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Sample records for laboratory rodent studies

  1. In Vivo Effects of Bisphenol A in Laboratory Rodent Studies

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Catherine A.; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Farabollini, Francesca; Newbold, Retha R.; Rubin, Beverly S.; Talsness, Chris E.; Vandenbergh, John G.; Walser-Kuntz, Debby R.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2007-01-01

    Concern is mounting regarding the human health and environmental effects of bisphenol A (BPA), a high-production-volume chemical used in synthesis of plastics. We have reviewed the growing literature on effects of low doses of BPA, below 50 mg/kg/day, in laboratory exposures with mammalian model organisms. Many, but not all, effects of BPA are similar to effects seen in response to the model estrogens diethylstilbestrol and ethinylestradiol. For most effects, the potency of BPA is approximately 10 to 1,000-fold less than that of diethylstilbestrol or ethinylestradiol. Based on our review of the literature, a consensus was reached regarding our level of confidence that particular outcomes occur in response to low-dose BPA exposure. We are confident that adult exposure to BPA affects the male reproductive tract, and that long-lasting, organizational effects in response to developmental exposure to BPA occur in the brain, the male reproductive system, and metabolic processes. We consider it likely, but requiring further confirmation, that adult exposure to BPA affects the brain, the female reproductive system, and the immune system, and that developmental effects occur in the female reproductive system. PMID:17683900

  2. Cytotoxic and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase-inducing effects of laboratory rodent diets. A cell culture study

    SciTech Connect

    Toerroenen, R.; Pelkonen, K.; Kaerenlampi, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Extracts of several rodent diets were studied for their cytotoxic and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase-inducing properties by an in vitro method. The cell culture system based on a mouse hepatoma cell line (Hepa-1) was shown to be convenient and sensitive method for screening of diets for these parameters implying the presence of compounds potentially harmful in vivo. Considerable differences among diets and batches were detected. Smallest effects were observed with a semipurified diet and with the unrefined diet which - contrary to other four unrefined diets - contained no fish.

  3. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity recovery following acute methyl parathion intoxication in two feral rodent species: comparison to laboratory rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.K.; Silvey, N.J.; Bailey, E.M. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    Widespread use of organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) has produced both acute and chronic intoxication among nontarget organisms. Most such studies have included fish and birds as opposed to mammals. However, numerous OP toxicity studies have been conducted on laboratory rodents creating a temptation to apply this data to feral rodents. Chronic OP exposure has been reported to produce cholinergic adaptation which in turn lowers mortality rates following a subsequent acute anticholinesterase exposure. The relevance that these laboratory rodent studies have on feral rodents is subject to debate. Field studies involving OP exposure among nontarget feral mammals have produced contradictory results. Increased mortality as a result of repeated OP application has been reported. This observation may be of considerable importance to nontarget feral rodent populations due to the repetitive nature of OP application protocols. The ability of feral rodents to recover brain AChE activity (BAA) between OP application intervals undoubtedly promotes their survival. This study investigated and compared BAA recovery following acute oral methyl parathion intoxication among 2 feral rodent species and among 2 common laboratory rodent species.

  4. Neurogenetics of aggressive behavior: studies in rodents.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Aki; Miczek, Klaus A

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is observed in many animal species, such as insects, fish, lizards, frogs, and most mammals including humans. This wide range of conservation underscores the importance of aggressive behavior in the animals' survival and fitness, and the likely heritability of this behavior. Although typical patterns of aggressive behavior differ between species, there are several concordances in the neurobiology of aggression among rodents, primates, and humans. Studies with rodent models may eventually help us to understand the neurogenetic architecture of aggression in humans. However, it is important to recognize the difference between the ecological and ethological significance of aggressive behavior (species-typical aggression) and maladaptive violence (escalated aggression) when applying the findings of aggression research using animal models to human or veterinary medicine. Well-studied rodent models for aggressive behavior in the laboratory setting include the mouse (Mus musculus), rat (Rattus norvegicus), hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), and prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). The neural circuits of rodent aggression have been gradually elucidated by several techniques, e.g., immunohistochemistry of immediate-early gene (c-Fos) expression, intracranial drug microinjection, in vivo microdialysis, and optogenetics techniques. Also, evidence accumulated from the analysis of gene-knockout mice shows the involvement of several genes in aggression. Here, we review the brain circuits that have been implicated in aggression, such as the hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and olfactory system. We then discuss the roles of glutamate and ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA), excitatory and inhibitory amino acids in the brain, as well as their receptors, in controlling aggressive behavior, focusing mainly on recent findings. At the end of this chapter, we discuss how genes can be identified that underlie individual differences in aggression, using the so-called forward genetics approach. PMID:24318936

  5. PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) DISRUPTS THE THYROID STATUS IN LABORATORY RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) DISRUPTS THE THYROID STATUS IN LABORATORY RODENTS. C. Lau, J.R. Thibodeaux, R.G. Hanson, B.E. Gray and J.M. Rogers. Reprod. Tox. Div. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    PFOS is an environmental contaminant ubiquitously found in h...

  6. Lung imaging of laboratory rodents in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, Dianna D.; Cavanaugh, Dawn; Price, Roger E.; Rivera, Belinda; Gladish, Gregory; Travis, Elizabeth

    2004-10-01

    We have been acquiring respiratory-gated micro-CT images of live mice and rats for over a year with our General Electric (formerly Enhanced Vision Systems) hybrid scanner. This technique is especially well suited for the lung due to the inherent high tissue contrast. Our current studies focus on the assessment of lung tumors and their response to experimental agents, and the assessment of lung damage due to chemotherapy agents. We have recently installed a custom-built dual flat-panel cone-beam CT scanner with the ability to scan laboratory animals that vary in size from mice to large dogs. A breath-hold technique is used in place of respiratory gating on this scanner. The objective of this pilot study was to converge on scan acquisition parameters and optimize the visualization of lung damage in a mouse model of fibrosis. Example images from both the micro-CT scanner and the flat-panel CT scanner will be presented, as well as preliminary data describing spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, and radiation dose parameters.

  7. Rodent Studies of Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoukas, Artin A.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in blood pressure can occur for two reasons: 1) A decrease in cardiac output resulting from the altered contractility of the heart or through changes in venous filling pressure via the Frank Starling mechanism or; 2) A change in systemic vascular resistance. The observed changes in cardiac output and blood pressure after long term space flight cannot be entirely explained through changes in contractility or heart rate alone. Therefore, alterations in filling pressure mediated through changes in systemic venous capacitance and arterial resistance function may be important determinants of cardiac output and blood pressure after long term space flight. Our laboratory and previous studies have shown the importance of veno-constriction mediated by the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex system on overall circulatory homeostasis and in the regulation of cardiac output. Our proposed experiments test the overall hypothesis that alterations in venous capacitance function and arterial resistance by the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex system are an important determinant of the cardiac output and blood pressure response seen in astronauts after returning to earth from long term exposure to microgravity. This hypothesis is important to our overall understanding of circulatory adjustments made during long term space flight. It also provides a framework for investigating counter measures to reduce the incidence of orthostatic hypotension caused by an attenuation of cardiac output. We continue to use hind limb unweighted (HLU) rat model to simulate the patho physiological effects as they relate to cardiovascular deconditioning in microgravity. We have used this model to address the hypothesis that microgravity induced cardiovascular deconditioning results in impaired vascular responses and that these impaired vascular responses result from abnormal alpha-1 AR signaling. The impaired vascular reactivity results in attenuated blood pressure and cardiac output responses to an orthostatic challenge. We have used in vitro vascular reactivity assays to explore abnormalities in vascular responses in vessels from HLU animals and, cardiac output (CO), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measurements to characterize changes in hemodynamics following HLU.

  8. "Control" laboratory rodents are metabolically morbid: why it matters.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bronwen; Ji, Sunggoan; Maudsley, Stuart; Mattson, Mark P

    2010-04-01

    Failure to recognize that many standard control rats and mice used in biomedical research are sedentary, obese, glucose intolerant, and on a trajectory to premature death may confound data interpretation and outcomes of human studies. Fundamental aspects of cellular physiology, vulnerability to oxidative stress, inflammation, and associated diseases are among the many biological processes affected by dietary energy intake and exercise. Although overfed sedentary rodents may be reasonable models for the study of obesity in humans, treatments shown to be efficacious in these animal models may prove ineffective or exhibit novel side effects in active, normal-weight subjects. PMID:20194732

  9. Estimation of Wildlife Hazard Levels Using Interspecies Correlation Models and Standard Laboratory Rodent Toxicity Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity data from laboratory rodents are widely available and frequently used in human health assessments as an animal model. We explore the possibility of using single rodent acute toxicity values to predict chemical toxicity to a diversity of wildlife species and to estimate ...

  10. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Taylor, Larry

    2008-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. NASA established the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, LADTAG has recommended investigating its toxicity in the lungs of laboratory animals. After receiving this recommendation, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in exposed rodents. The rodent pulmonary toxicity studies proposed here are the same as those proposed by the LADTAG. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal instillation (ITI). This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. We succeeded in completing an ITI study on JSC-1 lunar dust simulant in mice (Lam et al., Inhalation Toxicology 14:901-916, 2002, and Inhalation Toxicology 14: 917-928, 2002), and have conducted a pilot ITI study to examine the acute toxicity of an Apollo lunar (highland) dust sample. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies have been planned to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The ITI results will also be useful for choosing an exposure concentration for the animal inhalation study on a selected lunar dust sample, which is included as a part of this proposal. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The simulant exposure will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of ITI and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  11. Human and laboratory rodent low response to alcohol: Is better consilience possible?

    PubMed Central

    Crabbe, John C.; Bell, Richard L.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2010-01-01

    If people are brought into the laboratory and given alcohol, there are pronounced differences among individuals in many responses to the drug. Some participants in alcohol challenge protocols show a cluster of “low level of responses to alcohol,” determined by observing post-drinking related changes in subjective, motor and physiological effects at a given dose level. Those individuals characterized as having low Level of Response (LR) to alcohol have been shown to be at increased risk for a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol dependence (AD), and this relationship between low LR and AD appears to be in part genetic. LR to alcohol is an area where achieving greater consilience between the human and rodent phenotypes would seem to be highly likely. However, despite extensive data from both human and rodent studies, few attempts have been made to evaluate the human and animal data systematically in order to understand which aspects of LR appear to be most directly comparable across species and thus the most promising for further study. We review four general aspects of LR that could be compared between humans and laboratory animals: 1) behavioral measures of subjective intoxication; 2) body sway; 3) endocrine responses; and 4) stimulant, autonomic and electrophysiological responses. None of these aspects of LR provide completely face-valid direct comparisons across species. Nevertheless, one of the most replicated findings in humans is the low subjective response, but, as it may reflect either aversively-valenced and/or positively-valenced responses to alcohol as usually assessed, it is unclear which rodent responses are analogous. Stimulated heart rate appears to be consistent in animal and human studies, although at-risk subjects appear to be more, rather than less sensitive to alcohol using this measure. The hormone and electrophysiological data offer strong possibilities of understanding the neurobiological mechanisms, but the rodent data in particular are rather sparse and unsystematic. Therefore, we suggest that more effort is still needed to collect data using refined measures designed to be more directly comparable in humans and animals. Additionally, the genetically mediated mechanisms underlying this endophenotype need to be characterized further across species. PMID:20148776

  12. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  13. The rodent estrous cycle: Characterization of vaginal cytology and its utility in toxicological studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of the estrous cycle in laboratory rodents can be a useful measure of the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian reproductive axis. It can also serve as a way of insuring that animals exhibiting abnormal cycling patterns are disincluded from a study prior t...

  14. Adverse effects of incorporating ketoprofen into established rodent studies.

    PubMed

    Lamon, Tennille K; Browder, Elizabeth J; Sohrabji, Farida; Ihrig, Melanie

    2008-07-01

    The use of analgesics to prevent or treat postprocedural pain in rodents is increasingly encouraged by the laboratory animal community and federal funding agencies. However, the effects of analgesics on experimental outcomes are not well-documented. In this study, we incorporated ketoprofen into a well-established experimental protocol. Of the 44 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats obtained from vendor A that were given either ketoprofen (10 mg/kg s.c.) or saline and underwent ovariectomy, 19 that received ketoprofen died or were euthanized due to clinical illness within 3 to 7 d after surgery. Necropsy revealed gastrointestinal ulceration consistent with toxicity from nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug. In an attempt to identify factors responsible for this unanticipated outcome, SD rats from vendors A and B were subjected to the same protocol, but no clinical signs or pathologic lesions were observed in any of these rats, regardless of source. A third experiment with rats obtained from vendor A and housed in barriers 1 and 2 was done to clarify the conflicting results and to determine whether response to ketoprofen differed at the barrier level. Three of the 6 rats from barrier 2 that received ketoprofen in the third study had gastrointestinal lesions similar to those observed in the fi rst study, whereas none of the rats from barrier 1 had any lesions. These results suggest that the adverse effects seen after administration of ketoprofen were due to differences between barriers. PMID:18702447

  15. Adverse Effects of Incorporating Ketoprofen into Established Rodent Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lamon, Tennille K; Browder, Elizabeth J; Sohrabji, Farida; Ihrig, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    The use of analgesics to prevent or treat postprocedural pain in rodents is increasingly encouraged by the laboratory animal community and federal funding agencies. However, the effects of analgesics on experimental outcomes are not well-documented. In this study, we incorporated ketoprofen into a well-established experimental protocol. Of the 44 Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats obtained from vendor A that were given either ketoprofen (10 mg/kg SC) or saline and underwent ovariectomy, 19 that received ketoprofen died or were euthanized due to clinical illness within 3 to 7 d after surgery. Necropsy revealed gastrointestinal ulceration consistent with toxicity from nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug. In an attempt to identify factors responsible for this unanticipated outcome, SD rats from vendors A and B were subjected to the same protocol, but no clinical signs or pathologic lesions were observed in any of these rats, regardless of source. A third experiment with rats obtained from vendor A and housed in barriers 1 and 2 was done to clarify the conflicting results and to determine whether response to ketoprofen differed at the barrier level. Three of the 6 rats from barrier 2 that received ketoprofen in the third study had gastrointestinal lesions similar to those observed in the first study, whereas none of the rats from barrier 1 had any lesions. These results suggest that the adverse effects seen after administration of ketoprofen were due to differences between barriers. PMID:18702447

  16. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  17. Epithelial Gaps in a Rodent Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Quantitative Validation Study

    E-print Network

    Alberta, University of

    Epithelial Gaps in a Rodent Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Quantitative Validation Study of the gastrointestinal tract. Epithelial gaps in the small intestine of patients and rodents have been demonstrated using of small intestine to proteins, smaller solutes, and water in rodent models.7,8 Furthermore, myosin light

  18. Is the rodent a valuable model system for studying invariant visual object recognition?

    E-print Network

    Zoccolan, Davide

    Is the rodent a valuable model system for studying invariant visual object recognition? DavideGovern Institute for Brain Research, MIT; 2 The Rowland Institute at Harvard Despite the many advantages rodents to investigate the neuronal processing of visual objects. A cru- cial step in establishing whether rodents

  19. A rodent model for the study of invariant visual object recognition

    E-print Network

    Zoccolan, Davide

    A rodent model for the study of invariant visual object recognition Davide Zoccolana,b,c,1 , Nadja closely mirror our own. Meanwhile, simpler and more accessible animal models such as rodents have been assumed to lack advanced visual process- ing machinery. As a result, little is known about rodents

  20. Rodent Brain Microinjection to Study Molecular Substrates of Motivated Behavior.

    PubMed

    Poland, Ryan S; Bull, Cecilia; Syed, Wahab A; Bowers, M Scott

    2015-01-01

    Brain microinjection can aid elucidation of the molecular substrates of complex behaviors, such as motivation. For this purpose rodents can serve as appropriate models, partly because the response to behaviorally relevant stimuli and the circuitry parsing stimulus-action outcomes is astonishingly similar between humans and rodents. In studying molecular substrates of complex behaviors, the microinjection of reagents that modify, augment, or silence specific systems is an invaluable technique. However, it is crucial that the microinjection site is precisely targeted in order to aid interpretation of the results. We present a method for the manufacture of surgical implements and microinjection needles that enables accurate microinjection and unlimited customizability with minimal cost. Importantly, this technique can be successfully completed in awake rodents if conducted in conjunction with other JoVE articles that covered requisite surgical procedures. Additionally, there are many behavioral paradigms that are well suited for measuring motivation. The progressive ratio is a commonly used method that quantifies the efficacy of a reinforcer to maintain responding despite an (often exponentially) increasing work requirement. This assay is sensitive to reinforcer magnitude and pharmacological manipulations, which allows reinforcing efficacy and/ or motivation to be determined. We also present a straightforward approach to program operant software to accommodate a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule. PMID:26437131

  1. Rodent Brain Microinjection to Study Molecular Substrates of Motivated Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Poland, Ryan S.; Bull, Cecilia; Syed, Wahab A.; Bowers, M. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Brain microinjection can aid elucidation of the molecular substrates of complex behaviors, such as motivation. For this purpose rodents can serve as appropriate models, partly because the response to behaviorally relevant stimuli and the circuitry parsing stimulus-action outcomes is astonishingly similar between humans and rodents. In studying molecular substrates of complex behaviors, the microinjection of reagents that modify, augment, or silence specific systems is an invaluable technique. However, it is crucial that the microinjection site is precisely targeted in order to aid interpretation of the results. We present a method for the manufacture of surgical implements and microinjection needles that enables accurate microinjection and unlimited customizability with minimal cost. Importantly, this technique can be successfully completed in awake rodents if conducted in conjunction with other JoVE articles that covered requisite surgical procedures. Additionally, there are many behavioral paradigms that are well suited for measuring motivation. The progressive ratio is a commonly used method that quantifies the efficacy of a reinforcer to maintain responding despite an (often exponentially) increasing work requirement. This assay is sensitive to reinforcer magnitude and pharmacological manipulations, which allows reinforcing efficacy and/ or motivation to be determined. We also present a straightforward approach to program operant software to accommodate a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule. PMID:26437131

  2. Two new rodent models for actinide toxicity studies. [/sup 237/Pu, /sup 241/Am

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.N.; Jones, C.W.; Gardner, P.A.; Lloyd, R.D.; Mays, C.W.; Charrier, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    Two small rodent species, the grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster) and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), have tenacious and high retention in the liver and skeleton of plutonium and americium following intraperitoneal injection of Pu and Am in citrate solution. Liver retention of Pu and Am in the grasshopper mouse is higher than liver retention in the deer mouse. Both of these rodents are relatively long-lived, breed well in captivity, and adapt suitably to laboratory conditions. It is suggested that these two species of mice, in which plutonium retention is high and prolonged in both the skeleton and liver, as it is in man, may be useful animal models for actinide toxicity studies.

  3. Comparison of Birth-and Conception-Based Definitions of Postnatal Age in Developmental and Reproductive Rodent Toxicity Studies: Influence of Gestation Length and Timing of Neonatal Examinations on Litter Data in Controls

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratories conducting developmental and reproductive toxicity studies with rodents use varied protocols for determining the timing of neonatal litter examinations and subsequent measurements. Most laboratories determine timing based on the day of birth (DOB); l.e., gestation le...

  4. Effect of Weak Acid Hypochlorous Solution on Selected Viruses and Bacteria of Laboratory Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Taharaguchi, Motoko; Takimoto, Kazuhiro; Zamoto-Niikura, Aya; Yamada, Yasuko K.

    2014-01-01

    Weak acid hypochlorous solution (WAHS) is known to have efficacy for inactivating pathogens and to be relatively safe with respect to the live body. Based on these advantages, many animal facilities have recently been introducing WAHS for daily cleaning of animal houses. In this study, we determined the effect of WAHS in inactivating specific pathogens of laboratory rodents and pathogens of opportunistic infection. WAHS with an actual chloride concentration of 60 ppm and a pH value of 6.0 was generated using purpose-built equipment. One volume of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), Sendai virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella pneumotropica, Corynebacterium kutscheri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was mixed with 9 or 99 volumes of WAHS (×10 and ×100 reaction) for various periods (0.5, 1, and 5 min) at 25°C. After incubation, the remaining infectious viruses and live bacteria were determined by plaque assay or culture. In the ×100 reaction mixture, infectious viruses and live bacteria could not be detected for any of the pathogens examined even with the 0.5-min incubation. However, the effects for MHV, B. bronchiseptica, and P. aeruginosa were variable in the ×10 reaction mixture with the 0.5- and 1-min incubations. Sufficient effects were obtained by elongation of the reaction time to 5 min. In the case of MHV, reducing organic substances in the virus stock resulted in the WAHS being completely effective. WAHS is recommended for daily cleaning in animal facilities but should be used properly in order to obtain a sufficient effect, which includes such things as using a large enough volume to reduce effects of organic substances. PMID:24770639

  5. Effect of weak acid hypochlorous solution on selected viruses and bacteria of laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Taharaguchi, Motoko; Takimoto, Kazuhiro; Zamoto-Niikura, Aya; Yamada, Yasuko K

    2014-01-01

    Weak acid hypochlorous solution (WAHS) is known to have efficacy for inactivating pathogens and to be relatively safe with respect to the live body. Based on these advantages, many animal facilities have recently been introducing WAHS for daily cleaning of animal houses. In this study, we determined the effect of WAHS in inactivating specific pathogens of laboratory rodents and pathogens of opportunistic infection. WAHS with an actual chloride concentration of 60 ppm and a pH value of 6.0 was generated using purpose-built equipment. One volume of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), Sendai virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella pneumotropica, Corynebacterium kutscheri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was mixed with 9 or 99 volumes of WAHS (×10 and ×100 reaction) for various periods (0.5, 1, and 5 min) at 25°C. After incubation, the remaining infectious viruses and live bacteria were determined by plaque assay or culture. In the ×100 reaction mixture, infectious viruses and live bacteria could not be detected for any of the pathogens examined even with the 0.5-min incubation. However, the effects for MHV, B. bronchiseptica, and P. aeruginosa were variable in the ×10 reaction mixture with the 0.5- and 1-min incubations. Sufficient effects were obtained by elongation of the reaction time to 5 min. In the case of MHV, reducing organic substances in the virus stock resulted in the WAHS being completely effective. WAHS is recommended for daily cleaning in animal facilities but should be used properly in order to obtain a sufficient effect, which includes such things as using a large enough volume to reduce effects of organic substances. PMID:24770639

  6. Mammary gland neoplasia in long-term rodent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I H; Russo, J

    1996-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequent spontaneous malignancy diagnosed in women in the western world, is continuously increasing in incidence in industrialized nations. Although breast cancer develops in women as the result of a combination of external and endogenous factors such as exposure to ionizing radiation, diet, socioeconomic status, and endocrinologic, familial, or genetic factors, no specific etiologic agent(s) or the mechanisms responsible of the disease has been identified as yet. Thus, experimental models that exhibit the same complex interactions are needed for testing various mechanisms and for assessing the carcinogenic potential of given chemicals. Rodent mammary carcinomas represent such a model to a great extent because, in these species, mammary cancer is a multistep complex process that can be induced by either chemicals, radiation, viruses, or genetic factors. Long-term studies in rodent models have been particularly useful for dissecting the initiation, promotion, and progression steps of carcinogenesis. The susceptibility of the rodent mammary gland to develop neoplasms has made this organ a unique target for testing the carcinogenic potential of specific genotoxic chemicals and environmental agents. Mammary tumors induced by indirect- or direct-acting carcinogens such as 7, 12-dimethlbenz(a)anthracene or N-methyl-N-nitrosourea are, in general, hormone dependent adenocarcinomas whose incidence, number of tumors per animal, tumor latency, and tumor type are influenced by the age, reproductive history, and endocarinologic milieu of the host at the time of carcinogen exposure. Rodent models are informative in the absence of human data. They have provided valuable information on the dose and route of administration to be used and optimal host conditions for eliciting maximal tumorigenic response. Studies of the influence of normal gland development on the pathogenesis of chemically induced mammary carcinomas have clarified the role of differentiation in cancer initiation. Comparative studies with the development of the human breast and the pathogenesis of breast cancer have contributed to validate rodent-to-human extrapolations. However, it has not been definitively established what type of information is necessary for human risk assessment, whether currently toxicity testing methodologies are sufficient for fulfilling those needs, or whether treatment-induced tumorigenic responses in rodents are predictive of potential human risk. An alternative to the traditional bioassays are mechanism-based toxicology and molecular and cellular approaches, combined with comparative in vitro systems. These approaches might allow the rapid screen of chemicals for setting priorities for further studies to determine the dose-response relationship for chemical effects at low doses, to assess effects other than mutagenesis and/or tumorigenesis, or to establish qualitative and quantitative relationships of biomarkers to toxic effects. Until there is enough information on the predictive value of mechanism-based toxicology for risk assessment, this approach should be used in conjunction with and validated by the traditional in vivo long-term bioassays. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 8. A Figure 8. B Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. Figure 13. Figure 14. Figure 15. Figure 16. Figure 17. Figure 18. Figure 19. Figure 20. Figure 21. Figure 22. Figure 23. Figure 24. Figure 25. Figure 26. PMID:8899375

  7. Laboratory Rodent Diets Contain Toxic Levels of Environmental Contaminants: Implications for Regulatory Tests

    PubMed Central

    Rocque, Louis-Marie; Spiroux de Vendômois, Joël; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2015-01-01

    The quality of diets in rodent feeding trials is crucial. We describe the contamination with environmental pollutants of 13 laboratory rodent diets from 5 continents. Measurements were performed using accredited methodologies. All diets were contaminated with pesticides (1-6 out of 262 measured), heavy metals (2-3 out of 4, mostly lead and cadmium), PCDD/Fs (1-13 out of 17) and PCBs (5-15 out of 18). Out of 22 GMOs tested for, Roundup-tolerant GMOs were the most frequently detected, constituting up to 48% of the diet. The main pesticide detected was Roundup, with residues of glyphosate and AMPA in 9 of the 13 diets, up to 370 ppb. The levels correlated with the amount of Roundup-tolerant GMOs. Toxic effects of these pollutants on liver, neurodevelopment, and reproduction are documented. The sum of the hazard quotients of the pollutants in the diets (an estimator of risk with a threshold of 1) varied from 15.8 to 40.5. Thus the chronic consumption of these diets can be considered at risk. Efforts toward safer diets will improve the reliability of toxicity tests in biomedical research and regulatory toxicology. PMID:26133768

  8. Laboratory Rodent Diets Contain Toxic Levels of Environmental Contaminants: Implications for Regulatory Tests.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Defarge, Nicolas; Rocque, Louis-Marie; Spiroux de Vendômois, Joël; Séralini, Gilles-Eric

    2015-01-01

    The quality of diets in rodent feeding trials is crucial. We describe the contamination with environmental pollutants of 13 laboratory rodent diets from 5 continents. Measurements were performed using accredited methodologies. All diets were contaminated with pesticides (1-6 out of 262 measured), heavy metals (2-3 out of 4, mostly lead and cadmium), PCDD/Fs (1-13 out of 17) and PCBs (5-15 out of 18). Out of 22 GMOs tested for, Roundup-tolerant GMOs were the most frequently detected, constituting up to 48% of the diet. The main pesticide detected was Roundup, with residues of glyphosate and AMPA in 9 of the 13 diets, up to 370 ppb. The levels correlated with the amount of Roundup-tolerant GMOs. Toxic effects of these pollutants on liver, neurodevelopment, and reproduction are documented. The sum of the hazard quotients of the pollutants in the diets (an estimator of risk with a threshold of 1) varied from 15.8 to 40.5. Thus the chronic consumption of these diets can be considered at risk. Efforts toward safer diets will improve the reliability of toxicity tests in biomedical research and regulatory toxicology. PMID:26133768

  9. Teaching Laboratory Rodent Research Techniques under the Tenets of Situated Learning Improves Student Confidence and Promotes Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, Tiffany L; Taylor, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    A targeted needs assessment at our institution revealed that the online system used to train researchers on performing techniques with animals did not provide opportunities to practice skills, introduce learners to animal care staff, nor satisfactorily support researchers’ needs to become comfortable with laboratory animal species. To correct these deficiencies, a series of hands-on training sessions, framed theoretically in situated learning, was developed. This theoretical framework asserts that learning for everyday living (in this case, performing laboratory animal techniques) happens when people interact within the community while using the ‘tools at hand’ (that is, the instruments and jargon of the field). From this perspective, the students work alongside the instructor as apprentices. The instructor creates increasingly challenging learning opportunities as students work toward independently performing techniques. To test our hypothesis that teaching from this perspective improves comfort levels with laboratory animals and promotes collaborative relationships between animal care and research personnel, a mixed-method design involving online surveys (first survey, n = 45; second survey, n = 35) and semistructured interviews (n = 10) was used. Quantitative results revealed that students became more comfortable with laboratory animals and were more likely to contact animal care personnel due to participating in the training program. The qualitative arm of the study identified specific features of the training program that improved comfort levels for students (seeing then doing, working in small groups, learning within a comfortable environment, and building collegial relationships). These results support teaching rodent research techniques from the practical and theoretical approach of situated learning. PMID:25199092

  10. Arvicanthis ansorgei, a Novel Model for the Study of Sleep and Waking in Diurnal Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Jeffrey; Ruppert, Elisabeth; Calvel, Laurent; Robin-Choteau, Ludivine; Gropp, Claire-Marie; Allemann, Caroline; Reibel, Sophie; Sage-Ciocca, Dominique; Bourgin, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep neurobiology studies use nocturnal species, mainly rats and mice. However, because their daily sleep/wake organization is inverted as compared to humans, a diurnal model for sleep studies is needed. To fill this gap, we phenotyped sleep and waking in Arvicanthis ansorgei, a diurnal rodent widely used for the study of circadian rhythms. Design: Video-electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram (EMG), and electrooculogram (EOG) recordings. Setting: Rodent sleep laboratory. Participants: Fourteen male Arvicanthis ansorgei, aged 3 mo. Interventions: 12 h light (L):12 h dark (D) baseline condition, 24-h constant darkness, 6-h sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Wake and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep showed similar electrophysiological characteristics as nocturnal rodents. On average, animals spent 12.9 h ± 0.4 awake per 24-h cycle, of which 6.88 h ± 0.3 was during the light period. NREM sleep accounted for 9.63 h ± 0.4, which of 5.13 h ± 0.2 during dark period, and REM sleep for 89.9 min ± 6.7, which of 52.8 min ± 4.4 during dark period. The time-course of sleep and waking across the 12 h light:12 h dark was overall inverted to that observed in rats or mice, though with larger amounts of crepuscular activity at light and dark transitions. A dominant crepuscular regulation of sleep and waking persisted under constant darkness, showing the lack of a strong circadian drive in the absence of clock reinforcement by external cues, such as a running wheel. Conservation of the homeostatic regulation was confirmed with the observation of higher delta power following sustained waking periods and a 6-h sleep deprivation, with subsequent decrease during recovery sleep. Conclusions: Arvicanthis ansorgei is a valid diurnal rodent model for studying the regulatory mechanisms of sleep and so represents a valuable tool for further understanding the nocturnality/diurnality switch. Citation: Hubbard J, Ruppert E, Calvel L, Robin-Choteau L, Gropp CM, Allemann C, Reibel S, Sage-Ciocca D, Bourgin P. Arvicanthis ansorgei, a novel model for the study of sleep and waking in diurnal rodents. SLEEP 2015;38(6):979–988. PMID:25409107

  11. Results from a Survey of Current Practices for Sampling of Nervous System in Rodents and Non-rodents in General Toxicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey of current practices for sampling and examination of the nervous system in rodents and non-rodents for general and neurotoxicity (NT) studies was conducted by the Nervous System Sampling Subcommittee of the STP. For general toxicity studies most of those surveyed (>63%) ...

  12. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence-based identification of bacteria in laboratory rodents: a practical approach in laboratory animal bacteriology diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Köhrer, Karl; Gougoula, Christina; Sager, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Correct identification of bacteria is crucial for the management of rodent colonies. Some bacteria are difficult to identify phenotypically outside reference laboratories. In this study, we evaluated the utility of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing as a means of identifying a collection of 30 isolates of rodent origin which are conventionally difficult to identify. Sequence analysis of the first approximate 720 to 880 bp of the 5'- end of 16S rDNA identified 25 isolates (83.33%) with ? 99% similarity to a sequence of a type strain, whereas three isolates (10%) displayed a sequence similarity ? 97% but <99% to the type strain sequences. These similarity scores were used to define identification to species and genus levels, respectively. Two of the 30 isolates (6.67%) displayed a sequence similarity of ? 95 but <97% to the reference strains and were thus allocated to a family. This technique allowed us to document the association of mice with bacteria relevant for the colonies management such as Pasteurellaceae, Bordetella hinzii or Streptococcus danieliae. In addition, human potential pathogens such as Acinetobacter spp., Ochrobactrum anthropi and Paracoccus yeei or others not yet reported in mouse bacterial species such as Leucobacter chironomi, Neisseria perflava and Pantoea dispersa were observed. In conclusion, the sequence analysis of 16S rDNA proved to be a useful diagnostic tool, with higher performance characteristics than the classical phenotypic methods, for identification of laboratory animal bacteria. For the first time this method allowed us to document the association of certain bacterial species with the laboratory mouse. PMID:24876090

  13. Anaesthesia and physiological monitoring during in vivo imaging of laboratory rodents: considerations on experimental outcomes and animal welfare

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of imaging technologies has dramatically increased the efficiency of preclinical studies, enabling a powerful, non-invasive and clinically translatable way for monitoring disease progression in real time and testing new therapies. The ability to image live animals is one of the most important advantages of these technologies. However, this also represents an important challenge as, in contrast to human studies, imaging of animals generally requires anaesthesia to restrain the animals and their gross motion. Anaesthetic agents have a profound effect on the physiology of the animal and may thereby confound the image data acquired. It is therefore necessary to select the appropriate anaesthetic regime and to implement suitable systems for monitoring anaesthetised animals during image acquisition. In addition, repeated anaesthesia required for longitudinal studies, the exposure of ionising radiations and the use of contrast agents and/or imaging biomarkers may also have consequences on the physiology of the animal and its response to anaesthesia, which need to be considered while monitoring the animals during imaging studies. We will review the anaesthesia protocols and monitoring systems commonly used during imaging of laboratory rodents. A variety of imaging modalities are used for imaging rodents, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, high frequency ultrasound and optical imaging techniques such as bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging. While all these modalities are implemented for non-invasive in vivo imaging, there are certain differences in terms of animal handling and preparation, how the monitoring systems are implemented and, importantly, how the imaging procedures themselves can affect mammalian physiology. The most important and critical adverse effects of anaesthetic agents are depression of respiration, cardiovascular system disruption and thermoregulation. When anaesthetising rodents, one must carefully consider if these adverse effects occur at the therapeutic dose required for anaesthesia, if they are likely to affect the image acquisitions and, importantly, if they compromise the well-being of the animals. We will review how these challenges can be successfully addressed through an appropriate understanding of anaesthetic protocols and the implementation of adequate physiological monitoring systems. PMID:22877315

  14. STUDY OF THE CHEMICAL AND BEHAVIORAL TOXICOLOGY OF SUBSTITUTE CHEMICALS IN MICROTINE RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute oral LD50 and 30-day dietary subacute LC50 studies of 10 selected pesticides were evaluated in microtine rodents. As a means to developing new animal model systems, four species of microtine rodents including Microtus ochrogaster (MO), Microtus canicaudus (MC), Microtus pen...

