Saudi environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sayed, A.A.H.; Shebl, A.M.; Ramadan, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    An active strain of Pseudomonas sp. isolated from oil-contaminated soil at the Arabian Gulf was able to utilize the crude oil at a concentration of 5 mg/ml added to sterile Gulf water. microbial growth and gas chromatographic analysis of the remaining oil were used as a criteria for oil degradation by this strain. The bacteria at a cell density of 10{sup 5} CFU/ml was able to degrade the crude oil at concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 15 mg/ml in Gulf water samples. At low concentration (2.5 mg/ml), about 70% of crude oil had disappeared within 7 days. At high concentration (15 mg/ml), the extent of oil degradation decreased, where only 50% of the added oil had disappeared. The rate of degradation by the inoculated bacteria was slightly increased by the addition of inorganic nutrients, mainly P or N to the Gulf water. The degradative capacity of Pseudomonas sp. was optimum when the bacteria was incubated at 25 C, where 47% of the added oil has disappeared within 5 days of incubation. Low cell density (10{sup 3} CFU/ml) of the degrading bacteria required a long lag period before initiation of oil degradation, whereas high cell density (10{sup 6} CFU/ml) rapidly degraded oil with a short lag period under the same conditions. This strain could be useful in decontamination of spilled oil in Gulf water if it acts well under field trial test and survived for a reasonable period sufficient for oil biodegradation.

  19. Comparison of longevity between a laboratory strain and a natural population of Anastrepha Fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) under field cage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Cendra, P.; Vilardi, J.; Segura, D.; Cladera, J.; Allinghi, A.

    2007-03-15

    The South American fruit fly Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) is one of the most destructive fruit pests in this region, infesting major fruit crops. Implementation of the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of an area-wide integrated approach against this species requires information on the survival of mass-reared and sterilized insects in the field and their ability to mate with wild females. The survival rates in field cages of both non-irradiated and irradiated laboratory flies were compared with that of wild flies. Both types of laboratory flies survived longer than their wild counterparts over the 8 days under the experimental conditions. The irradiation dose (70 Gy) did not affect survival of the laboratory reared flies. Our results improve the prospect of integrating the SIT into the control of A. fraterculus populations in Argentina. (author) [Spanish] Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann), la mosca sudamericana de la fruta, es una de las plagas mas destructivas en la region que infesta a los principales cultivos de frutas. La implementacion de la Tecnica del Insecto Esteril (TIE) como parte de un manejo integrado en areas extensivas contra esta especie requiere ensayos que demuestren que los insectos producidos en forma masiva y esterilizados son capaces de sobrevivir en el campo y aparearse con las hembras silvestres. Se comparo la supervivencia de individuos de una linea de laboratorio, tanto irradiados como no irradiados con la de individuos de una poblacion natural. Los dos tratamientos de moscas de laboratorio sobrevivieron mas tiempo que las salvajes durante los 8 dias y en las condiciones ensayadas. La dosis de radiacion (70 Gy.) no afecto la supervivencia de las moscas criadas en laboratorio. Nuestros resultados mejoran las perspectivas de integrar la TIE en el control de las poblaciones argentinas de A. fraterculus. (author)

  20. Investigation on some biological aspects of Chrysoperla lucasina (Chrysopidae: Neuroptera) on Bemisia tabaci in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, A; Sharifi, F; Mirmoayedi, A

    2012-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci is one of the most important key pests of many types of cultivated plants. Lacewings (Chrysopidae: Neuroptera) are predatory insects, widely used in biological control programs. Between them green lacewing is a promising biological control agent of pests in green houses and crop fields. In this study, gravid females of the green lacewing Chrysoperla lucasina (Lacroix) were captured from Sarepolzahab ( altitude 540m, latitude 34 degrees ,14' N 46 degrees, 9' E) in western part of Iran. Collected insects were reared in a growth chamber, under experimental conditions (25 +/- 1 degrees C, 70 +/- 5% RH and a photoperiod of 16:8 L: D). Different diets were offered to larvae which consisted of a whitefly species B. tabaci, an aphid Myzus persica and also lyophilized powder of drone honeybee (Apis melifera). As different foods were used to nurish larvae, so for each diet, mean larval period were calculated, and finally means were compared to each other. Anova in MSTAT-C was used for analysis of variance, and Duncan multiple range test (DMRT) to compare between means. The results showed that larvae had maximum duration of 27 +/- 0.33 days when fed on honeybee lyophilized powder and the minimum value was 17.9 +/- 0.3 days for B. tabaci. 25 +/- 0.27 day recorded for M. persicae. Food preference of the 3rd instar larvae of green lacewing was surveyed, they showed a food preference to M. persicae, to compare with B. tabaci, as the former has a bigger body size, so more easily to be captured by the predator larvae. The 3rd instar larvae of lacewing were more voracious on preys, than the 1st or the 2nd instar larvae. Statistically speaking, there were a significantly difference when mean of different preys consumed by predator larvae were compared. We found, that when the predator larvae have fed on B. tabaci, their development time was shorter, and when arrived to adult stage, the adults showed, an improved fertility. The results indicated that the suitable prey not only can increase the rate of through accelerating developmental stages of the predator and by means of an increase in its pupal body weight consequently promoting the fecundity of resulting adults, but also can alter predators population density in relation to own production numbers. PMID:23885430

  1. Similar quartz crystallographic textures in rocks of continental earth's crust (by neutron diffraction data): III. Relation of quartz texture types with means and conditions of texture formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. N. Ivankina, T. I.; Ullemeyer, K.; Vasin, R. N.

    2008-09-15

    Examples of different rocks collected in different regions of the continental earth's crust are presented. Groups of quartz crystallographic textures of the same type are selected for these rocks. The relationship between the types of textures and the physical means and conditions of their formation is analyzed. The effect of the {alpha}-{beta} phase transition in quartz on the texture transformations in rocks is considered.

  2. Attraction of gravid anopheles Pseudopunctipennis females to oviposition substrates by Spirogyra majuscula (Zygnematales: Zygnmataceae) algae under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Torres-Estrada, José L; Meza-Alvarez, Rosa A; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Rodríguez, Mario H; Arredondo-Jiménez, Juan I

    2007-03-01

    The attraction of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis gravid females to oviposition substrates containing Spirogyra majuscula algae was investigated under laboratory conditions. Gravid females deposited significantly more eggs in cups containing natural algae in water from breeding sites than in cups containing artificial (nylon rope) life-like algae in water from the corresponding natural breeding site, or in cups containing natural algae in distilled water. Bioassays with Spirogyra majuscula organic extracts indicated that these extracts at concentrations of 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% attracted more oviposition, but concentrations of 1%, 10%, and 100% were repellent. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis of algae organic extracts revealed a mixture of ethyl acetate and hydrocarbons compounds. These results suggest that the attraction of gravid An. pseudopunctipennis to natural breeding sites containing filamentous algae is probably mediated by organic compounds released by the algae. PMID:17536363

  3. Selective oviposition by Aedes aegypti (Diptera: culicidae) in response to Mesocyclops longisetus (Copepoda: Cyclopoidea) under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Torres-Estrada, J L; Rodríguez, M H; Cruz-López, L; Arredondo-Jimenez, J I

    2001-03-01

    The influence of predacious Mesocyclops longisetus Thiebaud on the selection of oviposition sites by prey Aedes aegypti (L.) was studied under laboratory and field conditions. In both cases, gravid Ae. aegypti females were significantly more attracted to ovitraps containing copepods or to ovitraps with water in which copepods were held previously than to distilled water. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene compounds including 3-carene, alpha-terpinene, alpha-copaene, alpha-longipinene, alpha-cedrene, and delta-cadinene were found in hexane extracts of copepods by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses. These compounds may be responsible for attracting gravid Ae. aegypti females and may increase the number of potential prey for the copepod. PMID:11296821

  4. Under What Conditions Does Caseworker-Caregiver Racial/Ethnic Similarity Matter for Housing Service Provision? An Application of Representative Bureaucracy Theory

    PubMed Central

    McBeath, Bowen; Chuang, Emmeline; Bunger, Alicia; Blakeslee, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine child welfare caseworkers’ housing-related service strategies when they serve culturally similar versus culturally dissimilar clients. Testing hypotheses drawn from representative bureaucracy theory and using data from the second cohort of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, we find that when non-Caucasian caseworkers share the same racial/ethnic background as caregivers, caseworkers use more active strategies to connect caregivers to needed housing services. The relationship between racial/ethnic matching and frontline workers’ repertoire of service strategies is most pronounced when the need for housing has been registered formally via referrals and case plans and thus legitimated institutionally. These results reinforce basic tenets of representative bureaucracy theory and provide evidence of the benefits of racial and ethnic diversity in the human service workforce. Our findings also highlight the need for research identifying institutional and frontline organizational factors that enhance the quality of service provision. PMID:25745270

  5. Modeling of salt-water migration through spod-podzolic soils under the field and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhina, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of highly mineralized water influence on soils is an important issue in the contemporary world. Various regions with different conditions are exposed to salt-affected soils forming. Salinization of soils is a complex process of the chemical and physical properties changes. Therefore the chain of the laboratory and field experiments should be done in order to assess the main factors promoting highly mineralized water migration. In addition to it modelling is a good way to understand and evaluate main chemical and physical transformations in soils. The chain of experiments was done to assess salt water movement in spod-podzolic soils under field and laboratory conditions. The main goals were to evaluate the rate of salt water movement through soils and to estimate velocity of the desalinization process. Field experiment was conducted on spod-podzolic soils of Kaliningrad region. There were 4 sites measuring 20*25 cm watering with salt water in amount of 5 liters per each area. The mineralization of the solution was 100 g/l. In addition to the salt affected sites, 2 non polluted grounds were assessed too. Soils samples were collected in the period of 1 week, 1 month, 3 month and 1 year after the spill had been done. The samples were taken each 10 cm 110 cm deep and in double repeatability. Main chemical and physical parameters, such as volume water content, pH, conductivity, amount of calcium ion, magnesium, sodium, and chlorite in soils etc. were measured in each sample. The second experiment was conducted to evaluate the rate of soils solutions transformation under the laboratory conditions. Organic horizon was taken from the field and was stuffed in columns with 1.0 g/cm3 density. There were 16 columns with 4 cm diameter. 14 columns were showered with salt water with the same mineralization as in the field experiment. The amount of salt water injected in columns was 104 mm per one sample which is equal to the salt water volume spilled per one area in the previous experiment. Also there were 2 columns as a verification variant contained pure soil. Each column was washed off with different amount of distilled water. The total volume of the pure solution was equal to the mean amount of the annual precipitation in the region of the field experiment. The main physical and chemical properties were measured in soils samples as well in the first experiment. In addition to it the complex assessment of soil's water were made. The experiments revealed the fast rate of salinization-desalinization processes in spod-podzolic soils of the coniferous areas in Kaliningrad region. The maximum values of conductivity were observed at the end of 1 week period and made up more than 2000 mSm/cm in top soils horizons. Furthermore the desalinization of the soils took place in both field and laboratory experiments a year after the spill. The reported study was partially supported by RFBR, research project No 12-05-31088 mol_a.

  6. Wave operators, similarity and dynamics for a class of Schrödinger operators with generic non-mixed interface conditions in 1D

    SciTech Connect

    Mantile, Andrea

    2013-08-15

    We consider a simple modification of the 1D-Laplacian where non-mixed interface conditions occur at the boundaries of a finite interval. It has recently been shown that Schrödinger operators having this form allow a new approach to the transverse quantum transport through resonant heterostructures. In this perspective, it is important to control the deformations effects introduced on the spectrum and on the time propagator by this class of non-selfadjoint perturbations. In order to obtain uniform-in-time estimates of the perturbed semigroup, our strategy consists in constructing stationary wave operators allowing to intertwine the modified non-selfadjoint Schrödinger operator with a “physical” Hamiltonian. For small values of a deformation parameter “?,” this yields a dynamical comparison between the two models showing that the distance between the corresponding semigroups is dominated by ??? uniformly in time in the L{sup 2}-operator norm.

  7. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... certain diseases or conditions. What are lab tests? Laboratory tests are medical procedures that involve testing samples ...

  8. Dynamic similarity in erosional processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheidegger, A.E.

    1963-01-01

    A study is made of the dynamic similarity conditions obtaining in a variety of erosional processes. The pertinent equations for each type of process are written in dimensionless form; the similarity conditions can then easily be deduced. The processes treated are: raindrop action, slope evolution and river erosion. ?? 1963 Istituto Geofisico Italiano.

  9. Pregnancy diabetes: A comparison of diagnostic protocols based on point-of-care, routine and optimized laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Sjoerd A. A.; de Groot, Monique J. M.; Salden, Lorenzo P. W.; Draad, Patrick J. G. J.; Dijkstra, Ineke M.; Lunshof, Simone; van Thiel, Sjoerd W.; Boonen, Kristel J. M.; Thelen, Marc H. M.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro glycolysis poses a problem during diabetes screening, especially in remote laboratories. Point-of-care analysis (POC) may provide an alternative. We compared POC, routine and STAT analysis and a feasible protocol during glucose tolerance test (GTT) for pregnancy diabetes (GDM) screening. In the routine protocol, heparin tubes were used and turn-around-time (TAT) was unsupervised. In the STAT protocol, tubes were processed immediately. The feasible protocol comprised of citrated tubes with a TAT of 1?hour. Outcome was defined as glucose concentration and clinical diagnosis. Glucose measured by POC was higher compared to routine analysis at t?=?0 (0.25?mM) and t?=?120 (1.17?mM) resulting in 17% more GDM diagnoses. Compared to STAT analysis, POC glucose was also higher, although less pronounced (0.06 and 0.9?mM at t?=?0 and t?=?120?minutes, respectively) and misclassification was only 2%. Glucose levels and clinical diagnosis were similar using the feasible protocol and STAT analysis (0.03?mM and ?0.07?mM at t?=?0 and t?=?120, 100% identical diagnoses). POC is an viable alternative for STAT glucose analysis in GDM screening (sensitivity: 100%, specificity: 98%). A feasible protocol (citrated phlebotomy tubes with a TAT of 60?minutes) resulted in 100% identical outcome and provides the best alternative. PMID:26542612

  10. No evidence for memory interference across sessions in food hoarding marsh tits Poecile palustris under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Urhan, A Utku; Brodin, Anders

    2015-05-01

    Scatter hoarding birds are known for their accurate spatial memory. In a previous experiment, we tested the retrieval accuracy in marsh tits in a typical laboratory set-up for this species. We also tested the performance of humans in this experimental set-up. Somewhat unexpectedly, humans performed much better than marsh tits. In the first five attempts, humans relocated almost 90 % of the caches they had hidden 5 h earlier. Marsh tits only relocated 25 % in the first five attempts and just above 40 % in the first ten attempts. Typically, in this type of experiment, the birds will be caching and retrieving many times in the same sites in the same experimental room. This is very different from the conditions in nature where hoarding parids only cache once in a caching site. Hence, it is possible that memories from previous sessions will disturb the formation of new memories. If there is such proactive interference, the prediction is that success should decay over sessions. Here, we have designed an experiment to investigate whether there is such memory interference in this type of experiment. We allowed marsh tits and humans to cache and retrieve in three repeated sessions without prior experience of the arena. The performance did not change over sessions, and on average, marsh tits correctly visited around 25 % of the caches in the first five attempts. The corresponding success in humans was constant across sessions, and it was around 90 % on average. We conclude that the somewhat poor performance of the marsh tits did not depend on proactive memory interference. We also discuss other possible reasons for why marsh tits in general do not perform better in laboratory experiments. PMID:25573290

  11. The persistence of colostral Anaplasma antibodies and incidence of in utero transmission of Anaplasma infections in calves under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Potgieter, F T; van Rensburg, L

    1987-12-01

    Twenty-six calves, born from 25 Anaplasma-infected, intact and splenectomized cows, from a herd kept under strict tick-free laboratory conditions, were monitored for the presence of Anaplasma antibodies, using the rapid card agglutination test. Serum was collected at birth, weekly for 12 weeks, and then monthly for approximately 6 months. Specific antibodies passively acquired could be detected in calf sera for an average period of 8 weeks after birth. Calves that remained positive for longer than 12 weeks were suspected of having contracted in utero infections. Infection of the calves was confirmed by splenectomy. It was concluded that 4 calves in Group I contracted in utero infections. Two of the dams were chronically infected, whilst the other 2 underwent acute primary reactions during the 1st and 2nd trimesters of gestation, respectively. Subsequently all calves born from infected cows in this tick-free herd were serologically screened before being splenectomized at an average age of 8 months. Out of 50 cows, 8 in utero infected calves were identified serologically and this finding was confirmed through splenectomy or subinoculation of blood. Both Anaplasma centrale and Anaplasma marginale were carried transplacentally. Splenectomized and intact cows, chronically infected or undergoing primary reactions during the 1st, 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation, produced infected calves. A 15,6% incidence of in utero transmitted infections were observed amongst 77 calves under these conditions. None of the 13 splenectomized cows, undergoing primary A. centrale infections during gestation, aborted. Clinical signs of disease were not observed in any of the 12 in utero infected calves prior to splenectomy. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:3444609

  12. Influence of water hardness on accumulation and elimination of cadmium in two aquatic mosses under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, C; Vaillancourt, G; Pazdernik, L

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of water hardness on the accumulation and elimination of cadmium (Cd) by two aquatic mosses, Fontinalis dalecarlica and Platyhypnidium riparioides, under laboratory conditions. The two mosses were exposed to nominal Cd concentrations of 0, 0.8, 2, and 10 microg . L-1, which includes the concentration range generally found in nature. The influence of three levels of water hardness (very soft: 11.7 mg . L-1; soft: 44.2 mg . L-1; and hard water: 92.3 mg . L-1 as CaCO3) was measured while maintaining the alkalinity and pH constant during the 28-day exposure. The Cd accumulation by the aquatic mosses was rapid, showing the potential of accumulation and the sensitivity of this biomonitor. Even if the actual Cd concentration in the water was low (concentration <0.15 microg . L-1 to 6.82 microg . L-1 of Cd), the uptake of Cd was very fast and mostly linear. This study was conducted in water hardness comparable to that found in the Canadian shield (hardness was <100 mg . L-1 as CaCO3). When the actual Cd concentration in the water was as high as 6.82 microg . L-1, the uptake of Cd was mostly linear and the steady state condition was not reach. Accumulation rates of Cd were significantly different when the mosses were in very soft (11.7 mg . L-1) as compared to hard water (92.3 mg . L-1 as CaCO3). The elimination of Cd followed a very slow process for the two species studied. The elimination rates of Cd from the mosses were not influenced by water hardness. PMID:9419268

  13. The widely distributed hard tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, can retain canine parvovirus, but not be infected in laboratory condition

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Hiroyuki; TANAKA, Tetsuya; MOCHIZUKI, Masami

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Ticks are known to transmit various pathogens, radically threatening humans and animals. Despite the close contact between ticks and viruses, our understanding on their interaction and biology is still lacking. The aim of this study was to experimentally assess the interaction between canine parvovirus (CPV) and a widely distributed hard tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, in laboratory condition. After inoculation of CPV into the hemocoel of the ticks, polymerase chain reaction assay revealed that CPV persisted in inoculated unfed adult female ticks for 28 days. Canine parvovirus was recovered from the inoculated ticks using a cell culture, indicating that the virus retained intact in the ticks after inoculation, but significant positive reaction indicating virus infection was not detected in the tick organs by immunofluorescence antibody test using a monoclonal antibody. In the case of ticks inoculated with feline leukemia virus, the virus had shorter persistence in the ticks compared to CPV. These findings provide significant important information on the characteristic interaction of tick with non-tick-borne virus. PMID:25650060

  14. Bacterial survival and association with sludge flocs during aerobic and anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, S R; Bitton, G

    1983-01-01

    The fate of indicator bacteria, a bacterial pathogen, and total aerobic bacteria during aerobic and anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge under laboratory conditions was determined. Correlation coefficients were calculated between physical and chemical parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, total solids, and volatile solids) and either the daily change in bacterial numbers or the percentage of bacteria in the supernatant. The major factor influencing survival of Salmonella typhimurium and indicator bacteria during aerobic digestion was the temperature of sludge digestion. At 28 degrees C with greater than 4 mg of dissolved oxygen per liter, the daily change in numbers of these bacteria was approximately -1.0 log10/ml. At 6 degrees C, the daily change was less than -0.3 log10/ml. Most of the bacteria were associated with the sludge flocs during aerobic digestion of sludge at 28 degrees C with greater than 2.4 mg of dissolved oxygen per liter. Lowering the temperature or the amount of dissolved oxygen decreased the fraction of bacteria associated with the flocs and increased the fraction found in the supernatant. PMID:6401978

  15. YUCCA Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory, Annual Progress Report, FY 1997 for activity WP 1221 unsaturated drip condition testing of spent fuel and unsaturated dissolution tests of glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J. K.; Buck, E. C.; Emery, J. W.; Finch, R. J.; Finn, P. A.; Fortner, J.; Hoh, J. C.; Mertz, C.; Neimark, L. A.; Wolf, S. F.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.

    1998-09-18

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory in the period of October 1996 through September 1997. Studies have been performed to evaluate the behavior of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under the unsaturated conditions (low-volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with actinide-doped waste glasses, in progress for over 11 years, indicate that the transuranic element release is dominated by colloids that continuously form and span from the glass surface. The nature of the colloids that form in the glass and spent fuel testing programs is being investigated by dynamic light scattering to determine the size distribution, by autoradiography to determine the chemistry, and by zeta potential to measure the electrical properties of the colloids. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for 12 years. They show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases forming on the sample surface is similar to that observed for uranium found in natural oxidizing environments. The reaction of spent fuel samples in conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for over six years, and the results suggest that spent fuel forms many of the same alteration products as UO{sub 2}. With spent fuel, the bulk of the reaction occurs via a through-grain reaction process, although grain boundary attack is sufficient to have reacted all of the grain boundary regions in the samples. New test methods are under development to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel samples with intact cladding: the rate at which alteration and radionuclide release occurs when water penetrates fuel sections and whether the reaction causes the cladding to split. Alteration phases have been formed on fine grains of UO{sub 2} in contact with small volumes of water within a several month period when the radiolysis product H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is added to the groundwater solution. The test setup has been mocked up for operation with spent fuel in the hot-cell.

  16. [Conditioning studies in the Pavlov's laboratory during 75 years of its existence (on the 150th birthday of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov)].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, N F; Vo?lokova, N L

    1999-01-01

    The paper reviews experimental and clinical data obtained on physiology and pathology of the higher nervous system by the Laboratory founded by I. P. Pavlov during 75 years of its existence: the principle of systemic organisation of the brain structures activity, the role of separate subcortical structures in organisation of behaviour, theoretical development of experimental pathology problems, inner inhibition, the role of sympathetic nervous system in conditioning, possible neurophysiological and neurochemical mechanisms of conditioning. PMID:10641258

  17. LABORATORY STUDY FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) USING SODIUM METABISULFITE UNDER ACIDIC CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAM JB; GUTHRIE MD; LUECK KJ; AVILA M

    2007-07-18

    This report describes the results from RPP-PLAN-32738, 'Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome(VI) to Chrome(I1I) in the Secondary Waste Stream', using sodium metabisulfite. Appendix A presents the report as submitted by the Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) to CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The CLS carried out the laboratory effort under Contract Number 21065, release Number 30. This report extracts the more pertinent aspects of the laboratory effort.

