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Sample records for laboratory newport news

  1. 33 CFR 165.504 - Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va. 165.504 Section 165.504 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.504 Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James...

  2. 33 CFR 165.504 - Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va. 165.504 Section 165.504 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.504 Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James...

  3. 33 CFR 165.504 - Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va. 165.504 Section 165.504 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.504 Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James...

  4. 33 CFR 165.504 - Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va. 165.504 Section 165.504 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.504 Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James...

  5. 33 CFR 165.504 - Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va. 165.504 Section 165.504 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.504 Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James...

  6. 77 FR 58773 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; James River, Newport News, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; James River, Newport News, VA AGENCY... James River, mile 5.0, at Newport News, VA. The deviation is necessary to facilitate the structural... regular operating schedule, the US 17/258 Bridge over the James River, mile 5.0, at Newport News, VA...

  7. 78 FR 11094 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; James River, Between Isle of Wight and Newport News, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... and Newport News, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation... News, VA. This deviation is necessary to facilitate generator replacement on the James River Draw... operating schedule, the James River Bridge, mile 5.0, between Isle of Isle and Newport News, VA opens...

  8. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newport News, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-07-13

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), in this Environmental Assessment (EA), reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from the proposed construction of various site improvements and the proposed installation and operation of the Helios light source at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia. Jefferson Lab is operated by the Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc. (SURA) under contract to DOE. With this proposal, DOE intends to construct no more than four major two or three story additions totaling about 151,000 sq. ft. (square feet) to CEBAF Center, the main facility administration building, and the addition of three new single story and one two story operations support structures on the accelerator site. The structures are a 28,000 sq. ft. storage building, a 15,100 sq. ft. technical support building, a 3,500 sq. ft. refrigeration service building, and a two-story 22,600 sq. ft addition to the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility. The proposed action also involves the installation and operation of the Helios (High-Energy Lithography Source) accelerator in the FEL Addition. DOE proposes to take this action to provide Jefferson Lab with improved staff and operations support facilities that, along with the operation of Helios, will provide an increased capability to facilitate accelerator and physics program operations. Support activities necessary to effect the installation and operation of Helios would begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 03. It is expected that the Helios machine should be available to serve developmental and operational activities in support of the physics program later in FY 04. In this EA, DOE presents the no action alternative, alternatives considered and dismissed, and the proposed action alternative. It also evaluates the impacts of each.

  9. Newport Geomagnetic Observatory

    The Newport observatory dedication, 11 June 1966. Left to right: V. Adm H. Arnold Karo, Dep Adm. ESSA (Environmental Science Services Administration); US Senator Henry M. Jackson, Washington State; Mayor David Sherman, Newport, Washington; US Congressman Thomas S. Foley, 5th Dist., Washington; R. Ad...

  10. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    Belfast: On the next level above Galileo Wales: 2nd All Wales Physics Teachers Meeting England: Good afternoon Natural Philosphers... Communication: Posters win prizes Careers: Physics On Course 2004 Visits: Refreshing Physics Sport: Cheating at baseball Physics on Stage: Polish performance Space: Forces that affect GPS satellites New Zealand: It’s not All Black News these days New Initiatives: NOISE Physics on Stage 3: Lively stars heading for ESA

  11. 77 FR 6010 - Anchorage Regulations; Newport, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ...The Coast Guard is changing the shape and expanding the dimensions of anchorage ``D'' at Newport, Rhode Island, to better accommodate increasing cruise ship visits to Newport and to improve navigation...

  12. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  13. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    AWARDS Presentations to top students; PHYSICS IN PRIMARY SCIENCE Amaze and inspire; WEB RESOURCES PhysicsClub goes live; EVENTS GIREP develops thinking; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Carbon dating may not run to time; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Vocational qualifications; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Flanders gears up for curriculum change; EXHIBITIONS Building the Universe; EVENTS Physics Discipline Network VII; SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE Progress in UK post-16 courses; Teaching Advancing Physics... the story so far; An outside observer's view of Advancing Physics; Student views of SHAP; Results from the SHAP pilot: successful and girl-friendly; AWARDS Royal visit to publisher;

  14. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    EPS AWARD WINNERS Award for outreach to Physics Education authors; TEACHER TRAINING Helping teachers specialize in physics; AAPT SUMMER MEETING The science of light; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Do you believe in skepticism?; E-LEARNING Massive investment in Swedish online learning; UK SCIENCE YEAR News from Science Year; 11-16 CURRICULUM Naming the energy parts; TEACHER TRAINING Electronic Discussion Group for Trainee Teachers; PUBLICATIONS Physics on Course 2002; WALES Physics in Powys; HIGHER EDUCATION HE solutions to the physics teacher shortage; SCOTLAND The 27th Scottish Stirling Meeting; NORTHERN IRELAND Belfast physics teachers' meeting; SCOTLAND Physics Summer School, Edinburgh 2001; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Physics education research: massive growth; AAPT SUMMER MEETING Just-In-Time Teaching;

  15. Renewable Energy Optimization Report for Naval Station Newport

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.; Mosey, G.; Olis, D.

    2012-02-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage the development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. As part of this effort, EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island. NREL's Renewable Energy Optimization (REO) tool was utilized to identify RE technologies that present the best opportunity for life-cycle cost-effective implementation while also serving to reduce energy-related carbon dioxide emissions and increase the percentage of RE used at NAVSTA Newport. The technologies included in REO are daylighting, wind, solar ventilation preheating (SVP), solar water heating, photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal (heating and electric), and biomass (gasification and cogeneration). The optimal mix of RE technologies depends on several factors including RE resources; technology cost and performance; state, utility, and federal incentives; and economic parameters (discount and inflation rates). Each of these factors was considered in this analysis. Technologies not included in REO that were investigated separately per NAVSTA Newport request include biofuels from algae, tidal power, and ground source heat pumps (GSHP).

  16. 77 FR 27381 - Safety Zone; Newport High School Graduation Fireworks, Newport, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Newport High School Graduation Fireworks... the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not plan to....1. 2. Add Sec. 165.T216 Safety Zone; Newport High School Graduation Fireworks Display; Newport,...

  17. 76 FR 59596 - Anchorage Regulations; Newport, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But, you may submit a request... cruise ship visits to Newport and to improve navigation safety. DATES: Comments and related material..., Rhode Island, to better accommodate increasing cruise ship visits to Newport, and to improve...

  18. Jefferson Laboratory: Maintenance overview

    SciTech Connect

    Steve F.Suhring

    1998-05-01

    Maintenance, repair, and upgrades to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, a DOE laboratory located in Newport News, VA, USA, is based upon a two-week run cycle followed by a one-shift maintenance period. The rationale for this approach will be presented including a brief look at the maintenance funding, support staff, and beam availability. Means for improving the machine will be presented including record keeping of downtime, compilation of data, dissemination of findings, and allocation of resources. Maintenance problems facing Jefferson Lab will be presented.

  19. 33 CFR 334.82 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coasters Harbor Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Coasters Harbor Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. 334.82 Section 334... Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within a “C-shaped” area adjacent to and surrounding Coasters Harbor Island beginning at Coddington Point...

  20. SUITABILITY OF SELECTED CROPS AND SOIL FOR GARDEN SYMPHYLAN (SYMPHYLA, SCUTIGERELLIDAE: SCUTIGERELLA IMMACULATA NEWPORT) POPULATION GROWTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The suitability of selected crops and soil for garden symphylan (Scutigerella immaculata Newport) population growth was studied in the laboratory and field. In the laboratory, we measured the population increase of S. immaculata after 8 w from a starting density of 35 in pots of spinach (Spinacia o...

  1. 33 CFR 110.212 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Newport Bay Harbor, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.212 Newport Bay Harbor, Calif. (a) The anchorage...° from Newport Bay Channel Light 11, this line being the north line of the main fairway; northwest of...

  2. 33 CFR 110.212 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Newport Bay Harbor, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.212 Newport Bay Harbor, Calif. (a) The anchorage...° from Newport Bay Channel Light 11, this line being the north line of the main fairway; northwest of...

  3. 78 FR 48609 - Safety Zone; James River; Newport News, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... zone around the USNS Del Monte. This safety zone will restrict vessel traffic on a portion of the James...) the zone is of limited size; (iii) mariners may transit the waters in and around this safety zone...

  4. Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport utilities metering, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, D.M.

    1992-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed this report for the US Navy`s Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Rhode Island (NUWC). The purpose of the report was to review options for metering electricity and steam used in the NUWC compound, and to make recommendations to NUWC for implementation under a follow-on project. An additional NUWC concern is a proposed rate change by the servicing utility, Newport Electric, which would make a significant shift from consumption to demand billing, and what effect that rate change would have on the NUWC utility budget. Automated, remote reading meters are available which would allow NUWC to monitor its actual utility consumption and demand for both the entire NUWC compound and by end-use in individual buildings. Technology is available to perform the meter reads and manipulate the data using a personal computer with minimal staff requirement. This is not meant to mislead the reader into assuming that there is no requirement for routine preventive maintenance. All equipment requires routine maintenance to maintain its accuracy. While PNL reviewed the data collected during the site visit, however, it became obvious that significant opportunities exist for reducing the utility costs other than accounting for actual consumption and demand. Unit costs for both steam and electricity are unnecessarily high, and options are presented in this report for reducing them. Additionally, NUWC has an opportunity to undertake a comprehensive energy resource management program to significantly reduce its energy demand, consumption, and costs.

  5. INFLUENCE OF BELOW-GROUND FEEDING BY GARDEN SYMPHYLANS (SYMPHYLA, SCUTIGERELLIDAE: SCUTIGERELLA IMMACULATA NEWPORT) ON PLANT HEALTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of garden symphylan (Scutigerella immaculata Newport) root feeding on crop health was measured in the laboratory and in the field. In the laboratory, the relative susceptibility of sweet corn (Zea mays L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and tomato (Lyc...

  6. 33 CFR 110.46 - Newport Harbor, Newport, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... beginning. (b) Area No. 2. The waters east of Goat Island beginning at a point bearing 090, 245 yards from Goat Island Shoal Light; thence 007, 505 yards; thence 054, 90 yards; thence 086, 330 yards; thence... beginning. (c) Area No. 3. The waters north of Goat Island Causeway Bridge beginning at Newport Harbor...

  7. Revised Miocene and Pliocene diatom biostratigraphy of Upper Newport Bay, Newport Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    North Pacific diatom zones XXIII through IX of Schrader are recognizable in the middle Miocene to lower Pliocene stratigraphic section exposed around Upper Newport Bay in Newport Beach, California. Correlation with DSDP Site 173 and other stratigraphic sections in California allows the selection of diatom datums that are the most reliable for long-distance correlation. Individual diatom datums are proposed as markers for North Pacific diatom zones XXIII through IX. Correlations with DSDP Site 173 reveal a hiatus in the lower part of Core 15 that corresponds with a distinct lithologic and floral change in the core. Preliminary silicoflagellate data for the Upper Newport Bay stratigraphic section supports the diatom correlations. Correlation with calcareous nannofossil, radiolarian, and silicoflagellate zones at Upper Newport Bay and at DSDP Site 173 suggests that the boundary between North Pacific diatom zones XVII and XVI approximates the middle Miocene/upper Miocene boundary. The Miocene/Pliocene boundary is estimated to be in North Pacific diatom zone X. One new stratigraphically useful diatom species is described, Lithodesmium reynoldsii. ?? 1976.

  8. 33 CFR 110.46 - Newport Harbor, Newport, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... beginning. (b) Area No. 2. The waters east of Goat Island beginning at a point bearing 090°, 245 yards from Goat Island Shoal Light; thence 007°, 505 yards; thence 054°, 90 yards; thence 086°, 330 yards; thence... beginning. (c) Area No. 3. The waters north of Goat Island Causeway Bridge beginning at Newport Harbor...

  9. 33 CFR 110.46 - Newport Harbor, Newport, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... beginning. (b) Area No. 2. The waters east of Goat Island beginning at a point bearing 090°, 245 yards from Goat Island Shoal Light; thence 007°, 505 yards; thence 054°, 90 yards; thence 086°, 330 yards; thence... beginning. (c) Area No. 3. The waters north of Goat Island Causeway Bridge beginning at Newport Harbor...

  10. 33 CFR 110.46 - Newport Harbor, Newport, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... beginning. (b) Area No. 2. The waters east of Goat Island beginning at a point bearing 090°, 245 yards from Goat Island Shoal Light; thence 007°, 505 yards; thence 054°, 90 yards; thence 086°, 330 yards; thence... beginning. (c) Area No. 3. The waters north of Goat Island Causeway Bridge beginning at Newport Harbor...

  11. 33 CFR 110.46 - Newport Harbor, Newport, R.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... beginning. (b) Area No. 2. The waters east of Goat Island beginning at a point bearing 090°, 245 yards from Goat Island Shoal Light; thence 007°, 505 yards; thence 054°, 90 yards; thence 086°, 330 yards; thence... beginning. (c) Area No. 3. The waters north of Goat Island Causeway Bridge beginning at Newport Harbor...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1112 - Newport Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Newport Bay, CA. 80.1112 Section 80.1112 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1112 Newport Bay, CA. A line drawn from...

  13. 77 FR 22489 - Special Anchorage Regulations, Newport Bay Harbor, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Anchorage Regulations, Newport Bay Harbor, CA'' in the Federal Register (76 FR 78185). We received no... docket. The enlargement of the special anchorage areas does not pose any waterway or navigational hazard... ordinance and the City of Newport's municipal code. The enlargement of the special anchorages does...

  14. 33 CFR 110.95 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Newport Bay Harbor, Calif. 110.95 Section 110.95 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.95 Newport Bay Harbor, Calif. (a) Area A-1. In Lido Channel, northeast of a line parallel...

  15. 77 FR 27115 - Newport to Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ...The Coast Guard will enforce the Special Local Regulation for the biennial Newport to Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Friday, June 15, 2012. During the enforcement period, no person or vessel may enter or remain in the regulated area except for participants in the event, supporting personnel, vessels registered with the event organizer, and......

  16. The Newporte impact structure, North Dakota, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, C.; Reimold, W.U.

    1995-12-31

    The 3-km-diameter Newporte structure is located close to the USA - Canada border in North Dakota, in the Williston Basin. The structure is currently covered by about 3 km of various supracrustal rock formations and was first studied in the course of hydrocarbon exploration in the late 1970s. The structure is situated in Precambrian crystalline basement, which is highly fractured and brecciated. Detailed petrographic and geochemical studies of rock samples from the Duerre 43-5, the Mott 14-34, and the Wisdahl 23 -10 drill cores show the presence of three types of breccias: a mainly granite-derived breccia, a predominantly (meta) sediment-derived breccia, and a mixed breccia type. Quartz grains (as well as a few rare feldspar grains) from all three breccia types show planar deformation features (PDFs) with up to five sets per grain. Measurements of the crystallographic orientations of the PDFs show predominantly (10{bar 1}3) ({omega}) and (10{bar 1}2) ({pi}) orientations, which are characteristic of shock metamorphism and indicate peak shock pressures in excess of 12 GPa. The major and trace element composition of the target rocks (granitoid and sedimentary rocks) and the fragmental impact breccias was measured. All three rock types (sediments, granitoids, and breccias) show a wide compositional range. Mixing calculations were performed and yield results and are in general agreement with the petrographic observations, but the compositional similarity of the target rock components and their wide range in chemical composition make unambiguous mixing calculations difficult. The results of our study confirm the impact origin of the Newporte structure. 43 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella Newport isolated from animals, the environment, and animal food products in Canada.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Cornelius; Martin, Laura; Muckle, Anne; Archambault, Marie; McEwen, Scott; Weir, Emily

    2006-04-01

    Multi-drug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Newport strains are increasingly isolated from animals and food products of animal origin and have caused septicemic illness in animals and humans. The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence and the epidemiologic, phenotypic, and genotypic characteristics of S. Newport of animal origin that may infect humans, either via the food chain or directly. During the 1993-2002 period, the Office International des Epizooties Reference Laboratory for Salmonellosis in Guelph, Ontario, received 36 841 Salmonella strains for serotyping that had been isolated from animals, environmental sources, and food of animal origin in Canada. Of these, 119 (0.3%) were S. Newport. Before 2000, none of 49 S. Newport strains was resistant to more than 3 antimicrobials. In contrast, between January 2000 and December 2002, 35 of 70 isolates, primarily of bovine origin, were resistant to at least 11 antimicrobials, including the extended-spectrum cephalosporins. The blaCMY-2', flo(st'), strA, strB, sulII, and tetA resistance genes were located on plasmids of 80 to 90 MDa that were self-transmissible in 25% of the strains. Conserved segments of the integron 1 gene were found on the large MDR-encoding plasmids in 3 of 35 strains additionally resistant to gentamicin and spectinomycin or to spectinomycin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and trimethoprim. Resistance to kanamycin and neomycin was encoded by the aphA-1 gene, located on small plasmids (2.3 to 6 MDa). The increase in bovine-associated MDR S. Newport infections is cause for concern since it indicates an increased risk of human acquisition of the infection via the food chain. PMID:16639942

  18. 77 FR 20330 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area; Rhode Island Sound off Newport, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... Sound off Newport, RI AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The U.S... located in the waters of Rhode Island Sound, 4 nautical miles due south of Lands End in Newport, Rhode... area in Rhode Island Sound, 4 nautical miles due south of Lands End in Newport, Rhode Island....

  19. Outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections linked to cucumbers--United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Kristina M; Chu, Alvina; Anand, Madhu; Nguyen, Thai-An; Bottichio, Lyndsay; Wise, Matthew; Williams, Ian; Seelman, Sharon; Bell, Rebecca; Fatica, Marianne; Lance, Susan; Baldwin, Deanna; Shannon, Kyle; Lee, Hannah; Trees, Eija; Strain, Errol; Gieraltowski, Laura

    2015-02-20

    In August 2014, PulseNet, the national molecular subtyping network for foodborne disease surveillance, detected a multistate cluster of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport infections with an indistinguishable pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern (XbaI PFGE pattern JJPX01.0061). Outbreaks of illnesses associated with this PFGE pattern have previously been linked to consumption of tomatoes harvested from Virginia's Eastern Shore in the Delmarva region and have not been linked to cucumbers or other produce items. To identify the contaminated food and find the source of the contamination, CDC, state and local health and agriculture departments and laboratories, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducted epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory investigations. A total of 275 patients in 29 states and the District of Columbia were identified, with illness onsets occurring during May 20-September 30, 2014. Whole genome sequencing (WGS), a highly discriminating subtyping method, was used to further characterize PFGE pattern JJPX01.0061 isolates. Epidemiologic, microbiologic, and product traceback evidence suggests that cucumbers were a source of Salmonella Newport infections in this outbreak. The epidemiologic link to a novel outbreak vehicle suggests an environmental reservoir for Salmonella in the Delmarva region that should be identified and mitigated to prevent future outbreaks. PMID:25695319

  20. Report of the Study of Newport's Libraries, Summer 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowery, Ann; Holden, Barbara

    An investigation of the school and public libraries in Newport, New Hampshire was conducted to determine the kinds of cooperation which would lead to the best possible service for users. The following major recommendations were made. First, it was suggested that the Advisory Council on Libraries created for the study, be maintained, and that a…

  1. 76 FR 14799 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Newport, VT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... the surface, at Newport, VT (75 FR 73015) Docket No. FAA-2010-0938. Interested parties were invited to... rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p....

  2. Block glides offshore Newport Beach, Southern California continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.G.; Clarke, S.H. Jr.; Kennedy, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    The continental slope offshore Newport Beach, California, is characterized by a relatively gentle (approximately 1/sup 0/) grade and is dissected by numerous channels and canyons, of which the most conspicuous is Newport Canyon. An unusual series of block-glide landslides have developed on this lope adjacent to many of these channels. Locally, secondary channels that develop along pull-apart fractures between the slide blocks may service as conduits for downslope sediment movement. A detailed seismic-reflection survey of the area shows that the slope is underlain by soft water-saturated unstable sediment of Quaternary age. The block-glides lie wholly within this sediment; displaced blocks appear to have moved only a short distance downslope and are preserved as intact masses that exhibit downward increasing internal deformation. This deformation reaches a maximum near the front of the displaced mass and in basal beds nearest the slip surface. The morphology of the blocks and their intervening channellike erosional scarps is similar to that of glacial blocks and their associated bergschrunds. The formation of new scarps and the widening of channels formed as pull-aparts by the ongoing process of block movement may contribute to headward erosion and widening of Newport Canyon and its tributaries. Slope failure might be greatly enhanced by strong ground motion associated with nearby earthquakes. The authors suspect that renewed movement occurs on these blocks during major seismic events on the nearby Newport-Inglewood fault (e.g., 1933 M/sub L/ 6.3 event).

  3. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.81 Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. (a) The area. All of the navigable...

  4. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.81 Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. (a) The area. All of the navigable...

  5. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.81 Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. (a) The area. All of the navigable...

  6. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.81 Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. (a) The area. All of the navigable...

  7. Paleoecology of middle and late Miocene Monterey Formation, Upper Newport Bay, Newport Beach, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, A.P.; Douglas, R.G.

    1986-07-01

    The Miocene Monterey Formation exposed along the cliffs of Upper Newport Bay represents a lower calcareous facies dominated by foraminifera and coccoliths, indicating warm climate and low nutrient waters, and a siliceous facies consisting of diatomaceous rocks, which records high productivity as a result of climatic deterioration and intensified upwelling. Using the distribution and preservation of foraminifera in the California continental borderland basins as a modern analog, they interpret the effect of changing environmental (climatic and oceanographic) conditions during the middle and late Miocene on the distribution and preservation of foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, radiolarians, diatoms, and sediments. Two stratigraphic sections were sampled: (1) middle Miocene (Luisian) section 1, and (2) late Miocene (upper Mohnian) section 2. Section 1 best correlates with the middle Miocene Sphenolithus heteromorphus nannofossil zone. Benthic foraminifera indicate deposition in upper bathyal to upper middle bathyal depths. Poor preservation of calcareous tests is generally associated with homogeneous sediments, whereas better preservation is correlated with indistinctly laminated rocks. Stratigraphic section 2, which accumulated in upper bathyal depths, covers parts of the early late Miocene (upper Mohnian) Denticulopsis hustedtii-D. lauta and D. hustedtii diatom zones. Foraminifera and nannofossils are generally more abundant and better preserved in well laminated sediments than in sediments with homogeneous to indistinct laminations. Benthic foraminifera favoring low oxygen conditions have low diversities in rocks with poorly preserved laminations, but have higher densities in well laminated intervals.

  8. Impact origin of the Newporte structure, Williston basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, N.F.; Gerlach, T.R.; Anderson, N.L.

    1996-05-01

    The Newporte field is located just south of the United States-Canada border in Renville County, North Dakota, in the north-central portion of the Williston basin. Integration of seismic, well-log, and core data supports the interpretation of an impact origin for the Newporte structure. The structure involves both Precambrian basement and lower Paleozoic sedimentary units. Oil and gas production began in 1977 from brecciated basement rocks along the rim of the 3.2-km-diameter circular structure. Both well logs and seismic data were used to determine thickness changes of sedimentary units overlying the structure. Resulting isopach maps reveal a circular, bowl-shaped feature with a recognizable rim. Microscopic shock metamorphic features in quartz and feldspar are visible in basement clasts that form a mixed breccia with Cambrian Deadwood sandstone within the western rim of the structure. A Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician age is suggested for the structure because of the presence of flatlying Deadwood sandstone overlying mixed basement/sandstone breccia along portions of the rim. Identification of the Newporte structure as an impact crater adds to the growing base of evidence revealing the relevance of impact craters to petroleum exploration.

  9. Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    We are summarizing the experimental program of Jefferson Lab (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA) in deep inelastic electron scattering. We show recent results and discuss future plans for both the present 6 GeV era and the 12 GeV energy-upgraded facility.

  10. Genetic diversity of Salmonella pathogenicity islands SPI-5 and SPI-6 in Salmonella Newport.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guojie; Allard, Marc; Strain, Errol; Stones, Robert; Zhao, Shaohua; Brown, Eric; Meng, Jianghong

    2014-10-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Newport is one of the common serotypes causing foodborne salmonellosis outbreaks in the United States. Salmonella Newport consists of three lineages exhibiting extensive genetic diversity. Due to the importance of Salmonella pathogenicity islands 5 and 6 (SPI-5 and SPI-6) in virulence of pathogenic Salmonella, the genetic diversity of these two SPIs may relate to different potentials of Salmonella Newport pathogenicity. Most Salmonella Newport strains from North America belong to Salmonella Newport lineages II and III. A total 28 Salmonella Newport strains of lineages II and III from diverse sources and geographic locations were analyzed, and 11 additional Salmonella genomes were used as outgroup in phylogenetic analyses. SPI-5 was identified in all Salmonella Newport strains and 146 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected. Thirty-nine lineage-defining SNPs were identified, including 18 nonsynonymous SNPs. Two 40-kb genomic islands (SPI5-GI1 and SPI5-GI2) encoding bacteriophage genes were found between tRNA-ser and pipA. SPI5-GI1 was only present in Salmonella Newport multidrug-resistant strains of lineage II. SPI-6 was found in all strains but three Asian strains in Salmonella Newport lineage II, whereas the three Asian strains carried genomic island SPI6-GI1 at the same locus as SPI-6 in other Salmonella. SPI-6 exhibited 937 SNPs, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that clustering of Salmonella Newport isolates was a reflection of their geographic origins. The sequence diversity within SPI-5 and SPI-6 suggests possible recombination events and different virulence potentials of Salmonella Newport. The SNPs could be used as biomarkers during epidemiological investigations. PMID:25188010

  11. Epidemic of restaurant-associated illness due to Salmonella newport.

    PubMed

    Narain, J P; Lofgren, J P

    1989-07-01

    In June and July 1982, a large outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with a barbecue restaurant involved 120 persons in central Arkansas. The illness was characterized by diarrhea, abdominal pain, and vomiting; 23 patients (19%) were hospitalized. Epidemiologic investigation showed that persons who became ill were more likely to have eaten ham or pork sandwiches at the restaurant before their illness than those who remained well. Stool cultures from 19 customers and each of the eight restaurant employees were positive for Salmonella newport. Cultures of a ham slice obtained from the restaurant and a partially consumed pork sandwich obtained from one ill person both grew Salmonella of same serotype. PMID:2749351

  12. 77 FR 47787 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Newport River, Morehead...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... Waterway (AIWW), Newport River, Morehead City, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Carolina Coastal Railroad Bridge, at AIWW mile 203.8, across Newport River in Morehead City, NC....

  13. 75 FR 73015 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Newport, VT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory Evaluation... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3... action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Newport, VT, as the Newport Non-Directional Beacon (NDB)...

  14. 75 FR 6360 - Information on Surplus Land at a Military Installation Designated for Disposal: Newport Naval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Farms 1 & 2, Portsmouth, and Midway/Green Lane Parcel, Stringham Road and Portion of Defense Highway.../Green Lane Parcel, Stringham Road and Portion of Defense Highway, that are surplus to the needs of the... Complex at 43 Smith Road, located within the County of Newport and the City of Newport, RI. The...

  15. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    When Mary took up her appointment in the Institute's Education Department in June 1997, she indicated that she wished to return to teaching in two or three years. We have just heard that in September she will be joining the staff of the Science Department at Camden Girls' School, London. Mary's departure from the Institute is a great loss to the Department, where she has worked tirelessly, and with great imagination, to support those who teach physics at all secondary levels - and at primary level too when the opportunity presented itself. She has made tremendous contributions to the careers side of the Department's work, supporting careers events, providing informal training for others willing to do the same, helping to develop new careers materials and identifying people whom the Institute could use as role models or as the subject of case studies in print or electronic publications. Mary has been equally happy and willing to support pupils, students and teachers, and has been a wonderful role model herself, coming from an industrial research background, training for teaching after a career break and willing and able to teach biology, chemistry and design technology as well as physics. Mary has also written and edited Phases virtually single-handed. We are delighted to hear that Mary will continue to support the department's work as one of its teacher `volunteers'. Ilya Eigenbrot We are pleased to report that Ilya Eigenbrot, who will be known to some through his work at the Royal Institution and his appearances at the Christmas Lectures in a technical support role, has agreed to give the IOP Schools (touring) Lecture next year. The subject will be Lasers and this will follow nicely on to Zbig's lecture this year. Resources (print) Physics on Course The tenth issue of the Institute's popular guide to higher education, Physics on Course 2001, will be published early in July and distributed to all schools and colleges in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Its pages are brimming with useful information to help sixth-formers and college students who wish to study physics make the very important decision regarding their particular choice of course and university. Under the heading `Summary tables of physics courses' every university listed in the publication has a table which includes all the courses on offer, their entrance requirements, duration and the awards given. Another section of the book entitled `Departmental information' includes data on the teaching and assessment styles of the Physics Department, special facilities plus a contact name and address. These sections, together with an expanded set of case studies of recent students and various other interesting articles, make this publication a must for anyone who is considering studying physics at university. Copies of Physics on Course 2001 will be available from Leila Solomon, Education Department, Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London, W1N 3DH. The Particle Physics Wallchart (PCET) This full-colour chart, with a set of Teachers Notes, was published recently. It has been developed by PCET with Professor Peter Kalmus acting as expert consultant. The cost of the chart and notes is £7.75 plus VAT and copies can be purchased from PCET, 27 Kirchen Road, London W13 0UD (fax: 020 8566 5120). Inspire II The second part of Inspire was published in the Spring. It is a highly visual, full-colour leaflet which can be used as a stand-alone item but which was designed to `nest' inside the first four-page spread which was distributed in February. The occupational areas for physicists covered in the second leaflet include the media/leisure, finance and engineering (at technician level) industries. The third of the intended four sheets will be published later this year. (Copies of Inspire II have been included in the Affiliated schools/colleges package; other schools/colleges will be sent copies on request.) Nanotechnology - a technical brief The Industrial Affairs Department of the Institute is working on a series of Technical Briefs to broaden the provision of physics information to Members. The first title in the series, `Nanotechnology', is due to be published last month. The aim of this new series is to provide technical updates on current applications of physics, targeted at the nonspecialist scientist and engineer. The emphasis will be on burgeoning areas of physics with potential application across several or many fields. `Nanotechnology', for example, will sketch the background to the field, indicate the current state of the art and give a realistic view on future developments. The target readers are Institute of Physics Members in general, not specialists in nanotechnology or related topics and, in this respect, the Briefs could be of great interest to teachers. They are free of charge to Members but £7.50 for non-members. To obtain a copy, contact Emma Woods on 020 7470 4927 or by e-mail (emma.woods@iop.org). Courses Physics Update: 8-10 July, University of York The information leaflet/booking form for this course was sent to schools and colleges at the beginning of this term. Lecture topics include Ultrasonic imaging, Chaos, and The search for extra-terrestrial intelligent life. There will be workshops on New activities from Salters Horners physics, Computer modelling in A2 physics and Misconceptions in the learning of forces. Further information and booking forms are available from Leila Solomon. The venues and dates of subsequent Update courses are: 8-10 December, Oxford University 31 March-2 April 2001, Malvern College 7-9 July 2001, Royal Holloway College, London Teaching Physics INSET Days Following successful pilot runs in the summer term last year and at IOP Congress, the Education Department is organizing four (possibly five) INSET days for those teaching physics at KS3 without a strong background in the subject. The recent dates in June were all fully booked. The programme will be basically same for all the events with an introductory talk Inspiring Your Pupils, followed by workshops on Forces, Electricity and Light designed to enhance participants' knowledge of physics and its applications and to improve their confidence in teaching that knowledge. At each venue there will be an opportunity to tour the facilities, meet the staff and to assess the potential for school visits or link activities. The fee including course materials, lunch and other refreshments is £25. Leaflets have been sent to schools in the localities but further copies will be sent on request. Places are limited and prompt booking is essential. Further courses are planned for the autumn term as follows: Explore@Bristol (4 October) and possibly London in November. Substantially similar events may be organized for those teaching physics at KS4 in the Spring term of 2001. Physics Discipline Network Workshop: 14/15 September, University of Leeds `Our assessment of students and the media's assessment of us!' is the focus of this two-day event. The network was established in 1994 to encourage debate and discussion of teaching and learning initiatives among university physicists. Over the past five years the annual workshops have attracted over 200 delegates from most of the UK university physics departments. This year's workshop looks set to get off to a lively start with Professor Paul Black questioning the typical format of university physics examinations. This will be followed by a session on `A question of chemistry - creative problems for critical thinkers' which it is hoped will prompt thinking about comparable approaches in physics. This is just the start of a full programme of presentations including grass roots innovative practices as well as lead speakers of national prominence. Attention will focus on schools, too, with an input on the Pupil Researcher Initiative as a way of promoting physics at school level. Further details of this event are available from Dr Ashley Clarke in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently evident throughout Europe. CERN, ESA and ESO (the European centres for high-energy physics, cosmology, space and astronomy) have just launched Physics on Stage, a Europe-wide programme which aims to draw attention to some of the best practices in physics teaching in schools and colleges. During this year, national programmes are being planned in 22 nations, leading on to a celebratory event at CERN during the European Week for Science and Technology (6-11 November). Here 400 delegates from the 22 participating nations will gather to present selected projects. The UK will have 40 delegates present, funded by the EC and we are seeking practising teachers to contribute their simple, transferable, practical ideas. These can be kitemarked and your school can use the Physics on Stage logo. We would like to hear from both primary and secondary schools in the UK. Teachers can apply to join the delegation by saying what they have to offer to the festival and how they would contribute to the dissemination of good practice afterwards. This would be an opportunity to discover what novel ideas and insights there are on the continent and then to share what you have learned with colleagues at home. It would also be an excellent opportunity to show off some of the good practice from UK classrooms. In return for the week's trip to Geneva (and cover) we ask that participants commit themselves to sharing what they have learned with UK teachers - through meetings, advanced skills teaching or perhaps even writing an article (for Physics Education?). Applications should be supported by a letter from your headteacher. Schools, other organizations and individuals may apply for a kite-mark for a project but the application should be supported by a letter from someone unconnected with the organization of the project. Nominations should be sent to Dr Steven Chapman, Secretary to the UK National Steering Committee Physics on Stage, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (e-mail: steven.chapman@iop.org), from whom further information about this initiative can also be obtained. More details can additionally be found on the website at www.physics-on-stage.co.uk. The closing date for kite-marking of projects is 30 September and that for applications to travel to Geneva is 30 July.

  16. Phylogenetics and Differentiation of Salmonella Newport Lineages by Whole Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guojie; Meng, Jianghong; Strain, Errol; Stones, Robert; Pettengill, James; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick; Brown, Eric; Allard, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Newport has ranked in the top three Salmonella serotypes associated with foodborne outbreaks from 1995 to 2011 in the United States. In the current study, we selected 26 S. Newport strains isolated from diverse sources and geographic locations and then conducted 454 shotgun pyrosequencing procedures to obtain 16–24 × coverage of high quality draft genomes for each strain. Comparative genomic analysis of 28 S. Newport strains (including 2 reference genomes) and 15 outgroup genomes identified more than 140,000 informative SNPs. A resulting phylogenetic tree consisted of four sublineages and indicated that S. Newport had a clear geographic structure. Strains from Asia were divergent from those from the Americas. Our findings demonstrated that analysis using whole genome sequencing data resulted in a more accurate picture of phylogeny compared to that using single genes or small sets of genes. We selected loci around the mutS gene of S. Newport to differentiate distinct lineages, including those between invH and mutS genes at the 3′ end of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1), ste fimbrial operon, and Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) associated-proteins (cas). These genes in the outgroup genomes held high similarity with either S. Newport Lineage II or III at the same loci. S. Newport Lineages II and III have different evolutionary histories in this region and our data demonstrated genetic flow and homologous recombination events around mutS. The findings suggested that S. Newport Lineages II and III diverged early in the serotype evolution and have evolved largely independently. Moreover, we identified genes that could delineate sublineages within the phylogenetic tree and that could be used as potential biomarkers for trace-back investigations during outbreaks. Thus, whole genome sequencing data enabled us to better understand the genetic background of pathogenicity and evolutionary history of S. Newport and also provided additional markers for epidemiological response. PMID:23409020

  17. SAMPLING CONSIDERATIONS FOR GARDEN SYMPHYLANS (SCUTIGERELLA IMMACULATA NEWPORT) IN WESTERN OREGON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sampling recommendations were developed for a potato bait sampling method used to estimate garden symphylan (Scutigerella immaculata Newport) densities in western Oregon. Sample size requirements were developed using Taylor's power law to describe the relationship between sample means and variances...

  18. What's News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Renee

    2005-01-01

    News analysis and entertainment media is part of a media literacy that helps students access, analyze, evaluate and create messages using media in various forms. Media literacy is a key asset in a democracy as well as a bridge to reading comprehension, as skillful media use and script-reading activities can support the English acquisition skills,…

  19. Computer News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities: Classroom Projects and Curriculum Ideas, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents several news stories about computers and technology. (1) Applied Science Associates of Narragansett, Rhode Island is providing computer modeling technology to help locate the remains to the USS Bonhomme Richard, which sank in 1779 after claiming a Revolutionary War victory. (2) Whyville, the leading edu-tainment virtual world…

  20. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House

    National Chemistry Week (NCW)

    National Chemistry Week Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles).

    Awards Announced

    Passer Award

    Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are:
    • George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL
    • Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH
    • Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA
    • Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA
    • Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL
    • Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section

    Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist; there is an honorarium of 1500 plus expenses.

    Welch Award

    Roger D. Kornberg, a professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, received the 2001 Welch Award for his discovery of the nucleosome and establishing its role in gene regulation; for his discovery of a giant complex of 20 proteins known as the "Mediator", which regulates the transcription process; and for determining the atomic structure of RNA polymerase II. The 300,000 award salutes Kornberg's lifetime contributions to biochemistry.

    NSTA Teacher Awards

    During its 2001 national convention the National Science Teachers Association presented prizes and awards to teachers for their exemplary teaching practices and commitment to quality science education. Many appear below.
    Distinguished Service to Science Education Award
    • JoAnne Vasquez, Science Consultant, Gilbert, AZ
    • Richard F. Duncan, Beaverton Administrative Center, Beaverton, OR
    • Mitchell E. Batoff, New Jersey City University, Jersey City, NJ
    Distinguished Informal Science Education Award
    • Al Stenstrup, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, WI
    Ciba Specialty Chemicals Education Foundation Exemplary Science Teaching Award, High School Level
    • Gerald Friday, Marquette High School, Milwaukee, WI
    Gustav Ohaus Innovations in Science Teaching, High School
    • Mark Stefanski, Marin Academy, San Rafael, CA (first place)
    • James A. Szoka, Clarke County High School, Berryville, VA (second place)
    Gustav Ohaus Innovations in Science Teaching, College
    • William F. McComas, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (first place)
    • Barbara M. Lom, Davidson College, Davidson, NC (second place)

    Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities

    Proposal Deadlines

    Proposal Deadlines will not appear this month. Readers should consult page 876 of the July 2001 issue or JCE Online.

    National Educators' Workshop

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology's Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory will host the 16th annual National Educators' Workshop (NEW: Update): Experiments in Engineering, Materials Science, and Technology. NEW: Update is part of the NIST centennial celebration. It will be held in Gaithersburg, MD, and at the University of Maryland, College Park, October 14-17, 2001. NEW: Update, is a partnership involving industry, government, and education. It will have a program of Experiments and Demonstrations, Mini Workshops, and Plenary Sessions. For registration information, contact Jim Jacobs, NEW: Update 2001, School of Science and Technology, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504-8060; phone: 757/823-8109/9072; fax: 757/823-8215; dplaclaire@nsu.edu. The latest information about the workshop will be at http://MST-Online.nsu.edu/new.