  15. OCT-aided anastomosis platform study in the rodent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Tong, Dedi; Zhu, Shan; Wu, Lehao; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Lee, WP Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-02-01

    Anastomosis is one of the most commonly performed procedure in the clinical environment that involves tubular structures, such as blood vessel, lymphatic vessel, seminal duct and ureter. Suture based anastomosis is still the foundation for most basic surgical training and clinical operation, although alternate techniques have been developed and under development. For those tubular-structure-anastomosis, immediate real-time post-operative evaluation of the surgical outcome is critical to the success of surgery. Previously evaluation is mostly based on surgeons' experience. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography is high-speed, high-resolution noninvasive 3D imaging modality that has been widely used in the biomedical research and clinical study. In this study we used Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography as an evaluation tool for anastomosis of lymphatic vessels, ureter and seminal duct in rodent model. Immediate post-operative and long term surgical site data were collected and analyzed. Critical clinical parameters such as lumen patency, anastomosed site narrowing and suture error detection are provided to surgeons.

  16. Carcinogenesis studies in rodents for evaluating risks associated with chemical carcinogens in aquatic food animals

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, J.; Bucher, J.; Yang, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Fish and shellfish caught in polluted waters contain potentially dangerous amounts of toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. Public concern was heightened when a large percentage of winter flounder taken from Boston Harbor was found to have visible cancer of the liver; winter flounder outside the estuary area had no liver lesions. Long-term chemical carcinogenesis studies could be easily and feasibly designed using laboratory rodents offered diets containing fish caught in polluted waters. Induced cancers in rodents would corroborate field observations in fish; positive results from these studies would provide further evidence about potential human health hazards from eating substantial amounts of chemically contaminated fish. Nonetheless, fish and aquatic organisms should be viewed as environmental biological monitors of pollution or of potential human health hazards, and authorities responsible for assuring clean and safe rivers, bodies of water, and biota should give more attention to these valid biological indicators or sentinels of environmental pollution. Consequently, fish and other sea creatures alone should serve as alarms regarding whether water areas constitute public health hazards. 101 refs.

  17. Carcinogenesis studies in rodents for evaluating risks associated with chemical carcinogens in aquatic food animals.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, J; Bucher, J; Yang, R

    1991-01-01

    Fish and shellfish caught in polluted waters contain potentially dangerous amounts of toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. Public concern was heightened when a large percentage of winter flounder taken from Boston Harbor was found to have visible cancer of the liver; winter flounder outside the estuary area had no liver lesions. Long-term chemical carcinogenesis studies could be easily and feasibly designed using laboratory rodents offered diets containing fish caught in polluted waters. Induced cancers in rodents would corroborate field observations in fish; positive results from these studies would provide further evidence about potential human health hazards from eating substantial amounts of chemically contaminated fish. Nonetheless, fish and aquatic organisms should be viewed as environmental biological monitors of pollution or of potential human health hazards, and authorities responsible for assuring clean and safe rivers, bodies of water, and biota should give more attention to these valid biological indicators or sentinels of environmental pollution. Consequently, fish and other sea creatures alone should serve as alarms regarding whether water areas constitute public health hazards. PMID:2050050

  18. Electromechanical design of a body weight support system for a therapeutic robot for rodent studies

    E-print Network

    Mayalu, Michaëlle Ntala

    2010-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to better understand and treat locomotor disorders, an over-ground therapeutic robot prototype to study recovery of locomotion after spinal cord injury in rodents is under development. One key ...

  19. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dust in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been contemplating returning astronauts to the moon for long-duration habitation and research and using it as a stepping-stone to Mars. Other spacefaring nations are planning to send humans to the moon for the first time. The surface of the moon is covered by a layer of fine dust. Fine terrestrial dusts, if inhaled, are known to pose a health risk to humans. Some Apollo crews briefly exposed to moon dust that adhered to spacesuits and became airborne in the Lunar Module reported eye and throat irritation. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle or outpost would inevitably become contaminated with lunar dust. To assess the health risks of exposure of humans to airborne lunar dust, we evaluated the toxicity of Apollo 14 moon dust in animal lungs. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally first done by intratracheal instillation (ITI) of aqueous suspensions of the test dust into the lungs of rodents. If a test dust is irritating or cytotoxic to the lungs, the alveolar macrophages, after phagocytizing the dust particles, will release cellular messengers to recruit white blood cells (WBCs) and to induce dilation of blood capillary walls to make them porous, allowing the WBCs to gain access to the alveolar space. The dilation of capillary walls also allows serum proteins and water entering the lung. Besides altering capillary integrity, a toxic dust can also directly kill the cells that come into contact with it or ingest it, after which the dead cells would release their contents, including lactate dehydrogenase (a common enzyme marker of cell death or tissue damage). In the treated animals, we lavaged the lungs 1 and 4 weeks after the dust instillation and measured the concentrations of these biomarkers of toxicity in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluids to determine the toxicity of the dust. To assess whether the inflammation and cellular injury observed in the biomarker study would lead to persistent or progressive histopathological changes, a similar study was conducted to microscopically examine rat lung tissue and the associated lymph nodes for lesions, including fibrosis, 1 or 3 months after the instillation. The results from this ITI study led us to select two concentrations (20 and 60 mg/cu m) for an inhalation study, in which rats were exposed to lunar dust 6 h daily for 4 weeks (5d/wk). Similar biochemical and histopathological assessments were carried out in these rats 1 day or 1, 4, or 13 weeks after the dust exposure. Rats exposed to lunar dust by ITI or inhalation showed effects indicating that the dust is moderately toxic. The data will be useful to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in a lunar habitat and also help engineers designing dust mitigation systems for lunar vehicles and habitats.

  20. Studies on the life history and development of Cuterebra polita (Diptera: Cuterebridae) in four species of rodents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capelle, K.J.

    1970-01-01

    Cuterebra polita Coquillett is a primary parasite of the pocket gopher, Thomomys talpoides, in the western United States. It also occurs secondarily in other wild rodents that come into close contact with pocket gophers.Field studies disclosed pursuit, mating, and ovipositing at an aggregation site near Monte Cristo, Utah. Eggs were individually attached to fibrous roots suspended from the roof of shallow gopher burrows. This refinement of the host-parasite relationship has not previously been described for other North American cuterebrids.In the laboratory, 3 gravid females produced 186-357 viable eggs; about 85% were induced to hatch or hatched spontaneously after 12 days. Dissection of 1 of the females revealed another 886 eggs, for a total of 1243.Larvae were artificially introduced and developed in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), domestic mice (Mus musculus), hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), and meadow voles (Microtus montanus). The domestic rabbit (Orystolagus cuniculus) appeared refractory. The rate and success of development in the 4 rodent species was variable, but terminal larval development averaged about 22 days. Warbles appeared after 8 days in the rodents, and the majority of the cysts occurred in the posterior dorsal region.On the basis of larval characteristics, C. polita and C. thomomuris appear to be independent, valid species, though they share a common host.

  1. The Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure on Behavior: Rodent and Primate Studies

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Colleen F.; Adkins, Miriam M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of alcohol by women during pregnancy is a continuing problem. In this review the behavioral effects of prenatal alcohol from animal models are described and related to studies of children and adults with FASD. Studies with monkeys and rodents show that prenatal alcohol exposure adversely affects neonatal orienting, attention and motor maturity, as well as activity level, executive function, response inhibition, and sensory processing later in life. The primate moderate dose behavioral findings fill an important gap between human correlational data and rodent mechanistic research. These animal findings are directly translatable to human findings. Moreover, primate studies that manipulated prenatal alcohol exposure and prenatal stress independently show that prenatal stress exacerbates prenatal alcohol-induced behavioral impairments, underscoring the need to consider stress-induced effects in fetal alcohol research. Studies in rodents and primates show long-term effects of prenatal and developmental alcohol exposure on dopamine system functioning, which could underpin the behavioral effects. PMID:21499982

  2. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Taylor, L.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Astronauts on the Moon will go in and out of the base for various activities, and will inevitably bring some dust into the living quarters. Depressurizing the airlock so that astronauts can exit for outdoor activities could also bring dust inside the airlock to the habitable area. Concerned about the potential health effects on astronauts exposed to airborne lunar dust, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust. The toxicity data also will be needed by toxicologists to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts residing in the lunar habitat and by environmental engineers to design an appropriate dust mitigation strategy. We conducted a study to examine biomarkers of toxicity (inflammation and cytotoxicity) in lung lavage fluids from mice intrapharyngeally instilled with lunar dust samples; we also collected lung tissue from the mice for histopathological examination 3 months after the dust instillation. Reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) having known toxicities and industrial exposure limits were studied in parallel with lunar dust so that the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. A 6-month histopathology study has been planned. These instillation experiments will be followed by inhalation studies, which are more labor intensive and technologically difficult. The animal inhalation studies will be conducted first with an appropriate lunar dust simulant to ensure that the exposure techniques to be used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of these studies collectively will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and enable us to establish exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  3. Why can't rodents vomit? A comparative behavioral, anatomical, and physiological study.

    PubMed

    Horn, Charles C; Kimball, Bruce A; Wang, Hong; Kaus, James; Dienel, Samuel; Nagy, Allysa; Gathright, Gordon R; Yates, Bill J; Andrews, Paul L R

    2013-01-01

    The vomiting (emetic) reflex is documented in numerous mammalian species, including primates and carnivores, yet laboratory rats and mice appear to lack this response. It is unclear whether these rodents do not vomit because of anatomical constraints (e.g., a relatively long abdominal esophagus) or lack of key neural circuits. Moreover, it is unknown whether laboratory rodents are representative of Rodentia with regards to this reflex. Here we conducted behavioral testing of members of all three major groups of Rodentia; mouse-related (rat, mouse, vole, beaver), Ctenohystrica (guinea pig, nutria), and squirrel-related (mountain beaver) species. Prototypical emetic agents, apomorphine (sc), veratrine (sc), and copper sulfate (ig), failed to produce either retching or vomiting in these species (although other behavioral effects, e.g., locomotion, were noted). These rodents also had anatomical constraints, which could limit the efficiency of vomiting should it be attempted, including reduced muscularity of the diaphragm and stomach geometry that is not well structured for moving contents towards the esophagus compared to species that can vomit (cat, ferret, and musk shrew). Lastly, an in situ brainstem preparation was used to make sensitive measures of mouth, esophagus, and shoulder muscular movements, and phrenic nerve activity-key features of emetic episodes. Laboratory mice and rats failed to display any of the common coordinated actions of these indices after typical emetic stimulation (resiniferatoxin and vagal afferent stimulation) compared to musk shrews. Overall the results suggest that the inability to vomit is a general property of Rodentia and that an absent brainstem neurological component is the most likely cause. The implications of these findings for the utility of rodents as models in the area of emesis research are discussed. PMID:23593236

  4. Why Can’t Rodents Vomit? A Comparative Behavioral, Anatomical, and Physiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Charles C.; Kimball, Bruce A.; Wang, Hong; Kaus, James; Dienel, Samuel; Nagy, Allysa; Gathright, Gordon R.; Yates, Bill J.; Andrews, Paul L. R.

    2013-01-01

    The vomiting (emetic) reflex is documented in numerous mammalian species, including primates and carnivores, yet laboratory rats and mice appear to lack this response. It is unclear whether these rodents do not vomit because of anatomical constraints (e.g., a relatively long abdominal esophagus) or lack of key neural circuits. Moreover, it is unknown whether laboratory rodents are representative of Rodentia with regards to this reflex. Here we conducted behavioral testing of members of all three major groups of Rodentia; mouse-related (rat, mouse, vole, beaver), Ctenohystrica (guinea pig, nutria), and squirrel-related (mountain beaver) species. Prototypical emetic agents, apomorphine (sc), veratrine (sc), and copper sulfate (ig), failed to produce either retching or vomiting in these species (although other behavioral effects, e.g., locomotion, were noted). These rodents also had anatomical constraints, which could limit the efficiency of vomiting should it be attempted, including reduced muscularity of the diaphragm and stomach geometry that is not well structured for moving contents towards the esophagus compared to species that can vomit (cat, ferret, and musk shrew). Lastly, an in situ brainstem preparation was used to make sensitive measures of mouth, esophagus, and shoulder muscular movements, and phrenic nerve activity–key features of emetic episodes. Laboratory mice and rats failed to display any of the common coordinated actions of these indices after typical emetic stimulation (resiniferatoxin and vagal afferent stimulation) compared to musk shrews. Overall the results suggest that the inability to vomit is a general property of Rodentia and that an absent brainstem neurological component is the most likely cause. The implications of these findings for the utility of rodents as models in the area of emesis research are discussed. PMID:23593236

  5. Rodent-repellent studies. III. Advanced studies in the evaluation of chemical repellents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellack, E.; DeWitt, J.B.

    1949-01-01

    In order to bridge the gap between preliminary screening of chemicals for potential rodent repellency and the application ofthese compounds to paper cartons, more advanced studies in the evaluation ofpromising materials have been carried out. These studies have resulted in: (1) a modification of the food acceptance technique which eliminates doubtful compounds and also provides a closer analogy to the ultimate goal, and (2) a method for rapidly testing chemicals incorporated in paper. When the results of these latter tests are expressed as a function of time, it can be shown that a distinct correlation exists between the deterrency exhibited by treated paper and the repellency of treated food.

  6. Comparison of Birth-and Conception-Based Definitions of Postnatal Age in Developmental and Reproductive Rodent Toxicity Studies: lnfluence of Gestation Length on Measurements of Offspring Body Weight and Puberty in Controls

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most laboratories conducting developmental and reproductive toxicity studies in rodents assign age by defining postnatal day (PND) 0 or 1 as the day of birth (DOB); i.e., gestation length affects PND and the timing of postnatal measurements. Some laboratories, however, define age...

  7. An epidemiological comparative study on diagnosis of rodent leptospirosis in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Esfandiari, Behzad; Pourshafie, Mohammad Reza; Gouya, Mohammad Mehdi; Khaki, Pejvak; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Darvish, Jamshid; Bidhendi, Soheila Moradi; Hanifi, Hamed; Nahrevanian, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by leptospires, in which transmission occurs through contact with contaminated biological fluids from infected animals. Rodents can act as a source of infection for humans and animals. The disease has a global distribution, mainly in humid, tropical and sub-tropical regions. The aim of this study was to compare culture assays, the microscopic agglutination test (MAT), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and nested PCR (n-PCR), for the diagnosis of leptospirosis in rodents in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran. METHODS: One hundred fifty-one rodents were trapped alive at 10 locations, and their urine and kidney samples were collected and used for the isolation of live Leptospira. The infecting serovars were identified and the antibody titres were measured by MAT, using a panel of 20 strains of live Leptospira species as antigens. The presence of leptospiral DNA was evaluated in urine and kidney samples using PCR and n-PCR. RESULTS: No live leptospires were isolated from the kidney and urine samples of the rodents. Different detection rates of leptospirosis were observed with MAT (21.2%), PCR (11.3%), and n-PCR (3.3%). The dominant strain was Leptospira serjoehardjo (34.4%, p=0.28), although other serotypes were also found. The prevalence of positive leptospirosis tests in rodents was 15.9, 2.6, and 2.6% among Rattus norvegicus, R. rattus, and Apodemus sylvaticus, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Leptospirosis was prevalent in rodents in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran. MAT was able to detect leptospires more frequently than culture or PCR. The kidney was a more suitable site for identifying leptospiral DNA by n-PCR than urine. Culture was not found to be an appropriate technique for clinical diagnosis. PMID:25773440

  8. Issues in the Design and Interpretation of Chronic Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies in Rodents: Approaches to Dose Selection

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than three decades chronic studies in rodents have been the benchmark for assessing the potential long-term toxicity, and particularly the carcinogenicity, of chemicals. With doses typically administered for about 2 years (18 months to lifetime), the rodent bioassay has ...

  9. A NEW METHOD TO QUANTIFY CORE TEMPERATURE INSTABILITY IN RODENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to quantify instability of autonomic systems such as temperature regulation should be important in toxicant and drug safety studies. Stability of core temperature (Tc) in laboratory rodents is susceptible to a variety of stimuli. Calculating the temperature differential o...

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Enterohepatic Helicobacter Species Isolated from Both Laboratory and Wild Rodents

    E-print Network

    Sheh, Alexander

    The draft genome sequences of eight enterohepatic Helicobacter species, H. muridarum, H. trogontum, H. typhlonius, and five unnamed helicobacters, are presented here. Using laboratory mice pervasively infected with ...

  11. MONITORING OF THE ESTROUS CYCLE IN THE LABORATORY RODENT BY VAGINAL LAVAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ovarian cyclicity in a number of laboratory species can be monitored easily and noninvasively by observing changes in the vaginal cytology. his chapter describes the techniques used to collect data in the laboratory rat and mouse and how to interpret the lavages as they are obtai...

  12. Sublethal health effects in laboratory rodents from environmentally relevant exposures to oil sands contaminants.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; North, Michelle A; Smits, Judit E G

    2015-12-01

    Increasing activity of oil sands extraction and processing in northern Alberta is marked by ongoing controversy about the nature and extent of associated environmental impacts. Bitumen contains a mixture of toxic chemicals, including metals and residual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), whose release into the environment poses a distinct risk to the surrounding environment, plus wildlife and human health. In the present study, the authors evaluated several subclinical biomarkers of exposure and effect to mixtures of metals (Pb, Cd, and Hg) and/or PAHs (3 alkylated forms) at environmentally relevant concentrations (100-fold and 10-fold higher than the maximum dissolved concentrations found in snow, to simulate a worst-case scenario), using laboratory mice as a model for future studies of small mammals in the wild. Both metals and alkyl-PAHs exposure were associated with 1) increased relative liver, kidney, and spleen size; 2) alterations in the homeostasis of the antioxidant vitamins A and E in liver; and 3) compromised glutathione redox status in testes, with results also indicating synergistic interactions from co-exposure. The combination of morphometric and oxidative stress biomarkers provide reliable and sensitive measures of the response to contaminant exposure in a mammalian model, suggesting associated physiological costs. Based on the present experimental study, the authors propose that wild small mammals will prove to be valuable sentinel species reflecting sublethal health effects from oil sands-related contaminants. The present study's results also present a basis for the interpretation of future field data. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:2884-2897. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26139097

  13. Anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of Musa sapientum peel extract in the laboratory rodents

    PubMed Central

    Onasanwo, Samuel Adetunji; Emikpe, Benjamin Obukowho; Ajah, Austin Azubuike; Elufioye, Taiwo Olayemi

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of the methanol extract of Musa sapientum peel in the laboratory rats. Materials and Methods: Methanol extract of the peels on Musa sapientum (MEMS) was evaluated for its anti-ulcer using alcohol-induced, aspirin-induced, and pyloric ligation-induced models, and for its ulcer healing employing acetic acid-induced ulcer models in rats. Results: The findings from this experiment showed that MEMS (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, b.w.) anti-ulcer and ulcer healing activity (P ? 0.05) is dose-dependent. Also, MEMS exhibited healing of the ulcer base in all the treated groups when compared with the control group. Conclusion: The outcomes of this experiment revealed that the anti-ulcer effect of MEMS may be due to its anti-secretory and cyto-protective activity. The healing of the ulcer base might not be unconnected with basic fibroblast growth factors responsible for epithelial regeneration. PMID:23900937

  14. A new exposure model to evaluate smoked illicit drugs in rodents: A study of crack cocaine.

    PubMed

    Hueza, Isis M; Ponce, Fernando; Garcia, Raphael C T; Marcourakis, Tânia; Yonamine, Maurício; Mantovani, Cínthia de C; Kirsten, Thiago B

    2016-01-01

    The use of smoked illicit drugs has spread dramatically, but few studies use proper devices to expose animals to inhalational abused drugs despite the availability of numerous smoking devices that mimic tobacco exposure in rodents. Therefore, the present study developed an inexpensive device to easily expose laboratory animals to smoked drugs. We used crack cocaine as the drug of abuse, and the cocaine plasma levels and the behaviors of animals intoxicated with the crack cocaine were evaluated to prove inhaled drug absorption and systemic activity. We developed an acrylic device with two chambers that were interconnected and separated by a hatch. Three doses of crack (100, 250, or 500mg), which contained 63.7% cocaine, were burned in a pipe, and the rats were exposed to the smoke for 5 or 10min (n=5/amount/period). Exposure to the 250-mg dose for 10min achieved cocaine plasma levels that were similar to those of users (170ng/mL). Behavioral evaluations were also performed to validate the methodology. Rats (n=10/group) for these evaluations were exposed to 250mg of crack cocaine or air for 10min, twice daily, for 28 consecutive days. Open-field evaluations were performed at three different periods throughout the experimental design. Exposed animals exhibited transient anorexia, increased motor activity, and shorter stays in central areas of the open field, which suggests reduced anxiety. Therefore, the developed model effectively exposed animals to crack cocaine, and this model may be useful for the investigation of other inhalational abused drugs. PMID:26391341

  15. Considerations for resting state functional MRI and functional connectivity studies in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wen-Ju; Billings, Jacob C. W.; Grooms, Joshua K.; Shakil, Sadia; Keilholz, Shella D.

    2015-01-01

    Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) and functional connectivity mapping have become widely used tools in the human neuroimaging community and their use is rapidly spreading into the realm of rodent research as well. One of the many attractive features of rs-fMRI is that it is readily translatable from humans to animals and back again. Changes in functional connectivity observed in human studies can be followed by more invasive animal experiments to determine the neurophysiological basis for the alterations, while exploratory work in animal models can identify possible biomarkers for further investigation in human studies. These types of interwoven human and animal experiments have a potentially large impact on neuroscience and clinical practice. However, impediments exist to the optimal application of rs-fMRI in small animals, some similar to those encountered in humans and some quite different. In this review we identify the most prominent of these barriers, discuss differences between rs-fMRI in rodents and in humans, highlight best practices for animal studies, and review selected applications of rs-fMRI in rodents. Our goal is to facilitate the integration of human and animal work to the benefit of both fields. PMID:26300718

  16. An Experimental Study of Competition between Seed-Eating Desert Rodents and Ants Author(s): James H. Brown, Diane W. Davidson, O. J. Reichman

    E-print Network

    Brown, James H.

    An Experimental Study of Competition between Seed-Eating Desert Rodents and Ants Author(s): James H Rodents and Ants James H. Brown Department of Ecology, and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona synopsis. Reciprocal increases in rodent and ant densities on 0.1 ha plots from which the other taxon had

  17. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  18. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1990-01-01

    The scope of the study is to investigate ways of controlling the microgravity environment of the International Space Station by means of a tethered system. Four main study tasks were performed. First, researchers analyzed the utilization of the tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station and the tether capability to actively control the center of gravity position in order to compensate for activities that would upset the mass distribution of the Station. The purpose of the second task was to evaluate the whole of the experiments performable in a variable gravity environment and the related beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of fluid, materials, and life science, so as to assess the relevance of a variable g-level laboratory. The third task involves the Tethered Variable Gravity Laboratory. The use of the facility that would crawl along a deployed tether and expose experiments to varying intensities of reduced gravity is discussed. Last, a study performed on the Attitude Tether Stabilizer concept is discussed. The stabilization effect of ballast masses tethered to the Space Station was investigated as a means of assisting the attitude control system of the Station.

  19. March 26, 2008 Tool-using rodents rake in rewards

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    March 26, 2008 Tool-using rodents rake in rewards By teaching rodents to use tools, RIKEN of a rodent trained in the laboratory to use tools has shattered standard conceptions that only a select group to a rodent model. The rodent they selected, the degu, is a highly social, naturally curious, chinchilla

  20. Rodent repellency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Welch, J.F.; Bellack, E.

    1950-01-01

    In the course of studies involving more than 2,500 chemical repellents, it has been found that certain groups of- compounds containing nitrogen or sulfur are repellent to rats under the , test conditions and it appears probable that some of these compounds might be used for the protection of packaged goods against rodent attacks. Additional tests to determine optimum methods of application will be necessary before final evaluation of these compounds will be possible and extensive field trials will be required to establish the degree of protection which may be afforded by the use of these materials. Pending such final evaluation, it may be assumed that the results,to date offer a means of selecting the most promising types of'materials for further trial....On the basis of the test data, it appears that some amine derivative, such as a salt of some organic, acid, or a complex with trinitrobenzene or with a metallic salt of a dialkyl dithiocarbamic acid might offer promise of protection of packaging materials against rodent attacks....Protection might be obtained through the use of certain 'physical deterrents' such as plastics, waxes or drying oils.

  1. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Information on the Tethered Gravity Laboratory on the International Space Station is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include active control, low gravity processes identification, systems analysis, tether interfaces with the Laboratory, elevator and payload configurations, elevator subsystems, and accelerometer technology requirements.

  2. Animal Models for the Study of Rodent-Borne Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses: Arenaviruses and Hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joseph W; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Mucker, Eric M; Brocato, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Human pathogenic hantaviruses and arenaviruses are maintained in nature by persistent infection of rodent carrier populations. Several members of these virus groups can cause significant disease in humans that is generically termed viral hemorrhagic fever (HF) and is characterized as a febrile illness with an increased propensity to cause acute inflammation. Human interaction with rodent carrier populations leads to infection. Arenaviruses are also viewed as potential biological weapons threat agents. There is an increased interest in studying these viruses in animal models to gain a deeper understating not only of viral pathogenesis, but also for the evaluation of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate disease threats. In this review, we examine current knowledge regarding animal models employed in the study of these viruses. We include analysis of infection models in natural reservoirs and also discuss the impact of strain heterogeneity on the susceptibility of animals to infection. This information should provide a comprehensive reference for those interested in the study of arenaviruses and hantaviruses not only for MCM development but also in the study of viral pathogenesis and the biology of these viruses in their natural reservoirs. PMID:26266264

  3. Animal Models for the Study of Rodent-Borne Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses: Arenaviruses and Hantaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Joseph W.; Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Mucker, Eric M.; Brocato, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Human pathogenic hantaviruses and arenaviruses are maintained in nature by persistent infection of rodent carrier populations. Several members of these virus groups can cause significant disease in humans that is generically termed viral hemorrhagic fever (HF) and is characterized as a febrile illness with an increased propensity to cause acute inflammation. Human interaction with rodent carrier populations leads to infection. Arenaviruses are also viewed as potential biological weapons threat agents. There is an increased interest in studying these viruses in animal models to gain a deeper understating not only of viral pathogenesis, but also for the evaluation of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate disease threats. In this review, we examine current knowledge regarding animal models employed in the study of these viruses. We include analysis of infection models in natural reservoirs and also discuss the impact of strain heterogeneity on the susceptibility of animals to infection. This information should provide a comprehensive reference for those interested in the study of arenaviruses and hantaviruses not only for MCM development but also in the study of viral pathogenesis and the biology of these viruses in their natural reservoirs. PMID:26266264

  4. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) thermal control issues; (2) attitude control sybsystem; (3) configuration constraints; (4) payload; (5) acceleration requirements on Variable Gravity Laboratory (VGL); and (6) VGL configuration highlights.

  5. Network "Rodent-borne pathogens" in Germany: longitudinal studies on the geographical distribution and prevalence of hantavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, R G; Schmidt-Chanasit, J; Schlegel, M; Jacob, J; Pelz, H-J; Mertens, M; Wenk, M; Büchner, T; Masur, D; Sevke, K; Groschup, M H; Gerstengarbe, F-W; Pfeffer, M; Oehme, R; Wegener, W; Bemmann, M; Ohlmeyer, L; Wolf, R; Zoller, H; Koch, J; Brockmann, S; Heckel, G; Essbauer, S S

    2008-12-01

    Hantavirus infections are known in Germany since the 1980s. While the overall antibody prevalence against hantaviruses in the general human population was estimated to be about 1-2%, an average of 100-200 clinical cases are recorded annually. In the years 2005 and 2007 in particular, a large increase of the number of human hantavirus infections in Germany was observed. The most affected regions were located in the federal states of Baden-Wuerttemberg, Bavaria, North Rhine Westphalia, and Lower Saxony. In contrast to the well-documented situation in humans, the knowledge of the geographical distribution and frequency of hantavirus infections in their rodent reservoirs as well as any changes thereof was very limited. Hence, the network "Rodent-borne pathogens" was established in Germany allowing synergistic investigations of the rodent population dynamics, the prevalence and evolution of hantaviruses and other rodent-associated pathogens as well as their underlying mechanisms in order to understand their impact on the frequency of human infections. A monitoring of hantaviruses in rodents from endemic regions (Baden-Wuerttemberg, Bavaria, North Rhine Westphalia, Lower Saxony) and regions with a low number of human cases (Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania, Brandenburg, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt) was initiated. Within outbreak regions, a high prevalence of Puumala virus (PUUV) was detected in bank voles. Initial longitudinal studies in North Rhine Westphalia (city of Cologne), Bavaria (Lower Bavaria), and Lower Saxony (rural region close to Osnabrück) demonstrated a continuing presence of PUUV in the bank vole populations. These longitudinal studies will allow conclusions about the evolution of hantaviruses and other rodent-borne pathogens and changes in their distribution, which can be used for a risk assessment of human infections. This may become very important in order to evaluate changes in the epidemiology of rodent-borne pathogens in the light of expected global climate changes in the future. PMID:19030894

  6. Rodent models of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.D.; Busto, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The use of physiologically regulated, reproducible animal models is crucial to the study of ischemic brain injury--both the mechanisms governing its occurrence and potential therapeutic strategies. Several laboratory rodent species (notably rats and gerbils), which are readily available at relatively low cost, are highly suitable for the investigation of cerebral ischemia and have been widely employed for this purpose. We critically examine and summarize several rodent models of transient global ischemia, resulting in selective neuronal injury within vulnerable brain regions, and focal ischemia, typically giving rise to localized brain infarction. We explore the utility of individual models and emphasize the necessity for meticulous experimental control of those variables that modulate the severity of ischemic brain injury.169 references.

  7. A Study on the Glycan Specificity of Natural Antibody Repertoires in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Ping; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Inbred strains of mice and rats are widely used in preclinical investigations evaluating the effectiveness of glycan-based biomecines, however, the glycan specificity repertoires of serum Abs in rodents have not been fully characterized. In the present study, serum antibodies in naïve mice and rats of different inbred strains were analyzed for specificity against 4 representative carbohydrate structures including PGA (1,4-linked ?-D-galactopyranosyluronic acids), ?-glucan, mannan and ?-glucan (dextran). Mannan was not recognized by serum Abs from any of the mouse and rat strains. Serum IgM in naïve F344, BN and Lewis rats recognized PGA and ?-glucan and, less strongly, dextran. High titer circulating IgM against PGA were found in mice of BALB/c, C57BL/6, C3H/NeH and BXSB strains. C3H/NeH was the only strain which also produced low titer IgM against ?-glucan and dextran. Age-related production of high titer IgM, IgA and IgG Abs against ?-glucan was observed in BXSB mice. Intraperitoneal immunization of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice with ?-glucan elicited strong IgM responses, while immunization with PGA also led to an increase of anti-PGA IgM Ab titers. These results provide useful information on the characteristics of glycan-specific natural antibody repertoires in rodents. PMID:20003821

  8. This information sheet is for the care and use of laboratory rodents (including rats, mice, hamsters, guinea pigs & gerbils).

    E-print Network

    Wood, Marcelo A.

    , hamsters, guinea pigs & gerbils). Potential Zoonotic Diseases: Colony-born rodents are generally docile the virus in their respiratory secretions, saliva, urine and feces. Transmission to humans is via inhalation are at greater risk. Animal or animal products such as dander, hair, scales, fur, saliva and body waste

  9. Rodent repellent studies. IV. Preparation and properties of trinitrobenzene-aryl amine complexes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Bellack, E.; Welch, J.F.

    1953-01-01

    Data are presented on methods of preparation, chemical arid physical characteristics, toxicity, and repellency to rodents of complexes of symmetrical trinitrohenzene with various aromatic amines: When applied in suitable carriers or incorporated in plastic .films, members of this series ofmaterials were shown to offer significant increases in time required by wild rodents to damage common packaging materials.

  10. Ventilatory function assessment in safety pharmacology: Optimization of rodent studies using normocapnic or hypercapnic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goineau, Sonia; Rompion, Sonia; Guillaume, Philippe; Picard, Sandra

    2010-09-15

    Although the whole body plethysmography for unrestrained animals is the most widely used method to assess the respiratory risk of new drugs in safety pharmacology, non-appropriate experimental conditions may mask deleterious side effects of some substances. If stimulant or bronchodilatory effects can be easily evidenced in rodents under standard experimental conditions, i.e. normal air breathing and diurnal phase, drug-induced respiratory depression remains more difficult to detect. This study was aimed at comparing the responsiveness of Wistar rats, Duncan Hartley guinea-pigs or BALB/c mice to the respiratory properties of theophylline (50 or 100 mg/kg p.o.) or morphine (30 mg/kg i.p.) under varying conditions (100% air versus 5% CO{sub 2}-enriched air, light versus dark day phase), in order to select the most appropriate experimental conditions to each species for safety airway investigations. Our results showed that under normocapnia the ventilatory depressant effects of morphine can be easily evidenced in mice, slightly observed in guinea-pigs and not detected in rats in any day phase. Slight hypercapnic conditions enhanced the responsiveness of rats to morphine but not that of guinea-pigs and importantly they did not blunt the airway responsiveness of rats to the stimulation and bronchodilation evoked by theophylline, the most widely used reference agent in safety pharmacology studies. In conclusion, hypercapnic conditions associated with the non-invasive whole body plethysmography should be considered for optimizing the assessment of both the ventilatory depressant potential of morphine-like substances or the respiratory stimulant effects of new drugs in the rat, the most extensively used species in rodent safety and toxicological investigations.