  18. Matrix diffusion and sorption of Cs+, Na+, I- and HTO in granodiorite: Laboratory-scale results and their extrapolation to the in situ condition.

    PubMed

    Tachi, Yukio; Ebina, Takanori; Takeda, Chizuko; Saito, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Ohuchi, Yuji; Martin, Andrew James

    2015-08-01

    Matrix diffusion and sorption are important processes controlling radionuclide transport in crystalline rocks. Such processes are typically studied in the laboratory using borehole core samples however there is still much uncertainty on the changes to rock transport properties during coring and decompression. It is therefore important to show how such laboratory-based results compare with in situ conditions. This paper focuses on laboratory-scale mechanistic understanding and how this can be extrapolated to in situ conditions as part of the Long Term Diffusion (LTD) project at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland. Diffusion and sorption of (137)Cs(+), (22)Na(+), (125)I(-) and tritiated water (HTO) in Grimsel granodiorite were studied using through-diffusion and batch sorption experiments. Effective diffusivities (De) of these tracers showed typical cation excess and anion exclusion effects and their salinity dependence, although the extent of these effects varied due to the heterogeneous pore networks in the crystalline rock samples. Rock capacity factors (?) and distribution coefficients (Kd) for Cs(+) and Na(+) were found to be sensitive to porewater salinity. Through-diffusion experiments indicated dual depth profiles for Cs(+) and Na(+) which could be explained by a near-surface Kd increment. A microscopic analysis indicated that this is caused by high porosity and sorption capacities in disturbed biotite minerals on the surface of the samples. The Kd values derived from the dual profiles are likely to correspond to Kd dependence on the grain sizes of crushed samples in the batch sorption experiments. The results of the in situ LTD experiments were interpreted reasonably well by using transport parameters derived from laboratory data and extrapolating them to in situ conditions. These comparative experimental and modelling studies provided a way to extrapolate from laboratory scale to in situ condition. It is well known that the difference in porosity between laboratory and in situ conditions is a key factor to scale laboratory-derived De to in situ conditions. We also show that cation excess diffusion is likely to be a key mechanism in crystalline rocks and that high Kd in the disturbed surfaces is critically important to evaluate transport in both laboratory and in situ tests. PMID:26024950

  19. A review of hydrologic and geologic conditions related to the radioactive solid-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Solid waste contaminated by radioactive matter has been buried in the vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory since 1944. By 1973, an estimated six million cubic feet of such material had been placed in six burial grounds in two valleys. The practice initially was thought of as a safe method for permanently removing these potentially hazardous substances from man's surroundings, but is now que.3tionable at this site because of known leaching of contaminants from the waste, transport in ground water, and release to the terrestrial and fluvial environments. This review attempts to bring together in a single document information from numerous published and unpublished sources regarding the past criteria used for selecting the Oak Ridge burial-ground sites, the historical development and conditions of these facilities as of 1974, the geologic framework of the Laboratory area and the movement of water and water-borne contaminants in that area, the effects of sorption and ion exchange upon radionuclide transport, and a description and evaluation of the existing monitoring system. It is intended to assist Atomic Energy Commission (now Energy Research and Development Administration) officials in the formulation of managerial decisions concerning the burial grounds and present monitoring methods. Sites for the first three burial grounds appear to have been chosen during and shortly after World War II on the basis of such factors as safety, security, and distance from sources of waste origin. By 1950, geologic criteria had been introduced, and in the latter part of that decade, geohydrologic criteria were considered. While no current criteria have been defined, it becomes evident from the historical record that the successful containment of radionuclides below land surface for long periods of time is dependent upon a complex interrelationship between many geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical controls, and any definition of criteria must include consideration of these factors. For the most part, the burial grounds have been developed by a simple cut and fill procedure similar to the operation of a municipal landfill. Low permeability of the residuum, high rainfall, shallow depth to ground water, the excavation of trenches below the water table, and other practices, have contributed to a condition of waste leaching in probably all of the burial grounds. Despite these conditions, only very small concentrations of radionuclides have been found in wells or otherwise attributed to the initial three, small sites in Bethel Valley. This fact, however, may be due in part to the scant extent of site monitoring of those burial grounds for transport of radionuclides in ground water, and to the discharge of liquid radioactive waste to the drainage in concentrations that probably would have masked the presence of contaminants derived from these burial grounds. In comparison to the Bethel Valley sites, larger amounts of radioactive contaminants have been found in wells, seeps, trench overflow, and the drainages that drain Burial Grounds 4 and 5 in Melton Valley. The movement of radionuclides from the trenches to the drainages show that the latter sites are not suitable for the retention of all contaminants under existing conditions, and invalidates the operational concept of long-term or permanent retention of all radionuclides in the geologic environment. The transport of many radioactive ions leached from the waste has been retarded by the very high sorptive and ion exchange capacity of the residuum with which the radionuclides have had contact. Not all radionuclides, though, will be retained in the subsurface by adsorption, absorption, or ion exchange. Among those radioactive contaminants that may be problematical with respect to trench burial at Oak Ridge are tritium and other negatively-charged nuclides, positively-charged radionuclides included in some of the complexed molecules, radioactive ions that have chemical properties si

  20. Pathogenicity of Beauveria bassiana isolated from Moroccan Argan forests soil against larvae of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Imoulan, Abdessamad; Elmeziane, Abdellatif

    2014-03-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the major tephritid pest in Morocco. This pest survives in Moroccan forests Argania spinosa and continually invades the nearest agricultural areas. Entomopathogenic fungi are an interesting tool for fruit fly control and hold a useful alternative to conventional insecticides. However, primary selection of effective pathogens should be taken in laboratory condition prior to applying them in the field. Here, we used third late instar larvae of C. capitata to investigate the effectiveness of 15 local Beauveria bassiana isolates. Results showed that all isolates were able to infect the larval stage, producing a large mortality rate in puparia ranging from 65 to 95 % and caused significant reduction in adult emergence. The fungal treatments revealed that the mycosis occurred also in adults escaping infection as pupariating larvae. The percentage of mycosed puparia was highest in strain TAM6.2 (95 %) followed by ERS4.16 (90 %), therefore they were the most virulent. Median lethal concentration (LC??) was studied for five isolates at four concentrations ranging from 10? to 10? conidia ml?¹. The results showed that the slopes of regression lines for B. bassiana ERS4.16 (slope = 0.386) and TAM6.2 (slope = 0.41) were the most important and had the lowest LC?? values (2.85 × 10³ and 3.16 × 10³ conidia ml?¹ respectively). This investigation suggests that the soil of Argan forests contains pathogenic B. bassiana isolates and highlights for the first time their potential as biological control toward C. capitata larval stage in Morocco. PMID:24122125

  1. Testing Insecticidal Activity of Novel Chemically Synthesized siRNA against Plutella xylostella under Laboratory and Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liang; Chen, Yong; Hu, Zhen; Hu, Meiying

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last 60 years, synthetic chemical pesticides have served as a main tactic in the field of crop protection, but their availability is now declining as a result of the development of insect resistance. Therefore, alternative pest management agents are needed. However, the demonstration of RNAi gene silencing in insects and its successful usage in disrupting the expression of vital genes opened a door to the development of a variety of novel, environmentally sound approaches for insect pest management. Methodology/Principal Findings Six small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were chemically synthesized and modified according to the cDNA sequence of P. xylostella acetylcholine esterase genes AChE1 and AChE2. All of them were formulated and used in insecticide activity screening against P. xylostella. Bioassay data suggested that Si-ace1_003 and Si-ace2_001 at a concentration of 3 µg cm?2 displayed the best insecticidal activity with 73.7% and 89.0%, mortality, respectively. Additional bioassays were used to obtain the acute lethal concentrations of LC50 and LC90 for Si-ace2_001, which were 53.66 µg/ml and 759.71 µg/ml, respectively. Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to confirm silencing and detected that the transcript levels of P. xylostella AChE2 (PxAChE2) were reduced by 5.7-fold compared to the control group. Consequently, AChE activity was also reduced by 1.7-fold. Finally, effects of the siRNAs on treated plants of Brassica oleracea and Brassica alboglabra were investigated with different siRNA doses. Our results showed that Si-ace2_001 had no negative effects on plant morphology, color and growth of vein under our experimental conditions. Conclusions The most important finding of this study is the discovery that chemically synthesized and modified siRNA corresponding to P. xylostella AChE genes cause significant mortality of the insect both under laboratory and field conditions, which provides a novel strategy to control P. xylostella and to develop bio-pesticides based on the RNA interference technology. PMID:23667556

  2. Medical laboratory scientists are key members of the medical team, detecting diseases and other conditions by performing chemical,

    E-print Network

    , medical terminology, microbiology, and anatomy and physiology. Medical Laboratory Science--BS wwwMedical laboratory scientists are key members of the medical team, detecting diseases and other on blood, tissues, and bodily fluids.They are some of the most versatile medical professionals

  3. 42 CFR 493.1771 - Condition: Inspection requirements applicable to all CLIA-certified and CLIA-exempt laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    (a) Each laboratory issued a CLIA certificate must meet the requirements in § 493.1773 and the specific requirements for its certificate type, as specified in §§ 493.1775 through 493.1780. (b) All CLIA-exempt laboratories must comply with the inspection requirements in §§ 493.1773 and...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1771 - Condition: Inspection requirements applicable to all CLIA-certified and CLIA-exempt laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    (a) Each laboratory issued a CLIA certificate must meet the requirements in § 493.1773 and the specific requirements for its certificate type, as specified in §§ 493.1775 through 493.1780. (b) All CLIA-exempt laboratories must comply with the inspection requirements in §§ 493.1773 and...

  5. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Service Act, as implemented by 21 CFR part 900, subpart B. (d) Diagnostic laboratory tests—(1) Who may... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic...

  6. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Service Act, as implemented by 21 CFR part 900, subpart B. (d) Diagnostic laboratory tests—(1) Who may... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic...

  7. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... implemented by 21 CFR part 900, subpart B. (d) Diagnostic laboratory tests—(1) Who may furnish services... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic...

  8. THE MATERIAL RESEARCH LABORATORY IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE NEW METHODS AND INSTRUMENTS WITH ITS TESTING IN CONDITIONS

    E-print Network

    Titov, Anatoly

    of the equipment. The collective of laboratory has coped successfully with task, basically thanks to works of Ku- dryashev V.A. and Kezerashvili V.L. (in that time we were named as the physical equipment development

  9. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt...ampoules, marked clearly as substances that deplete the ozone layer, restricted to laboratory use and analytical...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt...ampoules, marked clearly as substances that deplete the ozone layer, restricted to laboratory use and analytical...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt...ampoules, marked clearly as substances that deplete the ozone layer, restricted to laboratory use and analytical...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt...ampoules, marked clearly as substances that deplete the ozone layer, restricted to laboratory use and analytical...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt...ampoules, marked clearly as substances that deplete the ozone layer, restricted to laboratory use and analytical...

  14. Tensile and Fatigue Testing and Material Hardening Model Development for 508 LAS Base Metal and 316 SS Similar Metal Weld under In-air and PWR Primary Loop Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2015 report we presented a baseline mechanistic finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) for systemlevel heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis and fatigue life estimation under reactor thermal-mechanical cycles. In the present report, we provide tensile and fatigue test data for 508 low-alloy steel (LAS) base metal, 508 LAS heat-affected zone metal in 508 LAS–316 stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal welds, and 316 SS-316 SS similar metal welds. The test was conducted under different conditions such as in air at room temperature, in air at 300 oC, and under PWR primary loop water conditions. Data are provided on materials properties related to time-independent tensile tests and time-dependent cyclic tests, such as elastic modulus, elastic and offset strain yield limit stress, and linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening model parameters. The overall objective of this report is to provide guidance to estimate tensile/fatigue hardening parameters from test data. Also, the material models and parameters reported here can directly be used in commercially available finite element codes for fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components under in-air and PWR water conditions.

  15. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  16. Repellency of a kaolin particle film to potato payllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) on tomato under laboratory and field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, is a vector of “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum,” the bacterium causing several diseases in solanaceous crops. Laboratory and field no-choice and choice experiments were conducted to evaluate repellency of kaolin particle film on adults of B. cockerel...

  17. A Laboratory Exercise to Illustrate Increased Salivary Cortisol in Response to Three Stressful Conditions Using Competitive ELISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haussmann, Mark F.; Vleck, Carol M; Farrar, Eugenia S.

    2007-01-01

    Perceived stress activates the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, resulting in the release of glucocorticoids into the systemic circulation. Glucocorticoids cause the elevation of blood glucose, providing the necessary energy for the organism to cope with stress. Here, we outline a laboratory exercise that uses a competitive ELISA kit to…

  18. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and laboratory purposes. Pursuant to Decision XI/15 of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, effective... with other chemicals controlled or not controlled by the Montreal Protocol as is customary for... of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, methyl bromide is exempted for the following...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and laboratory purposes. Pursuant to Decision XI/15 of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, effective... with other chemicals controlled or not controlled by the Montreal Protocol as is customary for... of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, methyl bromide is exempted for the following...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and laboratory purposes. Pursuant to Decision XI/15 of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, effective... with other chemicals controlled or not controlled by the Montreal Protocol as is customary for... of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, methyl bromide is exempted for the following...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and laboratory purposes. Pursuant to Decision XI/15 of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, effective... with other chemicals controlled or not controlled by the Montreal Protocol as is customary for... of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, methyl bromide is exempted for the following...

  2. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... requirements of section 354 of the Public Health Service Act, as implemented by 21 CFR part 900, subpart B. (d... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic...

  3. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... requirements of section 354 of the Public Health Service Act, as implemented by 21 CFR part 900, subpart B. (d... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.32 Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic...

  4. Soil structure, colloids, and chemical transport as affected by short-term reducing conditions: a laboratory study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland soils in the Midwestern US often undergo reducing conditions when soils are temporally flooded during the spring and remain water saturated for days or weeks. Short-term reducing conditions change the chemistry of the soil and may affect soil structure and solution chemical transport. The eff...

  5. Similarity spectra analysis of high-performance jet aircraft noise.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, Tracianne B; Gee, Kent L; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2013-04-01

    Noise measured in the vicinity of an F-22A Raptor has been compared to similarity spectra found previously to represent mixing noise from large-scale and fine-scale turbulent structures in laboratory-scale jet plumes. Comparisons have been made for three engine conditions using ground-based sideline microphones, which covered a large angular aperture. Even though the nozzle geometry is complex and the jet is nonideally expanded, the similarity spectra do agree with large portions of the measured spectra. Toward the sideline, the fine-scale similarity spectrum is used, while the large-scale similarity spectrum provides a good fit to the area of maximum radiation. Combinations of the two similarity spectra are shown to match the data in between those regions. Surprisingly, a combination of the two is also shown to match the data at the farthest aft angle. However, at high frequencies the degree of congruity between the similarity and the measured spectra changes with engine condition and angle. At the higher engine conditions, there is a systematically shallower measured high-frequency slope, with the largest discrepancy occurring in the regions of maximum radiation. PMID:23556581

  6. Evaluation of a bioluminescence method, contact angle measurements and topography for testing the cleanability of plastic surfaces under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redsven, I.; Kymäläinen, H.-R.; Pesonen-Leinonen, E.; Kuisma, R.; Ojala-Paloposki, T.; Hautala, M.; Sjöberg, A.-M.

    2007-04-01

    Detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by bioluminescence is used, for instance, in the food industry and in hospitals to assess the hygiene status of surfaces. The aim of this laboratory study was to investigate the feasibility of the ATP method for estimating the cleanability of resilient floor coverings from biological soil. The surfaces were worn using a Soiling and Wearing Drum Tester, and soiled and cleaned with an Erichsen Washability and Scrubbing Resistance Tester. In the laboratory test carried out with the bioluminescence method, most of the new and worn floor coverings that were biologically soiled were cleaned efficiently. According to this study, the semiquantitative ATP screening method can be used for hygiene monitoring of flooring materials. No correlation was found between cleanability and contact angles or surface topography measured using a profilometer. However, by revealing local irregularities and damage on surfaces, scanning electron micrographs appeared useful in explaining differences in cleanability.

  7. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. First topical report, Results of laboratory screening of additives

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-04-16

    Several tasks have been completed in a program to evaluate additives to improve fine particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Screening tests and laboratory evaluations of additives are summarized in this report. Over 20 additives were evaluated; four were found to improve flyash precipitation rates. The Insitec particle analyzer was also evaluated; test results show that the analyzer will provide accurate sizing and counting information for particles in the size range of {le} 10 {mu}m dia.

  8. ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

    2012-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

  9. Effects of Long-Term Food Restriction Under Thermoneutral Conditions on Brown Adipose Tissue of Laboratory Mice.

    PubMed

    Elsukova, E I; Mizonova, O V; Medvedev, L N

    2015-09-01

    Long-term food restriction (3 weeks, 60% of normal consumption of control animals) was followed by an increase in DNA and protein content in the intercapsular brown fat of mice. As the animals were kept under thermoneutral conditions, these changes are thought to be a result of food restriction. PMID:26459485

  10. Olive-oil mill wastewater transport under unsaturated and saturated laboratory conditions using the geoelectrical resistivity tomography method and the FEFLOW model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seferou, P.; Soupios, P.; Kourgialas, N. N.; Dokou, Z.; Karatzas, G. P.; Candasayar, E.; Papadopoulos, N.; Dimitriou, V.; Sarris, A.; Sauter, M.

    2013-09-01

    An integrated approach for monitoring the vertical transport of a solute into the subsurface by using a geophysical method and a simulation model is proposed and evaluated. A medium-scale (1 m3) laboratory tank experiment was constructed to represent a real subsurface system, where an olive-oil mill wastewater (OOMW) spill might occur. High-resolution cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was performed to monitor the OOMW transport. Time-lapse ERT images defined the spatial geometry of the interface between the contaminated and uncontaminated soil into the unsaturated and saturated zones. Knowing the subsurface characteristics, the finite element flow and transport model FEFLOW was used for simulating the contaminant movement, utilizing the ERT results as a surrogate for concentration measurements for the calibration process. A statistical analysis of the ERT measurements and the corresponding transport model results for various time steps showed a good agreement between them. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the most important parameters of the simulation model (unsaturated flow, saturated flow and transport) was performed. This laboratory-scale study emphasizes that the combined use of geophysical and transport-modeling approaches can be useful for small-scale field applications where contaminant concentration measurements are scarce, provided that its transferability from laboratory to field conditions is investigated thoroughly.

  11. Field and laboratory studies on water conditions affecting the potency of VectoBac (Bacillus thuringiensis serotype H-14) against larvae of the blackfly, Simulium damnosum.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M D; Akpabey, F J; Osei-Atweneboana, M Y; Boakye, D A; Ocran, M; Kurtak, D C; Cheke, R A; Mensah, G E; Birkhold, D; Cibulsky, R

    2005-12-01

    River water conditions that might influence the efficacy of VectoBac, a formulation of the microbial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 Berliner against Simulium damnosum sensu lato Theobald (Diptera: Simuliidae) larvae were investigated. A standard formulation was assayed 130 times over 15 months using a mini-gutter system at a field station beside the River Pra in Ghana. The lethal concentration (LC) values, river temperature, conductivity, turbidity and pH were analysed using univariate and multivariate statistics to identify which of these parameters influenced its performance. River temperature, conductivity and turbidity (in that order) were identified as having direct effects on the potency of VectoBac. Water temperature and conductivity were negatively correlated, whereas turbidity and pH were positively correlated with LC values. Analyses of river water samples revealed that despite observed differences in total solids, sodium and potassium cations and chloride concentrations, all the parameters measured did not differ significantly between wet and dry seasons. A simple method for rearing S. damnosum s.l. in the laboratory was then adopted to study the effect of conductivity on potency of VectoBac under controlled conditions. Increasing the conductivity of the water medium up to 3,000 microS enhanced potency by about 42%, whereas increasing that of the insecticide alone raised it by 37%. The results obtained suggest that for effective use of VectoBac for blackfly control in West Africa, river temperature, conductivity and turbidity should be taken into consideration, perhaps by only selecting rivers with optimal conditions for treatment. The laboratory-based system developed for assaying the product overcomes the vagaries associated with field conditions and also the demand for huge logistic requirements of the mini-gutter system, which has to be sited near rivers. PMID:16336305

  12. Preliminary Results for the 2-4 Millimeter Wavelength Continuum Opacity of Ammonia based on New Laboratory Measurements under Simulated Jovian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaraj, Kiruthika; Steffes, P. G.

    2007-10-01

    New high-precision laboratory measurements are now being conducted to measure the opacity of ammonia in a hydrogen/helium atmosphere in the 2-4 mm wavelength range. Previous single-wavelength measurements conducted at 3.2 mm (Joiner and Steffes, 1991 and Mohammed, 2005) gave little insight into the frequency dependence of ammonia opacity and were limited by the sensitivity of their equipment. New results have been obtained for the ammonia continuum using an enhanced high precision measurement system with a confocal mirror resonator. Preliminary measurements of the ammonia continuum opacity (2.5 - 4 mm wavelength range) under Jovian conditions have been made with a gas mixture consisting of 84.7% hydrogen, 13.3% helium and 2-4 % ammonia and at pressures of 1-3 bars at 290 K. Future measurements will be conducted at temperatures of 218K and 204K and shorter wavelengths extending down to 2 mm. These results will be used to verify which model best predicts the opacity of ammonia under Jovian conditions at these wavelengths. The 2-4 mm wavelength range has been extensively used for disk averaged emission measurements of the outer planets and for interferometric mapping of Saturn (Griffin and Orton 1993, Muhleman and Berge, 1991 and van de Tak et. al, 1999). These laboratory measurements could potentially influence the interpretation of these observations. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under Grant NNG06GF34G.

  13. Laboratory Measurements of the 5-20 cm Wavelength Opacity of Ammonia Pressure-Broadened by Methane under Jovian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinsomboon, Garrett; Steffes, P. G.

    2012-10-01

    In order to fully understand the role methane (CH4) plays in the microwave emission spectra of the deep atmospheres of the outer planets, over 280 laboratory measurements of the opacity of ammonia in a methane environment have been made in the 5-20 cm wavelength range. All opacity measurements were made with either 100 or 200 mbars of ammonia and with 1 to 3 bars of added methane in the 330-450K temperature range. A formalism for the absorptivity of ammonia broadened by methane has now been developed and had been applied to the Hanley et al. (Icarus, v. 202, 2009) model for the opacity of ammonia. Due to methane’s relatively low abundance at Jupiter ( 0.2% by volume), its effect on the microwave spectrum which will be observed by the Juno MWR (Microwave Radiometer) will be minimal. However, these experimental results will significantly improve the understanding of the microwave emission spectrum of Uranus and Neptune where methane plays a more dominant role. This work was supported by NASA Contract NNM06AA75C from Marshall Space Flight Center supporting the Juno Mission Science Team, under Subcontract 699054X from the Southwest Research Institute.

  14. Laboratory analysis of gas hydrate cores for evaluation of reservoir conditions. For the months December 1, 1983-April 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    The object of this work is to provide technical assistance to Morgantown Energy Technology Center's effort to develop a leading program in the evaluation of hydrate samples in porous media at reservoir conditions. During the period from January to March work done on the project focused on the preparation of the heat transfer and hydrate formation data and on the writing of the previous reports. During the last two months, including April, time has been devoted to the modification of our computer program to generate hydrate stability data in the earth. In addition to this work, the effect of gas composition on dissociation enthalpy is being studied.