    Chemistry Is in the News Conference

    Chemistry Is in the News-Teaching Organic Chemistry in the Context of Real World Issues, will be held at the University of Missouri-Columbia September 21-23, 2001. Funding from the Dreyfus Foundation will support 18 participants and will offer some partial travel grants. The conference will instruct faculty about the philosophy, pedagogy, implementation, and assessment of the project, doing so in small collaborative groups. It will focus on facilitating news-media-based authentic learning activities aimed at connecting real-world social, economic, and political issues to the teaching of organic chemistry and the development of student-assisted collaborative learning groups. The conference organizers are Rainer Glaser and James Groccia. Those interested should contact Rainer Glaser, University of Missouri, Department of Chemistry, Columbia, MO 65211; phone: 573/882-0331; fax: 573/882-2754; GlaserR@missouri.edu.

    ChemNet-Chemistry Lecture on the Internet

    A multimedia chemistry lecture, developed by R. Demuth, S. Nick, K. Rabe, L. Lensment, S. Schanze, J. Andresen, and W. Bensch of the University of Kiel, Germany, is being provided without charge over the Internet. The lecture is directed at students of chemistry, agricultural science, medicine, biology, and engineering and other interested persons. The lecture is in German but an English version is planned. With the aid of ChemNet the group plans to attain some information on the use and efficiency of multimedia teaching and learning software. The lecture deals with the fundamentals of general and inorganic chemistry. In addition to traditional content, new ways of chemical reasoning are considered. The presentation includes topics from the living world and everyday life such as household chemicals, renewable materials, and acid rain, and includes links from the text to other content. Graphics, animations, photos, and videos illustrate the topics discussed. A table of contents on the home page lists all the main topics and directs users into specific chapters; there are also a search function and a glossary. A feedback option allows students to contact the developing team. ChemNet can be found at www.chemievorlesung.uni-kiel.de. To gain access, a registration form needs to be completed.

    Future Meetings: 2YC3

    Upcoming conferences sponsored by 2YC3, the Two-Year College Chemistry Consortium, an activity of the ACS Division of Chemical Education, are listed below. Details of each conference are available at that conference's Web site.
    • September 14-15, 2001: 156th Conference (Midwestern), Anoka-Ramsey Community College, Coon Rapids, MN 55433; http://www.ar.cc.mn.us/2yc3/. Contact Lance S. Lund (llund@an.cc.mn.us) or Patty Pieper (ppieper@an.cc.mn.us).
    • November 2-3, 2001: 157th Conference (Western), Community College of Southern Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89102. Contact Kaveh Zarrabi (zarrabi@nevada.edu).
    • April 5-6, 2002: 158th Conference (Southern), in conjunction with the National ACS Meeting, Orlando, FL; site pending.
    • July 30-August 3, 2002: 159th Conference (Western), in conjunction with the 17th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA; http://atom.chem.wwu.edu/acs/bcce2002.html. Contact Clarita Bhat (ccbhat@msn.com).

    Future Meetings: NSTA

    Upcoming meetings of the National Science Teachers Association, including those at both the regional and national levels, appear below.
    • October 25-27, 2001: Salt Lake City, UT (Western Area)
    • November 8-10, 2001: Columbus, OH (Midwestern Area)
    • December 6-8, 2001: Memphis, TN (Southern Area)
    • March 27-30, 2002: San Diego, CA (2002 National Convention)
    For details, see the NSTA Web site, www.nsta.org.

  1. National Cancer Institute News

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer subtype. All NCI news All NCI news Media Resources Media Contacts B-roll for Media Multicultural ... NCI Annual Fact Book NCI Visuals Online Social Media @NCIMedia NCI YouTube Subscribe to NCI News Releases ...

  2. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER...

  3. Genetic Variability in Multi-Drug Resistant Salmonella Newport Associated with Dairy Cattle and S. Kentucky Associated with Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Differences in pathogenesis and ecological niches make Salmonella Newport and S. Kentucky candidates for the study of genetic variability. S. Kentucky is the top serotype isolated from broilers; however it is infrequently associated with human illness. In contrast, S. Newport is both a ...

  4. An outbreak due to peanuts in their shell caused by Salmonella enterica serotypes Stanley and Newport--sharing molecular information to solve international outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Kirk, M D; Little, C L; Lem, M; Fyfe, M; Genobile, D; Tan, A; Threlfall, J; Paccagnella, A; Lightfoot, D; Lyi, H; McIntyre, L; Ward, L; Brown, D J; Surnam, S; Fisher, I S T

    2004-08-01

    Salmonellosis is a global problem caused by the international movement of foods and high incidence in exporting countries. In September 2001, in an outbreak investigation Australia isolated Salmonella Stanley from imported peanuts, which resulted in a wider investigation in Canada, England & Wales and Scotland. Patients infected with Salmonella serotypes known to be isolated from peanuts and reported to surveillance systems were interviewed to determine exposure histories. Tagged image file format (TIFF) images of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of Salmonella isolates were shared electronically amongst laboratories. Laboratories tested packets of 'Brand X' peanuts from various lots and product lines. In total, 97 cases of S. Stanley and 12 cases of S. Newport infection were found. Seventy-three per cent (71/97) of S. Stanley cases were in persons of Asian ethnicity. Twenty-eight per cent of cases recalled eating Brand X peanuts and a further 13% had peanuts in their house in the previous month or had eaten Asian-style peanuts. Laboratories isolated S. Stanley, S. Newport, S. Kottbus, S. Lexington and S. Unnamed from Brand X peanuts. Isolates of S. Stanley from peanuts and human patients were indistinguishable by PFGE. This international outbreak resulted from a product originating from one country affecting several others. Rapid sharing of electronic DNA images was a crucial factor in delineating the outbreak; multinational investigations would benefit from a harmonized approach. PMID:15310157

  5. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House

    Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz/TD/TDhome.html. This site also has links to JCE guidelines for prospective authors. Volunteers should contact Vitz by the medium of their preference: Ed Vitz, Editor, Tested Demonstrations, Journal of Chemical Education, Department of Chemistry, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA 19530; phone: 610/683-4443; fax: 610/683-1352; email: vitz@kutztown.edu.

    Awards Announced

    ACS Regional Awards in High School Chemistry Teaching The American Chemical Society has announced winners of regional awards in high school chemistry teaching for 1999. Winners have demonstrated excellence in teaching, exceptional ability to challenge and inspire students, extracurricular work, and willingness to keep up to date in the field. The award consists of two certificates (one for the recipient, the other for display at the recipient's school) and a cash prize of 1,000.
    • Thomas W. Adams, Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics & Humanities at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana: Central Region
    • Arthur J. Crumm, Barstow School, Kansas City, Missouri: Midwest Region
    • Esther H. Freeman, Tabb High School, Yorktown, Virginia: Southeast Region
    • Joan A. Laredo-Liddell, St. Barnabas High School, Bronx, New York: Middle Atlantic Region, 1998
    • David T. Lee, Mountain Lakes High School, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey: Middle Atlantic Region, 1999
    • Diane Coley McGann, Santa Ana High School, Santa Ana, California: Western Region
    • William J. Pilotte, Newington High School, Newington, Connecticut: Northeast Region
    • Judith C. Seydel, Idaho Falls High School, Idaho Falls, Idaho: Northwest Region
    • Brenda A. Wolpa, Canyon Del Oro High School, Tucson, Arizona: Southwest/Rocky Mountain Region
    NSF Distinguished Public Service Award As a part of its celebration in 2000 of its half-century in existence, the National Science Foundation has announced the recipient of its Distinguished Public Service Award.
    • Samuel P. Massie, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland (Emeritus)
    1999 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Academies have announced the recipients in the 1999 fellowship programs. The names of those in chemistry or chemistry-related programs appear below. The complete list and background information about fellowship programs are available at http://national-academies.org. Information about the next (2000) competition can be obtained by contacting the Fellowship Office of the National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418; email: infofell@nas.edu; WWW: http://fellowships.nas.edu. 1999 Predoctoral Fellows
    • Martin Elliott Hayes, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Organic Chemistry
    1999 Dissertation Fellows
    • Robyn P. Hickerson, University of Utah, Chemistry
    1999 Postdoctoral Fellows
    • Luke Koenigs Lightning, University of California, San Francisco, Biochemistry
    • Eric W. Wong, University of California, Los Angeles, Physical Chemistry
    University of Wisconsin System Award Alliant Energy has announced the recipient of its 1999 Underkofler Excellence in Teaching Award, to recognize and reward outstanding teachers at University of Wisconsin System institutions.
    • Kim Kostka, University of Wisconsin-Rock County, Janesville, Wisconsin
    Kim is also the recipient of the 1999 Green Chemistry Challenge Award from the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. She is co-editor of the JCE feature column Teaching with Problems and Case Studies.

    Award Deadlines

    James Flack Norris Award The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society is receiving nominations for the 2000 James Flack Norris Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Teaching of Chemistry. The Norris Award, one of the oldest awards given by a Section of the American Chemical Society, is presented annually and consists of a certificate and an honorarium of 3,000. Nominees must have served with special distinction as teachers of chemistry at any level: secondary school, college, or graduate school. Since 1951, awardees have included eminent and less-widely-known but equally effective teachers at all levels. The awardee for 1999 is Joseph J. Lagowski of the University of Texas at Austin. Nominating material must be limited to 30 pages and focus specifically on the nominee's contribution to and effectiveness in teaching chemistry, as distinguished from research. These qualities are demonstrated by a condensed curriculum vitae as a portion of a nominating letter, which, in turn, is supported by as many seconding letters as are necessary to convey the nominee's qualification for the award. These may show the impact of the nominee's teaching in inspiring colleagues and students toward an active life on chemistry or related sciences, or may attest to the influence of the nominee's other activities in chemical education, such as textbooks, journal articles, or other professional activity at the national level. Materials should be of 8.5 x 11-in. size and should not include books or reprints. Nomination materials for 2000 should be sent to Robert S. Umans, Chemistry Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215-2521; email: umans@chem.bu.edu. They should be received before April 15, 2000. Undergraduate Analytical Research Program Grant The Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh (SACP) has established a 10,000 annual grant to promote high-quality, innovative undergraduate research in the field of analytical chemistry and to promote training and development of undergraduate students in the field of analytical chemistry. Chemistry faculty at U.S. colleges and universities not having a graduate program in the chemical sciences are eligible to apply. Application forms for the Undergraduate Analytical Research Program (UARP) grant may be obtained by calling 1-800/825-3221 ext. 208 or by visiting the SACP's Web site at www.sacp.org. The deadline for applications for the year 2000 grant is March 31, 2000. American Microchemical Society Undergraduate Student Awards The American Microchemical Society announces its undergraduate awards for students who have done research in any area of analytical chemistry. Awardees receive 1000, travel expenses up to 250, and accommodation for two nights to receive the awards at the Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) to be held October 29-November 3, 2000. Applications should include a cover letter, a two-page summary of analytical research conducted by the student written in his or her own words, at least three letters of recommendation (one must be from a research director), a one-page summary of career goals, and official transcripts from undergraduate institution(s). Awardees are expected to present their work at EAS as a poster at the Undergraduate Research Poster Session. More details and a list of former awardees is available at http://chemweb.chem.uconn.edu/microchem/. Three copies of all materials, including letters and transcripts, should be sent to David J. Butcher, Department of Chemistry and Physics, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC 28723; phone: 828/227-3683; fax: 828/227-7647; email: butcher@wpoff.wcu.edu; WWW: http://www3.wcu.edu/ butcher/. The deadline for applications for 2000 awards is March 15, 2000. Dimick Award for Chromatography The Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh (SACP) solicits nominations for the year 2001 Keene P. Dimick Award for Chromatography. The award is presented annually for noteworthy accomplishments in the area of gas and supercritical fluid chromatography (GC, SFC). The award, administered by SACP, consists of 5,000 cash prize presented at a symposium arranged by the awardee during the Pittsburgh Conference. There are no restrictions of age, nationality, sex, or professional affiliation. Letters of nomination, including a complete resume for the candidate, should be sent to Keene P. Dimick Award Committee, Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh, 300 Penn Center Boulevard, Suite 332, Pittsburgh, PA 15235-5503. The deadline for nominations is April 15, 2000.

    Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities

    Upcoming Conferences PITTCON The Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy will present its annual event, PITTCON 2000, at the Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, LA, March 12-17, 2000. There will be more than 1,900 technical presentations and 3,000 exposition booths. Further information is available on the Web at http://www.pittcon.org or by telephone at 412/826-3220, ext. 142. Oilseed Conference The 49th Oilseed Conference will be held March 19-21, 2000, at the Doubletree Hotel in New Orleans, LA. The theme of the meeting is "Surviving in a Changing Global Economy". More information is available at the conference Web site: www.aocs.org/oilseed.htm, by phone: 217/359-2344, or by fax: 217/351-8091. American Oil Chemists' Society The 91st American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) Annual Meeting and Expo will be held April 25-28, 2000, at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA. Further information is available by contacting the AOCS Meetings & Exhibits Department; phone: 217/359-2344; fax: 217/351-8091; email: meetings@aocs.org. Chem 13 News: In Memory of Reg Friesen Issue 278 of Chem 13 News (October 1999) is in memory of Reg Friesen (see also JCE, 1999, 76, 27). A complimentary copy of this memorial issue is available upon request to kjackson@uwaterloo.ca. Free Source of Problems The Moles Web site (http://138.100.72.157/moles) is a free source of problems (in the Spanish language) that can be used in teaching problems of chemistry at the college/university level. While it is specially devoted to engineering education, it is also of interest for other studies where chemistry is involved. This site seeks to broaden its base by soliciting contributions from the United States and other American countries. Those interested in submitting problems for peer review (papers in English would be translated into Spanish) should contact Gabriel Pinto, Department of Chemical Engineering, Polytechnical University of Madrid, 28006 Madrid, Spain; email: gpinto@iqi.etsii.upm.es.

    Proposal Deadlines

    National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 5, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships Program (CSEMS) TBA
    • Advanced Techological Education (ATE) Preliminary April 13, 2000 (anticipated) Formal Oct. 13, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Graduate Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) TBA (anticipated late spring 2000)
    • Online DUE forms available at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/documents/general/forms/forms.htm
    • NSF Documents Online available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/pubsys/browser/odbrowse.pl
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 15, 1999, and November 15, 2000
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: June 30, 2000
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 15, 2000
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 15, 2000
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: June 30, 2000
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: Preliminary Proposals: June 15, 2000 Complete Proposals: September 1, 2000
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: March 1, 2000
    • Senior Scientist Mentor: September 1, 2000
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW:http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; WWW:http://www.rescorp.org

  6. Researching Television News Archives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhoit, Frances Goins

    To demonstrate the uses and efficiency of major television news archives, a study was conducted to describe major archival programs and to compare the Vanderbilt University Television News Archives and the CBS News Index. Network coverage of an annual news event, the 1983 State of the Union address, is traced through entries in both. The findings…

  7. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals

  8. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  9. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include:

    Total Pages Served 361,115

    Total Visits 138,377

    Total Unique Visitors 51,744

    Total Repeat Visitors 11,536

    Average Visit Length 03:05

    Average Requests/Visit 10.8

    Average Pages/Visit 2.6

    Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include:

    ·JCE Index to all 76 years of Journal issues, available all the time with responses within seconds.

    ·Supplementary materials that are important to only a limited number of our subscribers; materials that augment laboratory experiments are a good example.

    ·Supplementary videos, such as the videos, still images, and excerpts from interviews with nuclear chemists that give fuller meaning to the Viewpoints article "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements- One Atom at a Time" referred to below.

    ·Internet feature columns are more effective in a dynamic medium. Two that are in place are Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum (edited by Theresa Zielinski) and Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems (edited by William Robinson and Susan Nurrenbern).

    ·Buyers Guides have their content updated often and link to other useful sites. There is one for books and software and another for supplies and equipment. Elements Added to Periodic Table Two new transuranic elements have been added to the list in the Viewpoints article "Chemistry of the Heaviest ElementsOne Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee (JCE, 1999, 76, 331). The new elements have atomic numbers 118 and 116. The path to the discovery of these elements was predicted by Robert Smolanczuk, a young Polish theorist whose calculations led him to conclude that a lead-krypton collision technique could produce element 118, which then decays to element 116. Others questioned his results, but Hoffman invited him to join the team at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a decision was made to try out his ideas. The result was almost complete verification of Smolanczuk's calculations. The experimental team was headed by Kenneth E. Gregorich; Darleane Hoffman is one of 15 codiscoverers of element 118. Awards Willard Gibbs Medal Lawrence F. Dahl of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is the recipient of 1999 Willard Gibbs Medal, the highest award of the Chicago Section of the American Chemical Society. It is awarded annually to a world-renowned scientist selected by a jury of panelists composed of eminent chemists elected by the Board of Directors of the Chicago Section. The award was presented at the Chicago Section's meeting in May 1999. Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities Grant Program for Senior Scientist Mentors The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation announces a new initiative within its Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: the Senior Scientist Mentors. Undergraduate participation in research is generally acknowledged to be one of the most effective ways for students to learn and appreciate chemistry. Key to a meaningful research experience is the advising and counseling a student can receive from leaders in chemical research. Application Details Emeritus faculty who maintain active research programs in the chemical sciences may apply for one of a limited number of awards that will allow undergraduates to do research under their guidance. Successful applicants, who are expected to be closely engaged in a mentoring relationship with the students, will receive grants of 10,000 annually for two years (20,000 total) for undergraduate stipends and modest research support. In approximately three pages, applicants should describe their ongoing research and the nature of the participation by undergraduates in the research activity. The role of the applicant as mentor should be clearly outlined. The application should also contain a curriculum vitae of no more than five pages that includes representative publications; a letter of support from the department chair that also commits appropriate space and facilities for the undergraduate participants; and a letter of support from a colleague (preferably from outside the department) who is familiar with the applicant's research and teaching. This initiative is open to all institutions that offer bachelor's or higher degrees in the chemical sciences. Use the standard cover page for the Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences, which is available at www.dreyfus.org. "Senior Scientist Mentors" should be entered as the project title. An original and five copies of the application are required. Applications should be received in the Foundation office (555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022) by September 1, 1999; awards will be announced toward the end of January 2000.

    Proposal Deadlines

    National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov.

    The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW: http://www.dreyfus.org/

    Research Corporation

    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final opportunity for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www: http://www.rescorp.org

  10. Detection and control of a nosocomial outbreak caused by Salmonella Newport at a large animal hospital

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective – To describe active surveillance, early recognition, and aggressive mitigation efforts that allowed control of an outbreak of nosocomial S. Newport infections in a large referral hospital without closure. Design – Longitudinal outbreak investigation Procedures – An outbreak of S. Newpor...

  11. Salmonella newport and typhimurium colonization of fruit differs from leaves in various tomato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Han, Sanghyun; Micallef, Shirley Ann

    2014-11-01

    Several outbreaks of Salmonella enterica infections have been linked to tomatoes. One cost-effective way to complement on-farm preventive Good Agricultural Practices is to identify cultivars with inherent decreased susceptibility to Salmonella colonization. Fruit and leaves of 13 tomato cultivars with distinct phenotypes were screened to evaluate their susceptibility to Salmonella epiphytic colonization. Field-grown fruit or gnotobiotically grown seedling leaves were spot inoculated in replicate with either Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 or a tomato outbreak-associated strain of Salmonella Newport. Initial loads of the Salmonella inocula were 2.5 log CFU per fruit and 3.5 or 7.0 log CFU per seedling. Salmonella cells were retrieved and enumerated using direct plating after 24 h of incubation at room temperature for fruit and 72 h at 26°C during the day and 18°C at night for seedling leaves. Epiphytic colonization of fruit by S. enterica was cultivar-dependent and serotype-specific, but did not necessarily correlate with leaf colonization. Fruit of cultivar Heinz-1706 were the least colonized by Salmonella Newport, while the highest populations were retrieved from fruit of Nyagous. By contrast, seedling leaves supporting the lowest populations were Florida 91 VF and the highest were Virginia Sweets for Salmonella Newport. For Salmonella Typhimurium the lowest was Nyagous and the highest was Heinz-1706 and Moneymaker. The tomato outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport attained higher population densities on fruit than did Salmonella Typhimurium, suggesting better adaptation to tomato fruit colonization. Salmonella Newport populations were significantly lower on leaves, but not fruit of the near-isogenic line Movione, compared with the parent cultivar Moneymaker, suggesting the immunity conferring gene Pto could be responding to this outbreak strain. Susceptibility of tomato fruit to Salmonella colonization is highly variable and could be one criterion for cultivar selection for cultivation. PMID:25364916

  12. Association between handling of pet treats and infection with Salmonella enterica serotype newport expressing the AmpC beta-lactamase, CMY-2.

    PubMed

    Pitout, Johann D D; Reisbig, Mark D; Mulvey, Mike; Chui, Linda; Louie, Marie; Crowe, Larry; Church, Deirdre L; Elsayed, Sameer; Gregson, Dan; Ahmed, Rafiq; Tilley, Peter; Hanson, Nancy D

    2003-10-01

    Resistance to the extended-spectrum cephalosporins can occur in Salmonella species via the production of extended-spectrum and AmpC beta-lactamases. We describe human infections with Salmonella enterica serotype Newport phage type 14 strains resistant to ceftazidime (CAZ) and cefoxitin (FOX) related to the handling of pet treats containing dried beef. These strains were isolated from five patients in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, during 2002 and were compared to a strain cultured from a commercial pet treat present at the property of one of the patients. The strains were resistant to FOX, CAZ, cefpodoxime, ampicillin, and chloramphenicol; intermediate resistant to ceftriaxone and cefotaxime; and sensitive to the aminoglycosides, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, and imipenem. Isoelectric focusing, multiplex PCR, and sequencing of the amplicons showed that all strains produced the plasmid-encoded AmpC beta-lactamase, CMY-2. Restriction analysis of plasmid DNA following transformation demonstrated that bla(CMY-2) was encoded on an approximately 140-kb plasmid. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed the human and pet treat Salmonella strains to be highly related. This study is the first to implicate the transfer of multidrug-resistant Salmonella species through the handling of commercial pet treats containing animal products. In addition to documenting the first cases of human infection caused by CMY-2-producing S. enterica serotype Newport strains in Canada, this study illustrates the necessity of rapid and accurate laboratory-based surveillance in the identification of novel types of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:14532185

  13. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House

    Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999.
    • Guy Anderson
    • Jim Becvar
    • Jerry Bell
    • Jim Birk
    • Diane Bunce
    • Ann Cartwright
    • Thomas Clark
    • Jane Crosby
    • Maria Dean
    • Art Ellis
    • Donald Elswick
    • Tommy Franklin
    • Babu George
    • Paul Heath
    • Angela Hoffman
    • Lynn Hogue
    • J. J. Lagowski
    • Frank Lambert
    • Dorothy Lehmkuhl
    • George Lelevre
    • Scott Luaders
    • Jane McMullen
    • Marci Merritt
    • Carl Minnier
    • Richard Narske
    • Ron Perkins
    • Gabriel Pinto
    • Dick Potts
    • Herb Retcofsky
    • Jerry Sarquis
    • Elke Schoffers
    • Sara Selfe
    • Uni Susskind
    • J. Mark Tolman
    • John Varine
    • Dawn Wakeley
    • Marla White
    Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift Subscription Awards As spring, the season of awards, approaches, we remind you of our handy Gift Certificates (a replica is shown on page 142). A gift of the Journal is not only affordable (gift subscriptions are 37/year (U.S.), 50/year (non-U.S.), but has lasting value. This is a really good way to help someone just starting out on a teaching career. An idea worth sharing comes from Carl Minnier of Essex Community College in Baltimore. He is chair of the Student Awards Committee of the Maryland Section of the ACS. This section has asked for 25 certificates because they honor annually an outstanding student from each of the two-year and four-year colleges within the territory of the Maryland Section. Want another interesting idea: give a one-year subscription to each Undergraduate Research Symposium participant. Classroom Activities for Outreach Many of our readers are involved with outreach programsindividually in their child's class, in a regional group that visits schools, in a van program, or as a demonstrator at their local science museum. Many readers have enthusiastically reported that our Classroom Activities series is a great resource for such programs. Since the Activities are designed for a high school classroom or lab (Activity 24 in this continuing series can be found in this issue), they are purposely not demanding of equipment, facilities, or time. But outreach activities often take place in very restricted environments, perhaps without sinks or electricity, sometimes with limited table space. So that we can provide timely advice in recommending activities for you to take "on the road", Nancy Gettys and Erica Jacobsen of the Journal staff have done an analysis of each, recommending whether it might be done in a workshop setting (where tables, a sink, and electricity could be expected) or in a booth (probably no sink and very limited space). There are also very useful notes. Some sample entries are: Activity:What's Gluep? Characterizing a Cross-Linked Polymer. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1432A (November 1998). Workshop?yes Booth?could show properties of pre-made gluep Notes:Need access to water. Can be messy. People usually enjoy the activity. Works well. Activity:CD Light: An Introduction to Spectroscopy. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1568A (December 1998). Workshop?yes Booth?yes, with colored plastic onlynot solutions Notes:Can be difficult to measure and cut cardboard for spectroscope. Pre-made spectroscopes and partially constructed ones to show method could be provided. Needs good light source to work well. Activity:Cleaning Up with Chemistry: Investigating the Action of Zeolite in Laundry Detergent. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1461A (October 1999). Workshop?yes Booth?could demonstrate tubes of soapy water with and without zeolite Notes:Need access to water. Quick and easy. More information about JCE Classroom Activities is available on JCE Online at: http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/AboutJCE/Features/JCE_CA/. Here you will find the notes described above and a list of all published Classroom Activities. The site is updated regularly.

    Awards Announced

    United Nations Environment Program The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) has selected Mario J. Molina, professor of earth, atmosphere, and planetary sciences at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as the winner of the 1999 UNEP Sasakawa Environment Prize. The prize, worth $200,000, is for his outstanding global contributions in the field of atmospheric chemistry. ACS Northeastern Section The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society has awarded the Henry A. Hill Award to Morton Z. Hoffman, professor of chemistry at Boston University. The award is given annually to a member of the section for outstanding service.

    Award Deadlines

    Mettler-Toledo Thermal Analysis Education Grant Mettler-Toledo has established a grant to honor Edith A. Turi of the Polymer Research Institute, Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY, for her lifelong contribution to the cause of thermal analysis education. The grant will be awarded on an annual basis to not-for-profit organizations in North America that confer degrees up to the Ph. D. level and provide or intend to provide education in thermal analysis; it will consist of Mettler-Toledo thermal analysis instrumentation, peripherals, training and service. Applications must be submitted by April 1, 2000. Application forms may be downloaded from http://www.na.mt.com. Questions should be directed to Jon Foreman, Product Manager, Thermal Analysis, Mettler-Toledo, Inc., 1900 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, OH 43240; phone: 1-800/638-8537; fax: 614/438-4871; email: Thermal.Grant@mt.com.

    Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities

    Cosmos in the Classroom 2 A national symposium on the trials and tribulations of teaching astronomy to college non-science majors will be held at the Pasadena, California, Convention Center on July 17-19, 2000, as part of the 112th Annual Meeting of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. Designed for everyone who teaches introductory astronomy, the symposium will focus on ways to improve teaching, to involve students more effectively, and to put astronomy in a wider context. Specific discussion topics will include: getting out of lecture mode, using the Web effectively, dealing with creationism and astrology, and laboratory and observation projects. The 2.5-day program will involve panels of mentor instructors, an exchange of handouts and teaching resources, hands-on workshops for trying new techniques and approaches, and lots of time for discussion. Participants will range from veteran instructors to nervous graduate students about to teach their first solo course. We especially hope to involve those teaching astronomy in small colleges without extensive astronomy research programs, and colleagues in other sciences who teach astronomy on a part-time basis. To get on the mailing list for the meeting, send your name, institution, email, and postal mailing address (indicating an interest in the 2000 Education Symposium) via: email: meeting@aspsky.org; fax: 415/337-5205 (Attn: 2000 Education Symp.) mail: 2000 Education Symposium, ASP, 390 Ashton Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94112. Green Chemistry 4th Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference "Sustainable Technologies: From Research to Industrial Implementation", the 4th Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference, will be held June 27-29, 2000, at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Technical sessions will highlight recent advances in green chemistry and engineering including greener solvents, catalysis, benign synthesis and processing, bio-based synthesis and processing, designing safer chemicals and materials, process design and measurement, and modeling/computational methods. For information on the conference, visit the ACS Web site: http://www.acs.org/meetings/greencfp.htm or contact the ACS Meetings Department by phone: 202/872-6286; fax: 202/872-6013; email: d_ruddy@acs.org. Gordon Conference on Green Chemistry The 5th Gordon Research Conference on Green Chemistry will be held July 16-21, 2000, at Connecticut College, New London, CT. For more information contact either of the symposium organizers: Tracy C. Williamson, OPPT (mail code 7406), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, 401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; phone: 202/260-2659; fax: 202/260-0816; email: williamson.tracy@epa.gov; www.epa.gov/greenchemistry.; Isvan Horvath, Department of Organic Chemistry, Eotvos Lorand University, Pazmany Peter setany 1/A, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary; phone: 36-1-209-0590; fax: 36-1-372-2620; email: ithorvath@compuserve.com. Green Chemistry Symposium at ACS Meeting The symposium, "Green Chemistry: Applications in Academia and Industry" will be held at the Fall 2000 American Chemical Society Meeting, from August 20-25, 2000, in Washington, DC. The symposium is being sponsored by the Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry. Papers are invited on all areas of green chemistry. For more information, contact one of the symposium organizers: Tracy C. Williamson, williamson.tracy@epa.gov; Paul T. Anastas, anastas.paul@epa.gov; Mary M. Kirchhoff, kirchhoff.mary@epa.gov. All are at the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (mail code 7406), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, 401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20560; phone: 202/260-2659; fax: 202/260-0816; http://www.epa.gov/greenchemistry. 16th BCCE, July 30-August 3, 2000 The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education will be held at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, between July 30 and August 3, 2000. The meeting is promising to have a very full program. As of December 3, 1999 (the deadline for the submission of proposals for symposia and workshops), 64 of each had been submitted. Information about these proposed presentations, as well as about other aspects of the conference, are posted on the BCCE website at http://www.umich.edu/ bcce. If you wish to hold a meeting of your organization at the time of the conference, please let the organizers know at bcce@umich.edu so that space can be set aside. And please plan to attend! Teaching/Research Sabbatical Fellowships The University of Tennessee-Knoxville announces its designation by the National Science Foundation as one of three Research Sites for Educators in Chemistry (RSE). The program offers 12- 15-month teaching/research sabbatical fellowships. Fellows will spend a semester at University of Tennessee-Knoxville, a semester at a research-active partner (Berea College, the University of the South-Sewanee, or the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga), and a summer in research at UT-K, a partner school, or in industry. Fellows will have minimal teaching loads, continuous involvement in collaborative research in environmental and/or chemical analysis, and exposure to a successful model for establishing a thriving undergraduate research program. For information contact Kelsey D. Cook; kcook@utk.edu; phone: 865-974-8019. The other two RSEC sites are Georgia Tech (contact is Kent Barefield; kent.barefield@chemistry.gatech.edu) and the University of New Mexico (contact is Dana Brabson; gb6s@unm.edu). Soaring Endowments: Research Corp. Report "The Midas Touch: Do Soaring Endowments Have Any Impact on College Science?" is the title of their 1998 annual report, just published by Research Corporation. In it the foundation reports that endowment growth appears to have only incidental effects on ongoing support for college research and education in the physical sciences. More likely targets for expenditures are new and remodeled buildings and student aid. Interviews with college administrators support the conclusion that large endowments do not guarantee the funds needed to hire enough faculty scientists to teach and do related research with students, to house the sciences in up-to-date buildings, or equip laboratories with modern instrumentation. Copies of "The Midas Touch" are available without charge from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711. The report will also be available in January 2000 on the foundation's Web site at http://www.rescorp.org. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 5, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships Program (CSEMS) TBA
    • Advanced Techological Education (ATE) Preliminary April 13, 2000 (anticipated) Formal Oct. 13, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Graduate Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) TBA (anticipated late spring 2000)
    • Online DUE forms available at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/documents/general/forms/forms.htm
    • NSF Documents Online available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/pubsys/browser/odbrowse.pl
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 15, 2000
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: June 30, 2000
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 15, 2000
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 15, 2000
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: June 30, 2000
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: Preliminary Proposals: June 15, 2000 Complete Proposals: September 1, 2000
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: March 1, 2000
    • Senior Scientist Mentor: September 1, 2000
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW:http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; WWW:http://www.rescorp.org

  14. Differentiation of UK endemic strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport from epidemic North American strains by PCR detection of a truncated bapA chromosomal gene.

    PubMed

    Horton, R A; Card, R; Randall, L P; Teale, C J

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a PCR test to detect chromosomal differences between epidemic multidrug resistant (epi-MDR) strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport (S. Newport) and non-epi-MDR strains of S. Newport that are endemic to the United Kingdom (UK). Sequence analysis of the biofilm-associated protein A gene (bapA) showed that epi-MDR strains of S. Newport from the United States of America (USA) had a deletion of 309bp, which was not present in non-epi-MDR strains of S. Newport from the UK. A PCR test was developed using primers designed to target this difference and was applied to a panel of S. Newport isolates comprising of strains from the UK (n=20, non-epi-MDR), from the USA (n=10, epi-MDR) and from Canada (n=7). A second panel of isolates (n=73) was used to assess the test specificity, and these isolates consisted of non-Newport Salmonella serovars (n=25), and other epidemic serovars (n=48). Epi-MDR S. Newport isolates produced a characteristic 505bp amplicon, whereas non-epi-MDR S. Newport isolates produced an 814bp amplicon. The bapA PCR has potential to discriminate between these S. Newport strains irrespective of their carrying resistance genes. PMID:26850548

  15. News: A Consumer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doig, Ivan; Doig, Carol

    A guide to news media, this book describes how to tell when a report is biased; provides tips on spotting hoaxes and public relations ploys in the news; gives standards to judge expert opinion and reliable sources; lists critics and other sources of help for the news consumer; discusses the endless contest among politicians, newsmen, and…

  16. Genomic Evidence Reveals Numerous Salmonella enterica Serovar Newport Reintroduction Events in Suwannee Watershed Irrigation Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Scott A.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Huanli; Tall, Ben D.; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Jay-Russell, Michele; Vellidis, George; Elkins, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work indicated a predominance (56.8%) of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport among isolates recovered from irrigation ponds used in produce farms over a 2-year period (B. Li et al., Appl Environ Microbiol 80:6355–6365, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02063-14). This observation provided a valuable set of metrics to explore an underaddressed issue of environmental survival of Salmonella by DNA microarray. Microarray analysis correctly identified all the isolates (n = 53) and differentiated the S. Newport isolates into two phylogenetic lineages (S. Newport II and S. Newport III). Serovar distribution analysis showed no instances where the same serovar was recovered from a pond for more than a month. Furthermore, during the study, numerous isolates with an indistinguishable genotype were recovered from different ponds as far as 180 km apart for time intervals as long as 2 years. Although isolates within either lineage were phylogenetically related as determined by microarray analysis, subtle genotypic differences were detected within the lineages, suggesting that isolates in either lineage could have come from several unique hosts. For example, strains in four different subgroups (A, B, C, and D) possessed an indistinguishable genotype within their subgroups as measured by gene differences, suggesting that strains in each subgroup shared a common host. Based on this comparative genomic evidence and the spatial and temporal factors, we speculated that the presence of Salmonella in the ponds was likely due to numerous punctuated reintroduction events associated with several different but common hosts in the environment. These findings may have implications for the development of strategies for efficient and safe irrigation to minimize the risk of Salmonella outbreaks associated with fresh produce. PMID:26386063

  17. Community-Based Decision-Making: Application of Web-Based Near-Road Modeling System to Newport News, Virginia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Living, working, and going to school near roadways has been associated with a number of adverse health effects, including asthma exacerbation, cardiovascular impairment, and respiratory symptoms. In the United States, 30% - 45% of urban populations live or work in the near-road e...

  18. Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.; Fields, J.; Roberts, J. O.

    2012-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island where multiple contaminated areas pose a threat to human health and the environment. Designated a superfund site on the National Priorities List in 1989, the base is committed to working toward reducing the its dependency on fossil fuels, decreasing its carbon footprint, and implementing RE projects where feasible. The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) partnered with NREL in February 2009 to investigate the potential for wind energy generation at a number of Naval and Marine bases on the East Coast. NAVSTA Newport was one of several bases chosen for a detailed, site-specific wind resource investigation. NAVSTA Newport, in conjunction with NREL and NFESC, has been actively engaged in assessing the wind resource through several ongoing efforts. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and a survey of potential wind turbine options based upon the site-specific wind resource.

  19. The antimicrobial effects of cinnamon leaf oil against multi-drug resistant Salmonella Newport on organic leafy greens.