  11. Urban Market Gardening and Rodent-Borne Pathogenic Leptospira in Arid Zones: A Case Study in Niamey, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Dobigny, Gauthier; Garba, Madougou; Tatard, Caroline; Loiseau, Anne; Galan, Max; Kadaouré, Ibrahima; Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Picardeau, Mathieu; Bertherat, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis essentially affects human following contact with rodent urine-contaminated water. As such, it was mainly found associated with rice culture, recreational activities and flooding. This is also the reason why it has mainly been investigated in temperate as well as warm and humid regions, while arid zones have been only very occasionally monitored for this disease. In particular, data for West African countries are extremely scarce. Here, we took advantage of an extensive survey of urban rodents in Niamey, Niger, in order to look for rodent-borne pathogenic Leptospira species presence and distribution across the city. To do so, we used high throughput bacterial 16S-based metabarcoding, lipL32 gene-targeting RT-PCR, rrs gene sequencing and VNTR typing as well as GIS-based multivariate spatial analysis. Our results show that leptospires seem absent from the core city where usual Leptospira reservoir rodent species (namely R. rattus and M. natalensis) are yet abundant. On the contrary, L. kirschneri was detected in Arvicanthis niloticus and Cricetomys gambianus, two rodent species that are restricted to irrigated cultures within the city. Moreover, the VNTR profiles showed that rodent-borne leptospires in Niamey belong to previously undescribed serovars. Altogether, our study points towards the importance of market gardening in maintain and circulation of leptospirosis within Sahelian cities. In Africa, irrigated urban agriculture constitutes a pivotal source of food supply, especially in the context of the ongoing extensive urbanization of the continent. With this in mind, we speculate that leptospirosis may represent a zoonotic disease of concern also in arid regions that would deserve to be more rigorously surveyed, especially in urban agricultural settings. PMID:26437456

  12. Urban Market Gardening and Rodent-Borne Pathogenic Leptospira in Arid Zones: A Case Study in Niamey, Niger.

    PubMed

    Dobigny, Gauthier; Garba, Madougou; Tatard, Caroline; Loiseau, Anne; Galan, Max; Kadaouré, Ibrahima; Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Picardeau, Mathieu; Bertherat, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Leptospirosis essentially affects human following contact with rodent urine-contaminated water. As such, it was mainly found associated with rice culture, recreational activities and flooding. This is also the reason why it has mainly been investigated in temperate as well as warm and humid regions, while arid zones have been only very occasionally monitored for this disease. In particular, data for West African countries are extremely scarce. Here, we took advantage of an extensive survey of urban rodents in Niamey, Niger, in order to look for rodent-borne pathogenic Leptospira species presence and distribution across the city. To do so, we used high throughput bacterial 16S-based metabarcoding, lipL32 gene-targeting RT-PCR, rrs gene sequencing and VNTR typing as well as GIS-based multivariate spatial analysis. Our results show that leptospires seem absent from the core city where usual Leptospira reservoir rodent species (namely R. rattus and M. natalensis) are yet abundant. On the contrary, L. kirschneri was detected in Arvicanthis niloticus and Cricetomys gambianus, two rodent species that are restricted to irrigated cultures within the city. Moreover, the VNTR profiles showed that rodent-borne leptospires in Niamey belong to previously undescribed serovars. Altogether, our study points towards the importance of market gardening in maintain and circulation of leptospirosis within Sahelian cities. In Africa, irrigated urban agriculture constitutes a pivotal source of food supply, especially in the context of the ongoing extensive urbanization of the continent. With this in mind, we speculate that leptospirosis may represent a zoonotic disease of concern also in arid regions that would deserve to be more rigorously surveyed, especially in urban agricultural settings. PMID:26437456

  13. Using the Activity-based Anorexia Rodent Model to Study the Neurobiological Basis of Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by excessively restricted caloric intake and abnormally high levels of physical activity. A challenging illness to treat, due to the lack of understanding of the underlying neurobiology, AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. To address this need, neuroscientists are using an animal model to study how neural circuits may contribute toward vulnerability to AN and may be affected by AN. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a bio-behavioral phenomenon described in rodents that models the key symptoms of anorexia nervosa. When rodents with free access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel experience food restriction, they become hyperactive – running more than animals with free access to food. Here, we describe the procedures by which ABA is induced in adolescent female C57BL/6 mice. On postnatal day 36 (P36), the animal is housed with access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel. After 4 days of acclimation to the running wheel, on P40, all food is removed from the cage. For the next 3 days, food is returned to the cage (allowing animals free food access) for 2 hr daily. After the fourth day of food restriction, free access to food is returned and the running wheel is removed from the cage to allow the animals to recover. Continuous multi-day analysis of running wheel activity shows that mice become hyperactive within 24 hr following the onset of food restriction. The mice run even during the limited time during which they have access to food. Additionally, the circadian pattern of wheel running becomes disrupted by the experience of food restriction. We have been able to correlate neurobiological changes with various aspects of the animals’ wheel running behavior to implicate particular brain regions and neurochemical changes with resilience and vulnerability to food-restriction induced hyperactivity. PMID:26555618

  14. Using the Activity-based Anorexia Rodent Model to Study the Neurobiological Basis of Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by excessively restricted caloric intake and abnormally high levels of physical activity. A challenging illness to treat, due to the lack of understanding of the underlying neurobiology, AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. To address this need, neuroscientists are using an animal model to study how neural circuits may contribute toward vulnerability to AN and may be affected by AN. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a bio-behavioral phenomenon described in rodents that models the key symptoms of anorexia nervosa. When rodents with free access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel experience food restriction, they become hyperactive - running more than animals with free access to food. Here, we describe the procedures by which ABA is induced in adolescent female C57BL/6 mice. On postnatal day 36 (P36), the animal is housed with access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel. After 4 days of acclimation to the running wheel, on P40, all food is removed from the cage. For the next 3 days, food is returned to the cage (allowing animals free food access) for 2 hr daily. After the fourth day of food restriction, free access to food is returned and the running wheel is removed from the cage to allow the animals to recover. Continuous multi-day analysis of running wheel activity shows that mice become hyperactive within 24 hr following the onset of food restriction. The mice run even during the limited time during which they have access to food. Additionally, the circadian pattern of wheel running becomes disrupted by the experience of food restriction. We have been able to correlate neurobiological changes with various aspects of the animals' wheel running behavior to implicate particular brain regions and neurochemical changes with resilience and vulnerability to food-restriction induced hyperactivity. PMID:26555618

  15. A Novel Water Delivery System for Administering Volatile Chemicals while Minimizing Chemical Waste in Rodent Toxicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent toxicity studies typically use water bottles to administer test chemicals via drinking water. However, water bottles provide inconsistent exposure of volatile chemicals due to varying headspace, as well as lead to excessive waste of test material. In order to refine drin...

  16. Laboratory plasma studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliflet, Arne

    1993-11-01

    The contents of the document are as follows: NIKE KrF Laser Support; Microwave and Millimeter Wave Experiments; Studies of Novel Accelerator Concepts and Free Electron Lasers; Studies for the Modified Betatron Accelerator (MBA); PHAROS 3 Studies; Electron Beam Diagnostics; Microwave Energy Deposition in the Upper Atmosphere; and Visualization Tools and Parallel Processing for Physics Applications.

  17. JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay for detection of genotoxic carcinogens: II. Summary of definitive validation study results.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yoshifumi; Kojima, Hajime; Omori, Takashi; Corvi, Raffaella; Honma, Masamistu; Schechtman, Leonard M; Tice, Raymond R; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Burlinson, Brian; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Kraynak, Andrew R; McNamee, James; Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Pant, Kamala; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Priestley, Catherine; Takasawa, Hironao; Wada, Kunio; Wirnitzer, Uta; Asano, Norihide; Escobar, Patricia A; Lovell, David; Morita, Takeshi; Nakajima, Madoka; Ohno, Yasuo; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay (comet assay) is used internationally to investigate the in vivo genotoxic potential of test chemicals. This assay, however, has not previously been formally validated. The Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM), with the cooperation of the U.S. NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM)/the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), and the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society/Mammalian Mutagenesis Study Group (JEMS/MMS), organized an international validation study to evaluate the reliability and relevance of the assay for identifying genotoxic carcinogens, using liver and stomach as target organs. The ultimate goal of this exercise was to establish an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. The study protocol was optimized in the pre-validation studies, and then the definitive (4th phase) validation study was conducted in two steps. In the 1st step, assay reproducibility was confirmed among laboratories using four coded reference chemicals and the positive control ethyl methanesulfonate. In the 2nd step, the predictive capability was investigated using 40 coded chemicals with known genotoxic and carcinogenic activity (i.e., genotoxic carcinogens, genotoxic non-carcinogens, non-genotoxic carcinogens, and non-genotoxic non-carcinogens). Based on the results obtained, the in vivo comet assay is concluded to be highly capable of identifying genotoxic chemicals and therefore can serve as a reliable predictor of rodent carcinogenicity. PMID:26212295

  18. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The use is studied of tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station. Particular emphasis is placed by the microgravity community on the achievement of high quality microgravity conditions. The tether capability is explored for active control of the center of gravity and the analysis of possible tethered configurations.

  19. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William; Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation by E. coli and Y. pestis LPS. The chip revealed an oscillation pattern in translocation of NF-kB indicating the presence of a negative feedback loop involving IKK. Activation of NF-kB is preceded by phosphorylation of many kinases and to correlate the kinase activity with translocation, we performed flow cytometric assays in the PhosphoChip module. Phopshorylated forms of p38. ERK and RelA were measured in macrophage cells challenged with LPS and showed a dynamic response where phosphorylation increases with time reaching a maximum at {approx}30-60min. To allow further downstream analysis on selected cells, we also implemented an optical-trapping based sorting of cells. This has allowed us to sort macrophages infected with bacteria from uninfected cells with the goal of obtaining data only on the infected (the desired) population. The various microfluidic chip modules and the accessories required to operate them such as pumps, heaters, electronic control and optical detectors are being assembled in a bench-top, semi-automated device. The data generated is being utilized to refine existing TLR pathway model by adding kinetic rate constants and concentration information. The microfluidic platform allows high-resolution imaging as well as quantitative proteomic measurements with high sensitivity (study cell-signaling involved in host-pathogen interactions and other diseases such as cancer. The advances made in this project have been presented at numerous national and international conferences and are documented in many peer-reviewed publications as listed. Finer details of many of the component technologies are described in these publications. The chapters to follow in this report are also adapted from other manuscripts that are accepted for publication

  20. Bone marrow spontaneous lesions in rodents from nonclinical 104-week carcinogenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Petterino, Claudio; Mukaratirwa, Sydney; Bradley, Alys

    2015-12-01

    The authors performed a retrospective study to determine the incidences and range of spontaneous lesions in the bone marrow (sternum and femur) of control mice and rats. Data was collected from 2186 mice (Crl:CD-1(ICR)BR), and 2347 rats (Han Wistar and CD(SD) rats) from the control dose groups of 104-week carcinogenicity studies carried out between 2005 and 2014. The incidence of spontaneous lesions in the bone marrow was higher in mice than in rats, and in both species non-neoplastic lesions were more common than neoplastic lesions. In mice, the most common non-neoplastic lesions in the bone marrow were increased cellularity, pigmented macrophages, and decreased cellularity, and the most common neoplastic lesions were malignant lymphoma, granulocytic leukemia and histiocytic sarcoma. There were occasional sex and site differences (sternum marrow vs femur marrow) in the incidence of a few bone marrow lesions in mice. In rats, the most common non-neoplastic lesions were increased cellularity and stromal fibrosis, and the most common neoplastic lesion was malignant lymphoma. In rats, no sex predilection in the incidence of bone marrow lesions was apparent, and there were no significant site differences in the incidence of lesions. To the best knowledge of the authors, there are no recent reports on spontaneous pathological findings in bone marrow of rodents, and we believe that these results will facilitate the interpretation of background findings and/or their increased incidence in carcinogenicity studies. PMID:26376165

  1. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 3; Rodent Tissue Repair: Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaya, T. E.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Myofiber injury-repair was studied in the rat gastrocnemius following a crush injury to the lower leg prior to flight in order to understand if the regenerative responses of muscles are altered by the lack of gravitational forces during Cosmos 2044 flight. After 14 days of flight, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed from the 5 injured flight rodents and various Earth-based treatment groups for comparison. The Earth-based animals consisted of three groups of five rats with injured muscles from a simulated, tail-suspended, and vivarium as well as an uninjured basal group. The gastrocnemius muscle from each was evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to document myofiber, vascular, and connective tissue alterations following injury. In general the repair process was somewhat similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to extracellular matrix organization and myofiber regeneration. Small and large myofibers were present with a newly organized extracellular matrix indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with no enlarged area of non-muscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well differentiated with more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region but small myofibers and proteoglycans, nevertheless, were in their usual configuration. Thus, myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, but for the most part, resulted in functional muscle tissue.

  2. Tactile and non-tactile sensory paradigms for fMRI and neurophysiologic studies in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Bailey, Christopher J.; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a popular functional imaging tool for human studies. Future diagnostic use of fMRI depends, however, on a suitable neurophysiologic interpretation of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal change. This particular goal is best achieved in animal models primarily due to the invasive nature of other methods used and/or pharmacological agents applied to probe different nuances of neuronal (and glial) activity coupled to the BOLD signal change. In the last decade, we have directed our efforts towards the development of stimulation protocols for a variety of modalities in rodents with fMRI. Perception of the natural world relies on the formation of multi-dimensional representation of stimuli impinging on the different sensory systems, leading to the hypothesis that a sensory stimulus may have very different neurophysiologic outcome(s) when paired with a near simultaneous event in another modality. Before approaching this level of complexity, reliable measures must be obtained of the relatively small changes in the BOLD signal and other neurophysiologic markers (electrical, blood flow) induced by different peripheral stimuli. Here we describe different tactile (i.e., forepaw, whisker) and non-tactile (i.e., olfactory, visual) sensory paradigms applied to the anesthetized rat. The main focus is on development and validation of methods for reproducible stimulation of each sensory modality applied independently or in conjunction with one another, both inside and outside the magnet. We discuss similarities and/or differences across the sensory systems as well as advantages they may have for studying essential neuroscientific questions. We envisage that the different sensory paradigms described here may be applied directly to studies of multi-sensory interactions in anesthetized rats, en route to a rudimentary understanding of the awake functioning brain where various sensory cues presumably interrelate. PMID:18839094

  3. Ectoparasites of Rodents Captured in Hamedan, Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Zendehfili, Hamid; Zahirnia, Amir Hossein; Maghsood, Amir Hossein; Khanjani, Mohammad; Fallah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rodents with a population greater than the entire population of other mammals on earth are the source of economic losses and health conflicts. One of the major health problems with the rodents is their role as reservoir hosts of zoonotic diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the infestation of commensal rodents with ectoparasites in Hamedan City, Western Iran. Methods: The samples were collected by live traps during years 2012–2013. After transferring the samples to the Entomological Laboratory of Hamedan University of Medical Sciences, their ectoparasites were collected and identified. Results: A total of 171 slides were prepared from 105 captured commensal rodents: Mus musculus, Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus comprising three orders namely Mesostigmata: Hypoaspis (Laelaspis) astronomica, Dermanyssius sp, Pachylaelapidae (male). Metastigmata: Rhipicephalus sp and Anoplura: Polyplax spinulosa were recovered in Hamedan City. Seventy (66.6%) rodents were found infested with at least one species of ectoparasites. Conclusion: The results of our study indicate that ectoparasites infestation in commensal rodents of Hamedan city is high and more attention by local health authorities is needed to prevent zoonotic diseases. PMID:26623438

  4. Rodent-repellent studies. I. Method for the evaluation of chemical repellents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellack, E.; DeWitt, J.B.

    1949-01-01

    A biological assay procedure and a method for the numerical expression of results have been devised for the determination of the repellency to rodents of different chemical compounds. The procedure is based upon the degree of acceptability of foods containing the candidate repellents,. and has been shown. to offer a rapid, reliable measure of repellent activIty.

  5. Linking human behavior to environmental effects using a case study of urban rodent control

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pest control is common practice in many land use activities worldwide. Although often inadvertent, pest control can affect non-target species, sometimes fatally. Using social survey data about residential rodent control behavior in two areas in California, we applied a framewor...

  6. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The...-pregnant. Dosing should begin as soon as possible after weaning and, in any case, before the animals are 9... interfere with the general metabolism of the animals and, particularly in feeding studies, may disturb...

  7. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The...-pregnant. Dosing should begin as soon as possible after weaning and, in any case, before the animals are 9... interfere with the general metabolism of the animals and, particularly in feeding studies, may disturb...

  8. Laboratory studies of volcanic jets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, S.W.; Sturtevant, B.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments to study the fluid dynamics of violent volcanic eruptions employed pure gases erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used were Freon 12 and Freon 22, both of high molecular weight and high density, to model heavy, particulate- laden volcanic gases; nitrogen, a moderate molecular weight and density gas with well known thermodynamic properties; and He, a low molecular weight and density gas used as an analogue of steam, the dominant gas of most volcanic eruptions.-W.H.B.

  9. Behavioural effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on laboratory rodents: statistical methodologies and an application concerning developmental PCB exposure.

    PubMed

    Puopolo, M; Santucci, D; Chiarotti, F; Alleva, E

    1999-10-01

    Appropriate behavioural tests and adequate statistical tools may help to establish the ED properties of a given compound by pointing out the alterations of selected behavioural endpoints. Frequently, laboratory collected data consist of frequencies and/or durations of specific items, and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique is performed to assess whether the investigated factors affect these behavioural endpoints. Moreover, when numerous aspects of behaviour are investigated simultaneously, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), a multivariate technique, may be very useful to reduce the overwhelming number of correlated original variables to a few orthogonal artificial variables (factors). Continuous Time Markov Chain (CTMC) models may be applied to analyse the time structure of a behavioural pattern when data consist of sequences of events and the time points at which they occur. Moreover, the Cox Proportional Hazard Model, a methodology originally developed for the analysis of failure time data, may help to evidence the effects of a given treatment on behavioural sequences when the assumptions of CTMC models are not fully satisfied. Analyses on data from mice of the outbred CD-1 strain (controls in a study of toxicity and exposed to PCB during development) are presented as examples to show how adequate statistical analyses and appropriate behavioural tests may reveal relevant effect of treatments otherwise not easily detected. PMID:10467721

  10. Evaluation of NASA Foodbars as a Standard Diet for Use in Short-Term Rodent Space Flight Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, Janet; Grindeland, Richard; Barrett, Joyce; Dalton, Bonnie; Mandel, Adrian; Wade, Charles

    2003-01-01

    A standard rodent diet for space flight must meet the unique conditions imposed by the space environment and must be nutritionally adequate since diet can influence the outcome of experiments. This paper evaluates the use of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Foodbars as a standard space flight diet for rats. The Foodbar's semi-purified formulation permits criteria such as nutrient consistency, high nutrient bioavailability and flexibility of formulation to be met. Extrusion of the semi-purified diet produces Foodbars with the proper texture and a non-crumbing solid form for use in space. Treatment of Foodbar with 0.1% potassium sorbate prevents mold growth. Irradiation (15-25 kGy) prevents bacterial growth and in combination with sorbate-treatment provides added protection against mold for shelf-stability. However, during the development process, nutrient analyses indicated that extrusion and irradiation produced nutrient losses. Nutrients were adjusted accordingly to compensate for processing losses. Nutrient analysis of Foodbars continues to be performed routinely to monitor nutrient levels. It is important that the standard rodent diet provide nutrients that will prevent deficiency but also avoid excess that may mask physiological changes produced by space flight. All vitamins levels in the Foodbars, except for vitamin K conformed to or exceeded the current NRC (1995) recommendations. All indispensable amino acids in Foodbar conformed to or exceeded the NRC nutrient recommendation for mice growth and rat maintenance. However, some indispensable amino acids were slightly below recommendations for rat reproduction/growth. Short-term (18-20 d) animal feeding studies indicated that Foodbars were palatable, supported growth and maintained health in rats. Results indicated that NASA rodent Foodbars meet both the physical and nutritional criteria required to support rodents in the space environment and thus, may be used successfully as a standard diet for short-term space flight studies. However, nutritional adequacy of NASA Rodent Foodbars as a standard diet on longer duration (>20 d) space flight missions remains to be determined.

  11. Laboratory Studies Towards Understanding Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Abou Mrad, Ninette; Blum, Jürgen; Charnley, Steven B.; Chiavassa, Thierry; Cordiner, Martin A.; Mousis, Olivier; Danger, Grégoire; Duvernay, Fabrice; Gundlach, Bastian; Hartogh, Paul; Marboeuf, Ulysse; Simonia, Irakli; Simonia, Tsitsino; Theulé, Patrice; Yang, Rui

    2015-09-01

    This review presents some of the recent advancements in our understanding of comets facilitated by laboratory studies, need for new laboratory simulations, and predictions for future explorations. With the spacecraft Rosetta at the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a large volume of science data is expected to follow early results that have been published recently. The most surprising of them being hard ice shell that bounced the lander Philae a couple of times before settling on the comet. Long evaded molecular nitrogen has now been detected in the comet 67P/CG. The observed density of 470 kg m^{- 3} is in line with other comet observations, whereas the nature and composition of hydrocarbons detected on the surface are still a puzzle. Observation of D/H ratio that deviates significantly from Earth's water D/H ratio brings back to the table the long-standing question whether or not water on Earth was delivered by comet impacts. Our review summarizes some of the critical laboratory work that helps improve our understanding of cometary interior (whether amorphous or crystalline or containing clathrates), cometary surface (rich of complex organics), cometary coma and tail (D/H ratio, negative ions, and photoluminescence). Outstanding questions are also discussed.

  12. Laboratory study of cometary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; Brucato, J.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, P.

    In situ exploration (e.g., GIOTTO mission) and astronomical observations (e.g., ISO) of comets have provided fundamental information about the structure, chemistry and physical properties of materials present in such primordial bodies of the Solar System. Moreover, it is known that cosmic materials evolve, depending on the efficiency of active processes (e.g., thermal annealing, UV irradiation, ion bombardment, gassolid interactions) in different space environments. Thus, the properties of cometary constituents must be considered in a wider perspective, including cosmic dust formation around cold stars and evolution in the interstellar medium until the formation of proto-planetary nebulae. In this scenario, laboratory experiments provide important hints to clarify the status of cometary compounds. The laboratory work is aimed at both reproducing material properties and at simulating their evolution based on the most effective mechanisms active in space. Several techniques are used to synthesise "analogues" of cometary compounds with controlled chemical and physical characteristics. The study of optical properties, complemented by other analytical techniques, is applied to investigate the products of synthesis in the experiments. The monitoring of the effects produced by processing methods, similar to those active in space, provides information both on the reactivity of materials and on the efficiency of treatments. Such an approach is able to provide quantitative information on chemical and structural modifications produced on organic and refractory materials. The comparison of laboratory results with data coming from space observations and in situ measurements provides a powerful tool to understand the real nature of comets and to place constraints on formation and evolution pathways. The laboratory experiments on analogues gain even more relevance as a sort of training in the future perspective of analysing cometary samples returned to Earth by space missions (e.g., Stardust).

  13. Wentworth Institute Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual. Laboratory Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avakian, Harry; And Others

    This publication is a laboratory study guide designed for mechanical engineering students. All of the experiments (with the exception of experiment No. 1) contained in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual have been included in this guide. Brief theoretical backgrounds, examples and their solutions, charts, graphs, illustrations, and…

  14. Assessment of attention and inhibitory control in rodent developmental neurotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Lori L; Strupp, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    In designing screens to assess potential neurotoxicants, the paramount goal is that the selected assessment tools detect dysfunction if it exists. This goal is particularly challenging in the case of cognitive assessments. Cognition is not a unitary phenomenon, and indeed there is growing evidence that different aspects of cognitive functioning are subserved by distinct neural systems. As a result, if a particular neurotoxicant selectively damages certain neural systems but not others, it can impair some cognitive, sensory, or affective functions, but leave many others intact. Accordingly, studies with human subjects use batteries of cognitive tests, cognizant of the fact that no one test is capable of detecting all forms of cognitive dysfunction. In contrast, assessment of cognitive functioning in non-human animal developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) studies typically consists of a single, presumably representative, "learning and memory" task that is expected to detect all potential effects on cognitive functioning. Streamlining the cognitive assessment in these studies saves time and money, but these shortcuts can have serious consequences if the aspect of cognitive functioning that is impaired is not tapped by the single selected task. In particular, executive functioning - a constellation of cognitive functions which enables the organism to focus on multiple streams of information simultaneously, and revise plans as necessary - is poorly assessed in most animal DNT studies. The failure to adequately assess these functions - which include attention, working memory, inhibitory control, and planning - is particularly worrisome in light of evidence that the neural systems that subserve these functions may be uniquely vulnerable to early developmental insults. We illustrate the importance of tapping these areas of functioning in DNT studies by describing the pattern of effects produced by early developmental Pb exposure. Rats exposed to lead (Pb) early in development were tested on a series of automated attention tasks, as well as on a radial arm maze task. The lead-exposed rats were not impaired in this demanding radial arm maze task, despite conditions which tapped the limits of both working and long-term memory. In contrast, the automated tests designed to assess rodent executive functioning revealed selective and functionally important deficits in attention and regulation of emotion or negative affect (produced by committing an error or not receiving an expected reward). This example underscores the importance of including tasks to specifically tap executive functioning in DNT batteries. Such tasks are not only sensitive but can also shed light on the specific nature of the dysfunction, and they can implicate dysfunction of specific neural systems, information which can be used to design therapeutic interventions. Although the use of such tasks increases the time and effort needed to complete the battery, the benefits outweigh the cost, in light of the greater sensitivity of the battery and the more complete characterization of effects. PMID:25224214

  15. Learning to Predict Carcinogenesis of Unstudied Chemicals in Rodents from

    E-print Network

    Bahler, Dennis R.

    Learning to Predict Carcinogenesis of Unstudied Chemicals in Rodents from Completed Rodent Trials subchronic (90 day) and chronic (2 year) rodent exposures studies and, therefore, are costly and time the results of microbial assays, physical- chemical parameters, and the results of 90-day rodent exposure

  16. Measuring rodent incisors from scats can increase accuracy of predator diet studies. An illustration based on island cats and rats.

    PubMed

    Bonnaud, Elsa; Vidal, Eric; Zarzoso-Lacoste, Diane; Torre, Franck

    2008-09-01

    Non-invasive diet studies, which are a simple but important tool to understand trophic interactions inside ecosystems, need to be as detailed as possible. Determining the precise biomass of ingested prey is a key to obtaining not only a better understanding of the amount of food really ingested but also the predator-prey interactions. It is particularly relevant in the case of rodents, because they are often a predominant prey in carnivores' diet and can differ widely in biomass. This study demonstrates how an original and simple method for measuring rat incisors found in cat scats produces measurements which can be correlated with rat weight. This correlation, used in a field application, made it possible to: (i) calculate a more accurate biomass of rats in cat diets and thus obtain a better estimation of the proportion of rats compared to other prey in cat diets; (ii) show that cats preferentially ate smaller rats, indicating that the use of the mean weight of rodents sampled by trap-lines may induce a significant bias in the biomass calculation. Likewise, a correlation between rat lens weight and incisor measurements was found. Using this correlation, it should be possible to estimate the age of the rats eaten by cats and obtain a better understanding of the impact of predators on prey population dynamics. PMID:18722988

  17. A LABORATORY FOR FISH BEHAVIOR STUDIES

    E-print Network

    fish behavior. The laboratory includes a concrete experimental tank, 60 feet long, 20 feet wide, and 5 of fish passage over dams or other obstruc- tions to migration require interpretation of fish behaviorA LABORATORY FOR FISH BEHAVIOR STUDIES Marine Biological Laboratory !\\^.-. i : i>J;,9 WOODS HOLE

  18. Two-photon microscopy as a tool to study blood flow and neurovascular coupling in the rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Andy Y; Driscoll, Jonathan D; Drew, Patrick J; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B; Kleinfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral vascular system services the constant demand for energy during neuronal activity in the brain. Attempts to delineate the logic of neurovascular coupling have been greatly aided by the advent of two-photon laser scanning microscopy to image both blood flow and the activity of individual cells below the surface of the brain. Here we provide a technical guide to imaging cerebral blood flow in rodents. We describe in detail the surgical procedures required to generate cranial windows for optical access to the cortex of both rats and mice and the use of two-photon microscopy to accurately measure blood flow in individual cortical vessels concurrent with local cellular activity. We further provide examples on how these techniques can be applied to the study of local blood flow regulation and vascular pathologies such as small-scale stroke. PMID:22293983

  19. Non-invasive muscle contraction assay to study rodent models of sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Age-related sarcopenia is a disease state of loss of muscle mass and strength that affects physical function and mobility leading to falls, fractures, and disability. The need for therapies to treat age-related sarcopenia has attracted intensive preclinical research. To facilitate the discovery of these therapies, we have developed a non-invasive rat muscle functional assay system to efficiently measure muscle force and evaluate the efficacy of drug candidates. Methods The lower leg muscles of anesthetized rats are artificially stimulated with surface electrodes on the knee holders and the heel support, causing the lower leg muscles to push isometric pedals that are attached to force transducers. We developed a stimulation protocol to perform a fatigability test that reveals functional muscle parameters like maximal force, the rate of fatigue, fatigue-resistant force, as well as a fatigable muscle force index. The system is evaluated in a rat aging model and a rat glucocorticoid-induced muscle loss model Results The aged rats were generally weaker than adult rats and showed a greater reduction in their fatigable force when compared to their fatigue-resistant force. Glucocorticoid treated rats mostly lost fatigable force and fatigued at a higher rate, indicating reduced force from glycolytic fibers with reduced energy reserves. Conclusions The involuntary contraction assay is a reliable system to assess muscle function in rodents and can be applied in preclinical research, including age-related sarcopenia and other myopathy. PMID:22035016

  20. 75 FR 80011 - Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ..., 1978 (43 FR 60013). As stated in its scope (Sec. 58.1), this regulation prescribes good laboratory.... Sample Storage Container Retention FDA's regulations currently require that facilities maintain test article storage containers for the duration of the study (21 CFR 58.105(c)). FDA believes that...

  1. Rodents And Other Gnawers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information about rodents and lagomorphs, including definitions and the characteristics of these animals. Contains teaching activities such as "Habitats for Hoppers,""Cartoon Gnawers," and "The Great Rodent Expedition." Reproducible handouts for two of the activities are provided. (TW)

  2. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  3. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  4. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  5. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  6. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  7. Erythrocyte permeability to urea and water: comparative study in rodents, ruminants, carnivores, humans, and birds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifeng; Lei, Tianluo; Bankir, Lise; Zhao, Dan; Gai, Xiaodong; Zhao, Xuejian; Yang, Baoxue

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian erythrocytes exhibit high urea permeability (P (urea)) due to UT-B expression in their cytoplasmic membrane. This high P (urea) allows fast equilibration of urea in erythrocytes during their transit in the hyperosmotic renal medulla. It also allows more urea (in addition to that in plasma) to participate in counter-current exchange between ascending and descending vasa recta, thus improving the trapping of urea in the medulla and improving urine concentrating ability. To determine if P (urea) in erythrocytes is related to diet and urine concentrating ability, we measured P (urea) in erythrocytes from 11 different mammals and 5 birds using stopped-flow light scattering. Carnivores (dog, fox, cat) exhibited high P (urea) (in x10(-5) cm/s, 5.3 ± 0.6, 3.8 ± 0.5 and 2.8 ± 0.7, respectively). In contrast, herbivores (cow, donkey, sheep) showed much lower P (urea) (0.8 ± 0.2, 0.7 ± 0.2, 1.0 ± 0.1, respectively). Erythrocyte P (urea) in human (1.1 ± 0.2), and pig (1.5 ± 0.1), the two omnivores, was intermediate. Rodents and lagomorphs (mouse, rat, rabbit) had P (urea) intermediate between carnivores and omnivores (3.3 ± 0.4, 2.5 ± 0.3 and 2.4 ± 0.3, respectively). Birds that do not excrete urea and do not express UT-B in their erythrocytes had very low values (<0.1 × 10(-5) cm/s). In contrast to P (urea), water permeability, measured simultaneously, was relatively similar in all mammals. The species differences in erythrocytes P (urea) most probably reflect adaptation to the different types of diet and resulting different needs for concentrating urea in the urine. PMID:20878327

  8. [Caucasian cryptic species of rodents as models for studying the problem of species and speciation].

    PubMed

    Baskevich, M I; Potapov, S G; Mironova, T A

    2015-01-01

    The problem of species and speciation is considered using as a model the cryptic species of rodents inhabiting the Caucasus, the mountain chain with prominent altitude environmental gradient and insular pattern of mountain habitats. These circumstances open additional possibilities for the choice of species conception (biological or phylogenetic), exploration of ancestry pathways (sympatric or allopatric speciation) of model cryptic species groups, and testing the 'refuge' hypothesis. As model species, sibling-species Sicista from the group 'caucasica' (a group of unstriped birch mice) and representatives of the vole subspecies Terricola (Microtus, Arvicolinae) were used. Based on the new data on karyology, nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial gene cytb, multivariate statistical analysis of odontologic traits, and biogeography of sibling-species Sicista from the group 'caucasica' and voles from subspecies Terricola (Microtus, Arvicolinae), their evolutionary history is reconstructed and applicable species concepts are examined. For the present sibling-species Sicista from the group 'caucasica' the allopatric dispersion is typical, which agrees with the hypothesis of speciation in refuges. The sympatry of Terricola sibling-species in the Caucasus is considered as being secondary, and their phenotypic likeness--as an adaptation to similar environmental conditions. Affirmed coexistence of sibling-species Microtus (Terricola) majori and Microtus (Terricola) daghestanicus in the Caucasus (without their hybridization) supports the biological conception of species. The existence of Sicista allospecies from the group of Caucasian unstriped birch mice is best conformed to the phylogenetic conception. However, the high level of chromosomal differences between sibling-species and, in particular, between extreme variants of common evolutionary line (Sicista kazbegica, Sicista kluchorica) does not contradict the biological conception of species. PMID:26353399

  9. Does Nocturnality Drive Binocular Vision? Octodontine Rodents as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Zuniga, Tomas; Medina, Felipe S.; Fredes, Felipe; Zuniga, Claudio; Severín, Daniel; Palacios, Adrián G.; Karten, Harvey J.; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Binocular vision is a visual property that allows fine discrimination of in-depth distance (stereopsis), as well as enhanced light and contrast sensitivity. In mammals enhanced binocular vision is structurally associated with a large degree of frontal binocular overlap, the presence of a corresponding retinal specialization containing a fovea or an area centralis, and well-developed ipsilateral retinal projections to the lateral thalamus (GLd). We compared these visual traits in two visually active species of the genus Octodon that exhibit contrasting visual habits: the diurnal Octodon degus, and the nocturnal Octodon lunatus. The O. lunatus visual field has a prominent 100° frontal binocular overlap, much larger than the 50° of overlap found in O. degus. Cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer were 40% fewer in O. lunatus (180,000) than in O. degus (300,000). O. lunatus has a poorly developed visual streak, but a well developed area centralis, located centrally near the optic disk (peak density of 4,352 cells/mm2). O. degus has a highly developed visual streak, and an area centralis located more temporally (peak density of 6,384 cells/mm2). The volumes of the contralateral GLd and superior colliculus (SC) are 15% larger in O. degus compared to O. lunatus. However, the ipsilateral projections to GLd and SC are 500% larger in O. lunatus than in O. degus. Other retinorecipient structures related to ocular movements and circadian activity showed no statistical differences between species. Our findings strongly suggest that nocturnal visual behavior leads to an enhancement of the structures associated with binocular vision, at least in the case of these rodents. Expansion of the binocular visual field in nocturnal species may have a beneficial effect in light and contrast sensitivity, but not necessarily in stereopsis. We discuss whether these conclusions can be extended to other mammalian and non-mammalian amniotes. PMID:24391911

  10. Does nocturnality drive binocular vision? Octodontine rodents as a case study.

    PubMed

    Vega-Zuniga, Tomas; Medina, Felipe S; Fredes, Felipe; Zuniga, Claudio; Severín, Daniel; Palacios, Adrián G; Karten, Harvey J; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Binocular vision is a visual property that allows fine discrimination of in-depth distance (stereopsis), as well as enhanced light and contrast sensitivity. In mammals enhanced binocular vision is structurally associated with a large degree of frontal binocular overlap, the presence of a corresponding retinal specialization containing a fovea or an area centralis, and well-developed ipsilateral retinal projections to the lateral thalamus (GLd). We compared these visual traits in two visually active species of the genus Octodon that exhibit contrasting visual habits: the diurnal Octodon degus, and the nocturnal Octodon lunatus. The O. lunatus visual field has a prominent 100° frontal binocular overlap, much larger than the 50° of overlap found in O. degus. Cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer were 40% fewer in O. lunatus (180,000) than in O. degus (300,000). O. lunatus has a poorly developed visual streak, but a well developed area centralis, located centrally near the optic disk (peak density of 4,352 cells/mm(2)). O. degus has a highly developed visual streak, and an area centralis located more temporally (peak density of 6,384 cells/mm(2)). The volumes of the contralateral GLd and superior colliculus (SC) are 15% larger in O. degus compared to O. lunatus. However, the ipsilateral projections to GLd and SC are 500% larger in O. lunatus than in O. degus. Other retinorecipient structures related to ocular movements and circadian activity showed no statistical differences between species. Our findings strongly suggest that nocturnal visual behavior leads to an enhancement of the structures associated with binocular vision, at least in the case of these rodents. Expansion of the binocular visual field in nocturnal species may have a beneficial effect in light and contrast sensitivity, but not necessarily in stereopsis. We discuss whether these conclusions can be extended to other mammalian and non-mammalian amniotes. PMID:24391911

  11. Neural mechanisms involved in memory formation and retrieval within the rodent hippocampus : an in vivo electrophysiological study

    E-print Network

    Quirk, Michael C. (Michael Clayton), 1974-

    2002-01-01

    While it is well established that the rodent hippocampus plays a crucial role in the formation and retrieval of spatial memories, the neural mechanisms underlying this process have not been completely characterized. In ...