  15. Laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity of gaseous ammonia (NH3) under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Jenkins, Jon M.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave opacity measurements have been conducted for gaseous ammonia simulating Jovian atmosphere conditions at five frequencies from 18.5 to 1.38 cm, at temperatures from 178 to 300 K and 1-6 atm pressures. The atmospheric composition is 90-percent H/10-percent He. In the 1.38-18.5 cm wavelength range, ammonia absorption is well expressed by Berge and Gulkis' (1976) lineshape. The results obtained suggest that either an ammonia abundance 1.5-2.0 times greater than solar must be present at less than 1-2 bar, or some other microwave absorber is present.

  16. Effect of farm and simulated laboratory cold environmental conditions on the performance and physiological responses of lactating dairy cows supplemented with bovine somatotropin (BST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, B. A.; Johnson, H. D.; Li, R.; Collier, R. J.

    1990-09-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of bovine somatotropin (BST) supplementation in twelve lactating dairy cows maintained in cold environmental conditions. Six cows were injected daily with 25 mg of BST; the other six were injected with a control vehicle. Cows were maintained under standard dairy management during mid-winter for 30 days. Milk production was recorded twice daily, and blood samples were taken weekly. Animals were then transferred to environmentally controlled chambers and exposed to cycling thermoneutral (15° to 20° C) and cycling cold (-5° to +5° C) temperatures for 10 days in a split-reversal design. Milk production, feed and water intake, body weights and rectal temperatures were monitored. Blood samples were taken on days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 10 of each period and analyzed for plasma triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), cortisol, insulin and prolactin. Under farm conditions, BST-treated cows produced 11% more milk than control-treated cows and in environmentally controlled chambers produced 17.4% more milk. No differences due to BST in feed or water intake, body weights or rectal temperatures were found under laboratory conditions. Plasma T3 and insulin increased due to BST treatment while no effect was found on cortisol, prolactin or T4. The results showed that the benefits of BST supplementation in lactating dairy cows were achieved under cold environmental conditions.

  17. Laboratory measurements of the microwave properties of H2S under simulated Jovian conditions with an application to Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboer, David R.; Steffes, Paul G.

    1994-01-01

    H2S opacity may significantly affect the brightness temperatures of Uranus and Neptune due to possible depletion of ammonia in the tropospheres of those planets (de Pater et al. 1991). Though the rotational line centers of H2S are in the millimeter wavelengths region, significant absorption is also present at centimeter wavelengths due to pressure broadening of the lines. Accordingly, the properties of H2S under Jovian conditions have been measured in order to constrain further the constituents' abundances on these planets. These absorptivity measurements show values that are significantly greater than values predicted by the Van Vleck-Weisskopf models traditionally used at centimeter wavelengths. In order to better model the opacity due to H2S under Jovian conditions a Ben-Reuven lineshape formalism has therefore been developed and is presented. This formalism provides a possible constraint on the relative abundances of H2S and NH3 on Neptune based on Voyager 2 radio occultation results (Lindal 1992).

  18. Short-term evaluation of visible implant alpha tags in juveniles of three fish species under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Turek, K C; Pegg, M A; Pope, K L

    2014-04-01

    Visible implant alpha (VI alpha) tag-induced changes in mortality and condition, as well as tag retention and readability, were examined during a 4-week period for juveniles of three fish species: tiger muskellunge Esox masquinongy × Esox lucius (91?±?7?mm total length, L(T), mean?±?s.d.), Snake River cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki behnkei (84?±?8?mm) and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (85?±?5?mm). Mortality and condition did not differ between tagged fish and control fish for any species and overall tag retention rates were high (92% for E. masquinongy × E. lucius, 91% for O. c. behnkei and 100% for O. mykiss). Short-term readability of VI alpha tags was low in juvenile E. masquinongy × E. lucius and juvenile O. c. behnkei. Therefore, it is not recommend to use VI alpha tags in juvenile E. masquinongy × E. lucius or juvenile O. c. behnkei for periods >2?weeks, but VI alpha tags seem to be suitable for juvenile O. mykiss for a period of at least 4?weeks. PMID:24689672

  19. Experimental paradigm for in-laboratory proxy aquatic studies under conditions of static, non-flow-through chemical exposures.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Tirumuru V; Flick, Robert; Lazorchak, James M; Smith, Mark E; Wiechman, Barry; Lattier, David L

    2015-12-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as 17?-ethynylestradiol, 17?-estradiol, estrone, and para-nonylphenol have been measured in wastewater-treatment plant effluents, surface waters, sediments, and sludge and have been shown to induce liver-specific vitellogenin (vtg) messenger RNA in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The purpose of the present study was to establish minimal concentrations of select EDCs necessary to induce transcription of vtg in 48-h static renewal exposures, as measured by quantitative real-time thermal cycle amplification. Adult males were exposed to 17?-ethynylestradiol, 17?-estradiol, estrone, and para-nonylphenol. Dose-dependent increases in vtg expression were significant with all chemicals tested. The lowest concentrations of these chemicals to induce measurable vtg expression, with significant difference from respective controls, were 17?-ethynylestradiol, 2.2?ng?L(-1) ; para-nonylphenol, 13.9??g?L(-1) ; 17?-estradiol, 42.7?ng?L(-1) ; and estrone, 46.7?ng?L(-1) , measured as 48-h average concentrations. The present experiments were designed to frame a commonly acceptable approach for investigators who conduct static, in-laboratory proxy environmental aquatic exposures. The present study highlights the need for investigators to report in peer-reviewed submissions the observed concentration values for minimal induction levels when measuring molecular responses to chemical exposures by means of real-time polymerase chain reaction, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, or other "omic" technologies. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:2796-2802. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the United States of America. PMID:26088724

  20. Mathematical prediction of imidacloprid persistence in two Croatian soils with different texture, organic matter content and acidity under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Brozni?, Dalibor; Milin, ?edomila

    2013-01-01

    In the present laboratory study, persistence of imidacloprid (IMI) as a function of initial insecticide concentration and soil properties in two Croatian soils (Krk sandy clay and Istria clay soils) was studied and described mathematically. Upon fitting the obtained experimental data for the higher concentration level (5 mg/kg) to mathematical models, statistical parameters (R (2), scaled root mean squared error and ? (2) error) indicated that the single first-order kinetics model provided the best prediction of IMI degradation in the Krk sandy clay soil, while in the Istria clay soil biphasic degradation was observed. At the lower concentration level (0.5 mg/kg), the biphasic models Gustafson and Holden models as well as the first-order double exponential model fitted the best experimental data in both soils. The disappearance time (DT50) values estimated by the single first-order double exponential model (from 50 to 132 days) proved that IMI can be categorized as a moderately persistent pesticide. In the Krk sandy clay soil, resulting DT50 values tended to increase with an increase of initial IMI concentration, while in the Istria clay soil, IMI persistence did not depend on the concentration. Organic matter of both experimental soils provided an accelerating effect on the degradation rate. The logistic model demonstrated that the effect of microbial activity was not the most important parameter for the biodegradation of IMI in the Istria clay soil, where IMI degradation could be dominated by chemical processes, such as chemical hydrolysis. The results pointed that mathematical modeling could be considered as the most convenient tool for predicting IMI persistence and contributes to the establishment of adequate monitoring of IMI residues in contaminated soil. Furthermore, IMI usage should be strictly controlled, especially in soils with low organic matter content where the risk of soil and groundwater contamination is much higher due to its longer persistence and consequent leaching and/or moving from soil surface prior to its degradation. PMID:23998302

  1. Laboratory Measurements of the 5-20 cm Wavelength Opacity of Ammonia and Water Vapor under High-Temperature Conditions charactyeristic of the Deep Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, Amadeo; Steffes, Paul G.

    2015-11-01

    In the past decade, several extensive laboratory studies have been conducted of the microwave opacity of ammonia and water vapor in preparation for interpretation of the precise measurements of Jovian microwave emission to be made with the Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR) instrument. (See, e.g., Hanley et al. (Icarus, 202, 2009), Karpowicz and Steffes. (Icarus, 212, 2011), Karpowicz and Steffes. (Icarus, 214, 2011), and Devaraj et al. (Icarus, 241, 2014)). All of these works include models for the opacity of these constituents valid over the pressure and temperature ranges measured in their laboratory experiments (temperatures up to 500 K and pressures up to 100 bars). However, studies of the Jovian microwave emission indicate that significant contributions to the emission at the 24-cm and 50-cm wavelengths to be measured by the Juno MWR will be made by layers of the atmosphere with temperatures at or exceeding 600 K. While the ammonia opacity models described by Hanley et al. (Icarus, 202, 2009) and Devaraj et al. (Icarus, 241, 2014) give consistent results at temperatures up to 500 K (within 6%), they diverge significantly at temperatures and pressures exceeding 550 K and 50 bars, respectively. Similarly, at temperatures above 600 K, the model for water vapor opacity developed by Karpowicz and Steffes. (Icarus, 212, 2011; Icarus, 214, 2011) exhibits larger than expected microwave opacity. To resolve these ambiguities, we present results of laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity of ammonia in a hydrogen/helium atmosphere at temperatures up to 600 K and pressures up to 80 Bars, and that for water vapor at temperatures up to 600 K. This work was supported by the NASA Juno Mission.

  2. Life history of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) fed with castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) pollen in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Marafeli, P P; Reis, P R; Silveira, E C da; Souza-Pimentel, G C; de Toledo, M A

    2014-08-01

    The predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is one of the principal natural enemies of tetranychid mites in several countries, promoting efficient control of those mites in several food and ornamental crops. Pest attacks such as that of the spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae), is one of the problems faced by farmers, especially in the greenhouse, due to the difficulty of its control with the use of chemicals because of the development of fast resistance making it hard to control it. The objective of this work was to study the life history of the predatory mite N. californicus as a contribution to its mass laboratory rearing, having castor bean plant [Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae)] pollen as food, for its subsequent use as a natural enemy of T. urticae on a cultivation of greenhouse rosebushes. The studies were carried out in the laboratory, at 25 ± 2°C of temperature, 70 ± 10% RH and a 14 hour photophase. The biological aspects and the fertility life table were appraised. Longevity of 32.9 days was verified for adult females and 40.4 days for males. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm) was 0.2 and the mean generation time (T) was 17.2 days. The population doubled every 4.1 days. The results obtained were similar to those in which the predatory mite N. californicus fed on T. urticae. PMID:25296220

  3. Behavioral responses of the Iberian waterfrog, Pelophylax perezi (Seoane, 1885), to three nitrogenous compounds in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Egea-Serrano, Andrés; Tejedo, Miguel; Torralva, Mar

    2011-08-01

    Several studies have assessed the effects of nitrogenous compounds on amphibian behavior. However, few have focused on the effects of their combination with other stressors or on the variation of the response to pollutants among populations. We analyzed the effect of nitrogenous compounds (NH(4)(+); NO(2)(-); NO(3)(-), both alone and in combination) on larval behavior (activity level and location in the water column) in four populations of Pelophylax perezi naturally exposed to different levels of eutrophication. Larval activity was highest and use of the bottom of the experimental beaker was lowest at lower concentrations of nitrogenous compounds acting singly, these responses being minimal and maximal, respectively, at both control and higher concentrations. This pattern appears to fit to an hormetic response. Additionally, the combination of nitrogenous compounds affected more severely the response variables than when ammonium or nitrite acted singly according to an additive model. Populations inhabiting highly polluted aquatic habitats marginally showed higher activity level than the populations from less polluted environments, especially when larvae were exposed to ammonium or when nitrite appeared in combination with other nitrogen forms. Levels of activity correlated positively with larval final mass. Moreover, for similar levels of activity, larvae from polluted populations had higher growth rates than those coming from reference populations which suggests interdemic differences in behavioral sensitivity to nitrogenous pollutants. PMID:21512748

  4. Laboratory analysis of gas hydrate cores for evaluation of reservoir conditions. For the months January 1, 1984-May 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    The objective is to provide technical assistance to METC's effort to develop a leading program in the evaluation of hydrate samples in porous media at reservoir conditions. An existing computer program has been modified to calculate enthalpies of dissociation, equilibrium pressures, and earth temperature-depth profiles for hydrate formation as a function of gas composition. In this report results of the depth-temperature studies are presented. The effect of gas composition, geothermal gradient, permafrost thickness and pressure gradient on the thickness of a hydrate stability zone in permafrost regions is covered. The effect of ocean bottom temperature, gas composition and ocean depth on a hydrate stability zone beneath the ocean is shown. These variables are considered to be among the more important in determining the potential that a particular region has for containing hydrates and they need to be measured in any geological investigation of a region. 24 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  5. Effect of Commercial Cyanobacteria Products on the Growth and Antagonistic Ability of Some Bioagents under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    El-Mougy, Nehal S.; Abdel-Kader, Mokhtar M.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of blue-green algal compounds against the growth of either pathogenic or antagonistic microorganisms as well as their effect on the antagonistic ability of bioagents was studied under in vitro conditions. The present study was undertaken to explore the inhibitory effect of commercial algal compounds, Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix, against some soil-borne pathogens. In growth medium supplemented with these algal compounds, the linear growth of pathogenic fungi decreased by increasing tested concentrations of the two algal compounds. Complete reduction in pathogenic fungal growth was observed at 2% of both Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix. Gradual significant reduction in the pathogenic fungal growth was caused by the two bioagents and by increasing the concentrations of algal compounds Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix. The present work showed that commercial algal compounds, Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix, have potential for the suppression of soil-borne fungi and enhance the antagonistic ability of fungal, bacterial, and yeast bio-agents. PMID:24307948

  6. Comparison of cyanobacterial microcystin synthetase (mcy) E gene transcript levels, mcy E gene copies, and biomass as indicators of microcystin risk under laboratory and field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Felexce F; Madramootoo, Chandra A; Jabaji, Suha

    2014-01-01

    Increased incidences of mixed assemblages of microcystin-producing and nonproducing cyanobacterial strains in freshwater bodies necessitate development of reliable proxies for cyanotoxin risk assessment. Detection of microcystin biosynthetic genes in water blooms of cyanobacteria is generally indicative of the presence of potentially toxic cyanobacterial strains. Although much effort has been devoted toward elucidating the microcystin biosynthesis mechanisms in many cyanobacteria genera, little is known about the impacts of co-occurring cyanobacteria on cellular growth, mcy gene expression, or mcy gene copy distribution. The present study utilized conventional microscopy, qPCR assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study how competition between microcystin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa CPCC 299 and Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA 126 impacts mcyE gene expression, mcyE gene copies, and microcystin concentration under controlled laboratory conditions. Furthermore, analyses of environmental water samples from the Missisquoi Bay, Quebec, enabled us to determine how the various potential toxigenic cyanobacterial biomass proxies correlated with cellular microcystin concentrations in a freshwater lake. Results from our laboratory study indicated significant downregulation of mcyE gene expression in mixed cultures of M. aeruginosa plus P. agardhii on most sampling days in agreement with depressed growth recorded in the mixed cultures, suggesting that interaction between the two species probably resulted in suppressed growth and mcyE gene expression in the mixed cultures. Furthermore, although mcyE gene copies and McyE transcripts were detected in all laboratory and field samples with measureable microcystin levels, only mcyE gene copies showed significant positive correlations (R2 > 0.7) with microcystin concentrations, while McyE transcript levels did not. These results suggest that mcyE gene copies are better indicators of potential risks from microcystins than McyE transcript levels or conventional biomass proxies, especially in water bodies comprising mixed assemblages of toxic and nontoxic cyanobacteria. PMID:24838591

  7. Spectroscopic set-up for simultaneous UV-Vis/(Q)EXAFS in situ and in operando studies of homogeneous reactions under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias; Heusel, Gerhard; Mangold, Stefan; Bertagnolli, Helmut

    2010-03-01

    A novel experimental set-up for in operando studies of homogeneous catalyzed reactions under laboratory conditions has been developed and tested. It combines time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reaction solution is stirred in a vessel and pumped in a circle by a peristaltic free gear-wheel through a measurement cell. The X-ray and UV/Vis beams probe the same sample volume of the cell orthogonally. Reactants can be added to the reaction mixture in the course of the measurements and a defined gas atmosphere can be adjusted up to a pressure of 10 bar. The in situ reduction of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate to cerium(III) by isopropanol is studied as a test reaction with quick-XANES and UV/Vis measurements with a time resolution of 60 s and 1 s, respectively. PMID:20157283

  8. Persistence of the herbicides (/sup 14/C)chlorsulfuron and (/sup 14/C)metsulfuron methyl in prairie soils under laboratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.E.

    1986-11-01

    Metsulfuron methyl, whose structure is closely related to that of chlorsulfuron, is currently being evaluated on the Canadian prairies as a postemergence treatment for the control of broadleaf weeds in cereal crops, in non-crop land and for brush control. Although applied postemergence, some of the herbicide will come into contact with the soil making it necessary to determine the fate of metsulfuron methyl in the soil. These studies were undertaken to investigate the rate of breakdown and the fate of (/sup 14/C)metsulfuron methyl in three soils under laboratory conditions where no leaching could occur. The rate of breakdown of (/sup 14/C)chlorsulfuron was also investigated in one of the soils.

  9. Rotation of the external genitalia in male Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera, Psychodidae) in laboratory conditions and in captured specimens in Algarve, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ferrolho, J; Maia, C; Gomes, J; Alves-Pires, C; Cristóvão, J M; Campino, L; Afonso, M O

    2015-10-01

    Protozoal parasites are the causative agents of many insect-borne infectious diseases worldwide with impact on human and animal health. Leishmaniasis is caused by Leishmania spp. and transmitted by female Phlebotomine sand flies. In Portugal, two species of Phlebotomus (Larroussius), namely Phlebotomus perniciosus and Phlebotomus ariasi are the proven vectors of Leishmania infantum. Phlebotomine females and males rest and breed in the same sites; and these locations can be predicted according to the male external genitalia maturation. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the timing of complete rotation of the male external genitalia in laboratory conditions and to characterize the external genitalia rotation in field captured males to predict the male and female sand fly breeding and resting sites. This knowledge can be applied in the design and implementation of integrated sand fly control strategies targeting these sites. PMID:26099682

  10. Quantifying similarity between motifs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shobhit; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Bailey, Timothy L; Noble, William Stafford

    2007-01-01

    A common question within the context of de novo motif discovery is whether a newly discovered, putative motif resembles any previously discovered motif in an existing database. To answer this question, we define a statistical measure of motif-motif similarity, and we describe an algorithm, called Tomtom, for searching a database of motifs with a given query motif. Experimental simulations demonstrate the accuracy of Tomtom's E values and its effectiveness in finding similar motifs. PMID:17324271

  11. Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are thought to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: (1) objectives, (2) approach and techniques adopted, (3) adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), and (4) results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

  12. Laboratory measurements of the 3.7-20 cm wavelength opacity of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Shahan, Patrick; Christopher Barisich, G.; Bellotti, Amadeo

    2015-01-01

    In the past two decades, multiple observations of Venus have been made at X-Band (3.6 cm) using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), and maps have been created of the 3.6 cm emission from Venus (see, e.g., Devaraj, K. [2011]. The Centimeter- and Millimeter-Wavelength Ammonia Absorption Spectra under Jovian Conditions. PhD Thesis, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA). Since the emission morphology is related both to surface features and to deep atmospheric absorption from CO2 and SO2 (see, e.g., Butler, B.J., Steffes, P.G., Suleiman, S.H., Kolodner, M.A., Jenkins, J.M. [2001]. Icarus 154, 226-238), knowledge of the microwave absorption properties of sulfur dioxide in a carbon dioxide atmosphere under conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus is required for proper interpretation. Except for a single measurement campaign conducted at a single wavelength (3.2 cm) over 40 years ago (Ho, W., Kaufman, I.A., Thaddeus, P. [1966]. J. Geophys. Res. 71, 5091-5108), no measurements of the centimeter-wavelength properties of any Venus atmospheric constituent have been conducted under conditions characteristic of the deep atmosphere (pressures from 10 to 92 bars and temperatures from 400 to 700 K). New measurements of the microwave properties of SO2 and CO2 at wavelengths from 3.7 to 20 cm have been conducted under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus, using a new high-pressure system. Results from this measurement campaign conducted at temperatures from 430 K to 560 K and at pressures up to 92 bars are presented. Results indicate that the model for the centimeter-wavelength opacity from pure CO2 (Ho, W., Kaufman, I.A., Thaddeus, P. [1966]. J. Geophys. Res. 71, 5091-5108), is valid over the entire centimeter-wavelength range under simulated conditions for the deep atmosphere of Venus. Additionally, the laboratory results indicate that both of the models for the centimeter-wavelength opacity of SO2 in a CO2 atmosphere from Suleiman et al. (Suleiman, S.H., Kolodner, M.A., Steffes, P.G. [1996]. J. Geophys. Res. 101, 4623-4635) and from Fahd and Steffes (Fahd, A.K., Steffes, P.G. [1992]. Icarus 97, 200-210) can reliably be used under conditions of the deep atmosphere of Venus.

  13. Quality Assurance Program for Molecular Medicine Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Hajia, M; Safadel, N; Samiee, S Mirab; Dahim, P; Anjarani, S; Nafisi, N; Sohrabi, A; Rafiee, M; Sabzavi, F; Entekhabi, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Molecular diagnostic methods have played and continuing to have a critical role in clinical laboratories in recent years. Therefore, standardization is an evolutionary process that needs to be upgrade with increasing scientific knowledge, improvement of the instruments and techniques. The aim of this study was to design a quality assurance program in order to have similar conditions for all medical laboratories engaging with molecular tests. Methods: We had to design a plan for all four elements; required space conditions, equipments, training, and basic guidelines. Necessary guidelines was prepared and confirmed by the launched specific committee at the Health Reference Laboratory. Results: Several workshops were also held for medical laboratories directors and staffs, quality control manager of molecular companies, directors and nominees from universities. Accreditation of equipments and molecular material was followed parallel with rest of program. Now we are going to accredit medical laboratories and to evaluate the success of the program. Conclusion: Accreditation of medical laboratory will be succeeding if its basic elements are provided in advance. Professional practice guidelines, holding training and performing accreditation the molecular materials and equipments ensured us that laboratories are aware of best practices, proper interpretation, limitations of techniques, and technical issues. Now, active external auditing can improve the applied laboratory conditions toward the defined standard level. PMID:23865028

  14. Effect of wind speed on the pheromone-mediated behavior of sexual morphs of the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas) under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Goldansaz, Seyed H; McNeil, Jeremy N

    2006-08-01

    The effect of wind on the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae, male responsiveness to the sex pheromone, and on the calling behavior of virgin oviparae, was studied under constant wind speeds in the laboratory and in the field. A significant proportion of females called at wind speeds up to 4 m/sec, whereas male flight behavior in clean air was inhibited at velocities > 2 m/sec. However, males continued to walk over the range of wind speeds at which females called. Under constant wind velocities in a wind tunnel, males downwind of calling females oriented on the upwind edge of the release stand, and fewer individuals took flight at low constant wind speeds than in a clean air plume. In all cases, whether calling females were present or not, the males that took flight moved downwind. However, when a bridge was available, a significant proportion of males walked upwind to the pheromone source. The same orientation and walking behaviors were observed when males were placed downwind of calling females under variable wind conditions in the field. However, contrary to the laboratory results, 30% of the males tested flew upwind and landed on the source. A more detailed examination found that males orienting toward a source would walk if wind speeds were high but initiated flight in an "upwind" direction if there was a lull in wind velocity. These findings suggest that for the potato aphid, and probably for many other insect species with weak flight capacity, walking behavior is a significant component of pheromone-mediated mate location. This would permit males to continue foraging for calling females in the vicinity when wind velocities inhibit flight. PMID:16900427

  15. Laboratory and field-based calibration study for the use of freshwater bivalve shells as an archive of environmental and climatic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lartaud, F.; Le Callonnec, L.; de Rafelis, M.; Emmanuel, L.; Missang, E.; Castrec-Rouelle, M.; Mouchel, J. M.; Segalen, L.