    PubMed

    Todd, Jennifer; Friedman, Mendel; Patel, Jitendra; Jaroni, Divya; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2013-08-16

    There is generally no kill-step when preparing salad vegetables, so there is a greater risk for foodborne illness from contaminated vegetables. Some essential oils have antimicrobial activities and could provide a natural way to reduce pathogens on fresh produce. The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of cinnamon oil wash against Salmonella enterica serotype Newport on organic leafy greens. Organic romaine and iceberg lettuce, and organic baby and mature spinach were inoculated with Salmonella Newport and then dip treated in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) control and 3 different concentrations (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5% v/v) of cinnamon oil. The treatment time varied at either 1 or 2min, and storage temperature varied at either 4 or 8°C. Samples were collected at days 0, 1, and 3. For romaine and iceberg lettuce, S. Newport was not recovered on day 3 for 2min 0.3% and 0.5% cinnamon oil treatments. For mature spinach, S. Newport was not recovered by day 3 for the 2min 0.3% and 0.5% 4°C treatments. For baby spinach, there was no recovery of S. Newport by day 1 for all 0.5% treatments. Overall, the cinnamon oil treatments were concentration and time dependent with higher concentrations and longer treatment times providing the greatest reduction in S. Newport population on leafy greens. In addition, the treatments had a residual effect with the greatest reduction generally seen on the last day of sampling. Storage temperature did not have a significant effect on the reduction of S. Newport. Based on the results of this study, cinnamon oil has the potential to be used as a treatment option for washing organic baby and mature spinach, and iceberg and romaine lettuces. PMID:23911760

  20. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to celebrate the Group's 50th anniversary by examining what has been done, focusing on why and how it was done, with lessons and ambitions for the future. The meeting will be held at Institute Headquarters and the programme is as follows: 10.45 - 11.00 Welcome and introduction (Philip Britton: Chair of the Education Group) 11.00 - 11.45 Examinations and assessment through the ages (Tim Akrill, Chief Examiner for A-level Physics with Edexcel) 11.45 - 12.30 Curriculum reform in physics, past, present and future (Professor Jon Ogborn, Director of the Post-16 Physics Initiative) 14.00 - 14.15 Physics education and the Institute of Physics, some personal reflections (speaker to be announced) 14.15 - 15.00 Connecting with Advancing Physics: the first year in HE physics (Professor Mick Brown, University of Cambridge) 15.15 - 15.35 Physics education, the next 50 years! (Ken Dobson, Honorary Editor of Physics Education) The day should hold something for everyone, so reserve your place if you can. Schools and Colleges lecture Dr Zbig Sobiesierski of the University of the West of England is the 1999 - 2000 Institute of Physics Schools and Colleges lecturer, touring the country with his talk `Seeing is believing?'. He will demonstrate the different physical ways in which we can both make and mix colour and will then proceed to discuss why our eyes respond to light in the way they do. The lecture will be aimed primarily at students aged 14 and above, but it will also be suitable for older audiences. The intention, as with previous series, will be to show the relevance of the physics concepts to the members of the audience and the world in which they live. To find out more about the lecture in your area and to make a booking, contact should be made with the local organizer (full details of the list can be obtained from Catherine Wilson at Institute Headquarters). The dates and venues planned so far are as follows: 1 Nov: Northern College, Aberdeen 2 Nov: University of St Andrews 3 Nov: Heriot-Watt University 4 Nov: Strathclyde University 17 Nov: York University 24 Nov: Bristol University 1 Dec: Open University 7 Dec: Kent University 14 Dec: Cardiff University 15 Dec: University of Wales, Swansea 24 Jan: Reading University 10 Feb: Abingdon School 16 Feb: Plymouth University 2 Mar: Sheffield University 7 Mar: CLRC Daresbury Laboratory 8 Mar: Liverpool University 9 Mar: Manchester 10 Mar: Lancaster University 15 Mar: Surrey University 16 Mar: Brighton University 17 Mar: St Vincent College, Gosport 22 Mar: Leeds University 23 Mar: Loughborough Grammar School 24 Mar: Oakham School 30 Mar: St Peter's School, Wolverhampton 18 May: University of Hertfordshire 11 Jul: Science Museum 12 Jul: Royal Institution The assistance of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, CLRC Daresbury Laboratory and DERA Malvern is acknowledged in staging this year's events. Courses, lectures and competitions `Physics in perspective', the study course for sixth-formers and college students, will take place in London on 6 - 8 February 2000, offering insights into many different aspects of physics. The programme commences during the afternoon of Sunday 6 February at King's College London with a Balloon debate, followed by Brian O'Rourke's talk on the `Physics of Formula 1 cars'. On Monday 7 February at the Royal Institution, John Avison (former Honorary Editor of Physics Education) will develop the `Thinking physics' theme by presenting the audience with varied topics in an unusual and challenging way. The second talk of the afternoon, by Professor Roy Sambles, will cover `Lasers, light and liquid crystals'. On the final day (Tuesday 8 February), again at the Royal Institution, Sara Ellison will lead the audience in `Heavenly pursuits', whilst later Dr Colin Wright will entertain with `Juggling - theory and practice'. Futher information and bookings for the course can be made by contacting Mrs Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4800, fax: 020 7470 4848, e-mail: leila.solomon@iop.org). The cost for the complete series of lectures is £20 - one teacher accompanying a minimum of ten students will be admitted free. `Paperclip physics' is the contest for students who have the admirable desire to explain physics to nonscientists and who can also build a physics demonstration from items found around the home! Closing date for entries to the 2000 competition is 30 November 1999 with regional heats and finals planned for January/February and the Grand Final on 22 March 2000 at the Institute's Headquarters in London. Entries will be welcomed from Year 12, S5, Transition Year/First-year Leaving Certificate students or equivalents from schools and colleges: each team must consist of no fewer than three and no more than six students. Presentations should take no longer than five minutes and a hazard assessment must be submitted for each entry beforehand. As for the course mentioned above, more details and entry forms can be obtained from Leila Solomon at the Institute of Physics. Finally, the programme is now available for education events to be staged at the annual Physics Congress being held in Brighton on 27 - 30 March 2000. There will be hands-on activities for pupils aged 10 - 12 (school years 6 - 7), which must be booked in advance, as well as lectures and activities for students in years 8 - 10 on Music and sound (28 - 29 March) and Static electricity (30 March). In addition there will be INSET for teachers and technicians based on `Teaching physics at key stage 3' - hands-on workshops open to nonspecialist teachers of physics at an affordable cost. Further details can be found at the Congress website (www.iop.org/IOP/Congress), and bookings should be made through Leila Solomon. The public lectures during the Congress and commencing each evening at the Brighton Centre at 6 pm will be: 27 Mar: Mike & Wendy Gluyas `Musical Squares' 28 Mar: Professor Malcolm Longair 29 Mar: Adam Hart-Davis 30 Mar: Peter Barham `The physics of ice-cream'

  1. Geologic and molluscan evidence for a previously misunderstood late pleistocene, cool water, open coast terrace at Newport Bay, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, C.L., II

    2001-01-01

    A macro-invertebrate fauna from a 7 m elevation terrace remnant on the front of the Newport Mesa contains 63 mollusks, 58 specifically identified. These taxa represent a mixed death assemblage similar to that seen on rocky terrace platforms at intertidal depths in southern to central California today. The extralimital northern bivalve Macoma inquinala (Carpenter) and gastropods Tectura sp., cf. T. persona (Rathke), and Tegula montereyi (Kiener) suggest slightly cooler water temperatures than present today. These extralimital cool-water taxa, along with the terrace's geomorphic position in the palisades along the front of Newport Mesa, below other mapped terraces, separate it from the well known first terrace and its associated warm-water fauna recognized by previous authors, and suggest a younger age than the first terrace around Newport Bay.

  2. HIGH PREVALENCE OF INCOMPATIBILITY GROUP INCA/C AMONG MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROTYPE NEWPORT ISOLATED FROM DAIRY CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serotype Newport exhibiting increased morbidity and mortality among man and animals has emerged in North America and Canada. Risk factors for infection by MDR S. Newport have included exposure to dairy farms, consumption of undercooked ground beef or u...

  3. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica Serovar Newport Outbreak Isolates by CRISPR-MVLST and Determination of the Relationship between CRISPR-MVLST and PFGE Results

    PubMed Central

    Shariat, Nikki; Kirchner, Margaret K.; Sandt, Carol H.; Trees, Eija; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Newport (S. Newport) is the third most prevalent cause of food-borne salmonellosis. Rapid, efficient, and accurate methods for identification are required to track specific strains of S. Newport during outbreaks. By exploiting the hypervariable nature of virulence genes and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), we previously developed a sequence-based subtyping approach, designated CRISPR–multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (CRISPR-MVLST). To demonstrate the applicability of this approach, we analyzed a broad set of S. Newport isolates collected over a 5-year period by using CRISPR-MVLST and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among 84 isolates, we defined 38 S. Newport sequence types (NSTs), all of which were novel compared to our previous analyses, and 62 different PFGE patterns. Our data suggest that both subtyping approaches have high discriminatory abilities (>0.95) with a potential for clustering cases with common exposures. Importantly, we found that isolates from closely related NSTs were often similar by PFGE profile as well, further corroborating the applicability of CRISPR-MVLST. In the first full application of CRISPR-MVLST, we analyzed isolates from a recent S. Newport outbreak. In this blinded study, we confirmed the utility of CRISPR-MVLST and were able to distinguish the 10 outbreak isolates, as defined by PFGE and epidemiological data, from a collection of 20 S. Newport isolates. Together, our data show that CRISPR-MVLST could be a complementary approach to PFGE subtyping for S. Newport. PMID:23678062

  4. Broadcast News Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeyak, Paul G.

    This book is designed to introduce the fundamentals of broadcast news writing. The first three chapters concern leads, organization of material, and grammar and style. Chapter four brings the news writer into contact with the technological and aesthetic demands of radio and discusses interviews, lead-ins, and tag lines. Chapter five deals with…

  5. With News Search Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  6. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    Unification of Journal Options Beginning in 2000, the Journal subscription form will get much simpler and your Journal subscription will bring you even more than previously. Below is an outline of how the new system will work for individuals. Subscriptions for Individuals

    • Beginning September 1, 1999, all Journal print subscriptionscurrent, continuing, new, and renewalwill bring you monthly print issues and give you full access to JCE Online+everything that we have online.
    • If you don't want paper copy of your issue, there is a No-Print Optionwe donate your print copy to our Teacher Workshop Program and you have full access to everything online.
    • If you do want both paper and online but don't want to keep back issuessaving storage spaceyou can purchase JCE CD each year.
    A chart illustrating this new system appears below. It lists all subscription choices for individuals in the U. S., for ACS Student Affiliates, and for non-U.S. individuals. Other Subscription Rates There are now two types of subscriptions for libraries. These are described under New IP-Address Option for Libraries, below. For information about Promotional (larger quantities for workshops, classes, etc.) or Gift Subscription Award Certificate rates, contact the Journal (jce@chem.wisc.edu); 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608/262-5153. Extensions for Current JCE Online Subscribers At present there are more than 1,000 subscribers to JCE Online+: we think of these as our technological pioneers. These subscribers will have their subscriptions automatically extended according to the scheme below.

    Online Subscription Expires

    JCE Subscriptions Extended By

    Sept. 1, 1999 - Feb. 29, 2000 3 months
    Mar. 1, 2000 - Aug. 31, 2000 6 months
    Sept. 1, 2000 - Feb. 28, 2001 9 months
    Mar. 1, 2001 - Aug. 31, 2001 12 months
    Sept. 1, 2001 - Feb. 28, 2002 15 months
    Mar. 1, 2002 - Aug. 31, 2002 18 months
    Sept. 1, 2002 - Feb. 28, 2003 21 months
    Easy Access to JCE Online For quick and easy access to JCE Online, do this. Get the carrier sheet that comes in your Journal plastic mailing bag, the one with your mailing label on it.
    **************************FIRM 53706
    99990 Z Mar 2000 Z0142
    Jane L. Doe Premier School and College Avogadro Avenue Anywhere, USA
    Point your Web browser to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu. When asked for your name, enter your name exactly as it appears on the mailing label of your Journal issueeven if it is incorrect! Name: Jane L Doe Whenever asked for your password, enter your subscriber number, the first (5-digit) number on the second line of the label. Password: 99990 New IP-Address Option for Libraries While standard username/password access (where all users share the same access information) may be fine for some libraries, others find this system too limited and therefore unworkable. Such institutions have requested access by IP address, with no prompting for UserName and Password. We believe that this is just the tip of the iceberg and that many, if not most, library and institutional subscribers will want this type of access in the near future. Therefore we have added an IP-Address subscription option for libraries and institutions. With this option, the library or institution provides us with a list of all IP numbers that will receive access. Any desktop computer using one of these IP numbers will have immediate access, without the prompt for name and password. Because this requires considerably more administrative work on our end, there is a somewhat larger (but reasonable) fee. Please make your librarian aware of this new option that will provide you and all your colleagues with desktop access to JCE. Immediate Access to Online At present new subscribers are not able to get immediate access to JCE Onlinea limitation for subscribers who order over the telephone using a credit card. We now have an arrangement with our subscription fulfillment agent to give new subscribers immediate access to JCE Online by a guest account. The temporary guest account information will be provided as a part of the telephone order; when the new account is active, the account information will be emailed. Remember to Provide Your Email Address Knowing your email address has become important for Journal communication. In addition to account information, we will send an order confirmation to each subscriber who provides an email address. For those who want it, we intend, in the near future, to send an email message announcing when each month's issue goes online. We do not sell or give email addresses to anyone else. Keeping Up to Date with JCE Online JCE Online will continue to change and expand, as the technology around us changes and as new features and columns are added. The best way to keep abreast of new developments is to look for the JCE Online column in both print and online. Jon Holmes, editor of JCE Online, uses this column to keep readers in touch with the latest happenings:
    • JCE Online FAQs (March 1999, p 446)
    • JCE Online 99 (April 1999, p 584)
    • JCE Feature Columns (May 1999, p 718)
    • Molecular Modeling (June 1999, p 871)
    JCE: A Good Deal That Keeps Getting Better If you carry copies of JCE around in hopes of finding time to read them, you may think they are getting heavierand they are. Your Journal was more than a third bigger in 1998 than it was in 1995! We have printed more pages every year since 1996 (see graph for the past 25 years). We estimate that you will receive more than 2000 pages this year and even more next year. This is more pages than at any time in the Journal 's history, excepting the four years 1929-1932, when the pages were smaller. We are printing more pages because we need to. We have many good manuscripts that have been peer reviewed and accepted and now are awaiting publication in print. The time between acceptance of a manuscript and its publication is already too long. Unless we print more pages, it will grow longer. For the past three years we have been slowly but steadily reducing this publication lag, and we don't want to stop now. JCE accepts only those manuscripts that pass strict peer review (fewer than half the number we receive), but we are receiving more manuscripts each year, with no apparent decline in quality. A recent analysis of our expenses revealed that to process a subscription order, print 12 issues of JCE, and mail those 12 issues to you costs about 37 - exactly what we charged in 1999 for an individual subscription. This 37 does not include the cost of the editorial work that goes into making JCE an excellent journal: evaluating, reviewing, and working with authors to improve manuscripts, copy editing and preparing proofs, and laying out and desktop publishing each of the 600 articles we publish each year. JCE is a nonprofit operation, but we cannot survive if we provide a product whose production costs exceed income. Therefore the Board of Publication found it necessary to increase the individual subscription fee for next year to 42. This is a 31% increase over 1995 (less than 21% if inflation is taken into account), which is significantly below the estimated 40% increase in number of pages you will receive in 2000. Another way to see the tremendous value of JCE is to compare the cost per page for various journals. JCE costs less per printed page than any other journal we know. A quick survey revealed that cost per page ranges from 2 cents for JCE to 2-28 cents for various ACS journals to 46 cents for a science education research journal published by a commercial publisher to as much as 2 for a commercially published science research journal. JCE 's costs to institutional subscribers such as libraries are even more favorable by comparison with other journals, because we want JCE to be accessible to libraries in high schools and small colleges. How can we afford to be such a bargain? The entire community of chemical education contributes to writing, reviewing, and testing the materials we publish. Some members volunteer even more time as feature editors. The editorial staff work hard and often spend more than the typical work week doing their jobs superlatively and making this a great Journal. The Board of Publication, the Division of Chemical Education, and everyone associated with the Journal are dedicated to providing our readers with the best possible publication at the lowest possible cost. All that effort counts for a lot, and you are the beneficiary. What can you do to help continue this tradition of excellence at minimal cost? Become a JCE Ambassador. Ask others to join with us as subscribers. Or give them gift subscriptions (an even better bargain) and encourage them to continue to subscribe. The more subscribers we have, the less the cost to each. Also, volunteer your time as an author, reviewer, column editor, or in some other capacity. JCE is a great journal because its readers have given of themselves to make it that way. Please continue to work with us to keep it that way. Awards Aspirin Prize The first international Aspirin Prize for Solidarity through Chemistry has been awarded to K. C. Nicolaou of Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, and the University of California, San Diego. The prize honors Nicolaou for his creativity in the synthesis of natural products and for his development of innovative synthetic methods. Nicolaou and his colleagues E. J. Sorensen and N. Winssinger contributed an overview of this area of chemistry to the Journal in their Viewpoints article, "The Art and Science of Organic and Natural Products Synthesis", J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1225. The award commemorates the centenary of the first synthesis of a pure and stable form of acetylsalicylic acid, the active ingredient of aspirin. Awarded every two years, the Aspirin Prize is sponsored by Química Farmacéutica Bayer S.A. (Barcelona) and includes a monetary award of 20,000. Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities Travel Awards, ACS Women Chemists Committee Women Chemists Committee of the American Chemical Society is calling for applications for travel awards for post-doctoral, graduate, and undergraduate women to make their first research presentation at a national meeting sponsored by Eli Lilly & Co. For more information and an application form, contact your department chair; http://www.tamug.tamu.edu/ascwcc; or Cheryl Brown, ACS, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036; phone: 800/227-5558 ext. 6022; email c_brown@acs.org. The deadline for receipt of applications for meetings between January 1 and June 30, 2000, is October 15, 1999; for meetings between July 1 and December 31, 2000, the deadline is March 15, 2000. Call for Symposia, Papers, Workshops: 16th BCCE The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education will be held July 30­August 3, 2000, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The conference Web site at http://www.umich.edu/ bcce is ready to accept proposals for symposia, papers, posters, and workshops. Or proposals may be submitted in writing to the Program Chair, Brian Coppola, phone: 734/764-7329; email: bcoppola@umich.edu. The deadline for submission of proposals for symposia and workshops is December 13, 1999; the deadline for submission of abstracts of papers and posters is February 4, 2000. For general information contact Seyhan Ege, phone: 734/764-7340; email: snege@umich.edu. 16th IUPAC Conference on Chemical Thermodynamics 16th IUPAC Conference on Chemical Thermodynamics (concurrent with 55th Calorimetry Conference and 10th Symposium on Thermodynamics of Nuclear Materials) August 6­11, 2000 Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada This conference will cover research topics in all areas of thermodynamics. In addition, there will be a special poster session for papers on two aspects of thermodynamics education: lecture demonstrations and undergraduate laboratory experiments. Come and join us for lobster and learn what is new and exciting in thermodynamics. To be on the email list for this meeting, send a message to: ICCT@IS.DAL.CA. For further details, consult the conference Web site: http://IS.DAL.CA/ ICCT. Chair: Mary Anne White, Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4J3, Canada; phone and fax: 902/494-3894, email: Mary.Anne.White@DAL.CA. Microscale Workshops The National Microscale Chemistry Center, located at Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts, will offer several workshops in fall 1999, spring 2000, and fall 2000. Workshops for elementary school teachers run from 8:30 a.m. on a Thursday to 2:00 p.m. the following day. Workshops for high school teachers run from 5:30 p.m. on a Friday until 2:00 p.m. on Sunday. There are also workshops for college/2-year college/high school teachers that will be held during summer 2000, from 8:30 a.m. on a Monday to 2:00 p.m. on Friday. The workshops include all materials, free housing, and all meals; there is a registration fee. Early registration is advised. For further information, contact Mono M. Singh, Director, National Microscale Chemistry Center, 315 Turnpike Street, North Andover, MA 01845; phone: 978/837-5137; fax: 878/837-5017; msingh@merrimack.edu. Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching The Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching (CASTL) has both a higher education and K-12/Teacher Education component. The CASTL section of the Carnegie Web site contains a review of the three-part design of the higher education program and materials and information developed over the past year: http://www.carnegiefoundation.org (click on Program Information and then on CASTL). This site includes (i) the original press release for the project; (ii) booklets and information about the Pew Scholars National Fellowship Program and the Campus Programtwo of the three components of the CASTL; (iii) links to materials about the scholarship of teaching and learning newly available on other sites. The Pew Learning and Technology Program The Pew Learning and Technology Program is an 8.8-million, four-year effort to place the national discussion about the impact that new technologies are having on the nation's campuses in the context of student learning and ways to achieve this learning cost-effectively. The Program has three areas of work: the Pew Grant Program in Course Redesign; the Pew Symposia in Learning and Technology; the Pew Learning and Technology Program Newsletter. The Pew Learning and Technology Program is coordinated by the newly created Center for Academic Transformation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute led by its executive director, Carol A. Twigg. The Center's mission is to serve as a source of expertise and support for those in and around higher education who wish to transform their academic practices to make them more accessible, more effective, and more productive by taking advantage of the capabilities of information technology. For further information, see the Center Web site at www.center.rpi.edu or contact Abbie Basile at basila@rpi.edu or 518/276-8323. Materials Available Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children The 1999 list of Outstanding Trade Books for Children, a cooperative project between NSTA and the Children's Book Council, has been published recently. Published annually for more than 20 years, the list of outstanding trade books is intended to help educators, librarians, parents, and others interested in science education to promote science through reading. The books are geared for children in grades K-8. This 1999 list is available through the NSTA Web site at www.nsta.org/pubs/sc, or through NSTA's Fax on Demand service (888/400-NSTA); when prompted, select number 842 to receive a faxed copy of the trade book list. ACS Pamphlet on Global Climate Change and Fact Sheet on Chemical Weapons Global Climate Change, an updated pamphlet that replaces the 1990 version, presents an overview of the factors that influence climate and describes the basis of recent public concerns. The pamphlet explains in clear, concise language what scientists know and don't know about the greenhouse effect. The 12-page pamphlet is written for the nonscientist. It is ideal for science teachers, policymakers, and others interested in learning more about this global issue. Chemical Weapons is now available in the Science in Focus series. This fact sheet explores the issues and lethal chemicals involved in chemical weapons production. The 4-page fact sheet provides timely information on scientific issues in order to promote a greater understanding of the technical issues we face today. These publications, as well as other information pamphlets and fact sheets on topical issues affecting society, are available from the ACS Office of Society Services. Other topics include Acid Rain; Biotechnology; Chemical Risk: A Primer; Chemical Risk: Personal Decisions; Ground Water; Hazardous Waste Management; Pesticides; Recycling; and Science in Focus: Endocrine Distruptors. To obtain a single free copy or the price schedule for multiple copies call 1-800/227-5558 or write to the ACS Office of Society Services, 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC. The pamphlets can also be found the ACS Government Affairs Web site:http://www.acs.org/govt by clicking publications/reports.

    Proposal Deadlines

    National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 5, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships Program (CSEMS) TBA
    • Advanced Techological Education (ATE) Preliminary April 13, 2000 (anticipated) Formal Oct. 14, 1999, and Oct. 13, 2000 (anticipated)
    • NSF Graduate Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) TBA (anticipated late spring 2000)
    • Online DUE forms available at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/documents/general/forms/forms.htm
    • NSF Documents Online available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/pubsys/browser/odbrowse.pl
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov.

    The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 15, 1999, and November 15, 2000
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: June 30, 2000
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 15, 2000
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 15, 2000
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: June 30, 2000
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: Preliminary Proposals: June 15, 2000 Complete Proposals: September 1, 2000
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: March 1, 2000
    • Senior Scientist Mentor: September 1, 1999, and September 1, 2000
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW:http://www.dreyfus.org/

    Research Corporation

    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final opportunity for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; WWW:http://www.rescorp.org

  7. Seasonal Detection of Human Viruses and Coliphage in Newport Bay, California▿

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sunny C.; Chu, Weiping; He, Jian-Wen

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) currently used to indicate water quality in the coastal environment may be inadequate to reflect human viral contamination. Coliphage was suggested as a better indicator of human viral pollution and was proposed by the U.S. EPA as an alternative indicator for fecal pollution in groundwater. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and distribution of FIB, F+ coliphage, and PCR-detectable human adenovirus and enterovirus for an entire year at 15 locations around the Newport Bay watershed, an important southern California estuary for water recreation and an ecological reserve. Peak concentrations and prevalences of FIB and F+ coliphage were associated with winter storms (wet weather). Human adenoviruses and enteroviruses, however, were detected by PCR in ∼5% of samples collected in the summer (dry weather) but only once in wet weather. These results demonstrated that FIB and coliphage have similar seasonal and freshwater-to-saltwater distribution patterns, while the detection of human viruses depends on a distribution pattern that is the opposite of that of FIB and coliphage. This research suggested that coliphage and FIB share similar environmental sources, while sources of human viruses in Newport Bay are perhaps different. PMID:17720839

  8. How Much News Is Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Ronald G.

    Although the apparent audiences of the news media are quite large, the real audience for news, in particular hard news of politics and public affairs, is much smaller than is commonly assumed. This situation, while antithetical to the democratic ideal of a news-hungry, well-informed electorate, in practice makes little difference in the way the…

  9. The Origins of Borrowed News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    A study was conducted to assess the indications in print of news borrowing (reporting news distributed by second hand or government controlled sources) in the 1970s, and to examine the relationship between borrowed news and the restrictions and reductions in newspapers' overseas news staff. The "New York Times" and the "Chicago Tribune" were…

  10. In situ evaluation of Paenibacillus alvei in reducing carriage of Salmonella enterica serovar newport on whole tomato plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, tomatoes have been implicated as a primary vehicle in foodborne outbreaks of Salmonella Newport and other Salmonella serovars. Long-term intervention measures to reduce Salmonella prevalence on tomatoes remain elusive for growing and post-harvest environments. A naturally-occurring bacter...

  11. An outbreak of Salmonella Newport associated with mung bean sprouts in Germany and the Netherlands, October to November 2011.

    PubMed

    Bayer, C; Bernard, H; Prager, R; Rabsch, W; Hiller, P; Malorny, B; Pfefferkorn, B; Frank, C; de Jong, A; Friesema, I; Stark, K; Rosner, Bm

    2014-01-01

    The largest Salmonella enterica serovar Newport outbreak (n=106) ever reported in Germany occurred in October and November 2011. Twenty associated cases were reported in the Netherlands. The outbreak investigation included an analytical epidemiological study, molecular typing of human and food isolates and food traceback investigations. Unspecified Salmonella had been detected in samples of mung bean sprouts at a sprout producer (producer A) in the Netherlands and mung bean sprouts contaminated with S. Newport had been found during routine sampling at a sprout distributor in Germany. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of sprouts being the infection vehicle. In a case-control study, we compared 50 notified adult S. Newport cases with 45 Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis cases regarding their food consumption in the three days before illness. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, only sprout consumption was significantly associated with S. Newport infection (odds ratio: 18.4; 95% confidence interval: 2.2-150.2). Molecular typing patterns of human isolates were indistinguishable from a mung bean sprouts isolate. Traceback of sprouts led to distributors and producer A in the Netherlands. Since sprouts are frequently contaminated with microorganisms, consumers need to be aware that consumption of raw or insufficiently cooked sprouts may pose a health risk. PMID:24434173

  12. Literature and the Sea. Proceedings of a Conference Held at the Marine Science Center, Newport, Oregon, May 8, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astro, Richard, Ed.

    This document is a collection of eight papers presented at a conference held at the Marine Science Center, Newport, Oregon, May 8, 1976. The conference concluded a course offered jointly by the School of Oceanography and the Department of English at Oregon State University. The conference had two purposes: (1) focus on the relationship between…

  13. GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION AND CORRELATION TO MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE OF ISOLATES OF SALMONELLA NEWPORT DERIVED FROM BEEF AND DAIRY CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput genotyping of Salmonella isolates obtained from food production animals is an essential component of food safety to evaluate pathogenic and antimicrobial resistance profiles. A total of 99 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresi...

  14. Turning News into Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Majorie

    1987-01-01

    Suggests young people can respond to news stories and political issues they feel strongly about through poetry, and presents one student's effective use of satire which lets his emotions "leak through" to the reader. (NH)

  15. Water Power Program News

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-19

    News stories about conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Wind and Water Power Program, and other federal agencies.

  16. Migration of Caenorhabditis elegans to manure and manure compost and potential for transport of Salmonella newport to fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Stephen J; Anderson, Gary L; Williams, Phillip L; Millner, Patricia D; Beuchat, Larry R

    2006-01-15

    A study was done to determine if a free-living, bacterivorous nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, migrates to bovine manure, turkey manure, composted bovine manure, composted turkey manure, and manure-amended soil inoculated with Salmonella Newport. Movement of the worm to lettuce, strawberries, and carrots was also studied. C. elegans moved most rapidly to turkey manure and strawberries, with 35% and 60% of worms, respectively, associating with samples within 30 min. Survival and reproduction of C. elegans in test materials were not affected by the presence of S. newport. Bovine manure and bovine manure compost inoculated with S. newport (8.6 log10 CFU/g) were separately placed in the bottom of a glass jar and covered with a layer of soil (5 cm) inoculated (50 worms/g) or not inoculated with C. elegans. A piece of lettuce, strawberry, or carrot was placed on top of the soil before jars were sealed and held at 20 degrees C for up to 10 days. In the system using soil inoculated with C. elegans, S. newport initially in bovine manure was detected on the surface of lettuce, strawberry, and carrot samples within 3, 1, and 1 days, respectively. The pathogen was detected on lettuce, strawberry, and carrot within 1, 7, and 1 days, respectively, when initially present in bovine manure compost. With one exception, the pathogen was not detected on the produce over the 10-day incubation period when C. elegans was not present in the soil. Results indicate that C. elegans has the potential for transporting S. newport in soil to the surface of preharvest fruits and vegetables in contact with soil. PMID:16226330

  17. Segmentation and thrusting along the offshore Newport-Inglewood-Rose Canyon zone of deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.I.; Fischer, P.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The offshore Newport-Inglewood-Rose Canyon (NI-RC) zone of deformation is a 106-km-long, linear zone of folds and faults that extend from Newport Beach to La Jolla. Using seismicity and high-resolution and digitally processed seismic reflection data, three distinct fault segments are defined. These segments control the position and trend of shelf break: (1) the Laguna Beach segment (Corona Del Mar to San Mateo Point), a right-stepping zone with activity decreasing southward to San Mateo Point, where the latest activity was middle Holocene. (2) The San Onofre segment (San Mateo Point to Oceanside), where a major, 2-km-wide, left-stepping break occurs near the center of this segment opposite San Onofre; it is associated with an apparent basement discontinuity, a major blind thrust ramp and bowing of the continental slope. Shoreward of the NI-RC zone a 20-km-long synclinal fold trends subparallel to the zone. (3) The La Jolla segment (Oceanside to La Jolla), north of Encinitas, overlapping, left-stepping fault splays are associated with folding and thrusting. Preliminary earthquake focal mechanism studies suggest that right-lateral faulting, with a minor reverse component, is dominant along the NI-RC Zone. Earthquake foci do not seem to be related to the thrust faults. Compressional deformation along the zone is thought to be a direct result of relative North American/Pacific plate motion direction changes at 4 Ma. Deformation was concentrated near the left-stepping break in the San Onofre segment, perhaps producing a detached block or flake. Mapped structures suggest the NI-RC is dislocated by the blind' thrust ramp.

  18. 77 FR 12865 - Accreditation and Approval of SGS North America, Inc., as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ...Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to 19 CFR 151.12 and 19 CFR 151.13, SGS North America, Inc., 12650 McManus Blvd., Suite 103, Newport News, VA 23602, has been approved to gauge and accredited to test petroleum and petroleum products, organic chemicals and vegetable oils for customs purposes, in accordance with the provisions of 19 CFR 151.12 and 19 CFR 151.13. Anyone wishing to employ......

  19. Do you want the good news or the bad news first? The nature and consequences of news order preferences.

    PubMed

    Legg, Angela M; Sweeny, Kate

    2014-03-01

    Information often comes as a mix of good and bad news, prompting the question, "Do you want the good news or the bad news first?" In such cases, news-givers and news-recipients differ in their concerns and considerations, thus creating an obstacle to ideal communication. In three studies, we examined order preferences of news-givers and news-recipients and the consequences of these preferences. Study 1 confirmed that news-givers and news-recipients differ in their news order preferences. Study 2 tested two solutions to close the preference gap between news-givers and recipients and found that both perspective-taking and priming emotion-protection goals shift news-givers' delivery patterns to the preferred order of news-recipients. Study 3 provided evidence that news order has consequences for recipients, such that opening with bad news (as recipients prefer) reduces worry, but this emotional benefit undermines motivation to change behavior. PMID:24177520

  20. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Highlights major science news stories of 1982 reported in "Science News." Categories include space/astronomy, biology, chemistry, medicine, energy, physics, anthropology/paleontology, earth sciences, technology, behavior, science/society, and the environment. (JN)

  1. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  2. How Newsmakers Make the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, George

    1978-01-01

    Presents illustrations from the Carter presidential campaign to demonstrate the credentials procedures for newspeople, and discusses schedules, pools, and mults that aid in coverage of the news while enabling the newsmaker to make the news. (JMF)

  3. News | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    News about scientific advances in cancer prevention, program activities, and new projects are included here in NCI press releases and fact sheets, articles from the NCI Cancer Bulletin, and Clinical Trial News from the NCI website.

  4. Perplexity Analysis of Obesity News Coverage

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Delano J.; Elhadad, Noémie; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-01-01

    An important task performed during the analysis of health news coverage is the identification of news articles that are related to a specific health topic (e.g. obesity). This is often done using a combination of keyword searching and manual encoding of news content. Statistical language models and their evaluation metric, perplexity, may help to automate this task. A perplexity study of obesity news was performed to evaluate perplexity as a measure of the similarity of news corpora to obesity news content. The results of this study showed that perplexity increased as news coverage became more general relative to obesity news (obesity news ≈ 187, general health news ≈ 278, general news ≈ 378, general news across multiple publishers ≈ 382). This indicates that language model perplexity can measure the similarity news content to obesity news coverage, and could be used as the basis for an automated health news classifier. PMID:20351893

  5. The Trouble with Bad News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jack B.

    1981-01-01

    Subjective comments from veteran news reporters, media critics, and the public give the impression that bad or negative news is becoming a major problem in this country. This impression raises major questions concerning how much is really known about bad news, including whether the media present an accurate or distorted picture of reality in

  6. Political News and Political Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  7. Science News of the Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a review of important science news stories reported in Science News during 1976. Most items include a volume and page number reference to the issue of Science News in which the article appeared. Items are grouped under general major headings such as: space, astronomy, medicine, chemistry, etc. (SL)

  8. The Trouble with Bad News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jack B.

    1981-01-01

    Subjective comments from veteran news reporters, media critics, and the public give the impression that bad or negative news is becoming a major problem in this country. This impression raises major questions concerning how much is really known about bad news, including whether the media present an accurate or distorted picture of reality in…

  9. The Structure of Foreign News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.; Thompson, Kirstin D.

    To examine the ways in which aspects of foreign news content are linked together, an analysis was performed on the data collected during a content analysis of foreign news in major national daily newspapers and broadcast news programs over 12 days. The analysis included the identification of (1) up to four topics from an all-inclusive descriptive…

  10. Television News; Anatomy and Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Maury

    Primarily for the journalist, this book explores three aspects of television news--its techniques, its journalistic concepts, and its effects on society--in developing its argument that the relationship of television news technique to concept is extremely intimate and widely misunderstood, and that the effects of television news on society are so…

  11. TV News Flow Studies Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjarvard, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Compares different theoretical approaches to the study of international news. Finds many comparative studies of the foreign news output of national broadcasters and few studies analyzing the actual flow of television news between actors at the wholesale level and the flow between wholesale and retail level. Suggests a better framework for the…

  12. The Sources of Radio News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, D. Charles

    To examine the production of programing material in a radio newsroom, a study was undertaken of the sources presented to the newsroom, of sources within the sources, of sources actively sought by the news staff, of degrees of processing of news items, and of the sources comprising the news output. Information in each of these areas was collected…

  13. Political News and Political Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article

  14. ATLAS-2 Video News Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video presents a Marshall Space Flight Center-Television (MSFC-TV) news release describing the objectives of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications in Science-2 (ATLAS-2), which is being flown on STS-56. Dr. Tim Miller (Mission Scientist), Dr. Marsha Torr (Mission Scientist), and Teresa Vanhooser (Mission Manager) explain that the ATLAS-2 mission is being launched to study earth atmospheric interactions with the sun in general and how manmade chemicals and pollution are contributing to ozone depletion in our atmosphere in particular. Seven instruments comprise the core payload. ATLAS-2 is an integral part of the Spacelab contribution to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth and characterizes the chemical and physical components of Earth's middle atmosphere and the solar energy injected in the atmosphere, studies that began on ATLAS-1.

  15. ATLAS-1 Video News Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Allen Kenitzer, from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), narrates this NASA Kennedy Space Center video presenting a MSFC-Television news release describing the overall scientific objectives of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications in Science-1 (ATLAS-1) Spacelab mission. Byron Lichtenberg (NASA Science Astronaut) and Anthony O'Neil (ATLAS-1 Mission Manager) explain that the 13 sophisticated and complementary instruments carried in shuttle Atlantis' payload bay are designed to identify the chemical species in our atmosphere, to measure the Sun's energy falling on and entering the atmosphere, to study the behavior of charged particles in the electric and magnetic fields surrounding the earth, and to gather ultraviolet light from stars and galaxies. ATLAS-1 is the first Spacelab flight of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Mission to Planet Earth.

  16. The Newport Button: The Large Scale Replication Of Combined Three-And Two-Dimensional Holographic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, James J.

    1984-05-01

    A unique type of holographic imagery and its large scale replication are described. The "Newport Button", which was designed as an advertising premium item for the Newport Corporation, incorporates a complex overlay of holographic diffraction gratings surrounding a three-dimensional holographic image of a real object. The combined pattern is recorded onto a photosensitive medium from which a metal master is made. The master is subsequently used to repeatedly emboss the pattern into a thin plastic sheet. Individual patterns are then die cut from the metallized plastic and mounted onto buttons. A discussion is given of the diffraction efficiencies of holograms made in this particular fashion and of the special requirements of the replication process.

  17. Evaluating gulls as potential vehicles of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport (JJPX01.0061) contamination of tomatoes grown on the eastern shore of Virginia.

    PubMed

    Gruszynski, Karen; Pao, Steven; Kim, Chyer; Toney, Denise M; Wright, Kim; Colón, Ana; Engelmeyer, T; Levine, Seth J

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Newport pattern JJPX01.0061 has been identified as causing several multistate outbreaks in the last 10 years, primarily due to contamination of tomatoes grown in Virginia. The goal of this study was to evaluate gulls as a potential vehicle of S. Newport pattern 61 contamination for tomatoes grown on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Gull fecal samples were collected at four sites in eastern Virginia for 3 months (May to July) in 2012, resulting in 360 samples, among which Salmonella was isolated from 62 samples. Twenty-two serotypes and 26 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis DNA fingerprint patterns, including S. Newport pattern 61, were identified. All of the patterns that were isolated multiple times, with the exception of S. Newport patterns JJPX01.0030 and JJPX01.0061, were clustered in time and geographical location. These results strongly suggest that both patterns of S. Newport are endemic to sites on the Eastern Shore where gulls were sampled. This study provides additional information regarding the epidemiology of S. Newport pattern 61 in Virginia and how tomatoes sold interstate may become contaminated in the field. PMID:24141129

  18. In Situ Evaluation of Paenibacillus alvei in Reducing Carriage of Salmonella enterica Serovar Newport on Whole Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Sarah; Enurah, Alexander; Strain, Errol; Millner, Patricia; Rideout, Steven L.; Brown, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, tomatoes have been implicated as a primary vehicle in food-borne outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport and other Salmonella serovars. Long-term intervention measures to reduce Salmonella prevalence on tomatoes remain elusive for growing and postharvest environments. A naturally occurring bacterium identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Paenibacillus alvei was isolated epiphytically from plants native to the Virginia Eastern Shore tomato-growing region. After initial antimicrobial activity screening against Salmonella and 10 other bacterial pathogens associated with the human food supply, strain TS-15 was further used to challenge an attenuated strain of S. Newport on inoculated fruits, leaves, and blossoms of tomato plants in an insect-screened high tunnel with a split-plot design. Survival of Salmonella after inoculation was measured for groups with and those without the antagonist at days 0, 1, 2, and 3 and either day 5 for blossoms or day 6 for fruits and leaves. Strain TS-15 exhibited broad-range antimicrobial activity against both major food-borne pathogens and major bacterial phytopathogens of tomato. After P. alvei strain TS-15 was applied onto the fruits, leaves, and blossoms of tomato plants, the concentration of S. Newport declined significantly (P ≤ 0.05) compared with controls. Astonishingly, >90% of the plants had no detectable levels of Salmonella by day 5 for blossoms. The naturally occurring antagonist strain TS-15 is highly effective in reducing the carriage of Salmonella Newport on whole tomato plants. The application of P. alvei strain TS-15 is a promising approach for reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination during tomato production. PMID:24747888

  19. In situ evaluation of Paenibacillus alvei in reducing carriage of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport on whole tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Allard, Sarah; Enurah, Alexander; Strain, Errol; Millner, Patricia; Rideout, Steven L; Brown, Eric W; Zheng, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Recently, tomatoes have been implicated as a primary vehicle in food-borne outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport and other Salmonella serovars. Long-term intervention measures to reduce Salmonella prevalence on tomatoes remain elusive for growing and postharvest environments. A naturally occurring bacterium identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Paenibacillus alvei was isolated epiphytically from plants native to the Virginia Eastern Shore tomato-growing region. After initial antimicrobial activity screening against Salmonella and 10 other bacterial pathogens associated with the human food supply, strain TS-15 was further used to challenge an attenuated strain of S. Newport on inoculated fruits, leaves, and blossoms of tomato plants in an insect-screened high tunnel with a split-plot design. Survival of Salmonella after inoculation was measured for groups with and those without the antagonist at days 0, 1, 2, and 3 and either day 5 for blossoms or day 6 for fruits and leaves. Strain TS-15 exhibited broad-range antimicrobial activity against both major food-borne pathogens and major bacterial phytopathogens of tomato. After P. alvei strain TS-15 was applied onto the fruits, leaves, and blossoms of tomato plants, the concentration of S. Newport declined significantly (P ≤ 0.05) compared with controls. Astonishingly, >90% of the plants had no detectable levels of Salmonella by day 5 for blossoms. The naturally occurring antagonist strain TS-15 is highly effective in reducing the carriage of Salmonella Newport on whole tomato plants. The application of P. alvei strain TS-15 is a promising approach for reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination during tomato production. PMID:24747888

  20. Molecular epidemiology of an outbreak caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Newport in Finland and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Lyytikäinen, O; Koort, J; Ward, L; Schildt, R; Ruutu, P; Japisson, E; Timonen, M; Siitonen, A

    2000-04-01

    Between December 1997 and January 1998 an increase in the number of isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, a serotype rarely causing indigenous infections in Finland, was detected. This included two clusters of gastroenteritis following funeral meals. An inquiry via Enter-net revealed a concomitant increase in cases of S. Newport in the United Kingdom. To investigate the Finnish outbreak, a total of 56 S. Newport strains (22 from the outbreak period, 27 from pre- and post-outbreak period, and 7 from imported food producing animals) were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE); selected isolates were also phage typed. Two retrospective questionnaire studies evaluating food exposures among the funeral attendants were conducted. All isolates from the clusters had an identical PFGE pattern which was also found in 13 infections temporally close to but not associated with the clusters. The Finnish outbreak was caused by the same phage type as the one in the United Kingdom. In both clusters, an epidemiological link between illness and exposure to cured ham was found. In conclusion, the outbreak was not limited to the two clusters but was more widely spread both in and outside Finland. Early alarm systems of food-borne outbreaks and collaboration between European countries are needed for investigating international outbreaks. PMID:10813141

  1. Delivering bad news to patients

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Lonnie; Cox, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    When physicians lack proper training, breaking bad news can lead to negative consequences for patients, families, and physicians. A questionnaire was used to determine whether a didactic program on delivering bad news was needed at our institution. Results revealed that 91% of respondents perceived delivering bad news as a very important skill, but only 40% felt they had the training to effectively deliver such news. We provide a brief review of different approaches to delivering bad news and advocate for training physicians in a comprehensive, structured model. PMID:26722188

  2. Figuring Out Health News

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the American Psychiatric Association (APA), are other good sources. previous continue Getting Help The best way to get a full understanding of medical news is to ask someone like a doctor or science teacher for help in figuring out what it ...