  12. Spatial Segregation between Invasive and Native Commensal Rodents in an Urban Environment: A Case Study in Niamey, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Garba, Madougou; Dalecky, Ambroise; Kadaoure, Ibrahima; Kane, Mamadou; Hima, Karmadine; Veran, Sophie; Gagare, Sama; Gauthier, Philippe; Tatard, Caroline; Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2014-01-01

    Invasive rodents have been responsible for the diffusion worldwide of many zoonotic agents, thus representing major threats for public health. Cities are important hubs for people and goods exchange and are thus expected to play a pivotal role in invasive commensal rodent dissemination. Yet, data about urban rodents' ecology, especially invasive vs. native species interactions, are dramatically scarce. Here, we provide results of an extensive survey of urban rodents conducted in Niamey, Niger, depicting the early stages of rodent bioinvasions within a city. We explore the species-specific spatial distributions throughout the city using contrasted approaches, namely field sampling, co-occurrence analysis, occupancy modelling and indicator geostatistics. We show that (i) two species (i.e. rural-like vs. truly commensal) assemblages can be identified, and that (ii) within commensal rodents, invasive (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) and native (Mastomys natalensis) species are spatially segregated. Moreover, several pieces of arguments tend to suggest that these exclusive distributions reflect an ongoing native-to-invasive species turn over. The underlying processes as well as the possible consequences for humans are discussed. PMID:25379785

  13. STUDY OF THE PREVALENCE OF Capillaria hepatica IN HUMANS AND RODENTS IN AN URBAN AREA OF THE CITY OF PORTO VELHO, RONDÔNIA, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Elierson José Gomes; Basano, Sérgio de Almeida; de Souza, Márcia Maria; Honda, Eduardo Resende; de Castro, Márcio Botelho; Colodel, Edson Moleta; Silva, Jéssica Carolinne Damasceno e; Barros, Lauro Prado; Rodrigues, Elisa Sousa; Camargo, Luís Marcelo Aranha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatic capillariosis, caused by Capillaria hepatica (Calodium hepaticum) (Bancroft, 1893), Travassos, 1915 (Nematoda, Trichinelloidea, Capillariidae), is a common zoonosis in rodents but is rare in humans. Seventy-two cases in humans have been reported worldwide since the first case was described by MACARTHUR in 192417,27. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Capillaria hepatica in humans and rodents in an urban area of Porto Velho, the capital of Rondônia, in Brazil. Methods: After conducting a census of the area, 490 residents were randomly selected, and, after signing a term of consent, provided blood samples that were screened for anti-Capillaria hepatica antibodies. Simultaneously, rats were captured to assess the prevalence of this parasite in rodents by histopathological examination in liver sections. Results: A prevalence of 1.8% was found among residents who had specific antibodies at a dilution of 1:150, indicating exposure to parasite eggs; 0.8% of the subjects also had positive titers at a dilution of 1:400, indicating true infection. The prevalence in rats was 2%. Conclusions: The prevalence of infection with this parasite among humans and rats was low. While the prevalence encountered among humans was within the limits reported in the literature, the prevalence among rodents was much lower. PMID:25651325

  14. Rodent Research-1 Validation of Rodent Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Beegle, Janet

    2013-01-01

    To achieve novel science objectives, validation of a rodent habitat on ISS will enable - In-flight analyses during long duration spaceflight- Use of genetically altered animals- Application of modern analytical techniques (e.g. genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics)

  15. Quantitative Ultrasound Assessment of Ultrasound Therapy in Rodent Mammary

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Quantitative Ultrasound Assessment of Ultrasound Therapy in Rodent Mammary Tumors: In Vivo and Ex as temperature monitoring in a rat model mammary tumor both in vivo and ex vivo. In the in vivo study, 40 rodent. These studies demonstrated increases in the BSC in rodent mammary tumors with therapy in both ex vivo, water

  16. LABORATORY SCALE STEAM INJECTION TREATABILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory scale steam injection treatability studies were first developed at The University of California-Berkeley. A comparable testing facility has been developed at USEPA's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center. Experience has already shown that many volatile organic...

  17. Simulated Laboratory/Field Study of Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubowsky, Nathan; Hartman, Elliott M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Immediately following a lecture discussion on early hominid characteristics and behavior, students participate in a laboratory study of bipedal locomotion based on an analysis of footprints. The development and use of this simulation are described. (JN)

  18. Exsanguination Postconditioning of ICH (EPIC-H) Using the Lancet for Brain Bleed in Rodents, Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral iron overload contributes to free-radical damage and secondary brain injury following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Phlebotomy most effectively removes iron from the human body, compared with any pharmacological agent (e.g., chelator), and does not impact mean arterial blood pressure. For centuries, this ancient method was a treatment for stroke. This is the first controlled scientific evaluation of this approach after ICH. Femoral catheterization occurred at 30 min following collagenase infusion. Three different exsanguination volumes were tested: 1, 2, 3 ml (approximately 5-15 % (normotensive) loss of total blood volume; or 3.33-10 ml/kg) compared with ICH and sham controls. Brain water content, hemorrhage size, and neuroscore were measured 24 h later. Preliminary analysis of the data demonstrated that therapeutic phlebotomy occurring shortly after ICH in adult rats significantly decreased brain edema and hemorrhagic size at 1 day after the brain injury. However, the neuroscore was unchanged compared with untreated animals. Therefore, exsanguination therapy after ICH using the traditional phlebotomy approach may eventually ameliorate early brain injury (hemorrhage and edema) in further human studies, despite equivocal changes in the short-term neurological functional ability. In meantime, translational studies must further delineate the involvement of specific neuroprotective molecules, sympathetic responses, hemodynamic-vasoactive mediators, or neuroendocrine factors involved in this apparent postconditioning approach following ICH in rodents. PMID:26463922

  19. Positron imaging feasibility studies: characteristics of (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake in rodent and canine neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Weiden, P.L.; Grunbaum, J.

    1981-10-01

    Uptake (/sup 3/H)thymidine was studied in BALB/c mice with EMT-6 sarcoma, in Buffalo rats with Morris 7777 hepatoma, and in nine dogs with spontaneous neoplasms: four lymphomas, two osteosarcomas, two soft-tissue sarcomas, and a thyroid carcinoma. High tumor-to-tissue ratios were observed for all tumor types assayed, and absolute uptakes, when computed as percent dose per gram tumor normalized for body weight, were similar for transplanted and spontaneous tumors. In the rodent tumors, radiothymidine was retained for at least 3 hr in the tumor without appreciable loss. In canine neoplasms, although the highest uptakes were observed in cellular tumors with many mitotic figures, tumor uptake showed significant variability that did not correlate with any obvious histologic change, and thus may reflect true biologic differences in metabolism among tumors at different sites in the same animal. These studies provide additional experimental evidence that the ratios of neoplastic to normal tissue and the kinetics of thymidine uptake by tumors are suitable for positron emission tomography of neoplasms in small and large, animals, including both transplanted and spontaneous tumors.

  20. Reprint of "Value of water mazes for assessing spatial and egocentric learning and memory in rodent basic research and regulatory studies".

    PubMed

    Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Maneuvering safely through the environment is central to survival of all animals. The ability to do this depends on learning and remembering locations. This capacity is encoded in the brain by two systems: one using cues outside the organism (distal cues), allocentric navigation, and one using self-movement, internal cues and sometimes proximal cues, egocentric navigation. Allocentric navigation involves the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and surrounding structures (e.g., subiculum); in humans this system encodes declarative memory (allocentric, semantic, and episodic, i.e., memory for people, places, things, and events). This form of memory is assessed in laboratory animals by many methods, but predominantly the Morris water maze (MWM). Egocentric navigation involves the dorsal striatum and connected structures; in humans this system encodes routes and integrated paths and when over-learned becomes implicit or procedural memory. Several allocentric methods for rodents are reviewed and compared with the MWM with particular focus on the Cincinnati water maze (CWM). MWM advantages include minimal training, no food deprivation, ease of testing, reliable learning, insensitivity to differences in body weight and appetite, absence of non-performers, control methods for performance effects, repeated testing capability and other factors that make this test well-suited for regulatory studies. MWM limitations are also reviewed. Evidence-based MWM design and testing methods are presented. On balance, the MWM is arguably the preferred test for assessing learning and memory in basic research and regulatory studies and the CWM is recommended if two tests can be accommodated so that both allocentric (MWM) and egocentric (CWM) learning and memory can be effectively and efficiently assessed. PMID:26071087

  1. Laboratory Studies of DIB Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies of the following potential diffuse interstellar band (DIB) carriers are reviewed: unspecified organics, carbon chains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fullerenes and derivatives, as well as porphyrins and related material. An assessment of each is given, along with suggestions for further experimental studies needed to fully test each candidate. Of the experimental techniques in common use matrix isolation spectroscopy with neon matrices is the most appropriate for the DIBs. The low vapor pressure and high reactivity of these materials preclude gas phase studies on many of these species. At this point, given the type and quality of published data available, carbon chains and PARs are the most promising candidates for a number of the DIBs.

  2. Some studies on spontaneous Hymenolepis diminuta infection in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Azza K; Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Kamal, Amany M

    2015-04-01

    Hymenolepis diminuta is a tapeworm that occurs worldwide. It is known to be found commonly in areas where large amounts of food grains or other dry feed products, which are the favorite foods for rats. Transmission of disease to human is uncommon; however, it may be a serious threat for population who are living in rural areas which are suffering from excessive rodents. Here, this study had done on spontaneous H. diminuta infection in laboratory rats as a model. Out of thirty five adult laboratory rats investigated for parasitic diseases only nine (25.71%) were diagnosed positive for spontaneous H. diminuta infection. Four of them (44.44%) were found losing of weight and lacking of motility, while the others were normal. On microscopic examination, H. diminuta eggs had been found in their stool. On autopsy, small intestines were found to contain from 5-6 multi-segmented tapeworms in each rat. Histopathologically, intestinal lumen showed varying sections of H. diminuta segments with serrated borders. H. diminuta infection caused multiple mucosal ulcers with absence of intestinal villi from the surface epithelium and excessive mucin. Moreover, inflammatory cells infiltration in the connective tissue core of the villi. Furthermore, the Toluidine blue stain showed that there are Mastiocytosis. Additionally, there were goblet cells hyperplasia on using PAS. Moreover, there were high expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and inducible Nitric-Oxide Synthase (iNOs). This implicate, strong correlation between COX-2, TNF-? and iNOs expression and inflammation induced by H. diminuta. PMID:26012226

  3. Field studies on dominant rodents and the efficacy of certain insecticides to their fleas in Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Mohamed Ismail; Mikhail, Micheal William

    2011-08-01

    A preliminary survey of domestic rodent and the efficacy of bendiocarb, diazinon and pirimiphos-methyl insecticides to their fleas were carried out in Dakahlia Governorates (Aga, Meet-Ghamr, El-Senbellawen, Temi El-Amded, Beni-Abed, Dekernes, Nabarow, Talkha, Menia El-Nasr and El-Kordy). Rodent index (number of rodent/trap) and percentage frequency of drodent species were recorded from October 2010 to May 2011. The main rodent species found were the Norway rat, Rattus norvegicus, the grey-bellied rat, R. rattus alexandrinus, the white-bellied rat, R. r. frugivorus and the house mouse, Mus musculus. The rodent index at Beni-Abed, Nabarow, Meet-Ghamr, Dekernes and El-Kordy centers showed 0.46, 0.39, 0.34, 0.33 & 0.33, respectively, while Menia El-Nasr center showed the lowest (0.08). Aga, Talkha, El-Senbellawen, and Temi El-Amded centers showed moderate (0.25, 0.21, 0.2 & 0.16, respectively). The commonest flea species was the oriental rat flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, the mouse flea, Leptopsylla segnis, the dog flea, Ctenocephalides canis and the sticktight flea Echidnophaga gallinacea. The highest number of fleas was on R. norvegicus (Flea index=10.9) while lowest number was on Mus musculus (Flea index=0.1). X. cheopis was the highest frequency distributed for all domestic rodent species (60.9%), while, C. canis was the lowest (1.6%). The results showed that bendiocarb was effective (Lc50=0.389%) than diazinon (Lc50=1.039%) and pirimiphosmethyl (Lc50=2.056 %). PMID:21980770

  4. Photographic laboratory studies of explosions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, M. M.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a series of cinematographic studies of explosions made with a high-speed rotating-mirror streak camera which uses a high-frequency stroboscopic ruby laser as the light source. The results obtained mainly concern explosions initiated by focused laser irradiation from a pulsed neodymium laser in a detonating gas consisting essentially of an equimolar mixture of acetylene and oxygen at an initial pressure of 100 torr at room temperature. Among the most significant observations were observations of a spherical blast wave preceded by a Chapman-Jouguet detonation which is stabilized immediately after initiation, the merging of a spherical flame with a shock front of the blast wave in which the flame is propagating, the division of a spherical detonation front into a shock wave and flame, and the generation of shock waves by a network of spherical flames.

  5. Alpha-Synuclein Expression in the Oligodendrocyte Lineage: an In Vitro and In Vivo Study Using Rodent and Human Models

    PubMed Central

    Djelloul, Mehdi; Holmqvist, Staffan; Boza-Serrano, Antonio; Azevedo, Carla; Yeung, Maggie S.; Goldwurm, Stefano; Frisén, Jonas; Deierborg, Tomas; Roybon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this study, we sought evidence for alpha-synuclein (ASYN) expression in oligodendrocytes, as a possible endogenous source of ASYN to explain its presence in glial inclusions found in multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). We identified ASYN in oligodendrocyte lineage progenitors isolated from the rodent brain, in oligodendrocytes generated from embryonic stem cells, and in induced pluripotent stem cells produced from fibroblasts of a healthy individual and patients diagnosed with MSA or PD, in cultures in vitro. Notably, we observed a significant decrease in ?SYN during oligodendrocyte maturation. Additionally, we show the presence of transcripts in PDGFR?/CD140a+ cells and SOX10+ oligodendrocyte lineage nuclei isolated by FACS from rodent and human healthy and diseased brains, respectively. Our work identifies ASYN in oligodendrocyte lineage cells, and it offers additional in vitro cellular models that should provide significant insights of the functional implication of ASYN during oligodendrocyte development and disease. PMID:26235891

  6. Rodent-borne diseases in Thailand: targeting rodent carriers and risky habitats

    PubMed Central

    Herbreteau, Vincent; Bordes, Frédéric; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Supputamongkol, Yupin; Morand, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Background Comparative analysis, which aims at investigating ecological and evolutionary patterns among species, may help at targeting reservoirs of zoonotic diseases particularly in countries presenting high biodiversity. Here, we developed a simple method to target rodent reservoirs using published studies screening microparasite infections. Methods We compiled surveys of microparasites investigated in rodents trapped in Thailand. The data comprise a total of 17,358 rodents from 18 species that have been investigated for a total of 10 microparasites (viruses, bacteria and protozoans). We used residual variation of microparasite richness controlled for both rodent sample size and pathogens’ screening effort to identify major rodent reservoirs and potential risky habitats. Results Microparasite species richness was positively related to rodent sample size and pathogens’ screening effort. The investigation of the residual variations of microparasite species richness showed that several rodent species harboured more pathogens than expected by the regression model. Similarly, higher pathogen richness than expected was observed in rodents living in non-flooded lands, forests and paddy fields. Conclusion Our results suggest to target some rodent species that are not commonly investigated for pathogen screening or surveillance such as R. adamanensis or B. savilei, and that non-flooded lands and forests should be more taken into caution, whereas much surveys focused on paddy rice fields and households. PMID:22957129

  7. Applications of schedule-induced polydipsia in rodents for the study of an excessive ethanol intake phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ford, Matthew M

    2014-05-01

    Schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) is generated by subjecting a highly motivated animal to a sub-optimal rate of food reinforcement while also providing access to a fluid. SIP is one of several adjunctive (or displacement) behaviors that are expressed in an exaggerated form that is deemed 'excessive.' This feature makes SIP an attractive model for studying an excessive ethanol drinking phenotype in rodents. Multiple experimental variables are crucial for the full manifestation of adjunctive drinking, including the degree of food deprivation, the inter-pellet interval selected, and the size of the food reward offered. Although these variables were extensively studied and optimized for water polydipsia in rats, a similarly customized approach to ethanol SIP and application of the procedure in mice have largely been curtailed in favor of the default variable values historically used for water SIP in rats. Further, ethanol SIP also requires careful consideration of variables such as taste and ethanol concentration. Investigation of the stress axis and neurochemical systems such as dopamine and serotonin in mediating adjunctive drinking stemmed from two leading hypotheses regarding the underlying mechanisms of SIP generation: 1) SIP as a coping strategy to mitigate stress associated with the aversive environmental condition, and 2) SIP as a displacement of reward in a highly motivated animal. Ethanol SIP is a powerful model of excessive intake because it can generate an ethanol-dependent state and sustain frequent and intoxicating levels of blood ethanol with voluntary oral consumption. The required food deprivation and the loss of the excessive drinking phenotype following removal of the generator schedule are the two main limitations of the model. Future utility of ethanol SIP will be enhanced by more fully dissecting the underlying hormonal and neurochemical mechanisms and optimizing experimental variables for ethanol SIP on a per species and strain basis. PMID:24680665

  8. Applications of schedule-induced polydipsia in rodents for the study of an excessive ethanol intake phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) is generated by subjecting a highly motivated animal to a sub-optimal rate of food reinforcement while also providing access to a fluid. SIP is one of several adjunctive (or displacement) behaviors that are expressed in an exaggerated form that is deemed ‘excessive’. This feature makes SIP an attractive model for studying an excessive ethanol drinking phenotype in rodents. Multiple experimental variables are crucial for the full manifestation of adjunctive drinking, including the degree of food deprivation, the inter-pellet interval selected, and the size of the food reward offered. Although these variables were extensively studied and optimized for water polydipsia in rats, a similarly customized approach to ethanol SIP and application of the procedure in mice have largely been curtailed in favor of the default variable values historically used for water SIP in rats. Further, ethanol SIP also requires careful consideration of variables such as taste and ethanol concentration. Investigation of the stress axis and neurochemical systems such as dopamine and serotonin in mediating adjunctive drinking stemmed from two leading hypotheses regarding the underlying mechanisms of SIP generation: 1) SIP as a coping strategy to mitigate stress associated with the aversive environmental condition, and 2) SIP as a displacement of reward in a highly motivated animal. Ethanol SIP is a powerful model of excessive intake because it can generate an ethanol-dependent state and sustain frequent and intoxicating levels of blood ethanol with voluntary oral consumption. The required food deprivation and the loss of the excessive drinking phenotype following removal of the generator schedule are the two main limitations of the model. Future utility of ethanol SIP will be enhanced by more fully dissecting the underlying hormonal and neurochemical mechanisms and optimizing experimental variables for ethanol SIP on a per species and strain basis. PMID:24680665

  9. Lurking in the Shadows: Emerging Rodent Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Besselsen, David G.; Franklin, Craig L.; Livingston, Robert S.; Riley, Lela K.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent parvoviruses, Helicobacter spp., murine norovirus, and several other previously unknown infectious agents have “emerged” in laboratory rodents relatively recently. These agents have been discovered serendipitously or through active investigation of atypical serology results, cell culture contamination, unexpected histopathology, or previously unrecognized clinical disease syndromes. The potential research impact of these agents is not fully known. Infected rodents have demonstrated immunomodulation, tumor suppression, clinical disease (particularly in immunodeficient rodents), and histopathology. Perturbations of organismal and cellular physiology also likely occur. These agents posed unique challenges to laboratory animal resource programs once discovered; it was necessary to develop specific diagnostic assays and an understanding of their epidemiology and transmission routes before attempting eradication, and then evaluate eradication methods for efficacy. Even then management approaches varied significantly, from apathy to total exclusion, and such inconsistency has hindered the sharing and transfer of rodents among institutions, particularly for genetically modified rodent models that may not be readily available. As additional infectious agents are discovered in laboratory rodents in coming years, much of what researchers have learned from experiences with the recently identified pathogens will be applicable. This article provides an overview of the discovery, detection, and research impact of infectious agents recently identified in laboratory rodents. We also discuss emerging syndromes for which there is a suspected infectious etiology, and the unique challenges of managing newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:18506061

  10. Safety assessment of mushroom ?-glucan: subchronic toxicity in rodents and mutagenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Nan, F H; Chen, S; Wu, J F; Lu, C L; Soni, Madhu G

    2011-11-01

    Mushroom ?-glucan, a polymer of ?-(1,3/1,6)-glucan, has been claimed for its health benefits. The objective of this study was to assess the safety in-use of mushroom ?-glucan as dietary supplement and food ingredient. Hence, a subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies were conducted. In the subchronic toxicity study, Sprague Dawley rats (12/sex/group) were administered (gavage) mushroom ?-glucan at dose levels of 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 90 days. As compared to control group, administration of ?-glucan did not result in any toxicologically significant treatment-related changes in clinical observations, ophthalmic examinations, body weights, body weight gains, feed consumption, and organ weights. No adverse effects of the ?-glucan on the hematology, serum chemistry parameters, urinalysis or terminal necropsy (gross or histopathology findings) were noted. The results of mutagenicity studies as evaluated by gene mutations in Salmonella typhimurium, in vitro chromosome aberrations and in vivo micronucleus test in mouse did not reveal any genotoxicity of ?-glucan. Based on the subchronic study, the no observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for mushroom ?-glucan was determined as 2000 mg/kgbw/day, the highest dose tested. PMID:21856366

  11. Safety assessment of mushroom ?-glucan: subchronic toxicity in rodents and mutagenicity studies.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Chen SN; Nan FH; Chen S; Wu JF; Lu CL; Soni MG

    2011-11-01

    Mushroom ?-glucan, a polymer of ?-(1,3/1,6)-glucan, has been claimed for its health benefits. The objective of this study was to assess the safety in-use of mushroom ?-glucan as dietary supplement and food ingredient. Hence, a subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies were conducted. In the subchronic toxicity study, Sprague Dawley rats (12/sex/group) were administered (gavage) mushroom ?-glucan at dose levels of 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 90 days. As compared to control group, administration of ?-glucan did not result in any toxicologically significant treatment-related changes in clinical observations, ophthalmic examinations, body weights, body weight gains, feed consumption, and organ weights. No adverse effects of the ?-glucan on the hematology, serum chemistry parameters, urinalysis or terminal necropsy (gross or histopathology findings) were noted. The results of mutagenicity studies as evaluated by gene mutations in Salmonella typhimurium, in vitro chromosome aberrations and in vivo micronucleus test in mouse did not reveal any genotoxicity of ?-glucan. Based on the subchronic study, the no observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for mushroom ?-glucan was determined as 2000 mg/kgbw/day, the highest dose tested.

  12. The prosocial effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA): Controlled studies in humans and laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Kamilar-Britt, Philip; Bedi, Gillinder

    2015-10-01

    Users of ±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 'ecstasy') report prosocial effects such as sociability and empathy. Supporting these apparently unique social effects, data from controlled laboratory studies indicate that MDMA alters social feelings, information processing, and behavior in humans, and social behavior in rodents. Here, we review this growing body of evidence. In rodents, MDMA increases passive prosocial behavior (adjacent lying) and social reward while decreasing aggression, effects that may involve serotonin 1A receptor mediated oxytocin release interacting with vasopressin receptor 1A. In humans, MDMA increases plasma oxytocin and produces feelings of social affiliation. It decreases identification of negative facial expressions (cognitive empathy) and blunts responses to social rejection, while enhancing responses to others' positive emotions (emotional empathy) and increasing social approach. Thus, consistent with drug folklore, laboratory administration of MDMA robustly alters social processing in humans and increases social approach in humans and animals. Effects are consistent with increased sociability, with mixed evidence about enhanced empathy. These neurobiologically-complex prosocial effects likely motivate recreational ecstasy use. PMID:26408071

  13. Rodent models to study the metabolic effects of shiftwork in humans

    PubMed Central

    Opperhuizen, Anne-Loes; van Kerkhof, Linda W. M.; Proper, Karin I.; Rodenburg, Wendy; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2015-01-01

    Our current 24-h society requires an increasing number of employees to work nightshifts with millions of people worldwide working during the evening or night. Clear associations have been found between shiftwork and the risk to develop metabolic health problems, such as obesity. An increasing number of studies suggest that the underlying mechanism includes disruption of the rhythmically organized body physiology. Normally, daily 24-h rhythms in physiological processes are controlled by the central clock in the brain in close collaboration with peripheral clocks present throughout the body. Working schedules of shiftworkers greatly interfere with these normal daily rhythms by exposing the individual to contrasting inputs, i.e., at the one hand (dim)light exposure at night, nightly activity and eating and at the other hand daytime sleep and reduced light exposure. Several different animal models are being used to mimic shiftwork and study the mechanism responsible for the observed correlation between shiftwork and metabolic diseases. In this review we aim to provide an overview of the available animal studies with a focus on the four most relevant models that are being used to mimic human shiftwork: altered timing of (1) food intake, (2) activity, (3) sleep, or (4) light exposure. For all studies we scored whether and how relevant metabolic parameters, such as bodyweight, adiposity and plasma glucose were affected by the manipulation. In the discussion, we focus on differences between shiftwork models and animal species (i.e., rat and mouse). In addition, we comment on the complexity of shiftwork as an exposure and the subsequent difficulties when using animal models to investigate this condition. In view of the added value of animal models over human cohorts to study the effects and mechanisms of shiftwork, we conclude with recommendations to improve future research protocols to study the causality between shiftwork and metabolic health problems using animal models. PMID:25852554

  14. HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN RODENTS — USES AND CAVEATS IN TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of cardiac pacing dynamics that has recently garnered a great deal of interest in environmental health studies. While the use of these measures has become popular, much uncertainty remains in the interpretation of results, both in terms ...

  15. Acute and sub-chronic oral toxicity study of black tea in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Tapas Kumar; Chatterjee, Suparna; Hazra, Alok Kumar; Pradhan, Richeek; Chowdhury, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic oral toxicity study for black tea (Camellia sinensis), the most commonly consumed variety of tea, is lacking. The present study was undertaken to assess the iron load on black tea (Camellia sinensis) and its safety aspects in animals. Materials and Methods: The analysis of iron was done in six tea samples as per American Public Health Association method using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Maximum physical iron-loaded tea sample was identified on black tea sample 2 (BTS-2), and this was further studied for acute and 90-day sub-chronic toxicity following Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines. Results: Black tea sample 2 did not show any signs of toxicity or mortality at up to 2 g/kg per oral dose in Swiss albino mice. 90-day toxicity studies in Wistar rats did not reveal any evidence of toxicity at up to 250 mg/kg/day (2.5% infusion of BTS-2) oral dose as exhibited by regular observations, body weight, food consumption, hematology, serum chemistry, organ weights, and histopathology. Further, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, unsaturated iron binding capacity, and ferritin were not altered after 90 days of treatment. Masson trichrome staining and Perls’ staining did not reveal any abnormalities in hepatic tissue following 90-day treatment of high iron-loaded BTS-2. Conclusions: This safety study provides evidence that BTSs, in spite of relatively high iron content, show no significant iron-related toxicity on acute or sub-chronic oral administration in animals. PMID:25878375

  16. Heteroxenous coccidia increase the predation risk of parasitized rodents.

    PubMed

    Vorísek, P; Votýpka, J; Zvára, K; Svobodová, M

    1998-12-01

    We have investigated the influence of heteroxenous coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina) on the predation risk of intermediate hosts. Voles infected with Frenkelia spp. were found more frequently in buzzards' (Buteo buteo) prey than among snap-trapped rodents. To eliminate the possibility of traps selecting for uninfected rodents, a laboratory experiment was performed. Mice experimentally infected with Sarcocystis dispersa seemed to be more likely caught by the final host, the long-eared owl (Asio otus); this result was confirmed by a mathematical model. Field data confirmed the adaptive value of parasite-induced changes. The increase of predation is directed towards the specific final host only or is non-specific. In the populations studied the probability of predation of parasitized individuals by the specific predator was increased. PMID:9881375

  17. Anthocyanins do not influence long-chain n-3 fatty acid status: studies in cells, rodents and humans?

    PubMed Central

    Vauzour, David; Tejera, Noemi; O'Neill, Colette; Booz, Valeria; Jude, Baptiste; Wolf, Insa M.A.; Rigby, Neil; Silvan, Jose Manuel; Curtis, Peter J.; Cassidy, Aedin; de Pascual-Teresa, Sonia; Rimbach, Gerald; Minihane, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Increased tissue status of the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with cardiovascular and cognitive benefits. Limited epidemiological and animal data suggest that flavonoids, and specifically anthocyanins, may increase EPA and DHA levels, potentially by increasing their synthesis from the shorter-chain n-3 PUFA, ?-linolenic acid. Using complimentary cell, rodent and human studies we investigated the impact of anthocyanins and anthocyanin-rich foods/extracts on plasma and tissue EPA and DHA levels and on the expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2), which represents the rate limiting enzymes in EPA and DHA synthesis. In experiment 1, rats were fed a standard diet containing either palm oil or rapeseed oil supplemented with pure anthocyanins for 8 weeks. Retrospective fatty acid analysis was conducted on plasma samples collected from a human randomized controlled trial where participants consumed an elderberry extract for 12 weeks (experiment 2). HepG2 cells were cultured with ?-linolenic acid with or without select anthocyanins and their in vivo metabolites for 24 h and 48 h (experiment 3). The fatty acid composition of the cell membranes, plasma and liver tissues were analyzed by gas chromatography. Anthocyanins and anthocyanin-rich food intake had no significant impact on EPA or DHA status or FADS2 gene expression in any model system. These data indicate little impact of dietary anthocyanins on n-3 PUFA distribution and suggest that the increasingly recognized benefits of anthocyanins are unlikely to be the result of a beneficial impact on tissue fatty acid status. PMID:25573539

  18. Urinary Lipocalin Protein in a Female Rodent with Correlation to Phases in the Estrous Cycle: An Experimental Study Accompanied by In Silico Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saibaba, Ganesan; Alagesan, Alagersamy; Rengarajan, Rengasamy Lakhsminarayanan; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2013-01-01

    Male urinary lipocalin family proteins, practically odorant-binding proteins but also could be pheromones by themselves, in rodents act as a shuttle for chemosignal communication and facilitate delivery of the signals for access to congeners. However, presence of this protein in urine of female rodents has not yet been reported. Therefore, the present investigation was carried out to find if lipocalin family protein is present in the urine of female house rat and, if so, to find whether its expression differs between the phases in the estrous cycle. The rat urinary protein was separated in single dimensional gel electrophoresis. A 14.5 kDa lipocalin protein appeared in the urine prominently during the estrus and metestrus phases compared to proestrus and diestrus phases. The expression of this protein in the urine was very low in ovariectomized rats. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis affirmed the 14.5 kDa protein as a lipocalin family protein. Analysis adopting bio-informatics tools further proved the protein as a lipocalin family member. Thus, this study for the first time demonstrated the presence of a lipocalin family protein in the urine of a female rodent and it was highly expressed during estrus phase. This lipocalin protein in female rat urine may facilitate a chemosignal function independently of a pheromone or in association with a specific pheromone. PMID:23967199

  19. Urinary lipocalin protein in a female rodent with correlation to phases in the estrous cycle: an experimental study accompanied by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Subramanian; Rajesh, Durairaj; Saibaba, Ganesan; Alagesan, Alagersamy; Rengarajan, Rengasamy Lakhsminarayanan; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2013-01-01

    Male urinary lipocalin family proteins, practically odorant-binding proteins but also could be pheromones by themselves, in rodents act as a shuttle for chemosignal communication and facilitate delivery of the signals for access to congeners. However, presence of this protein in urine of female rodents has not yet been reported. Therefore, the present investigation was carried out to find if lipocalin family protein is present in the urine of female house rat and, if so, to find whether its expression differs between the phases in the estrous cycle. The rat urinary protein was separated in single dimensional gel electrophoresis. A 14.5 kDa lipocalin protein appeared in the urine prominently during the estrus and metestrus phases compared to proestrus and diestrus phases. The expression of this protein in the urine was very low in ovariectomized rats. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis affirmed the 14.5 kDa protein as a lipocalin family protein. Analysis adopting bio-informatics tools further proved the protein as a lipocalin family member. Thus, this study for the first time demonstrated the presence of a lipocalin family protein in the urine of a female rodent and it was highly expressed during estrus phase. This lipocalin protein in female rat urine may facilitate a chemosignal function independently of a pheromone or in association with a specific pheromone. PMID:23967199

  20. Ultrastructural features of masseter muscle exhibiting altered occlusal relationship—a study in a rodent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, Marcio V.; Aciole, Gilberth T. S.; Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; Baptista, Abrahão F.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Aguiar, Marcio C.; Santos, Jean N.