    2009-04-01

    The accretionary growth of mollusc shells makes it possible to obtain recordings of the life history of these organisms. Freshwater bivalves are common inhabitant of past and present rivers and lakes. The wide latitudinal distribution of the Unionidae allows their shells to be used as an archive of environmental variations. Physical and chemical record of the shells contains precious information on water temperature, rainfall or metal concentrations. We developed a coupled laboratory and field-based calibration study on freshwater bivalve shells to determine the ability to track water oxygen isotopes composition (?18Ow), dissolved metal and temperature changes at a decadal to infra-annual time scale. A genetically homogenous population of Anodonta cygnea and Corbicula fluminea have been cultured in the Seine River and in laboratory, under controlled conditions. Daily temperatures and semi-monthly ?18Ow and trace metals (Mn, Cu, Zn, Cd, As, Pb, …) were measured during the experiment. For the micro-sampling strategy, we have to establish a chronological time scale in the shell growth. Thus each month, an experimental 4 hours Mn2+ staining was performed to have a precise temporal marking during shell growth. Additionally, wild stocks of European and African Unionidae shells were analysed under microscopy and geochemical study. Mn2+ markings can be recognized under cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis of cross section along the growth axis of the shells. Their identification on the two distinct groups (in vivo and in vitro experiments) helps us to determine the cyclicity of the natural fluctuations of the luminescence and the shell growth rate. The counting of annual growth increments reveals a life span over ten years, but micro-CL rhythms are also identified. This sclerochronologic approach is used to confront water physico-chemical changes with the biogenic carbonate geochemical records. First results show a latitudinal gradient (from France to South Africa) of ?18O and ?13C shells in respect with the climatic conditions (temperature and humidity). This study contributes to fixe the interest of freshwater bivalve shells analyses for hydrological management (i.e. tracking of natural or anthropogenic dissolved metal pollution) as well as (paleo)climatic investigations.

  16. Measuring Total Flux of Organic Vapors From the Unsaturated Zone Under Natural Conditions: Design, Laboratory and Field Testing of a Flux Chamber Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, F. D.; Choi, J.; Smith, J. A.

    2002-05-01

    A simple, easy-to-use, and inexpensive device for measuring VOC flux under natural conditions was designed and tested both in a controlled laboratory environment and in a natural field setting. The chamber consists of a stainless-steel right circular cylinder open on one end with a flexible, impermeable membrane allowing for chamber expansion and contraction. Air is pumped from inside the chamber through activated carbon traps and returned to the chamber maintaining a net zero pressure gradient from the inside to the outside of the chamber. The traps are analyzed using thermal desorption/GC-FID and the mass of contaminant is divided by the product of the sampled area and sample time to give VOC flux measured by the chamber. Design parameters for the chamber were selected using continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR)-equation based modeling under step, sinusoidal and transport-model simulation flux inputs. Laboratory testing of the flux chamber under both diffusion and advection dominated conditions was performed in a device constructed to simulate unsaturated zone transport. Aqueous trichloroethene (TCE) solution was pumped through the bottom of a steel drum inside which 50-cm of fine sand was suspended. For diffusion-dominated transport experiments, the chamber was installed in the sand at the top of the simulator and operated in the same manner as would occur in the field. The flux measurement of the chamber was then compared to flux prediction based on measured linear concentration data from the simulator and Fick's law. Advective transport is initiated in the vadose zone simulator by flowing humidified, pressurized air into an input port in the bottom of the simulator below the suspended porous media. Soil-gas velocity is calculated by dividing the airflow input by the surface area of the simulator. Flux was measured with the chamber and compared to flux predicted using airflow and concentration data from the simulator. Results from both the diffusion-only and combined advection/diffusion tests indicate the chamber device performs well under a wide range of fluxes. Additionally, results of side-by-side testing of three chamber devices at a TCE-contaminated field site are presented.

  17. Prediction of Meteorological Conditions for the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity and comparisons with the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-García, Jorge; Rafkin, Scot; Martín-Torres, Javier; Elvira-Gómez, Javier; Lepinette, Alain; Kahanpää, Henrik; Rodríguez-Manfredi, Jose; Navarro, Sara; Sebastián, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    The Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) is applied to the Gale Crater region, the landing site of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover Curiosity. The landing site within Gale Crater is at one of the lowest elevation locations between the crater rim and the ~4 km high central mound known as Mt. Sharp. As Curiosity heads toward its long term target of Mt. Sharp, the meteorological conditions are expected to change due to the increasing influence of topographically-induced thermal circulations that have been predicted by numerous previous studies [1, 2 ,3, 4]. For the first time ever, these mesoscale model predictions of slope flows can be validated against the meteorological data that is currently being collected by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) [5]. We first provide a comparison of MRAMS predictions (pressure, temperature, winds, and ground temperature) to the REMS data available near the season of landing (~LS 150-200) in order to provide a baseline of model performance, and then we provide predictions of the meteorological conditions as a function of season and expected location of the rover as a function of time. Acknowledgements: JP-G and FJM-T are supported by Economy and Competitivity Ministry (AYA2011-25720). S. R. is supported by the MSL Project at JPL. References: [1] Rafkin, S. C. R., and T. I. Michaels (2003), J. Geophys. Res., 108(E12), 8091. [2] Michaels, T. I., and S. C. R. Rafkin (2008), J. Geophys. Res.-Planets, 113. [3] Toigo, A. D., and M. I. Richardson (2003), J. Geophys. Res., 108(E12), 8092. [4] Tyler, D., J. R. Barnes, and E. D. Skyllingstad (2008), J. Geophys. Res.-Planets, 113(E8). [5] Gómez-Elvira, J., et al. (2012), Space Science Reviews, 170(1-4), 583-640.

  18. Water absorption kinetics in different wettability conditions studied at pore and sample scales in porous media by NMR with portable single-sided and laboratory imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolotti, V.; Camaiti, M.; Casieri, C.; De Luca, F.; Fantazzini, P.; Terenzi, C.

    2006-08-01

    NMR relaxation time distributions of water 1H obtained by a portable single-sided surface device have been compared with MRI internal images obtained with a laboratory imaging apparatus on the same biocalcarenite (Lecce Stone) samples during capillary water uptake. The aim of this work was to check the ability of NMR methods to quantitatively follow the absorption phenomenon under different wettability conditions of the internal pore surfaces. Stone wettability changes were obtained by capillary absorption of a chloroform solution of Paraloid PB72, a hydrophobic acrylic resin frequently used to protect monuments and buildings, through one face of each sample. Both relaxation and imaging data have been found in good quantitative agreement each other and with masses of water determined by weighing the samples. In particular the Washburn model of water capillary rise applied to the imaging data allowed us to quantify the sorptivity in both treated and untreated samples. Combining relaxation and imaging data, a synergetic improvement of our understanding of the water absorption kinetics at both pore and sample scales is obtained. Since relaxation data have been taken over the course of time without interrupting the absorption process, simply by keeping the portable device on the surface opposite to the absorption, the results show that the single-sided NMR technique is a powerful tool for in situ evaluation of water-repellent treatments frequently used for consolidation and/or protection of stone artifacts.

  19. Complete larval development of the hermit crabs Clibanarius aequabilis and Clibanarius erythropus (Decapoda: Anomura: Diogenidae), under laboratory conditions, with a revision of the larval features of genus Clibanarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartilotti, Cátia; Calado, Ricardo; Dos Santos, Antonina

    2008-06-01

    The complete larval development (four zoeae and one megalopa) of Clibanarius aequabilis and C. erythropus, reared under laboratory conditions, is described and illustrated. The larval stages of the two northeastern Atlantic Clibanarius species cannot be easily differentiated. Their morphological characters are compared with those of other known Clibanarius larvae. The genus Clibanarius is very homogeneous with respect to larval characters. All Clibanarius zoeae display a broad and blunt rostrum, smooth abdominal segments and an antennal scale without a terminal spine. Beyond the second zoeal stage, the fourth telson process is present as a fused spine, and the uropods are biramous. In the fourth larval stage all species display a mandibular palp. The Clibanarius megalopa presents weakly developed or no ocular scales, symmetrical chelipeds, apically curved corneous dactylus in the second and third pereiopods, and 5-11 setae on the posterior margin of the telson. Apart from the number of zoeal stages, Clibanarius species may be separated, beyond the second zoeal stage, by the telson formula and the morphology of the fourth telson process.

  20. Dispersal and Survival of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Phages In Vivo in Rainbow Trout and In Vitro under Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Their Use in Phage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, Sif K.; Dalsgaard, Inger; Middelboe, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Attention has been drawn to phage therapy as an alternative approach for controlling pathogenic bacteria such as Flavobacterium psychrophilum in salmonid aquaculture, which can give rise to high mortalities, especially in rainbow trout fry. Recently, phages have been isolated with a broad host range and a strong lytic potential against pathogenic F. psychrophilum under experimental conditions. However, little is known about the fate of phages at environmental conditions. Here, we quantified the dispersal and fate of F. psychrophilum phages and hosts in rainbow trout fry after intraperitoneal injection. Both phages and bacteria were isolated from the fish organs for up to 10 days after injection, and coinjection with both bacteria and phages resulted in a longer persistence of the phage in the fish organs, than when the fish had been injected with the phages only. The occurrence of both phage and bacterium was most prevalent in the kidney and spleen, with only minor occurrence in the brain. The experiment showed that injected phages were rapidly spread in the internal organs of the fish, also in the absence of bacteria. Parallel examination of the regulation of bacteriophage infectivity in controlled laboratory experiments at various environmental conditions showed that pH had only minor effects on long-term (3 months) phage infectivity within a pH range of 4.5 to 7.5, whereas phage infectivity was immediately lost at pH 3. In the absence of host cells, phage infectivity decreased by a factor of 10,000 over 55 days in untreated pond water, while the sterilization and removal of particles caused a 100-fold increase in phage survival relative to the control. In addition, F. psychrophilum-specific phages maintained their infectivity for ?2 months in glycerol at ?80°C, whereas infectivity decreased by a factor 10 when kept in a buffer at 20°C. Only a very small degradation in infectivity was seen when bacteriophages were added and dried on fish feed pellets. Together, these results indicate that application of bacteriophages represents a promising approach for the control of F. psychrophilum infections in trout and suggest fish feed as a potential delivery method. PMID:23747702

  1. Reconsolidation of Crushed Salt to 250°C Under Hydrostatic and Shear Stress Conditions Scott Broome, Frank Hansen, and SJ Bauer Sandia National Laboratories, Geomechanics Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broome, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    Design, analysis and performance assessment of potential salt repositories for heat-generating nuclear waste require knowledge of thermal, mechanical, and fluid transport properties of reconsolidating granular salt. Mechanical properties, Bulk (K) and Elastic (E) Moduli and Poisson's ratio (?) are functions of porosity which decreases as the surrounding salt creeps inward and compresses granular salt within the rooms, drifts or shafts. To inform salt repository evaluations, we have undertaken an experimental program to determine K, E, and ? of reconsolidated granular salt as a function of porosity and temperature and to establish the deformational processes by which the salt reconsolidates. The experiments will be used to populate the database used in the reconsolidation model developed by Callahan (1999) which accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent on effective stress to account for the effects of porosity. Mine-run salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Program (WIPP) was first dried at 105 °C for a few days. Undeformed right-circular cylindrical sample assemblies of unconsolidated granular salt with an initial porosity of ~ 40%, nominally 10 cm in diameter and 17.5 cm in length, are jacketed in lead. Samples are placed in a pressure vessel and kept at test temperatures of 100, 175 or 250 °C; samples are vented to the atmosphere during the entire test procedure. At these test conditions the consolidating salt is always creeping, the creep rate increases with increasing temperature and stress and decreases as porosity decreases. In hydrostatic tests, confining pressure is increased to 20 MPa with periodic unload/reload loops to determine K. Volume strain increases with increasing temperature. In shear tests at 2.5 and 5 MPa confining pressure, after confining pressure is applied, the crushed salt is subjected to a differential stress, with periodic unload/reload loops to determine E and ?. At predetermined differential stress levels the stress is held constant and the salt consolidates. Displacement gages mounted on the samples show little lateral deformation until the samples reach a porosity of ~10%. Interestingly, vapor is vented in tests at 250°C and condenses at the vent port. Release of water is not observed in the lower two test temperatures. It is hypothesized that the water originates from fluid inclusions, which were made accessible by intragranular deformational processes including decrepitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. A .--A ention has recently been focused on microbes that occur in the plum-age of wild birds and can degrade feathers under laboratory conditions and in poultry-

    E-print Network

    Forsyth, Mark

    and can degrade feathers under laboratory conditions and in poultry- waste composters. In particular America, and poultry feathers were rapidly broken down when incubated in a suspension of this bacterium (Bur and Ichida 1999). If feather-degrading microbes affect wild birds under normal condi- tions

  3. Self-Similar Modes of Coherent Diffusion

    E-print Network

    O. Firstenberg; P. London; D. Yankelev; R. Pugatch; M. Shuker; N. Davidson

    2010-08-16

    Self-similar solutions of the coherent diffusion equation are derived and measured. The set of real similarity solutions is generalized by the introduction of a nonuniform phase surface, based on the elegant Gaussian modes of optical diffraction. In an experiment of light storage in a gas of diffusing atoms, a complex initial condition is imprinted, and its diffusion dynamics is monitored. The self-similarity of both the amplitude and the phase pattern is demonstrated, and an algebraic decay associated with the mode order is measured. Notably, as opposed to a regular diffusion spreading, a self-similar contraction of a special subset of the solutions is predicted and observed.

  4. Exploration Laboratory Analysis FY13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael; Perusek, Gail P.; Fung, Paul P.; Shaw, Tianna, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, which is stated as the Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), and to perform human research studies on the International Space Station (ISS) that are supported by the Human Health and Countermeasures (HHC) element. Since there are significant similarities in the research and medical operational requirements, ELA hardware development has emerged as a joint effort between ExMC and HHC. In 2012, four significant accomplishments were achieved towards the development of exploration laboratory analysis for medical diagnostics. These achievements included (i) the development of high priority analytes for research and medical operations, (ii) the development of Level 1 functional requirements and concept of operations documentation, (iii) the selection and head-to-head competition of in-flight laboratory analysis instrumentation, and (iv) the phase one completion of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects under the topic Smart Phone Driven Blood-Based Diagnostics. To utilize resources efficiently, the associated documentation and advanced technologies were integrated into a single ELA plan that encompasses ExMC and HHC development efforts. The requirements and high priority analytes was used in the selection of the four in-flight laboratory analysis performers. Based upon the competition results, a down select process will be performed in the upcoming year. Looking ahead, this unified effort has positioned each element for an in-flight lab analysis demonstration of select diagnostics measurements in the 2015 timeframe.

  5. Gibbs Paradox and Similarity Principle

    E-print Network

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2008-11-11

    As no heat effect and mechanical work are observed, we have a simple experimental resolution of the Gibbs paradox: both the thermodynamic entropy of mixing and the Gibbs free energy change are zero during the formation of any ideal mixtures. Information loss is the driving force of these spontaneous processes. Information is defined as the amount of the compressed data. Information losses due to dynamic motion and static symmetric structure formation are defined as two kinds of entropies - dynamic entropy and static entropy, respectively. There are three laws of information theory, where the first and the second laws are analogs of the two thermodynamic laws. However, the third law of information theory is different: for a solid structure of perfect symmetry (e.g., a perfect crystal), the entropy (static entropy for solid state) S is the maximum. More generally, a similarity principle is set up: if all the other conditions remain constant, the higher the similarity among the components is, the higher the value of entropy of the mixture (for fluid phases) or the assemblage (for a static structure or a system of condensed phases) or any other structure (such as quantum states in quantum mechanics) will be, the more stable the mixture or the assemblage will be, and the more spontaneous the process leading to such a mixture or an assemblage or a chemical bond will be.

  6. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover and carbon content of a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleeem Abbasi, M.; Tahir, M. Mahmood; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2015-02-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in soil-plant systems. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water-filled pore space) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues, i.e., the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata, incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed a wide variation in total N, C, lignin, polyphenols and C / N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of Glycine max and the shoot and root of Trifolium repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% recovery of N that had been released from these added resources. The roots of Glycine max and Zea mays and the shoot of Zea mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation. After an initial immobilization, leaves of Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively, and representing a 16, 32 and 33% N recovery, respectively. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01) and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ? 0.01), C / N ratio (r = -0.69; p ? 0.05), lignin / N ratio (r = -0.68; p ? 0.05), polyphenol / N ratio (r = -0.73; p ? 0.05) and (lignin + polyphenol) : N ratio (r = -0.70; p ? 0.05) indicating a significant role of residue chemical composition and quality in regulating N transformations and cycling in soil. The present study indicates that incorporation of plant residues strongly modifies the mineralization-immobilization turnover (MIT) of soil that can be taken into account to develop synchronization between net N mineralization and crop demand in order to maximize N delivery and minimize N losses.

  7. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on carbon-nitrogen content and nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover in a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M. K.; Tahir, M. M.; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2014-10-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, soil properties improvement and plant growth promotion. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water filled pore space (WFPS)) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues i.e. the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Poplus euramericana, Rubinia pseudoacacia and Elagnus umbellate incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed wide variation in total N, carbon, lignin, polyphenols and C/N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of G. max and the shoot and root of T. repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% of added N being released from these resources. The roots of G. max and Z. mays and the shoot of Z. mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation showing net immobilization. After an initial immobilization, leaves of P. euramericana, R. pseudoacacia and E. umbellate exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively and representing a 16, 32 and 33% of added N being released. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ? 0.01), and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ? 0.01), C/N ratio (r = -0.69; p ? 0.05), lignin/N ratio (r = -0.68; p ? 0.05), polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.73; p ? 0.05) and ligin + polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.70; p ? 0.05) indicating a significant role of residue chemical composition and quality in regulating N transformations and cycling in soil. The present study indicates that incorporation of plant residues strongly modify the mineralization-immobilization turnover (MIT) of soil that can be taken into account to develop synchronization between net N mineralization and crop demand in order to maximize N delivery and minimize N losses.

  8. A similar shot to the previous image, this photograph, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A similar shot to the previous image, this photograph, looking northwest, provides a closer image of the brick penthouse and other devices - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Electronics Laboratory Building (E Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  9. Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAH Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

  10. Similarity in seismogeodynamics on different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhich, V. V.; Psakhie, S. G.; Levina, E. A.; Dimaki, A. V.; Astafurov, S. V.; Shilko, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    Long-term research in the preparation of earthquakes of different energies with M = 3.5-7.9 within the Baikal rift zones shows that they are similar to each other and to microquakes with E = 1-103 J initiated on tectonic fault fragments in natural experiments. Moreover, detailed studies of slickensides of dimensions 1-103 m2 in tectonic faults also demonstrate their physicomechanical similarity to each other and to nano- and microscale contact patches of different materials in laboratory experiments. The research results confirm the conclusion that there exists a similarity in the laws of contact interaction of different solids, including their stick-to-dynamic slip transition, from nanoscopic to geodynamic scales.

  11. Learning task-specific similarity

    E-print Network

    Shakhnarovich, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The right measure of similarity between examples is important in many areas of computer science. In particular it is a critical component in example-based learning methods. Similarity is commonly defined in terms of a ...

  12. An update of hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, Emphasis 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Linda C.

    2006-01-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds, evaporation ponds, and disposal wells at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer underlying the INL. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, maintains ground-water monitoring networks at the INL to determine hydrologic trends, and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from wells in the USGS ground-water monitoring networks during 1999-2001. Water in the Snake River Plain aquifer moves principally through fractures and interflow zones in basalt, generally flows southwestward, and eventually discharges at springs along the Snake River. The aquifer is recharged principally from infiltration of irrigation water, infiltration of streamflow, ground-water inflow from adjoining mountain drainage basins, and infiltration of precipitation. Water levels in wells rose in the northern and west-central parts of the INL by 1 to 3 feet, and declined in the southwestern parts of the INL by up to 4 feet during 1999-2001. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INL generally decreased or remained constant during 1999-2001. Decreases in concentrations were attributed to decreased rates of radioactive-waste disposal, radioactive decay, changes in waste-disposal methods, and dilution from recharge. Tritium concentrations in water samples decreased as much as 8.3 picocuries per milliliter (pCi/mL) during 1999-2001, ranging from 0.43?0.14 to 13.6?0.6 pCi/mL in October 2001. Tritium concentrations in five wells near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) increased a few picocuries per milliliter from October 2000 to October 2001. Strontium-90 concentrations decreased or remained constant during 1999-2001, ranging from 2.1?0.6 to 42.4?1.4 pCi/L in October 2001. During 1999-2001, concentrations of cesium-137, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239, -240 (undivided) were less than the reporting level in water samples from all wells sampled at the INL. The concentration of americium-241 in one sample was 0.003?0.001 pCi/L, the reporting level for that constituent. Cobalt-60 was not detected in any samples collected during 1999-2001. Changes in detectable concentrations of nonradioactive chemical constituents in water from the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INL varied during 1999-2001. In October 2001, water from one well south of the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC) [known as the Test Reactor Area (TRA) until 2005] contained 139 micrograms per liter (?g/L) of chromium, a decrease from the concentration of 168 ?g/L detected in October 1998. Other water samples contained from less than 16.7 to 21.3 ?g/L of chromium. In October 2001, concentrations of sodium in water samples from most of the wells in the southern part of the INL were larger than the background concentration of 10 mg/L, but were similar to or slightly less than October 1998 concentrations. The largest sodium concentration was 75 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in water from well USGS 113. In 2001, chloride concentrations in most water samples from the INTEC and the Central Facilities Area (CFA) exceeded ambient concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/L, respectively. Chloride concentrations in water from wells near the RTC were less than 20 mg/L. At the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), chloride concentrations in water from wells USGS 88, 89, and 120 were 81, 40, and 23 mg/L, respectively. Concentrations of chloride in all other wells near the RWMC were less than 19 mg/L. During 2001, concentrations of sulfate in water from two wells near the RTC, two wells near the RWMC, and one well near the CFA exceeded 40 mg/L, the estimated background concentration of sulfate in the Snake River

  13. Similarity Theory of Withdrawn Water Temperature Experiment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Selective withdrawal from a thermal stratified reservoir has been widely utilized in managing reservoir water withdrawal. Besides theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, model test was also necessary in studying the temperature of withdrawn water. However, information on the similarity theory of the withdrawn water temperature model remains lacking. Considering flow features of selective withdrawal, the similarity theory of the withdrawn water temperature model was analyzed theoretically based on the modification of governing equations, the Boussinesq approximation, and some simplifications. The similarity conditions between the model and the prototype were suggested. The conversion of withdrawn water temperature between the model and the prototype was proposed. Meanwhile, the fundamental theory of temperature distribution conversion was firstly proposed, which could significantly improve the experiment efficiency when the basic temperature of the model was different from the prototype. Based on the similarity theory, an experiment was performed on the withdrawn water temperature which was verified by numerical method. PMID:26065020

  14. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alard, C.