  3. E News: Report highlights

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Three technologies are highlighted in this issue: a rooftop ice storage system for small commercial loads; chlorofluorocarbon-free electric chillers and their expected market; and the FlashBake oven, a commercial-sized oven that uses high intensity quartz lamps to cook food quickly. Regular columns on Member News and Work in Progress are included.

  4. News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Milliot, Jim; Bing, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Reviews library news for 1997. Highlights public library budgets, examined by number of patrons served; Internet filters and censorship; librarians and the media; private and government funding sources; outsourcing; expectations for growth in the publishing industry, emphasizing the Asian economic crisis; and new ideas from the next generation of…

  5. News from LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1994-01-26

    We present a brief summary of recent news from LBL related to accelerator physics. This talk was given on October 29, 1993 at the 6th Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on the subject ``Synchro- Betraton Resonances,`` held in Funchal (Madeira, Portugal), October 24--30, 1993.

  6. The News, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase the…

  7. Parent News Offline, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues published in volume 1 (1999) of "Parent News Offline," a newsletter of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN), designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The spring 1999 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Child Care: How…

  8. Parent News Offline, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 4 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2002 issue contains the following articles: (1) "Middle College High Schools:…

  9. Parent News Offline, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two issues in volume 2 of "Parent News Offline," a publication of the National Parent Information Network (NPIN) designed to introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through NPIN. The Spring 2000 issue contains the following articles: (1) "'Zero Tolerance': What Parents…

  10. Smart Start News, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Monica, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Smart Start is a comprehensive public-private initiative to help all North Carolina children enter school healthy and ready to succeed, and provides children from birth to age five access to high-quality and affordable child care, health care, and other critical services. This document comprises the first two issues of "Smart Start News," a…

  11. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  12. News & Issues, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshinsky, Carole J., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This publication is comprised of the two 1999 issues of "News and Issues," a newsletter devoted to identifying and promoting strategies to reduce the young child poverty rate, and to improve the life chances of children still living in poverty. The Winter/Spring issue includes the following articles: (1) "Innovative Strategies Help Families Cope…

  13. Content-based analysis of news video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Junqing; Zhou, Dongru; Liu, Huayong; Cai, Bo

    2001-09-01

    In this paper, we present a schema for content-based analysis of broadcast news video. First, we separate commercials from news using audiovisual features. Then, we automatically organize news programs into a content hierarchy at various levels of abstraction via effective integration of video, audio, and text data available from the news programs. Based on these news video structure and content analysis technologies, a TV news video Library is generated, from which users can retrieve definite news story according to their demands.

  14. Impacts of rainfall on the water quality of the Newport River Estuary (Eastern North Carolina, USA).

    PubMed

    Coulliette, Angela D; Noble, Rachel T

    2008-12-01

    The Newport River Estuary (NPRE), an important North Carolina (NC) shellfish harvesting area, has been experiencing alterations to the land-water interface due to increasing population and coastal development. Water quality degradation in the estuary over the last decade has led to an increase of shellfish harvesting area closures, and has been postulated to be due to non-point source contamination in the form of stormwater. Water samples were taken in the NPRE (n =179) over a range of weather conditions and all seasons from August 2004 to September 2006. Fecal coliform (FC), as estimated by E. coli (EC), and Enterococcus (ENT) concentrations (MPN per 100 ml) were examined in relation to rainfall levels and distance from land. The relationships among the fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and environmental parameters were also examined. The data revealed a significant increase in FC concentrations after measured rainfall amounts of 2.54 cm (general threshold) and 3.81 cm (management action threshold). However, higher than expected FIB concentrations existed during conditions of negligible rainfall (<0.25 cm), indicating a possible reservoir population in the sediment. Overall, stormwater runoff appears to be adversely impacting water quality in the NPRE. PMID:18401112

  15. Modeling of Selenium for the San Diego Creek Watershed and Newport Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2009-01-01

    The San Diego Creek watershed and Newport Bay in southern California are contaminated with selenium (Se) as a result of groundwater associated with urban development overlying a historical wetland, the Swamp of the Frogs. The primary Se source is drainage from surrounding seleniferous marine sedimentary formations. An ecosystem-scale model was employed as a tool to assist development of a site-specific Se objective for the region. The model visualizes outcomes of different exposure scenarios in terms of bioaccumulation in predators using partitioning coefficients, trophic transfer factors, and site-specific data for food-web inhabitants and particulate phases. Predicted Se concentrations agreed well with field observations, validating the use of the model as realistic tool for testing exposure scenarios. Using the fish tissue and bird egg guidelines suggested by regulatory agencies, allowable water concentrations were determined for different conditions and locations in the watershed and the bay. The model thus facilitated development of a site-specific Se objective that was locally relevant and provided a basis for step-by-step implementation of source control.

  16. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Susan B; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Susan B. Blaeser.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27036268

  17. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Susan B; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Susan B. Blaeser.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:26827033

  18. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  19. NEWS: Eclipse matters (still)!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    This collection of snippets has as its theme the 1999 Solar Eclipse, and covers items that might be of interest to eclipse watchers and their associates. Much information can be obtained from the national web site at http://www.eclipse.org.uk. Set up by the CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, on behalf of the UK Eclipse Group, the site is intended to keep viewers abreast of developments during the countdown to the eclipse. The list of contents includes: about eclipses; eclipse pictures; eclipse science; safety advice; latest news; and local information. There is also a wealth of images and video footage, so the site has been organized with the visitor having a small PC and modem in mind, so that the key information can be accessed as quickly as possible. Free colour leaflets containing useful details for eclipse watchers can be obtained from the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. `The Sun - our local star' and `Neutrinos' are additions to PPARC's series introducing key areas of its science. They answer such questions as what the Sun is, what eclipses are, why the Sun is important and where neutrinos come from. They support the National Curriculum Key Stages 3 and 4 plus A-level physics. The A5 leaflets open out into an A2 sized double-sided wall chart and bulk quantitites are available for class sets, visitor centres, exhibitions, open days etc. A full list of PPARC materials can be found at the website http://www.pparc.ac.uk or by order from Mark Wells, PPARC, Polaris House, North Star Avenue, Swindon SN2 1SZ (fax: 01793 442002). A message has been received from George Care, Head of Physics in the Science Department at Mounts Bay School, Penzance, which we now pass on to our readers. During his application for electronic access to Physics Education via the Institute of Physics Affiliated Schools and Colleges scheme, George notes that his school is on the track of the eclipse this summer and he has invited us to pass on the details to anyone who would like to research the event. At the time of his correspondence, no-one had requested use of the school's facilities. The school's address is Boscathnoe Lane, Heamoor, Penzance TR18 3JT, Cornwall (fax: 01736 331633) if you want to get in touch. Finally we include the following article from a Guernsey-based company committed to supplying equipment for safe observation of the solar eclipse this summer. Eclipse posters are also available, at £10 each, from the company at Belle Etoile, Rue du Hamel, Castel, Guernsey GY5 7QJ (fax: 01481 64871) and more information can be viewed at their website http://ds.dial.pipex.com/eclipse99page/.

  20. A Survey of Electronic News Gathering and Television News Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Vernon A.; DiCioccio, John P.

    A 1977 national survey of 216 television stations that use electronic news gathering (ENG) and of 224 stations that still use only film for camera reporting showed little difference in the types of news the two kinds of operations covered, although stations using ENG shot more stories than did those still using only film. The persons making

  1. STS-135 and Expedition 28 Joint Crew News Conference - Duration: 46 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Atlantis crew members and their six station colleagues gathered in the Japanese Kibo Laboratory to take questions from news media. Reporters at four NASA centers, NASA headquarters and in Japan par...

  2. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    Supplementary Materials The number of supplementary materials that accompany print articles has grown and also become more varied. The new guidelines for lab experiments call for supplementary materials in most cases, so that the actual materials used in lab can be made available. The From Past Issues column edited by Kathryn Williams and many of the technology columns frequently have supplements for JCE Online. An especially interesting supplement that we would like to call to the attention of readers is a collection of videos from the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, based on interviews with nuclear chemists who have discovered and studied the heaviest elements. These movies accompany the Viewpoints article, "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements-One Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee. The titles of the movies are listed below; illustrative stills are shown at the bottom of the page. Researchers involved with the segments about Lawrencium include Robert Silva, Torbjorn Sikkeland, Matti Nurmia, Robert Latimer, and Albert Ghiorso, all of whom are from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (QuickTime 3 is needed in order to view the videos; it can be downloaded free from http://www.apple.com.)

    • A Brief Note about Plutonium, by Glenn Seaborg
    • Plutonium and Why It Was Kept a Secret
    • The Prediction of the Actinide Series, by Glenn Seaborg
    • First Chemical Separation of Lawrencium at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 1970
    • The HILAC or Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator
    • Discovery of Lawrencium
    • How To Collect Lawrencium Atoms
    • The Discovery of Element 106-Finally
    • The Naming of Element 106
    • The Limits of Discovering the Heavy Elements
    • What Good Is a Heavy Element?
    To see these videos, view the Supplements of http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Mar/abs331.html. People: Glenn Seaborg Glenn Seaborg, frequent contributor and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall 1998 ACS Meeting in Boston he suffered a serious fall following a stroke, from which he never recovered. One of his last photographs, taken the previous day at a Journal luncheon, appears on page 1360 of the November 1998 issue. His commentary on his long career in chemistry and education appears on page 1520 of the December 1998 issue. Seaborg was a Nobel laureate, discoverer of elements, scientific advisor to presidents, former chancellor of the University of California, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, chairman of the steering committee of the CHEM Study project, founder of Lawrence Hall of Science, , the list goes on and on. He was at the same time a passionate supporter of education. Seaborg published fourteen articles in the Journal between 1951 and 1998. He was interviewed in 1975 by David Ridgway as part of the Impact series (JCE 1975, 52, 70), and that interview is highly recommended reading (see supplement to this article). He received the 1994 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education; his award address was published in the ACS Division of Chemical Education's CHED Newsletter, Fall 1995. Memorial articles with details of his life and his scientific contributions have appeared in The New York Times (Saturday, February 27, 1999, page 1) and Chemical & Engineering News (March 8, 1999, page 29). But there is also the spirit of the man, what he believed in, what he tried to do, what he hoped he had accomplished. A sense of that can be gained from the excerpts that are reprinted below, taken first from the Impact interview and then from the award address. Ridgway: On reflection, now, out of your many contributions to chemistry, is there one that you feel has had more of an impact than others? Seaborg: The discovery of plutonium would answer that question. The impact there is probably nearly as great as any single chemical discovery. Ridgway: What was the state of the "art" in your field when you first decided to bend your energies in this direction? Seaborg: In nuclear science? Very crude. I mean we had difficulty even making the simplest Geiger counter work. This facet alone was always a challenge. Ridgway: What do you look for in a young person who wishes to work with you in your research program? Seaborg: Certainly I try to identify intelligence and creativity and very importantly, industry, that is the willingness to work hard which leads to dedication. Ridgway: ...research and teaching or research versus teaching. Do you consider in your own pursuits in the academic life a dichotomy between teaching and research? Seaborg: Definitely not! I think they go together very well. I teach freshman chemistry and it's a joy to meet my freshman chemistry sections. It gives me a better perspective even though it's at the beginning level. In addition, the fact that I'm conducting research helps (in my opinion) freshman chemistry. As your readers well know, freshman chemistry is a sophisticated and complicated subject these days. Pimentel Award Address: Regarding the CHEM Study project: Although my heavy schedule as Chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, and numerous other commitments should have made me decline this added responsibility, the unusual circumstances of our meeting and the ardor of the group led to my somewhat bewildered acceptance. Report of the National Commission on Excellence in Education (1983): If an unfriendly foreign power had attempted to impose on America the mediocre educational performance that exists today, we might well have viewed it as an act of war. As it stands, We have allowed this to happen to ourselves Discussing Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS): It is an unfortunate fact, borne out by research and much anecdotal experience, that by the time they reach high school most students have already decided whether or not they like chemistry, and whether or not they are good at it. In Summary: Having served in many capacities, educational and governmental over my career, I have no illusions about the complexities involved in implementing change. Yet there is really no choice if we are to survive and thrive as a nation. We must shine a strong spotlight on education, with special and lasting emphasis on science and technology, and the real-world connections so apparent to us in chemistry and all the sciences. Lab Safety Training The Laboratory Safety Workshop announces laboratory safety training in six locations this summer. The 24-hour short courses are for secondary and college/university science educators. The dates and locations are:
    June 16-19: TBA, Minneapolis, MN June 23-26: Southwest Texas State Univ., San Marcos, TX July 7-10: University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV July 14-17: Northeastern University, Boston, MA August 3-6: College of Charleston, Charleston, SC August 16-19: TBA, Seattle, WA
    For further information contact Laboratory Safety Workshop, 192 Worcester Road, Natick, MA 01760-2552; phone: 508/647-1900; fax: 508/647-0062; email: lswpfm@aol.com. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . Contact the DUE Information Center at phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; www: http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final year for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www: http://www.rescorp.org

  3. Educational Technology News. Fall 2005, Volume 5, Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Point Associates / North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL), 2005

    2005-01-01

    Educational Technology News is a biannual newsletter published by the Center for Technology at the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL). The following topics are discussed in this issue: (1) TechPOINT: Measure Progress, Achieve Technology Proficiency; (2) New in the Center for Technology: Five-Year Research Project Identifies Key

  4. Values Analysis in the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuse, Loretta S.; Kuse, Hildegard R.

    1991-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students examine the value content of news presentations. Explains that after classroom brainstorming, students watch news broadcasts and answer values-related questions. Suggests references for teachers on the sources of U.S. values. (SG)

  5. What Turns Events into News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  6. Getting Out the Good News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paciancia, David

    1995-01-01

    A majority of American schools are meeting the challenge of educating children. A New York State district gets out the good news by producing school newsletters and videos, by constant and close contact with the local news media, and by forming ties with local real estate agents. (MLF)

  7. Myth, Method and International News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lule, Jack

    Defining myth as a cultural narrative in symbolic form that articulates a world view and offers consensus with that view, this paper uses a brief "New York Times" report on the Soviet shooting down of South Korean airline flight 007 as the basis for comparison of international news and myth. Following a review of the literature on myth and news,…

  8. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews major science news stories of 1988 as reported in the pages of Science News. Covers the areas of anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, food science, mathematics and computers, paleobiology, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. (YP)

  9. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a review of important science news stories of 1989 as reported in the pages of "Science News." Topics include anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, environment, food science, math and computers, paleobiology, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. (CW)

  10. Media Choices for Specialized News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Herbert H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines preferred media sources for four categories of special news--medicine, science, business, and consumer economics. Found that respondents ranked the media in the following order as preferred sources of specialized news: (1) local television affiliates, (2) local newspapers, (3) magazines, (4) radio, (5) cable networks, and (6) national

  11. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of science news stories reported in "Science News" during 1987. References each item to the volume and page number in which the subject was addressed. Contains references on astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, earth sciences, environment, mathematics and computers, paleontology and anthropology, physics, science…

  12. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Reviews important science news stories reported during 1984 in "Science News" magazine. These stories are in the categories of: anthropology and paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; computers; mathematics; earth science; the environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology. (JN)

  13. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Reviews important science news stories of 1981 as reported in "Science News." Gives a one-sentence summary and volume and page references for each story. Groups items by topic including space and astronomy, archaeology and anthropology, technology, behavior, science and society, energy, environment, and specific science disciplines. (DC)

  14. Television News Exchanges in Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Don M.

    In 1984, a project was initiated in Asia under the sponsorship of the Asia Pacific Broadcasting Union that represents a major break-through in achieving a better balance in the collection, editing, and distribution of the world's news. This break-through was the Asiavision Satellite News Exchange, which has made it possible for many Asian…

  15. Evidence of Coseismic Subsidence Along the Newport-Inglewood Fault Zone During the Late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeper, R. J.; Rhodes, B. P.; Kirby, M. E.; Scharer, K. M.; Starratt, S.; Hemphill-Haley, E.; Bonuso, N.; Balmaki, B.; Garcia, D. J.; Creager, D. O.

    2014-12-01

    The Seal Beach wetlands (SBW) are located along strike of the Newport-Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), where fault geometry is poorly understood. However, the fault steps to the right in the SBW, and oil well and seismological studies indicate that the northeast segment of the fault is down-dropped as a result of oblique-normal slip. The location is significant because coseismic subsidence could alter tidal and/or fluvial processes within the SBW. Such a change should be recorded in the stratigraphy by sudden changes in grain size, magnetic susceptibility, and/or diatom assemblages. Based on field observations of 48 reconnaissance gouge cores and multi-proxy analyses of three vibracores and one piston core, we identify four stratigraphic units in the SBW: (1) very fine to fine sand from 426-350 cm; (2) organic-rich mud from 350-225 cm; (3) fine to coarse silt and clay from 225-100 cm; and (4) organic-rich mud with interbedded mud laminae from 100-0 cm. We interpret unit 2 to represent a relic marsh surface that subsided coseismically and was preserved under unit 3. We analyzed 38 sediment samples for diatoms from vibracore SB002VC to test this idea and characterize the depositional environment of stratigraphic units 4, 3, and 2. The diatom data suggest unit 4 is an intertidal deposit, unit 3 is a fresh/slightly brackish water deposit, and unit 2 is an intertidal deposit. Units 2 and 3 are separated by a sharp, irregular contact. Thus, the diatom data and depositional contact from vibracore SB002VC are consistent with a relic marsh surface subsiding abruptly during an earthquake on the NIFZ. As a result of the earthquake, the intertidal environment abruptly changed to an environment dominated by fresh to slightly brackish water. We hypothesize that the earthquake did not result in flooding by seawater because coseismic uplift of the southwest segment of the NIFZ temporarily isolated the SBW from tidal influence. Radiocarbon dates constrain this event to no more than 1957 cal yr BP. Future work will include Cs-137/Pb-210 dating of unit 4 and pollen analysis in units 3 and 2, additional radiocarbon dating and completing grain size analysis of vibracore SB002VC.

  16. Contaminants in sediment, food-chain biota, and bird eggs from the Newport Bay watershed, Orange County, California.

    PubMed

    Santolo, Gary M; Byron, Earl R; Ohlendorf, Harry M

    2016-02-01

    Groundwater-related discharges in the San Diego Creek/Newport Bay watershed in Orange County, California have the potential to adversely affect the surface waters within the watershed and would likely not comply with the established total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for the watershed. In 2004 and 2005, we studied the concentrations of contaminants of TMDL concern (particularly selenium [Se]) in birds that are at risk of exposure to contaminated food items because they feed and nest in the Newport Bay watershed. Most bioaccumulation is from elevated Se in groundwater downstream of a historic terminal swamp. Se bioaccumulation was observed in all biota tested, and DDE was found in fish and bird egg samples. Effects of contaminants on fish and birds are inconclusive due to the management disturbances in the watershed (e.g., flood control) and lack of bird nesting habitat. Although a significant relationship was observed between DDE concentrations and eggshell thinning in American avocet (Recurvirostra americana) eggs, the shell thinning in avocet and other species examined was not enough to result in hatching failure. Further focused monitoring efforts will be needed to characterize the exposure and risk levels. PMID:26803663

  17. International News Flows in the Post-Cold War World: Mapping the News and the News Producers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sreberny-Mohammadi, Annabelle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the global political environment, major global news providers, and technologies of global news production. Argues for a multinational comparative mapping of international news representation in the 1990s. Outlines a major international venture to update and elaborate the 1979 UNESCO/IAMCR study of foreign news in the media of 29 countries,…

  18. Change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and Free Electron Laser, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    In this environmental assessment (EA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from a proposed change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and operation of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility beyond the initial demonstration period. With this proposal, DOE intends to increase CEBAF operating range from its current operating maximum beam energy of 4.0 GeV [giga-(billion) electron volts] to 8.0 GeV at a beam power of no greater than 1,000 kW [1 megawatt (MW)], its maximum attainable level, based on current technology and knowledge, without significant, costly equipment modifications. DOE has prepared an EA for this action to determine the potential for adverse impacts from operation of CEBAF and the FEL at the proposed levels. Changing the operating parameters of CEBAF would require no new major construction and minor modifications to the accelerator, its support systems, the FEL, and onsite utility systems. Modifications and performance improvements would be made to (1) the accelerator housed in the underground tunnels, (2) its support systems located in the above ground service buildings, and (3) the water and equipment cooling systems both in the tunnel and at the ground surface. All work would be performed on previously disturbed land and in, on, or adjacent to existing buildings, structures, and equipment. With the proposed action, the recently constructed FEL facility at the Jefferson Lab would operate in concert with CEBAF beyond its demonstration period and up to its maximum effective electron beam power level of 210 kW. In this EA, DOE evaluates the impacts of the no-action alternative and the proposed action alternative. Alternatives considered, but dismissed from further evaluation, were the use of another accelerator facility and the use of another technology.

  19. The Diffusion of "Shocking" Good News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroldsen, Edwin O.; Harvey, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    A study of the diffusion of news about the Mormon Church's approval of Blacks for the priesthood revealed that "shocking" good news can ignite the interpersonal communications system, that news has more credibility when obtained from media than when obtained interpersonally, and that people use mass media to verify news obtained interpersonally.…

  20. Index to NASA News Releases 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the index to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject index, Personal name index, News release number index, Accession number index, Speeches, and News releases.

  1. Television News and the Miners' Strike.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberbatch, Guy; And Others

    A content analysis was performed on all of the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) Nine O'Clock News and ITV (Independent Television) News at Ten programs that were broadcast during Britain's year-long miners' strike--March 1984-March 1985--and a four-month sample of Channel 4 news to examine how television news covered a protracted story of…

  2. MedlinePlus FAQ: News Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/faq/news.html Question: I saw a news article on MedlinePlus but now I can't ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Answer: The health news page displays the most recent news. MedlinePlus displays ...

  3. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  4. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  5. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers...

  6. [The making of AIDS news].

    PubMed

    Spink, M J; Medrado, B; Menegon, V M; Lyra, J; Lima, H

    2001-01-01

    This study is part of the overall research effort on the role of the media in making sense of events in late modernity. The main objective is to investigate the context in which news about AIDS is produced at the interface between norms for producing news (as expressed by professional journalists) and an analysis of news stories published in four mainstream Brazilian newspapers. The results are organized in three broad topics: (a) the construction of news about AIDS; (b) the visibility of AIDS news during the study period; and (c) factors that facilitate or hinder the production of AIDS news. Important factors include exclusiveness of the story and/or novelty of the content, the notion of hot (or cold) news, and the specific contents. The authors also emphasize the inevitable chance elements associated with organizational characteristics and daily journalism. They conclude by pointing to recent changes in both the shape of the AIDS epidemic and the communications dynamics resulting from recent developments in the electronic media. PMID:11514866

  7. What makes gambling news?

    PubMed

    McMullan, J L; Mullen, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines print media coverage of casino and electronic gambling in one Canadian province from 1992 to 1997. It provides a theme analysis of content of 234 gambling stories printed in the top two daily newspapers in Nova Scotia. The findings of our content analysis indicate that pro-gambling corporate and political newspaper sources waged a successful media campaign and constructed a powerful public rhetoric in support of new gambling products, services, and institutions. The media, for their part, gave visibility and form to these structured messages. They helped create expectations about gambling and economics and gambling and government. Law and order, and moral and medical discourses about gambling, we discovered, were minor representations in the news coverage, although moral narratives were a pervasive secondary theme in much of the reporting. At bottom, the press produced a "politics of truth" about gambling that was both an external exercise of power and an internal organizational production. PMID:11842527

  8. Forty Years of Excellence and Beyond. Proceedings of the Annual North East Association for Institutional Research (NEAIR) Conference (40th, Newport, Rhode Island, November 9-12, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Tiffany, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The NEAIR 2013 Conference Proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the Newport, Rhode Island, conference. Papers in this document include: (1) Aspiring to the Role of "Data Badass:" Some Thoughts on the Political Context of IR (Mark Freeman); (2) Data-Driven Internal Benchmarks and Successful Learning Outcomes (Mamta Saxena…

  9. Characterization of Small ColE1-Like Plasmids Conferring Kanamycin Resistance in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Newport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-antibiotic resistant (MR) Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Newport are an increasing concern in human and animal health. Many strains are known to carry antibiotic resistance determinants on multiple plasmids, yet detailed information is scarce. Three plasmids conferring kanamycin...

  10. Complete Closed Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotypes Anatum, Montevideo, Typhimurium, and Newport, Isolated from Beef, Cattle, and Humans.

    PubMed

    Harhay, Dayna M; Bono, James L; Smith, Timothy P L; Fields, Patricia I; Dinsmore, Blake A; Santovenia, Monica; Kelley, Christy M; Wang, Rong; Harhay, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are a diverse group of bacteria with a wide range of virulence potential. To facilitate genome comparisons across this virulence spectrum, we present eight complete closed genome sequences of four S. enterica serotypes (Anatum, Montevideo, Typhimurium, and Newport), isolated from various cattle samples and from humans. PMID:26847891

  11. Complete Closed Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotypes Anatum, Montevideo, Typhimurium, and Newport, Isolated from Beef, Cattle, and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bono, James L.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Fields, Patricia I.; Dinsmore, Blake A.; Santovenia, Monica; Kelley, Christy M.; Wang, Rong; Harhay, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are a diverse group of bacteria with a wide range of virulence potential. To facilitate genome comparisons across this virulence spectrum, we present eight complete closed genome sequences of four S.enterica serotypes (Anatum, Montevideo, Typhimurium, and Newport), isolated from various cattle samples and from humans. PMID:26847891

  12. Apple, carrot, and hibiscus edible films containing the plant antimicrobials carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde inactivate Salmonella Newport on organic leafy greens in sealed plastic bags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde incorporated into apple, carrot and hibiscus based edible films against Salmonella Newport in contaminated organic leafy greens. The leafy greens tested included romaine and iceberg lettuce, and ...

  13. Complete closed genome sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes Anatum, Montevideo, Typhimurium and Newport, isolated from beef, cattle, and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica are a versatile group of bacteria with a wide range in virulence potential. To facilitate genome comparisons across this virulence spectrum, we present eight complete closed genome sequences of four S. enterica serotypes (Anatum, Montevideo, Typhimurium, and Newport) isolated fro...

  14. TV Producer Juggles Daily News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Bill

    1989-01-01

    Brennan discusses the daily activities required in the production of a television news show. In "The Not-So-Glamorous Life of a TV Reporter," Linda Yu describes the time and effort required to become a television reporter. (LS)

  15. Microbial Control News - November 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first of a column in the Society for Invertebrate Pathology Newsletter. Entitled "Microbial Control News" this article summarizes regulatory actions in the U.S. and Canada regarding microbial insect pest control agents....

  16. Increasing Learning from TV News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perloff, Richard M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment that manipulated two variables, repetition and pausing for viewer "digestion" of information in a news telecast. Concludes that the use of repetition increased viewers' retention of information, but that pauses did not. (FL)

  17. "Physiology in the News": Using Press Releases to Enhance Lay Communication and Introduce Current Physiology Research to Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kevin L.; Poteracki, James M.; Steury, Michael D.; Wehrwein, Erica A.

    2015-01-01

    Michigan State University's senior-level undergraduate physiology capstone laboratory uses a simple exercise termed "Physiology in the News," to help students explore the current research within the field of physiology while also learning to communicate science in lay terms. "Physiology in the News" is an activity that charges…

  18. The Myth of Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.; White, Kathryn P.

    After critiquing the usual estimates of the importance of television as a source of news, the national audience for television news over a two-week period is identified from the 1974-1975 W.R. Simmons study (which uses a diary technique for gathering data). Analysis showed that, in the two-week period, 49% of the adult population did not watch a…

  19. Video segmentation techniques for news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Michael; Wolf, Wayne H.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes our experiences in video analysis for a video library on the World Wide Web. News and documentary programs, though seemingly simple, have some characteristics which can cause problems in simple shot segmentation algorithms. We have developed a methodology, based on our experience with the analysis of several hours of news/documentary footage, which improve the results of shot segmentation on this type of material and which in turn allows for higher-quality storyboards for our video library.

  20. Measurements of slope currents and internal tides on the Continental Shelf and slope off Newport Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Noble, Marlene A.; Norris, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    An array of seven moorings housing current meters and oceanographic sensors was deployed for 6 months at 5 sites on the Continental Shelf and slope off Newport Beach, California, from July 2011 to January 2012. Full water-column profiles of currents were acquired at all five sites, and a profile of water-column temperature was also acquired at two of the five sites for the duration of the deployment. In conjunction with this deployment, the Orange County Sanitation District deployed four bottom platforms with current meters on the San Pedro Shelf, and these meters provided water-column profiles of currents. The data from this program will provide the basis for an investigation of the interaction between the deep water flow over the slope and the internal tide on the Continental Shelf.

  1. Results from a winter 2009-2010 nearshore mooring test in 25 m water depth off Newport, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dever, E. P.; Waldorf, B. W.; Risien, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), two surface moorings will be placed in 25 m water depth off Newport, Oregon and Grays Harbor, Washington. These moorings are intended to acquire continuous observations over the inner-shelf, where the surface boundary layer interacts continuously with the ocean bottom boundary layer. The moorings will utilize the WHOI-developed stretch hose technology implemented at several operational moorings along the US east coast. For the purposes of mooring survival, the largest significant waves need to be considered. Analysis of the historical record indicates the 100-year return period storm would generate 14.5 m high waves. The harsh wind and wave conditions encountered over the inner-shelf have the potential to cause mooring failure either by destroying surface buoy components, or by causing subsurface mooring components to fail. For example, during a winter storm in December 2007, several NDBC moorings along the Oregon and Washington coasts broke. To test modeling of mooring performance under winter conditions we constructed a test/pilot mooring with hardware, communications and power similar to the OOI buoy design. The test focused on the survivability of components. The mooring was equipped with a load cell to examine responses under varying wave and mean flow conditions. A secondary objective of the deployment was to test Ship-to-Ship/Ship-to-Shore Wireless Access Protocol (SWAP) telemetry from the buoy to shore over a distance of 1.5 km. Load cell data as well as buoy instruments (conductivity, temperature) were telemetered. This test mooring was deployed near one of the OOI sites in 25 m of water off Newport, Oregon in late October 2009. The mooring parted in mid-March 2010, two weeks prior to planned recovery. We recovered all mooring components, and we will report on the mooring design, the test, and the science and engineering data received.

  2. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418, via email at infofell@nas.edu, or at http://fellowships.nas.edu. 1998 Pre-Doctoral Fellows Rafael Alcala, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Chemical Engineering Diego J. Díaz, Cornell University, Analytical Chemistry Kanya Lynn Henderson, Colorado State University, Biochemistry Félix Mario Rivas, State University of New York, Buffalo, Organic Chemistry 1998 Dissertation Fellows Kristala Lanett Jones, Arizona State University, Chemical Engineering 1998 Postdoctoral Fellows Edgardo Tabión Farinas, Yale University, Interdisciplinary Chemistry Data Base of Online Courses TeleEducation NB, a province-wide distributed distance learning network in the Canadian province of New Brunswick, has implemented an international online course database of more than 9,000 courses. The database includes public and private courses at all levels from more than 15 countries and includes only those courses that can be completed fully online. Courses vary from graduate-level engineering offerings to simple "How to" courses. The database provides access to courses and programs leading to accredited degrees, diplomas, and certificates. Professional development and personal interest courses are also included. Students can access course information by browsing subject areas or by searching specific fields. Hotlinks connect students directly to the delivering institutions. In the past year, there has been an exponential rise in the number of courses being offered online, from fewer than 2,000 in January 1998 to more than 10,000 in December 1998. It is expected that there will be more than 40,000 online courses by the year 2000. The TeleCampus Online Course Database provides students with a means of finding information on courses that meet their needs. The database can be accessed from TeleCampus at http://telecampus.edu. Change in the Introductory Chemistry Course, an Online Course An online conference, Proposals for Change in the Introductory Chemistry Course, will take place from March 29 to April 10, 1999. The conference will be chaired by James N. Spencer, Chemistry Department, Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604; j_spencer@acad.fandm.edu. While both process and content need to be considered in making changes, this conference will be limited to a discussion of content. It will take the approach that if we begin to examine the current content and how and why certain topics came to be considered as essential for the course, we may be able to approach a common curriculum so that the process of how to best to implement it may then be developed. Stephen J. Hawkes of Oregon State University compiled suggestions for the content of general chemistry and served as leader of the Zero Base Course discussion group for the Task Force on the General Chemistry Curriculum. The goal of the zero base approach is a detailed curriculum in which topics are developed so that students understand the phenomena considered necessary for the course. This analysis requires that the principles that should be in the course be identified, that those not necessary be removed, and perhaps additional principles be added. This online conference will list more than 100 proposals compiled from many viewpoints. Proposals are worded as debatable propositions to engender serious discussion. After discussion, amendment, deletion, extension, and some consensus, the proposals will be distributed to the chemistry community in various forms. Future discussions are also planned. The CONFCHEM World Wide Web site has the URL http://www.chem.vt.edu/confchem/. The March and April session is free to all Internet users. To subscribe to the CONFCHEM Listserv send the message: SUBSCRIBE CONFCHEM your-first-and-last-name to LISTSERV@CLVM.CLARKSON.EDU X-ray Structure Solution Manual Allen Hunter announces the release of the second edition of his lab manual for introductory diffraction methods courses. It was written as a step-by-step guide to solving routine crystal structures for crystallographic novices and is entitled "Allen Hunter's Youngstown State University X-ray Structure Analysis Lab Manual: A Beginner's Introduction". The manual has been developed in an undergraduate course that enrolls a broad mixture of chemists, engineers, geologists, and biologists. It is optimized for use with the SHELXTL suite of programs but should prove useful to those using other structure solution packages as well. This edition has been reviewed at twelve sites and will be available for general use in January 1999. The lab manual is available without charge as a .pdf file to academic users, provided that each copy is registered and users inform the author about how it is used in their teaching. Those interested in obtaining a copy should contact the author at adhunter@cc.ysu.edu. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP)
    • Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999
    • Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm or contact the DUE Information Center; phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; www: http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final year for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www:http://www.rescorp.org

  3. Antarctic news clips - 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-07-01

    The newspaper and magazine stories selected for this book present only a sampling of one year's (July 1991 to July 1992) news coverage of Antarctica. The only requirement for inclusion in this publication is that the article's subject matter pertains or refers to Antarctica in some way - whether it is focused on the science done there, or on the people who play such a large part in the work accomplished, or on the issues related to it. No attempt has been made to correlate the number of articles, or their length, with the importance of the subjects treated. Clippings are provided to the Foundation by a service that searches for items containing the phrase 'National Science Foundation'. Identical versions of many stories, especially those written and distributed by wire services such as the Associated Press and United Press International, and by syndicated columnists, are published in numerous papers across the United States. Other articles are submitted from a variety of sources, including interested readers across the United States and in New Zealand.

  4. Biodegradation of news inks

    SciTech Connect

    Erhan, S.Z.; Bagby, M.O.

    1995-12-01

    Printing ink vehicles that require no petroleum components were prepared by modifying vegetable oil. Physical properties of inks formulated with these vehicles meet or exceed the industry standards for lithographic and letterpress newsprint applications. Elimination of petroleum-based resin and reduced pigment requirements, due to the light vehicle color, provide a competitively priced alternative to petroleum-based inks of equal quality. These ink vehicles, made exclusively from soybean oil, were subjected to biodegradation, and the results were compared with those obtained with commercial vehicles. Results show that they degrade faster and more completely than commercial hybrid (partial) soy or mineral oil based vehicles. Fermentations were allowed to proceed for 5, 12, and 25 days. Both mono-and mixed cultures of microorganisms commonly found in soil were used. In 25 days, commercial mineral oil based vehicles degraded 17-27%, while commercial hybrid soy oil based vehicles degraded 58-68% and our 100% soy oil based vehicles degrade 82-92%. Similar studies were conducted with commercial news inks consisting of soy or mineral oil with petroleum resins along with the four colored pigments and USDA`s 100% soy oil based ink consisting of modified soybean oil and pigment. Results show that pigment slowed the degradation of ink vehicles; however, neither time nor type of pigment played a significant role. Also these inks were degraded by using {open_quotes}Modified Sturm Test{close_quotes} (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). In this method, test organisms were obtained from activated sludge, and the extent of degradation was determined by measuring carbon dioxide evolution. In all cases USDA`s ink degraded faster and more completely (for all four colors) than either hybrid soy oil based or petroleum based inks.