    2010-05-01

    The role of occlusion on Tempormandibular Disorders (TMD) is still unclear, mainly regarding muscular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occlusion highlights on masseter ultra morphology. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly divided in four groups: 10 for control group, 10 for occlusal alteration group (CCO). Rats underwent unilateral amputation of the left inferior and superior molar cusps to simulate an occlusal wear situation. The rats of control group had no occlusal wear. Half of the animals of each group was sacrificed in 14 days after the occlusal consuming and half 30 days after the occlusal consuming. The masseter muscles ipsilateral to the amputated molars were excised and processed for light microscopy, electron microscopy. The light microscopy did not show differences between the groups. The electron microscopy was able to detect a degree of intracellular damage in muscle fibers of CCO group: swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae and cleared matrix, signs of hypercontraction of I bands and myofibril disorganization.

  1. Ultrastructural features of masseter muscle exhibiting altered occlusal relationship - a study in a rodent model

    SciTech Connect

    Lisboa, Marcio V.; Aciole, Gilberth T. S.; Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Santos, Jean N.; Baptista, Abrahao F.; Aguiar, Marcio C.

    2010-05-31

    The role of occlusion on Tempormandibular Disorders (TMD) is still unclear, mainly regarding muscular function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occlusion highlights on masseter ultra morphology. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly divided in four groups: 10 for control group, 10 for occlusal alteration group (CCO). Rats underwent unilateral amputation of the left inferior and superior molar cusps to simulate an occlusal wear situation. The rats of control group had no occlusal wear. Half of the animals of each group was sacrificed in 14 days after the occlusal consuming and half 30 days after the occlusal consuming. The masseter muscles ipsilateral to the amputated molars were excised and processed for light microscopy, electron microscopy. The light microscopy did not show differences between the groups. The electron microscopy was able to detect a degree of intracellular damage in muscle fibers of CCO group: swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae and cleared matrix, signs of hypercontraction of I bands and myofibril disorganization.

  2. JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay for the detection of genotoxic carcinogens: I. Summary of pre-validation study results.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yoshifumi; Kojima, Hajime; Omori, Takashi; Corvi, Raffaella; Honma, Masamistu; Schechtman, Leonard M; Tice, Raymond R; Burlinson, Brian; Escobar, Patricia A; Kraynak, Andrew R; Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Nakajima, Madoka; Pant, Kamala; Asano, Norihide; Lovell, David; Morita, Takeshi; Ohno, Yasuo; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay (comet assay) is used internationally to investigate the in vivo genotoxic potential of test chemicals. This assay, however, has not previously been formally validated. The Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM), with the cooperation of the U.S. NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM)/the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), and the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society/Mammalian Mutagenesis Study Group (JEMS/MMS), organized an international validation study to evaluate the reliability and relevance of the assay for identifying genotoxic carcinogens, using liver and stomach as target organs. The ultimate goal of this validation effort was to establish an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. The purpose of the pre-validation studies (i.e., Phase 1 through 3), conducted in four or five laboratories with extensive comet assay experience, was to optimize the protocol to be used during the definitive validation study. PMID:26212293

  3. Acute, mutagenicity, teratogenicity and subchronic oral toxicity studies of diaveridine in rodents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzhong; Sun, Feifei; Tang, Shusheng; Zhang, Suxia; Cao, Xingyuan

    2015-09-01

    Diaveridine (DVD) is a member of the 2,4-pyrimidinediamine class of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors. It is used in combination with sulfaquinoxaline as an antiprotozoal agent in animals for the prophylaxis and treatment of coccidiosis and leucocytozoonosis. Herein, we report a complete toxicological safety assessment of DVD for clinical use. The study of toxicity, genetic toxicity (mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus assay, mice sperm abnormality test and in vivo chromosome aberration test of mammalian bone marrow), 90-day sub-chronic toxicity and teratogenicity test were performed. In the acute oral toxicity tests, median lethal dose, LD50, was more than 2378mg/kg body weight in Sprague Dawley rats (1025mg/kg body weight in ICR mice). The testing results for three terms of mutagenicity toxicity (mouse chromosome aberration, erythrocyte micronucleus and sperm abnormality) were all negative at 128-512mg/kg body weight. For 90-day feeding of DVD at the dosage of 10mg/kg body weight in both male and female SD rats, no signs of toxicological effects were detected. Meanwhile, for teratogenicity test in female SD rats at the dosage of 37mg/kg body weight, there were no toxicological signs observed. Thus, our results suggested that the DVD is safe when administered orally in rats at 10mg/kg body weight per day. PMID:26397222

  4. ART and health: clinical outcomes and insights on molecular mechanisms from rodent studies.

    PubMed

    Feuer, S K; Camarano, L; Rinaudo, P F

    2013-04-01

    Since the birth of the first IVF-conceived child in 1978, the use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) has grown dramatically, contributing to the successful birth of 5 million individuals worldwide. However, there are several reported associations of ART with pregnancy complications, such as low birthweight (LBW), preterm birth, birth defects, epigenetic disorders, cancer and poor metabolic health. Whether this is attributed to ART procedures or to the subset of the population seeking ART remains a controversy, but the most relevant question today concerns the potential long-term implications of assisted conception. Recent evidence has emerged suggesting that ART-conceived children have distinct metabolic profiles that may predispose to cardiovascular pathologies in adulthood. Because the eldest IVF individuals are still too young to exhibit components of chronic middle-aged syndromes, the use of animal models has become particularly useful in describing the effects of unusual or stressful preimplantation experiences on adult fitness. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which embryos integrate environmental signals into development and metabolic gene expression programs will be essential for optimizing ART procedures such as in vitro culture conditions, embryo selection and transfer. In the future, additional animal studies to identify mechanisms underlying unfavorable ART outcomes, as well as more epidemiological reviews to monitor the long-term health of ART children are required, given that ART procedures have become routine medical practice. PMID:23264495

  5. ART and health: clinical outcomes and insights on molecular mechanisms from rodent studies

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, S.K.; Camarano, L.; Rinaudo, P.F.

    2013-01-01

    Since the birth of the first IVF-conceived child in 1978, the use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) has grown dramatically, contributing to the successful birth of 5 million individuals worldwide. However, there are several reported associations of ART with pregnancy complications, such as low birthweight (LBW), preterm birth, birth defects, epigenetic disorders, cancer and poor metabolic health. Whether this is attributed to ART procedures or to the subset of the population seeking ART remains a controversy, but the most relevant question today concerns the potential long-term implications of assisted conception. Recent evidence has emerged suggesting that ART-conceived children have distinct metabolic profiles that may predispose to cardiovascular pathologies in adulthood. Because the eldest IVF individuals are still too young to exhibit components of chronic middle-aged syndromes, the use of animal models has become particularly useful in describing the effects of unusual or stressful preimplantation experiences on adult fitness. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which embryos integrate environmental signals into development and metabolic gene expression programs will be essential for optimizing ART procedures such as in vitro culture conditions, embryo selection and transfer. In the future, additional animal studies to identify mechanisms underlying unfavorable ART outcomes, as well as more epidemiological reviews to monitor the long-term health of ART children are required, given that ART procedures have become routine medical practice. PMID:23264495

  6. Evidence for rodent-common and species-typical limb and digit use in eating, derived from a comparative analysis of ten rodent species.

    PubMed

    Whishaw, I Q; Sarna, J R; Pellis, S M

    1998-11-01

    Order Rodentia comprises a vast portion of mammalian species (1814 species), which occupy extremely diverse habitats requiring very distinct motor specializations (e.g. burrowing, hopping, climbing, flying and swimming). Although early classification of paw use ability suggests rodents are impoverished relative to primates and make little use of their paws, there have been no systematic investigations of paw use in rodents. The present study was undertaken to describe limb/paw movements in a variety of common rodents. The movements used for handling sunflower seeds and other foods were videorecorded and analyzed in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus), Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus), Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), laboratory mouse (Mus musculus), laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus), gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), Richardson's ground squirrel (Spermophilus richardsonni), prairie dog (Cynomus parvidens), and Canadian beaver (Castor americanus). The results suggested five order-common movements of food handling: (1) locating food by sniffing, (2) grasping food by mouth, (3) sitting back on the haunches to eat, (4) grasping the food using an elbow-in movement, and (5) manipulate the food with the digits. Different species displayed species-typical specializations including (1) bilateral grasping with the paws (gerbil), (2) unilateral grasping with a paw (beaver), (3) unilateral holding (ground squirrels), (4) various grip and digit postures (all species), (5) unilateral object removal from the mouth (gerbil), (6) bilateral thumb holding (squirrels), and (7) simultaneous holding/manipulation of two objects (squirrels). Only the guinea pig did not handle food with its paws, suggesting its behavior is regressive. The existence of a core pattern of paw and digit use in rodents suggests that skilled limb and paw movements originate at least with the common ancestors of the rodent, and likely the common ancestor to rodent and primate lineages, while species-typical movements suggest specialization/regression of limb use has occurred in a number of mammalian orders. PMID:9821545

  7. Cellular Inductive Powering System for Weakly-Linked Resonant Rodent Implants

    E-print Network

    Genov, Roman

    Cellular Inductive Powering System for Weakly-Linked Resonant Rodent Implants Nima Soltani, Miaad S interfaces (NIs) on awake behaving rodents have become a common technique. In recent years, research efforts on laboratory rodents are often conducted with a cable carrying power to the NI device. Cables have the typical

  8. Interstellar Molecules: Laboratory, Theoretical and Astronomical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David A.

    2012-05-01

    Our understanding of interstellar molecules rests critically upon laboratory and theoretical studies of fundamental molecular processes: the absorption and emission of radiation; bimolecular chemical reactions; photodissociation and photoionization; and collisional excitation. The importance of such studies will be discussed in relation to recent observations of molecules performed with the Herschel Space Observatory. As a specific example, some puzzling observations of chlorine-bearing molecular ions will be considered.

  9. 75 FR 80011 - Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ...laboratories to develop standard operating procedures...internationally recognized standard, Quality management...Requirements ISO 9001, available from...Standardization (ISO) at: http...a requirement for standard operating...

  10. The susceptibility of rodents to schistosome infection, with special reference to Schistosoma haematobium.

    PubMed

    Gear, J H; Davis, D H; Pitchford, R J

    1966-01-01

    In this investigation the susceptibility of several species of rodents-Praomys (Mastomys) natalensis, Saccostomus campestris, Arvicanthus niloticus, Aethomys chrysophilus, Tatera brantsi and the white mouse (SAIMR 200 strain)-to Schistosoma haematobium was determined and the pathology studied. From the results it is clear that these rodents are susceptible to infection with Schistosoma haematobium. For various reasons, notably adaptability to laboratory conditions, the most suitable as laboratory animals for the study of bilharziasis are Saccostomus campestris, Arvicanthus niloticus and Praomys (Mastomys) natalensis. These three species breed readily in the laboratory and show a high susceptibility to S. haematobium, with characteristic lesions involving several organs, including the lungs, liver, spleen, pancreas and intestine. PMID:5297005

  11. Laboratory studies of halogen containing species

    SciTech Connect

    Burkholder, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    Halogen containing molecules play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. Evaluation of their influence on atmospheric ozone loss requires detailed knowledge of the photochemistry of these molecules. I will discuss laboratory studies of (1) the photochemistry of ClONO{sub 2} and BrONO{sub 2} and their impact on stratospheric chemistry and (2) detection methods for IO and the reactivity of I with O{sub 3} and IO with IO, NO, ClO.

  12. Laboratory and field studies in rotational spectroscopy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drouin, Brian J.

    2004-01-01

    Rotational spectroscopy of atmospheric molecules has long been a hallmark of laboratory and field studies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. in addition to maintenance of the millimeter and submillimeter spectral line catalog, the laboratory has actively purued the challenging laboratory tasks of quantitative linewidth measurements and transient species identification.

  13. Spontaneous expression of magnetic compass orientation in an epigeic rodent: the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus.

    PubMed

    Oliveriusová, Ludmila; N?mec, Pavel; Pavelková, Zuzana; Sedlá?ek, František

    2014-07-01

    Magnetoreception has been convincingly demonstrated in only a few mammalian species. Among rodents, magnetic compass orientation has been documented in four species of subterranean mole rats and two epigeic (i.e. active above ground) species-the Siberian hamster and the C57BL/6J mouse. The mole rats use the magnetic field azimuth to determine compass heading; their directional preference is spontaneous and unimodal, and their magnetic compass is magnetite-mediated. By contrast, the primary component of orientation response is learned in the hamster and the mouse, but both species also exhibit a weak spontaneous bimodal preference in the natural magnetic field. To determine whether the magnetic compass of wild epigeic rodents features the same functional properties as that of laboratory rodents, we investigated magnetic compass orientation in the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus (Cricetidae, Rodentia). The voles exhibited a robust spontaneous bimodal directional preference, i.e. built nests and slept preferentially along the north-south axis, and deflected their directional preference according to a shift in the direction of magnetic north, clearly indicating that they were deriving directional information from the magnetic field. Thus, bimodal, axially symmetrical directional choice seems to be a common feature shared by epigeic rodents. However, spontaneous directional preference in the bank vole appeared to be more pronounced than that reported in the hamster and the mouse. These findings suggest that bank voles are well suited for future studies investigating the adaptive significance and mechanisms of magnetic orientation in epigeic rodents. PMID:24913128

  14. Spontaneous expression of magnetic compass orientation in an epigeic rodent: the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveriusová, Ludmila; N?mec, Pavel; Pavelková, Zuzana; Sedlá?ek, František

    2014-07-01

    Magnetoreception has been convincingly demonstrated in only a few mammalian species. Among rodents, magnetic compass orientation has been documented in four species of subterranean mole rats and two epigeic (i.e. active above ground) species—the Siberian hamster and the C57BL/6J mouse. The mole rats use the magnetic field azimuth to determine compass heading; their directional preference is spontaneous and unimodal, and their magnetic compass is magnetite-mediated. By contrast, the primary component of orientation response is learned in the hamster and the mouse, but both species also exhibit a weak spontaneous bimodal preference in the natural magnetic field. To determine whether the magnetic compass of wild epigeic rodents features the same functional properties as that of laboratory rodents, we investigated magnetic compass orientation in the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus (Cricetidae, Rodentia). The voles exhibited a robust spontaneous bimodal directional preference, i.e. built nests and slept preferentially along the north-south axis, and deflected their directional preference according to a shift in the direction of magnetic north, clearly indicating that they were deriving directional information from the magnetic field. Thus, bimodal, axially symmetrical directional choice seems to be a common feature shared by epigeic rodents. However, spontaneous directional preference in the bank vole appeared to be more pronounced than that reported in the hamster and the mouse. These findings suggest that bank voles are well suited for future studies investigating the adaptive significance and mechanisms of magnetic orientation in epigeic rodents.

  15. Laboratory studies in ultraviolet solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Kohl, J. L.; Gardner, L. D.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    The research activity comprised the measurement of basic atomic processes and parameters which relate directly to the interpretation of solar ultraviolet observations and to the development of comprehensive models of the component structures of the solar atmosphere. The research was specifically directed towards providing the relevant atomic data needed to perform and to improve solar diagnostic techniques which probe active and quiet portions of the solar chromosphere, the transition zone, the inner corona, and the solar wind acceleration regions of the extended corona. The accuracy with which the physical conditions in these structures can be determined depends directly on the accuracy and completeness of the atomic and molecular data. These laboratory data are used to support the analysis programs of past and current solar observations (e.g., the Orbiting solar Observatories, the Solar Maximum Mission, the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount, and the Naval Research Laboratory's rocket-borne High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph). In addition, we attempted to anticipate the needs of future space-borne solar studies such as from the joint ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. Our laboratory activities stressed two categories of study: (1) the measurement of absolute rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination and electron impact excitation; and (2) the measurement of atomic transition probabilities for solar density diagnostics. A brief summary of the research activity is provided.

  16. Laboratory and theoretical studies of baroclinic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy; Leslie, Fred W.; Fitzjarrald, Dan; Reynolds, Nathaniel D.; Chou, Shih-Hung; Payne, Karen; Fehribach, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    An understanding is being developed for processes which may be important in the atmosphere, and the definition and analysis of baroclinic experiments utilizing the geophysical fluid flow cells (GFFC) apparatus in microgravity space flights. Included are studies using numerical codes, theoretical models, and terrestrial laboratory experiments. The numerical modeling is performed in three stages: calculation of steady axisymmetric flow, calculation of fastest-growing linear eigenmodes, and nonlinear effects (first, wave-mean flow interactions, then wave-wave interactions). The code can accommodate cylindrical, spherical, or channel geometry. It uses finite differences in the vertical and meridional directions, and is spectral in the azimuthal. The theoretical work was mostly in the area of effects of topography upon the baroclinic instability problem. The laboratory experiments are performed in a cylindrical annulus which has a temperture gradient imposed upon the lower surface and an approximately isothermal outer wall, with the upper and inner surfaces being nominally thermally insulating.

  17. Clinical laboratory studies of disinfection with Sporicidin.

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, H D

    1985-01-01

    The clinical microbiology laboratory evaluation of disinfectants can serve as a guide for their application to reduce hospital-acquired infections. The use of Sporicidin, a glutaraldehyde-phenol formulation, was evaluated by the application of modified MIC and MBC determinations for standard organisms. In addition, the effect of this formulation on bacteria that may proliferate in water at ambient temperatures was studied. This investigation indicated that such studies can help the clinical microbiologist to guide the use of disinfectants and sterilants for the maintenance of a safe hospital environment. PMID:3932457

  18. Rodent Models of Depression: Neurotrophic and Neuroinflammatory Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Stepanichev, Mikhail; Dygalo, Nikolay N.; Grigoryan, Grigory; Shishkina, Galina T.; Gulyaeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models are an indispensable tool for studying etiology and progress of depression. Since interrelated systems of neurotrophic factors and cytokines comprise major regulatory mechanisms controlling normal brain plasticity, impairments of these systems form the basis for development of cerebral pathologies, including mental diseases. The present review focuses on the numerous experimental rodent models of depression induced by different stress factors (exteroceptive and interoceptive) during early life (including prenatal period) or adulthood, giving emphasis to the data on the changes of neurotrophic factors and neuroinflammatory indices in the brain. These parameters are closely related to behavioral depression-like symptoms and impairments of neuronal plasticity and are both gender- and genotype-dependent. Stress-related changes in expression of neurotrophins and cytokines in rodent brain are region-specific. Some contradictory data reported by different groups may be a consequence of differences of stress paradigms or their realization in different laboratories. Like all experimental models, stress-induced depression-like conditions are experimental simplification of clinical depression states; however, they are suitable for understanding the involvement of neurotrophic factors and cytokines in the pathogenesis of the disease—a goal unachievable in the clinical reality. These major regulatory systems may be important targets for therapeutic measures as well as for development of drugs for treatment of depression states. PMID:24999483

  19. Laboratory Studies of Interstellar PAH Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are though to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken over the past years to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: objectives, approach and techniques adopted, adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

  20. DNA metabarcoding diet analysis for species with parapatric vs sympatric distribution: a case study on subterranean rodents.

    PubMed

    Lopes, C M; De Barba, M; Boyer, F; Mercier, C; da Silva Filho, P J S; Heidtmann, L M; Galiano, D; Kubiak, B B; Langone, P; Garcias, F M; Gielly, L; Coissac, E; de Freitas, T R O; Taberlet, P

    2015-05-01

    Closely related sympatric species commonly develop different ecological strategies to avoid competition. Ctenomys minutus and C. flamarioni are subterranean rodents parapatrically distributed in the southern Brazilian coastal plain, showing a narrow sympatric zone. To gain understanding on food preferences and possible competition for food resources, we evaluated their diet composition performing DNA metabarcoding analyzes of 67 C. minutus and 100 C. flamarioni scat samples, collected along the species geographical ranges. Thirteen plant families, mainly represented by Poaceae, Araliaceae, Asteraceae and Fabaceae, were identified in the diet of C. minutus. For C. flamarioni, 10 families were recovered, with a predominance of Poaceae, Araliaceae and Asteraceae. A significant correlation between diet composition and geographical distance was detected in C. minutus, whereas the diet of C. flamarioni was quite homogeneous throughout its geographical distribution. No significant differences were observed between males and females of each species. However, differences in diet composition between species were evident according to multivariate analysis. Our results suggest some level of diet partitioning between C. flamarioni and C. minutus in the sympatric region. While the first species is more specialized on few plant items, the second showed a more varied and heterogeneous diet pattern among individuals. These differences might have been developed to avoid competition in the region of co-occurrence. Resource availability in the environment also seems to influence food choices. Our data indicate that C. minutus and C. flamarioni are generalist species, but that some preference for Poaceae, Asteraceae and Araliaceae families can be suggested for both rodents. PMID:25649502

  1. High Resolution Laboratory Studies for Astronomical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Harshal; Brown, L. R.; Drouin, B. J.; Miller, C. E.; Pearson, J. C.; Sung, K.; Yu, S.

    2012-05-01

    Understanding astronomical observations of molecules requires detailed spectroscopic data that can only be derived from laboratory studies. These data, including accurate transition frequencies, intensities, broadening coefficients, and collisional rates are essential for the proper characterization of the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of astronomical sources. Equally important is the comprehensive spectroscopic characterization of astronomical molecules in multiple wavelength regions. A strong effort is in place in the JPL Molecular Spectroscopy Group to provide fundamental knowledge to support ground-, aircraft-, and space-based astronomical spectroscopy. A synopsis of the high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy of astronomical molecules at JPL is presented, highlighting benchmark studies that span wavelengths from the radio to the optical. The systems under study include molecules that are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium and/or exoplanetary atmospheres (CH4, CO2, H2O, and NH3), as well as ones that have recently been shown to be important constituents of the interstellar gas (O2, CH3OH, H3O+, and HCl+).

  2. Miniature wireless recording and stimulation system for rodent behavioural testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnell, R. C.; Dempster, J.; Pratt, J.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Elucidation of neural activity underpinning rodent behaviour has traditionally been hampered by the use of tethered systems and human involvement. Furthermore the combination of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) and various neural recording modalities can lead to complex and time-consuming laboratory setups. For studies of this type, novel tools are required to drive forward this research. Approach. A miniature wireless system weighing 8.5 g (including battery) was developed for rodent use that combined multichannel DBS and local-field potential (LFP) recordings. Its performance was verified in a working memory task that involved 4-channel fronto-hippocampal LFP recording and bilateral constant-current fimbria-fornix DBS. The system was synchronised with video-tracking for extraction of LFP at discrete task phases, and DBS was activated intermittently at discrete phases of the task. Main results. In addition to having a fast set-up time, the system could reliably transmit continuous LFP at over 8 hours across 3-5 m distances. During the working memory task, LFP pertaining to discrete task phases was extracted and compared with well-known neural correlates of active exploratory behaviour in rodents. DBS could be wirelessly activated/deactivated at any part of the experiment during EEG recording and transmission, allowing for a seamless integration of this modality. Significance. The wireless system combines a small size with a level of robustness and versatility that can greatly simplify rodent behavioural experiments involving EEG recording and DBS. Designed for versatility and simplicity, the small size and low-cost of the system and its receiver allow for enhanced portability, fast experimental setup times, and pave the way for integration with more complex behaviour.

  3. Laboratory studies of polar stratospheric cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    It is now well established that heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play an important role in Arctic and Antarctic ozone loss. The most common PSCs, denoted type I, form several degrees above the ice frost point and are thought to be composed primarily of nitric acid and water. Although these clouds have often been assumed to be nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) their exact composition is not known. We are using FTIR spectroscopy to study the nucleation and growth of model type I PSCs in the laboratory. We are studying both thin film samples mimicking stratospheric particulate and freely-floating sub-micrometer sized particles. The results of these studies will be discussed in the context of current theories for type I PSC formation.

  4. Laboratory studies of polar stratospheric cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, M.A.; Anthony, S.E.; Disselkamp, R.; Iraci, L.T.

    1995-12-31

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are generally classified as type I or type II, depending on their formation temperature. Type II PSCs form at stratospheric temperatures near 189 K and are composed of water ice. Type I PSCs are stable at warmer temperatures and contain both nitric acid and water. Because nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) is the thermodynamically stable form of HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O under stratospheric conditions, it has often been assumed that type I PSCs are composed of NAT. Recent measurements, however, suggest that NAT may not form readily in the stratosphere due to a kinetic barrier. Type I PSCs are believed to nucleate on preexisting stratospheric sulfate aerosols composed of sulfuric acid and water. We are performing laboratory experiments to measure the nucleation and growth of type I PSCs on sulfuric acid. We study both thin film samples modeling stratospheric particles and actual aerosol samples generated in the laboratory. The results of these studies will be discussed in the context of current theories for type I PSC formation.

  5. ? Pictoris, a Laboratory for Planetary Formation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagrange, A.; Chauvin, G.

    2012-12-01

    Shortly after its discovery in 1984, the Beta Pictoris disc was recognised as a possible site of past, ongoing or future planet formation. It has since been observed extensively, from the X-ray domain to centimetre wavelengths by many ground- and space-based telescopes. The disc has become a remote laboratory to study the physical and chemical characteristics of debris discs. Recently, we were able to detect a companion orbiting the star at a distance comparable to that of Saturn in our Solar System. The ? Pic system thus offers a unique opportunity to study giant planet properties and planet/disc interactions. We present a short — and necessarily incomplete — review of the main discoveries made in this fascinating system over three decades of observations, a number of which were achieved with ESO telescopes.

  6. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S.; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts. PMID:26196134

  7. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts. PMID:26196134

  8. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies on the zero G cloud physics laboratory are reported. This program involves the definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineations of a set of candidate experiments that must utilize the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity.

  9. Enucleation for Treating Rodent Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Laura A; Uchihashi, Mayu; Bergin, Ingrid L; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-01-01

    Our standard of care for rodent corneal lesions previously included treatment of the primary lesion, application of topical NSAIDs, and systemic NSAIDs in severe cases. When intensive medical management was unsuccessful, animals were euthanized, leading to premature loss of valuable genetically modified animals and those on long-term studies. We investigated enucleation surgery as a treatment for 15 cases of rodent corneal disease that did not respond to medical management. Enucleation was performed under isoflurane anesthesia and involved removal of the globe, extensive hemostasis, and packing the orbital space with absorbable gelatin sponge. The lid margins were closed by tarsorrhaphy and tissue glue. Analgesia was provided by using buprenorphine preoperatively and carprofen chew tabs postoperatively. To date, we have a 100% success rate with this procedure (n = 20; 15 clinically affected rodents [2 rats, 13 mice], 5 healthy controls), which included a 60-d follow-up period. The single complication involved dehiscence of the tarsorrhaphy site and was repaired by trimming the lid margins to provide fresh tissue for closure. Histologic examination at both 1 and 3 mo after surgery revealed no evidence of infection of the enucleation site. Enucleation in rodents is a straightforward procedure that represents a refinement to our current standard of care for rodents, does not cause significant inflammation of remaining periocular structures, and has reduced the number of animals euthanized prior to study endpoint because of severe ocular lesions. PMID:26045460

  10. Assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of rodent mammary tumors using ultrasound backscatter

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of rodent mammary tumors using ultrasound of studies, liver tumors in rodents have been treated using focused ultrasound with outcomes ranging from

  11. Rocket and Laboratory Studies in Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG5-5122 and covers the period from March 1, 1997 to February 28, 2001. This grant was a continuation of a program in rocket and laboratory studies in ultraviolet astronomy that was supported by NASA grant NAG5-619. As of March 1, 2001, this program is continuing under grant NAG5-5315. During the period of the grant, annual status reports have been submitted detailing the scientific achievements and current objectives of each report period. These will not be repeated here. Among the highlights of the program are four successful rocket launches including participation in the campaign to study comet Hale-Bopp in April 1997. We have continued our emphasis on long-slit spectroscopy of extended sources in the shorter wavelength far-ultraviolet, necessitating the development of evacuated telescope/spectrograph payloads. Finally, we also note the use of our ultraviolet calibration facilities in support of other sounding rocket investigators and for other space missions such as the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We include a list of the sounding rocket launches performed under NASA sponsorship during this period, a list of Ph.D. degrees awarded to students who worked in this program, and a summary bibliography of publications between 1997 and 2001.

  12. Vitamin K Contents of Rodent Diets: A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate nutrient intake is critical in the maintenance of normal physiological activity of rodents in biomedical studies. Vitamin K is an essential nutrient in rodent diets and functions as a cofactor for the y-carboxylation of certain proteins involved in blood coagulation and bone metabolism. Dif...

  13. Microdialysis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2010-01-01

    Microdialysis is an in vivo sampling technique that permits the quantification of various substances (e.g., neurotransmitters, peptides, electrolytes) in blood and tissue. It is also used to infuse substances into the brain and spinal cord. This unit describes methods for the construction and stereotaxic implantation of microdialysis probes into discrete brain regions of the rat and mouse. Procedures for the conduct of conventional and quantitative microdialysis experiments in the awake and anesthetized rodent are also provided. PMID:19340813

  14. Rocket and laboratory studies in astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the period from September 1, 1993 to August 31, 1994. During the reporting period we launched the Faint Object Telescope to measure the absolute flux of a hot white dwarf star in the spectral range below 1200 A. This experiment was not successful due to a failure of an electronics unit in the onboard TV acquisition system. The source of the failure has been identified and corrected and is described in detail below. The payload was recovered in excellent condition and we are planning to refurbish it for flight during the November 1995 Australia campaign. We have continued our laboratory studies of the ultraviolet performance of charge-coupled-detector (CCD) arrays and plan to include a UV-sensitive CCD in a new payload that was assembled during the current period. The objective of the experiment is the ultraviolet imaging of Jupiter and we are scheduled to launch the payload, 36.115UG, in May-June 1995. We have also begun the design of a high-resolution FUV spectrograph for a future flight of the FOT and have just recently received a high line density grating fabricated by Jobin-Yvon, S.A. (France) for evaluation. Work has continued on the analysis of data from previous rocket experiments.

  15. Infrared laboratory studies of synthetic planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.

    1972-01-01

    The initial stages of the research were involved with a test of Burch's law of multiplicative transmittance for mixed absorbing gases when their lines are broadened by H2 and He, which are constituents of the atmospheres of the major planets. The broadening of individual lines in the CO fundamental by various gases was investigated. Line strength and half-width for individual CO lines were studied as a function of temperature. Measurements of total band absorptance as a function of absorber thickness and total effective pressure were made at various temperatures for bands of CO and N2O. Attempts were made to develop a phenomenological theory of line broadening that would account for the phenomena observed for the CO fundamental and those reported for more highly polar gases. Laboratory measurements of nitric acid vapor absorptance were compared with balloon measurements in arriving at an estimate of the quantity of nitric acid vapor present in the earth's atmosphere in the region of the ozone layer.

  16. A Study of Mathematics Needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Keith J.

    A study was conducted to determine what mathematics skills were needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy. Data obtained from studies, course outlines, textbooks, and reports were used to construct a 79-item mathematics skill questionnaire. This questionnaire was administered to employers,…

  17. pH as a biomarker of neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease: a translational rodent-human MRS study

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Valette, Julien; Baligand, Céline; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Hantraye, Philippe; Bloch, Gilles; Gaura, Véronique; Rialland, Amandine; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Verny, Christophe; Damier, Philippe; Remy, Philippe; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Carlier, Pierre; Lebon, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis and follow-up of neurodegenerative diseases are often hampered by the lack of reliable biomarkers. Neuroimaging techniques like magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offer promising tools to detect biochemical alterations at early stages of degeneration. Intracellular pH, which can be measured noninvasively by 31P-MRS, has shown variations in several brain diseases. Our purpose has been to evaluate the potential of MRS-measured pH as a relevant biomarker of early degeneration in Huntington's disease (HD). We used a translational approach starting with a preclinical validation of our hypothesis before adapting the method to HD patients. 31P-MRS-derived cerebral pH was first measured in rodents during chronic intoxication with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP). A significant pH increase was observed early into the intoxication protocol (pH=7.17±0.02 after 3 days) as compared with preintoxication (pH=7.08±0.03). Furthermore, pH changes correlated with the 3NP-induced inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase and preceded striatum lesions. Using a similar MRS approach implemented on a clinical MRI, we then showed that cerebral pH was significantly higher in HD patients (n=7) than in healthy controls (n=6) (7.05±0.03 versus 7.02±0.01, respectively, P=0.026). Altogether, both preclinical and human data strongly argue in favor of MRS-measured pH being a promising biomarker for diagnosis and follow-up of HD. PMID:22373643

  18. Rocket and Laboratory Studies in Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.; McCandliss, Stephan R.

    2004-01-01

    This report covers the period from March 1, 2001 to August 31, 2004. This grant was the continuation of NASA grant NAG5-5122 and supported the Johns Hopkins sounding rocket program that had its roots in the 1960s. The emphasis of this program has been the development of instrumentation for far-ultraviolet astronomy, the training of graduate students in all aspects of a space mission, and the application of these techniques to timely scientific problems. During this period we completed the fabrication of our new long-slit dual-order spectrograph (LIDOS), and successfully flew it on a Black Brant sounding rocket on December 16, 2003 (36.208 UG). The targets were the bright star gamma-Cassiopeiae and its surrounding reflection nebulae, IC 59 and IC 63. We also continued the analysis of the data from our previous flight to study the reflection nebula IC 405 (36.198 UG), which revealed a far-ultraviolet nebular scatter to stellar flux ratio that, contrary to expectations, rises steeply toward the blue. Verifying this result required extensive post-flight analysis and calibration of the Faint Object Telescope FOT) payload, which entailed measuring the telescope mirror reflectivities, the absolute efficiency of the spectrograph, and the telescope point spread function, using a new vacuum collimator developed as part of former graduate student Eric Burgh's Ph.D. dissertation. This work, being done with graduate student Kevin France, has been completed and a paper describing the results has been accepted for publication by the Astrophysical Journal. We have also continued a number of laboratory calibration studies and design efforts.