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  15. Hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected radiochemical and chemical constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1992 through 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Tucker, B.J.; Ackerman, D.J.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1997-04-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds and disposal wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, maintains a monitoring network at the INEL to determine hydrologic trends and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from the Snake River Plain aquifer during 1992--95.

  16. Assessment by self-organizing maps of element release from sediments in contact with acidified seawater in laboratory leaching test conditions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, I; Martín-Torre, M C; Galán, B; Viguri, J R

    2015-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is gaining interest as a significant global option to reduce emissions of CO2. CCS development requires an assessment of the potential risks associated with CO2 leakages from storage sites. Laboratory leaching tests have proved to be a useful tool to study the potential mobilization of metals from contaminated sediment in a decreased-pH environment that mimics such a leakage event. This work employs a self-organizing map (SOM) tool to interpret and analyze the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn from equilibrium, column, and pH-dependent leaching tests. In these tests, acidified seawater is used for simulating different CO2 leakage scenarios. Classification was carried out detailing the mobilization of contaminants for environments of varying pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, and type of contact of the laboratory leaching tests. Component planes in the SOMs allow visualization of the results and the determination of the worst case of element release. The pH-dependent leaching test with initial addition of either base or acid was found to mobilize the highest concentrations of metals. PMID:26563235

  17. Selection of USSR foreign similarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disler, J. M. (principal investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The similarity regions in the United States and Canada were selected to parallel the conditions that affect labeling and classification accuracies in the U.S.S.R. indicator regions. In addition to climate, a significant condition that affects labeling and classification accuracies in the U.S.S.R. is the proportion of barley and wheat grown in a given region (based on sown areas). The following regions in the United States and Canada were determined to be similar to the U.S.S.R. indicator regions: (1) Montana agrophysical unit (APU) 104 corresponds to the Belorussia high barley region; (2) North Dakota and Minnesota APU 20 and secondary region southern Manitoba and Saskatchewan correspond to the Ural RSFSR barley and spring wheat region; (3) Montana APU 23 corresponds to he North Caucasus barley and winter wheat region. Selection criteria included climates, crop type, crop distribution, growth cycles, field sizes, and field shapes.

  18. Laboratory measurements of the microwave and millimeter-wave opacity of gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO2) under simulated conditions for the Venus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahd, Antoine K.; Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory measurements have been conducted of the opacity of gaseous SO2 in a CO2 atmosphere at 12.3 cm, 1.32 cm, and 0.32 cm, with a view to the effects of this gas on the mm-wave emission of the Venus atmosphere. Close agreement is noted between the results obtained and the absorptivity predicted from a Van Vleck-Weisskopf formalism at the two shortest wavelengths, but not at the longest. These results have been incorporated into a radiative transfer model in order to infer an abundance profile for gaseous SO2 in Venus' middle atmosphere, and are also used to ascertain the effects of a SO2/CO2 gaseous mixture on the mm-wavelength spectrum of Venus.

  19. Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

  20. Physiological and psychological responses to outdoor vs. laboratory cycling.

    PubMed

    Mieras, Molly E; Heesch, Matthew W S; Slivka, Dustin R

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the physiological and psychological responses to laboratory vs. outdoor cycling. Twelve recreationally trained male cyclists participated in an initial descriptive testing session and 2 experimental trials consisting of 1 laboratory and 1 outdoor session, in a randomized order. Participants were given a standardized statement instructing them to give the same perceived effort for both the laboratory and outdoor 40-km trials. Variables measured include power output, heart rate (HR), core temperature, skin temperature, body weight, urine specific gravity (USG), Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE), attentional focus, and environmental conditions. Wind speed was higher in the outdoor trial than in the laboratory trial (2.5 ± 0.6 vs. 0.0 ± 0.0 m·s-1, p = 0.02) whereas all other environmental conditions were similar. Power output (208.1 ± 10.2 vs. 163.4 ± 11.8 W, respectively, p < 0.001) and HR (152 ± 4 and 143 ± 6 b·min-1, respectively, p = 0.04) were higher in the outdoor trial than in the laboratory trial. Core temperature was similar, whereas skin temperature was cooler during the outdoor trial than during the laboratory trial (31.4 ± 0.3 vs. 33.0 ± 0.2° C, respectively, p < 0.001), thus creating a larger thermal gradient between the core and skin outdoors. No significant differences in body weight, USG, RPE, or attentional focus were observed between trials. These data indicate that outdoor cycling allows cyclists to exercise at a higher intensity than in laboratory cycling, despite similar environmental conditions and perceived exertion. In light of this, cyclists may want to ride at a higher perceived exertion in indoor settings to acquire the same benefit as they would from an outdoor ride. PMID:24476776

  1. Perceiving Similarity and Comprehending Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Lawrence E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A series of three experiments was conducted to assess the comprehension of four types of cross-modal (synesthetic) similarities in children and adults. Both perceptual and verbal (metaphoric) modes were tested. (PCB)

  2. Hydrologic Conditions and Distribution of Selected Constituents in Water, Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1996 through 1998

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. Bartholomay; B. J. Tucker; L. C. Davis; M. R. Greene

    2000-09-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds and disposal wells at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, maintains a monitoring network at the INEEL to determine hydrologic trends and to delineate the movement to radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from the Snake River Plain aquifer during 1996-98. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEEL decreased or remained constant during 1996-98. Decreased concentrations are attributed to reduced rates of radioactive-waste disposal, sorption process, radioactive decay, and changes in waste-disposal practices. Detectable concentrations of chemical constituents in water from the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEEL were variable during 1996-98.

  3. Laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity and vapor pressure of sulfuric acid vapor under simulated conditions for the middle atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave absorption measurements at wavelengths of 13.4 and 3.6 cm were made in gaseous H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere under simulated conditions for the Venus middle atmosphere. The results suggest that abundances of gaseous H2SO4 on the order of 15-30 ppm could account for the absorption observed by radio occultation measurements at these wavelengths. They also imply that such abundances would correspond to saturation vapor pressure existing at or above the 46-48-km range, which correlates with the observed cloud base.

  4. Laboratory Experiments, Numerical Simulations, and Astronomical Observations of Deflected Supersonic Jets: Application to HH 110

    E-print Network

    Hartigan, P; Wilde, B H; Coker, R F; Rosen, P A; Hansen, J F; Blue, B E; Williams, R J R; Carver, R; Frank, A

    2009-01-01

    Collimated supersonic flows in laboratory experiments behave in a similar manner to astrophysical jets provided that radiation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are unimportant in the laboratory jets, and that the experimental and astrophysical jets share similar dimensionless parameters such as the Mach number and the ratio of the density between the jet and the ambient medium. Laboratory jets can be studied for a variety of initial conditions, arbitrary viewing angles, and different times, attributes especially helpful for interpreting astronomical images where the viewing angle and initial conditions are fixed and the time domain is limited. Experiments are also a powerful way to test numerical fluid codes in a parameter range where the codes must perform well. In this paper we combine images from a series of laboratory experiments of deflected supersonic jets with numerical simulations and new spectral observations of an astrophysical example, the young stellar jet HH 110. The experiments provide key i...

  5. Visualizing multiple word similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Kievit-Kylar, Brent; Jones, Michael N

    2012-09-01

    Although many recent advances have taken place in corpus-based tools, the techniques used to guide exploration and evaluation of these systems have advanced little. Typically, the plausibility of a semantic space is explored by sampling the nearest neighbors to a target word and evaluating the neighborhood on the basis of the modeler's intuition. Tools for visualization of these large-scale similarity spaces are nearly nonexistent. We present a new open-source tool to plot and visualize semantic spaces, thereby allowing researchers to rapidly explore patterns in visual data that describe the statistical relations between words. Words are visualized as nodes, and word similarities are shown as directed edges of varying strengths. The "Word-2-Word" visualization environment allows for easy manipulation of graph data to test word similarity measures on their own or in comparisons between multiple similarity metrics. The system contains a large library of statistical relationship models, along with an interface to teach them from various language sources. The modularity of the visualization environment allows for quick insertion of new similarity measures so as to compare new corpus-based metrics against the current state of the art. The software is available at www.indiana.edu/~semantic/word2word/. PMID:22810803

  6. FINAL REPORT - Biogeochemistry of Uranium Under Reducing and Re-oxidizing Conditions:An Integrated Laboratory and Field Study and Acceptable Endpoints for Metals and Radionuclides: Quantifying the Stability of Uranium and Lead Immobilized Under Sulfate Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Peyton; James Amonette; Haluk Beyenal; Gill Geesey; Zbigniew Lewandowski; Rajesh Sani

    2005-10-07

    Our understanding of subsurface microbiology is hindered by the inaccessibility of this environment, particularly when the hydrogeologic medium is contaminated with toxic substances. Research in our labs indicated that the composition of the growth medium (e.g., bicarbonate complexation of U(VI)) and the underlying mineral phase (e.g., hematite) significantly affects the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction and immobilization through a variety of effects. Our research was aimed at elucidating those effects to a much greater extent, while exploring the potential for U(IV) reoxidation and subsequent re-mobilization, which also appears to depend on the mineral phases present in the system. In situ coupons with a variety of mineral phases were placed in monitoring wells at the NABIR FRC. These coupons showed that the mineral phase composition significantly affected the resulting attached phase microbial community. Our comparative use of both batch and open flow reactors (more representative of field conditions) indicates that hydrodynamics and continual influx of substrate and contaminants can also yield significantly different results than those obtained with closed serum bottles. To this end, the following overall experimental hypothesis tested was the following: On a mineral surface under anaerobic conditions, accumulations of secondary inorganic precipitates are controlled by a) the bacteria associated with the mineral surface, b) the electron acceptors available for anaerobic bacterial respiration, and c) local hydrodynamics and pH buffers govern micro- and meso-scale interaction of U in the presence of electron donors and acceptors, and nutrients.

  7. Hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected radiochemical and chemical constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1989 through 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Orr, B.R.; Liszewski, M.J.; Jensen, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds and disposal wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, maintains a continuous monitoring network at the INEL to determine hydrologic trends and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from the Snake River Plain aquifer during 1989-91. Water in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer moves principally through fractures and interflow zones in basalt, generally flows southwestward, and eventually discharges at springs along the Snake River. The aquifer is recharged principally from irrigation water, infiltration of streamflow, and ground-water inflow from adjoining mountain drainage basins. Water levels in wells throughout the INEL generally declined during 1989-91 due to drought. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEL decreased or remained constant during 1989-91. Decreased concentrations are attributed to reduced rates of radioactive-waste disposal, sorption processes, radioactive decay, and changes in waste-disposal practices. Detectable concentrations of chemical constituents in water from the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEL were variable during 1989-91. Sodium and chloride concentrations in the southern part of the INEL increased slightly during 1989-91 because of increased waste-disposal rates and a lack of recharge from the Big Lost River. Plumes of 1,1,1-trichloroethane have developed near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and the Radioactive Waste Management Complex as a result of waste disposal practices.

  8. Exploration Laboratory Analysis - ARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael K.; Fung, Paul P.

    2012-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL). The SMEMCL provided diagnosis and treatment for the evidence-based medical conditions and hence, a basis for developing ELA functional requirements.

  9. What Difference Reveals about Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagi, Eyal; Gentner, Dedre; Lovett, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Detecting that two images are different is faster for highly dissimilar images than for highly similar images. Paradoxically, we showed that the reverse occurs when people are asked to describe "how" two images differ--that is, to state a difference between two images. Following structure-mapping theory, we propose that this disassociation arises…

  10. Gender, Similarity, and Source Credibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Judy C.

    More than 300 adults responded to a telephone survey designed to examine whether the gender of the source and the similarity of gender between the source and the receiver affected the receiver's perception of source credibility. The results indicated that (1) men had more overall credibility than did women, (2) women recognized that they would…

  11. Mean Similarity Analysis Version 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    MEANSIM6 contains software for Mean Similarity Analysis, a method of assessing the strength of a classification of many objects (sites) into a relatively small number of groups. Classification strength is measured by the extent to which sites within the same groups are more simil...

  12. Experimental divertor similarity database parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, I.H.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.

    1995-12-01

    A set of experimentally-determined dimensionless parameters is proposed for characterizing the regime of divertor operation. The objective is to be able to compare as unambiguously as possible the operation of different divertors and to understand what physical similarities and differences they represent. Examples from Alcator C- Mod are given. 4 refs., 5 figs,. 3 tabs.

  13. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  14. Retrospective Clinical and Molecular Analysis of Conditioned Laboratory Dogs (Canis familiaris) with Serologic Reactions to Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Rickettsia rickettsii

    PubMed Central

    Scorpio, Diana G; Wachtman, Lynn M; Tunin, Richard S; Barat, Nicole C; Garyu, Justin W; Dumler, J Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Dogs are susceptible to different tickborne infections, including members of the Anaplasmataceae (Ehrlichia canis, E. ewingii, E. chaffeensis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, A. platys), Borrelia burgdorferi, and Rickettsia rickettsii. These diseases can manifest with clinical signs including fever, anorexia, malaise, lameness, rash, and bleeding episodes; however, these signs are nonpathognomonic, and infections can occur in the absence of clinical signs. Hematologic abnormalities can include leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, hyperproteinemia and hypergammaglobulinemia. In biomedical research, diseases such as canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, Lyme disease, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever may cause morbidity among exposed dogs and confound research results. Random-source dogs are susceptible to these diseases because of their increased risk of arthropod exposure. Nonpurpose bred, randomly selected conditioned dogs (n = 21) were examined; blood samples were taken for hematology, biochemistry analysis, tickborne pathogen serology, and PCR. Of these, 2 dogs (10% of the population) presented with illness characterized by fever, malaise, lameness, or hemostatic abnormalities, and 15 (71%) had antibodies to one or more tickborne pathogens. No specific hematologic or biochemical differences were apparent between seronegative dogs and seropositive dogs reactive to all 3 pathogens. E. canis and B. burgdorferi PCR of tissues and blood were negative for all dogs. PCR amplification of several Ehrlichia and Anaplasma genes yielded no positive samples. From this cohort of dogs, serologic and molecular results indicate prior exposure without active infection or clinical disease. Exposure to and potential for infection with these bacteria and other pathogens may contribute to blood and tissue alterations that could confound experiments and lead to misinterpretation of data in canine models. PMID:18947166

  15. Similarity-Detection and Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, T.; Lässig, M.

    1996-03-01

    Assessing the similarities among long sequences of alphabets is a challenging task often encountered in molecular biology. The goal is to find the optimal alignment of sequences and evaluate the statistical significance of the similarities. Here we show that the sequence alignment process is equivalent to finding the optimal trajectory of a directed path in a random potential. Correlations among sequences act as an attractive (columnar) potential well which tends to localize the directed path. On the otherhand, transmission/transcription ``errors'' such as bit flips and random insertions/deletions lead to random potentials which tend to delocalize the directed path. The process of signal recognition is thus shown to be a localization phenomenon. The existence of the disorder-induced localization-delocalization transition gives a well-defined statistical notion to signal recognition. Analytic solution of this problem can be used as a guide to locate optimal parameters in the alignment of macromolecular sequences such as DNA's and proteins.

  16. Self-Similar Collisionless Shocks

    E-print Network

    Boaz Katz; Uri Keshet; Eli Waxman

    2006-09-17

    Observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows suggest that the correlation length of magnetic field fluctuations downstream of relativistic non-magnetized collisionless shocks grows with distance from the shock to scales much larger than the plasma skin depth. We argue that this indicates that the plasma properties are described by a self-similar solution, and derive constraints on the scaling properties of the solution. For example, we find that the scaling of the characteristic magnetic field amplitude with distance from the shock is B \\propto D^{s_B} with -1particles is dn/dE \\propto E^{-2/(s_B+1)}, and that the scaling of the magnetic correlation function is \\propto x^{2s_B} (for x>>D). We show that the plasma may be approximated as a combination of two self-similar components: a kinetic component of energetic particles and an MHD-like component representing "thermal" particles. We argue that the latter may be considered as infinitely conducting, in which case s_B=0 and the scalings are completely determined (e.g. dn/dE \\propto E^{-2} and B \\propto D^0). Similar claims apply to non- relativistic shocks such as in supernova remnants, if the upstream magnetic field can be neglected. Self-similarity has important implications for any model of particle acceleration and/or field generation. For example, we show that the diffusion function in the angle \\mu of momentum p in diffusive shock acceleration models must satisfy D_{\\mu\\mu}(p,D) = D^{-1}D'_{\\mu\\mu}(p/D), and that a previously suggested model for the generation of large scale magnetic fields through a hierarchical merger of current-filaments should be generalized. A numerical experiment testing our analysis is outlined (Abridged).

  17. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD United Kingdom phone +44 1223 763500 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/ #12 Laboratory are freely available via the Internet: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/ ISSN 1476-2986 #12 involves taking a lot of very similar pho- tographs with only slightly varying settings. This has

  18. An update of hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer and perched groundwater zones, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, emphasis 2006-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1952, radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged to infiltration ponds (also called percolation ponds), evaporation ponds, and disposal wells at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has affected water quality in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and perched groundwater zones underlying the INL. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, maintains groundwater monitoring networks at the INL to determine hydrologic trends, and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer and in perched groundwater zones. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from aquifer and perched groundwater wells in the USGS groundwater monitoring networks during 2006-08. Water in the Snake River Plain aquifer primarily moves through fractures and interflow zones in basalt, generally flows southwestward, and eventually discharges at springs along the Snake River. The aquifer primarily is recharged from infiltration of irrigation water, infiltration of streamflow, groundwater inflow from adjoining mountain drainage basins, and infiltration of precipitation. From March-May 2005 to March-May 2008, water levels in wells generally remained constant or rose slightly in the southwestern corner of the INL. Water levels declined in the central and northern parts of the INL. The declines ranged from about 1 to 3 feet in the central part of the INL, to as much as 9 feet in the northern part of the INL. Water levels in perched groundwater wells around the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATRC) also declined. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INL generally decreased or remained constant during 2006-08. Decreases in concentrations were attributed to decreased rates of radioactive-waste disposal, radioactive decay, changes in waste-disposal methods, and dilution from recharge and underflow. In April or October 2008, reportable concentrations of tritium in groundwater ranged from 810 ? 70 to 8,570 ? 190 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), and the tritium plume extended south-southwestward in the general direction of groundwater flow. Tritium concentrations in water from wells completed in shallow perched groundwater at the ATRC were less than the reporting levels. Tritium concentrations in deep perched groundwater exceeded the reporting level in 11 wells during at least one sampling event during 2006-08 at the ATRC. Tritium concentrations from one or more zones in each well were reportable in water samples collected at various depths in six wells equipped with multi-level WestbayTM packer sampling systems. Concentrations of strontium-90 in water from 24 of 52 aquifer wells sampled during April or October 2008 exceeded the reporting level. Concentrations ranged from 2.2 ? 0.7 to 32.7 ? 1.2 pCi/L. Strontium-90 has not been detected within the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer beneath the ATRC partly because of the exclusive use of waste-disposal ponds and lined evaporation ponds rather than using the disposal well for radioactive-wastewater disposal at ATRC. At the ATRC, the strontium-90 concentration in water from one well completed in shallow perched groundwater was less than the reporting level. During at least one sampling event during 2006-08, concentrations of strontium-90 in water from nine wells completed in deep perched groundwater at the ATRC were greater than reporting levels. Concentrations ranged from 2.1?0.7 to 70.5?1.8 pCi/L. At the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), the reporting level was exceeded in water from two wells completed in deep perched groundwater. During 2006-08, concentrations of cesium-137, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239, -240 (undivided), and americium-241 were less than the reporting level in water samples from all wells and all zones in wells equipped with multi-level WestbayTM packer sampling systems

  19. Evaluating Gender Discrimination Claims: Is There a Gender Similarity Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Teri J.; Phillips, James S.; Konopaske, Robert; Townsend, Joellyn

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the possible existence of a gender similarity bias in evaluations of gender discrimination allegations, using a laboratory experiment in which the strength of evidence against a defendant company and the gender of the plaintiff were manipulated. Participants were ethnically diverse undergraduate students. Although female mock jurors…

  20. General sound classification and similarity in MICHAEL CASEY

    E-print Network

    Casey, Michael

    General sound classification and similarity in MPEG-7 MICHAEL CASEY MERL Cambridge Research Laboratory, Cambridge, USA E-mail: casey@merl.com We introduce a system for generalised sound classification of environmental sounds, musical instruments, music genre and human speakers. In addition to classification

  1. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1211 - Condition: Urinalysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Urinalysis. 493.1211 Section 493.1211...Testing § 493.1211 Condition: Urinalysis. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Urinalysis, the laboratory must meet the...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205...Testing § 493.1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology, the laboratory must meet the...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1204 - Condition: Parasitology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Parasitology. 493.1204 Section 493...Testing § 493.1204 Condition: Parasitology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Parasitology, the laboratory must meet the...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1213 - Condition: Toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Toxicology. 493.1213 Section 493.1213...Testing § 493.1213 Condition: Toxicology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Toxicology, the laboratory must meet the...

  17. Conceptual Similarity Promotes Generalization of Higher Order Fear Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; White, Allison J.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that conceptual similarity promotes generalization of conditioned fear. Using a sensory preconditioning procedure, three groups of subjects learned an association between two cues that were conceptually similar, unrelated, or mismatched. Next, one of the cues was paired with a shock. The other cue was then reintroduced to…

  18. On Constructing Facial Similarity Maps California Institute of Technology

    E-print Network

    Perona, Pietro

    of the same individ- ual under different lighting conditions. We demonstrate that using our methods we can effectively create Face Spaces which correspond to human notions of facial similarity. 1. Introduction Humans naturally perceive the similarity between dif- ferent objects. Humans are especially sensitive to facial

  19. Laboratory Studies of Interstellar PAH Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

  20. Nonlocal similarity based DEM super resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zekai; Wang, Xuewen; Chen, Zixuan; Xiong, Dongping; Ding, Mingyue; Hou, Wenguang

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses a new topic, DEM super resolution, to improve the resolution of an original DEM based on its partial new measurements obtained with high resolution. A nonlocal algorithm is introduced to perform this task. The original DEM was first divided into overlapping patches, which were classified either as "test" or "learning" data depending on whether or not they are related to high resolution measurements. For each test patch, the similar patches in the learning dataset were identified via template matching. Finally, the high resolution DEM of the test patch was restored by the weighted sum of similar patches under the condition that the reconstruction weights were the same in different resolution cases. A key assumption of this strategy is that there are some repeated or similar modes in the original DEM, which is quite common. Experiments were done to demonstrate that we can restore a DEM by preserving the details without introducing artifacts. Statistic analysis was also conducted to show that this method can obtain higher accuracy than traditional interpolation methods.