  5. News Reporters and News Sources: What Happens Before the Story is Written.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strentz, Herbert

    The purpose of this book is to make student journalists, reporters, and news audiences more sensitive to the complexities of the news gathering and reporting process. The five chapters discuss news gathering and the power of the press; pitfalls and pratfalls awaiting the reporter; interviewing; informing, protecting, and promoting news sources;…

  6. Media Orientation and Television News Viewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Daniel G.

    1990-01-01

    Uses factor analysis to compare the surveillance role and communication utility of television and newspapers. Finds much variance explained by these two uses. Finds those who seek hard news on television also seek hard news in newspapers. (RS)

  7. Society for the History of Psychology News.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shayna Fox

    2016-05-01

    Presents the Society for the History of Psychology News column. This column records miscellaneous publication news, announcements, research notes, reviews of books, and conference information, as well as references that support their writings. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100928

  8. An Economic Theory of News Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, John

    Over the years, journalists, social scientists, and government commissions have defined news in a variety of ways, but their definitions consistently lack the notion that, above all, news is a commodity and must sell. Within the journalism profession, and particularly in television news, the potential for conflict between a media corporation's…

  9. Making the News: Jobs in TV Journalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csorny, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    What do TV news workers do each day? For many of them, contributing to daily news broadcasts has changed greatly over the years. This evolution will likely continue for years to come. And more changes to news production are expected, according to Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass…

  10. Technology: News Readers and Other Handy Utilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how there are advantages and disadvantages to using an Internet News Reader instead of a Web browser. The major advantage is that one can read the headlines and short summaries of news articles from dozens of sources quickly. Another advantage the author points out to news readers is that one gets a short

  11. The Importance of Radio News to Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ernie

    While the news is considered a vitally important aspect of most radio stations' formats, broadcasters need to determine what a listener wants from the news-listening experience and how a station can program news in the form most desirable for the listener. This study, based on a Lawrence, Kansas, telephone survey of radio listeners, found that…

  12. Network Evening News Coverage of Environmental Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Michael R.; And Others

    Focusing on ABC, NBC, and CBS's evening news broadcasts from January 1984 through February 1986, a study examined network news coverage of environmental risk--defined as manmade chemical, biological, and physical agents that create risk in the indoor, outdoor, and occupational environments. Using the Vanderbilt University "Television News Index…

  13. Scandal Clouds News Corporation's Move into Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2011-01-01

    When News Corporation announced last fall its entry into the education technology market, some observers said the media conglomerate led by Rupert Murdoch was a bad fit for education. Between the ownership of conservative-leaning outlets like Fox News and a reputation for identifying opportunities to generate lots of revenue very quickly, News

  14. Technology: News Readers and Other Handy Utilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how there are advantages and disadvantages to using an Internet News Reader instead of a Web browser. The major advantage is that one can read the headlines and short summaries of news articles from dozens of sources quickly. Another advantage the author points out to news readers is that one gets a short…

  15. Making Your News Service More Effective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Joel S., Ed.

    "CASE Currents" and "Techniques" articles, materials written especially for this manual, and papers from the 1976 CASE News/Information Special Conference make up this updated handbook on how to make a college news service more effective. Part I, "Managing the News Service" contains nine papers dealing with such issues as managing, staffing,…

  16. Confronting Danger: AIDS in the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Jim D.; And Others

    Using metaphors drawn from news stories to chart the progression, a study documented the change of meaning of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) as reflected in the news during a 15-month period beginning July 1, 1985. More than 3,200 news stories about AIDS from four wire services were examined for metaphoric content, and 300 AIDS-related…

  17. The Nature of News in Three Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Walter J.; And Others

    Five studies conducted at Oklahoma State University on the nature of news are reported in this volume. The first study reports the similarities and differences in news values among 10 city editors. The second and third studies replicate the first, one with city news editors and the other with wire service newsmen as subjects. Study 4 summarizes a…

  18. AIDS and the news media.

    PubMed

    Nelkin, D

    1991-01-01

    News reports on AIDS have appeared at a time of general public concern about health risks, and, like the coverage of risk, the reporting on AIDS has been controversial. Perceptions of this disease have been linked to economic and personal stakes, professional ideologies, administrative responsibilities, and moral beliefs. It is from this perspective that news coverage of AIDS must be understood. The norms and practices of journalism, the technical uncertainties of risk evaluation, and the pressures placed on the media by various interests have influenced the reporting on this disease. However, media reports also shape the social context of the epidemic, affecting public perceptions, personal behavior, and policy agendas. PMID:1791792

  19. Apple, carrot, and hibiscus edible films containing the plant antimicrobials carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde inactivate Salmonella Newport on organic leafy greens in sealed plastic bags.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Libin; Olsen, Carl; McHugh, Tara; Friedman, Mendel; Jaroni, Divya; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde incorporated into apple, carrot, and hibiscus-based edible films against Salmonella Newport in bagged organic leafy greens. The leafy greens tested included organic Romaine and Iceberg lettuce, and mature and baby spinach. Each leafy green sample was washed, dip inoculated with S. Newport (10⁷ CFU/mL), and dried. Each sample was put into a Ziploc® bag. Edible films pieces were put into the Ziploc bag and mixed well. The bags were sealed and stored at 4 °C. Samples were taken at days 0, 3, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. On all leafy greens, 3% carvacrol films showed the best bactericidal effects against Salmonella. All 3 types of 3% carvacrol films reduced the Salmonella population by 5 log₁₀ CFU/g at day 0 and 1.5% carvacrol films reduced Salmonella by 1 to 4 log₁₀ CFU/g at day 7. The films with 3% cinnamaldehyde showed 0.5 to 3 log reductions on different leafy greens at day 7. The films with 0.5% and 1.5% cinnamaldehyde and 0.5% carvacrol also showed varied reductions on different types of leafy greens. Edible films were the most effective against Salmonella on Iceberg lettuce. This study demonstrates the potential of edible films incorporated with carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde to inactivate S. Newport on organic leafy greens. PMID:24460771

  20. A multi-country outbreak of Salmonella Newport gastroenteritis in Europe associated with watermelon from Brazil, confirmed by whole genome sequencing: October 2011 to January 2012

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, L; Fisher, I; Peters, T; Mather, A; Thomson, N; Rosner, B; Bernard, H; McKeown, P; Cormican, M; Cowden, J; Aiyedun, V; Lane, C

    2015-01-01

    In November 2011, the presence of Salmonella Newport in a ready-to-eat watermelon slice was confirmed as part of a local food survey in England. In late December 2011, cases of S. Newport were reported in England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Ireland and Germany. During the outbreak, 63 confirmed cases of S. Newport were reported across all six countries with isolates indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from the watermelon isolate. A subset of outbreak isolates were whole-genome sequenced and were identical to, or one single nucleotide polymorphism different from the watermelon isolate. In total, 46 confirmed cases were interviewed of which 27 reported watermelon consumption. Further investigations confirmed the outbreak was linked to the consumption of watermelon imported from Brazil. Although numerous Salmonella outbreaks associated with melons have been reported in the United States and elsewhere, this is the first of its kind in Europe. Expansion of the melon import market from Brazil represents a potential threat for future outbreaks. Whole genome sequencing is rapidly becoming more accessible and can provide a compelling level of evidence of linkage between human cases and sources of infection, to support public health interventions in global food markets. PMID:25138971

  1. A multi-country outbreak of Salmonella Newport gastroenteritis in Europe associated with watermelon from Brazil, confirmed by whole genome sequencing: October 2011 to January 2012.

    PubMed

    Byrne, L; Fisher, I; Peters, T; Mather, A; Thomson, N; Rosner, B; Bernard, H; McKeown, P; Cormican, M; Cowden, J; Aiyedun, V; Lane, C

    2014-01-01

    In November 2011, the presence of Salmonella Newport in a ready-to-eat watermelon slice was confirmed as part of a local food survey in England. In late December 2011, cases of S. Newport were reported in England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Ireland and Germany. During the outbreak, 63 confirmed cases of S. Newport were reported across all six countries with isolates indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from the watermelon isolate.A subset of outbreak isolates were whole-genome sequenced and were identical to, or one single nucleotide polymorphism different from the watermelon isolate.In total, 46 confirmed cases were interviewed of which 27 reported watermelon consumption. Further investigations confirmed the outbreak was linked to the consumption of watermelon imported from Brazil.Although numerous Salmonella outbreaks associated with melons have been reported in the United States and elsewhere, this is the first of its kind in Europe.Expansion of the melon import market from Brazil represents a potential threat for future outbreaks. Whole genome sequencing is rapidly becoming more accessible and can provide a compelling level of evidence of linkage between human cases and sources of infection,to support public health interventions in global food markets. PMID:25138971

  2. Campus Child Care News, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Marion F., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of the three 1998 issues of a newsletter disseminating information on the National Coalition for Campus Child Care Centers (NCCCC) and providing a forum for news, research, and information concerning campus child care centers. The February issue contains stories on the White House Conference on Child Care, registration…

  3. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This is a review of important science news stories of 1990 as reported in the pages of this journal. Areas covered include anthropology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, computers and math, earth sciences, environment, food science, materials science, paleobiology, physics, science and society, and space sciences. (CW)

  4. Science News of the Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Highlights important 1985 science stories appearing in "Science News" under these headings: anthropology and paleontology, astronomy, behavior, biology, biomedicine, chemistry, computers and mathematics, earth sciences, environment, physics, science and society, space sciences, and technology. Each entry includes the volume and page number in…

  5. How to Tell Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  6. Agar disk diffusion and automated microbroth dilution produce similar antimicrobial susceptibility testing results for Salmonella serotypes Newport, Typhimurium, and 4,5,12:i-, but differ in economic cost.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, Karin; Cummings, Kevin J; Warnick, Lorin D; Schukken, Ynte H; Siler, Julie D; Gröhn, Yrjo T; Davis, Margaret A; Besser, Tom E; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Data generated using different antimicrobial testing methods often have to be combined, but the equivalence of such results is difficult to assess. Here we compared two commonly used antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods, automated microbroth dilution and agar disk diffusion, for 8 common drugs, using 222 Salmonella isolates of serotypes Newport, Typhimurium, and 4,5,12:i-, which had been isolated from clinical salmonellosis cases among cattle and humans. Isolate classification corresponded well between tests, with 95% overall category agreement. Test results were significantly negatively correlated, and Spearman's correlation coefficients ranged from -0.98 to -0.38. Using Cox's proportional hazards model we determined that for most drugs, a 1 mm increase in zone diameter resulted in an estimated 20%-40% increase in the hazard of growth inhibition. However, additional parameters such as isolation year or serotype often impacted the hazard of growth inhibition as well. Comparison of economical feasibility showed that agar disk diffusion is clearly more cost-effective if the average sample throughput is small but that both methods are comparable at high sample throughput. In conclusion, for the Salmonella serotypes and antimicrobial drugs analyzed here, antimicrobial susceptibility data generated based on either test are qualitatively very comparable, and the current published break points for both methods are in excellent agreement. Economic feasibility clearly depends on the specific laboratory settings, and disk diffusion might be an attractive alternative for certain applications such as surveillance studies. PMID:21877930

  7. Agar Disk Diffusion and Automated Microbroth Dilution Produce Similar Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Results for Salmonella Serotypes Newport, Typhimurium, and 4,5,12:i-, But Differ in Economic Cost

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Kevin J.; Warnick, Lorin D.; Schukken, Ynte H.; Siler, Julie D.; Gröhn, Yrjo T.; Davis, Margaret A.; Besser, Tom E.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Data generated using different antimicrobial testing methods often have to be combined, but the equivalence of such results is difficult to assess. Here we compared two commonly used antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods, automated microbroth dilution and agar disk diffusion, for 8 common drugs, using 222 Salmonella isolates of serotypes Newport, Typhimurium, and 4,5,12:i-, which had been isolated from clinical salmonellosis cases among cattle and humans. Isolate classification corresponded well between tests, with 95% overall category agreement. Test results were significantly negatively correlated, and Spearman's correlation coefficients ranged from −0.98 to −0.38. Using Cox's proportional hazards model we determined that for most drugs, a 1 mm increase in zone diameter resulted in an estimated 20%–40% increase in the hazard of growth inhibition. However, additional parameters such as isolation year or serotype often impacted the hazard of growth inhibition as well. Comparison of economical feasibility showed that agar disk diffusion is clearly more cost-effective if the average sample throughput is small but that both methods are comparable at high sample throughput. In conclusion, for the Salmonella serotypes and antimicrobial drugs analyzed here, antimicrobial susceptibility data generated based on either test are qualitatively very comparable, and the current published break points for both methods are in excellent agreement. Economic feasibility clearly depends on the specific laboratory settings, and disk diffusion might be an attractive alternative for certain applications such as surveillance studies. PMID:21877930

  8. Newport Coast Elementary School, Newport Beach, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the building of the elementary school named in the title--winner of an energy efficiency design award--including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on the architects, manufacturers/suppliers, and construction team; a general building description; and a case study of construction costs and specifications. Also…

  9. Temporal and Cross Correlations in Business News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, T.; Takei, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Watanabe, T.

    We empirically investigate temporal and cross correlations inthe frequency of news reports on companies, using a dataset of more than 100 million news articles reported in English by around 500 press agencies worldwide for the period 2003--2009. Our first finding is that the frequency of news reports on a company does not follow a Poisson process, but instead exhibits long memory with a positive autocorrelation for longer than one year. The second finding is that there exist significant correlations in the frequency of news across companies. Specifically, on a daily time scale or longer the frequency of news is governed by external dynamics, while on a time scale of minutes it is governed by internal dynamics. These two findings indicate that the frequency of news reports on companies has statistical properties similar to trading volume or price volatility in stock markets, suggesting that the flow of information through company news plays an important role in price dynamics in stock markets.

  10. How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dary, David

    This book is a primer on the techniques of news writing and the application of those principles to print and broadcast journalism. Chapters include: "The News Media," which presents a brief history of journalism and the foundations on which it is based; "What Is News?"; "Gathering News," which discusses news beats, reporters' qualifications, and…

  11. News clippings for introductory astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, Matthew

    1999-09-01

    Most students entering our introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors arrive not merely lacking scientific facts-they also have misconceptions about the nature of science, and many have a handicapping ``science anxiety'' (in addition to math anxiety). So I have added a ``current science'' requirement to our introductory course. Each student must compile a file of five astronomy news articles taken from readily available sources.

  12. STS-99 Crew News Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Shuttle Crew (Mission Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, Mission Specialists Janet L. Kavandi, Janice E. Voss, Mamoru Mohri, and Gerhard P.J. Thiele) are shown in a live news conference presenting the mission objectives of STS-99. The main objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of Earth. This project is named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM).

  13. Implicit Operational Definitions of Economic News Literacy in the Printed News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1981-01-01

    Describes study which focused on the economic vocabulary used in national and international news magazines and papers. Compares findings with definitions of economic literacy proposed by economists and suggests that economics courses include economic news literacy. (KC)

  14. Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics: news.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Michael

    2014-01-01

    While a PhD candidate, doing my thesis at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Biology Division under Dr. Charles Congdon, my introduction to the immune response was studying graft vs. host (GVH) disease as a consequence of bone marrow transplantation in mice. The sequalae of GVH was impressive, and demonstrated the potential of negative clinical consequences of the immune system. The idea of harnessing this immunological phenomena in cancer therapy was appealing even in the late 1960s. The problem was that at the time T-cells as a component of the immune system were identified but not defined. We moved to soluble antigen stimulation in mice and recognized and described the post antigen stimulation changes in lymphatic tissue germinal centers during the first 48 h after the induction of the humoral immune response. We described the extracellular localization of soluble antigens on the surface of dendritic reticular cells of the stroma, directing a response of B-cells to produce antibody against non-self. The ensuing reaction was the rapid proliferation of B-cells toward antibody secreting plasma cells. PMID:25424781

  15. News and Notes.

    PubMed

    1993-04-01

    NEW DATES FOR BOARD EXAMINATION—: The date of the 1993 Certifying Examination of the American Board of Dermatology has been changed, superseding the dates published in the January 1993 issue of the Archives (1993; 129:22). It will now be held on Sunday and Monday, October 10 and 11,1993, at the Holiday Inn O'Hare Airport in Rosemont, Ill. The deadline for receipt of applications is May 1,1993. The date of the Dermatopathology Special Qualification Examination did not change. The deadline for receipt of applications is July 1, 1993. However, the date for the Examination for Special Qualification in Dermatological Immunology/ Diagnostic and Laboratory Immunology is also changed from the date published in the January 1993 issue of the Archives (1993;129:22). It will now be held on Friday, October 8, 1993, at the Holiday Inn O'Hare Airport, Rosemont, Ill. The deadline for receipt of applications is April 1, 1993. For further information, contact. PMID:27081777

  16. The Changing Landscape of Science News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riordon, James

    2011-03-01

    Social media are revolutionizing the ways that people communicate and the ways they get their news. Traditional news outlets are in decline, and no subject area is declining faster than science news. Every day there are fewer professional science journalists working in traditional media. On the other hand, ever greater numbers of scientists, science enthusiasts, and online journalists are turning to blogs, podcasts, eBooks, twitter feeds, and social media sites like Facebook and Tumbler to spread news about science. I will present an overview of the state of science journalism and speculate on the likely directions it seems to be heading. I will also offer some general guidelines to help scientists understand what makes a good science news story, as well as suggesting ways that they can get their work in the news.

  17. Structure of the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon and Palos Verdes Fault Zones and Implications for Current Fault Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakian, V. J.; Bormann, J. M.; Klotsko, S.; Holmes, J. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Faulting in the Inner California Borderlands is complex. In the past, this region has undergone various deformational events such as extensional and rotational deformation to variable strike-slip deformation; this has imparted the geomorphology and fault structures observed offshore Southern California. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the current fault structures and the hazards they pose to populated coastal regions. The geometry and architecture of these structures can have significant implications for ground motions in the event of a rupture, and therefore impact working models of hazard assessment. Here, focusing on the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NI/RC) and Palos Verdes (PV) fault zones, we use new and existing multibeam, CHIRP and Multi-Channel Seismic (MCS) data to describe the geometry of the fault system. We interpret reprocessed (prestack time migration) MCS data collected in 1979, 1986, and 2006 as well as newly acquired high-res MCS datasets collected offshore San Diego County. Combining these high and intermediate resolution datasets with very high resolution CHIRP data, we define structures that show distinct changes in the style of deformation through time, and place constraints on the segmentation of faults in this system. The timing of the most recent deformation on the NI/RC appears to vary along-strike. Likewise, the NI/RC fault's dip direction and angle appears to vary along-strike, and these changes in dip seem to mark the boundaries of restraining and releasing bends. Additionally, the NI/RC fault appears to die away to the north, possibly partitioning its strain on to the PV fault. We will present interpretations of the faults' current deformational activity as well as likelihood of rupture propagating across releasing/restraining bends, and discuss how this impacts current fault models that are employed for hazard assessment for Los Angeles and San Diego counties.

  18. Use of global trade item numbers in the investigation of a salmonella newport outbreak associated with blueberries in Minnesota, 2010.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin D; Rigdon, Carrie E; Robinson, Trisha J; Hedberg, Craig; Smith, Kirk E

    2013-05-01

    In August 2010, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture and Minnesota Department of Health investigated an outbreak of six cases of Salmonella Newport infection occurring in northwestern Minnesota, which identified fresh blueberries as the cause. Initially, traditional traceback methods involving the review of invoices and bills of lading were used to attempt to identify the source of the outbreak. When these methods failed, novel traceback methods were used. Specifically, supplier-specific 12-digit Global Trade Item Numbers (GTINs) and shopper-card information were used to identify a single blueberry grower linked to cases, corroborating the results of a case-control study in which consuming fresh blueberries was statistically associated with illness (5 of 5 cases versus 8 of 19 controls, matched odds ratio [MOR] undefined, P = 0.02). Consuming fresh blueberries from retailer A was also statistically associated with illness (3 of 3 cases versus 3 of 18 controls, MOR undefined, P = 0.03). Based on initially incomplete evidence in this investigation, the invoices pointed to wholesaler A and grower A, based on first-in-first-out product rotation. However, when point-of-sale data were analyzed and linked to shopper-card information, a common GTIN was identified. This information led to an on-site record evaluation at retailer A, and the discovery of additional records at this location documented the supply chain from grower B to wholesaler C to retailer A, shifting the focus of the investigation from grower A to grower B. This investigation demonstrates the emerging concepts of Critical Tracking Events (CTEs) and Key Data Elements (KDE) related to food product tracing. The use of these shopper-cased data and the event data that were queried by investigators demonstrates the potential utility of consciously designed CTEs and KDEs at critical points in the supply chain to better facilitate product tracing. PMID:23643117

  19. Newport Green, a fluorescent sensor of weakly bound cellular Zn(2+): competition with proteome for Zn(2.).

    PubMed

    Karim, Mohammad Rezaul; Petering, David H

    2016-02-17

    Newport Green (NPG) is a recognized sensor of cellular Zn(2+) that displays fluorescence enhancement upon binding to Zn(2+). Because of its modest affinity for Zn(2+), the extent of its capacity to bind cellular Zn(2+) is unclear. The present study investigated the range of reactivity of NPGESTER with cells, isolated (Zn)-proteome, and model Zn-proteins. The sensor accumulated in pig kidney LLC-PK1 cells and was slowly (>40 min) hydrolyzed to the fluorescent, acid form, NPGACID. The powerful, cell permeant Zn(2+) chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)-ethane-1,2-diamine (TPEN) failed to quench the growing fluorescence emission, indicating that Zn-NPGACID had not formed and NPG-Zn-protein adduct species probably were not present. Furthermore, NPGACID did not bind to Zn-carbonic anhydrase or Zn-alcohol dehydrogenase, two proteins that form adducts with some other sensors. Strikingly, most of the NPGACID that had been converted from NPGESTER was detected in the extracellular medium not the cells. As a result, after cells were incubated with NPGESTER and then Zn-pyrithione to raise the internal concentration of mobile Zn(2+), Zn-NPGACID was only observed in the external medium. Residual cellular NPGACID was unable to bind extra intracellular Zn(2+) delivered by pyrithione. Proteome isolated from the sonicated cell supernatant was also unreactive with NPGACID. Titration of proteome or glutathione with Zn(2+) in the presence of NPGACID revealed that NPGACID only weakly competes for mobile Zn(2+) in the presence of these cellular components. In addition, when proteomic Zn(2+) was released by a nitric oxide donor or N-ethyl-maleimide, little Zn(2+) was detected by NPGACID. However, exposure to nitric oxide independently enhanced the fluorescence properties of NPGACID. Thus, the biochemical properties of NPG related to cellular Zn(2+) chelation deepen the question of how it functions as a Zn(2+) sensor. PMID:26694316

  20. Modelling biofilm formation of Salmonella enterica ser. Newport as a function of pH and water activity.

    PubMed

    Dimakopoulou-Papazoglou, Dafni; Lianou, Alexandra; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-02-01

    The effect of pH and water activity (aw) on the formation of biofilm by Salmonella enterica ser. Newport, previously identified as a strong biofilm producer, was assessed. Biofilm formation was evaluated in tryptone soy broth at 37 °C and at different combinations of pH (3.3-7.8) and aw (0.894-0.997). In total, 540 biofilm formation tests in 108 pH and aw combinations were carried out in polystyrene microtiter plates using crystal violet staining and optical density (OD; 580 nm) measurements. Since the individual effects of pH and aw on biofilm formation had a similar pattern to that observed for microbial growth rate, cardinal parameter models (CPMs) were used to describe these effects. CPMs described successfully the effects of these two environmental parameters, with the estimated cardinal values of pHmin, pHopt, pHmax, awmin and awopt being 3.58, 6.02, 9.71, 0.894 and 0.994, respectively. The CPMs assumption of the multiplicative inhibitory effect of environmental factors was validated in the case of biofilm formation using additional independent data (i.e. 430 OD data at 86 different combinations of pH and aw). The validation results showed a good agreement (r(2) = 0.938) between observed and predicted OD with no systematic error. In the second part of this study, a probabilistic model predicting the pathogen's biofilm formation boundaries was developed, and the degree of agreement between predicted probabilities and observations was as high as 99.8%. Hence, the effect of environmental parameters on biofilm formation can be quantitatively expressed using mathematical models, with the latter models, in turn, providing useful information for biofilm control in food industry environments. PMID:26678133

  1. Mantle helium along the Newport-Inglewood fault zone, Los Angeles basin, California: A leaking paleo-subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boles, J. R.; Garven, G.; Camacho, H.; Lupton, J. E.

    2015-07-01

    Mantle helium is a significant component of the helium gas from deep oil wells along the Newport-Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ) in the Los Angeles (LA) basin. Helium isotope ratios are as high as 5.3 Ra (Ra = 3He/4He ratio of air) indicating 66% mantle contribution (assuming R/Ra = 8 for mantle), and most values are higher than 1.0 Ra. Other samples from basin margin faults and from within the basin have much lower values (R/Ra < 1.0). The 3He enrichment inversely correlates with CO2, a potential magmatic carrier gas. The δ13C of the CO2 in the 3He rich samples is between 0 and -10‰, suggesting a mantle influence. The strong mantle helium signal along the NIFZ is surprising considering that the fault is currently in a transpressional rather than extensional stress regime, lacks either recent magma emplacement or high geothermal gradients, and is modeled as truncated by a proposed major, potentially seismically active, décollement beneath the LA basin. Our results demonstrate that the NIFZ is a deep-seated fault directly or indirectly connected with the mantle. Based on a 1-D model, we calculate a maximum Darcy flow rate q ˜ 2.2 cm/yr and a fault permeability k ˜ 6 × 10-17 m2 (60 microdarcys), but the flow rates are too low to create a geothermal anomaly. The mantle leakage may be a result of the NIFZ being a former Mesozoic subduction zone in spite of being located 70 km west of the current plate boundary at the San Andreas fault.

  2. Educating children's nurses for communicating bad news.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Corkin, Doris; Coad, Jane; Hollis, Rachel

    2013-10-01

    Some parents are unhappy with the way news is broken to them. This article seeks to educate and inform the reflective practitioner on a series of communication strategies to enhance their skills. This is important because the way news is disclosed can affect the way news is accepted and the level of support the family will require. The importance of clarity, honesty and empathy is emphasised. PMID:24112022

  3. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    Classroom Activities Mean Teamwork As much as any other facet of the editing and production of the Journal, the Classroom Activity series means teamwork! The aim is for activities to be interesting and accessible to introductory students, based on inexpensive and readily available materials, connected by content to some part of the Journal issue, able to be integrated into the high school curriculum, and safe. There need to be questions posed and answers at the ready. Additional information in print and on the Web needs to be identified and checked. The activities are designed to be ready for teachers to hand to students, so they really need to work-that means that they go through a lot of testing in Journal House where there is, quite fittingly, no lab. This is a tall order, one requiring someone with experience in high school teaching. From the start of the Activities in September 1997, Nancy Gettys has had a major role in their success. While Nancy's primary responsibility is as the Technical Editor of JCE Software, she has experience in teaching high school and has called on that experience to try and test, expand, try again, plan the illustrations (remember the photographs of the activities with surface phenomena that were featured in the table of contents of the February 1998 issue?), and perhaps hardest of all-tell us when something will just not work in high school. Nancy continues to work with the Classroom Activities, but she now has a colleague in fellow high school teacher Erica Jacobsen who has recently joined our staff. Introducing... Erica Jacobsen joined our staff last fall as an editorial assistant and has recently become an assistant editor. She received her undergraduate degree in education from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her teaching licenses include certifications in chemistry, physics, biology, and natural science for grades six through twelve. During her undergraduate years, she worked with the Chemical Education Group. Her undergraduate research and senior thesis were directed by John W. Moore and centered on the subject of HIV and its use as a topic in the chemistry curriculum. The research culminated in writing and publishing "HIV-1 Protease: An Enzyme at Work," a videotape and teacher/student guide offered by the Journal of Chemical Education Software. After graduation, Erica taught chemistry, AP chemistry, and physics for two years at a rural public high school in Minnesota. During her teaching, as a reader of the Journal, she was delighted to see the introduction of the Classroom Activities feature. She found the ready-made activities a great complement to her "hands-on, minds-on" curriculum. Due to her husband's job transfer, she has returned to Madison and is even more delighted to now be a part of the development of Classroom Activities. Her duties at Journal House include helping to test, research, and write Classroom Activities. She divides her time between working at Journal House, taking additional science coursework at the university for professional development, and tutoring chemistry students. She is settling in to her new life in Madison and she and her husband enjoy exploring the Wisconsin outdoors together. European Conference on Research in Chemical Education The 5th European Conference on Research in Chemical Education (5th ECRICE) will be held from September 21-25, 1999, at the University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. It will include plenary lectures, symposia, workshops, poster sessions, and social events. The working language of the conference will be English, but contributions in French are also invited. For more information contact Georgios Tsarparlis, University of Ioannina, Department of Chemistry, GR-451 10 Ioannina, Greece; phone: +30 651 98431; fax: +30 651 44989; email: gtsepar@cc.uoi.gr. The conference World Wide Web site is http://www.uoi.gr/conf_sem/ecrice5. Symposium on Natural Products: Chemistry and Bioactivity Hauser and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Colorado at Boulder are offering a three-day symposium on natural products which include pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, and consumer products, to be held May 19-21, 1999. For further information or to make arrangements to attend, contact University of Colorado at Boulder, Attn: Rosemary Trujillo, Campus Box 215, Boulder, CO 80309-0215; email: rosemary.trujillo@colorado.edu; fax: 303/492-0439. Workshops for Small-Scale Chemistry The Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education at Colorado State University announces two workshop programs for summer 1999. Interested community college faculty are invited to apply for the Small-Scale Chemistry for Pollution Prevention Summer Institute, June 7-18, 1999. The Institute features hands-on training in small-scale chemistry laboratory techniques. Travel to Fort Collins, CO, lodging, per diem, and classroom/laboratory materials are funded for selected participants with a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in collaboration with the Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE). For more information contact Barry Carroll by email: barry_carroll@csmate.colostate.edu; phone: 970/491-1700, or access http://www.csmate.colostate.edu/Programs/PETE_Page.html. Interested high school teachers are invited to apply for two one-week workshops in Small-Scale Chemistry Laboratory for the Regular Chemistry Course (June 21-25, 1999) and Small-Scale Chemistry Laboratory for Advanced Placement Chemistry (June 28-July 2, 1999). The workshops feature hands-on training in small-scale chemistry laboratory techniques. Classroom/laboratory materials, books, and two graduate credits are included in the $395 fee for each course. For more information contact Courtney Butler by email: courtney@ csmate.colostate.edu, phone: 970/491-1700, or access http://www.csmate.colostate.edu/. 16th BCCE: Call for Suggestions The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education will be held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor from July 30-August 3, 2000. Information about the conference is posted on the World Wide Web at www.umich.edu/ bcce or may be obtained from the following persons. General Chair: Seyhan Ege; phone: 734/764-7340; fax: 734/647-4865; email: snege@umich.edu. Program Chair: Brian Coppola; phone: 734/764-7329; email: bcoppola@umich.edu. Workshop Coordinator: Evelyn Jackson; phone: 517/355-9715 ext.204; email: ejackson@argus.cem.msu.edu. Massachusetts State Science Fair The 50th Massachusetts State Science Fair will take place April 30 and May 1, 1999. To celebrate the anniversary, we plan to hold a gathering of all Fair alumni/alumnae. Thus we are trying to contact all persons who have ever exhibited science projects at this state-wide high school Fair that has been held each year at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Anyone who has exhibited a science project at the State Fair should send their name, present address, the name of the school they were attending when participating in the Fair, and the date(s) they exhibited to the Fair office: Massachusetts State Science Fair, 45 Howlands Lane, Kingston, MA 02364-1637. If there are questions, contact Micheline M. Mathews-Roth, M.D., the chair of the alumni/alumnae committee, by phone at 617/525-2249. Call for Proposals, EDUCAUSE '99 Celebrating New Beginnings is the title of the EDUCAUSE '99 annual conference, to be held October 26-29, 1999, in Long Beach, California. The conference will be a celebration of new beginnings and a forum to shape and define our agenda for the 21st century. This is a new association focused on enabling information technology to shape the nature of teaching, learning, scholarship, research, and institutional management and invite you to participate. At this first EDUCAUSE annual conference, we will identify the opportunities, address the issues, and celebrate the potential for transforming education through information technology; we will bring together information resource professionals to participate in a diverse, comprehensive, carefully focused program with many opportunities for interactive and one-on-one communication. The conference has five tracks with each track having five focus areas: technical infrastructure; planning and strategy; service delivery; applications and best practices; and management and organization. Speakers at the general session include Colin Powell, retired chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Rita Colwell, director of the National Science Foundation; and Barry Munitz, president of the J. Paul Getty Trust. For more information visit the conference WWW site at http://www.educause.edu/conference/e99. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53
    available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953 For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm or contact the DUE Information Center; phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; www: http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final year for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www: http://www.rescorp.org Virtual Conference on Molecular Simulation The journal Molecular Simulation is sponsoring a virtual conference on the latest applications and techniques in the field, to be held April 19-May 4, 1999. Applications and Methodology of Molecular Simulation in the Physical and Biological Sciences will bring together experts in a wide range of disciplines encompassed within the physical and biological sciences. An important aim of the meeting is to foster cross fertilization of ideas, algorithms, and applications between them. Sessions will include papers on topics in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, and pharmacology. Comment and discussion will be encouraged and the resulting material will be edited and form part of the proceedings. The format of the virtual conference will be formal sessions with invited and contributed papers, posters and subsequent interactive discussions with authors, where comment and criticism will be sought on the formal lectures (along the lines of a Faraday Discussion). During the conference all material will be accessible at the conference Web site, http://molsim.vei.co.uk/ and accepted papers will be published after the end of the conference (following refereeing and editing) in Molecular Simulation. To register, fill in the form at http://molsim.vei.co.uk/register/index.html. Smallscale and Microscale Chemistry This is a call for presenters and participants to the 150th 2YC3 conference, November 5-6, 1999 in Fort Smith, Arkansas. The theme of this conference is "Smallscale and Microscale Chemistry-Steps into the 21st Century" and considers techniques, the escalating cost of chemicals, and their disposal. Environmental concerns are also topics that need to be addressed if this laboratory science will teach an awareness of man's responsibility to the environment. Please send abstracts for paper and poster presentations or workshop proposals to Thomas R. Clark at the address below. Westark College is committed to supporting your participation and will present a enthusiastic program. Additional assistance can be obtained from Thomas R. Clark, Department of Chemistry, Westark College, Fort Smith, AR 72913; phone: 501/788-7623; fax: 501/788-7612; email: tclark@systema.westark.edu. Information Requested from AP Chemistry Teachers in Intensive Scheduling A chemistry teacher in western Pennsylvania who is working on her Master's thesis, "The Impact of Intensive Scheduling on Student Achievement in Chemistry", is seeking pre- and post-Block Scheduling AP Chemistry Exam Scores. Data from Block, A/B Rotational, and Copernican schedules is of particular interest. Please send comments and scores to Chris Ann Slye, 1200 Tenth Avenue, Irwin, PA 15642; email: cabst71@pitt.edu; phone: 724/861-0250. A Great Student Award! Spring is award season, and a subscription to the Journal has lasting value as well as a reasonable price. We have personalized subscription award certificates and accompanying sample issues, ready for presentation. Whether it is one subscription to an outstanding student or 50 to each of this year's graduates in an ACS Local Section, we stand ready to help.

  4. News: Good chemical manufacturing process criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This news column covers topics relating to manufacturing criteria, machine to machine technology, novel process windows, green chemistry indices, business resilience, immobilized enzymes, and Bt crops.

  5. NEWS: Solid foundations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Among the initiatives to be found at UK universities is a vocational award with the title `University Foundation Degree' at Nottingham Trent University. This qualification will be offered in 14 different subjects including four in the Faculty of Science and Mathematics, in the areas of applied biology, applied sciences, chemistry and physics. The courses will be available on a two-year full-time, three-year sandwich or a part-time basis. Set at a higher standard and specification than the Higher National Diplomas which it replaces, the UFD has been devised in consultation with industry and will cover the technical and specialist areas demanded by employers to combat skills shortages. The UFD in applied sciences concentrates on practical applications through laboratory, IT and project work, supported by lectures and seminars. At the end students can enter the employment market or transfer onto the second year of a degree course. Science-based careers including research and development would be the aim of those taking the UFD in physics. The first year develops the fundamentals of modern physics supported by studies in mathematics, IT and computer programming, whilst year 2 is vocational in nature with industrial problem solving and work experience as well as an academic theme associated with environmental aspects of the subject. Those who complete the UFD will be allowed automatic progression to a specified honours degree course and would normally be expected to study for a further two years for this award. However, those demonstrating an outstanding academic performance can transfer to the linked degree programme at the end of the first year via fast-track modules. Back in May the UK's Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) announced new standard benchmarks for degrees. These will be introduced into higher education institutions from 2002 to outline the knowledge, understanding and skills a student should gain from a particular higher education course. These benchmark statements should help students to make informed choices about their degree and subsequent employability, as well as informing employers about the skills and knowledge of the graduates they propose to employ. Academics from each discipline have agreed the statements for their areas of expertise to a common framework.

  6. Evaluating wildlife as a potential source of Salmonella serotype Newport (JJPX01.0061) contamination for tomatoes on the eastern shore of Virginia.

    PubMed

    Gruszynski, K; Pao, S; Kim, C; Toney, D; Wright, K; Ross, P G; Colon, A; Levine, S

    2014-05-01

    Eastern Shore of Virginia red, round tomatoes contaminated with Salmonella serotype Newport pattern JJPX01.0061 have been a source of several multistate outbreaks within the last 10 years. No source of the contamination has yet been identified. The goal of this study was to evaluate wildlife as a potential source of contamination. Faecal samples from deer, turtles and birds were collected between November 2010 and July 2011 from seventeen locations on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. A total of 262 samples were tested for the presence of Salmonella using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A total of 23 (8.8%) samples tested positive for Salmonella spp. and were further characterized by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping. Overall, twelve serotypes were identified, including Salmonella serotype Javiana, another common serotype associated with tomato-related outbreaks. Only one avian sample collected in July 2011 was determined to be positive for S. Newport pattern 61. This sample was collected from the ground at a site where birds, mostly gulls, were congregating. Although many of the avian samples from this site were dry, the site yielded eleven positive Salmonella samples. This suggests that certain Salmonella serotypes may persist in the environment despite extreme conditions. The recovery of one Newport pattern 61 isolate alone does not yield much information regarding the environmental reservoirs of this pathogen, but when combined with other data including the recovery of several isolates of Javiana from birds, it suggests that birds might be a potential source of Salmonella contamination for tomatoes on the Eastern Shore. PMID:23773825

  7. A new species of Scolopocryptops Newport: a troglobitic scolopocryptopine centipede from a remarkable siliciclastic area of eastern Brazil (Scolopendromorpha, Scolopocryptopidae, Scolopocryptopinae)

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Jr, Amazonas; Bichuette, Maria Elina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe Scolopocryptops troglocaudatus sp. n., a new troglobitic scolopocryptopine centipede species. The species was found in a remarkable siliciclastic karst area of Eastern Brazil, in three caves of the Chapada da Diamantina, in the state of Bahia. Scolopocryptops troglocaudatus sp. n. is close to Scolopocryptops miersii Newport, 1845 and Scolopocryptops ferrugineus macrodon (Kraepelin, 1903) but differs from them by troglomorphic features, such as depigmentation, long appendages and a thin cuticle. This new species is the second troglobitic scolopocryptopine described and is the first discovered in Brazil. PMID:25829851

  8. A new species of Scolopocryptops Newport: a troglobitic scolopocryptopine centipede from a remarkable siliciclastic area of eastern Brazil (Scolopendromorpha, Scolopocryptopidae, Scolopocryptopinae).

    PubMed

    Chagas-Jr, Amazonas; Bichuette, Maria Elina

    2015-01-01

    We describe Scolopocryptopstroglocaudatus sp. n., a new troglobitic scolopocryptopine centipede species. The species was found in a remarkable siliciclastic karst area of Eastern Brazil, in three caves of the Chapada da Diamantina, in the state of Bahia. Scolopocryptopstroglocaudatus sp. n. is close to Scolopocryptopsmiersii Newport, 1845 and Scolopocryptopsferrugineusmacrodon (Kraepelin, 1903) but differs from them by troglomorphic features, such as depigmentation, long appendages and a thin cuticle. This new species is the second troglobitic scolopocryptopine described and is the first discovered in Brazil. PMID:25829851

  9. Media Literacy, News Literacy, or News Appreciation? A Case Study of the News Literacy Program at Stony Brook University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This case study provides practical and theoretical insights into the Stony Brook news literacy program, which is one of the most ambitious and well-funded curricular experiments in modern journalism education and media literacy. Analysis of document, interview, and observation data indicates that news literacy educators sought to teach students…

  10. Media Literacy, News Literacy, or News Appreciation? A Case Study of the News Literacy Program at Stony Brook University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This case study provides practical and theoretical insights into the Stony Brook news literacy program, which is one of the most ambitious and well-funded curricular experiments in modern journalism education and media literacy. Analysis of document, interview, and observation data indicates that news literacy educators sought to teach students

  11. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    1999 EAS Awards The Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) announces the winners of their 1999 awards, which will be presented during their annual meeting, to be held November 14-19, 1999, at the Garden State Convention Center in Somerset, NJ. ACS Analytical Chemistry Division, Findeis Young Investigator Award

    • David Clemmer, Indiana University
    EAS Award for Achievements in Separation Science
    • Milton L. Lee, Brigham Young University
    EAS Award for Achievements in Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
    • Phil Williams, Grain Research Laboratory, Winnipeg, Canada
    EAS Award for Achievements in Magnetic Resonance
    • Frank A. L. Anet, University of California, Los Angeles (Emeritus)
    EAS Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry
    • Catherine Fenselau, University of Maryland at College Park
    Galactic Industries Award for Achievements in Chemometrics
    • Harald Martens, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)
    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP)
    • Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999
    • Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953
    For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov.