  19. Liver Dysfunction and Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase Signalling in Early Sepsis: Experimental Studies in Rodent Models of Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Martin; Lambeck, Sandro; Lupp, Amelie; Rudiger, Alain; Dyson, Alex; Carré, Jane E.; Kortgen, Andreas; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen; Sponholz, Christoph; Fuhrmann, Valentin; Hilger, Ingrid; Claus, Ralf A.; Riedemann, Niels C.; Wetzker, Reinhard; Singer, Mervyn; Trauner, Michael; Bauer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatic dysfunction and jaundice are traditionally viewed as late features of sepsis and portend poor outcomes. We hypothesized that changes in liver function occur early in the onset of sepsis, yet pass undetected by standard laboratory tests. Methods and Findings In a long-term rat model of faecal peritonitis, biotransformation and hepatobiliary transport were impaired, depending on subsequent disease severity, as early as 6 h after peritoneal contamination. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signalling was simultaneously induced at this time point. At 15 h there was hepatocellular accumulation of bilirubin, bile acids, and xenobiotics, with disturbed bile acid conjugation and drug metabolism. Cholestasis was preceded by disruption of the bile acid and organic anion transport machinery at the canalicular pole. Inhibitors of PI3K partially prevented cytokine-induced loss of villi in cultured HepG2 cells. Notably, mice lacking the PI3K? gene were protected against cholestasis and impaired bile acid conjugation. This was partially confirmed by an increase in plasma bile acids (e.g., chenodeoxycholic acid [CDCA] and taurodeoxycholic acid [TDCA]) observed in 48 patients on the day severe sepsis was diagnosed; unlike bilirubin (area under the receiver-operating curve: 0.59), these bile acids predicted 28-d mortality with high sensitivity and specificity (area under the receiver-operating curve: CDCA: 0.77; TDCA: 0.72; CDCA+TDCA: 0.87). Conclusions Liver dysfunction is an early and commonplace event in the rat model of sepsis studied here; PI3K signalling seems to play a crucial role. All aspects of hepatic biotransformation are affected, with severity relating to subsequent prognosis. Detected changes significantly precede conventional markers and are reflected by early alterations in plasma bile acids. These observations carry important implications for the diagnosis of liver dysfunction and pharmacotherapy in the critically ill. Further clinical work is necessary to extend these concepts into clinical practice. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23152722

  20. Geomagnetic field detection in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Olcese, J.; Reuss, S.; Semm, P.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to behavioral evidence for the detection of earth-strength magnetic fields (MF) by rodents, recent investigations have revealed that electrophysiological and biochemical responses to MF occur in the pineal organ and retina of rodents. In addition, ferrimagnetic deposits have been identified in the ethmoidal regions of the rodent skull. These findings point to a new sensory phenomenon, which interfaces with many fields of biology, including neuroscience, psychophysics, behavioral ecology, chronobiology and sensory physiology.

  1. 3D Segmentation of Rodent Brain Structures Using Hierarchical Shape Priors and Deformable

    E-print Network

    Huang, Junzhou

    3D Segmentation of Rodent Brain Structures Using Hierarchical Shape Priors and Deformable Models directly applying PCA on all struc- tures. We use this method to segment rodent brain structures images. This technical achievement has permitted the detailed anatomical study of the rodent brain, which

  2. Towards Large-Scale Multi-Agent Based Rodent Simulation: The "Mice In A Box" Scenario

    E-print Network

    Coenen, Frans

    Towards Large-Scale Multi-Agent Based Rodent Simulation: The "Mice In A Box" Scenario E. Agiriga, F of a Multi-Agent Based Simulation (MABS) frameworks, to support rodent simulation, is presented. The issues examples. To the best knowledge of the authors there is no work on MABS frameworks to study rodent

  3. Gene Expression in the Rodent Brain is Associated with Its Regional Connectivity

    E-print Network

    Wolf, Lior

    Gene Expression in the Rodent Brain is Associated with Its Regional Connectivity Lior Wolf1 *, Chen of a prototypical mammalian rodent brain, using a combination of rat brain regional connectivity data with gene expression of the mouse brain. Remarkably, even though this study uses data from two different rodent species

  4. The Touchscreen Cognitive Testing Method for Rodents: How to Get the Best out of Your Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussey, Timothy J.; Padain, Tina L.; Skillings, Elizabeth A.; Winters, Boyer D.; Morton, A. Jennifer; Saksida, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    The touchscreen testing method for rodents is a computer-automated behavioral testing method that allows computer graphic stimuli to be presented to rodents and the rodents to respond to the computer screen via a nose-poke directly to the stimulus. The advantages of this method are numerous; however, a systematic study of the parameters that…

  5. Hindlimb unloading rodent model: technical aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in the mid-1970s, many laboratories around the world have used the rat hindlimb unloading model to simulate weightlessness and to study various aspects of musculoskeletal loading. In this model, the hindlimbs of rodents are elevated to produce a 30 degrees head-down tilt, which results in a cephalad fluid shift and avoids weightbearing by the hindquarters. Although several reviews have described scientific results obtained with this model, this is the first review to focus on the technical aspects of hindlimb unloading. This review includes a history of the technique, a brief comparison with spaceflight data, technical details, extension of the model to mice, and other important technical considerations (e.g., housing, room temperature, unloading angle, the potential need for multiple control groups, age, body weight, the use of the forelimb tissues as internal controls, and when to remove animals from experiments). This paper is intended as a reference for researchers, reviewers of manuscripts, and institutional animal care and use committees. Over 800 references, related to the hindlimb unloading model, can be accessed via the electronic version of this article.

  6. Laboratory studies of crystal growth in magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J. E.; Welsch, B. T.; First, E.; Shea, T.

    2012-12-01

    The proportions, compositions, and interrelationships among crystalline phases and glasses in volcanic rocks cryptically record pre-eruptive intensive conditions, the timing of changes in crystallization environment, and the devolatilization history of eruptive ascent. These parameters are recognized as important monitoring tools at active volcanoes and interpreting geologic events at prehistoric and remote eruptions, thus motivating our attempts to understand the information preserved in crystals through an experimental appoach. We are performing laboratory experiments in mafic, felsic, and intermediate composition magmas to study the mechanisms of crystal growth in thermochemical environments relevant to volcanic environments. We target features common to natural crystals in igneous rocks for our experimental studies of rapid crystal growth phenomena: (1) Surface curvature. Do curved interfaces and spongy cores represent evidence of dissolution (i.e., are they corrosion features), or do they record the transition from dendritic to polyhedral morphology? (2) Trapped melt inclusions. Do trapped liquids represent bulk (i.e., far-field) liquids, boundary layer liquids, or something intermediate, depending on individual species diffusivity? What sequence of crystal growth rates leads to preservation of sealed melt inclusions? (3) Subgrain boundaries. Natural phenocrysts commonly exhibit tabular subgrain regions distinguished by small angle lattice misorientations or "dislocation lamellae" and undulatory extinction. Might these crystal defects be produced as dendrites undergo ripening? (4) Clusters. Contacting clusters of polymineralic crystals are the building blocks of cumulates, and are ubiquitous features of mafic volcanic rocks. Are plagioclase and clinopyroxene aligned crystallographically, suggesting an epitaxial (surface energy) relationship? (5) Log-normal size distribution. What synthetic cooling histories produce "natural" distributions of crystal sizes, and are phenocrystic textures uniquely attributed to staged cooling? In addition, we seek to explore the limitations of the experimental approach. Which aspects of natural crystallization sequences are adequately reproduced in experimental charges, and which are compromised by the obligatory reduced temporal and spatial scales of crystal growth experiments? What are the implications of synthetic starting materials and thermal pre-treatments for nucleation, growth, heterophase equilibria, and textural maturation?

  7. Gene Polymorphism Studies in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Jeffry

    2009-01-01

    I present a laboratory procedure for illustrating transcription, post-transcriptional modification, gene conservation, and comparative genetics for use in undergraduate biology education. Students are individually assigned genes in a targeted biochemical pathway, for which they design and test polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. In this…

  8. Experimental sleep deprivation as a tool to test memory deficits in rodents.

    PubMed

    Colavito, Valeria; Fabene, Paolo F; Grassi-Zucconi, Gigliola; Pifferi, Fabien; Lamberty, Yves; Bentivoglio, Marina; Bertini, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Paradigms of sleep deprivation (SD) and memory testing in rodents (laboratory rats and mice) are here reviewed. The vast majority of these studies have been aimed at understanding the contribution of sleep to cognition, and in particular to memory. Relatively little attention, instead, has been devoted to SD as a challenge to induce a transient memory impairment, and therefore as a tool to test cognitive enhancers in drug discovery. Studies that have accurately described methodological aspects of the SD protocol are first reviewed, followed by procedures to investigate SD-induced impairment of learning and memory consolidation in order to propose SD protocols that could be employed as cognitive challenge. Thus, a platform of knowledge is provided for laboratory protocols that could be used to assess the efficacy of drugs designed to improve memory performance in rodents, including rodent models of neurodegenerative diseases that cause cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease in particular. Issues in the interpretation of such preclinical data and their predictive value for clinical translation are also discussed. PMID:24379759

  9. Experimental sleep deprivation as a tool to test memory deficits in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Colavito, Valeria; Fabene, Paolo F.; Grassi-Zucconi, Gigliola; Pifferi, Fabien; Lamberty, Yves; Bentivoglio, Marina; Bertini, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Paradigms of sleep deprivation (SD) and memory testing in rodents (laboratory rats and mice) are here reviewed. The vast majority of these studies have been aimed at understanding the contribution of sleep to cognition, and in particular to memory. Relatively little attention, instead, has been devoted to SD as a challenge to induce a transient memory impairment, and therefore as a tool to test cognitive enhancers in drug discovery. Studies that have accurately described methodological aspects of the SD protocol are first reviewed, followed by procedures to investigate SD-induced impairment of learning and memory consolidation in order to propose SD protocols that could be employed as cognitive challenge. Thus, a platform of knowledge is provided for laboratory protocols that could be used to assess the efficacy of drugs designed to improve memory performance in rodents, including rodent models of neurodegenerative diseases that cause cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease in particular. Issues in the interpretation of such preclinical data and their predictive value for clinical translation are also discussed. PMID:24379759

  10. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96...and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps,...

  11. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96...and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps,...

  12. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96...and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps,...

  13. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96...and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps,...

  14. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96...and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps,...

  15. Rodent carcinogens: Setting priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, L.S.; Slone, T.H.; Stern, B.R.; Manley, N.B.; Ames, B.N. )

    1992-10-09

    The human diet contains an enormous background of natural chemicals, such as plant pesticides and the products of cooking, that have not been a focus of carcinogenicity testing. A broadened perspective that includes these natural chemicals is necessary. A comparison of possible hazards for 80 daily exposures to rodent carcinogens from a variety of sources is presented, using an index (HERP) that relates human exposure to carcinogenic potency in rodents. A similar ordering would be expected with the use of standard risk assessment methodology for the same human exposure values. Results indicate that, when viewed against the large background of naturally occurring carcinogens in typical portions of common foods, the residues of synthetic pesticides or environmental pollutants rank low. A similar result is obtained in a separate comparison of 32 average daily exposures to natural pesticides and synthetic pesticides residues in the diet. Although the findings do not indicate that these natural dietary carcinogens are important in human cancer, they cast doubt on the relative importance for human cancer of low-dose exposures to synthetic chemicals.

  16. Laboratory Needs for Interstellar Ice Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogert, Abraham C. A.

    2012-05-01

    A large fraction of the molecules in dense interstellar and circumstellar environments is stored in icy grain mantles. The mantles are formed by a complex interplay between chemical and physical processes. Key questions on the accretion and desorption processes and the chemistry on the grain surfaces and within the icy mantles can only be answered by laboratory experiments. Recent infrared (2-30 micron) spectroscopic surveys of large samples of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) and background stars tracing quiescent cloud material have shown that the ice band profiles and depths vary considerably as a function of environment. Using laboratory spectra in the identification process, it is clear that a rather complex mixture of simple species (CH3OH, CO2, H2O, CO) exists even in the quiescent cloud phase. Variations of the local physical conditions (CO freeze out) and time scales (CH3OH formation) appear to be key factors in the observed variations. Sublimation and thermal processing dominate as YSOs heat their environments. The identification of several ice absorption features is still disputed. I will outline laboratory work (e.g., on salts, PAHs, and aliphatic hydrocarbons) needed to further constrain the ice band identification as well as the thermal and chemical history of the carriers. Such experiments will also be essential to interpret future high spectral resolution SOFIA and JWST observations.

  17. Atmospheric Science Field Laboratory - A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafferis, William

    1987-01-01

    Plans are underway to transfer the technology represented by the lightning and atmospheric science research facilities and capabilities at the Kennedy Space Center to outside users in other government agencies, private industry, and the academic community. Rocket triggered lightning is being used to demonstrate the feasibility of establishing an Atmospheric Science Field Laboratory as a permanent facility and long-term cost sharing. Results from previous programs and data from a lightning event which occurred during the STS-7 flight are presented to demonstrate the adequacy of the present lightning protection and measuring system to protect personnel, vehicle, and ground equipment, as well as to rapidly assess damage due to a lightning event.

  18. Gene Polymorphism Studies in a Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Jeffry

    2009-02-01

    I present a laboratory procedure for illustrating transcription, post-transcriptional modification, gene conservation, and comparative genetics for use in undergraduate biology education. Students are individually assigned genes in a targeted biochemical pathway, for which they design and test polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. In this example, students used genes annotated for the steroid biosynthesis pathway in soybean. The authoritative Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) interactive database and other online resources were used to design primers based first on soybean expressed sequence tags (ESTs), then on ESTs from an alternate organism if soybean sequence was unavailable. Students designed a total of 50 gene-based primer pairs (37 soybean, 13 alternative) and tested these for polymorphism state and similarity between two soybean and two pea lines. Student assessment was based on acquisition of laboratory skills and successful project completion. This simple procedure illustrates conservation of genes and is not limited to soybean or pea. Cost per student estimates are included, along with a detailed protocol and flow diagram of the procedure.

  19. Rodent Control: Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rodent food sources and nesting sites... Diseases from rodents Diseases directly transmitted by rodents Diseases indirectly transmitted by rodents Cleaning up after rodents Take precautions before and during clean up of ...

  20. A Science Librarian in the Laboratory: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomaszewski, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A science librarian in the laboratory can become a "point of access" for database instruction and provide a learning opportunity for students to develop their information literacy skills. A case study describes how a librarian in an organic chemistry laboratory helps the class run smoothly and identifies the science librarian as an ally and a…

  1. Original Article Using amphibians in laboratory studies: precautions against

    E-print Network

    Schmeller, Dirk S.

    Original Article Using amphibians in laboratory studies: precautions against the emerging is by far the most widely used amphibian species in laboratories. In the wild, X. laevis is an asymptomatic Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which has devastating effects on wild amphibian populations around the world

  2. Rocket and laboratory studies in astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.

    1993-01-01

    This report covers the period from September 1, 1992 to August 31, 1993. During the reporting period we launched the Faint Object Telescope to measure absolute fluxes of two hot dwarf stars in the spectral range below 1200 A. Although all systems worked normally, a higher than anticipated pressure in the detector led to ion-feedback that masked the useable data from the source. We have identified the source of the problem and are preparing for a reflight in the Fall of 1993. Our laboratory program for the evaluation of the ultraviolet performance of charge-coupled-detector (CCD) arrays continued with the aim of including a UV-sensitive CCD in a payload to be flown in 1994, and we have begun the assembly of this payload. Work has continued on the analysis of data from previous rocket experiments and from the UVX experiment which flew on STS-61C in January 1986.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY LABORATORY INTERCOMPARISON STUDIES PROGRAM, FY 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's intercomparison studies program for laboratories involved in environmental radiation measurements is described. The types of environmental samples distributed, the analysis required for each sample, the distribution schedule, and the sta...

  4. Incorporation of analgesics into rodent embryo transfer protocols: assessing the effects on reproductive outcomes 

    E-print Network

    Burckhardt, Heather Ann

    2009-05-15

    Surgical embryo transfer in rodents is a common procedure in today’s research laboratory, although little is known of the effect analgesics may have on not only the recipient female but also the embryos. Two perioperative analgesics, ketoprofen...

  5. LABORATORY STUDIES OF PRIORITY POLLUTANT TREATABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated several methods currently available to reduce the level of pollutants in an industrial plant wastewater stream. Its purpose was to screen these treatment processes. As a result of this screening, further in-depth evaluations should be considered. The study...

  6. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  7. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  8. Chronotype changes during puberty depend on gonadal hormones in the slow-developing rodent, Octodon degus

    PubMed Central

    Hagenauer, Megan Hastings; Ku, Jennifer HeeYoung; Lee, Theresa M.

    2011-01-01

    During puberty, human adolescents develop a later chronotype, exhibiting a delay in the timing of rest and activity as well as other daily physiological rhythms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether similar changes in chronotype occur during puberty in a laboratory rodent species, and, if so, to determine whether they are due to pubertal hormones acting on the circadian timekeeping system. To test this hypothesis, we carefully tracked daily activity rhythms across puberty in the slow-developing rodent Octodon degus. We confirmed that male degus showed a large reorganization of activity rhythms that correlated with secondary sex development during puberty, including a loss of bimodality and 3–5 hr phase-advance. Similar to humans, this circadian reorganization showed distinct sex differences, with females showing little change during puberty in two separate experiments. Prepubertal gonadectomy (GDX) eliminated the changes, whereas SHAM gonadectomy had little impact. Therefore, gonadal hormones are likely to play a role in pubertal changes in chronotype in this rodent species. Using evidence from a variety of species, including our recent studies in the rat, we conclude that chronotype changes during puberty are a well-demonstrated phenomenon in mammals. PMID:21316365

  9. Growth of Francisella spp. in rodent macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, L D; Burke, R D; Nano, F E

    1991-01-01

    We examined the nature of the interactions between the facultative intracellular pathogens Francisella tularensis and F. novicida and rodent macrophages. Growth of F. tularensis LVS was observed in macrophage monolayers from mice, guinea pigs, or rats. In contrast, F. novicida grew in macrophages from mice and guinea pigs but not in macrophages from rats. Transmission electron microscopy studies indicated that both Francisella species survive within macrophage phagosomes that are unfused with lysosomes. Images PMID:1879943

  10. Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS): A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Karen S.; Auping, Judith V.; Megargle, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    In the late 70's, a refurbishment of the analytical laboratories serving the Materials Division at NASA Lewis Research Center was undertaken. As part of the modernization efforts, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) was to be included. Preliminary studies indicated a custom-designed system as the best choice in order to satisfy all of the requirements. A scaled down version of the original design has been in operation since 1984. The LIMS, a combination of computer hardware, provides the chemical characterization laboratory with an information data base, a report generator, a user interface, and networking capabilities. This paper is an account of the processes involved in designing and implementing that LIMS.

  11. Streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in rodents as a model for studying mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic ? cell glucotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinzi; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and the corresponding glucotoxicity are the main pathogenic mechanisms of diabetes and its complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animal models are useful platforms for the understanding of ? cell glucotoxicity in diabetes. As diabetes induced by a single STZ injection is often referred to as type 1 diabetes that is caused by STZ’s partial destruction of pancreas, one question often being asked is whether the STZ type 1 diabetes animal model is a good model for studying the mitochondrial mechanisms of ? cell glucotoxicity. In this mini review, we provide evidence garnered from the literature that the STZ type 1 diabetes is indeed a suitable model for studying mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic ? cell glucotoxicity. Evidence presented includes: 1) continued ? cell derangement is due to chronic hyperglycemia after STZ is completely eliminated out of the body; 2) STZ diabetes can be reversed by insulin treatment, which indicates that ? cell responds to treatment and shows ability to regenerate; and 3) STZ diabetes can be ameliorated or alleviated by administration of phytochemicals. In addition, mechanisms of STZ action and fundamental gaps in understanding mitochondrial mechanisms of ? cell dysfunction are also discussed. PMID:25897251

  12. Laboratory study of avalanches in magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Van Compernolle, B; Morales, G J; Maggs, J E; Sydora, R D

    2015-03-01

    It is demonstrated that a novel heating configuration applied to a large and cold magnetized plasma allows the study of avalanche phenomena under controlled conditions. Intermittent collapses of the plasma pressure profile, associated with unstable drift-Alfvén waves, exhibit a two-slope power-law spectrum with exponents near -1 at lower frequencies and in the range of -2 to -4 at higher frequencies. A detailed mapping of the spatiotemporal evolution of a single avalanche event is presented. PMID:25871044

  13. Laboratory studies of refractory metal oxide smokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Nelson, R. N.; Donn, Bertram

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the properties of refractory metal oxide smokes condensed from a gas containing various combinations of SiH4, Fe(CO)5, Al(CH3)3, TiCl4, O2 and N2O in a hydrogen carrier stream at 500 K greater than T greater than 1500 K were performed. Ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectra of pure, amorphous SiO(x), FeO(x), AlO(x) and TiO(x) smokes are discussed, as well as the spectra of various co-condensed amorphous oxides, such as FE(x)SiO(y) or Fe(x)AlO(y). Preliminary studies of the changes induced in the infrared spectra of iron-containing oxide smokes by vacuum thermal annealing suggest that such materials become increasingly opaque in the near infrared with increased processing: hydration may have the opposite effect. More work on the processing of these materials is required to confirm such a trend: this work is currently in progress. Preliminary studies of the ultraviolet spectra of amorphous Si2O3 and MgSiO(x) smokes revealed no interesting features in the region from 200 to 300 nm. Studies of the ultraviolet spectra of both amorphous, hydrated and annealed SiO(x), TiO(x), AlO(x) and FeO(x) smokes are currently in progress. Finally, data on the oxygen isotopic composition of the smokes produced in the experiments are presented, which indicate that the oxygen becomes isotopically fractionated during grain condensation. Oxygen in the grains is as much as 3 percent per amu lighter than the oxygen in the original gas stream. The authors are currently conducting experiments to understand the mechanism by which fractionation occurs.

  14. METABOLIC AND THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSES OF THE RAT MAINTAINED IN ACRYLIC OR WIRE-SCREEN CAGES: IMPLICATIONS FOR PHARMACOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory rodents are usually housed and studied in cages with walls and floor made of ventilated metal or solid plastic materials. It should be recognized that a rodent's thermoregulatory requirements will vary in metal and plastic cages; and it is likely that its metabolic res...

  15. Coble NIST Mixture Interlaboratory NIST Inter-Laboratory Studies

    E-print Network

    Coble ­ NIST Mixture Interlaboratory Studies 02/20/2014 1 NIST Inter-Laboratory Studies for DNA Mixture Interpretation Michael D. Coble, PhD Carolyn R. Hill, MS; David L. Duewer, PhD; and Margaret C.M. Butler, Forensic DNA Typing, p. 216) #12;Coble ­ NIST Mixture Interlaboratory Studies 02/20/2014 2 NIST

  16. The power of using functional fMRI on small rodents to study brain pharmacology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Jonckers, Elisabeth; Shah, Disha; Hamaide, Julie; Verhoye, Marleen; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI), stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI), and pharmacological MRI (phMRI). Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimulation and/or a pharmacological challenge. The first part of this review describes the physiological basis of BOLD fMRI and the hemodynamic response on which the MRI contrast is based. Specific emphasis goes to possible effects of anesthesia and the animal’s physiological conditions on neural activity and the hemodynamic response. The second part of this review describes applications of the aforementioned techniques in pharmacologically induced, as well as in traumatic and transgenic disease models and illustrates how multiple fMRI methods can be applied successfully to evaluate different aspects of a specific disorder. For example, fMRI techniques can be used to pinpoint the neural substrate of a disease beyond previously defined hypothesis-driven regions-of-interest. In addition, fMRI techniques allow one to dissect how specific modifications (e.g., treatment, lesion etc.) modulate the functioning of specific brain areas (st-fMRI, phMRI) and how functional connectivity (rsfMRI) between several brain regions is affected, both in acute and extended time frames. Furthermore, fMRI techniques can be used to assess/explore the efficacy of novel treatments in depth, both in fundamental research as well as in preclinical settings. In conclusion, by describing several exemplary studies, we aim to highlight the advantages of functional MRI in exploring the acute and long-term effects of pharmacological substances and/or pathology on brain functioning along with several methodological considerations. PMID:26539115

  17. Laboratory studies of water column separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, R.; Rodal, E.

    2013-12-01

    Results of experimental studies of water column separation following an upstream valve closure are presented. Different geometrical arrangements with transparent PVC pipes are installed immediately downstream of the closing valve, namely, horizontal pipes, vertical pipes flowing down, and humpback profile pipes, the last two being used in order to obtain full pipe section vapor cavities. Maximum over pressures at water column rejoining, and maximum cavity lengths and duration, are compared with theoretical values and with previous experiments with horizontal pipes. Good agreement is found between theory and experiments, and interesting visual material is obtained.

  18. In vitro and in vivo effects of two coconut oils in comparison to monolaurin on Staphylococcus aureus: rodent studies.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Vijaya; Echard, Bobby; Perricone, Nicholas; Ingram, Cass; Enig, Mary; Bagchi, Debasis; Preuss, Harry G

    2013-06-01

    Since monolaurin, a monoglyceride formed in the human body in small quantities, has proven effective both in vitro and in vivo against certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus, an important question arises whether consuming a substance high in lauric acid content, such as coconut oil could increase intrinsic monolaurin production to levels that would be successful in overcoming staphylococcal and other microbial invaders. Both a cup plate method and a microdilution broth culture system were employed to test bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects of the test agents in vitro. To test effectiveness in vivo, female C3H/he mice (10-12 per group) were orally administered sterile saline (regular control), vancomycin (positive control), aqueous monolaurin, or two varieties of coconut oil (refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil and virgin coconut oil) for 1 week before bacterial challenge and 30 days after. A final group received both monolaurin and vancomycin. In contrast to monolaurin, the coconut oils did not show bactericidal activity in vitro. In vivo, the groups receiving vancomycin, monolaurin, or the combination showed some protection--50-70% survival, whereas the protection from the coconut oils were virtually the same as control--0-16% survival. Although we did not find that the two coconut oils are helpful to overcome S. aureus infections, we corroborated earlier studies showing the ability of monolaurin to do such. PMID:23767861

  19. Bone tissue reaction to Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb (at.%) in a rodent model: a preliminary SEM study.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Muñoz, Diego F; Sundaram, Paul Antony; Ramírez, Norman

    2007-07-01

    A variety of metals have been used to replace the skeletal framework of human beings. Gamma titanium aluminide (gammaTiAl) has been recently developed as a prospective material for turbine applications. In this preliminary study, the potential of gammaTiAl as a biomaterial was evaluated using an in vivo rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with gammaTiAl cylinders in the femur and observed for an experimental period lasting up to 180 days. The rats were sacrificed after periods of 45, 90 and 180 days. The femurs with the gammaTiAl implants were extracted and examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Normal bone growth processes were observed as early as 45 days after gammaTiAl cylinder implantation. No signs of rejection of the implant metal were observed. In fact, a layered bone growth was observed on the implant metal surface. The bone-metal interface showed signs of tissue growth from original bone to the metal surface. gammaTiAl appears to elicit a normal bone tissue reaction and hence, has potential as a metallic implant material. PMID:17387593

  20. DHA effect on chemotherapy-induced body weight loss: an exploratory study in a rodent model of mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Hajjaji, Nawale; Couet, Charles; Besson, Pierre; Bougnoux, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Body weight loss during the course of cancer disease has been associated with poor prognosis. Beside cancer-associated cachexia, weight loss can also result from chemotherapy. This work explored whether a model of mammary tumors in female Sprague Dawley rats could be appropriate to study the effect of doxorubicin on body weight, described weight change in this model, and assessed the effect of DHA on weight during chemotherapy. After tumor induction, rats were randomly assigned to a control or a DHA-enriched diet, and treated with doxorubicin or placebo twice a week for 2.5 wk (n = 6 in each group). Body weight, food intake, and tumor growth were monitored. Neither the induction of tumors nor their initial development impaired body weight gain. No reduction in food intake was observed. Tumor growth was similar between groups from day 1 to day 11. Although doxorubicin induced body weight loss from day 4 compared to placebo (P< 0.01) in rats fed the control diet, it did not induce body weight loss in rats fed the DHA-enriched diet (P = 0.02), indicating that DHA had a protective effect. These results indicate that doxorubicin can induce body weight loss in this model and that a DHA-enriched diet can prevent this effect. PMID:23035949

  1. Laboratory Astrophysics: Study of Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Lanz, T.; Stehlé, C.; Michaut, C.

    2002-12-01

    Radiative shocks are high Mach number shocks with a strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. They might be encountered in various astrophysical systems: stellar accretion shocks, pulsating stars, interaction of supernovae with the intestellar medium etc. A numerical one dimensional (1D) stationary study of the coupling between hydrodynamics and radiative transfer is being performed. An estimate of the error made by the 1D approach in the radiative transfer treatment is done by an approximate short characteristics approach. It shows, for exemple, how much of the radiation escapes from the medium in the configuration of the experiment. The experimental study of these shocks has been performed with the high energy density laser of the LULI, at the École Polytechnique (France). We have observed several shocks identified as radiative shocks. The shock waves propagate at about 50 km/s in a tiny 10 mm3 shock tube filled with gaz. From the measurements, it is possible to infer several features of the shock such as the speed and the electronic density.

  2. The safety of PolyGlycopleX® (PGX®) as shown in a 90-day rodent feeding study

    PubMed Central

    Matulka, Ray A; Lyon, Michael R; Wood, Simon; Ann Marone, Palma; Merkel, Daniel J; Burdock, George A

    2009-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the safety of PolyGlycopleX® (PGX®), a novel viscous dietary polysaccharide (fiber), when administered to Sprague Dawley® rats in the diet for 90 days. Methods Groups of ten male and ten female rats each consumed PGX mixed in the diet at levels of 0, 1.25, 2.5 or 5.0% for 90 days, then evaluated for toxicological effects on parameters that included neuromotor activity, body weight, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, hematology, and histopathology. Results Mean body weight, mean feed consumption and food efficiency in the treated groups were generally comparable to controls for both male and female rats. No changes were noted in neuromotor behavior, and histopathological analysis revealed no significant changes between treated and control animals. There were no differences in mean organ weight, organ-to-body weight or organ-to-brain weight values between controls and treated animals. Decreased red blood cell count occurred in the high dose males and increases in aspartate and alanine aminotransferase enzyme levels and triglycerides, while significant decreases in serum sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations were observed in the females fed 5.0% PGX. However, the decreased mineral concentrations may be the result of significantly increased urinary volume in both males and females at the high dose, with a concomitant decrease in urinary specific gravity (males and females) and protein concentration (females). These results were within historical control values, did not correlate with any histopathological changes, and were not considered adverse. Conclusion The results indicate a no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for PGX at 5.0% of the diet, corresponding to an average daily intake of 3219 and 3799 mg/kg bw/day in male and female rats, respectively. PMID:19149876

  3. Tracking genome organization in rodents by Zoo-FISH.

    PubMed

    Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang; Dobigny, Gauthier; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Biltueva, Larisa S; Perelman, Polina L; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Alkalaeva, Elena Z; Serdukova, Natalya A; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Murphy, William J; Robinson, Terence J

    2008-01-01

    The number of rodent species examined by modern comparative genomic approaches, particularly chromosome painting, is limited. The use of human whole-chromosome painting probes to detect regions of homology in the karyotypes of the rodent index species, the mouse and rat, has been hindered by the highly rearranged nature of their genomes. In contrast, recent studies have demonstrated that non-murid rodents display more conserved genomes, underscoring their suitability for comparative genomic and higher-order systematic studies. Here we provide the first comparative chromosome maps between human and representative rodents of three major rodent lineages Castoridae, Pedetidae and Dipodidae. A comprehensive analysis of these data and those published for Sciuridae show (1) that Castoridae, Pedetidae and Dipodidae form a monophyletic group, and (2) that the European beaver Castor fiber (Castoridae) and the birch mouse Sicista betulina (Dipodidae) are sister species to the exclusion of the springhare Pedetes capensis (Pedetidae), thus resolving an enduring trifurcation in rodent higher-level systematics. Our results together with published data on the Sciuridae allow the formulation of a putative rodent ancestral karyotype (2n = 50) that is thought to comprise the following 26 human chromosomal segments and/or segmental associations: HSA1pq, 1q/10p, 2pq, 2q, 3a, 3b/19p, 3c/21, 4b, 5, 6, 7a, 7b/16p, 8p/4a/8p, 8q, 9/11, 10q, 12a/22a, 12b/22b, 13, 14/15, 16q/19q, 17, 18, 20, X and Y. These findings provide insights into the likely composition of the ancestral rodent karyotype and an improved understanding of placental genome evolution. PMID:18266061

  4. Rodent models of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    McNeilly, Alan S; Duncan, W Colin

    2013-07-01

    Rodents are clearly valuable models for assessing disruption of fertility. The effects of different steroid treatments at different stages of reproductive life through from fetal to adult have been assessed for effects on fertility, ovarian morphology, hypothalamic-pituitary function or metabolic consequences. The results show that steroid treatments do disrupt fertility in many cases, but the underlying mechanisms are complicated by the effects of the different treatments at multiple sites. As models for PCOS at the ovarian level however, there are a number of problems particularly related to the fact that rodents are multi-ovular species. Apart from an absence of ovulation and corpora lutea, many of the different steroid regimes result in an increase in large atretic, or cystic follicles that do not parallel PCOS in women. Indeed a number of treatments are given at times when they will cause disruption of the positive feedback effects of estradiol, thus blocking ovulation in adult life. The resulting ovarian morphology thus appears to be like that of PCOS but is in fact not a clear mimic. This review of the various studies highlights parallels and problems with the use of rodents to study the mechanisms underlying the development of PCOS in women. PMID:23098676

  5. Systematic studies of Oryzomyine rodents (Muridae, Sigmodontinae): diagnoses and distributions of species formerly assigned to Oryzomys 'capito'

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, G.G.; Carleton, M.D.; Brothers, E.M.; Gardner, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    We describe the morphological species-boundaries and geographic distributions of ten Neotropical Oryzomys based on analyses of museum specimens (skins and skulls, examples preserved in fluid, chromosomal spreads, and information about collection sites from skin tags, field catalogs, and other sources). These species have been regarded as members of an Oryzomys capito complex and for a long time were consolidated into a single entity identified as O. capito. Our study documents the following: 1. Defining the limits of species within the O. capito complex first requires a comprehensive review and rigorous definition of O. capito itself. We consider Fischer's (1814) Mus megacephalus to be valid and available, designate a neotype to bear the name, and reinstate it as a senior synonym of capito Olfers (1818). We then provide a working definition of O. megacephalus and its close relative, O. laticeps, derived from analyses of morphometric variation, estimates of geographic distributions, and evaluations of synonyms. In our view, O. megacephalus occurs in Amazonia but also extends into eastern Paraguay; its synonyms are capito Olfers (1818), cephalotes Desmarest (1819), velutinus Allen and Chapman (1893), goeldi Thomas (1897), modestus Allen (1899), and perenensis Allen (1901). Oryzomys laticeps Lund (1840) occurs in the Atlantic Forest region of eastern Brazil. We designate a lectotype for laticeps and allocate the names saltator Winge (1887) and oniscus Thomas (1904) as synonyms. 2. We provide the first comprehensive taxonomic revision of Oryzomys yunganus Thomas (1902). Its range covers tropical evergreen rainforest formations in the Guiana region and the Amazon Basin where, as documented by voucher specimens, it has been collected at the same localities as O. megacephalus, O. nitidus, and O. tern of carotid arterial circulation, occlusal patterns of second upper and lower molars, cranial proportions, and chromosomal features. Appreciable intraspecific geographic variation occurs in diploid number of chromosomes and frequency of occurrence of the hypothenar plantar pad, but sampling inadequacies obscure the significance of this variation. Large body size is characteristic of populations in the western Amazon Basin and in the tepui region of eastern Venezuela; smaller size characterizes populations in the Guianas and along the eastern margin of the Amazon Basin. No other scientific name has been correctly associated with the species. Samples from Mirador, Palmera, and Mera in the western Andean foothills of central Ecuador possess a combination of pelage, cranial, and dental traits that distinguish them from all samples of O. yunganus. These specimens are the basis for a new species we describe here, one that is more closely related to O. yunganus than to any other member of the former O. 'capito' complex. 3. We redescribe Oryzomys bolivaris (reviewed by Pine, 1971, under the name O. bombycinus), amplify its geographic range, and contrast it with O. talamancae and O. alfaroi, two sympatric congeners often confused with it. A distinctive set of morphological traits allows unambiguous identification of specimens belonging to O. bolivaris. It is a trans-Andean species recorded from very wet tropical evergreen rainforests extending from eastern Honduras and Nicaragua through Costa Rica and Panama to western Colombia and Ecuador. Allen's (1901) bolivaris is the oldest name for this species; castaneus Allen (1901), rivularis Allen (1901), bombycinus Goldman (1912), alleni Goldman (1915), and orinus Pearson (1939) are synonyms. 4. We revise the definition of Oryzomys talamancae Allen (1891) provided by Musser and Williams (1985), document additional specimens, describe karyotypes from Ecuadoran and Venezuelan samples, and contrast its morphology, chromosomes, and distribution with those of O. alfaroi and O. megacephalus. The geographic distribution of O. talamancae is also trans-Andean, but it inh