  1. Similarity analysis of the streamer zone of Blue Jets

    E-print Network

    Popov, N A; Milikh, G M

    2016-01-01

    Multiple observations of Blue Jets (BJ)) show that BJ emits a fan of streamers similar to a laboratory leader. Moreover,in the exponential atmosphere those long streamers grow preferentially upward, producing a narrow coneconfined by the aperture angle. It was also noticed that BJ are similar to the streamer zone of a leader (streamer corona) and the modeling studies based on the streamers fractal structure were conducted. Objective of this paper is to study the fractal dimension of the bunch of streamer channels emitted by BJ, at different altitude and under the varying reduced electric field. This similarity analysis has been done in three steps: First we described the dendritic structure of streamers in corona discharge applying the fractal theory. Then using this model and the data from existing laboratory experiments we obtained the fractal dimension of the branching streamer channels. Finally the model was validated by the observations of BJ available from the literature.

  2. When is chemical similarity significant? The statistical distribution of chemical similarity scores and its extreme values.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Pierre; Nasr, Ramzi

    2010-07-26

    As repositories of chemical molecules continue to expand and become more open, it becomes increasingly important to develop tools to search them efficiently and assess the statistical significance of chemical similarity scores. Here, we develop a general framework for understanding, modeling, predicting, and approximating the distribution of chemical similarity scores and its extreme values in large databases. The framework can be applied to different chemical representations and similarity measures but is demonstrated here using the most common binary fingerprints with the Tanimoto similarity measure. After introducing several probabilistic models of fingerprints, including the Conditional Gaussian Uniform model, we show that the distribution of Tanimoto scores can be approximated by the distribution of the ratio of two correlated Normal random variables associated with the corresponding unions and intersections. This remains true also when the distribution of similarity scores is conditioned on the size of the query molecules to derive more fine-grained results and improve chemical retrieval. The corresponding extreme value distributions for the maximum scores are approximated by Weibull distributions. From these various distributions and their analytical forms, Z-scores, E-values, and p-values are derived to assess the significance of similarity scores. In addition, the framework also allows one to predict the value of standard chemical retrieval metrics, such as sensitivity and specificity at fixed thresholds, or receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves at multiple thresholds, and to detect outliers in the form of atypical molecules. Numerous and diverse experiments that have been performed, in part with large sets of molecules from the ChemDB, show remarkable agreement between theory and empirical results. PMID:20540577

  3. Semantically enabled image similarity search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casterline, May V.; Emerick, Timothy; Sadeghi, Kolia; Gosse, C. A.; Bartlett, Brent; Casey, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Georeferenced data of various modalities are increasingly available for intelligence and commercial use, however effectively exploiting these sources demands a unified data space capable of capturing the unique contribution of each input. This work presents a suite of software tools for representing geospatial vector data and overhead imagery in a shared high-dimension vector or embedding" space that supports fused learning and similarity search across dissimilar modalities. While the approach is suitable for fusing arbitrary input types, including free text, the present work exploits the obvious but computationally difficult relationship between GIS and overhead imagery. GIS is comprised of temporally-smoothed but information-limited content of a GIS, while overhead imagery provides an information-rich but temporally-limited perspective. This processing framework includes some important extensions of concepts in literature but, more critically, presents a means to accomplish them as a unified framework at scale on commodity cloud architectures.

  4. Laboratory Building.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  5. Hydrodynamic Scalings: from Astrophysics to Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Remington, B. A.

    2000-05-01

    A surprisingly general hydrodynamic similarity has been recently described in Refs. [1,2]. One can call it the Euler similarity because it works for the Euler equations (with MHD effects included). Although the dissipation processes are assumed to be negligible, the presence of shocks is allowed. For the polytropic medium (i.e., the medium where the energy density is proportional to the pressure), an evolution of an arbitrarily chosen 3D initial state can be scaled to another system, if a single dimensionless parameter (the Euler number) is the same for both initial states. The Euler similarity allows one to properly design laboratory experiments modeling astrophysical phenomena. We discuss several examples of such experiments related to the physics of supernovae [3]. For the problems with a single spatial scale, the condition of the smallness of dissipative processes can be adequately described in terms of the Reynolds, Peclet, and magnetic Reynolds numbers related to this scale (all three numbers must be large). However, if the system develops small-scale turbulence, dissipation may become important at these smaller scales, thereby affecting the gross behavior of the system. We analyze the corresponding constraints. We discuss also constraints imposed by the presence of interfaces between the substances with different polytropic index. Another set of similarities governs evolution of photoevaporation fronts in astrophysics. Convenient scaling laws exist in situations where the density of the ablated material is very low compared to the bulk density. We conclude that a number of hydrodynamical problems related to such objects as the Eagle Nebula can be adequately simulated in the laboratory. We discuss also possible scalings for radiative astrophysical jets (see Ref. [3] and references therein). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-Eng-48. 1. D.D. Ryutov, R.P. Drake, J. Kane, E. Liang, B. A. Remington, and W.M. Wood-Vasey. "Similarity criteria for the laboratory simulation of supernova hydrodynamics." Astrophysical Journal, v. 518, p. 821 (1999). 2. D.D. Ryutov, R.P. Drake, B.A. Remington. "Criteria for scaled laboratory simulations of astrophysical MHD phenomena." To appear in Astrophysical Journal - Supplement, April 2000. 3. Remington, B.A., Phys. Plasmas, 7, # 5 (2000).

  6. Mutual Information Based Extrinsic Similarity for Microarray Analysis

    E-print Network

    Ferhatosmanoglu, Hakan

    Division, Turkey Abstract. Genes responding similarly to changing conditions are believed levels of genes under changing experimental conditions. To analyze these profiles in an attempt to answer to be functionally related. Identification of such functional re- lations is crucial for annotation of unknown genes

  7. Growth of Corophium volutator under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Kater, Belinda J; Jol, Johan G; Smit, Mathijs G D

    2008-04-01

    Temperature-dependent growth is an important factor in the population model of Corophium volutator that was developed to translate responses in a 10-day acute bioassay to ecological consequences for the population. The growth rate, however, was estimated from old data, based on a Swedish population. Therefore, new growth rates are estimated herein from two experiments using Corophium volutator. To save time, a tool was developed to use image analysis to measure Corophium volutator. The experiments show that Corophium volutator has a low growth rate at low temperatures (5-10 degrees C). At higher temperatures no difference in growth rate between 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C was found. The growth rate from these experiments is comparable to data found in literature. A new relationship between temperature and individual growth was estimated, and incorporated into the Corophium population model. As the model also uses the same temperature relationship for reproduction, the modelled population growth rate at different temperatures changes as a result of the new data. The new growth rate and the updated temperature relationship result in reduced tolerance to external stressors, as previously predicted by the model. PMID:17960451

  8. Self-similarity in incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Ali; Kavvas, M Levent

    2015-12-01

    The self-similarity conditions of the 3-dimensional (3D) incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are obtained by utilizing one-parameter Lie group of point scaling transformations. It is found that the scaling exponents of length dimensions in i?=?1, 2, 3 coordinates in 3-dimensions are not arbitrary but equal for the self-similarity of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. It is also shown that the self-similarity in this particular flow process can be achieved in different time and space scales when the viscosity of the fluid is also scaled in addition to other flow variables. In other words, the self-similarity of Navier-Stokes equations is achievable under different fluid environments in the same or different gravity conditions. Self-similarity criteria due to initial and boundary conditions are also presented. Utilizing the proposed self-similarity conditions of the 3D hydrodynamic flow process, the value of a flow variable at a specified time and space can be scaled to a corresponding value in a self-similar domain at the corresponding time and space. PMID:26723165

  9. Self-similarity in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timashev, S. F.

    2000-02-01

    A general phenomenological approach to the analysis of experimental temporal, spatial and energetic series for extracting truly physical non-model parameters ("passport data") is presented, which may be used to characterize and distinguish the evolution as well as the spatial and energetic structure of any open nonlinear dissipative system. This methodology is based on a postulate concerning the crucial information contained in the sequences of non-regularities of the measured dynamic variable (temporal, spatial, energetic). In accordance with this approach, multi-parametric formulas for dynamic variable power spectra as well as for structural functions of different orders are identical for every spatial-temporal-energetic level of the system under consideration. In effect, this entails the introduction of a new kind of self-similarity in Nature. An algorithm has been developed for obtaining as many "passport data" as are necessary for the characterization of a dynamic system. Applications of this approach in the analysis of various experimental series (temporal, spatial, energetic) demonstrate its potential for defining adequate phenomenological parameters of different dynamic processes and structures.

  10. Bustin Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    Michael Bustin, Ph.D. is head of the Protein Section, Laboratory of Metabolism, CCR, NCI. Dr. Bustin received his Ph.D. from University at California, Berkeley and did postdoctoral work in the area of protein chemistry, in the laboratory of Drs. S. Moore

  11. FLUE GAS CONDITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a survey of available flue gas conditioning agents and user experience. Many existing chemicals have been used as conditioning agents in power plants or have been studied in the laboratory as potential agents. The particle collection efficiency of an e...

  12. A qualitative characterization of an introductory college nonmajors biology laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cherin Ann

    The nature of an undergraduate, nonmajors biology laboratory was investigated in this study. Student participants were enrolled in a general education biology laboratory course at the University of Northern Iowa. The researcher's purpose was to gain a characterization of the instructional format and laboratory activities experienced by students. Interpretation of student and instructor responses enabled an insider's view of the biology laboratory. The laboratory period was consistently described by both students and instructors as having three parts, Beginning, Middle, and End, with the End being of special importance for conceptual development. The instructional format of the three instructors differed within the three portions of the laboratory period, ranging from an inquiry-oriented, partial learning cycle to a fairly expository model labeled inform/verify/practice. There was striking similarity in intrasectional student and teacher descriptions of instructional format. Additionally, students experiencing the alternate instructor provided the same characterizations of instructional format as those provided by the instructor's usual students. There were no discernible patterns of instructional format based on sex or reasoning level. In addition to the central role of instructional format, three areas of importance emerged: the social aspects of learning, the collaborative and cooperative nature of laboratory work and learning, and the role of self-efficacy. Theory developed from and grounded in the data showed six factors important in the introductory college biology laboratory: collaborative and cooperative learning, student-student and teacher-student interactions, attitude and self-efficacy, learning process and learning style, effective instructional format, and science content. These factors were found to be similar to factors identified in the literature as important in K-12 science education. These factors were set in the context of schooling and learning paradigms, paralleling J. J. Schwab's four conditions of a curriculum (subject matter, learners, teachers, and milieus), Benjamin Bloom's model of important factors in student achievement and schooling (cognitive entry behaviors, affective entry behaviors, and quality of instruction), and fitting a constructivist epistemological framework.

  13. Self-similar Ultrarelativistic Jetted Blast Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshet, Uri; Kogan, Dani

    2015-12-01

    Following a suggestion that a directed relativistic explosion may have a universal intermediate asymptotic, we derive a self-similar solution for an ultrarelativistic jetted blast wave. The solution involves three distinct regions: an approximately paraboloid head where the Lorentz factor ? exceeds ? 1/2 of its maximal, nose value; a geometrically self-similar, expanding envelope slightly narrower than a paraboloid; and an axial core in which the (cylindrically, henceforth) radial flow {{u}} converges inward toward the axis. Most (?80%) of the energy lies well beyond the leading, head region. Here, a radial cross section shows a maximal ? (separating the core and the envelope), a sign reversal in {{u}}, and a minimal ?, at respectively ?1/6, ?1/4, and ?3/4 of the shock radius. The solution is apparently unique, and approximately agrees with previous simulations, of different initial conditions, that resolved the head. This suggests that unlike a spherical relativistic blast wave, our solution is an attractor, and may thus describe directed blast waves such as in the external shock phase of a ?-ray burst.

  14. Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-05-01

    Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

  15. A Laboratory Investigation of Groupthink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtright, John A.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the groupthink phenomenon under controlled, laboratory conditions. Results indicate that the presence or absence of disagreement (conflict, hostility) among members may be the best discriminator between groupthink and nongroupthink groups. (JMF)

  16. Vinson Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    Selected Publications Recent selected publications from Dr. Vinson's laboratory are listed below. To view an expanded bibliography, visit Dr. Vinson's CCR Research Directory Web site. Rishi V, Oh WJ, Heyerdahl SL, Zhao J, Scudiero D, Shoemaker RH, Vinson

  17. Bustin Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    Protein Section, Laboratory of Metabolism Principal Investigator: Dr. Michael Bustin Staff Scientists: Dr. Yuri V. Postnikov Dr. Takashi Furusawa Research Associates: Dr. Mark Rochman Postdoctoral Associates: Dr. Eric Ciappio Dr. Tao Deng Dr. Jamie Kugler

  18. Bustin Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    Research in the Laboratory Chromatin Architectural Proteins The Cellular Function of HMGN Proteins: Generation and Analysis of HMGN Knockout Mice Role of HMGN in Development Role of HMGN in Genome Integrity and DNA Repair Organization of HMGN in Nucleosom

  19. Annular self-similar solutions in ideal magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, R. M.; Mestel, A. J.

    2008-08-01

    We consider the possibility of self-similar solutions describing the implosion of hollow cylindrical annuli driven by an azimuthal magnetic field, in essence a self-similar imploding liner z-pinch. We construct such solutions for gasdynamics, for ideal ‘?=0’ plasma and for ideal magnetogasdynamics (MGD). In the latter two cases some quantities are singular at the annular boundaries. Numerical solutions of the full ideal MGD initial value problem indicate that the self-similar solutions are not attractive for arbitrary initial conditions, possibly as a result of flux-freezing.

  20. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  1. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  2. Reciprocal Space Mapping of Macromolecular Crystals in the Home Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Fewster, P. F.; Andrew, Norman; Boggon, T. J.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc A.

    1999-01-01

    Reciprocal space mapping techniques are used widely by the materials science community to provide physical information about their crystal samples. We have used similar methods at synchrotron sources to look at the quality of macromolecular crystals produced both on the ground and under microgravity conditions. The limited nature of synchrotron time has led us to explore the use of a high resolution materials research diffractometer to perform similar measurements in the home laboratory. Although the available intensity is much reduced due to the beam conditioning necessary for high reciprocal space resolution, lower resolution data can be collected in the same detail as the synchrotron source. Experiments can be optimized at home to make most benefit from the synchrotron time available. Preliminary results including information on the mosaicity and the internal strains from reciprocal space maps will be presented.

  3. Laboratory Exploration of Solar Energetic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David

    2007-01-01

    The solar atmosphere displays a wide variety of dynamic phenomena driven by the interaction of magnetic fields and plasma. In particular, plasma jets in the solar chromosphere and corona, coronal heating, solar flares and coronal mass ejections all point to the presence of magnetic phenomena such as reconnection, flux cancellation, the formation of magnetic islands, and plasmoids. While we can observe the signatures and gross features of such phenomena we cannot probe the essential physics driving them, given the spatial resolution of current instrumentation. Flexible and well-controlled laboratory experiments, scaled to solar parameters, open unique opportunities to reproduce the relevant unsteady phenomena under various simulated solar conditions. The ability to carefully control these parameters in the laboratory allows one to diagnose the dynamical processes which occur and to apply the knowledge gained to the understanding of similar processes on the Sun, in addition directing future solar observations and models. This talk introduces the solar phenomena and reviews the contributions made by laboratory experimentation.

  4. Bustin Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Michael Bustin Email: Bustinm@mail.nih.gov Tel: 301.496.5234Fax: 301.496.8419 Address: Protein Structure SectionLaboratory of MetabolismBuilding 37, Room 312237 Convent Drive, MSC 4255National Cancer InstituteBethesda, MD 20892 NIH Visitor Information

  5. Laboratory diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the first major goals of the microbiology laboratory is to isolate or detect clinically significant microorganisms from an affected site and, if more than one type of microorganism is present, to isolate them in approximately the same ratio as occurs in vivo. Whether an isolate is “clinically...

  6. Vinson Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Charles R. Vinson Email: vinsonc@mail.nih.gov Tel: 301.496.8753 Fax: 301.494.8419 Address: Gene Regulation Section Laboratory of Metabolism Building 37, Room 2D24 37 Convent Drive, MSC 4258 National Cancer Institute Bethesda, MD 20892 NIH Visitor Info

  7. Vinson Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    Research My laboratory studies the structure-function relationships of the mammalian B-ZIP class of sequence-specific DNA-binding dimeric proteins. More than 50 B-ZIP genes have been identified in the mammalian genome. In the most general terms, B-ZIP pro

  8. Lee Laboratory 

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kyung Lee, Ph.D. Email: KyungLee@mail.nih.gov Tel: 301.496.9635 Fax: 301.496.8419 Address: Chemistry Section Laboratory of Metabolism Building 37, Room 3122C 37 Convent Drive National Cancer Institute Bethesda, MD 20892 NIH Visitor Information: http:/

  9. Lee Laboratory 

    Cancer.gov

    Publications Recent selected publications from Dr. Lee's laboratory are listed below. For a complete bibliography, see Dr. Lee's PubMed list of publications (with abstracts) Lee, K H., Y. Johmura, L. -R. Yu, J. -E. Park, Y. Gao, J. K. Bang, M. Zhou, T. D.

  10. Telepresence Laboratory,

    E-print Network

    Kaber, David B.

    SPECIAL SECTION Telepresence John V. Draper, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee worlds for Requestsfor reprints should be sent to John V. Draper. Robotics and Process, and David B. Kaber and John M. Usher, Mississippi State University, Starkville, Mississippi Telepresence

  11. Exploring similarities among many species distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmerman, Scott; Wang, Jingyuan; Osborne, James; Shook, Kimberly; Huang, Jian; Godsoe, William; Simons, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    Collecting species presence data and then building models to predict species distribution has been long practiced in the field of ecology for the purpose of improving our understanding of species relationships with each other and with the environment. Due to limitations of computing power as well as limited means of using modeling software on HPC facilities, past species distribution studies have been unable to fully explore diverse data sets. We build a system that can, for the first time to our knowledge, leverage HPC to support effective exploration of species similarities in distribution as well as their dependencies on common environmental conditions. Our system can also compute and reveal uncertainties in the modeling results enabling domain experts to make informed judgments about the data. Our work was motivated by and centered around data collection efforts within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park that date back to the 1940s. Our findings present new research opportunities in ecology and produce actionable field-work items for biodiversity management personnel to include in their planning of daily management activities.

  12. Biosequence Similarity Search on the Mercury System

    E-print Network

    Chamberlain, Roger

    Biosequence Similarity Search on the Mercury System Praveen Krishnamurthy, Jeremy Buhler, Roger Chamberlain, Mark Franklin, Kwame Gyang, and Joseph Lancaster, "Biosequence Similarity Search on the Mercury on the Mercury System Praveen Krishnamurthy, Jeremy Buhler, Roger Chamberlain, Mark Franklin, Kwame Gyang

  13. Multimodal similarity and categorization of novel, three-dimensional objects.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Theresa; Jäkel, Frank; Wallraven, Christian; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2007-02-01

    Similarity has been proposed as a fundamental principle underlying mental object representations and capable of supporting cognitive-level tasks such as categorization. However, much of the research has considered connections between similarity and categorization for tasks performed using a single perceptual modality. Considering similarity and categorization within a multimodal context opens up a number of important questions: Are the similarities between objects the same when they are perceived using different modalities or using more than one modality at a time? Is similarity still able to explain categorization performance when objects are experienced multimodally? In this study, we addressed these questions by having subjects explore novel, 3D objects which varied parametrically in shape and texture using vision alone, touch alone, or touch and vision together. Subjects then performed a pair-wise similarity rating task and a free sorting categorization task. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of similarity data revealed that a single underlying perceptual map whose dimensions corresponded to shape and texture could explain visual, haptic, and bimodal similarity ratings. However, the relative dimension weights varied according to modality: shape dominated texture when objects were seen, whereas shape and texture were roughly equally important in the haptic and bimodal conditions. Some evidence was found for a multimodal connection between similarity and categorization: the probability of category membership increased with similarity while the probability of a category boundary being placed between two stimuli decreased with similarity. In addition, dimension weights varied according to modality in the same way for both tasks. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of 3D printing technology and MDS techniques in the study of visuohaptic object processing. PMID:16580027

  14. Mining gene sets for measuring similarities CHRISTINE NARDINI1

    E-print Network

    Nardini, Christine

    Mining gene sets for measuring similarities CHRISTINE NARDINI1 , DANIELE MASOTTI2 , SUNGROH YOON3 and data mining of these new, large types of data. The proliferation of devices able to process in paral of number of genes under different environmental conditions. Data mining algorithms demanded to the analysis

  15. Thematic Relations Affect Similarity via Commonalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golonka, Sabrina; Estes, Zachary

    2009-01-01

    Thematic relations are an important source of perceived similarity. For instance, the "rowing" theme of boats and oars increases their perceived similarity. The mechanism of this effect, however, has not been specified previously. The authors investigated whether thematic relations affect similarity by increasing commonalities or by decreasing…

  16. 1Features of Similarity Amos Tversky

    E-print Network

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    dimensions. The assessment of similarity between such stimuli, therefore, may be better described us examine the validity of the metric axioms when d is regarded as a measure of dissimilarity relation. Similarity judgments can be regarded as extensions of similarity statements, that is, statements

  17. Effects of statistical similarity in Young's interference experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mengwen; Zhao, Daomu

    2015-11-01

    Some new results are established on the condition that the fluctuating field at the pinholes in Young's interference experiment is statistically similar at a frequency ?0. It is shown that this condition ensures complete spectral coherence of the light in the plane of observation. Under this circumstance, the spectral degree of polarization and cross-polarization of the stochastic electromagnetic beam in the plane of observation are exactly the same as that in the pinholes. Furthermore, we derive a condition that ensures complete spatial coherence at the pinholes in the space-time domain.

  18. Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    spark today's domestic oil and gas boom, to developing critical technology behind many of today, the development of advanced technologies for counter- terrorism, the detection of nuclear and biological weapons as part of a wave of federal investment in science around World War II, the DOE National Laboratories have

  19. Lunar laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  20. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Dehumidifiers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, J.

    2012-03-01

    Six residential vapor compression cycle dehumidifiers spanning the available range of capacities and efficiencies were tested in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems Laboratory. Each was tested under a wide range of indoor air conditions to facilitate the development of performance curves for use in whole-building simulation tools.

  1. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    E-print Network

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-$n$-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and eval...

  2. Metallic wear debris sensors: promising developments in failure prevention for wind turbine gearsets and similar components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poley, Jack; Dines, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Wind turbines are frequently located in remote, hard-to-reach locations, making it difficult to apply traditional oil analysis sampling of the machine's critical gearset at timely intervals. Metal detection sensors are excellent candidates for sensors designed to monitor machine condition in vivo. Remotely sited components, such as wind turbines, therefore, can be comfortably monitored from a distance. Online sensor technology has come of age with products now capable of identifying onset of wear in time to avoid or mitigate failure. Online oil analysis is now viable, and can be integrated with onsite testing to vet sensor alarms, as well as traditional oil analysis, as furnished by offsite laboratories. Controlled laboratory research data were gathered from tests conducted on a typical wind turbine gearbox, wherein total ferrous particle measurement and metallic particle counting were employed and monitored. The results were then compared with a physical inspection for wear experienced by the gearset. The efficacy of results discussed herein strongly suggests the viability of metallic wear debris sensors in today's wind turbine gearsets, as correlation between sensor data and machine trauma were very good. By extension, similar components and settings would also seem amenable to wear particle sensor monitoring. To our knowledge no experiments such as described herein, have previously been conducted and published.