    The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.

    • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
    • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
    • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
    • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
    • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
    • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
    • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
    Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW: http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
    • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
    • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
    • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final opportunity for this program is summer 1999)
    • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
    • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
    Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www: http://www.rescorp.org 1999 American Oil Chemists' Society Awards The American Oil Chemists' Society announce the following awards, to be presented at their annual meeting in Orlando, FL, May 1999. Supelco/Nicholas Pelick Research Award
    • Andrew Sinclair, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology-University of Australia
    Stephen S. Chang Award
    • Edwin N. Frankel, University of California at Davis
    16th BCCE Coming Up The Web site for the 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education is up and running at http://www. umich.edu/ bcce. The Biennial Conference will be held from July 30 through August 3, 2000, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Organizers of symposia and workshops and proposers of papers are invited to submit their ideas via the Web or in writing to either the Program Chair, Brian Coppola; phone: 734/764-7329; email: bcoppola@umich.edu, or to the Workshop Coordinator, Evelyn Jackson; phone: 517/355-9715 ext 204; email: ejackson@argus.cem.msu.edu. For general information please contact Seyhan Ege; phone: 734/764-7340; email: snege@umich.edu. Student Participation at ACS Meetings The ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety (CHAS) announces a new program to encourage student participation in the CHAS technical program at ACS national meetings. CHAS will pay the registration fee for anyone who qualifies for the student rate (currently $25 for undergraduate or graduate students, precollege teachers) if the student presents either a poster or an oral paper as part of the CHAS technical program. For cosponsored or co-listed symposia, CHAS must be the primary sponsor. The initial offering of this program applies to the New Orleans, San Francisco, and Washington, DC, meetings. If registration information is known before guest registrations are due, CHAS can pay the registration fee directly; otherwise the fee can be reimbursed after the meeting upon submission of the registration receipt. For further information contact Ken Fivizzani, CHAS Chair-Elect; phone: 630/305-2032; fax: 630/305-2932; email: kfivizzani@nalco.com. Microscale Workshops in Mexico The Mexican Microscale Chemistry Center, in the Department of Basic Sciences of the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City, will offer several workshops in 1999:
    • High School Chemistry (May 19-21)
    • Physical Chemistry (June 9-11)
    • General Chemistry (June 16-18)
    • Advanced Organic Chemistry (June 23-25)
    • Environmental Chemistry (June 30-July 2)
    • Biochemistry (July 7-9)
    • Inorganic Chemistry (Aug. 9-11)
    • Electrochemistry (Nov. 10-12)
    Workshops are 20 hours long, beginning at 9 a.m. the first day and ending at 1 p.m. the final day. The language is normally Spanish, although occasionally there are guest instructors who teach in English. Early registration is advised. For further information contact Arturo Fregoso or Jorge Ibáñez, Universidad Iberoamericana, Centro Mexicano de Química en Microescala, Depto. de Ciencias Básicas, Prol. Paseo de la Reforma 880, 01210 México, D.F.; phone: (5) 267 4074, 267 4168, 267 4176; fax: (5) 267 4279, 267 4063; email: jorge.ibanez@uia.mx or arturo.fregoso@uia.mx. STEP Conference Science and Technology...Exploring the Possibilities symbolized the gathering of faculties to explore the innovations and integration of technology in the world of science education. The lectures, discussions, and workshops that formed the conference involved Ontario public and private schools and took place at Appleby College, Oakville, Ontario, in February 1999. Speakers were chosen to compliment the specific theme of technology in the classroom. STEP provided the opportunity for all the schools in Ontario to become one large community working toward a better future in teaching methods. Although the conference is over for this year, communication is still strong. A bigger and better STEP is planned for Friday, February 4, 2000. For more details please contact B. O'Leary, Head, Science and Technology Department, Appleby College, Oakville, Ontario L6K 3P1, Canada; boleary@appleby.on.ca. ACS Division of Chemical Education: 1999 Election of Officers Candidates for the 1999 annual election of Division officers for 2000 are listed below. Ballots will be mailed for arrival in late August or early September. Ballots must be received by the Secretary by October 1, 1999. Both ACS and affiliate members of the Division may vote for the offices of Chair-Elect and Treasurer in this election as a result of a recent change in the bylaws, approved in the 1997 election. Only ACS members may vote for Councilor/Alternate Councilor, since this is an ACS as well as a DivCHED office. For Chair-Elect (Chair in 2001)
    • Arlene Russell, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
    • Conrad Stanitski, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR
    Treasurer
    • Frank Torre, Springfield College, Springfield, MA
    • Anna Wilson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
    Councilor/Alternate Councilor
    • Craig Bowen, Clemson University, Clemson, SC
    • Mark Freilich, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
    • Marcy Towns, Ball State University, Muncie, IN
    • Carol White, Athens Area Technical Institute, Athens, GA

  12. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    New Source of Information from Advertisers The Journal has a new feature effective with the June 1999 issue. If you would like additional information about our advertisers or their products, the quickest and easiest way to get it is via JCE Online: go to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu click on Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. When you do contact our advertisers, be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. This is important to them, and to us. JCE Software Receives Award The Journal recently received notice that JCE Software portion of JCE Online has been selected as a Links2Go Key Resource for the topic of chemistry software. According to Links2Go (www.links2go.com), JCE Software's home page is one of the top fifty most accessed online resources in the area of chemistry software (currently ranked 45). Thanks to all of you who have visited JCE Online and the JCE Software area to make this possible. If you haven't visited the site yet, you can go there directly (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/index.html ) as well as via our JCE Online home page. You will be greeted with a short video of nitrogen triiodide exploding and be able to get a wealth of information about our latest releases, software, CD-ROMs/Video, student resources, materials for authors and software developers. You can see color graphics from our CD-ROMs, video, and software,... Actually, if you are familiar with our Catalog, this is much better. 1999 Welch Chemistry Prize Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science at Stanford University, has been named the 1999 recipient of the Welch Award in Chemistry for his lifetime achievements in physical and analytical chemistry. Zare's interests focus on the development and application of lasers and other novel instruments to explore chemical frontiers, ranging from molecules to chemical processes, from the inside of cells to the inside of meteorites. Zare and colleague Andrew Alexander are contributors to the Journal's Viewpoints series, sponsored by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation: "Anatomy of Elementary Chemical Reactions", JCE, 1998, 75, 1105. The Welch Award in Chemistry has been given by the Welch Foundation since 1972 to honor lifetime achievements in the field. Zare will be honored and presented with a $300,000 prize and gold medallion during the Foundation's annual award banquet held in Houston in October. NEACT Conference: Chemistry of Materials and Material Science The 61st Summer Conference of NEACT, the New England Association of Chemistry Teachers, will be held from Monday, August 9, through Thursday, August 12, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. The four-day conference will feature an exploration of the chemistry of materials and material science and effective methods of presenting these in the classroom and laboratory. The keynote address is "Teaching Solid State Chemistry at MIT" by Ron Latanision of MIT's Department of Material Science. Other presentations include "Driving Force", James Livingston; "The Colorful Nanoworld", Moungi Bawendi; "Molecular Wire-Based Amplification in Chemical Sensors", Timothy Swager; "Putting Solids in the Foundation", Arthur Ellis, George Lisensky, and Karen Nordell; "Miracle Materials", Valerie Wilcox; "Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", Richard Stein; and "Using Software in Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", William Vining. There will be a selection of workshops on the conference theme as well. The conference is open to all. The program chairperson is Peter J. Nassiff, Science Department Chairperson at Burlington High School. For further information contact Nassiff at 80 Gregory Road, Framingham, MA 01701; email: pnassiff@massed.net. Call for Symposia, Papers, & Workshops: 16th BCCE The Web site for the 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, July 30-August 3, 2000, at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, is up and running at http://www.umich.edu/ bcce. Organizers of symposia and workshops as well as proposers of papers are invited to submit their ideas over the Web or in writing to the Program Chair, Brian Coppola; phone: 734/764-7329; email: bcoppola@umich.edu, or to the Workshop Coordinator, Evelyn Jackson; phone: 517/355-9715 ext 204; email: ejackson@argus.cem.msu.edu. For general information please contact Seyhan Ege, phone: 734/764-7340, email: snege@umich.edu. ChemCareers Debuts on ChemCenter The ACS ChemCenter website has recently launched a moderated career forum where chemists, chemical engineers, scientists in related fields, students, and other interested persons pose their questions related to career development in the chemical sciences. At the site you can hear what your peers think about preparing for, launching, maintaining, and advancing a career in chemistry. You can bring questions, share experiences, or offer advice. The forum is moderated by ACS career consultants who offer their expert opinions as a part of the discussion. The address is http://www.chemcenter.org. Click on the "discussions" hypertext link under "Discover Chemistry." Green Chemistry The closing date for grant funding from the EPA/NSF Technologies for a Sustainable Environment Solicitation is July 26, 1999. For specific grant information, visit the Web site www.nsf.gov/pubs/1999/nsf99108/nsf99108.txt. For general grant information about green chemistry, go to www.epa.gov/greenchemistry, es.epa.gov/ncerqa/grants, and www.nsf.gov; phone: 202/260-2659. Grad Resources Hotline A national crisis hotline sponsored by Grad Resources was set up effective April 1999. Graduate students who face overwhelming stress or despair may call 1/877-GRAD-HLP, toll-free, 24 hours a day, every day, to speak anonymously with a counselor specially trained in graduate issues. Grad Resources is a non-profit organization serving graduate students. For further references and information, visit the Grad Resources Website at www.gradresources.org or contact Nick Repak at 1-800/867-0188. Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE)

    • Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999
    • NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999
    • DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953 For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.
      • Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998
      • Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999
      • New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999
      • Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999
      • Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999
      • Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July 15, 1999
      • Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry: February 26, 1999
      Further information may be obtained from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 555 Madison Avenue, Suite 1305, New York, NY 10022; phone: 212/753-1760; email: admin@dreyfus.org; WWW: http://www.dreyfus.org/ Research Corporation
      • Cottrell College Science Awards: May 15 and November 15
      • Cottrell Scholars: First regular business day in September
      • Partners in Science: December 1 (the final opportunity for this program is summer 1999)
      • Research Opportunity Awards: May 1 and October 1
      • Research Innovation Awards: May 1
      Further information may be obtained from Research Corporation, 101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85711-3332; phone: 520/571-1111; fax: 520/571-1119; email: awards@rescorp.org; www: http://www.rescorp.org ACS Division of Chemical Education Change in 1999 Election of Officers The notice of the 1999 election of CHED officers originally appeared on page 755 of the June 1999 issue of the Journal. The slate has changed because Frank Torre has withdrawn as a candidate for Treasurer. His new responsibilities as department chair at Springfield College will not permit him to devote the time necessary to serve the Division well. The Committee on Personnel and Nominations has submitted to the Executive Committee the name of Tamar (Uni) Susskind to replace Torre, and the Executive Committee has approved this change. As a result, the candidates on the revised 1999 ballot are below. Candidate statements for Chair-Elect and Treasurer are on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Jul /p896_4.html Treasurer (2000-2002) (amended)
      • Tamar (Uni) Susskind, Oakland Community College, Auburn Hills, MI
      • Anna Wilson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
      For Chair-Elect (Chair in 2001) Arlene Russell, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
    • Conrad Stanitski, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR
    Councilor/Alternate Councilor (2000-2002)
    • Craig Bowen, Clemson University, Clemson, SC
    • Mark Freilich, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
    • Marcy Towns, Ball State University, Muncie, IN
    • Carol White, Athens Area Technical Institute, Athens, GA
    Ballots will be mailed in August. Ballots must be received by the Secretary by October 1, 1999.

  13. NEWS: GIREP in Barcelona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    2000-11-01

    The 18th biannual conference of GIREP was held in Barcelona from 27 August to 1 September 2000. GIREP stands for Groupe International de Recherche sur l'Enseignement de la Physique. Some 400 delegates from 53 countries attended the conference, whose main concern was Physics Teacher Education beyond 2000. All contributions had to made in English. A conference like this needs to be singularly interesting to keep delegates away from the sunsoaked attractions and delights of one of the most exciting cities in the world - even if some of the excitement comes from wondering whether or not you are going to get your pocket picked. A typical conference day begins with two or three plenary lectures in the morning, with the afternoon given over to a set of nine parallel sessions. These sessions consisted of tightly timetabled 20 minute talks or other types of presentation. This meant that even the most dedicated delegate could get to little more than 10% of the over 200 sessions that were on offer in the afternoons. The event was organized by Catalonian locals working at the conference site, the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, and was superbly smooth. The list of organizations supporting the conference is too long to record, but ranged from the European Commission to Barcelona Science Museum. The UK can boast (if that is the right word) just 11 paid-up members of GIREP, which at about £10 per annum is hardly an expensive club - next year it goes up to 20 Euros - and the fee is worth it for the excellently produced book or CD-ROM of the conference proceedings. These contain a great deal of wisdom, plus the fair amount of infuriating rubbish that tends to be generated by educational research. I write here with all the prejudices of an aged ex-teacher, of course. The first morning lecture was given by Jon Ogborn, who used his recent work as organizer of the IoP post-16 Initiative to give some details of the Advancing Physics AS and A2 and make some general points about designing a new curriculum in Physics. His main argument perhaps was that a physics course should be designed as a set of narratives, with beginning, middle, end and a point, rather than as a set of concepts whose meaning was of more significance to the teacher or curriculum designer than to the students. He was followed by Ed Redish of the University of Maryland, another entertaining speaker who addressed the global problem of the decline in the number of students willing to study physics when given a free choice not to do so. His talk was wide ranging, but centred on the apparent fact that physics teaching was essentially unsuccessful - for a variety of reasons. He proposed that this was a problem that could and should be tackled scientifically, with a loop of research-instruction-design. Science is good at solving problems, but so far physics hasn't seen physics teaching and learning as problematic. Maybe physics lecturers are so good at physics that difficulty in learning it is taken to be a student problem (inattention, sheer stupidity) rather than a systemic one. I look forward to hearing more about this. What I did get from one or two lectures about research into the way teachers failed tended to raise my blood pressure to dangerous levels. In both cases considerable skill and effort had been put into finding out that curriculum innovations or new teaching techniques had been badly handled by teachers, who had still kept to their old ways - like using ray boxes in optics work, or failing to make best use of Real Time laboratory systems (i.e. data logging). These new approaches were described as expert-designed innovations. I am afraid that it occurred to me that if experts had been employed to produce a new production system in a factory failure of the workforce to implement it would have resulted in some high-level expert redundancies. Certainly not `more research' as was advocated here. But it wasn't all grief: many talks and lectures were inspiring and showed how many people across the world were working hard and intelligently to improve physics teaching - all for the benefit of learners. It occurred to me too how lucky we are in UK to be at the forefront of so much of this, and usually in a practical and pragmatic way that emphasizes the importance - the absolute necessity - of teachers being fully involved in any development that has a strong likelihood of success. Other countries, especially in Italy and France, seem to be just cottoning on to the need for more thoughtful practical work, the need for smart use of ICT, investigations etc. The UK does well here, partly because of and partly in spite of a strong and increasingly centrally determined curriculum and pedagogy. Some highlights: Ed Taylor (MIT, his website is www.eftaylor.com) made a lightning 20 minute raid on conventional physics teaching, i.e. Newton etc, cutting out the concept of force, F = ma, and replacing this with relativity and the Feynman Many Paths model of quantum physics as introductory topics. All the rest of physics follows naturally and coherently. This radical attack was closely followed by our own Ian Lawrence (now at Birmingham University) giving a concise and cogent demonstration of how Many Paths is taught in Advancing Physics (see the article on pages 400-405 of this issue). Brian Woolnough (Oxford University Department of Education) came down to earth with a nice talk about how teachers and ordinary PGCE students benefited from small educational research projects. Richard Gunstone (Monash University) gave a funny but fundamentally serious account of how bad things were in Australia, blaming Physics lecturers mostly, but making good points too about how other beginning professionals have different expectations and support systems from beginning teachers. I shall leave out the lowlights. I could go on. I could have chosen other talks to go to and been better or worse off. But the weather was hot and sunny, my pocket wasn't picked, transport, food and drink were cheap and there were lots of people to talk to. The conference dinner was at the Barcelona Ritz. The next GIREP conference will be at Lund University, Sweden, in early August 2002. Check out the website: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb

  14. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The session concluded with the talk by this year's award winner for Excellence in Introductory College teaching, Dr Dwight Neuenschwander from Southern Nazarene University in Oklahoma. Dwight's talk, invoking both Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol and Robert Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, was memorable for clarifying both the connections and the differences between physics and physics teaching. At a second ceremonial session on Tuesday, Terrence Walker of The Ohio State University gave the Klopsteg Memorial Lecture, entitled The Big Bang: Seeing Back to the Beginning. This was followed by the presentation of the Robert A Millikan Award Lecture - Beauty in Physics and the Arts, by Thomas Rossing of Northern Illinois University. Over the years Tom has made many contributions to the teaching of the physics of sound and music, and his lecture made wonderful connections between physics and the arts. At the first plenary session on Monday, Dr Elaine Seymour, a sociologist from the University of Colorado, gave a talk entitled: We Know Science Majors Are Lost Because of Poor Teaching, But Why Do They Resist Our Efforts To Improve Their Learning Experience? She described students' responses and resistance to the implementation of active-learning methods. The talk was thought-provoking, particularly when so many other talks at this meeting described new attempts to incorporate such methods in different educational settings. At the second plenary session on Wednesday, Eric Poisson from the University of Guelph gave a very interesting talk about Gravitational Wave Astronomy and the LIGO and VIRGO projects, including their theoretical motivation and expected experimental results. On Tuesday evening there was a very special show of physics demonstrations by the `Third Eye' group from China. Their presentations embody a very interesting philosophy. Each demonstration is designed to illustrate one or more basic concepts in physics in a way that will be both memorable and thought-provoking. Often these presentations have evolved, and at each stage their goal is to be able to accomplish the same demonstration with ever-simpler equipment. Given that we all live under financial constraints, the `third eye' refers to the ability to look around and find a useful piece of a demonstration apparatus amongst what others might perceive to be junk. All in all, it was a very stimulating and interesting presentation, and one can easily see why this group tours China to the rave reviews of the students there. As is true every year, the wealth of interesting and valuable work shared in the parallel sessions of contributed papers was astounding. As always, I found myself running from building to building in an attempt to hear as many talks as I could possibly attend. Often a colleague and I would split up to hear different talks, and then share what we'd learned over a meal later in the day. What follows are a few highlights of what we heard and saw in some of those sessions. As one would expect given the trend of recent years, there were many interesting talks about the incorporation of computers and instructional media in introductory physics teaching. Paris Naik from the University of Illinois presented a paper on their web-based Interactive Examples. These are very well thought-out homework problems that provide interactive help in the spirit of a Socratic dialogue. They can be viewed at webug.physics.uiuc.edu/courses/ie.html. Mario Belloni and Wolfgang Christian, both from Davidson College, each gave a talk on the use of Physlets, scriptable Java-based interactive physics problems. These can be sampled at webphysics.davidson.edu/physletprob. Ruth Chabay from Carnegie Mellon University presented the Visual Python real-time, three-dimensional graphics environment in which their first-year students are programming their own visualization of physical phenomena. Its power, ease of use and freeware usage make it a must-see at cil.andrew.cmu.edu/projects/visual. David Sokoloff (University of Oregon) and Priscilla Laws (Dickinson College) led a discussion session on the Interactive Lecture Demonstrations that they have been developing to promote active learning in the classroom. Loren Winters of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics showed some very fine work done with digital video cameras, both in producing motion videos for frame-by-frame analysis and in producing still images of high-speed phenomena. Finally, Patrick Tam of Humboldt State University in California talked about the Multimedia Resource for Learning and Online Teaching (MERLOT), a project to organize and review the proliferation of internet-based teaching materials that are rapidly becoming available. Their purpose is to make it easier for teachers like us to sift through the plethora of new innovations, to locate those that are potentially useful in our teaching, and finally to implement them effectively. You can check out the project on the web at www.merlot.org. As is evident from the number of sessions of contributed papers and the tandem conference, the quality and quantity of physics education research into new curricula and teaching methods continue to increase. A number of interesting areas were discussed including interactive lecture techniques, studio-classroom approaches combining lectures and labs, assessment techniques, and identifying and correcting student misconceptions. In addition to the plenary talks on current research topics in physics mentioned above, there were sessions on Space Physics and Hot Topics in Physics. There were sessions on professional and career concerns including Preparing Future Physics Faculty, New Faculty Experiences and Concerns, Balancing Career and Family, How Physics Topics Support the Job Market and Recruiting and Retaining Women in Physics. Whether one was a high school teacher or a university professor, this was an enjoyable and educational meeting. We all look forward to the Winter 2001 meeting from 6-11 January in San Diego, and to next summer's meeting from 21-25 July in Rochester, New York.

  15. Computational Methods for Analyzing Health News Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Delano J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers that investigate the media's coverage of health have historically relied on keyword searches to retrieve relevant health news coverage, and manual content analysis methods to categorize and score health news text. These methods are problematic. Manual content analysis methods are labor intensive, time consuming, and inherently…

  16. News Media Presence and Southeast Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliesch, Ralph E.

    1980-01-01

    Field research in Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia indicates that only a relative handful of the world's nations are directly involved in collecting news from these countries; the research also reveals that vast regions of the Third World have little or no direct news-seeking contact with one another. (GT)

  17. Science News and the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Using "Science News" as a teaching tool promotes writing about science, talking about science, and broadening students' views about what science is. This article describes an ongoing assignment in which students choose one article from "Science News" each week and write a brief summary and explanation of why they picked that article. (Contains 1…

  18. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program…

  19. Computational Methods for Analyzing Health News Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Delano J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers that investigate the media's coverage of health have historically relied on keyword searches to retrieve relevant health news coverage, and manual content analysis methods to categorize and score health news text. These methods are problematic. Manual content analysis methods are labor intensive, time consuming, and inherently

  20. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

  1. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification...

  2. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification...

  3. Broadcast Journalism; An Introduction to News Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mark W.

    The important features of writing news for radio and television are covered in this book. Ways to write colorful, accurate, and timely stories are explained with the emphasis on the differences between broadcast and newspaper stories. Other subjects treated are sources of news (including explanations of how the Associated Press copy works and how

  4. Television and the News: A Critical Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skornia, Harry J.

    This book contains a documented critical analysis of the state of broadcast journalism in the United States. It also examines the conditions that prevent news broadcasting as a practice from being a profession, and suggests steps needed to achieve professionalism in providing the kind of news service the nation needs but is not getting. Some of…

  5. Children's Fright Reactions to Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Joanne; Nathanson, Amy I.

    1996-01-01

    Finds that 37% of a random sample of children had been frightened by a news story on television; percentage of children frightened by news increased from kindergarten to the elementary school years, whereas the tendency to be frightened by fantastic, unreal content showed a decreasing trend; and tendency to respond with fright to violence between…

  6. Transmission of News in the Turkish Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroldsen, Edwin O.; Blake, Reed H.

    In the traditional Turkish village, the coffee house acts as a modern-day parish pump in news transmission. Within the coffee house, there is evidence of a two-step flow of communication. The role of the influential person in this study is the same as that in other studies: as a mediator and interpreter of news. In social characteristics, however,…

  7. Listening to Monotony: All-News Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woal, Michael

    A study analyzed statistically the monotony of all-news radio listening and identified stylistic figures that elicit attention in listeners. Subjects were 30 graduate students whose experience with radio news ranged from occasional listening over several months to regular listening five or seven days per week for several years. Respondents were…

  8. Scandal Clouds News Corporation's Move into Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2011-01-01

    When News Corporation announced last fall its entry into the education technology market, some observers said the media conglomerate led by Rupert Murdoch was a bad fit for education. Between the ownership of conservative-leaning outlets like Fox News and a reputation for identifying opportunities to generate lots of revenue very quickly, News…

  9. Broadcast Journalism; An Introduction to News Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mark W.

    The important features of writing news for radio and television are covered in this book. Ways to write colorful, accurate, and timely stories are explained with the emphasis on the differences between broadcast and newspaper stories. Other subjects treated are sources of news (including explanations of how the Associated Press copy works and how…

  10. Kids, Crime, and Local Television News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanich, Danilo

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of crime reporting occurs on local television news and in newspapers. Although crimes are extraordinary events, they assume an ordinariness that only daily reporting can give them. The obvious question is what does the news tell us about crime. This article compares the coverage of adult crime and the coverage of what the author…

  11. News Research for Better Newspapers, Volume Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Comp.

    The findings of research studies that come from a variety of sources and concern newspapers, some aspects of television news, and news media audiences are summarized briefly. Among the topics are audience characteristics, content of stories, readership, headlines and makeup, editorial policy, and editorial administration and personnel. Most of the…

  12. News Research for Better Newspapers. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Ed.

    This volume is a compilation of the summaries of news-editorial research reported in the American Newspaper Publishers Association News Research Bulletins during 1967. Of the 44 studies reported in this volume, twenty were done by universities, ten by individuals, nine by research agencies, and five by other organizations. The studies are arranged…

  13. Library Media Specialists: Doing the News!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Newspapers in Education (NIE) Week and how it can relate to school library media specialists. Highlights include the convergence of news media, including news on the Web; ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) resources, including lesson plans; relevant books; Web sites; and Web journalism. (LRW)

  14. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,

  15. Satellite News Feeds: Protecting a Transient Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwater, Tony; And Others

    Satellite news gathering (SNG) has been widely adopted in broadcast journalism in recent years, and appears likely to grow in importance as local television news operations increase their reliance on it. However, because the technology for SNG is so new, information transmitted through SNG systems is not adequately protected under current laws.…

  16. TV News Analysis Project Motivates Broadcast Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the use of content analysis by a journalism class in studying television news. Indicates that the method is flexible, generates familiarity with quantitative approaches to the analysis of broadcast journalism, can result in increased awareness of the complexity of the broadcast news medium, and increases student motivation. (TJ)

  17. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,…

  18. NIH News in Health: September 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wein, Harrison, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    News in Health, is a monthly newsletter that provides practical health news and information. As college students arrive on campus this fall, it is a time of new experiences, new friendships and making memories that will last a lifetime. Unfortunately for many, it can also be a time of excessive drinking and dealing with its aftermath--vandalism,…

  19. Predicting Political News Coverage by Newspaper Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Gilbert Len, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Concludes that the only significant factors explaining the amount of political news published by the Arkansas daily press during the 1972 senatorial primary election campaign were the size of the daily news hole and the number of wire services a newspaper used. (GT)

  20. Mass News: Practices, Controversies, and Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroy, David J., Ed.; Sterling, Christopher H., Ed.

    This selection of readings, primarily intended for a college journalism course, discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the major sources of the public news--the wire services, newspapers, and television. The first part of the book deals with the context of mass news and serves as an introduction to some of the crucial ideas shaping thinking…

  1. Astronaut Edgar Mitchell addresses MSC personnel and news media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, right, the Apollo 14 lunar module pilot, addresses JSC/MSC personnel and news media representatives and other visitors soon after he and his fellow crewmen were released from a 15-day confinement period in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. Pictured with Mitchell in front of the LRL, MSC bldg 37, are Astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., left, commander; and Stuart A Roosa, command module pilot, Mrs Mitchell is at right and Mrs. Roosa, near left. Roosa is flanked by his four children, left to right, Christopher A., Stuart A. Roosa Jr., John D. and Rosemary D.

  2. Space Shuttle Status News Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Richard Gilbech, External Tank "Tiger Team" Lead, begins this space shuttle news conference with detailing the two major objectives of the team. The objectives include: 1) Finding the root cause of the foam loss on STS-114; and 2) Near and long term improvements for the external tank. Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Manager, presents a chart to explain the external tank foam loss during STS-114. He gives a possible launch date for STS-121 after there has been a repair to the foam on the External Tank. He further discusses the changes that need to be made to the surrounding areas of the plant in New Orleans, due to Hurricane Katrina. Bill Gerstemaier, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations, elaborates on the testing of the external tank foam loss. The discussion ends with questions from the news media about a fix for the foam, replacement of the tiles, foam loss avoidance, the root cause of foam loss and a possible date for a new external tank to be shipped to NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  3. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  4. New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imagery of Deformation and Fault Architecture Along Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon Fault in the Inner California Borderlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. J.; Bormann, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic deformation and geomorphology of the Inner California Borderlands (ICB) records the transition from a convergent plate margin to a predominantly dextral strike-slip system. Geodetic measurements of plate boundary deformation onshore indicate that approximately 15%, or 6-8 mm/yr, of the total Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by faults offshore. The largest near-shore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NI/RC) fault complex, has a Holocene slip rate estimate of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr, according to onshore trenching, and current models suggest the potential to produce an Mw 7.0+ earthquake. The fault zone extends approximately 120 km, initiating from the south near downtown San Diego and striking northwards with a constraining bend north of Mt. Soledad in La Jolla and continuing northwestward along the continental shelf, eventually stepping onshore at Newport Beach, California. In late 2013, we completed the first high-resolution 3D seismic survey (3.125 m bins) of the NI/RC fault offshore of San Onofre as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project. We present new constraints on fault geometry and segmentation of the fault system that may play a role in limiting the extent of future earthquake ruptures. In addition, slip rate estimates using piercing points such as offset channels will be explored. These new observations will allow us to investigate recent deformation and strain transfer along the NI/RC fault system.

  5. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, Clive

    2012-06-01

    Herschel papers catalogued and accessible; Maskelyne papers accepted for the nation; centenary of the Hamburg Observatory; oldest astrologer's board found; Groupe Flammarion sold; ancient sundial found; keeping time (modern folk song about John Harrison).

  6. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, Clive

    2011-09-01

    Townsend Observatory destroyed; BAA Lunar Section archives; Astro-Cymru; Royal star identified; Formation of Johannes Kepler Working Group; Tycho Brahe exhumed; Ancient observatory discovered in Iran...; ... and in Mexico; Calling all ex-occupants of interplanetary craft.

  7. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    Croatia: Rijeka’s 2005 science festival attracts an enthusiastic crowd The Middle East: METSMaC conference reaches out to teachers around the Gulf and beyond Spain: Física en Acción 5: a Spanish festival that will have you cycling the tightrope Czech Republic: Astronomy lessons for everyone Sussex Planetarium: Planetarium sets its sights high TV series: Einstein gets animated for C4 cartoon series Memorial: Honouring the great: memorial to Robert Hooke is unveiled at Westminster Abbey Awards: SHAP awards prizes for exceptional student work Group meeting: IOP’s Education Group to meet in September Forthcoming Events

  8. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    Cyber Workshop: The Teacher Network visits Second Life Festival: Alarm clock rings for European science Grant Project: The reality of university science Student Physics: Young physicists' tournament in Korea Environment: Climate change documentary to be shown in every secondary school in England and Wales Centenary: Glasgow celebrates life of Kelvin

  9. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    SHAP Awards: SHAP students come out on top APECS Seminar: Able Pupils Experience Challenging Science project gets support SHAP Awards : Teachers get awards too Institute Awards: Musical squares: musical pair continue to share their adventures in sound Meeting: Rugby School hosts Schools’ Physics Group Meeting Germany: German didactics group puts on a full programme for spring meeting Radio Communication: GB4FUN: mobile radio shack hits the airwaves and is a hit with schools Saturn: Cassini Huygens mission: Saturn here we come! World Year of Physics: Conference continues with its preparations for 2005 Resources: New resources on radioactive materials available JG was supported by KBN grant no 2 P03A 020 24.

  10. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Resources: Online schools video library GIREP Seminar: A seminar not a conference New Teaching Resource: Free living for teachers Space: NASA proposes MEER - Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic-Reboost Electronic Teaching Materials: Superconductivity motivates need for upper secondary curriculum subjects Gifted and Talented: Seminars seek challenges Space: Comet chasing Particle Physics: Playing with single electrons Physics on Stage: Teachers explore the meaning of life Physics on Stage: Greek national event Physics on Stage: Physics on the Slovak stage Physics on Stage: Clubbing in Germany Physics on Stage: The Sun's star performance Higher Education: Physics: so refreshing USA: Broadening the Base AAPT Summer Meeting: US teachers in good form Astronomy: High school astronomy in the Czech Republic Space: Express to Mars Particle Physics: Journey to the centre of the Earth? ASE 2004: Flight from the ASE Physics Songs: A powerful melody Teacher Training: European training looks for ideal model

  11. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    11-14 Curriculum: Supporting Physics Teaching (11-14) Europe: Sci-tech couldn't be without it! Art-Science: Makrolab in Mountain Year Digital Curriculum: Should the BBC learn from the past? Scotland: Teachers get Rocket Science Malaysia: Controversy over the language medium for science teaching UK Science: Next stage of Science Year announced Special Educational Needs: Science for special needs students Folk Physics: Good vibrations Environment: IoM3 - a move towards sustainability? UK Primary Science: The threat of afternoon science

  12. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    IRELAND New courses for high-tech Ireland; SCIENCE YEAR Science Year launched with a jump; THE NETHERLANDS School science teachers face uncertainty; KOREA Embedding physics in a cultural context; TEACHING RESOURCES Teacher, get your hook; ICT RESOURCES Stock-take of ICT progress; INTERNET Teachers to test-drive new physics gateway; NEW ZEALAND Physics is valued in New Zealand; JAPAN Advancing Physics in Japan; HIGHER EDUCATION Networking works in Cologne; INSTITUTE MATTERS IoP demands a better deal for physics teachers; AUSTRALIA Physics numbers decline: educators blame the low impact curriculum; SCIENCE FOR THE PUBLIC More than sixty seconds in Glasgow; INTERNET A gift selection of papers from IoP; TEACHING STYLES I know what you did last summer;

  13. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    LINKS WITH PRIMARY SCIENCE SAD Physics; PHYSICS RESEARCH In a hurry...; PHYSICS COMMUNITY Scottish Stirling Meeting; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Global warming forecasts rise in skin cancer; EVENTS 2001 SET week; E-MAIL DISCUSSIONS Learning in science; STUDENT ACTIVITY Paperclip Physics; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Perspectives on Science; AWARDS Award for causing chaos; PHYSICS AT CONGRESS Physics and public heath: Do electrical power lines cause cancer? HIGHER EDUCATION First-year course development; INTERSCHOOL COLLABORATION Monitoring geomagnetic storms; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT UK course goes international; PHYSICS IN SCIENCE YEAR Website launched

  14. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Meetings: Physics Teachers@CERN 2003 Education Group Annual Conference: Observations by a first-time participant... Summer Workshop: Making Music Competition: Physics in the fast lane Bristol Festival of Physics: Ice cream ice-breakers Online Resources: Old favourites go online UK Curriculum: What does society want? UK Curriculum: Assessment of Science Learning 14-19 Forthcoming Events

  15. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Microscopy: Schools to gain remote access to Oxford University-based SEM Canada: Perimeter Institute calls international applicants to its 2005 summer school ASE: ASE 2005 refreshes the teaching parts that other conferences cannot reach Scotland: Glasgow hosts Kelvin exhibition Climate Analysis: Met Office sets up project to predict climate change Wales: Welsh teachers meet at Christ College, Brecon ESERA: ESERA 2005 unveils its conference programme Higher Education: Educators address school-university transition Christmas Lecture Series: Royal Institution supports Christmas Lecture series with interactive CD-ROM Events: UK’s Science Week kicks off in March Grants: PPARC and IOP to provide grants worth up to £400 Camera Competition: Congratulations go to camera winners Teachers’ TV: Teachers’ channel hits the small screen Physics and Music: Foster and Liebeck presentation combines physics and music Science on Stage: SOS gears up for Geneva festival Nanoworld: Hirsch lecture at Oxford focuses on the nanoworld GIREP: GIREP conference aims to raise physics’ profile Course: STELAR offers free radio-communication course

  16. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    Astronomy: Trust founder receives heavenly honour Africa: UK teaching methods make the difference in Rwandan schools Spaced Out: UK-based scale model places Jodrell Bank at the centre of our solar system Teaching Support: Teacher Network makes its mark in the classroom Correction Art on Stage: Galileo lacks momentum Meeting: Teachers are inspired by US gathering Online Study: PPLATO Foundation promotes new avenue to university study Conference: GIREP '04 creates atmosphere of 'curiosity and enthusiasm' Meeting: SonSD meeting allows exchange of teaching ideas Competition: Win a digital camera! Physics in Perspective: Events highlight how rewarding physics can be Meeting: ASE conference to deliver the best of Physics Education

  17. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Einstein year: Einstein is brought back to life for a year of educational events Workshop: Students reach out for the Moon Event: Masterclasses go with a bang Workshop: Students search for asteroids on Einstein's birthday Scotland: Curriculum for Excellence takes holistic approach Conference: Reporting from a mattress in Nachod Conference: 'Change' is key objective at ICPE conference 2005 Lecture: Institute of Physics Schools Lecture series Conference: Experience showcase science in Warwick National network: Science Learning Centre opens Meeting: 30th Stirling Physics Meeting breaks records Competition: Win a digital camera! Forthcoming Events

  18. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Schools lecture: Institute of Physics roadshow is a lecture series with a difference Rugby Meeting: 17th Annual Meeting for Teachers of Physics boasts an impressive schedule Courses: Year-12 pupils go to Open University Camera Competition: Enter now to win a new camera! Conference: Teachers invited to CERN in September New Zealand: Royal Society of New Zealand tackles fear of physics Bulgaria: Fairies, witches and extraterrestrials: how to teach science using theatre Schools lecture: Institute seeks speaker for its annual lecture series Competition: Critical thinking is encouraged by global warming competition Scotland: Two good reasons to visit Scotland this summer Competition: Test your knowledge Free Event: June IOP conference Conference: Also in Liverpool…

  19. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage focuses on life Women in Physics: DNA posters highlight the role of women Physics on Stage: Not just fair but better than ever Physics on Stage: Food inspires teaching of physics Physics on Stage: Powerful performances dispel the myth of boring physics Physics Songs: Physics inspires some of our readers to sing Physics on Stage: Awards recognize achievements of science teachers in Europe Curriculum: Japan tests Advancing Physics UK Assessment System: Assessment overhaul is overdue Future Physicists: Ambassadors are bringing physics alive Physics at work: Physics at work still going strong Teaching Teachers: US coalition helps new teachers Forthcoming Events

  20. News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    Two new combination pediatric vaccines advancing to use in infants Oncolytic viruses successfully delivered intravenously Cuba eliminates hepatitis B among minors under 15 Alzheimer's vaccine trial a success Study: Shingles vaccine safe for patients on immune-suppressing drugs Therapeutic cancer vaccine against metastatic renal cell carcinoma enters Phase 3 Pfizers Men B vaccine shows promise in Phase 2 Biovest initiates formal regulatory approval process for BiovaxID in Europe PMID:22914446

  1. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read…

  2. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read

  3. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  4. The Role of Audiovisual Mass Media News in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2011-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the role of audio/visual mass media news in language learning. In this regard, the two important issues regarding the selection and preparation of TV news for language learning are the content of the news and the linguistic difficulty. Content is described as whether the news is specialized or universal. Universal…

  5. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1993. The index is arranged in six sections: subject index, personal names index, news release number index, accession number index, speeches, and news releases.

  6. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1992. The index is arranged in six sections: subject index, personal names index, news release number index, accession number index, speeches, and news releases.

  7. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  8. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  9. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  10. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  11. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  12. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  13. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  14. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of...

  15. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  16. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  17. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  18. 31 CFR 515.573 - Transactions by news organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transactions by news organizations... Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.573 Transactions by news organizations... operation of news bureaus in Cuba whose primary purpose is the gathering and dissemination of news to...

  19. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of...