  6. Transmission ecology of rodent-borne diseases: New frontiers.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Frédéric; Blasdell, Kim; Morand, Serge

    2015-09-01

    Rodents are recognized reservoir hosts for many human zoonotic pathogens. The current trends resulting from anthropocene defaunation suggest that in the future they, along with other small mammals, are likely to become the dominant mammals in almost all human-modified environments. Recent intricate studies on bat-borne emerging diseases have highlighted that many gaps exist in our understanding of the zoonotic transmission of rodent-borne pathogens. This has emphasized the need for scientists interested in rodent-borne diseases to integrate rodent ecology into their analysis of rodent-borne pathogen transmission in order to identify in more detail the mechanisms of spillover and chains of transmission. Further studies are required to better understand the true impact of rodent abundance and the importance of pathogen sharing and circulation in multi-host- multi-pathogen communities. We also need to explore in more depth the roles of generalist and abundant species as the potential links between pathogen-sharing, co-infections and disease transmission. PMID:26176684

  7. Differences in Ultrasonic Vocalizations between Wild and Laboratory California Mice (Peromyscus californicus)

    PubMed Central

    Kalcounis-Rueppell, Matina C.; Petric, Radmila; Briggs, Jessica R.; Carney, Catherine; Marshall, Matthew M.; Willse, John T.; Rueppell, Olav; Ribble, David O.; Crossland, Janet P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) emitted by muroid rodents, including laboratory mice and rats, are used as phenotypic markers in behavioral assays and biomedical research. Interpretation of these USVs depends on understanding the significance of USV production by rodents in the wild. However, there has never been a study of muroid rodent ultrasound function in the wild and comparisons of USVs produced by wild and laboratory rodents are lacking to date. Here, we report the first comparison of wild and captive rodent USVs recorded from the same species, Peromyscus californicus. Methodology and Principal Findings We used standard ultrasound recording techniques to measure USVs from California mice in the laboratory (Peromyscus Genetic Stock Center, SC, USA) and the wild (Hastings Natural History Reserve, CA, USA). To determine which California mouse in the wild was vocalizing, we used a remote sensing method that used a 12-microphone acoustic localization array coupled with automated radio telemetry of all resident Peromyscus californicus in the area of the acoustic localization array. California mice in the laboratory and the wild produced the same types of USV motifs. However, wild California mice produced USVs that were 2–8 kHz higher in median frequency and significantly more variable in frequency than laboratory California mice. Significance The similarity in overall form of USVs from wild and laboratory California mice demonstrates that production of USVs by captive Peromyscus is not an artifact of captivity. Our study validates the widespread use of USVs in laboratory rodents as behavioral indicators but highlights that particular characteristics of laboratory USVs may not reflect natural conditions. PMID:20368980

  8. The rat: a laboratory model for studies of the diving response.

    PubMed

    Panneton, W Michael; Gan, Qi; Juric, Rajko

    2010-04-01

    Underwater submersion in mammals induces apnea, parasympathetically mediated bradycardia, and sympathetically mediated peripheral vasoconstriction. These effects are collectively termed the diving response, potentially the most powerful autonomic reflex known. Although these physiological responses are directed by neurons in the brain, study of neural control of the diving response has been hampered since 1) it is difficult to study the brains of animals while they are underwater, 2) feral marine mammals are usually large and have brains of variable size, and 3) there are but few references on the brains of naturally diving species. Similar responses are elicited in anesthetized rodents after stimulation of their nasal mucosa, but this nasopharyngeal reflex has not been compared directly with natural diving behavior in the rat. In the present study, we compared hemodynamic responses elicited in awake rats during volitional underwater submersion with those of rats swimming on the water's surface, rats involuntarily submerged, and rats either anesthetized or decerebrate and stimulated nasally with ammonia vapors. We show that the hemodynamic changes to voluntary diving in the rat are similar to those of naturally diving marine mammals. We also show that the responses of voluntary diving rats are 1) significantly different from those seen during swimming, 2) generally similar to those elicited in trained rats involuntarily "dunked" underwater, and 3) generally different from those seen from dunking naive rats underwater. Nasal stimulation of anesthetized rats differed most from the hemodynamic variables of rats trained to dive voluntarily. We propose that the rat trained to dive underwater is an excellent laboratory model to study neural control of the mammalian diving response, and also suggest that some investigations may be done with nasal stimulation of decerebrate preparations to decipher such control. PMID:20093670

  9. Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

  10. A Laboratory Analogue for the Study of Peer Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Damon; Hirschman, Richard; Angelone, D. J.; Lilly, Roy S.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory analogue for the study of peer sexual harassment, and to examine person and situational factors associated with male on female peer sexual harassment. One hundred twenty-two male participants were given the opportunity to tell jokes to a female confederate from a joke list that included…

  11. Evidence for Novel Hepaciviruses in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor Max; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Lukashev, Alexander N.; Gmyl, Anatoly; Coutard, Bruno; Adam, Alexander; Ritz, Daniel; Leijten, Lonneke M.; van Riel, Debby; Kallies, Rene; Klose, Stefan M.; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Binger, Tabea; Annan, Augustina; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Oppong, Samuel; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Rupp, Daniel; Hoffmann, Bernd; Schlegel, Mathias; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Krüger, Detlev H.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar; Cottontail, Veronika M.; Hemachudha, Thiravat; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Osterrieder, Klaus; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Matthee, Sonja; Beer, Martin; Kuiken, Thijs; Reusken, Chantal; Leroy, Eric M.; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Drosten, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is among the most relevant causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Research is complicated by a lack of accessible small animal models. The systematic investigation of viruses of small mammals could guide efforts to establish such models, while providing insight into viral evolutionary biology. We have assembled the so-far largest collection of small-mammal samples from around the world, qualified to be screened for bloodborne viruses, including sera and organs from 4,770 rodents (41 species); and sera from 2,939 bats (51 species). Three highly divergent rodent hepacivirus clades were detected in 27 (1.8%) of 1,465 European bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and 10 (1.9%) of 518 South African four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio). Bats showed anti-HCV immunoblot reactivities but no virus detection, although the genetic relatedness suggested by the serologic results should have enabled RNA detection using the broadly reactive PCR assays developed for this study. 210 horses and 858 cats and dogs were tested, yielding further horse-associated hepaciviruses but none in dogs or cats. The rodent viruses were equidistant to HCV, exceeding by far the diversity of HCV and the canine/equine hepaciviruses taken together. Five full genomes were sequenced, representing all viral lineages. Salient genome features and distance criteria supported classification of all viruses as hepaciviruses. Quantitative RT-PCR, RNA in-situ hybridisation, and histopathology suggested hepatic tropism with liver inflammation resembling hepatitis C. Recombinant serology for two distinct hepacivirus lineages in 97 bank voles identified seroprevalence rates of 8.3 and 12.4%, respectively. Antibodies in bank vole sera neither cross-reacted with HCV, nor the heterologous bank vole hepacivirus. Co-occurrence of RNA and antibodies was found in 3 of 57 PCR-positive bank vole sera (5.3%). Our data enable new hypotheses regarding HCV evolution and encourage efforts to develop rodent surrogate models for HCV. PMID:23818848

  12. Sensitization to rodents (mouse/rat) in urban atopic populations without occupational exposure living in Campania district (Southern Italy): a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Up to now very few data on allergic sensitization to rodent allergens in Western Europe and Italy are available, and there are no information at district level. The aim of this report was to investigate clinical significance and characteristics of allergic sensitization to mouse/rat (M/Rt) allergens in atopic subjects living in Campania district (Southern Italy). Methods Allergists from the whole Campania district were required to report the results of skin prick tests of at least 100 consecutive subjects. In 1,477 consecutive outpatients, we selected all subjects with an immediate skin reaction to M/Rt dander. Clinical history including a careful evaluation of the modality of exposure and the results of skin-prick tests (SPTs) were recorded. Results Fifty seven patients were sensitized to M/Rt dander (5.78%). Two patients were mono-sensitized. Fourteen patients reported indoor conditions suggesting presence of rodents allergens at home. All patients exhibited low-moderate degree of SPT positivity to M/Rt. High frequency of concomitant allergic sensitization to dust mites was found. Conclusions Our results suggest that the role of allergic sensitization to rodents is not negligible in atopic subjects without occupational exposure living in Campania district area; these values are higher in comparison to those previously found in Naples area. Highly atopic individuals should be tested by SPTs/evaluation of serum specific IgE to rodents in the case they should begin an occupational exposure to M/Rt or keep these animals as pets. PMID:23591013

  13. Rodent models for compulsive alcohol intake.

    PubMed

    Hopf, F Woodward; Lesscher, Heidi M B

    2014-05-01

    Continued seeking and drinking of alcohol despite adverse legal, health, economic, and societal consequences is a central hallmark of human alcohol use disorders. This compulsive drive for alcohol, defined by resistance to adverse and deleterious consequences, represents a major challenge when attempting to treat alcoholism clinically. Thus, there has long been interest in developing pre-clinical rodent models for the compulsive drug use that characterizes drug addiction. Here, we review recent studies that have attempted to model compulsive aspects of alcohol and cocaine intake in rodents, and consider technical and conceptual issues that need to be addressed when trying to recapitulate compulsive aspects of human addiction. Aversion-resistant alcohol intake has been examined by pairing intake or seeking with the bitter tastant quinine or with footshock, and exciting recent work has used these models to identify neuroadaptations in the amygdala, cortex, and striatal regions that promote compulsive intake. Thus, rodent models do seem to reflect important aspects of compulsive drives that sustain human addiction, and will likely provide critical insights into the molecular and circuit underpinnings of aversion-resistant intake as well as novel therapeutic interventions for compulsive aspects of addiction. PMID:24731992

  14. Serologic survey of orthopoxvirus infection among rodents in hungary.

    PubMed

    Oldal, Miklós; Sironen, Tarja; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Gy?z?; Dallos, Bianka; Kutas, Anna; Földes, Fanni; Kemenesi, Gábor; Németh, Viktória; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2015-05-01

    As a result of discontinuing vaccination against smallpox after the late 1970s, different orthopoxviruses (OPVs), such as cowpox virus (CPXV), have become a re-emerging healthcare threat among zoonotic pathogens. In Hungary, data on OPV prevalence among its rodent host species have been absent. Here, rodents belonging to four species, i.e., striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius), yellow-necked mouse (A. flavicollis), wood mouse (A. sylvaticus) and bank vole (Myodes glareolus), were live trapped at 13 sampling plots on a 149-ha area in the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary, from March to September in 2011 and 2012. Rodent sera were collected and screened for OPV-reactive antibodies with an immunfluorescence assay (IFA). Among the 1587 tested rodents, 286 (18.0%) harbored OPV-specific antibodies. Seroprevalence was the highest for the bank vole (71.4%) and the striped field mouse (66.7%). Due to a masting event in the autumn of 2011 across Central Europe, the abundance of bank voles increased drastically in the 2012 season, raising the overall OPV seroprevalence. We provide the first data on OPV occurrence and seroprevalence in rodents in Hungary. The circulation of OPV in rodents in densely populated areas warrants further studies to elucidate the zoonotic potential of OPV in humans. PMID:25988441

  15. Theoretical and practical considerations behind the use of laboratory animals for the study of Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macrì, Simone; Proietti Onori, Martina; Laviola, Giovanni

    2013-07-01

    In the present manuscript we review a substantial body of literature describing several pre-clinical animal models designed and developed with the purpose of investigating the biological determinants of Tourette syndrome (TS). In order to map the animal models onto the theoretical background upon which they have been devised, we first define phenomenological and etiological aspects of TS and then match this information to the available pre-clinical models. Thus, we first describe the characteristic symptoms exhibited by TS patients and then a series of hypotheses attempting to identify the multifactorial causes of TS. With respect to the former, we detail the phenomenology of abnormal repetitive behaviors (tics and stereotypies), obsessive-compulsive behaviors and aberrant sensory-motor gating. With respect to the latter, we describe both potential candidate vulnerability genes and environmental factors (difficult pregnancies, psychosocial stressors and infections). We then discuss how this evidence has been translated in pre-clinical research with respect to both dependent (symptoms) and independent (etiological factors) variables. Thus, while, on the one hand, we detail the methodologies adopted to measure abnormal repetitive and obsessive-compulsive behaviors, and sensory-motor gating, on the other hand, we describe genetic engineering studies and environmental modulations aimed at reproducing the proposed biological determinants in laboratory rodents. A special emphasis is placed upon "programming" events, occurring during critical stages of early development and exerting organizational delayed consequences. In the final section, we outline a heuristic model with the purpose of integrating clinical and pre-clinical evidence in the study of TS. PMID:23583771

  16. Rodent nutrition: digestive comparisons of 4 common rodent species.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kerrin

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes the literature regarding digestive strategies and captive diets of common rodent pocket pets. A comparison is made between the 2 suborders in which chinchillas, guinea pigs, hamsters, and gerbils occur, highlighting digestive anatomy and dietary adaptations. Recommended captive diets are provided, as well as common nutritionally related health issues that may be presented to veterinary clinics. PMID:25155666

  17. 21 CFR 58.130 - Conduct of a nonclinical laboratory study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Conduct of a nonclinical laboratory study. 58.130 Section 58.130 Food...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Protocol for and Conduct of a...

  18. 21 CFR 58.130 - Conduct of a nonclinical laboratory study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Conduct of a nonclinical laboratory study. 58.130 Section 58.130 Food...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Protocol for and Conduct of a...

  19. The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies

    E-print Network

    Foulger, G. R.

    - 1 - The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies for Geothermal Monitoring-Dinger Geothermal Program Office, U. S. Navy, China Lake, CA 93555-6001 Keith.Richards-Dinge@navy.mil Keywords of three-component digital seismometers at the Coso geothermal area, California, supplemented by 14

  20. SEWER SEDIMENT GATE AND VACUUM FLUSHING TANKS: LABORATORY FLUME STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to test the performance of a traditional gate-flushing device and a newly designed vacuum-flushing device in removing sediments from combined sewers and CSO storage tanks. A laboratory hydraulic flune was used to simulate a reach of sewer or storag...

  1. LABORATORY STUDY OF LIMESTONE REGENERATION IN DUAL ALKALI SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a series of open- and closed-loop laboratory bench scale experiments which were carried out to study parameters which affect the reaction of limestone with dual alkali flue gas desulfurization system process liquors. It gives details of several sets of operat...

  2. DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF LABORATORY ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Design and evaluation of laboratory ecological system studies are considered in relation to problems and objectives in environmental toxicology. Ecological systems are defined to be organismic systems together with their level-specific, co-extensive environmental systems and to o...

  3. Black carbon refractive index and morphology: a Laboratory study

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    Black carbon refractive index and morphology: a Laboratory study Dan M. Peters1 , Roy G. Grainger1 state that has a strong effect on black carbon absorption [4],[6]; as well as the UK Chemistry Aerosol effects. Bond, [1] summarize the aspects of black carbon that are unknown or uncertain and affect our

  4. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  5. Hiero-Dermato-Glyphics: Laboratory Study of the Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roark, Oakley F.

    1977-01-01

    Explains several laboratory exercises using the skin, including the mapping of receptors, counting of sweat glands, computation of total skin area, comparison of various animal skins, measurement of the palm triradius angle, and study of epidermal ridges (dermatoglyphics) in males and females. (CS)

  6. Developing Medicare Competitive Bidding: A Study of Clinical Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Hoerger, Thomas J.; Meadow, Ann

    1997-01-01

    Competitive bidding to derive Medicare fees promises several advantages over administered fee systems. The authors show how incentives for cost savings, quality, and access can be incorporated into bidding schemes, and they report on a study of the clinical laboratory industry conducted in preparation for a bidding demonstration. The laboratory industry is marked by variable concentration across geographic markets and, among firms themselves, by social and economic heterogeneity. The authors conclude that these conditions can be accommodated by available bidding design options and by careful selection of bidding markets. PMID:10180003

  7. Native Rodent Species Are Unlikely Sources of Infection for Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis along the Transoceanic Highway in Madre de Dios, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Shender, Lisa A.; De Los Santos, Maxy; Montgomery, Joel M.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Ghersi, Bruno M.; Razuri, Hugo; Lescano, Andres G.; Mazet, Jonna A. K.

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 2.3 million disability-adjusted life years are lost globally from leishmaniasis. In Peru's Amazon region, the department of Madre de Dios (MDD) rises above the rest of the country in terms of the annual incidence rates of human leishmaniasis. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis is the species most frequently responsible for the form of disease that results in tissue destruction of the nose and mouth. However, essentially nothing is known regarding the reservoirs of this vector-borne, zoonotic parasite in MDD. Wild rodents have been suspected, or proven, to be reservoirs of several Leishmania spp. in various ecosystems and countries. Additionally, people who live or work in forested terrain, especially those who are not regionally local and whose immune systems are thus naïve to the parasite, are at most risk for contracting L. (V.) braziliensis. Hence, the objective of this study was to collect tissues from wild rodents captured at several study sites along the Amazonian segment of the newly constructed Transoceanic Highway and to use molecular laboratory techniques to analyze samples for the presence of Leishmania parasites. Liver tissues were tested via polymerase chain reaction from a total of 217 rodents; bone marrow and skin biopsies (ear and tail) were also tested from a subset of these same animals. The most numerous rodent species captured and tested were Oligoryzomys microtis (40.7%), Hylaeamys perenensis (15.7%), and Proechimys spp. (12%). All samples were negative for Leishmania, implying that although incidental infections may occur, these abundant rodent species are unlikely to serve as primary reservoirs of L. (V.) braziliensis along the Transoceanic Highway in MDD. Therefore, although these rodent species may persist and even thrive in moderately altered landscapes, we did not find any evidence to suggest they pose a risk for L. (V.) braziliensis transmission to human inhabitants in this highly prevalent region. PMID:25062033

  8. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps, poisons, and other generally accepted...

  9. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps, poisons, and other generally accepted...

  10. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps, poisons, and other generally accepted...

  11. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps, poisons, and other generally accepted...

  12. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps, poisons, and other generally accepted...

  13. Climate, Deer, Rodents, and Acorns as Determinants

    E-print Network

    Climate, Deer, Rodents, and Acorns as Determinants of Variation in Lyme-Disease Risk Richard S. In no case did inclusion of deer or climate variables improve the predictive power of models based on rodents, Keesing F (2006) Climate, deer, rodents, and acorns as determinants of variation in Lyme-disease risk. PLo

  14. Studying X-ray Burst Nucleosynthesis in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, C. M.; Afanasieva, L.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Almarez-Calderon, S.; Bedoor, S.; Bertone, P. F.; Carnelli, P.; Chen, A. A.; Chen, J.; Clark, J. A.; Figueira, J. M.; Greene, J. P.; Hoffman, C. R.; Irvine, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lai, J.; Lee, H. Y.; Lighthall, J. C.; Manwell, S.; Marley, S. T.; Nair, C.; Palachan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Patel, N.; Paul, M.; Rasco, B. C.; Rehm, K. E.; Rogers, A. M.; Shetty, D.; Ugalde, C.; Wuosmaa, A.; Zinkann, G.

    2012-12-01

    Type I X-ray bursts are the most common explosions in the Galaxy; however, the nucleosynthesis that occurs during the thermonuclear runaway and explosion is poorly understood. In this proceedings we discuss current experimental efforts and techniques that are being used to study X-ray burst nucleosynthesis in the laboratory. Specifically, radioactive ion beam techniques that have recently been developed have allowed the study of some of the most important (?, p) reactions in X-ray bursts for the first time.

  15. Seroepidemiological survey of rodents collected at a U.S. military installation, Yongsan Garrison, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung-Chul; Klein, Terry A; Chong, Sung-Tae; Collier, Brett W; Usa, Msc; Yi, Song Chu; Song, Ki-Joon; Baek, Luck-Ju; Song, Jin-Won

    2007-07-01

    A seroepidemiological study of selected rodent-borne diseases (hantavirus [Seoul [SEO] virus], scrub typhus [Orientia tsutsugamushi], murine typhus [Rickettsia typhi], and leptospirosis [Leptospira interrogans]), as part of the U.S. military rodent surveillance and control program, was conducted from 2001 through 2005 at Yongsan Garrison, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Rodents were collected to determine the prevalence of rodent-borne diseases at a U.S. military installation in an urban environment. A total of 1,750 rodents representing three species was collected by using baited live traps (Tomahawk), glue boards, and poison baits (dead rodents observed but not assayed). The Norway rat, Rattus norvegicus (99.8%), accounted for nearly all of the rodents captured/observed. Only three roof rats, Rattus rattus (0.2%), and one house mouse, Mus musculus (<0.1%), were collected. R. norvegicus rats were the only rodents that were serologically positive for SEO virus (9.6%), scrub typhus (2.8%), murine typhus (3.8%), and leptospirosis (4.6%). One of six rodents that were positive for SEO virus by immunofluorescent antibody test was positive for SEO virus antigen by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Infection rates for SEO virus, scrub typhus, murine typhus, and leptospirosis varied annually. Rodents were captured from 228 (20.7%) of 1,104 total buildings in Yongsan Garrison. The Yongsan commissary had the highest annual infestation rate (22 rodents per year), followed by Commisky's Club (18 rodents per year). Annual infestation rates were high for food service facilities, which often store perishable food products outdoors for short periods of time, attracting rodent populations; refuse from these facilities provides harborage and food for rodents. The effect of rodent populations outside the boundary of Yongsan Garrison was not determined. PMID:17691691

  16. Helminth parasite species richness in rodents from Southeast Asia: role of host species and habitat.

    PubMed

    Palmeirim, Marta; Bordes, Frédéric; Chaisiri, Kittipong; Siribat, Praphaiphat; Ribas, Alexis; Morand, Serge

    2014-10-01

    Southeast Asia is a biodiversity hotspot that harbours many species of rodents, including some that live in close contact with humans. They host helminth parasites, some of which are of zoonotic importance. It is therefore important to understand the factors that influence the richness of the helminths parasitizing rodents. The specific objectives of this study were to evaluate rodent species as a factor determining helminth richness in rodent assemblages, to identify the major rodent helminth reservoir species and to explore the influence of habitat on helminth richness. We estimated helminth species richness using a large dataset of 18 rodent species (1,651 individuals) originating from Southeast Asia and screened for helminth parasites. The use of an unbiased estimator shows that the helminth species richness varies substantially among rodent species and across habitats. We confirmed this pattern by investigating the number of helminth species per individual rodent in all rodent species, and specifically in the two mitochondrial lineages Rattus tanezumi and R. tanezumi R3, which were captured in all habitats. PMID:25082015

  17. A Study: From Electronic Laboratory Notebooks to Generated Queries for Literature Recommendation

    E-print Network

    A Study: From Electronic Laboratory Notebooks to Generated Queries for Literature Recommendation the increasing use of Electronic Laboratory Notebooks (ELNs) in our research environments to capture Electronic Laboratory Notebooks to Generated Queries for Literature Recommendation. In Proceedings

  18. Interstellar dust: interfacing laboratory, theoretical and observational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anthony Peter

    2015-08-01

    In this talk I will consider how our understanding of interstellar dust can only be advanced through a combination of laboratory, theoretical and observational studies, which provide the critical framework for advancing our understanding. I will summarise what we currently know, or think we know, about the physical and compositional properties of dust and their evolution in interstellar media. Along the way I will question the utility of astronomical dust analogues and show, based on data from the laboratory, theoretical studies and from astronomical observations, that some of our prior interpretations need to be subjected to a critical re-evaluation. I will present interstellar dust modelling from a new vantage point and review ideas on the interpretation of observations within the framework of this model and its predictions for dust evolution within and between interstellar media. Finally, I will summarise some of the current outstanding issues and what we would like to learn in the future.

  19. Increased levels of IgE and autoreactive, polyreactive IgG in wild rodents: implications for the hygiene hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Devalapalli, A.P.; Lesher, A.; Shieh, K.; Solow, J.S.; Everett, M.L.; Edala, A.S.; Whitt, P.; Long, Renee R.; Newton, N.; Parker, W.

    2006-01-01

    To probe the potential role of Th1 versus Th2 reactivity underlying the hygiene hypothesis, intrinsic levels of Th1-associated and Th2-associated antibodies in the serum of wild rodents were compared with that in various strains of laboratory rodents. Studies using rat lung antigens as a target indicated that wild rats have substantially greater levels of autoreactive, polyreactive immunoglobulin G (IgG), but not autoreactive, polyreactive IgM than do laboratory rats, both on a quantitative and qualitative basis. Increased levels of serum IgG and IgE were observed in both wild rats and wild mice relative to their laboratory-raised counterparts, with the effect being most pronounced for IgE levels. Further, wild rats had greater intrinsic levels of both Th1- and Th2-associated IgG subclasses than did lab rats. The habitat (wild versus laboratory raised) had a more substantial impact on immunoglobulin concentration than did age, strain or gender in the animals studied. The presence in wild rodents of increased intrinsic, presumably protective, non-pathogenic responses similar to both autoimmune (autoreactive IgG, Th1-associated) and allergic (IgE, Th2-associated) reactions as well as increased levels of Th1-associated and Th2-associated IgG subclasses points toward a generally increased stimulation of the immune system in these animals rather than a shift in the nature of the immunoreactivity. It is concluded that, at least to the extent that feedback inhibition is a controlling element of immunoreactivity, an overly hygienic environment may affect the threshold of both types of immune responses more so than the balance between the different responses.

  20. Identification of Rodent Homologs of Hepatitis C Virus and Pegiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Scheel, Troels K. H.; Hjelle, Brian; Cullen, John M.; Burbelo, Peter D.; Chauhan, Lokendra V.; Duraisamy, Raja; Sanchez Leon, Maria; Jain, Komal; Vandegrift, Kurt Jason; Calisher, Charles H.; Rice, Charles M.; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human pegivirus (HPgV or GB virus C) are globally distributed and infect 2 to 5% of the human population. The lack of tractable-animal models for these viruses, in particular for HCV, has hampered the study of infection, transmission, virulence, immunity, and pathogenesis. To address this challenge, we searched for homologous viruses in small mammals, including wild rodents. Here we report the discovery of several new hepaciviruses (HCV-like viruses) and pegiviruses (GB virus-like viruses) that infect wild rodents. Complete genome sequences were acquired for a rodent hepacivirus (RHV) found in Peromyscus maniculatus and a rodent pegivirus (RPgV) found in Neotoma albigula. Unique genomic features and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that these RHV and RPgV variants represent several novel virus species in the Hepacivirus and Pegivirus genera within the family Flaviviridae. The genetic diversity of the rodent hepaciviruses exceeded that observed for hepaciviruses infecting either humans or non-primates, leading to new insights into the origin, evolution, and host range of hepaciviruses. The presence of genes, encoded proteins, and translation elements homologous to those found in human hepaciviruses and pegiviruses suggests the potential for the development of new animal systems with which to model HCV pathogenesis, vaccine design, and treatment. PMID:23572554

  1. Laboratory studies of in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. A., Jr.; Farmer, F. H.; Jarrett, O., Jr.; Staton, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    A lidar system is developed that uses four selected excitation wavelengths to induce chlorophyll 'a' fluorescence which is indicative of both the concentration and diversity of phytoplankton. The operating principles of the system and the results of measurements of phytoplankton fluorescence in a controlled laboratory environment are presented. A comparative study of results from lidar fluorosensor laboratory tank tests using representative species of phytoplankton in single and multispecies cultures from each of four color groups reveals that (1) there is good correlation between the fluorescence of chlorophyll 'a' remotely simulated and detected by the lidar system and in-situ measurements using four similar excitation wavelengths in a flow-through fluorometer; (2) good correlation exists between the total chlorophyll 'a' calculated from lidar-fluorosensor data and measurements obtained by the Strickland-Parsons method; and (3) the lidar fluorosensor can provide an index of population diversity.

  2. A Laboratory Study of Heterogeneity and Scaling in Geologic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S.; Boitnott, G.; Bussod, G.; Hagan, P.

    2004-05-01

    In rocks and soils, the bulk geophysical and transport properties of the matrix and of fracture systems are determined by the juxtaposition of geometric features at many length scales. For sedimentary materials the length scales are: the pore scale (irregularities in grain surface roughness and cementation), the scale of grain packing faults (and the resulting correlated porosity structures), the scale dominated by sorting or winnowing due to depositional processes, and the scale of geomorphology at the time of deposition. We are studying the heterogeneity and anisotropy in geometry, permeability, and geophysical response from the pore (microscopic), laboratory (mesoscopic), and backyard field (macroscopic) scales. In turn these data are being described and synthesized for development of mathematical models. Eventually, we will perform parameter studies to explore these models in the context of transport in the vadose and saturated zones. We have developed a multi-probe physical properties scanner which allows for the mapping of geophysical properties on a slabbed sample or core. This device allows for detailed study of heterogeneity at those length scales most difficult to quantify using standard field and laboratory practices. The measurement head consists of a variety of probes designed to make local measurements of various properties, including: gas permeability, acoustic velocities (compressional and shear), complex electrical impedance (4 electrode, wide frequency coverage), and ultrasonic reflection (ultrasonic impedance and permeability). We can thus routinely generate detailed geophysical maps of a particular sample. We are testing and modifying these probes as necessary for use on soil samples. As a baseline study we have been characterizing the heterogeneity of a bench-size Berea sandstone block. Berea Sandstone has long been regarded as a laboratory standard in rock properties studies, owing to its uniformity and ``typical'' physical properties. We find that both permeability and velocity exhibit complex heterogeneity at the centimeter scale. While some correlation with the outcropping of the bedding is apparent, much of the heterogeneity is not clearly associated with visual features. For the study of soil heterogeneity at a wide range of scales, we are focusing on a local glacial deposit. This deposit is a glacial kame terrace of fluvial origin with multi-scale sedimentary structures comprised of unconsolidated sands, clays, and gravels. There are also many joints and faults in the unconsolidated sediments, allowing study of these as potential fluid flow conduits or barriers. We have obtained undisturbed soil samples from this site, allowing detailed laboratory study using similar methods to those described for the sandstone block.

  3. A Laboratory Study of Heterogeneity and Scaling in Geologic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S.; Boitnott, G.; Smith, M.

    2003-12-01

    In rocks and soils, the bulk geophysical and transport properties of the matrix and of fracture systems are determined by the juxtaposition of geometric features at many length scales. For sedimentary materials the length scales are: the pore scale (irregularities in grain surface roughness and cementation), the scale of grain packing faults (and the resulting correlated porosity structures), the scale dominated by sorting or winnowing due to depositional processes, and the scale of geomorphology at the time of deposition. We are studying the heterogeneity and anisotropy in geometry, permeability, and geophysical response from the pore (microscopic), laboratory (mesoscopic), and backyard field (macroscopic) scales. In turn these data are being described and synthesized for development of mathematical models. Eventually, we will perform parameter studies to explore these models in the context of transport in the vadose and saturated zones. We have developed a multi-probe physical properties scanner which allows for the mapping of geophysical properties on a slabbed sample or core. This device allows for detailed study of heterogeneity at those length scales most difficult to quantify using standard field and laboratory practices. The measurement head consists of a variety of probes designed to make local measurements of various properties, including: gas permeability, acoustic velocities (compressional and shear), complex electrical impedance (4 electrode, wide frequency coverage), and ultrasonic reflection (ultrasonic impedance and permeability). We can thus routinely generate detailed geophysical maps of a particular sample. With the exception of the acoustic velocity, we are testing and modifying these probes as necessary for use on soil samples. As a baseline study we have been characterizing the heterogeneity of a bench-size Berea sandstone block. Berea Sandstone has long been regarded as a laboratory standard in rock properties studies, owing to its uniformity and ``typical'' physical properties. We find that both permeability and velocity exhibit complex heterogeneity at the centimeter scale. While some correlation with the outcropping of the bedding is apparent, much of the heterogeneity is not clearly associated with visual features. For the study of soil heterogeneity at a wide range of scales, we are focusing on a local glacial deposit. This deposit is a glacial kame terrace of fluvial origin with multi-scale sedimentary structures comprised of unconsolidated sands, clays, and gravels. There are also many joints and faults in the unconsolidated sediments, allowing study of these as potential fluid flow conduits or barriers. We have obtained undisturbed soil samples from this site, allowing detailed laboratory study using similar methods to those described for the sandstone block.

  4. Can shrub cover increase predation risk for a desert rodent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schooley, R.L.; Sharpe, Peter B.

    1996-01-01

    Previous research indicates that predation risk may influence activity patterns, habitat partitioning, and community structure of nocturnal desert rodents. Shrub microhabitat is typically considered safer than open microhabitat for these small mammals. We investigated predation risk for Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii), which are diurnal desert rodents that detect predators visually and use burrows for refuge. Our results suggested that shrub cover may increase risk for these squirrels by decreasing their ability to escape from predators. Our field experiment indicated that running speeds of juvenile squirrels were lower in shrub (Ceratoides lanata) habitat than in open areas. Shrub cover was also associated with shorter predator-detection distances (mammalian and avian) and fewer refuges (burrow entrances per hectare) than in open areas in one year but not in another. Our study demonstrated that the visual and locomotive obstruction of vegetative cover may increase predation risk for diurnal desert rodents and that elements of habitat-dependent risk may be temporally dynamic.