  3. Supervisor Attraction as a Function of Level of Supervisor Skillfulness and Supervisees' Perceived Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Larry Ronald; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This laboratory analogue investigated the effects of supervisor skillfulness and supervisor-supervisee attitude similarity on the attraction of the supervisee to the supervisor. Results showed a main effect of supervisor skillfulness on attraction but did not show attraction to vary as a function of supervisor-supervisee attitude similarity.…

  4. THE OCCURRENCE IN VIRGINIA OF GREEN.GILLED OYSTERS SIMILAR TO THOSE OF MARENNES

    E-print Network

    THE OCCURRENCE IN VIRGINIA OF GREEN.GILLED OYSTERS SIMILAR TO THOSE OF MARENNES By Philip H IN VIRGINIA OF GREEN.GILLED OYSTERS SIMILAR TO THOSE OF MARENNES. .:/-' By PHILIP H. MITCHELL and RAYMOND L- logical Laboratory of Brown University. INTRODUCTION. The appearance of green-gilled oysters in Lynnhaven

  5. Geoengineering characterization of welded tuffs from laboratory and field investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Nimick, F.B.; Board, M.P.

    1984-12-31

    Welded tuff beneath Yucca Mountain adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is being considered for development as a high-level radioactive waste repository by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Because access into Yucca Mountain has been limited to borehole explorations, early geoengineering materials characterizations have been derived from laboratory tests on cores from Yucca Mountain and from laboratory and field tests on welded tuffs located in G-Tunnel on the NTS. G-Tunnel contains welded tuffs that have similar properties and stress states to those at Yucca Mountain and has been the location for in situ rock mechanics testing. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the geoengineering material property data obtained to date and to compare appropriate laboratory and field data from G-Tunnel to findings from Yucca Mountain. Geomechanical and thermal data are provided and are augmented by limited geological and hydrological data. A comparison of results of laboratory measurements on tuffs from Yucca Mountain and G-Tunnel indicates good agreement between the bulk densities, saturations, moduli of elasticity, Poisson`s ratios, and P-wave velocities. The G-Tunnel tuff has slightly lower thermal conductivity, tensile strength, compressive strength and slightly higher matrix permeability than does the welded tuff near the proposed repository horizon at Yucca Mountain. From a laboratory-to-field scaling perspective, the modulus of deformation shows the most sensitivity to field conditions because of the presence of joints found in the field. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Geoengineering characterization of welded tuffs from laboratory and field investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Nimick, F.B.; Board, M.P.

    1984-12-31

    Welded tuff beneath Yucca Mountain adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is being considered for development as a high-level radioactive waste repository by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Because access into Yucca Mountain has been limited to borehole explorations, early geoengineering materials characterizations have been derived from laboratory tests on cores from Yucca Mountain and from laboratory and field tests on welded tuffs located in G-Tunnel on the NTS. G-Tunnel contains welded tuffs that have similar properties and stress states to those at Yucca Mountain and has been the location for in situ rock mechanics testing. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the geoengineering material property data obtained to date and to compare appropriate laboratory and field data from G-Tunnel to findings from Yucca Mountain. Geomechanical and thermal data are provided and are augmented by limited geological and hydrological data. A comparison of results of laboratory measurements on tuffs from Yucca Mountain and G-Tunnel indicates good agreement between the bulk densities, saturations, moduli of elasticity, Poisson`s ratios, and P-wave velocities. The G-Tunnel tuff has slightly lower thermal conductivity, tensile strength, compressive strength and slightly higher matrix permeability than does the welded tuff near the proposed repository horizon at Yucca Mountain. From a laboratory-to-field scaling perspective, the modulus of deformation shows the most sensitivity to field conditions because of the presence of the joints found in the field. 14 references, 1 table.

  7. China's Qaidam Basin Landscape Similar with Mars

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Geologist, sedimentation expert and Mars Science Laboratory team member David Rubin of the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center investigates longitudinal dunes in China's Qaidam Basin. He comments:

  8. 42 CFR 493.1225 - Condition: Clinical cytogenetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Clinical cytogenetics. 493.1225 Section...Testing § 493.1225 Condition: Clinical cytogenetics. If the laboratory provides services in the specialty of Clinical cytogenetics, the laboratory...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493.1210...493.1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the...

  14. Effects of Spatial Frequency Similarity and Dissimilarity on Contour Integration

    PubMed Central

    Persike, Malte; Meinhardt, Günter

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of spatial frequency similarity and dissimilarity on human contour integration under various conditions of uncertainty. Participants performed a temporal 2AFC contour detection task. Spatial frequency jitter up to 3.0 octaves was applied either to background elements, or to contour and background elements, or to none of both. Results converge on four major findings. (1) Contours defined by spatial frequency similarity alone are only scarcely visible, suggesting the absence of specialized cortical routines for shape detection based on spatial frequency similarity. (2) When orientation collinearity and spatial frequency similarity are combined along a contour, performance amplifies far beyond probability summation when compared to the fully heterogenous condition but only to a margin compatible with probability summation when compared to the fully homogenous case. (3) Psychometric functions are steeper but not shifted for homogenous contours in heterogenous backgrounds indicating an advantageous signal-to-noise ratio. The additional similarity cue therefore not so much improves contour detection performance but primarily reduces observer uncertainty about whether a potential candidate is a contour or just a false positive. (4) Contour integration is a broadband mechanism which is only moderately impaired by spatial frequency dissimilarity. PMID:26057620

  15. The snowmaker: nature identical snow production in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleef, S.; Jaggi, M.; Loewe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2013-12-01

    Using natural snow for laboratory experiments can be tricky due to shortage of winter periods and snowfall, difficulties of sample casting and transport, and the great variability of natural snow due to the varying conditions of crystal growth in the clouds. This hinders repeatable laboratory experiments with reproducible specimen and microstructural characteristics. To minimize experimental uncertainties we designed an improved machine called snowmaker, which enables us to produce nature-identical snow in a cold laboratory under well defined conditions. The snowmaker is based on well-known principles: warm humid air from a heated water basin is advected into a cold nucleation chamber where the vapor resublimates on stretched Nylon wires. Crystals are automatically harvested by a motor driven brush rack and collected in a box, thereby several kilograms of snow can be produced per day with minimum maintenance. The excess vapor is collected in a moisture trap to avoid frost in the laboratory. The entire construction is designed as a rolling, modular assembly system which can easily carried out of the laboratory for defrosting. In addition to previous attempts we focus on the reproducibility of the samples and the comparison to natural snow down to the microscale. We show that the settings of water temperature and cold laboratory temperature facilitates the production of different crystal shapes like dendrites and needles in a reproducible way. Besides photography, we analyzed the microstructure of snowmaker crystals in aggregated specimen by X-ray microtomography. Depending on the settings we can create reproducible samples with density of 50-170 kg/m3 and specific surface areas of 50-80 mm-1. We briefly touch similarities between artificial and natural snow samples with respect to crystal habit, microstructural parameters and short-time metamorphism.

  16. Evaluating Whole Chemical Mixtures and Sufficient Similarity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation supports apresentation describing dose-response assessment for complex chemical mixtures including deriving reference doses for mixtures evaluating sufficient similarity among chemical mixtures.

  17. Generalized Quantum Similarity Index: Applications in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvrie, P. A.; Antolín, J.; Angulo, J. C.

    2011-04-01

    A Generalized Quantum Similarity Index is defined, quantifying the similarity among density functions. The generalization includes, as new features (i) comparison among an arbitrary number of functions, (ii) its ability to modify the relative contribution of different regions within the domain, and (iii) the possibility of assigning different weights to each function according to its relevance on the comparative procedure. The similarity among atomic one-particle densities in both conjugated spaces, and neutral-cation similarity in ionization processes are analyzed. The results are interpreted attending to shell-filling patterns, and also in terms of experimentally accessible quantities of relevance in ionization processes.

  18. Similar mandibular osseous lesions in Tyrannosaurus rex and man.

    PubMed

    Neiburger, E J

    2005-01-01

    This report identifies several cases of similar-appearing multiple lesions in the mandibles of both humans and the dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex (T. rex). A diagnosis and potential etiologies are discussed. The appearance of these lesions in prehistoric fossils suggests that this pathology is an ancient affliction which predates humans and our mammalian ancestors. Lytic lesions of the oral structures have occurred in man and higher animals throughout time. The causes range from congenital anomalies, trauma, and infections to benign and metastatic neoplasms. Not only mammals suffer from these conditions; reptiles and birds experience similar diseases. PMID:16350345

  19. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  20. Virtual Laboratories

    E-print Network

    Piet Hut

    2006-10-07

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

  1. Structural Similarity Based Image Quality Assessment

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhou

    Assessment quality. The goal of image quality assessment research is to design methods that quantifyStructural Similarity Based Image Quality Assessment Zhou Wang, Alan C. Bovik and Hamid R. Sheikh scene. The principle hypothesis of structural similarity based image quality assessment is that the HVS

  2. Interleaving Helps Students Distinguish among Similar Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Doug

    2012-01-01

    When students encounter a set of concepts (or terms or principles) that are similar in some way, they often confuse one with another. For instance, they might mistake one word for another word with a similar spelling (e.g., allusion instead of illusion) or choose the wrong strategy for a mathematics problem because it resembles a different kind of…

  3. Perceived Similarity, Proactive Adjustment, and Organizational Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammeyer-Mueller, John D.; Livingston, Beth A.; Liao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores how perceived demographic and attitudinal similarity can influence proactive behavior among organizational newcomers. We propose that newcomers who perceive themselves as similar to their co-workers will be more willing to seek new information or build relationships, which in turn will lead to better long-term…

  4. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  5. Documents Similarity Measurement Using Field Association Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlam, El-Sayed; Fuketa, M.; Morita, K.; Aoe, Jun-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of text analysis and information retrieval and measurement of document similarity focuses on a new text manipulation system called FA (field association)-Sim that is useful for retrieving information in large heterogeneous texts and for recognizing content similarity in text excerpts. Discusses recall and precision, automatic indexing…

  6. Some Effects of Similarity Self-Disclosure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin C.; Strong, Stanley R.

    1972-01-01

    College males were interviewed about how college had altered their friendships, values, and plans. The interviewers diclosed experiences and feelings similar to those revealed by the students. Results support Byrne's Law of Similarity in generating interpersonal attraction in the interview and suggest that the timing of self-disclosures is…

  7. 7 CFR 51.1997 - Similar type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.1997 Similar type. Similar type...container are of the same general type and appearance. For example, nuts of the round type shall not be mixed with those of the long...

  8. Information filtering based on transferring similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Duo; Zhou, Tao; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Run-Ran; Jia, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2009-07-01

    In this Brief Report, we propose an index of user similarity, namely, the transferring similarity, which involves all high-order similarities between users. Accordingly, we design a modified collaborative filtering algorithm, which provides remarkably higher accurate predictions than the standard collaborative filtering. More interestingly, we find that the algorithmic performance will approach its optimal value when the parameter, contained in the definition of transferring similarity, gets close to its critical value, before which the series expansion of transferring similarity is convergent and after which it is divergent. Our study is complementary to the one reported in [E. A. Leicht, P. Holme, and M. E. J. Newman, Phys. Rev. E 73, 026120 (2006)], and is relevant to the missing link prediction problem.

  9. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  10. The first laboratory measurements of sulfur ions sputtering water ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, André; Pommerol, Antoine; Vorburger, Audrey; Wurz, Peter; Tulej, Marek; Scheer, Jürgen; Thomas, Nicolas; Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas

    2015-04-01

    The upcoming JUpiter ICy moons Explorer mission to Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto has renewed the interest in the interaction of plasma with an icy surface. In particular, the surface release processes on which exosphere models of icy moons rely should be tested with realistic laboratory experiments. We therefore use an existing laboratory facility for space hardware calibration in vacuum to measure the sputtering of water ice due to hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur ions at energies from 1 keV to 100 keV. Pressure and temperature are comparable to surface conditions encountered on Jupiter's icy moons. The sputter target is a 1cm deep layer of porous, salty water ice. Our results confirm theoretical predictions that the sputter yield from oxygen and sulfur ions should be similar. Thanks to the modular set-up of our experiment we can add further surface processes relevant for icy moons, such as electron sputtering, sublimation, and photodesorption due to UV light.

  11. Simple Penning ion source for laboratory research and development applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Ruzic, Brandon P.; Houlahan, Thomas J.

    2007-10-01

    A simple Penning ion generator (PIG) that can be easily fabricated with simple machining skills and standard laboratory accessories is described. The PIG source uses an iron cathode body, samarium cobalt permanent magnet, stainless steel anode, and iron cathode faceplate to generate a plasma discharge that yields a continuous 1mA beam of positively charged hydrogen ions at 1mTorr of pressure. This operating condition requires 5.4kV and 32.4W of power. Operation with helium is similar to hydrogen. The ion source is being designed and investigated for use in a sealed-tube neutron generator; however, this ion source is thoroughly described so that it can be easily implemented by other researchers for other laboratory research and development applications.

  12. Target template precision is unaffected by target-distractor similarity.

    PubMed

    Wyland, Hannah; Vecera, Shaun

    2015-09-01

    It is well supported that target templates held in visual short-term memory guide visual search (Desimone & Duncan, 1995; Wolfe, 1994). We investigated how template precision is affected by search context. Following previous research, participants searched RSVP streams for an orange letter and reported its presence or absence (Anderson, 2014). In different blocks, distractor letters were either similar to the target color (red, gold, green and blue) or dissimilar to the target color (white, purple, green and blue). If template precision is affected by search difficulty, accuracy differences should be found between the two distractor conditions. In Experiments 1-3, the RSVP stream consisted of eight frames of four letters each. Targets in Experiment 1 could appear at any location on the 2nd-6th frames. Compared to the distractor dissimilar condition, accuracy in the similar distractor condition was significantly worse. This difference, however, may reflect insufficient time for selection and consolidation processes, not template precision. To test this, targets in Experiment 2 appeared on screens 4-8. While subsequent displays may interrupt processing of the 4th-7th screens, the 8th (final) screen allows adequate time for selection and consolidation. Here, a significant interaction was found between distractor color and target position with follow-up tests indicating significantly better performance at the 8th position in the similar distractor condition. For Experiment 3, additional time was added between each RSVP display to allow selection and consolidation of each display. Although the main effect of distractor color was significant, the accuracy difference between the conditions was greatly reduced. To remove the need for selection processes, Experiment 4 presented a single stream of 16 frames. Accuracy for this experiment did not differ between conditions. The results of these experiments suggest that target identification is limited by selection, consolidation, and comparison processes, but not by template precision. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326134

  13. Structural similarities between biogenic uraninites produced by phylogenetically and metabolically diverse bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Jonathan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Mehta, Apurva; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2009-11-01

    While the product of microbial uranium reduction is often reported to be“UO2”, a comprehensive characterization including stoichiometry and unit cell determination is available for only one Shewanella species. Here, we compare the products of batch uranyl reduction by a collection of dissimilatory metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genera Shewanella, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfovibrio under similar laboratory conditions. Our results demonstrate that U(VI) bioreduction by this assortment of commonly studied, environmentally relevant bacteria leads to the precipitation of uraninite with a composition between UO2.00 and UO2.075, regardless of phylogenetic or metabolic diversity. Coupled analyses, including electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and powder diffraction, confirm that structurally and chemically analogous uraninite solids are produced. These biogenic uraninites have particle diameters of about 2-3 nm and lattice constants consistent with UO2.0 and exhibit a high degree of intermediate-range order. Results indicate that phylogenetic and metabolic variability within delta- and gamma-proteobacteria has little effect on nascent biouraninite structure or crystal size under the investigated conditions.

  14. Trial of integrated laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Osamu; Takahashi, Yuzo; Abe, Chikara; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakashima, Akira; Morita, Hironobu

    2011-06-01

    In most laboratory practices for students in medical schools, a laboratory guidebook is given to the students, in which the procedures are precisely described. The students merely follow the guidebook without thinking deeply, which spoils the students and does not entice them to think creatively. Problem-based learning (PBL) could be one means for the students themselves to actively learn, find problems, and resolve them. Such a learning attitude nurtures medical students with lifelong learning as healthcare professionals. We merged PBL and laboratory practices to promote deep thinking habits and developed an integrated laboratory practice. We gave a case sheet to groups of students from several schools. The students raised hypotheses after vivid discussion, designed experimental protocols, and performed the experiments. If the results did not support or disproved the hypothesis, the students set up another hypothesis followed by experiments, lasting for 4 or 5 consecutive days. These procedures are quite similar to those of professional researchers. The main impact achieved was the fact that the students developed the experimental design by themselves, for the first time in their college lives. All students enjoyed the laboratory practice, which they had never experienced before. This is an antidote to the guidebook-navigated traditional laboratory practice, which disappoints many students. As educators in basic medical sciences stand on the edge in terms of educating the next generation, there is a need to provide a strong foundation for medical students to design and perform scientific experiments. The integrated laboratory practice may provide the solution. PMID:21652510

  15. Generalized similarity in finite range solar wind magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S C; Nicol, R M

    2009-12-11

    Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. The ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide in situ observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterizes this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum--with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of approximately 2 in power--provides a test of this invariance. PMID:20366193

  16. Generalized Similarity in Finite Range Solar Wind Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Nicol, R. M.

    2009-12-11

    Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. The ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide in situ observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterizes this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum - with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of approx2 in power - provides a test of this invariance.

  17. Laboratory investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ray W.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies related to cometary grains and the nuclei of comets can be broken down into three areas which relate to understanding the spectral properties, the formation mechanisms, and the evolution of grains and nuclei: (1) Spectral studies to be used in the interpretation of cometary spectra; (2) Sample preparation experiments which may shed light on the physical nature and history of cometary grains and nuclei by exploring the effects on grain emissivities resulting from the ways in which the samples are created; and (3) Grain processing experiments which should provide insight on the interaction of cometary grains with the environment in the immediate vicinity of the cometary nucleus as the comet travels from the Oort cloud through perihelion, and perhaps even suggestions regarding the relationship between interstellar grains and cometary matter. A summary is presented with a different view of lab experiments than is found in the literature, concentrating on measurement techniques and sample preparations especially relevant to cometary dust.

  18. Similarity laws of lunar and terrestrial volcanic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsu, Y.; Okeefe, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model of a one dimensional, steady duct flow of a mixture of a gas and small solid particles (rock) was analyzed and applied to the lunar and the terrestrial volcanic flows under geometrically and dynamically similar conditions. Numerical results for the equilibrium two phase flows of lunar and terrestrial volcanoes under similar conditions are presented. The study indicates that: (1) the lunar crater is much larger than the corresponding terrestrial crater; (2) the exit velocity from the lunar volcanic flow may be higher than the lunar escape velocity but the exit velocity of terrestrial volcanic flow is much less than that of the lunar case; and (3) the thermal effects on the lunar volcanic flow are much larger than those of the terrestrial case.

  19. Gait signal analysis with similarity measure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyuk; Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  20. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  1. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S; Veers, P.

    2011-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring based on presentations from a condition monitoring workshop organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2009 and on additional references.

  2. OPTIMIZING BTEX BIODEGRADATION UNDER DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine optimum conditions for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (collectively known as BTEX) biodegradation by aquifer microorganisms under denitrifying conditions. Microcosms, constructed with aquifer samples from Traverse City, Mic...

  3. OPTIMIZING BTEX BIODEGRADATION UNDER DENITRYFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine optimum conditions for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (collectively known as BTEX) biodegradation by aquifer microorganisms under denitryfying conditions. icrocosms, constructed with aquifer samples from Traverse City, Mich...

  4. Self-similar interpolation in high-energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Gluzman, S.

    2015-06-01

    A method is suggested for interpolating between small-variable and large-variable asymptotic expansions. The method is based on the self-similar approximation theory resulting in self-similar root approximants. The latter are more general than the two-sided Padé approximants and modified Padé approximants, including these as particular cases. Being more general, the self-similar root approximants guarantee an accuracy that is not worse—and is often better—than that of the Padé approximants. The advantage of the root approximants is in their unambiguous definition and in the possibility of their construction, even when Padé approximants cannot be defined. Conditions for the unique definition of the root approximants are formulated. Several examples from high-energy physics illustrate the method.

  5. Conceptual combination: does similarity predict emergence? 

    E-print Network

    Wilkenfeld, Merryl Joy

    1995-01-01

    Conceptual combination is used as a paradigm for investigating the influence of similarity on emergence. Subjects were 180 undergraduates recruited from the psychology subject pool. Pairs of parent concepts were selected ...

  6. Media segmentation using self-similarity decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Jonathan T.; Cooper, Matthew L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a framework for analyzing the structure of digital media streams. Though our methods work for video, text, and audio, we concentrate on detecting the structure of digital music files. In the first step, spectral data is used to construct a similarity matrix calculated from inter-frame spectral similarity.The digital audio can be robustly segmented by correlating a kernel along the diagonal of the similarity matrix. Once segmented, spectral statistics of each segment are computed. In the second step,segments are clustered based on the self-similarity of their statistics. This reveals the structure of the digital music in a set of segment boundaries and labels. Finally, the music is summarized by selecting clusters with repeated segments throughout the piece. The summaries can be customized for various applications based on the structure of the original music.

  7. HYPOTHESIS TESTING WITH THE SIMILARITY INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mulltilocus DNA fingerprinting methods have been used extensively to address genetic issues in wildlife populations. Hypotheses concerning population subdivision and differing levels of diversity can be addressed through the use of the similarity index (S), a band-sharing coeffic...

  8. Bioinformatics Workshop #3 Database Similarity Searching

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Bioinformatics Workshop #3 Database Similarity Searching: What's available -- the algorithms of the computational techniques is magnified. Fall 2006; a GCG¥ Wisconsin PackageTM SeqLab® tutorial for Florida State

  9. Similarities in Becoming: Transsexuals and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Michael; Feinbloom, Deborah

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the diagnosis of transsexual in terms of its similarities with adolescence. In considering the extreme example of the transsexual, normal adolescent development emerges as more purposive and integrative in the establishment of gender identity. (JAC)

  10. Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Membership About the AAAAI Share | Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities This article has been reviewed ... or you could have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) , such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Because asthma ...

  11. Self-similarity in Laplacian growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark; Zabrodin, Anton; Abanov, Artem

    2008-01-01

    We consider Laplacian Growth of self-similar domains in different geometries. Self-similarity determines the analytic structure of the Schwarz function of the moving boundary. The knowledge of this analytic structure allows us to derive the integral equation for the conformal map. It is shown that solutions to the integral equation obey also a second-order differential equation which is the 1D Schroedinger equation with the sinh{sup -2}-potential. The solutions, which are expressed through the Gauss hypergeometric function, characterize the geometry of self-similar patterns in a wedge. We also find the potential for the Coulomb gas representation of the self-similar Laplacian growth in a wedge and calculate the corresponding free energy.