  20. "Good" News vs. "Bad": A Relative Impact Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Gerald; Hartung, Barbara W.

    A two-part study was designed to measure the amount of good news and bad news in newspapers and to measure readers' recall of stories that represented good news and bad news. The stories used in the study appeared on the front pages and on one of the inside pages of eight California newspapers during October 1978. A total of 559 telephone…

  1. Cancer News Coverage and Information Seeking

    PubMed Central

    NIEDERDEPPE, JEFF; FROSCH, DOMINICK L.; HORNIK, ROBERT C.

    2010-01-01

    The shift toward viewing patients as active consumers of health information raises questions about whether individuals respond to health news by seeking additional information. This study examines the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking using a national survey of adults aged 18 years and older. A Lexis-Nexis database search term was used to identify Associated Press (AP) news articles about cancer released between October 21, 2002, and April 13, 2003. We merged these data to the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), a telephone survey of 6,369 adults, by date of interview. Logistic regression models assessed the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking. Overall, we observed a marginally significant positive relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking (p < 0.07). Interaction terms revealed that the relationship was apparent only among respondents who paid close attention to health news (p < 0.01) and among those with a family history of cancer (p < 0.05). Results suggest that a notable segment of the population actively responds to periods of elevated cancer news coverage by seeking additional information, but they raise concerns about the potential for widened gaps in cancer knowledge and behavior between large segments of the population in the future. PMID:18300068

  2. Cancer news coverage and information seeking.

    PubMed

    Niederdeppe, Jeff; Frosch, Dominick L; Hornik, Robert C

    2008-03-01

    The shift toward viewing patients as active consumers of health information raises questions about whether individuals respond to health news by seeking additional information. This study examines the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking using a national survey of adults aged 18 years and older. A Lexis-Nexis database search term was used to identify Associated Press (AP) news articles about cancer released between October 21, 2002, and April 13, 2003. We merged these data to the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), a telephone survey of 6,369 adults, by date of interview. Logistic regression models assessed the relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking. Overall, we observed a marginally significant positive relationship between cancer news coverage and information seeking (p < 0.07). Interaction terms revealed that the relationship was apparent only among respondents who paid close attention to health news (p < 0.01) and among those with a family history of cancer (p < 0.05). Results suggest that a notable segment of the population actively responds to periods of elevated cancer news coverage by seeking additional information, but they raise concerns about the potential for widened gaps in cancer knowledge and behavior between large segments of the population in the future. PMID:18300068

  3. Print news and health psychology: some observations.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Esther

    2006-03-01

    This commentary overviews the look of health news in American print journalism and the research that suggests how health news creates influence at both the individual and policy levels. Crime and violence are argued to be public health issues, but unfortunately they are often not treated as such. There is clearly room for improvement in all areas of health news, but unfortunately the extreme stress that newspapers are under to maintain their high profit margins suggests that the resources for such improvement are unlikely to be available. Examination of the Minneapolis Star Tribune's coverage of health, crime and violence exemplifies problematic aspects. PMID:16464917

  4. Now Enhancing Working Skills: The ``NEWS`` Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, A.

    1995-01-23

    In October of 1992, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Merex Corporation began a pilot basic skills program to enhance workers` skills. The program, known as the NEWS (Now Enhancing Working Skills) Program, was implemented by the Training and Development Group of the Human Resources Division. A group of 106 employees known as Radiological Control Technicians (RCTs) from ESH-1 (Environmental, Safety, and Health) were targeted to take mandated DOE (Department of Energy) training. The main goal of the LANL/Merex partnership was to help RCTs prepare for mandated DOE Rad Con training and job performance by improving their information processing and math skills. A second goal of this project was to use the information from this small group to make some predictions about the Laboratory as a whole. This final report contains the description and an appendix for the ``NEWS`` program. The topics in this report include Merex class descriptions, test score results for the MAT, the WAT, the TABE, and Challenge test, a follow-up survey to Merex IPS and math training, student feedback statistics for skills programs, and lessons learned from the program.

  5. Benefits and Pitfalls: Producing TV News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Laura

    1974-01-01

    Examines the live television news show produced by students and faculty at Northern Illinois University with the aim of helping others avoid some difficulties and frustrations when setting up a similar show in their journalism curriculum. (TO)

  6. Radio's "March of Time": Dramatized News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichty, Lawrence W.; Bohn, Thomas W.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the early history of news reporting via radio and the influences of such newscasts as "March of Time" (which station WLW started in 1928) on the broadcast industry of the 1930s and 1940s. (RB)

  7. News about Women on the A Wire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebke, Barbara F.

    1985-01-01

    Reveals that 16 percent of stories carried on the United Press International A wire (which carries stories of national interest) were about women, and of these, 89 percent were hard news stories. (FL)

  8. Giving Bad News: A Qualitative Research Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Aein, Fereshteh; Delaram, Masoumeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The manner in which healthcare professionals deliver bad news affects the way it is received, interpreted, understood, and dealt with. Despite the fact that clinicians are responsible for breaking bad news, it has been shown that they lack skills necessary to perform this task. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian mothers’ experiences to receive bad news about their children cancer and to summarize suggestions for improving delivering bad news by healthcare providers. Materials and Methods: A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 mothers from two pediatric hospitals in Iran. Results: Five major categories emerged from the data analysis, including dumping information, shock and upset, emotional work, burden of delivering bad news to the family members, and a room for multidisciplinary approach. Conclusions: Effective communication of healthcare team with mothers is required during breaking bad news. Using multidisciplinary approaches to prevent harmful reactions and providing appropriate support are recommended. PMID:25068066

  9. Plans: Poop Deck, Boat Deck, Housetop, Bridge Deck, Upper Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plans: Poop Deck, Boat Deck, Housetop, Bridge Deck, Upper Bridge Deck, Navigating Bridge, Forecastle Deck, Upper Deck, Second Deck and Hold - Saugatuck, James River Reserve Fleet, Newport News, Newport News, VA

  10. The Virtuous All-News Radio Journalist: Perceptions of News Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfemeyer, K. Tim; McFadden, Lori L.

    To date, most of the scholarly research and critical articles about ethics in journalism have dealt with newspapers and television rather than with radio. To help fill this gap, a study surveyed a segment of the radio news community to determine some of the attitudes, values, and beliefs of news directors concerning ethics in their workplace.…

  11. Television News and Sexist Language: A Study of Television News Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhardt, Randall E.; Harless, James D.

    To test the hypothesis that use of sexist language in television newscasts cultivates images of women as immature, frivolous, or incompetent, two television news anchors (one male, one female) were asked to tape versions of a news story involving a 28-year-old female lottery winner. In one version, each anchor referred to this female as "woman,"…

  12. News Archives: One-Stop Shopping, Boutique Hopping and the Specialty News Search Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Nora

    1998-01-01

    Examines options for the researcher who wants to narrow canvassing of Web accessible material to just news-related articles. Discusses scout pages, meta-search pages, and news-only searches from World Wide Web search sites, then notes the benefits and problems for each. (AEF)

  13. News From Nowhere: Sources of International News in the Pacific Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richstad, Jim; Nnaemeka, Tony

    A study was undertaken to examine the sources of international news in the Pacific Island press in the light of J. Galtung's structural theory of imperialism and to explore the relationship between the remoteness and isolation of the Pacific press and its sources of news. The Galtungian concepts of center-periphery and dominance-dependency were…

  14. News Media Adversary and Consensus Roles, and Legislator Use of News Media for Job Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    A study examined how Alabama legislators' ratings of news media for job-relevant information correlate with their views on news media adversary and consensus agent roles. Eighty-two questionnaires (out of 140 mailed) were completed by Alabama state representatives and senators for a return rate of 59%. Results suggested that lawmakers who believe…

  15. Accuracy in News Reporting: A Review of the Research. ANPA News Research Report No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singletary, Michael

    This report provides a review of literature exploring accuracy in newspaper stories. The findings discussed do not reveal definite reasons for inaccuracy, but several possible error sources are delineated: amount of reporter involvement, type of news, psychological factors (stress, news reporters' fantasies, open/closed-mindedness, tendency to…

  16. Chemistry Is in the News: Taxonomy of authentic news media-based learning activities1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Rainer E.; Carson, Kathleen M.

    2005-09-01

    A brief history is given of approaches that aim at achieving a connectedness of the content of organic chemistry courses to real world issues. Recently, such approaches have relied more and more on online media resources, the tools of the Internet and the World Wide Web. We propose a six-level taxonomy of ‘authentic news media-based learning activities’ to provide a conceptual framework for the description and discussion of such approaches. The Chemistry Is in the News project was designed to allow students to draw explicit connections between the course content and real world issues in ways that engage the students in a full range of cognitive skills. The activities consisted in the study, creation, and peer review of news portfolios by student collaborative groups. A news portfolio consists of an authentic news article taken from the popular press with interpretive comments and questions.

  17. Teachable Moments in the News - an Online Resource Solar System Science News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhala, H. A. T.; Miller, E. A.; Goldstein, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Teachable Moments in the News (www.challenger.org/tmn/) is an online resource developed at Challenger Center for Space Science Education that takes recent news stories related to Solar System science and places them in a context relevant to the grades K-12 science curriculum. Using stories such as the launch of the MESSENGER spacecraft to Mercury, Teachable Moments in the News is meant to provide a seamless pathway from the news desk to the classroom. For each news item, an overview of the story is provided, along with high-quality inquiry-based, standards-driven lessons and links to more in-depth articles. Teachable Moments in the News is also a great tool for scientists who wish to stay informed of the recent events in Solar System exploration. The archived back issues of the quarterly published Web digest allow for a quick refresher on the most important news stories over the past several months. The very accessible nature of the stories makes the resource valuable for college students, and even the general public, as a means to keep up-to-date about current developments in planetary astronomy. Furthermore, college and university teachers can easily adapt many of the lessons to fit into the curriculum of an undergraduate astronomy course. During the poster session, we welcome suggestions from the scientific community on ways to enhance the usefulness of Teachable Moments in the News. For example, researchers could form partnerships with Teachable Moments in the News to provide news stories on their current research to be featured on the Web site. We invite researchers interested in this education and public outreach tool to visit the poster and provide suggestions on how to make the resource work as effectively as possible.

  18. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2004 Research Review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-03-01

    In-depth articles on several NREL technologies and advances, including: aligning quantum dots and related nanoscience and nanotechnology research; using NREL's Advanced Automotive Manikin (ADAM) to help test and design ancillary automotive systems; and harvesting ocean wind to generate electricity with deep-water wind turbines. Also covered are NREL news, research updates, and awards and honors received by the Laboratory.

  19. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-24

    An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

  20. Physician-patient communication: breaking bad news.

    PubMed

    Fields, Scott A; Johnson, W Michael

    2012-01-01

    Physicians often struggle with how to manage the task of breaking bad news with patients. Moreover, the arduous nature of the task can contribute to physician detachment from the patient or an avoidance of breaking the news in a timely manner. A plan of action can only improve physician confidence in breaking bad news, and also make the task more manageable. Over a decade ago, Rabow and McPhee offered a strategy; the ABCDE plan, which provided a patient centered framework from which to deliver troubling news to patients and families. At the heart of this plan was the creation of a safe environment, the demonstration of timely communication skills, and the display of empathy on the physician's part. Careful consideration of the doctor's own reactions to death and dying also played an important role. A close review of the five tenets of this plan indicates the relevance of Rabow and McPhee's strategy today. The patient base in our nation and state continues to be older, on average, and physicians are faced with numerous patients who have terminal illness. A constructive plan with specific ideas for breaking bad news can help physicians effectively navigate this difficult task. PMID:22655433

  1. Expanding the News Frame: The Systems Theory Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Laura J.; Tankard, James W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the main features of the systems perspective, focusing on general systems theory. Suggests that teaching future reporters to think of news events and issues in systems terms may be one approach to expanding the news frame. (PA)

  2. Race, Nation, and News in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Hemant

    1995-01-01

    Argues that racial ideology structures news coverage of race. Illustrates how two manifestations of racial ideology, namely racial hierarchy and temporal distancing, operate in news articles to help create racialized criteria for being an "American." (SR)

  3. Effects of Historical Coal Mining and Drainage from Abandoned Mines on Streamflow and Water Quality in Newport and Nanticoke Creeks, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaplin, Jeffrey J.; Cravotta, Charles A., III; Weitzel, Jeffrey B.; Klemow, Kenneth M.

    2007-01-01

    This report characterizes the effects of historical mining and abandoned mine drainage (AMD) on streamflow and water quality and evaluates potential strategies for AMD abatement in the 14-square-mile Newport Creek Basin and 7.6-square-mile Nanticoke Creek Basin. Both basins are mostly within the Northern Anthracite Coal Field and drain to the Susquehanna River in central Luzerne County, Pa. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Earth Conservancy, conducted an assessment from April 1999 to September 2000 that included (1) continuous stage measurement at 7 sites; (2) synoptic water-quality and flow sampling at 21 sites on June 2-4, 1999, and at 24 sites on October 7-8, 1999; and (3) periodic measurement of flow and water quality at 26 additional sites not included in the synoptic sampling effort. Stream water and surface runoff from the unmined uplands drain northward to the valley, where most of the water is intercepted and diverted into abandoned underground mines. Water that infiltrates into the mine workings becomes loaded with acidity, metals, and sulfate and later discharges as AMD at topographically low points along lower reaches of Newport Creek, Nanticoke Creek, and their tributaries. Differences among streamflows in unmined and mined areas of the watersheds indicated that (1) intermediate stream reaches within the mined area but upgradient of AMD sites generally were either dry or losing reaches, (2) ground water flowing to AMD sites could cross beneath surface-drainage divides, and (3) AMD discharging to the lower stream reaches restored volumes lost in the upstream reaches. The synoptic data for June and October 1999, along with continuous stage data during the study period, indicated flows during synoptic surveys were comparable to average values. The headwaters upstream of the mined area generally were oxygenated (dissolved oxygen range was 4.7 to 11.0 mg/L [milligrams per liter]), near-neutral (pH range was 5.8 to 7.6), and net alkaline (net alkalinity range was 2.0 to 25.0 mg/L CaCO3), with relatively low concentrations of sulfate (6.40 to 24.0 mg/L) and dissolved metals (less than 500 ug/L [micrograms per liter] of iron, manganese, and aluminum). In contrast, the AMD discharges and downstream waters were characterized by elevated concentrations of sulfate and dissolved metals that exceeded Federal and State regulatory limits. The largest AMD sources were the Susquehanna Number 7 Mine discharge entering Newport Creek near its mouth (flow range was 4.7 to 19 ft3/s [cubic feet per second]), the Truesdale Mine Discharge (Dundee Outfall) entering Nanticoke Creek about 0.5 mile upstream of Loomis Park (flow range was 0.00 to 38 ft3/s), and a mine-pit overflow entering near the midpoint of Newport Creek (flow range was 4.0 to 6.9 ft3/s). The three large discharges were poorly oxygenated (dissolved oxygen concentration range was <0.05 to 6.4 mg/L) and had elevated concentrations of sulfate (range was 710 to 890 mg/L) and low concentrations of dissolved aluminum (less than 25 ug/L), but they had distinctive concentrations of net alkalinity and dissolved iron and manganese. Effluent from the Susquehanna Number 7 Mine was near-neutral (pH range was 5.9 to 6.6) and net alkaline (net alkalinity range was 12.0 to 42.0 mg/L CaCO3) with elevated concentrations of sulfate (718 to 1,170 mg/L), dissolved iron (52,500 to 77,400 ug/L), and manganese (5,200 to 5,300 ug/L). Effluent from the Truesdale Mine also was near-neutral (pH range was 5.9 to 6.3) but had variable net alkalinity (-19.0 to 57.0 mg/L CaCO3) with elevated concentrations of sulfate (571 to 740 mg/L), dissolved iron (30,500 to 43,000 ug/L), and manganese (3,600 to 5,200 ug/L). Effluent from the mine-pit overflow in Newport Creek Basin was acidic (pH range was 4.3 to 5.0; net alkalinity range was -42 to -38 mg/L CaCO3) with elevated concentrations of sulfate (800 to 840 mg/L), iron (13,000 to 16,000 ug/L), and manganese (6,800 to 7,000 ug

  4. Astronomy, New Instrumentation, and the News Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Reporting of astronomical discoveries and events in the news media continues to expand to satisfy a seemingly voracious public interest. New telescopes, instruments, and facilities both up in space and on the ground, provide unique opportunities for media outreach on what scientists are accomplishing. And, new media such as website news providers, high-definition television, and video news walls help to fuel the growing activity. Ever since Tycho Brahe operated his own printing press, astronomers have striven to document their accomplishments for the wider world. In recent years, astronomers' media outreach has been successful in reaching the mass television audience through successful efforts at animation and scientific visualization, and through dramatic images acquired by some facilities, such as the solar physics satellites and ground observatories.

  5. Photographs cause false memories for the news.

    PubMed

    Strange, Deryn; Garry, Maryanne; Bernstein, Daniel M; Lindsay, D Stephen

    2011-01-01

    What is the effect on memory when seemingly innocuous photos accompany false reports of the news? We asked people to read news headlines of world events, some of which were false. Half the headlines appeared with photographs that were tangentially related to the event; others were presented without photographs. People saw each headline only once, and indicated whether they remembered the event, knew about it, or neither. Photos led people to immediately and confidently remember false news events. Drawing on the Source Monitoring Framework (Johnson, Hashtroudi, & Lindsay, 1993), we suggest that people often relied on familiarity and other heuristic processes when making their judgments and thus experienced effects of the photos as evidence of memory for the headlines. PMID:21062659

  6. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1987. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

  7. Science News for the U.S. Hispanic Audience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-02-01

    A science and health news service targeted toward the U.S. Hispanic community was launched on 23 January. ConCiencia, billed as the first Spanish-language science newswire service in the United States, provides free weekly news feeds to media targeting the U.S. Hispanic population. The news feeds, available to Spanish-language newspapers and radio stations, include newspaper features, radio segments, and online news content.

  8. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1986. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

  9. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1989. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

  10. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1988. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases.

  11. College Students' News Gratifications, Media Use, and Current Events Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Richard C.; Basil, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Results of testing uses and gratifications theory with college students show students' media use and surveillance needs increase college year. Demographic differences and gratifications sought drive news media use. Surveillance needs result in increased use of all news media, whereas entertainment needs result in television news and CNN viewing.…

  12. Localising News: Translation and the "Global-National" Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orengo, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Due to the peculiar nature of news texts, the adoption of a theory of "localisation" rather than conventional translation theories accounts more easily for both the commercial nature and the global scale of news distribution. News texts are global products which are distributed through a localisation process involving not only reception by locales…

  13. News for the '90s: A Question of Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Rosalind, Ed.; Thoman, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This special issue of "Media & Values" gives a perspective on how news is changing, what is missing in the news, and how to spot bias and misinformation in news coverage, both print and electronic. Articles examine the impact of computer imaging on the credibility of photographs and the issue of privacy--just how far should journalists go to get a…

  14. Dow Jones News/Retrieval--An IndepthBxook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Tim

    1984-01-01

    This introduction to the nonbibliographic databases offered by the Dow Jones News/Retrieval Service describes file content and search strategies in four groups: Dow Jones Business and Economic News; Dow Jones Quotes (market prices for stocks and other securities); Financial and Investment Services; General News and Information Services. Examples

  15. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This issue of the annual Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of headquarters staff during 1990. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Names Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number, Speeches, and New Releases Indices.

  16. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  17. News Icons and the Mainstreaming of Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, W. Lance; Lawrence, Regina G.

    1995-01-01

    Defines news icons, and discusses life cycle of a news icon. Offers a case study of coverage patterns of a garbage barge that for three months in 1987 was rejected at every port. Finds that the incident provided an occasion for journalists and their sources to refigure cultural scripts about garbage and recycling to produce news as cultural forum.…

  18. Identifying Sources of Bias in Agricultural News Reporting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, B. Kathryn; Dyer, James E.

    2000-01-01

    Articles from 1987-1996 issues of Farm Journal, Progressive Farmer, Successful Farming, Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News and World Report were analyzed, revealing lack of depth in reporting environmental and food safety issues and few presentation differences between agricultural and news publications. However, news magazines' artwork often conveyed…

  19. A Predictive Framework for Determining How Journalists Determine News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudino, James L.

    To determine how to articulate a concrete definition of the substance of the journalist's occupation, this paper offers a propositional framework of news value based on Kurt Lewin's gatekeeper model. First, the paper follows the established suggestion that news decisions are best studied from a gatekeeping perspective or that "news is whatever

  20. Network Television Evening News Coverage of Infectious Disease Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Michael; Wartenberg, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Examines coverage of several infectious diseases and teenage suicide to see whether television news favors covering illness where it clusters or when it occurs near major news centers where it is easier to cover. Finds that television news did go to where the illness broke out but tended to favor reporting urban over rural suicides. (RS)

  1. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  2. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  3. Long-range correlation analysis of economic news flow intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, S. P.; Faizliev, A. R.; Balash, V. A.; Korobov, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the paper is to examine the auto-correlation properties for time series of the news flow intensity using different methods, such as the fluctuation analysis, the detrended fluctuation analysis and the detrending moving average analysis. Empirical findings for news analytics data show the presence of long-range correlations for the time series of news intensity data.

  4. 26 CFR 49.4253-2 - Exemption for news services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exemption for news services. 49.4253-2 Section...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4253-2 Exemption for news services. (a) In general. The exemption for news services provided by section 4253(b) is applicable...

  5. 31 CFR 560.519 - Policy governing news organization offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Policy governing news organization... Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.519 Policy governing news organization... for the establishment and operation of news bureaus in Iran by United States organizations...

  6. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  7. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE... for news or advertising. Photographs for news purposes may be taken at the USNA without...

  8. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL MEETINGS POLICY-MEETINGS BETWEEN AGENCY PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a unique position in informing the public of...

  9. 26 CFR 49.4253-2 - Exemption for news services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exemption for news services. 49.4253-2 Section...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4253-2 Exemption for news services. (a) In general. The exemption for news services provided by section 4253(b) is applicable...

  10. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section 516.53 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News...

  11. 26 CFR 49.4253-2 - Exemption for news services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption for news services. 49.4253-2 Section...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4253-2 Exemption for news services. (a) In general. The exemption for news services provided by section 4253(b) is applicable...

  12. 31 CFR 560.519 - Policy governing news organization offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Policy governing news organization... Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.519 Policy governing news organization... for the establishment and operation of news bureaus in Iran by United States organizations...

  13. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE... for news or advertising. Photographs for news purposes may be taken at the USNA without...

  14. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall apply to any person who: (a) Is the publisher of any bona fide newspaper, news magazine or business...

  15. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall apply to any person who: (a) Is the publisher of any bona fide newspaper, news magazine or business...

  16. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall apply to any person who: (a) Is the publisher of any bona fide newspaper, news magazine or business...

  17. 31 CFR 560.519 - Policy governing news organization offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Policy governing news organization... Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.519 Policy governing news organization... for the establishment and operation of news bureaus in Iran by United States organizations...

  18. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE... for news or advertising. Photographs for news purposes may be taken at the USNA without...

  19. 26 CFR 49.4253-2 - Exemption for news services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemption for news services. 49.4253-2 Section...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications § 49.4253-2 Exemption for news services. (a) In general. The exemption for news services provided by section 4253(b) is applicable...

  20. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall apply to any person who: (a) Is the publisher of any bona fide newspaper, news magazine or business...

  1. 31 CFR 500.583 - News organization offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false News organization offices. 500.583..., Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 500.583 News organization offices. (a) Specific licenses may be issued authorizing all transactions necessary for the establishment and operation of news...

  2. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500... for news or advertising. Photographs for news purposes may be taken at the USNA without prior permission. Photographs for advertising and other commercial purposes may be taken, but only with the...

  3. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500... for news or advertising. Photographs for news purposes may be taken at the USNA without prior permission. Photographs for advertising and other commercial purposes may be taken, but only with the...

  4. TV News Is First Choice in Survey of High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Paul A.; Elwood, Harry

    1978-01-01

    A survey of more than 200 students in six high schools in West Virginia and Pennsylvania revealed that television was favored as a news source by a wide margin over newspapers, radio, and news magazines in three areas: general preference, believability, and preference should the consumer be limited to one news source. (GW)

  5. News for the '90s: A Question of Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Rosalind, Ed.; Thoman, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This special issue of "Media & Values" gives a perspective on how news is changing, what is missing in the news, and how to spot bias and misinformation in news coverage, both print and electronic. Articles examine the impact of computer imaging on the credibility of photographs and the issue of privacy--just how far should journalists go to get a

  6. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News (OLBIN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Malbet, Fabien

    2010-07-01

    The Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News (OLBIN) is a website and forum for scientists, engineers, and students who share a common interest in long-baseline stellar interferometry. Through OLBIN you will find links to projects devoted to stellar interferometry, as well as news items, recent papers and preprints, notices of upcoming meetings, and resources for further research. This paper describes the history of the website, how it has evolved to serve the community, and the current plans for its future development. The website can be found at http://olbin.jpl.nasa.gov/.

  7. Firefox Extension Framework for News Article Tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, Raymond K.; Buttler, David J.

    2006-08-08

    FEFNAT is a Firefox extension that is used to collect information about user interests when viewing new articles. When a user is reading a news article on a web-page, he can vote whether the article was interesting or not interesting by clicking the appropriate button on the extension's tool-bar. The purpose of this extension is to collet user interests and behavior while viewing new articles so that it can be used in my research for predicting how interesting future news article may be for the user.

  8. Firefox Extension Framework for News Article Tagging

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-08-08

    FEFNAT is a Firefox extension that is used to collect information about user interests when viewing new articles. When a user is reading a news article on a web-page, he can vote whether the article was interesting or not interesting by clicking the appropriate button on the extension's tool-bar. The purpose of this extension is to collet user interests and behavior while viewing new articles so that it can be used in my research formore » predicting how interesting future news article may be for the user.« less

  9. USDA-ARS Quartlerly News

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This quarterly article is an update of research going on at The USDA-ARS Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory in Poplarville, MS to be published in the Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Associations (LANLA) quarterly newsletter. This is one of three publications that I am sending out to the ...

  10. EMERGENCE OF A MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT STRAIN OF SALMONELLA SEROTYPE NEWPORT IN THE UNITED STATES, NARMS 1997-1999

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the National Microbial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) for Enteric Bacteria participating state and local health departments send every tenth human Salmonella submitted to their laboratory to CDC. Also, the USDA tests chilled carcasses and other raw meat and poultry products, including grou...

  11. Super-High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection-Based Analysis of the Late Pleistocene- Holocene Highstand-Active Newport Channel and Its Distributaries, Southern California Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temeng, A.; Covault, J. A.; Paull, C. K.; Ryan, H.; Sliter, R.; Graham, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Super-high-resolution multibeam bathymetry (vertical resolution of 0.15-m and horizontal resolution of 1 m at 50 m survey altitude) and chirp seismic-reflection profiles (3.5 kHz; vertical resolution of 0.11 m) were collected by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) in order to examine fine-scale details of the Holocene-active Newport channel and its distributaries offshore southern California. The resolution afforded by these data greatly exceeds industry-standard multichannel seismic- reflection data (typically 10 to 25 m vertical resolution). Recently acquired sparker data (100 to 4000 Hz), older Huntec deep-tow boomer (800 to 1200 Hz) and WesternGeco multichannel seismic-reflection data collected since the 1970's are available to analyze coarser-scale channel geometry and longer-term depositional evolution. As many as 48 radiocarbon ages from 16 piston cores are available in order to establish a chronostratigraphic framework for the latest Pleistocene and Holocene. Data show up to three coalescing, southwestward-trending, low-relief distributary channels at 800 m water depth in the western survey, whose features stand in sharp contrast with gentle, nearly flat topography in the eastern survey. The surveys are separated by the left-lateral Carlsbad Ridge Fault. Chirp profiles show the cut-and-fill organization of distributary channel-filling turbidites, which have an average thickness of ~ 2 m. Distributary channels are depressions < 1 km wide, with relief < 4 m from channel floor to levee top. The aim of this research is to study the stratigraphic architecture of these coalescing distributary channels and characterize their avulsion and depositional history and relationship to the main Newport channel. Additionally, the fine-scale stratigraphic architecture will be correlated with well-documented southern California allogenic influences of sedimentation, including climate, basin tectonics and sea level. This study provides insight into the finer-scale geometries and internal characteristics of deep-water channel scours and fill and the processes and controls on their formation.

  12. Comparing Local TV News with National TV News in Cancer Coverage: An Exploratory Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-joo; Long, Marilee; Slater, Michael D.; Song, Wen

    2014-01-01

    We compared local TV news with national TV news in terms of cancer coverage using a nationally representative sample of local nightly TV and national network TV (i.e., ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN) cancer news stories that aired during 2002 and 2003. Compared to national TV news, local TV cancer stories were (a) much shorter in length, (b) less likely to report on cancer prevention (i.e., preventive behaviors and screening tests), and (c) less likely to reference national organizations (i.e., NCI, ACS, NIH, CDC, FDA) that have made clear recommendations about ways to prevent cancer. The implications of these findings for health communication research and cancer education were discussed. PMID:24750022

  13. The News: July 1996-Spring 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The News, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of 14 consecutive issues of "The News," a newsletter of the Community College League of California. The lead articles of these issues are as follows: (1) Silicon Valley Executives Urge Colleges to Innovate, Network; (2) Policy Center Calls on Higher Education Leaders to Plan for Huge Wave of Students; (3) Enrollment Up…

  14. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  15. Political Ideology and News Organizational Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Joseph Man; Lee, Chin-Chuan

    Reporters in Hong Kong who were working for 21 Chinese-language newspapers were mailed questionnaires to elicit information on the following: how news organizations in a highly politicized environment exercise control on recruitment, policy direction with regard to the coverage of conflicting issues, and the resolution of possible conflicts…

  16. The Best of Chem 13 News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, Kathy

    1999-07-01

    This column is designed to give JCE readers a few highlights from Chem 13 News, a monthly publication for chemistry educators from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, and provides annotations describing a particular activity or a variety of sources from which new and creative ideas can be extracted.

  17. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  18. Captioning Effects on Television News Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Stephen D.; Davie, William R.

    Noting that the use of captions in television newscasts has grown from simple labeling of newsmakers to more complicated titling of graphics and enumerating important points in a script, a study examined the extent to which captioning assisted viewers in learning from different types of television news stories. Subjects, 100 undergraduate…

  19. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  2. Soviet Cybernetics: Recent News Items, Number Thirteen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Wade B.

    An issue of "Soviet Cybernetics: Recent News Items" consists of English translations of the leading recent Soviet contributions to the study of cybernetics. Articles deal with cybernetics in the 21st Century; the Soviet State Committee on Science and Technology; economic reforms in Rudnev's ministry; an interview with Rudnev; Dnepr-2; Dnepr-2…

  3. Parent News: A Compilation of 1997 Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Anne S., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document consists of the 12 issues of "Parent News" (an electronic Internet magazine for parents, prepared for the National Parent Information Network) published during 1997. Each monthly issue contains feature articles describing the activities of the National Parent Information Network, summarizing research useful to parents, announcing…

  4. News as Interaction: Technology, Content and Audience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Lee; And Others

    This paper proposes an integrated approach to the study of world events, as they are filtered and interpreted in the news, by systematic experimental research on the interaction of the technological characteristics of the media, the content or message, and the characteristics of the audience. Specifically, it is hypothesized that these three…

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. The News, Summer 1999-Summer 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Trische, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document contains five quarterly issues of The News, published Summer 1999 through Summer 2000 by the Community College League of California. The following items are contained in this document: "Grant Writing Success Depends on Resources, Information and Staff,""College Theaters Perform Balancing Act with Community, Instruction,…

  9. Is Education News Falling off Front Pages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    Billions in federal economic-stimulus dollars are slated to be spent to help improve public education, but Americans relying on traditional news outlets are likely to find out little, if anything, about what that effort might mean for the schools in their communities, a new report suggests. That's because education coverage of any type barely…

  10. Covering Adoption: General Depictions in Broadcast News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Susan L.; Karel, Amanda I.; Chatterjee, Karishma

    2006-01-01

    Using theories of stigma (Goffman, 1963) and media frames (Iyengar, 1991), 292 news stories pertaining to adoption that appeared on major broadcast networks between 2001 and 2004 were analyzed. Media coverage of adoptees contained more problematic than positive depictions. Although birth parents were not always depicted, adoptive parent and…

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. Science Education News, November 1974: Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarley, Orin, Ed.

    This issue of the newsletter of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is devoted to reports by seven members of the AAAS Consortium of Regional Environmental Education Councils, as well as other miscellaneous environmental news. Each report includes information on the progress of environmental education in that region and…

  15. Business News in Post-Watergate Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, J. T. W.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of the results of two surveys reveals that during the last ten years business editors have increased financial news reporting, tightened their source requirements, and doubled the salaries of business reporters working for newspapers with circulations above 50,000. (Author/RB)

  16. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  17. News Writing, Poetry, Speech Share Universal Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braddock, Clayton

    1990-01-01

    Maintains that journalism skills courses must also impart to students a sense of the splendid power of language and the artisanship of molding clear ideas with words. Points out that it is up to the teacher of news writing to remind future journalists of their rich language heritage. (SR)

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of

  19. Society for the History of Psychology news.

    PubMed

    Rodkey, Elissa

    2015-02-01

    Presents two brief news items. The first item discusses the archives of Roger Sperry, 1981 Nobel Prize Laureate. The note provides information as to the materials archived, their location, and contact archivist. The second item discusses the passing of José Luis Pinillos Díaz (1919-2013), a founder of Spanish psychology. PMID:25664887

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. Is Education News Falling off Front Pages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    Billions in federal economic-stimulus dollars are slated to be spent to help improve public education, but Americans relying on traditional news outlets are likely to find out little, if anything, about what that effort might mean for the schools in their communities, a new report suggests. That's because education coverage of any type barely

  2. Teaching Strategy: Human Rights in the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Offers a lesson in which the students investigate the media, in particular news stories, announcements, and advertisements, for evidence of attitudes on human rights. Assists students in developing an awareness of human-rights issues in everyday life and enables them to cite examples of human-rights protections and violations. (CMK)

  3. News Research for Better Newspapers. Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Ed.

    This volume contains all of the material published in American Newspaper Publishers Association (ANPA) News Research Bulletins during 1968. The 49 studies included are arranged under the following chapter titles: "Some Audience Characteristics,""Headlines and Makeup,""Content,""Some Communication Behavior,""Readership,""Readership by…

  4. Implication for Media Convergence on News Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumus, Agah; Ozad, Bahire

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, comparisons of the effects of the traditional news media and the Internet have been made in relation to comprehension and remembering. This study aims at assessing the effects of single and compound presentational elements, and making predictions for the future. One of the two main aims of this study is to measure…

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. Competence: News for the CDA Community, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patricia A., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    These three newsletter issues provide organizational news from the program that awards the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential to caregivers. Each issue provides a CDA profile of an exceptional educator or caregiver. The March issue introduces the new director of the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition and describes

  9. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  10. NewsWire, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richey, Nancy, Ed.; Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Guerrero, Jeanne, Ed.; Thrift, Beth, Ed.; Holton, Brook, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document contains five issues of "NewsWire," a newsletter created for the SouthEast and Islands Regional Technology in Education Consortium (SEIR-TEC). Topics addressed in these issues include: leadership and educational technology; technology program development; resources for teaching and learning with technology; U.S. Department of…

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  15. News "Speed Dating" for Scientists and Journalists: Conveying geoscience news in haiku-short form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybas, C. L.

    2006-12-01

    As Rachel Carson wrote in her 1956 book, The Sense of Wonder, it's important for everyone to develop an appreciation of "land, sea and sky." One of the best ways of getting the word out to the public about these realms is through the media. How do scientists capture the interest of the press in a society with a seemingly shorter and shorter attention span? Studies show that as the amount of scientific jargon and number of complex concepts in a news story increase, "filter-feeding" by the public of that news declines. When scientific jargon/complex concepts are few, the public "consumes" much more news. These results also apply to news story headlines: shorter headlines get the most interest. Based on these findings, one organization has started an experiment in "scientific speed dating": giving presenters three minutes to discuss results. They may have discovered something: news coverage of the research has been excellent. In today's world, conveying news about the geosciences in haiku-short form may be the best way of relating the wonders of land, sea and sky.

  16. A fuzzy ontology and its application to news summarization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Shing; Jian, Zhi-Wei; Huang, Lin-Kai

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, a fuzzy ontology and its application to news summarization are presented. The fuzzy ontology with fuzzy concepts is an extension of the domain ontology with crisp concepts. It is more suitable to describe the domain knowledge than domain ontology for solving the uncertainty reasoning problems. First, the domain ontology with various events of news is predefined by domain experts. The document preprocessing mechanism will generate the meaningful terms based on the news corpus and the Chinese news dictionary defined by the domain expert. Then, the meaningful terms will be classified according to the events of the news by the term classifier. The fuzzy inference mechanism will generate the membership degrees for each fuzzy concept of the fuzzy ontology. Every fuzzy concept has a set of membership degrees associated with various events of the domain ontology. In addition, a news agent based on the fuzzy ontology is also developed for news summarization. The news agent contains five modules, including a retrieval agent, a document preprocessing mechanism, a sentence path extractor, a sentence generator, and a sentence filter to perform news summarization. Furthermore, we construct an experimental website to test the proposed approach. The experimental results show that the news agent based on the fuzzy ontology can effectively operate for news summarization. PMID:16240764

  17. Cohesiveness in financial news and its relation to market volatility.

    PubMed

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Smuc, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets. PMID:24849598

  18. Cohesiveness in Financial News and its Relation to Market Volatility

    PubMed Central

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Šmuc, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets. PMID:24849598

  19. A website for astronomical news in Spanish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.

    2008-06-01

    Noticias del Cosmos is a collection of web pages within the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Valencia's website where we publish short daily summaries of astronomical press releases. Most, if not all of, the releases are originally written in English, and often Spanish readers may find them difficult to understand because not many people are familiar with the scientific language employed in these releases. Noticias del Cosmos has two principal aims. First, we want to communicate the latest astronomical news on a daily basis to a wide Spanish-speaking public who would otherwise not be able to read them because of the language barrier. Second, daily news can be used as a tool to introduce the astronomical topics of the school curriculum in a more immediate and relevant way. Most of the students at school have not yet reached a good enough level in their knowledge of English to fully understand a press release, and Noticias del Cosmos offers them and their teachers this news in their mother tongue. During the regular programme of school visits at the Observatory we use the news as a means of showing that there is still a lot to be discovered. So far the visits to the website have been growing steadily. Between June 2003 and June 2007 we had more than 30,000 visits (excluding 2006). More than 50% of the visits come from Spain, followed by visitors from South and Central America. The feedback we have received from teachers so far has been very positive, showing the usefulness of news items in the classroom when teaching astronomy.

  20. Efficient Tracking of News Topics Based on Chronological Semantic Structures in a Large-Scale News Video Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Tomoyoshi; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Mo, Hiroshi; Katayama, Norio; Satoh, Shin'ichi; Murase, Hiroshi

    Recent advance in digital storage technology has enabled us to archive a large volume of video data. Thanks to this trend, we have archived more than 1,800 hours of video data from a daily Japanese news show in the last ten years. When considering the effective use of such a large news video archive, we assumed that analysis of its chronological and semantic structure becomes important. We also consider that providing the users with the development of news topics is more important to help their understanding of current affairs, rather than providing a list of relevant news stories as in most of the current news video retrieval systems. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a structuring method for a news video archive, together with an interface that visualizes the structure, so that users could track the development of news topics according to their interest, efficiently. The proposed news video structure, namely the “topic thread structure”, is obtained as a result of an analysis of the chronological and semantic relation between news stories. Meanwhile, the proposed interface, namely “mediaWalker II”, allows users to track the development of news topics along the topic thread structure, and at the same time watch the video footage corresponding to each news story. Analyses on the topic thread structures obtained by applying the proposed method to actual news video footages revealed interesting and comprehensible relations between news topics in the real world. At the same time, analyses on their size quantified the efficiency of tracking a user's topic-of-interest based on the proposed topic thread structure. We consider this as a first step towards facilitating video authoring by users based on existing contents in a large-scale news video archive.

  1. Science versus News: On the Cutting Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, A. L.; French, V.; Villard, R.; Maran, S. P.

    1998-12-01

    This session is to aid communication between scientists and journalists, to motivate astronomers to be active in communicating their science to the public via the press, and to help both astronomers and journalists to understand the constraints under which the other group is operating. The session consists of two talks of about 20 minutes, followed by a panel discussion. The first talk is "What Makes a Topic News?" This segment, by Miles O'Brien of CNN News, takes the AAS audiences behind the scenes in the world of producing science news stories. --- What drives selection of assignments? How does the science reporter convince their editor to cover a story? What factors about television producing help and also hurt getting science subjects across to the public? The second talk is "Public Knowledge on Science: The Growing Gap Between Scientists and the Taxpayer." This presentation by Jon Miller, a public opinion expert will emphasize the problems scientists and society, face in communicating to the public. --- What does the public know about science and scientific method? How much translation is required to communicate with the public to engage their interest without unacceptable compromise of scientific accuracy? The final segment is a panel of both science journalists and astronomers moderated by Steve Maran. Together they will tackle a question that gets to the heart of the Science-Vs-News controversies, "When Should Results Go Public?" Published too soon, science is called "hype"; Published too late, it is no longer "news." Should all results be peer reviewed first, and is that a satisfactory prerequisite? Do scientists take self-serving advantage of the public interest by making announcements before results appear in journals? How do we address the public desire to experience science unfolding and to see real-time data such as planetary science missions? The panelists are Dr. David Helfand, from Columbia University, Dr. Bruce Margon, from the University of Washington, Mr. Thomas Siegfried, from The Dallas Daily News, Ms. Kathy Sawyer, from The Washington Post, Mr. John Noble Wilford from The New York Times, and Ms. Ann Kellan from CNN.

  2. Sharing good NEWS across the world: developing comparable scores across 12 countries for the neighborhood environment walkability scale (NEWS)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The IPEN (International Physical Activity and Environment Network) Adult project seeks to conduct pooled analyses of associations of perceived neighborhood environment, as measured by the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) and its abbreviated version (NEWS-A), with physical activity using data from 12 countries. As IPEN countries used adapted versions of the NEWS/NEWS-A, this paper aimed to develop scoring protocols that maximize cross-country comparability in responses. This information is also highly relevant to non-IPEN studies employing the NEWS/NEWS-A, which is one of the most popular measures of perceived environment globally. Methods The following countries participated in the IPEN Adult study: Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Colombia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Hong Kong, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Participants (N = 14,305) were recruited from neighborhoods varying in walkability and socio-economic status. Countries collected data on the perceived environment using a self- or interviewer-administered version of the NEWS/NEWS-A. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to derive comparable country-specific measurement models of the NEWS/NEWS-A. The level of correspondence between standard and alternative versions of the NEWS/NEWS-A factor-analyzable subscales was determined by estimating the correlations and mean standardized difference (Cohen’s d) between them using data from countries that had included items from both standard and alternative versions of the subscales. Results Final country-specific measurement models of the NEWS/NEWS-A provided acceptable levels of fit to the data and shared the same factorial structure with six latent factors and two single items. The correspondence between the standard and alternative versions of subscales of Land use mix – access, Infrastructure and safety for walking/cycling, and Aesthetics was high. The Brazilian version of the Traffic safety subscale was highly, while the Australian and Belgian versions were marginally, comparable to the standard version. Single-item versions of the Street connectivity subscale used in Australia and Belgium showed marginally acceptable correspondence to the standard version. Conclusions We have proposed country-specific modifications to the original scoring protocol of the NEWS/NEWS-A that enhance inter-country comparability. These modifications have yielded sufficiently equivalent measurement models of the NEWS/NEWS-A. Some inter-country discrepancies remain. These need to be considered when interpreting findings from different countries. PMID:23566032

  3. Stem Cells News Update: A Personal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wong, SC

    2013-01-01

    This article is a follow-up to a previous Commentary published in 2011. It updates some of the events mentioned in that Commentary and continues with more interesting and exciting news on stem cell research and the emerging field of Regenerative Medicine. Some of the news includes: 1) the 2012 Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka; 2) the cloning of human embryonic stem cells; 3) the continued search for truly pluripotent adult stem cells via in vitro and in vivo protocols; 4) the breakthrough in organ replacements; 5) the global stem cell race; 6) the global stem cell cryo-preservation business; 7) the worldwide stem cell donor registries, and 8) the issue of government regulation on stem cell therapy. PMID:24778557

  4. Live Blogging Science News: The Rosetta Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S.

    2016-03-01

    When one of the world's most popular online news websites decides to cover a space science event live, you know that something big is brewing. Stuart Clark reports on how live blogging can be used for science reporting and how an idea that was triggered by his observations during the Rosetta flyby of the asteroid Lutetia and the landing of the Curiosity rover on Mars led to him live blogging two of Rosetta's most memorable occasions for The Guardian newspaper.

  5. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 2, No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    NREL

    1999-03-17

    The cover story in this issue of the Alternative Fuel News highlights the niche market principle; the places in which AFVs would best fit. This year's SEP funding is expected to be the springboard needed for the development of niche projects. The Clean Cities Program, by matching those needs and attributes in niches, can dramatically increase the attractiveness of AFVs and make an impact on those high-mileage, high-use fleets.

  6. What's unusual in online disease outbreak news?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate and timely detection of public health events of international concern is necessary to help support risk assessment and response and save lives. Novel event-based methods that use the World Wide Web as a signal source offer potential to extend health surveillance into areas where traditional indicator networks are lacking. In this paper we address the issue of systematically evaluating online health news to support automatic alerting using daily disease-country counts text mined from real world data using BioCaster. For 18 data sets produced by BioCaster, we compare 5 aberration detection algorithms (EARS C2, C3, W2, F-statistic and EWMA) for performance against expert moderated ProMED-mail postings. Results We report sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), mean alerts/100 days and F1, at 95% confidence interval (CI) for 287 ProMED-mail postings on 18 outbreaks across 14 countries over a 366 day period. Results indicate that W2 had the best F1 with a slight benefit for day of week effect over C2. In drill down analysis we indicate issues arising from the granular choice of country-level modeling, sudden drops in reporting due to day of week effects and reporting bias. Automatic alerting has been implemented in BioCaster available from http://born.nii.ac.jp. Conclusions Online health news alerts have the potential to enhance manual analytical methods by increasing throughput, timeliness and detection rates. Systematic evaluation of health news aberrations is necessary to push forward our understanding of the complex relationship between news report volumes and case numbers and to select the best performing features and algorithms. PMID:20618980

  7. Daily News on the Internet: Finding and Effectively Using Free Online News Sources (Full Text Daily News Archives with Search Engines).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milbury, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Free online news sources are plentiful, but their useful access is problematic. The Chico High School (California) library's collection of Full Text Daily News Archives With Search Engines offers many advantages in a number of curriculum areas. Accessible from school and home, it provides an opportunity for teachers and librarians to collaborate…

  8. A Functional Conceptualization of Understanding Science in the News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Megan M.

    The idea that the public should have the capacity for understanding science in the news has been embraced by scientists, educators, and policymakers alike. An oft-cited goal of contemporary science education, in fact, is to enhance students' understanding of science in the news. But what exactly does it mean to understand science in the news? Surprisingly few have asked this question, or considered the significance of its answer. This dissertation steps away from issues of science teaching and learning to examine the nature of understanding science in the news itself. My work consolidates past scholarship from the multiple fields concerned with the relationship between science and society to produce a theoretical model of understanding science in the news as a complex, multidimensional process that involves an understanding of science as well as journalism. This thesis begins by exploring the relationship between the understanding implicit in understanding science in the news and understanding science. Many assume these two ways of knowing are one in the same. To rebut this assumption, I examine the types of knowledge necessary for understanding science and understanding science in the news. I then use the literature devoted to scientific literacy to show how past research has imagined the knowledge necessary to understand science in the news. Next, I argue that one of the principle difficulties with these conceptualizations is that they define science in the news in essentially the same terms as science. They also, I suggest, oversimplify how and why public interacts with science in the news. This dissertation concludes with a proposal for one way we might think about understanding science in the news on its own terms rather than those of understanding science. This dissertation attempts to connect two fields of research that rarely intersect, despite their multiple common interests: science education and mass communication. It considers the notion of understanding science in the news in light of the principles of each, rather than maintaining their distinction.

  9. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the annual index to NASA Releases and Speeches contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, and a selected listing of speeches presented by members of the Headquarters staff during 1991. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject Index, Personal Name Index, News Release Number Index, Accession Number Index, and Speeches and News Releases Indices.

  10. An effective news recommendation method for microblog user.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanrong; Dong, Shoubin; Zeng, Zhizhao; He, Jinchao

    2014-01-01

    Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data. PMID:24983011

  11. An Effective News Recommendation Method for Microblog User

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wanrong; Dong, Shoubin; Zeng, Zhizhao; He, Jinchao

    2014-01-01

    Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data. PMID:24983011

  12. The Prevalence of Multidrug Resistance Is Higher among Bovine than Human Salmonella enterica Serotype Newport, Typhimurium, and 4,5,12:i:− Isolates in the United States but Differs by Serotype and Geographic Region▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hoelzer, K.; Soyer, Y.; Rodriguez-Rivera, L. D.; Cummings, K. J.; McDonough, P. L.; Schoonmaker-Bopp, D. J.; Root, T. P.; Dumas, N. B.; Warnick, L. D.; Gröhn, Y. T.; Wiedmann, M.; Baker, K. N. K.; Besser, T. E.; Hancock, D. D.; Davis, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella represents an important zoonotic pathogen worldwide, but the transmission dynamics between humans and animals as well as within animal populations are incompletely understood. We characterized Salmonella isolates from cattle and humans in two geographic regions of the United States, the Pacific Northwest and the Northeast, using three common subtyping methods (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE], multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis [MLVA], and multilocus sequence typing [MLST]). In addition, we analyzed the distribution of antimicrobial resistance among human and cattle Salmonella isolates from the two study areas and characterized Salmonella persistence on individual dairy farms. For both Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes Newport and Typhimurium, we found multidrug resistance to be significantly associated with bovine origin of isolates, with the odds of multidrug resistance for Newport isolates from cattle approximately 18 times higher than for Newport isolates from humans. Isolates from the Northwest were significantly more likely to be multidrug resistant than those from the Northeast, and susceptible and resistant isolates appeared to represent distinct Salmonella subtypes. We detected evidence for strain diversification during Salmonella persistence on farms, which included changes in antimicrobial resistance as well as genetic changes manifested in PFGE and MLVA pattern shifts. While discriminatory power was serotype dependent, the combination of PFGE data with either MLVA or resistance typing data consistently allowed for improved subtype discrimination. Our results are consistent with the idea that cattle are an important reservoir of multidrug-resistant Salmonella infections in humans. In addition, the study provides evidence for the value of including antimicrobial resistance data in epidemiological investigations and highlights the benefits and potential problems of combining subtyping methods. PMID:20639364

  13. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  14. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  15. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  16. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  17. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  18. RPC-News: A Real-Time, Personalized, Chinese News System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Da-Wei; Chen, Ing-Chou; Ke, Hao-Ren; Chang, Ruei-Chuan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the design and implementation of a system for the selective dissemination of information (SDI) from news articles via the World Wide Web, in Chinese and English, that focuses on multi-language filtering tools and follows a client-server model. System architecture and user-interest modeling are discussed. (LRW)

  19. NewsMarket 2.0: Analysis of News for Stock Price Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Alessandro; Mastronardi, Rosangela

    Most of the existing financial research tools use a stock's historical price and technical indicators to predict future price trends without taking into account the impact of web news. The recent explosion of demand for information on financial investment management is driving the search for alternative methods of quantitative data analysis.

  20. Cloaked Attribution--What Does It Mean to News Readers? ANPA News Research Bulletin. No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Hugh M.; Somerick, Nancy

    A study was conducted to determine how people react to unnamed or veiled news sources in newspaper articles. A group of 283 persons, chosen at random from three contrasting communities, was asked to read two articles dealing with different topics, one with sources quoted by name and one with euphemisms ("a White House spokesman,""a city official")…

  1. Online News vs. Traditional Media: Students' News Acquisition Preferences. AIR 1999 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terkla, Dawn Geronimo; McKnight, Jennifer

    This study at Tufts University (Massachusetts) evaluated College NewsLink, a web-based newsclipping service, as part of a larger study to assess student preferences regarding the acquisition of current events information. The methodology was multi-pronged: first, faculty were surveyed concerning their familiarity with web-based products; second,…

  2. Hiring Practices and News Program Values of U.S. Television News Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harless, James D.; Collins, Erik L.

    A random sample of U.S. television news directors was surveyed by mail in the spring of 1973 concerning hiring practices, the college training they felt was helpful for potential employees, and specific reasons they had for hiring personnel during the past year. The directors also were asked to report the ratings of their evening newscast and to…

  3. "Chemistry Is in the News": Taxonomy of Authentic News Media-Based Learning Activities. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Rainer E.; Carson, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    A brief history is given of approaches that aim at achieving a connectedness of the content of organic chemistry courses to real world issues. Recently, such approaches have relied more and more on online media resources, the tools of the Internet and the World Wide Web. We propose a six-level taxonomy of 'authentic news media-based learning…

  4. What's New in the News? Comprehension of the News among Adults with Limited Formal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grebelsky, Ora

    An Israeli study determined what happens when persons with low-literacy levels read news accounts that presuppose general knowledge that the writer expects them to have, but that they may not necessarily possess. The study sample consisted of about 600 students, mostly women, in 30 literacy centers throughout the country. In each class, adult…

  5. Work Roles, News Gathering Equipment, and Newscasts in Current U.S. Television News Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harless, James D.; Collins, Erik L.

    In the Spring of 1973, American television news editors were surveyed for data on staff size, operating budgets, work roles, camera equipment, portable VTR equipment, wire services, mobile equipment, and number of newscasts. The data obtained are reported in five levels of operating budgets with a summary of the statistics for each area of news…

  6. APOLLO 13: A News Bulletin from ABC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 13: ABC breaks the news of a mishap aboard the spacecraft From the film documentary 'APOLLO 13: 'Houston, We've got a problem'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 13 : Third manned lunar landing attempt with James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., and Fred W. Haise, Jr. Pressure lost in SM oxygen system; mission aborted; LM used for life support. Mission Duration 142hrs 54mins 41sec

  7. Result Merging Strategies for a Current News Metasearcher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasolofo, Yves; Hawking, David; Savoy, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Metasearching of online current news services is a potentially useful Web application of distributed information retrieval techniques. Reports experiences in building a metasearcher designed to provide up-to-date searching over a significant number of rapidly changing current news sites, focusing on how to merge results from the search engines at…

  8. A Multi-Dimensional Approach to Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vraga, Emily; Tully, Melissa; Kotcher, John E.; Smithson, Anne-Bennett; Broeckelman-Post, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Measuring news media literacy is important in order for it to thrive in a variety of educational and civic contexts. This research builds on existing measures of news media literacy and two new scales are presented that measure self-perceived media literacy (SPML) and perceptions of the value of media literacy (VML). Research with a larger sample…

  9. News Media and Politicization: American Youth 1969-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ruth S.

    This document discusses a study undertaken to analyze news media usage among 13- and 17-year-old students. Specifically, television, radio, and newspaper attention levels are assessed and interest in news topics are compared with topics of interest to teenagers during the Vietnam-Watergate era. The objective is to provide information on the impact…

  10. News Media in the Courtroom: Free Press or Fair Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlstein, Allan

    The news media's interaction with the criminal justice system and the public--specifically, whether or not the news media's presence inside and outside the courtroom affects a defendant's right to a fair trial--is examined. In 1965, Dr. Sam Sheppard was convicted for the murder of his pregnant wife in their Cleveland suburban home. Since this case…

  11. Teaching the Scientific Method Using Current News Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Laura K.; Mahan, Carolyn G.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a short (less than 50 minutes) activity using news articles from sources such as "Science Daily" to teach students the steps of the scientific method and the difference between primary and secondary literature sources. The flexibility in choosing news articles to examine allowed us to tailor the activity to the specific interests of…

  12. A Functional Conceptualization of Understanding Science in the News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Megan M.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that the public should have the capacity for understanding science in the news has been embraced by scientists, educators, and policymakers alike. An oft-cited goal of contemporary science education, in fact, is to enhance students' understanding of science in the news. But what exactly does it "mean" to understand science

  13. Flow of News in the Gulf. New Communication Order 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Phil; And Others

    One of a series of publications dealing with the New Information Order, this paper contains reports of two studies concerning news flow in the Arabian Gulf region. The first study describes the content and volume of news exchanged between the Arab States of the Gulf region and Europe. Various sections of this report provide (1) information on the…

  14. All-News Radio Journalism: Source, Message and Audience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woal, Michael B.

    All-news radio is an important journalistic voice for large audiences. To maximize the size of audiences, all-news programing avoids specific partisan appeals. Three aspects of the objective journalistic style are important in forming the discourse of "newsradio": legitimatization, the creation of hierarchies of values; dramatic narration, a…

  15. Rereading Bad News: Compliance-Gaining Features in Management Memos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Carol; Baker, Margaret Ann

    1994-01-01

    Shows how compliance-gaining theory (more accurately than the "bad news formula") can help to explain the content and style of two kinds of memos that deliver bad news from managers to subordinates. Finds that features of compliance gaining governing message production explicate the power base, verbal strategies and tactics, and negotiating…

  16. Press Responsibility for Health News: Beyond Precision and Toward Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burd, Gene

    In addition to investigative and interpretative reporting, journalists might adopt a new approach to the news--preventive journalism. Preventive journalism would concentrate on news and information that could be used to prevent crises and conditions upon which the mass media thrive. In one area, public health, preventive journalism could be used…

  17. 17 CFR 242.505 - Exclusion for news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion for news media. 242.505 Section 242.505 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Analyst Certification § 242.505 Exclusion for news media. No provision of this Regulation AC shall...

  18. Great news, hard choices, and opportunities for paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, Peggy

    I want to share some great news about Paleoceanography's scientific impact. Its high impact factor reflects the number, quality, and breadth of submissions. Unfortunately, the positive news must be tempered by the difficulties of page budgets, which force hard decisions for us all.

  19. New News for the New World Information Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert L.

    Noting that recent emphasis in the New World Information Order debate has focused on the development of new structures for the production and exchange of news among Third World countries, this paper provides a qualitative and quantitative examination of three types of alternative news agencies. They include the second-tier Western agencies…

  20. The Effects of Market Structure on Television News Pricing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Michael O.; Wollert, James A.

    Multiple regression techniques were used to examine the business side of local television news operations for November 1978. Research questions examined the effect of several variables on local television news prices (advertising rates), including type of ownership, network affiliation/signal type, market size, cable network penetration, market…

  1. Teaching the Scientific Method Using Current News Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Laura K.; Mahan, Carolyn G.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a short (less than 50 minutes) activity using news articles from sources such as "Science Daily" to teach students the steps of the scientific method and the difference between primary and secondary literature sources. The flexibility in choosing news articles to examine allowed us to tailor the activity to the specific interests of

  2. News Media and Politicization: American Youth 1969-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ruth S.

    This document discusses a study undertaken to analyze news media usage among 13- and 17-year-old students. Specifically, television, radio, and newspaper attention levels are assessed and interest in news topics are compared with topics of interest to teenagers during the Vietnam-Watergate era. The objective is to provide information on the impact

  3. Rancocas and Zurbrugg Hospitals introduce "News Hound" idea.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    You may have more public relations ambassadors throughout your healthcare facility than you realized. They're called employees. Rancocas and Zurbrugg Hospitals in New Jersey mobilized them in an effort to spread the good news. Now they're News Hounds, and the results have been above expectations. PMID:10151488

  4. A Functional Conceptualization of Understanding Science in the News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Megan M.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that the public should have the capacity for understanding science in the news has been embraced by scientists, educators, and policymakers alike. An oft-cited goal of contemporary science education, in fact, is to enhance students' understanding of science in the news. But what exactly does it "mean" to understand science…

  5. Do Children Really Take Note of Science in the News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarman, Ruth; McClune, Billy

    2007-01-01

    For ten days in August 2006, Pluto was rarely out of the news as members of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) deliberated on its planetary status. For the members of the "News in Science Education" group, based at Queen's University, Belfast, this offered a great opportunity for educators to explore a number of interesting and important…

  6. eSchool News Online: www.eschoolnews.org.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2001-01-01

    Briefly describes content of eSchool News Online, an Internet-based publication for school officials containing reviews of current events, news relevant to schools, searchable archives, funding sources, technology forums, a calendar, and online access to hardcopy publications and special reports. Web address is www.eschoolnews.org. (PKP)

  7. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A listing is presented of 271 news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters and 72 selected speeches given by Headquarters staff in 1983. Subject and personal name indexes are arranged alphabetically. Indexes to titles, news release numbers, and accession numbers are arranged numerically.

  8. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches (1984) contains selected speeches and news releases issued by NASA Headquarters during the year 1984. The index was prepared by the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Facility operated for the National Aeronautical and Space Administration by PRC Government Information Systems.

  9. Do Children Really Take Note of Science in the News?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarman, Ruth; McClune, Billy

    2007-01-01

    For ten days in August 2006, Pluto was rarely out of the news as members of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) deliberated on its planetary status. For the members of the "News in Science Education" group, based at Queen's University, Belfast, this offered a great opportunity for educators to explore a number of interesting and important

  10. Positive Organizational Behavior: A Buffer for Bad News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Sandra L.; Holden, Tracey Quigley

    2012-01-01

    Most communication research on bad news messages focuses on crisis communication, where attention is often limited to image repair strategies. The authors argue that a key indicator of an organization's effectiveness in communicating "bad news" messages is its organizational culture. Developing an organizational culture that values positive…

  11. Handling News Media: Johnson and Dorman's Bag of Tricks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ralph H.; Dorman, William A.

    What passes for considered judgment in public discourse today is often little more than "unearned opinion"--the received opinion offered by others who have the power to shape the news. So students must develop consistent intellectual standards for routinely evaluating the news media which so frequently provide the empirical stuff about which they…

  12. News for a Teen Market: The Lessons of Channel One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoynes, William

    1998-01-01

    Describes the types of stories that Channel One covers and the characteristics and configuration of its news sources. Focusing mostly on anchor personalities and politicians, Channel One news serves as a promotional vehicle for itself and youth culture, providing a friendly environment for controversial product advertisements. Such dramatic and…

  13. Real and Ideal Television News Images: A Q-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Jeffrey Neil

    This investigation demonstrates the applicability of Stephenson's Q-Methodology, a psychological instrument, for gathering qualitative data concerning television news audiences. A questionnaire consisting of statements describing a possible news format was distributed to the viewers of three commercial television stations in Baton Rouge,…

  14. Index to NASA news releases and speeches, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A listing is provided of 201 news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters and 10 selected speeches presented by Headquarters staff in 1980. Subject and name indexes are arranged alphabetically. Indexes to titles, news release numbers and accession numbers are arranged numerically.

  15. Investigating the News Seeking Behavior of Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qayyum, M. Asim; Williamson, Kirsty; Liu, Ying-Hsang; Hider, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the news-seeking and browsing behaviours of young adults, partly in the context of everyday life information seeking (ELIS), in order to explore their perceptions of and attitudes towards print and online news media. The study is significant because traditional print newspapers face a steady decline in their readership with…

  16. Nuclear War and Its Consequences on Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, David M.; Cummings, Constance

    1989-01-01

    Studies how network television news responded to three 1983 news stories on the nuclear threat: (1) the theory of nuclear winter; (2) the fictional film "The Day After"; and (3) discussion by members of the Reagan administration of the possibility of fighting and prevailing in a limited nuclear war. (MS)

  17. Investigating the News Seeking Behavior of Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qayyum, M. Asim; Williamson, Kirsty; Liu, Ying-Hsang; Hider, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the news-seeking and browsing behaviours of young adults, partly in the context of everyday life information seeking (ELIS), in order to explore their perceptions of and attitudes towards print and online news media. The study is significant because traditional print newspapers face a steady decline in their readership with

  18. Possible Connections Between the Coronado Bank Fault Zone and the Newport-Inglewood, Rose Canyon, and Palos Verdes Fault Zones Offshore San Diego County, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliter, R. W.; Ryan, H. F.

    2003-12-01

    High-resolution multichannel seismic-reflection and deep-tow Huntec data collected by the USGS were interpreted to map the Coronado Bank fault zone (CBFZ) offshore San Diego County, California. The CBFZ is comprised of several major strands (eastern, central, western) that change in both orientation and degree of deformation along strike. Between Coronado Bank and San Diego, the CBFZ trends N25W and occupies a narrow 7 km zone. Immediately north of La Jolla submarine canyon (LJSC), the easternmost strand changes orientation to almost due north and appears to be offset in a right-lateral sense across the canyon axis. The strand merges with a prominent fault that follows the base of the continental slope in about 600 m water depth. The central portion of the CBFZ is mapped as a negative flower structure and deforms seafloor sediment as far north as 15 km north of LJSC. Farther north, this structure is buried by more than 400 m of basin sediment. Along the eastern edge of the Coronado Bank, the western portion of the CBFZ is characterized by high angle normal faults that dip to the east. North of the Coronado Bank, the western segment follows the western edge of a basement high; it cuts through horizontal basin reflectors and in places deforms the seafloor. We mapped an additional splay of the CBFZ that trends N40W; it is only observed north and west of LJSC. Although the predominant trend of the CBFZ is about N40W, along strike deviations from this orientation of some of the strands indicate that these strands connect with other offshore fault zones in the area. Based on the limited data available, the trend of the CBFZ south of Coronado Bank suggests that it might connect with the Rose Canyon fault zone (RCFZ) that has been mapped in San Diego Bay. North of Coronado Bank, the CBFZ is a much broader fault zone (about 25 km wide) composed of diverging fault strands. The westernmost strand may merge with the western strand of the Palos Verdes fault zone (PVFZ) south of Lasuen Knoll. The eastern strand trends toward the Newport-Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ) as imaged offshore near Dana Point. These connections suggest that the CBFZ is linked at depth with other prominent fault zones to the north (PVFZ and NIFZ) as well as to the south (RCFZ).

  19. Dive and Explore: An Interactive Exhibit That Simulates Making an ROV Dive to a Submarine Volcano, Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center, Newport, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.; Hanshumaker, W.; Osis, V.; Hamilton, C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a new interactive exhibit in which the user can sit down and simulate that they are making a dive to the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named ROPOS. The exhibit immerses the user in an interactive experience that is naturally fun but also educational. This new public display is located at the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. The exhibit is designed to look like the real ROPOS control console and includes three video monitors, a PC, a DVD player, an overhead speaker, graphic panels, buttons, lights, dials, and a seat in front of a joystick. The dives are based on real seafloor settings at Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (NE Pacific) that is also the location of a seafloor observatory called NeMO. The user can choose between 1 of 3 different dives sites in the caldera of Axial Volcano. Once a dive is chosen, then the user watches ROPOS being deployed and then arrives into a 3-D computer-generated seafloor environment that is based on the real world but is easier to visualize and navigate. Once on the bottom, the user is placed within a 360 degree panorama and can look in all directions by manipulating the joystick. By clicking on markers embedded in the scene, the user can then either move to other panorama locations via movies that travel through the 3-D virtual environment, or they can play video clips from actual ROPOS dives specifically related to that scene. Audio accompanying the video clips informs the user where they are going or what they are looking at. After the user is finished exploring the dive site they end the dive by leaving the bottom and watching the ROV being recovered onto the ship at the surface. The user can then choose a different dive or make the same dive again. Within the three simulated dives there are a total of 6 arrival and departure movies, 7 seafloor panoramas, 12 travel movies, and 23 ROPOS video clips. The exhibit software was created with Macromedia Director using Apple Quicktime and Quicktime VR. The exhibit is based on the NeMO Explorer web site (http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/nemo/explorer.html).

  20. A guide to reading health care news stories.

    PubMed

    Schwitzer, Gary

    2014-07-01

    From April 16, 2006, through May 30, 2013, a team of reviewers from HealthNewsReview.org, many of whom were physicians, evaluated the reporting by US news organizations on new medical treatments, tests, products, and procedures. After reviewing 1889 stories (approximately 43% newspaper articles, 30% wire or news services stories, 15% online pieces [including those by broadcast and magazine companies], and 12% network television stories), the reviewers graded most stories unsatisfactory on 5 of 10 review criteria: costs, benefits, harms, quality of the evidence, and comparison of the new approach with alternatives. Drugs, medical devices, and other interventions were usually portrayed positively; potential harms were minimized, and costs were ignored. Our findings can help journalists improve their news stories and help physicians and the public better understand the strengths and weaknesses of news media coverage of medical and health topics. PMID:24796314

  1. Text-based search of TV news stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Rakesh

    1996-11-01

    Our goal is to enable viewers to access TV programs based on their content. Towards this end, we present a system that automatically captures and processes TV news programs into a database that can be searched over the internet. Users browse this database by submitting simple English queries. The results of the query is a hyperlinked list of matching news stories. Clicking on any item in the list immediately launches a video of the pertinent part of the news broadcast. We segment TV news broadcasts into distinct news stories. We then index each story as a separate entity. In reply to a query, videos for these news stories are displayed rather than the whole TV program. News program s ar usually accompanied by a transcript in closed caption text. The closed caption text contains markers for story boundaries. Due to the live nature of TV news programs, the closed caption lags the actual audio/video by varying amounts of time up to a few seconds. The closed caption text, thus, has to be shifted to be aligned in time to the video. We use video and audio events to do this synchronization. The closed caption for each story is entered into a database. In response to a query, the database retrieves and ranks the matching closed caption stores. An HTML document is returned to the user which lists: 1) the name and time of the news program that this story belongs to, 2) thumbnails providing a visual summary of the story, 3) closed caption text. To view a news story, the user simply clicks on an item form the list and the video for that story is streamed onto a media player at the user side. This system maintains the manner of presentation of the media, namely video for TV programs, while allowing the common search and selection techniques used on the web.

  2. Student Teachers' Changes in Perspective on Education News Reports: A Framework for Reading, Dialogue, and Reflection on Education News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Shih-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the changing perspectives of Taiwanese student teachers toward the news coverage of educational events by proposing a framework of reading, dialogue, and reflection on education-related news report. In this study, we enrolled 28 student teachers to participate in the framework, being practiced seven times. To validate the…

  3. There is no news like bad news: women are more remembering and stress reactive after reading real negative news than men.

    PubMed

    Marin, Marie-France; Morin-Major, Julie-Katia; Schramek, Tania E; Beaupré, Annick; Perna, Andrea; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of specialized television channels offering 24-hour coverage, Internet and smart phones, the possibility to be constantly in contact with the media has increased dramatically in the last decades. Despite this higher access to knowledge, the impact media exposure has on healthy individuals remains poorly studied. Given that most information conveyed in the media is negative and that upon perception of threat, the brain activates the stress system, which leads to cortisol secretion, we decided to determine how healthy individuals react to media information. Accordingly, we investigated whether reading real negative news (1) is physiologically stressful, (2) modulates one's propensity to be stress reactive to a subsequent stressor and (3) modulates remembrance for these news. Sixty participants (30 women, 30 men) were randomly assigned to either twenty-four real neutral news excerpts or to twenty-four real negative excerpts for 10 minutes. They were then all exposed to a well-validated psychosocial stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which consists of an anticipation phase of 10 minutes and a test phase of 10 minutes. A total of eight salivary cortisol samples were collected, at 10-minutes intervals, throughout the experimental procedure. One day later, a free recall of the news was performed. Results showed that although reading negative news did not lead to change in cortisol levels (p>0.05), it led to a significant increase in cortisol to a subsequent stressor in women only (p<0.001). Also, women in the negative news condition experienced better memory for these news excerpts compared to men (p<0.01). These results suggest a potential mechanism by which media exposure could increase stress reactivity and memory for negative news in women. PMID:23071755

  4. There Is No News Like Bad News: Women Are More Remembering and Stress Reactive after Reading Real Negative News than Men

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Marie-France; Morin-Major, Julie-Katia; Schramek, Tania E.; Beaupr, Annick; Perna, Andrea; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J.

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of specialized television channels offering 24-hour coverage, Internet and smart phones, the possibility to be constantly in contact with the media has increased dramatically in the last decades. Despite this higher access to knowledge, the impact media exposure has on healthy individuals remains poorly studied. Given that most information conveyed in the media is negative and that upon perception of threat, the brain activates the stress system, which leads to cortisol secretion, we decided to determine how healthy individuals react to media information. Accordingly, we investigated whether reading real negative news (1) is physiologically stressful, (2) modulates ones propensity to be stress reactive to a subsequent stressor and (3) modulates remembrance for these news. Sixty participants (30 women, 30 men) were randomly assigned to either twenty-four real neutral news excerpts or to twenty-four real negative excerpts for 10 minutes. They were then all exposed to a well-validated psychosocial stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which consists of an anticipation phase of 10 minutes and a test phase of 10 minutes. A total of eight salivary cortisol samples were collected, at 10-minutes intervals, throughout the experimental procedure. One day later, a free recall of the news was performed. Results showed that although reading negative news did not lead to change in cortisol levels (p>0.05), it led to a significant increase in cortisol to a subsequent stressor in women only (p<0.001). Also, women in the negative news condition experienced better memory for these news excerpts compared to men (p<0.01). These results suggest a potential mechanism by which media exposure could increase stress reactivity and memory for negative news in women. PMID:23071755

  5. Interpretation of Results of Studies Evaluating an Intervention Highlighted in Google Health News: A Cross-Sectional Study of News

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Romana; Lazarus, Clement; Ravaud, Philippe; Yavchitz, Amélie; Boutron, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass media through the Internet is a powerful means of disseminating medical research. We aimed to determine whether and how the interpretation of research results is misrepresented by the use of “spin” in the health section of Google News. Spin was defined as specific way of reporting, from whatever motive (intentional or unintentional), to emphasize that the beneficial effect of the intervention is greater than that shown by the results. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of news highlighted in the health section of US, UK and Canada editions of Google News between July 2013 and January 2014. We searched for news items for 3 days a week (i.e., Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) during 6 months and selected a sample of 130 news items reporting a scientific article evaluating the effect of an intervention on human health. Results In total, 78% of the news did not provide a full reference or electronic link to the scientific article. We found at least one spin in 114 (88%) news items and 18 different types of spin in news. These spin were mainly related to misleading reporting (59%) such as not reporting adverse events that were reported in the scientific article (25%), misleading interpretation (69%) such as claiming a causal effect despite non-randomized study design (49%) and overgeneralization/misleading extrapolation (41%) of the results such as extrapolating a beneficial effect from an animal study to humans (21%). We also identified some new types of spin such as highlighting a single patient experience for the success of a new treatment instead of focusing on the group results. Conclusions Interpretation of research results was frequently misrepresented in the health section of Google News. However, we do not know whether these spin were from the scientific articles themselves or added in the news. PMID:26473725

  6. Hot news recommendation system from heterogeneous websites based on bayesian model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results. PMID:25093207

  7. Hot News Recommendation System from Heterogeneous Websites Based on Bayesian Model

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results. PMID:25093207

  8. 46 CFR 386.17 - Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial... § 386.17 Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Such photographs for news... Court Order or rule prohibits, photographs for news purposes may be taken in entrances, lobbies,...

  9. 46 CFR 386.17 - Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial... § 386.17 Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Such photographs for news... Court Order or rule prohibits, photographs for news purposes may be taken in entrances, lobbies,...

  10. 46 CFR 386.17 - Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial... § 386.17 Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Such photographs for news... Court Order or rule prohibits, photographs for news purposes may be taken in entrances, lobbies,...

  11. 46 CFR 386.17 - Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial... § 386.17 Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Such photographs for news... Court Order or rule prohibits, photographs for news purposes may be taken in entrances, lobbies,...

  12. 46 CFR 386.17 - Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial... § 386.17 Photographs for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Such photographs for news... Court Order or rule prohibits, photographs for news purposes may be taken in entrances, lobbies,...

  13. Traveling and Residential Mobility as Correlates of Mass Media News Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillinghast, William Arthur

    The effect of physical mobility on news consumption and on preference for a particular news medium for different geographic news was investigated in this study. A survey of 652 residents of Lansing, Michigan, linked levels of mass media news usage to the extent of residential mobility and to national and foreign traveling indexes. Demographic…

  14. News Bias in the 1972 Campaign: A Cross-Media Comparison. Journalism Monographs No. 58.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, C. Richard

    The television networks nightly news coverage of the 1972 Presidential campaign was examined between July 10 and November 6, 1972 to assess the nature and impact of political bias in news coverage. The campaign news coverage of two newspapers and one wire service was also compared with respect to the content and length of each medium's news about…

  15. Language use depending on news frame and immigrant origin.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Itziar; Igartua, Juan-José; Moral, Félix; Palacios, Elena; Acosta, Tania; Muñoz, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of the media on individuals' specific language use in relation to a news story on immigration: the influence of the news frame and group cue. Abstraction, complexity of language use, and negative affective language were evaluated. The 523 participants were randomly distributed to each of the four experimental conditions: news frame (crime versus economic contribution) by group cue (geographical origin of the immigrants involved: Moroccans versus Latin Americans). Through content analysis of the ideas and reflections that arose after the participants read the different news stories, using the Linguistic Category Model (LCM; Semin & Fiedler, 1991) to measure abstract language and the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC; Pennebaker, Booth, & Francis, 2007) to analyze complex language and negative affective language, it emerged that abstract language and negative affective language were more frequent in the participants assigned to the news frame on crime. Complex language was more commonly used when the news frame referred to the economic contribution of immigrants. Regression analyses showed the mediating role of attitude to immigration in the effects of news frame on negative affective language. The bootstrap method was used to assess the magnitude of the indirect effect. A significant mediator effect was also found through structural equation modeling. Analyses of covariance showed one interaction between news frame and group cue: Among those who read the news story in a frame linking immigration to crime and Moroccan origin, abstract language was more characteristic. The results are discussed from the theoretical perspective of framing. PMID:23113573

  16. Science news release and its benefits to your research

    PubMed Central

    Chang, You-De

    2007-01-01

    News release to the latest science findings is beneficial to both researchers and their served institutions as well as the public. It will help to set a bridge of communication between researchers, the public and media, and publishers, making the latest research findings well known to the public. World Journal of Gastroenterology has currently freely opened the News Release Service System (WJG-NRSS) for original articles with potential significance and novelty for news release to mass media to broaden the findings to the public.

  17. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  18. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... for certain diseases or conditions. What are lab tests? Laboratory tests are medical procedures that involve testing samples ...

  19. Databases toward Disseminated Use - Nikkei News Telecom -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasiwagi, Akira

    The need for “searchers” - adept hands in the art of information retrieval - is increasing nowadays. Searchers have become necessary as the result of the upbeat online database market. The number of database users is rising steeply. There is the urgent need to develop potential users of general information, such as newspaper articles. Simple commands, easy operation, and low prices hold the key to general popularization of databases, and the issue lies in how the industry will get about achieving this task. Nihon Keizai Shimbun has been undertaking a wide range of possibilities with Nikkei News Telecom. Although only two years have passed since its start, results of Nikkei’s efforts are summarized below.

  20. AJ26 rocket engine testing news briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (center) stands in front of a 'pathfinder' rocket engine with Orbital Sciences Corp. President and Chief Operating Officer J.R. Thompson (left) and Aerojet President Scott Seymour during a Feb. 24 news briefing at the south Mississippi facility. The leaders appeared together to announce a partnership for testing Aerojet AJ26 rocket engines at Stennis. The engines will be used to power Orbital's Taurus II space vehicles to provide commercial cargo transportation missions to the International Space Station for NASA. During the event, the Stennis partnership with Orbital was cited as an example of the new direction of NASA to work with commercial interests for space travel and transport.