  12. Similarity- versus rule-based categorization.

    PubMed

    Smith, E E; Sloman, S A

    1994-07-01

    An influential study by Rips (1989) provides the strongest evidence available that categorization cannot be reduced to similarity. In Rips's study, subjects were presented a sparse description of an object that mentioned only a value on a single dimension (e.g., "an object 3 inches in diameter"), followed by two categories (e.g., pizza and quarter), where one allowed more variability on the relevant dimension than did the other (the diameter of pizzas is more variable than that of quarters). Subjects judged the described object to be more likely to be a member of the variable category (pizza), but more similar to the nonvariable category (quarter). This dissociation between categorization and similarity strongly implies that categorization was not based on similarity. In our first experiment, we used sparse descriptions like Rips's, as well as rich descriptions that contained features characteristic of the nonvariable category. We found that categorization tracked similarity with both kinds of descriptions. In a second experiment, we modified our procedure to be more like that of Rips's by requiring subjects to think aloud while making their decisions. Now, like Rips, we found a dissociation between similarity and categorization with sparse items; with rich descriptions, categorization again tracked similarity. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that categorization can be done in two ways, by similarity and by rule. An exclusive reliance on rule-based categorization seems to occur only when the description of the to-be-categorized object does not contain any features characteristic of any relevant category. PMID:7934944

  13. Tool for defining catchment similarity matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shailesh Kumar; McMillan, Hilary; Bárdossy, András; Fateh, Chebana

    2014-05-01

    It is important to classify catchments for many reasons, for example, for prediction in ungauged basins, model parameterization and watershed development. There have been many studies on catchment classification, but no silver bullet exists for choosing the most relevant measure of catchment similarity. The aim of this study is to explore a new measure of similarity among catchments, using a data depth function. We used a similarity measure called "Depth-Depth plot" (DD-plot) which measures similarity in the catchment flow dynamics in multiple dimension. The area under the convex hull of DD-plot can be used as similarity matrix to any clustering technique. In this study we used Affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm for grouping the similar catchments. Catchment classifications based on flow and physical characteristics were compared. We evaluate whether the similarity based on depth-depth plots provides a better basis for transferring parameter sets of a hydrological model between catchments. We used a case study of 21 catchments located in the Bay of Plenty region in the North Island of New Zealand. The catchments have a wide range of topographic properties, response behaviours and geological features. The TopNet hydrological model was calibrated for all the catchments and the transferability of model parameters among the similar catchments was tested by transferring the parameters from within the cluster group and outside the group. The results of parameter transferred with in group based on Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient are promising. Results also show that clustering based on our proposed depth-depth measure, catchment characteristics, flow, and flow indices are different. The catchment classification of this study can be used to improve regional flood forecasting capabilities.

  14. Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11

    E-print Network

    for Position Control of a Flexible Joint 11.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to design a full in this laboratory is illustrated. For this laboratory, the servo is used in the high gear ratio configuration (refer = 2.6 · Km: one of the motor torque constants. Km = 0.00767 · Kg: gear ratio of the motor

  15. LABORATORY I FORCES AND EQUILIBRIUM

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY I FORCES AND EQUILIBRIUM Lab I -1 In biological systems, most objects of interest are in or almost in equilibrium, either stationary or moving with a constant velocity. This important condition of equilibrium is the result of a balance among all of the different forces interacting with the object

  16. Computer-Assisted Laboratory Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, William J., Hanyak, Michael E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the advantages and features of computer-assisted laboratory stations for use in a chemical engineering program. Also describes a typical experiment at such a station: determining the response times of a solid state humidity sensor at various humidity conditions and developing an empirical model for the sensor. (JN)

  17. Similarity Metrics for Closed Loop Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Yang, Lee C.; Bedrossian, Naz; Hall, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent and in what ways can two closed-loop dynamic systems be said to be "similar?" This question arises in a wide range of dynamic systems modeling and control system design applications. For example, bounds on error models are fundamental to the controller optimization with modern control design methods. Metrics such as the structured singular value are direct measures of the degree to which properties such as stability or performance are maintained in the presence of specified uncertainties or variations in the plant model. Similarly, controls-related areas such as system identification, model reduction, and experimental model validation employ measures of similarity between multiple realizations of a dynamic system. Each area has its tools and approaches, with each tool more or less suited for one application or the other. Similarity in the context of closed-loop model validation via flight test is subtly different from error measures in the typical controls oriented application. Whereas similarity in a robust control context relates to plant variation and the attendant affect on stability and performance, in this context similarity metrics are sought that assess the relevance of a dynamic system test for the purpose of validating the stability and performance of a "similar" dynamic system. Similarity in the context of system identification is much more relevant than are robust control analogies in that errors between one dynamic system (the test article) and another (the nominal "design" model) are sought for the purpose of bounding the validity of a model for control design and analysis. Yet system identification typically involves open-loop plant models which are independent of the control system (with the exception of limited developments in closed-loop system identification which is nonetheless focused on obtaining open-loop plant models from closed-loop data). Moreover the objectives of system identification are not the same as a flight test and hence system identification error metrics are not directly relevant. In applications such as launch vehicles where the open loop plant is unstable it is similarity of the closed-loop system dynamics of a flight test that are relevant.

  18. Nomogram for Computing the Value of Similarity Factor

    PubMed Central

    Gohel, M. C.; Ramkishan, A.; Patel, T. M.; Pandya, Radhika; Suthar, Vrunda; Koradia, Hiral; Madat, D. V.; Bariya, Shital; Mehta, Tejal

    2014-01-01

    The objective of present work was to construct nomogram for obtaining a value of similarity factor (f2) by employing the values of number of observations (n) and sum of squared difference of percentage drug dissolved between reference (R) and test (T) products . The steps for rearrangement of equation of similarity factor are presented. The values of f2 were selected in the range of 45 to 100 for 4 to 12 observations (n) for computing the values of Linear regression analysis was performed between number of observations and . Perfect correlation was observed in each case. Nomogram was constructed and later it was validated by using drug dissolution data from literature and our laboratory. The use of nomogram is recommended during research and development work to investigate effect of formulation or process variables. The nomogram can also be used during change in manufacturing site or change in equipment. It is concluded that the steps for calculation of f2 can be truncated in the middle (i.e. at the step of calculation of factor and a decision of similarity/dissimilarity can be taken employing the nomogram. PMID:25035538

  19. Self-Similar Compressible Free Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonEllenrieder, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lie group methods are used to find both exact and numerical similarity solutions for compressible perturbations to all incompressible, two-dimensional, axisymmetric vortex reference flow. The reference flow vorticity satisfies an eigenvalue problem for which the solutions are a set of two-dimensional, self-similar, incompressible vortices. These solutions are augmented by deriving a conserved quantity for each eigenvalue, and identifying a Lie group which leaves the reference flow equations invariant. The partial differential equations governing the compressible perturbations to these reference flows are also invariant under the action of the same group. The similarity variables found with this group are used to determine the decay rates of the velocities and thermodynamic variables in the self-similar flows, and to reduce the governing partial differential equations to a set of ordinary differential equations. The ODE's are solved analytically and numerically for a Taylor vortex reference flow, and numerically for an Oseen vortex reference flow. The solutions are used to examine the dependencies of the temperature, density, entropy, dissipation and radial velocity on the Prandtl number. Also, experimental data on compressible free vortex flow are compared to the analytical results, the evolution of vortices from initial states which are not self-similar is discussed, and the energy transfer in a slightly-compressible vortex is considered.

  20. Earthquake detection through computationally efficient similarity search.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Clara E; O'Reilly, Ossian; Bergen, Karianne J; Beroza, Gregory C

    2015-12-01

    Seismology is experiencing rapid growth in the quantity of data, which has outpaced the development of processing algorithms. Earthquake detection-identification of seismic events in continuous data-is a fundamental operation for observational seismology. We developed an efficient method to detect earthquakes using waveform similarity that overcomes the disadvantages of existing detection methods. Our method, called Fingerprint And Similarity Thresholding (FAST), can analyze a week of continuous seismic waveform data in less than 2 hours, or 140 times faster than autocorrelation. FAST adapts a data mining algorithm, originally designed to identify similar audio clips within large databases; it first creates compact "fingerprints" of waveforms by extracting key discriminative features, then groups similar fingerprints together within a database to facilitate fast, scalable search for similar fingerprint pairs, and finally generates a list of earthquake detections. FAST detected most (21 of 24) cataloged earthquakes and 68 uncataloged earthquakes in 1 week of continuous data from a station located near the Calaveras Fault in central California, achieving detection performance comparable to that of autocorrelation, with some additional false detections. FAST is expected to realize its full potential when applied to extremely long duration data sets over a distributed network of seismic stations. The widespread application of FAST has the potential to aid in the discovery of unexpected seismic signals, improve seismic monitoring, and promote a greater understanding of a variety of earthquake processes. PMID:26665176

  1. Earthquake detection through computationally efficient similarity search

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Clara E.; O’Reilly, Ossian; Bergen, Karianne J.; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Seismology is experiencing rapid growth in the quantity of data, which has outpaced the development of processing algorithms. Earthquake detection—identification of seismic events in continuous data—is a fundamental operation for observational seismology. We developed an efficient method to detect earthquakes using waveform similarity that overcomes the disadvantages of existing detection methods. Our method, called Fingerprint And Similarity Thresholding (FAST), can analyze a week of continuous seismic waveform data in less than 2 hours, or 140 times faster than autocorrelation. FAST adapts a data mining algorithm, originally designed to identify similar audio clips within large databases; it first creates compact “fingerprints” of waveforms by extracting key discriminative features, then groups similar fingerprints together within a database to facilitate fast, scalable search for similar fingerprint pairs, and finally generates a list of earthquake detections. FAST detected most (21 of 24) cataloged earthquakes and 68 uncataloged earthquakes in 1 week of continuous data from a station located near the Calaveras Fault in central California, achieving detection performance comparable to that of autocorrelation, with some additional false detections. FAST is expected to realize its full potential when applied to extremely long duration data sets over a distributed network of seismic stations. The widespread application of FAST has the potential to aid in the discovery of unexpected seismic signals, improve seismic monitoring, and promote a greater understanding of a variety of earthquake processes. PMID:26665176

  2. Predicting missing links via structural similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Guo-Dong; Fan, Chang-Jun; Yu, Lian-Fei; Xiu, Bao-Xin; Zhang, Wei-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Predicting missing links in networks plays a significant role in modern science. On the basis of structural similarity, our paper proposes a new node-similarity-based measure called biased resource allocation (BRA), which is motivated by the resource allocation (RA) measure. Comparisons between BRA and nine well-known node-similarity-based measures on five real networks indicate that BRA performs no worse than RA, which was the best node-similarity-based index in previous researches. Afterwards, based on localPath (LP) and Katz measure, we propose another two improved measures, named Im-LocalPath and Im-Katz respectively. Numerical results show that the prediction accuracy of both Im-LP and Im-Katz measure improve compared with the original LP and Katz measure. Finally, a new path-similarity-based measure and its improved measure, called LYU and Im-LYU measure, are proposed and especially, Im-LYU measure is shown to perform more remarkably than other mentioned measures.

  3. Visual Tracking via Weighted Local Cosine Similarity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Lu, Huchuan; Bo, Chunjuan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel weighted local cosine similarity (WLCS) and apply it to visual tracking. First, we present the local cosine similarity to measure the similarities between the target template and candidates, and provide some theoretical insights on it. Second, we develop an objective function to model the discriminative ability of local components, and use a quadratic programming method to solve the objective function and to obtain the discriminative weights. Finally, we design an effective and efficient tracker based on the WLCS method and a simple update manner within the particle filter framework. Experimental results on several challenging image sequences show that the proposed tracker achieves better performance than other competing methods. PMID:25423661

  4. Biosequence Similarity Search on the Mercury System

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Praveen; Buhler, Jeremy; Chamberlain, Roger; Franklin, Mark; Gyang, Kwame; Jacob, Arpith; Lancaster, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Biosequence similarity search is an important application in modern molecular biology. Search algorithms aim to identify sets of sequences whose extensional similarity suggests a common evolutionary origin or function. The most widely used similarity search tool for biosequences is BLAST, a program designed to compare query sequences to a database. Here, we present the design of BLASTN, the version of BLAST that searches DNA sequences, on the Mercury system, an architecture that supports high-volume, high-throughput data movement off a data store and into reconfigurable hardware. An important component of application deployment on the Mercury system is the functional decomposition of the application onto both the reconfigurable hardware and the traditional processor. Both the Mercury BLASTN application design and its performance analysis are described. PMID:18846267

  5. Psychophysical evaluation of document visual similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satkhozhina, Aziza; Ahmadullin, Ildus; Lee, Seungyon; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-03-01

    Applications that classify and search documents based on their visual appearance need to recognize what document features are the most critical to human perception when humans compare the documents. This paper presents the results of a psychophysical experiment where subjects were asked to group the documents based on their visual similarity. Results from 15 subjects were saved into similarity matrices, and tested for inter-rater agreement. The similarity matrix averaged across the subjects was analyzed using agglomerative hierarchical clustering to identify the clusters. The humans' clustering was approximated with the weighted sum of four distance matrices that we calculated based on four document features. We identified the relative importance of the document features using an optimization method. Then, we tested the approximation using K-fold cross validation and the K-nearest neighbor algorithm. The results of the testing confirm the effectiveness of our approach.

  6. Novel laboratory simulations of astrophysical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Parrish Clawson

    This thesis was motivated by the promise that some physical aspects of astrophysical jets and collimation processes can be scaled to laboratory parameters through hydrodynamic scaling laws. The simulation of astrophysical jet phenomena with laser-produced plasmas was attractive because the laser- target interaction can inject energetic, repeatable plasma into an external environment. Novel laboratory simulations of astrophysical jets involved constructing and using the YOGA laser, giving a 1064 nm, 8 ns pulse laser with energies up to 3.7 + 0.2 J . Laser-produced plasmas were characterized using Schlieren, interferometry and ICCD photography for their use in simulating jet and magnetosphere physics. The evolution of the laser-produced plasma in various conditions was compared with self-similar solutions and HYADES computer simulations. Millimeter-scale magnetized collimated outflows were produced by a centimeter scale cylindrically symmetric electrode configuration triggered by a laser-produced plasma. A cavity with a flared nozzle surrounded the center electrode and the electrode ablation created supersonic uncollimated flows. This flow became collimated when the center electrode changed from an anodeto a cathode. The plasma jets were in axially directed permanent magnetic fields with strengths up to 5000 Gauss. The collimated magnetized jets were 0.1-0. 3 cm wide, up to 2.0 cm long, and had velocities of ~4.0 × 10 6 cm/s. The dynamics of the evolution of the jet were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with fluxtube simulations from Bellan's formulation [6] giving a calculated estimate of ~2.6 × 10 6 cm/s for jet evolution velocity and evidence for jet rotation. The density measured with interferometry was 1.9 ± 0.2 × 10 17 cm -3 compared with 2.1 × 10 16 cm -3 calculated with Bellan's pressure balance formulation. Kinks in the jet column were produced consistent with the Kruskal-Shafranov condition which allowed stable and symmetric jets to form with the background magnetic fields. The Euler number for the laboratory jet was 9 compared with an estimate of 40 for young stellar object jets [135] which demonstrated adequate scaling between the two frames. A second experiment was performed concerning laboratory simulations of magnetospheres with plasma winds impinging on permanent magnetic dipoles. The ratio of the magnetopause measured with ICCD photography to the calculated magnetopause standoff distance was ~2.

  7. Similarities between severe tinnitus and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Moller, A R

    2000-03-01

    The symptoms and signs of severe tinnitus and chronic pain have many similarities and similar hypotheses have been presented regarding how the symptoms are generated. Pain and tinnitus have many different forms. The severity of the symptoms of both varies within wide limits, and it is not likely that all forms have the same pathology. Some individuals with severe tinnitus perceive sounds to be unpleasant or painful. This may be similar to what is known as allodynia, which is a painful sensation of normally innocuous stimulation of the skin. Many individuals with chronic pain experience a worsening of their pain from repeated stimulation (the "wind-up" phenomenon). This is similar to the increasingly unpleasant feeling from sounds that are repeated that many individuals with severe tinnitus experience. There are also similarities in the hypotheses about the generation of pain and tinnitus. Although less severe tinnitus may be generated in the ear, it is believed that severe tinnitus in many cases is caused by changes in the nervous system that occur as a result of neural plasticity. Acute pain caused by tissue injury is generated at the site of injury but chronic pain is often generated in the central nervous system, yet another similarity between chronic pain and severe tinnitus. The changes in the nervous system consist of altered synaptic efficacy including opening of dormant synapses. For pain, this is believed to occur in the wide dynamic range neurons of the spinal cord and brain stem. Less is known about the anatomic location of the changes that cause severe tinnitus but there are indications that it may be the inferior colliculus. It is also possible that other auditory systems than the classical ascending pathways may be involved in severe tinnitus. PMID:10755808

  8. Inferring Trust Based on Similarity with TILLIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolifard, Mozhgan; Herrmann, Peter; Knapskog, Svein J.

    A network of people having established trust relations and a model for propagation of related trust scores are fundamental building blocks in many of today’s most successful e-commerce and recommendation systems. However, the web of trust is often too sparse to predict trust values between non-familiar people with high accuracy. Trust inferences are transitive associations among users in the context of an underlying social network and may provide additional information to alleviate the consequences of the sparsity and possible cold-start problems. Such approaches are helpful, provided that a complete trust path exists between the two users. An alternative approach to the problem is advocated in this paper. Based on collaborative filtering one can exploit the like-mindedness resp. similarity of individuals to infer trust to yet unknown parties which increases the trust relations in the web. For instance, if one knows that with respect to a specific property, two parties are trusted alike by a large number of different trusters, one can assume that they are similar. Thus, if one has a certain degree of trust to the one party, one can safely assume a very similar trustworthiness of the other one. In an attempt to provide high quality recommendations and proper initial trust values even when no complete trust propagation path or user profile exists, we propose TILLIT — a model based on combination of trust inferences and user similarity. The similarity is derived from the structure of the trust graph and users’ trust behavior as opposed to other collaborative-filtering based approaches which use ratings of items or user’s profile. We describe an algorithm realizing the approach based on a combination of trust inferences and user similarity, and validate the algorithm using a real large-scale data-set.

  9. Similarity Based Semantic Web Service Match

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hui; Niu, Wenjia; Huang, Ronghuai

    Semantic web service discovery aims at returning the most matching advertised services to the service requester by comparing the semantic of the request service with an advertised service. The semantic of a web service are described in terms of inputs, outputs, preconditions and results in Ontology Web Language for Service (OWL-S) which formalized by W3C. In this paper we proposed an algorithm to calculate the semantic similarity of two services by weighted averaging their inputs and outputs similarities. Case study and applications show the effectiveness of our algorithm in service match.

  10. Some more similarities between Peirce and Skinner

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2002-01-01

    C. S. Peirce is noted for pioneering a variety of views, and the case is made here for the similarities and parallels between his views and B. F. Skinner's radical behaviorism. In addition to parallels previously noted, these similarities include an advancement of experimental science, a behavioral psychology, a shift from nominalism to realism, an opposition to positivism, a selectionist account for strengthening behavior, the importance of a community of selves, a recursive approach to method, and the probabilistic nature of truth. Questions are raised as to the extent to which Skinner's radical behaviorism, as distinguished from his S-R positivism, may be seen as an extension of Peirce's pragmatism. PMID:22478387

  11. Similar erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein sensitivities at the onset of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Reitzenstein, Jonathan E.; Yamamoto, Loren G.; Mavoori, Hareesh

    2010-01-01

    The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are employed in the evaluation of patients with suspected septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and acute rheumatic fever. The purpose of this study is to determine if one test has greater sensitivity (rises earlier) than the other. Laboratory data were retrieved for pediatric patients hospitalized with one of the above three conditions, who had both ESR and CRP tests done on or shortly prior to admission. Sensitivity calculations were performed for mild, moderate, and severe degrees of ESR and CRP elevation. Microcytic erythrocytes, as defined by mean corpuscular volume (MCV) <80 µL, were identified to see if this affects the ESR. ESR or CRP sensitivities depend on the cutoff value (threshold) chosen as a positive test. The sensitivities were similar for similar degrees of elevation. ESR and CRP discordance was not significantly related to MCV. We concluded that the CRP does not rise earlier than the ESR (their sensitivities are similar). Previously published conclusions are dependent on arbitrary thresholds. We could not find any evidence that MCV affects the ESR. PMID:21589835

  12. Accumulation of PCBs and Hg by fish and earthworms during field and laboratory exposures to Green Bay sediments. Administrative report

    SciTech Connect

    Mac, M.J.; Edsall, C.C.; Hesselberg, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    To determine whether the laboratory bioassay of Mac et al. (1984) was indeed predictive of the potential accumulation in an area with contaminated sediments, the authors conducted a field exposure of caged test organisms in lower Green Bay and a laboratory bioassay of sediments collected from the same area. The authors believe the results of this study provides an initial indication that the levels of bioaccumulation of contaminants from sediments in the laboratory are similar to what may be found in the natural environment, thus indicating potential predictive capability of the laboratory bioassay. The study further demonstrated the importance of sediment contact to the bioaccumulation process, even under conditions where significant bioaccumulation from water alone occurred.

  13. The Case of the Similar Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rochelle Wilson

    1982-01-01

    A possible logical flaw based on similar triangles is discussed with the Sherlock Holmes mystery, "The Muskgrave Ritual." The possible flaw has to do with the need for two trees to have equal growth rates over a 250-year period in order for the solution presented to work. (MP)

  14. Limit Cycles from the Similarity Renormalization Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, P.; Hammer, H.-W.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate renormalization group limit cycles within the similarity renormalization group (SRG) and discuss their signatures in the evolved interaction. A quantitative method to detect limit cycles in the interaction and to extract their period is proposed. Several SRG generators are compared regarding their suitability for this purpose. As a test case, we consider the limit cycle of the inverse square potential.

  15. Cognitive Similarity in Normal and Schizogenic Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibowitz, Gerald

    The basic purpose of this study was to measure cognitive similarity, and to test the hypothesis that the cognitive organization of a child (normal or schizophrenic) is more like that of his own parents than it is like that of randomly chosen, unrelated adults. Thirty-six matched family triads, half with sons hospitalized for a schizophrenic…

  16. Great Apes' Capacities to Recognize Relational Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun, Daniel B. M.; Call, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing relational similarity relies on the ability to understand that defining object properties might not lie in the objects individually, but in the relations of the properties of various object to each other. This aptitude is highly relevant for many important human skills such as language, reasoning, categorization and understanding…

  17. Training of Medical Assistants and Similar Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    The 12-member WHO Expert Committee on Professional and Technical Education of Medical and Auxiliary Personnel met during a 4-day conference in Geneva, Switzerland, to review experience to date, including surveys made by consultants in 1965 and 1966, and to make recommendations on the training and utilization of medical assistants and similar

  18. Joining similar and dissimilar advanced engineering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeslack, W. A., III; Froes, F. H.

    1995-03-01

    The typically specialized property combinations associated with advanced materials, combined with a desire for monolithic structures to maximize efficiency and performance, requires their effective joining. Through proper joining process selection and parameter optimization, both similar and ultimately dissimilar combinations of materials can be joined to produce high-performance components and systems.

  19. Joining similar and dissimilar advanced engineered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeslack, W. A., III; Froes, F. H.

    1995-03-01

    The typically specialized property combinations associated with advanced materials, combined with a desire for monolithic structures to maximize efficiency and performance, requires their effective joining. Through proper joining process selection and parameter optimization, both similar and ultimately dissimilar combinations of materials can be joined to produce high-performance components and systems.

  20. From Similarity to Chance1 Sergey Blok

    E-print Network

    Osherson, Daniel

    The blank-predicate argument Bears require biotin for hemoglobin synthesis. Wolves requires biotin- ition that cameras and computers do not require biotin but no a priori sense of whether bears and wolves do. Nonetheless, the assertion that bears require biotin, coupled with the similarity of wolves