  5. Teasing Apart the Effects of Seed Size and Energy Content on Rodent Scatter-Hoarding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    Scatter-hoarding rodents are known to play a crucial role in the seed dispersal of many plant species. Numerous studies have indicated that both seed size and the energy content of seeds can affect rodent foraging behavior. However, seed size is usually associated with energy content per seed, making it difficult to isolate how seed size and energy affect rodent foraging preferences. This study used 99 treatments of artificial seeds (11 seed sizes×9 levels of energy content) to tease apart the effect of seed size and energy content on rodent seed-caching behavior. Both seed traits showed significant effects, but their details depended on the stage of the rodent foraging process. Seeds with higher energy content were harvested more rapidly while seed size only had a modest effect on harvest rate. However, after harvesting, seed size showed a much stronger effect on rodent foraging behavior. Rodents’ choice of which seeds to remove and cache, as well as seed dispersal distance, seemed to reflect an optimal seed size. Our findings could be adapted in future studies to gain a better understanding of scatter-hoarding rodent foraging behavior, and the co-evolutionary dynamics between plant seed production and seed dispersers. PMID:25350369

  6. Teasing apart the effects of seed size and energy content on rodent scatter-hoarding behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    Scatter-hoarding rodents are known to play a crucial role in the seed dispersal of many plant species. Numerous studies have indicated that both seed size and the energy content of seeds can affect rodent foraging behavior. However, seed size is usually associated with energy content per seed, making it difficult to isolate how seed size and energy affect rodent foraging preferences. This study used 99 treatments of artificial seeds (11 seed sizes×9 levels of energy content) to tease apart the effect of seed size and energy content on rodent seed-caching behavior. Both seed traits showed significant effects, but their details depended on the stage of the rodent foraging process. Seeds with higher energy content were harvested more rapidly while seed size only had a modest effect on harvest rate. However, after harvesting, seed size showed a much stronger effect on rodent foraging behavior. Rodents' choice of which seeds to remove and cache, as well as seed dispersal distance, seemed to reflect an optimal seed size. Our findings could be adapted in future studies to gain a better understanding of scatter-hoarding rodent foraging behavior, and the co-evolutionary dynamics between plant seed production and seed dispersers. PMID:25350369

  7. Laboratory and vaccination studies with dried smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed

    COCKBURN, W C; CROSS, R M; DOWNIE, A W; DUMBELL, K R; KAPLAN, C; MCCLEAN, D; PAYNE, A M

    1957-01-01

    In a vaccination and laboratory study, two dried smallpox vaccines (designated P and Q) were tested at intervals of 4, 8, 16, and 32 weeks after storage at both 37 degrees C and 45 degrees C. Vaccine P was also tested after 64 weeks at these temperatures and gave 100% successful vaccination rates after all periods of storage at both temperatures. Vaccine Q deteriorated within four weeks, rapidly at 45 degrees C and less rapidly, but very substantially, at 37 degrees C. There was no clear evidence of the cause of this deterioration, but there was a suggestion of denaturation of some of the samples stored at the higher temperature. So far as could be ascertained, the laboratory results-rabbit skin scarification tests and chorio-allantoic membrane pock counts-ran parallel with the vaccination success rates. The pock count was found to be the more accurate method of laboratory titration. Vaccine P as used in the trial was not an exceptional batch.Vaccines which give a pock count of 10(8) infective units per ml will give the highest possible rate of successful primary vaccinations.A statistical note on the trials is given in an annex. PMID:13413647

  8. Estrogen and Hippocampal Plasticity in Rodent Models

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Michael R.; Baudry, Michel; Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Thompson, Richard F.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that ovarian hormones regulate a wide variety of non-reproductive functions in the central nervous system by interacting with several molecular and cellular processes. A growing animal literature using both adult and aged rodent models indicates that 17?-estradiol, the most potent of the biologically relevant estrogens, facilitates some forms of learning and memory, in particular those that involve hippocampal-dependent tasks. A recently developed triple-transgenic mouse (3xTg-AD) has been widely used as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease, as this mouse exhibits an age-related and progressive neuropathological phenotype that includes both plaque and tangle pathology mainly restricted to hippocampus, amygdala and cerebral cortex. In this report, we examine recent studies that compare the effects of ovarian hormones on synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity in adult and aged rodents. A better understanding of the non-reproductive functions of ovarian hormones has far-reaching implications for hormone therapy to maintain health and function within the nervous system throughout aging. PMID:19096158

  9. Leaching of coal combustion products: Field and laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chin-Min

    This study combines field monitoring and laboratory experiments to investigate the environmental impacts associated with the re-use of coal combustion by-products (CCPs). The monitoring data obtained from two full-scale CCP applications (i.e., re-use of fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material as a low permeability liner for a swine manure pond and portland cement concrete pavements containing CCPs) allowed environmental impacts to be evaluated under real or simulated in-service conditions. A complimentary laboratory leaching study elucidated fundamental physical and chemical mechanisms that determine the leaching kinetics of inorganic contaminants from CCPs. In the first field study, water quality impacts associated with the re-use of FGD material as a low permeability liner for a swine manure pond were examined by monitoring the water quality of water samples collected from the pond surface water and a sump collection system beneath the liner over a period of 5 years. Water samples collected from the sump and pond surface water met all Ohio non-toxic criteria, and in fact, generally met all national primary and secondary drinking water standards. Furthermore it was found that hazardous (i.e., As, B, Cr, Cu, and Zn) and agricultural pollutants (i.e., phosphate and ammonia) were effectively retained by the FGD liner system. The retention might be due to both sorption and precipitation. In the second field study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing CCPs was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under controlled loading and environmental conditions. Three types of portland-cement-concrete driving surfaces were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (OPC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50). None of the leachate concentrations for fluids collected from laboratory leaching tests exceeded the OhioEPA's non-toxic criteria. Surface runoff monitoring showed the highest release rates of inorganic elements from the FA50 concrete pavement, while there were no significant differences in release rates between OPC and FA30 concretes. The release of elements generally decreased with increasing pavement loading. Except for K and Cr, the release of elements was associated with the particulate (>0.45 micron) phase rather than the dissolved phase. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  10. Prediction of rodent carcinogenicity for 30 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.

    1996-10-01

    Predictions of carcinogenic activity are made for 30 chemicals currently being assessed for rodent carcinogenicity by the U.S. National Toxicology Program. The predictions are based upon the chemical structure, the anticipated or reported mutagenicity, and the reported sub-chronic toxicity of each chemical. It is predicted that 13 chemicals will be noncarcinogenic to rodents, that 7 will be genotoxic carcinogens, and that 10 may show some evidence of presumed nongenotoxic rodent carcinogenesis. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Long-term Continuous EEG Monitoring in Small Rodent Models of Human Disease Using the Epoch Wireless Transmitter System

    PubMed Central

    Zayachkivsky, Andrew; Lehmkuhle, Mark J.; Dudek, F. Edward

    2015-01-01

    Many progressive neurologic diseases in humans, such as epilepsy, require pre-clinical animal models that slowly develop the disease in order to test interventions at various stages of the disease process. These animal models are particularly difficult to implement in immature rodents, a classic model organism for laboratory study of these disorders. Recording continuous EEG in young animal models of seizures and other neurological disorders presents a technical challenge due to the small physical size of young rodents and their dependence on the dam prior to weaning. Therefore, there is not only a clear need for improving pre-clinical research that will better identify those therapies suitable for translation to the clinic but also a need for new devices capable of recording continuous EEG in immature rodents. Here, we describe the technology behind and demonstrate the use of a novel miniature telemetry system, specifically engineered for use in immature rats or mice, which is also effective for use in adult animals. PMID:26274779

  12. Geographic variation in rodent-flea relationships in the presence of black-tailed prairie dog colonies.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Bala; Cully, Jack F; Loughin, Thomas M; Montenieri, John A; Gage, Kenneth L

    2008-06-01

    We characterized the relationship between fleas and their rodent hosts in the presence of prairie dog colonies and compared them to adjacent assemblages away from colonies. We evaluated the rodent-flea relationship by quantifying prevalence, probability of infestation, flea load, and intensity of fleas on rodents. As prairie dog burrows provide refugia for fleas, we hypothesized that prevalence, flea load, and intensity would be higher for rodents that are associated with black-tailed prairie dog colonies. Rodents were trapped at off- and on-colony grids, resulting in the collection of 4,509 fleas from 1,430 rodents in six study areas. The rodent community composition varied between these study areas. Flea species richness was not different between prairie dog colonies and the surrounding grasslands (p = 0.883) but was positively correlated with rodent species richness (p = 0.055). Prairie dog colonies did not increase the prevalence of fleas (p > 0.10). Flea loads on rodents did not vary between off- and on-colony grids at three of the study areas (p > 0.10). Based on the prevalence, infestation rates, and flea loads, we identified Peromyscus maniculatus, Onychomys leucogaster, and two Neotoma species as important rodent hosts for fleas and Aetheca wagneri, Orchopeus leucopus, Peromyscopsylla hesperomys, Pleochaetis exilis, and Thrassisfotus as the most important fleas associated with these rodents. Prairie dog colonies did not seem to facilitate transmission of fleas between rodent hosts, and the few rodent-flea associations exhibited significant differences between off- and on-colony grids. PMID:18697322

  13. The use of a running wheel to measure activity in rodents: Relationship to energy balance, general activity, and reward

    PubMed Central

    Levine, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Running wheels are commonly employed to measure rodent physical activity in a variety of contexts, including studies of energy balance and obesity. There is no consensus on the nature of wheel-running activity or its underlying causes, however. Here, we will begin by systematically reviewing how running wheel availability affects physical activity and other aspects of energy balance in laboratory rodents. While wheel running and physical activity in the absence of a wheel commonly correlate in a general sense, in many specific aspects the two do not correspond. In fact, the presence of running wheels alters several aspects of energy balance, including body weight and composition, food intake, and energy expenditure of activity. We contend that wheel-running activity should be considered a behavior in and of itself, reflecting several underlying behavioral processes in addition to a rodent's general, spontaneous activity. These behavioral processes include defensive behavior, predatory aggression, and depression- and anxiety-like behaviors. As it relates to energy balance, wheel running engages several brain systems—including those related to the stress response, mood, and reward, and those responsive to growth factors—that influence energy balance indirectly. We contend that wheel-running behavior represents factors in addition to rodents' tendency to be physically active, engaging additional neural and physiological mechanisms which can then independently alter energy balance and behavior. Given the impact of wheel-running behavior on numerous overlapping systems that influence behavior and physiology, this review outlines the need for careful design and interpretation of studies that utilize running wheels as a means for exercise or as a measurement of general physical activity. PMID:22230703

  14. Synthetic cathinones and their rewarding and reinforcing effects in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Lucas R.; Olive, M. Foster

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic cathinones, colloquially referred to as “bath salts”, are derivatives of the psychoactive alkaloid cathinone found in Catha edulis (Khat). Since the mid-to-late 2000’s, these amphetamine-like psychostimulants have gained popularity amongst drug users due to their potency, low cost, ease of procurement, and constantly evolving chemical structures. Concomitant with their increased use is the emergence of a growing collection of case reports of bizarre and dangerous behaviors, toxicity to numerous organ systems, and death. However, scientific information regarding the abuse liability of these drugs has been relatively slower to materialize. Recently we have published several studies demonstrating that laboratory rodents will readily self-administer the “first generation” synthetic cathinones methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and methylone via the intravenous route, in patterns similar to those of methamphetamine. Under progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement, the rank order of reinforcing efficacy of these compounds are MDPV ? methamphetamine > methylone. MDPV and methylone, as well as the “second generation” synthetic cathinones ?-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (?-PVP) and 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC), also dose-dependently increase brain reward function. Collectively, these findings indicate that synthetic cathinones have a high abuse and addiction potential and underscore the need for future assessment of the extent and duration of neurotoxicity induced by these emerging drugs of abuse. PMID:25328910

  15. Synthetic cathinones and their rewarding and reinforcing effects in rodents.

    PubMed

    Watterson, Lucas R; Olive, M Foster

    2014-06-01

    Synthetic cathinones, colloquially referred to as "bath salts", are derivatives of the psychoactive alkaloid cathinone found in Catha edulis (Khat). Since the mid-to-late 2000's, these amphetamine-like psychostimulants have gained popularity amongst drug users due to their potency, low cost, ease of procurement, and constantly evolving chemical structures. Concomitant with their increased use is the emergence of a growing collection of case reports of bizarre and dangerous behaviors, toxicity to numerous organ systems, and death. However, scientific information regarding the abuse liability of these drugs has been relatively slower to materialize. Recently we have published several studies demonstrating that laboratory rodents will readily self-administer the "first generation" synthetic cathinones methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and methylone via the intravenous route, in patterns similar to those of methamphetamine. Under progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement, the rank order of reinforcing efficacy of these compounds are MDPV ? methamphetamine > methylone. MDPV and methylone, as well as the "second generation" synthetic cathinones ?-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (?-PVP) and 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC), also dose-dependently increase brain reward function. Collectively, these findings indicate that synthetic cathinones have a high abuse and addiction potential and underscore the need for future assessment of the extent and duration of neurotoxicity induced by these emerging drugs of abuse. PMID:25328910

  16. Anti-erosion stone bunds influence rodent dynamics and crop damage in Ethiopian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheretu, Yonas; Welegerima, Kiros; Teferi, Mekonen; Yirga, Gidey; Haile, Mitiku; Sluydts, Vincent; Bauer, Hans; Nyssen, Jan; Deckers, Jozef; Leirs, Herwig

    2014-05-01

    In areas of subsistence agriculture, a variety of soil conservation methods have been implemented in the last few decades to improve crop yields, however these can have unintended consequences such as providing habitat for rodent pests. We studied rodent population dynamics and estimated crop damage in high and low stone bund density fields for four cropping seasons in Tigray highlands, northern Ethiopia. Stone bunds are physical structures for soil and water conservation, and potentially habitat for rodents. We used a general model to relate the proportion of crop damage to rodent abundance, stone bund density and crop stages. We found a positive correlation between rodent abundance and crop damage, and significant variation in rodent abundance and crop damage between high and low stone bund density fields. Furthermore, crop damage also varied significantly between crop stages. We concluded that Mastomys awashensis and Arvicanthis dembeensis were the two most important crop pests in the highlands causing significant damage. Fields with high stone bund density (~10 m average distance apart) harbor more rodents and endure a significantly higher proportion of crop damage compared to fields with lower stone bund density (~15 m average distance apart). The fact that rodent abundances peaked during the reproductive stage of the crop and around harvest implies the need for management intervention before these crop stages are attained.

  17. COMPLEMENTARITY OF GENOTOXIC AND NONGENOTOXIC PREDICTORS OF RODENT CARCINOGENICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty-one chemicals known to be carcinogenic in rodent bioassays were selected for study. he chemicals were administered by gavage in two dose levels to female Sprague-Dawley rats. he effects of these 21 chemicals on four biochemical assays (hepatic DNA damage by alkaline elutio...

  18. Andes Hantavirus Variant in Rodents, Southern Amazon Basin, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Tokarz, Rafal; Ghersi, Bruno M.; Salmon-Mulanovich, Gabriela; Guezala, M. Claudia; Albujar, Christian; Mendoza, A. Patricia; Tinoco, Yeny O.; Cruz, Christopher; Silva, Maria; Vasquez, Alicia; Pacheco, Víctor; Ströher, Ute; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Cannon, Deborah; Nichol, Stuart T.; Hirschberg, David L.; Lipkin, W. Ian; Bausch, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated hantaviruses in rodents in the southern Amazon Basin of Peru and identified an Andes virus variant from Neacomys spinosus mice. This finding extends the known range of this virus in South America and the range of recognized hantaviruses in Peru. Further studies of the epizoology of hantaviruses in this region are warranted. PMID:24447689

  19. Neurobiology of rodent self-grooming and its value for translational neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Kalueff, Allan V; Stewart, Adam Michael; Song, Cai; Berridge, Kent C; Graybiel, Ann M; Fentress, John C

    2016-01-01

    Self-grooming is a complex innate behaviour with an evolutionarily conserved sequencing pattern and is one of the most frequently performed behavioural activities in rodents. In this Review, we discuss the neurobiology of rodent self-grooming, and we highlight studies of rodent models of neuropsychiatric disorders - including models of autism spectrum disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder - that have assessed self-grooming phenotypes. We suggest that rodent self-grooming may be a useful measure of repetitive behaviour in such models, and therefore of value to translational psychiatry. Assessment of rodent self-grooming may also be useful for understanding the neural circuits that are involved in complex sequential patterns of action. PMID:26675822

  20. Urban resident attitudes toward rodents, rodent control products, and environmental effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent control in urban areas can result in the inadvertent mortality of non-target species (e.g., bobcats). However, there is little detailed information about rodent control practices of urban residents. Our objective was to evaluate urban rodent control behaviors in two area...

  1. Laboratory combustion tube studies. Part II. Report SUPRI TR-10

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.E.; Fassihi, M.R.; Satman, A.; Williams, R.L.; Pettit, P.; Grim, J.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    To promote a better understanding of the problems and mechanisms involved in dry in-situ combustion of crude oils in porous media, continuing laboratory studies are carried out at SUPRI. The report about the first two experiments was submitted earlier to the Department of Energy. This report describes the results of the last three tube runs. Three laboratory combustion tube studies were made with unconsolidated core material, and Lombardi Zone crude oil from the San Ardo field, California. After preparation, the material was packed into the combustion tube. Conditions employed during the steady burning phase of each run were about constant. Injection pressure for all of them was 100 Psig (6.8 Atm.). Burning front velocities ranged from 7.22 cm/hr (5.68 ft/day) to 12.96 cm/hr (10.2 ft/day) while the stream front velocities ranged from 10.4 cm/hr to 13.48 cm/hr. The air flux was between 88.33 SCF/hr-ft/sup 2/ and 122.7SCF/hr-ft/sup 2/. Observed fuel ration ranged from 162.54 SCF/lb to 169.33 SCF/lb of fuel burned. The detailed analysis of these experiments accompanied with their field application will be presented later.

  2. Development and characterization of rodent cardiac phantoms: comparison with in vivo cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Steven; Jansen, Maurits A; Anderson, Tom; Gray, Gillian A; Schneider, Jürgen E; Hoskins, Peter R; Marshall, Ian

    2012-10-01

    The increasing availability of rodent models of human cardiovascular disease has led to a need to translate noninvasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from the clinic to the animal laboratory. The aim of this study was to develop phantoms simulating the short-axis view of left ventricular motion of rats and mice, thus reducing the need for live animals in the development of MRI. Cylindrical phantoms were moulded from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) Cryogel and attached via stiff water-filled tubing to a gear pump. Pulsatile distension of the phantoms was effected by suitable programming of the pump. Cine MRI scanning was carried out at 7 T and compared with in vivo rodent cardiac imaging. Suitable pulsatile performance was achieved with phantoms for which the PVA material had been subjected to two freeze-thaw cycles, resulting in T1 and T2 relaxation time constants of 1656±124 ms and 55±10 ms, respectively. For the rat phantom operating at 240 beats per min (bpm), the dynamic range of the outer diameter was from 10.3 to 12.4 mm with the wall thickness varying between 1.9 and 1.2 mm. Corresponding figures for the mouse phantom at 480 bpm were outer diameter range from 5.4 to 6.4 mm and wall thickness from 1.5 to 1.2 mm. Dynamic cardiac phantoms simulating rodent left ventricular motion in the short-axis view were successfully developed and compared with in vivo imaging. The phantoms can be used for future development work with reduced need of live animals. PMID:22770689

  3. Next-Generation Sequencing for Rodent Barcoding: Species Identification from Fresh, Degraded and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Maxime; Pagès, Marie; Cosson, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most diverse order among mammals, with more than 2,000 species currently described. Most of the time, species assignation is so difficult based on morphological data solely that identifying rodents at the specific level corresponds to a real challenge. In this study, we compared the applicability of 100 bp mini-barcodes from cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase 1 genes to enable rodent species identification. Based on GenBank sequence datasets of 115 rodent species, a 136 bp fragment of cytochrome b was selected as the most discriminatory mini-barcode, and rodent universal primers surrounding this fragment were designed. The efficacy of this new molecular tool was assessed on 946 samples including rodent tissues, feces, museum samples and feces/pellets from predators known to ingest rodents. Utilizing next-generation sequencing technologies able to sequence mixes of DNA, 1,140 amplicons were tagged, multiplexed and sequenced together in one single 454 GS-FLX run. Our method was initially validated on a reference sample set including 265 clearly identified rodent tissues, corresponding to 103 different species. Following validation, 85.6% of 555 rodent samples from Europe, Asia and Africa whose species identity was unknown were able to be identified using the BLASTN program and GenBank reference sequences. In addition, our method proved effective even on degraded rodent DNA samples: 91.8% and 75.9% of samples from feces and museum specimens respectively were correctly identified. Finally, we succeeded in determining the diet of 66.7% of the investigated carnivores from their feces and 81.8% of owls from their pellets. Non-rodent species were also identified, suggesting that our method is sensitive enough to investigate complete predator diets. This study demonstrates how this molecular identification method combined with high-throughput sequencing can open new realms of possibilities in achieving fast, accurate and inexpensive species identification. PMID:23144869

  4. Rorschach measures of aggression: a laboratory-based validity study.

    PubMed

    Kivisto, Aaron J; Swan, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to complement the archival research designs that have established the empirical foundations of Rorschach aggression scores, including Exner's ( 2003 ) Aggressive Movement (AG) score and Meloy and Gacono's ( 1992 ) Aggressive Content (AgC), Aggressive Past (AgPast), and Aggressive Potential (AgPot) variables. Utilizing a highly controlled laboratory-based aggression paradigm and self-report measures of violence history in a sample of 35 undergraduate males with an average age of 19.38 (SD = 2.11), this study found that only AgC was positively associated with in vivo aggression (r = .40, p = .02). None of the Rorschach measures of aggression were significantly associated with self-reported violence history, although there were several trends approaching significance. Theoretical and methodological implications are discussed. PMID:22906090

  5. Laboratory Study of Angular Momentum Transport in Astrophysical Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hantao

    2014-10-01

    Studying astrophysical processes in the lab becomes increasingly possible and exciting, as one of Stirling's favorite subjects throughout his scientific career. In this talk, I will describe experimental efforts to study mechanisms of rapid angular momentum transport required to occur in accretion disks to explain a wide range of phenomena from star formation, energetic activity of cataclysmic variables, to powering quasars, the most luminous steady sources in the Universe. By carefully isolating effects due to artificial boundaries, which are inherent to terrestrial experiments, certain astrophysical questions regarding hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic stabilities are being addressed in the laboratory. Inspirations from Stirling as well as scientific exchanges with him will be mentioned during this talk as part of my scientific journey on this subject.

  6. Laboratory Studies of Ice Nucleation on Volcanic Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect human respiratory health, atmospheric transport, and global climate. We have performed laboratory studies of the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (Basaltic Ash, Guatemala), Soufriere Hills (Andesetic Ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Rhyolitic Ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. We find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.1. For immersion freezing, however, only the Taupo ash exhibited efficient heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  7. Coupled laboratory and numerical studies of impacts into planetary regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, A.; Li, Y.; Curtis, J.; Colwell, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present the initial results from coupled experimental and numerical study of the response of particles to low-velocity impacts. In this study, laboratory experiments are used to validate and tune a new DEM capable of handling complex particle shapes for simulation of the behavior of planetary regolith. These studies have fundamental applications to granular material science, as well as broader applications to the response to low-energy impacts of surface layers on other planetary bodies, including planetesimals, asteroids, small moons, and planetary ring particles. Knowledge of the velocities and mass distributions of dust knocked off of planetary surfaces is necessary to understand the evolution of the upper layers of the soil, the plasma environment, and to develop mitigation strategies for transported dust. In addition, the fine particles in the regolith pose an engineering and safety hazard for equipment, experiments, and astronauts working in severe environments. Our laboratory experiments consist of impacting a spherical impactor into a bed of particles and tracking the subsequent mass loss and trajectories of the ejected particles. We begin with spherical particles and then we will expand to elongated rods, flake-like particles, and well-characterized aggregates. Complementary discrete element method (DEM) simulations are validated by these experimental studies; in the DEM simulations, the non-spherical nature of these particles will be described using a glued-sphere approach. An initial comparison between the particle ejection velocities observed in the experiments and simulations for spherical particles is shown in the figure. Discrepancies at low velocities are due to the fact that the trajectories of particles with such low ejection speeds are not observable in this setup. The simulations will then be used to gain physical insight and to evaluate a broader range of scenarios than can be easily explored experimentally, such as conditions similar to those present on lunar or small-body surfaces.

  8. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section...Workers Housing Standards § 654.415 Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other...

  9. Substitution Patterns Are Under Different Influences in Primates and Rodents

    E-print Network

    Arndt, Peter

    Substitution Patterns Are Under Different Influences in Primates and Rodents Yves Cle called isochore structures. Primates and rodents have different isochore structures, which suggests and rodents. Key words: genome evolution, isochore, substitution patterns, meiotic recombination, biased gene

  10. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program. Poisonous...

  11. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program. Poisonous...

  12. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program. Poisonous...

  13. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program. Poisonous...

  14. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program. Poisonous...

  15. 21 CFR 58.185 - Reporting of nonclinical laboratory study results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reporting of nonclinical laboratory study results... Reporting of nonclinical laboratory study results. (a) A final report shall be prepared for each nonclinical laboratory study and shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, the following: (1) Name and address...

  16. 21 CFR 58.185 - Reporting of nonclinical laboratory study results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting of nonclinical laboratory study results... Reporting of nonclinical laboratory study results. (a) A final report shall be prepared for each nonclinical laboratory study and shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, the following: (1) Name and address...

  17. Laboratory Studies of the Chemistry of Transneptunian Object Surface Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Palumbo, M. E.; Strazzulla, G.; Moore, M. H.; Cooper, J. F.; Sturner, S. J.

    Bombardment by cosmic-ray and solar wind ions alters the surfaces of transneptunian objects (TNOs) surfaces, and the influence of this weathering on candidate TNO materials has been extensively examined by laboratory scientists. Low-temperature radiation experiments with icy materials have demonstrated the existence of a rich TNO ice chemistry involving molecules suchas H2O, CH4, N2, and NH3. These same experiments have provided insight into reaction mechanisms needed to predict yet-unseen chemical species. Near-IR and visible spectra of ion-irradiated candidate refractories have generated the data needed to understand TNO colors and spectral slopes. The planning, execution, and interpretation of these experiments have been influenced by new energetic particle measurements from Voyager and other heliospheric spacecraft and by models for TNO surface irradiation fluxes and dosages. Experiments and available surface irradiation models suggest specific timescales for reddening of TNO surfaces. Altogether, laboratory investigations and heliospheric radiation measurements contribute to the study of TNOs by aiding in the interpretation of astronomical observations, by suggesting new lines of investigation, and by providing the underlying knowledge needed to unravel the chemical and spectral evolution of objects in the outer solar system.

  18. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

  19. Field and laboratory study of polysaccharides in fracturing treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Freck, J.; Gottschling, J.

    1981-01-01

    With the increased use of polysaccharides in fracturing treatments, subsequent problems have been encountered with inadequate polymer hydration, weak or over cross-linked fluid, formation of fish eyes, low viscosity and uncontrolled breakout. Problems have occurred due to inadvertent contamination from water supplies and fracturing tanks. In field studies of the Lost Hills and South Belridge areas in Kern County, California, field conditions and operational procedures were found to constitute critical factors in successful dispersion and in ideal cross-linking of polysaccharides. A comparison of field fluids with laboratory fluids was conducted with special emphasis on the quality of field water and on the effects of pH and temperature on the viscosity and sand fall rate. Laboratory tests indicate that fluid mixed in the field can exhibit a more effective cross-linking structure, a more stable viscosity strength and a lower sand fall rate if more control is exercised in the determination of pH range, in the selection of buffers and in the choice of treating water. Attention to these factors can reduce lost time, save expense, and increase well performance.

  20. The Miocene rodents of Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Z.

    2009-04-01

    During the Miocene period a group of shallow lakes was created in depressions at the territory of present-day Serbia. This caused the present wide distribution of lacustrine sediments, which occasionally alternate with the alluvial and marsh sediments. The remains of large mammals are relatively common, while the remains of small mammals used to be known only from two localities - Mala Miliva and Sibnica. The method of sediment sieving, used during the last decade, led to discovery of 6 new localities with remains of fossil vertebrates - Sibnica 1, Vra?evi?i, village Lazarevac, Bele Vode, Brajkovac and Tavnik. Most of the fossil material is represented by osteological and odontological remains of small mammals. The best represented group of small mammals at each of the localities was the rodents. According to the odontological material presence was proven for 35 rodent species from 6 families. MN zonation was determined according to structure of associations. The geological age of fossil-bearing sediments was determined by using the method of correlation with the sites in Europe and Turkey.

  1. CONTROLLING RODENTS IN COMMERCIAL POULTRY FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    CONTROLLING RODENTS IN COMMERCIAL POULTRY FACILITIES Judy Loven, Animal Damage Management and Ralph in and around livestock and farm facilities. Enclosed and insulated commercial poultry facilities provide ideal problems to a poultry manager. Rodents consume and contaminate feed, gnaw on struc- tural, mechanical

  2. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S.; Burleson, Theodore A.; Milton, Stephen V.; Morin, Auralee L.; Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Hannon, Fay E.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Lewellen, John W.

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  3. Laboratory study of methane production from broiler-chicken litter

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, J.C.H.; Huang, J.J.H.

    1980-01-01

    North Carolina is one of the largest poultry-production states in the United States. Although a considerable amount of work has been done on methane production from livestock, brewery, and municipal wastes, little is known concerning poultry waste. Consequently, a laboratory study was conducted to delineate the potential for thermophilic (60/sup 0/C) methane generation from broiler litter. Broiler litter was chosen as the substrate for the following reasons: first, it is the most abundant waste of poultry production in North Carolina; second, wood chips which are used as the bedding material could be a potential source of carbon for methane biosynthesis; and third, it has a desirable nitrogen content of 3 to 4%, a level similar to that of the cattle waste..

  4. An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise to Study Weber’s Law

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Jameson K.; Francisco, Eric M.; Zhang, Zheng; Baric, Cristina; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Weber’s Law describes the relationship between actual and perceived differences in stimulus intensity. To observe the relationship described in this law, we developed an exercise for undergraduate students, as experiential learning is an integral part of scientific education. We describe the experimental methods used for determining the subject’s discriminative capacity at multiple vibrotactile amplitudes. A novel four-point stimulator (designed and fabricated at the University of North Carolina) was used for the study. Features of the device, such as automated skin detection, make it feasible to perform this laboratory exercise in a reasonable lab period. At the conclusion of the lab exercise, students will thoroughly understand the principle of Weber’s Law as well as fundamental quantitative sensory testing concepts. This introduction to sensory testing will provide a suitable foundation for the undergraduate neuroscience student to investigate other aspects of sensory information processing in subsequent lab exercises. PMID:23493843

  5. NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The contents include: 1) ER-2 Specifications; 2) ER-2 Basic Configuration; 3) ER-2 Payload Areas: Nose Area; 4) ER-2 Payload Areas: SuperPod Fore and Aftbody; 5) ER-2 Payload Areas: SuperPod Midbody; 6) ER-2 Payload Areas: Q-Bay; 7) ER-2 Payload Areas: Q-Bay Hatch Designs; 8) ER-2 Payload Areas: External Pods; 9) ER-2 Electrical/Control Interface; 10) ER-2 Typical Flight Profile; 11) Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling TC-4; 12) TC-4 Timeline; 13) TC4 Area of Interest; 14) ER-2 TC4 Payload; 15) A/C ready for fuel; 16) ER-2 Pilot being suited; 17) ER-2 Taxing; 18) ER-2 Pilot post flight debrief; and 19) NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing.

  6. Nocturnal to Diurnal Switches with Spontaneous Suppression of Wheel-Running Behavior in a Subterranean Rodent

    PubMed Central

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Tøien, Øivind; Valentinuzzi, Veronica S.; Buck, C. Loren; Oda, Gisele A.

    2015-01-01

    Several rodent species that are diurnal in the field become nocturnal in the lab. It has been suggested that the use of running-wheels in the lab might contribute to this timing switch. This proposition is based on studies that indicate feed-back of vigorous wheel-running on the period and phase of circadian clocks that time daily activity rhythms. Tuco-tucos (Ctenomys aff. knighti) are subterranean rodents that are diurnal in the field but are robustly nocturnal in laboratory, with or without access to running wheels. We assessed their energy metabolism by continuously and simultaneously monitoring rates of oxygen consumption, body temperature, general motor and wheel running activity for several days in the presence and absence of wheels. Surprisingly, some individuals spontaneously suppressed running-wheel activity and switched to diurnality in the respirometry chamber, whereas the remaining animals continued to be nocturnal even after wheel removal. This is the first report of timing switches that occur with spontaneous wheel-running suppression and which are not replicated by removal of the wheel. PMID:26460828

  7. Interactions between multiple helminths and the gut microbiota in wild rodents

    PubMed Central

    Kreisinger, Jakub; Bastien, Géraldine; Hauffe, Heidi C; Marchesi, Julian; Perkins, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota is vital to host health and, as such, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms altering its composition and diversity. Intestinal helminths are host immunomodulators and have evolved both temporally and spatially in close association with the gut microbiota, resulting in potential mechanistic interplay. Host–helminth and host–microbiota interactions are comparatively well-examined, unlike microbiota–helminth relationships, which typically focus on experimental infection with a single helminth species in laboratory animals. Here, in addition to a review of the literature on helminth–microbiota interactions, we examined empirically the association between microbiota diversity and composition and natural infection of multiple helminth species in wild mice (Apodemus flavicollis), using 16S rRNA gene catalogues (metataxonomics). In general, helminth presence is linked with high microbiota diversity, which may confer health benefits to the host. Within our wild rodent system variation in the composition and abundance of gut microbial taxa associated with helminths was specific to each helminth species and occurred both up- and downstream of a given helminth's niche (gut position). The most pronounced helminth–microbiota association was between the presence of tapeworms in the small intestine and increased S24–7 (Bacteroidetes) family in the stomach. Helminths clearly have the potential to alter gut homeostasis. Free-living rodents with a diverse helminth community offer a useful model system that enables both correlative (this study) and manipulative inference to elucidate helminth–microbiota interactions. PMID:26150661

  8. Response of brown treesnakes to reduction of their rodent prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gragg, J.E.; Rodda, G.H.; Savidge, J.A.; White, Gary C.; Dean-Bradley, K.; Ellingson, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Trapping brown treesnakes (Boiga irregularis; BTS) with live-mouse (Mus domesticus) lures is the principal control technique for this invasive species on Guam. Lure-based trapping is also used on other islands as a precaution against undetected arrivals and in response to verified BTS sightings. However, the effectiveness of lure-based trapping on other islands is questionable, as it has yielded no BTS despite other evidence of their presence. Some evidence suggests that high rodent numbers may interfere with BTS control. To test the relationship between rodent abundance and snake trappability, we conducted a controlled, replicated field experiment incorporating a rodenticide treatment during a BTS mark-recapture study. Using open population modeling in Program MARK, we estimated BTS apparent survival and recapture probabilities. Rodent reduction increased BTS recapture probabilities by 52-65% in 2002 and 22-36% in 2003, and it decreased apparent survival by <1% both years. This appears to be the first published instance of manipulating wild prey to influence snake behavior. Rodent reduction may enhance detection and control of BTS with traps on Guam and other islands. It may also amplify the effectiveness of oral toxicants against BTS.

  9. Assessing Spatial Learning and Memory in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Williams, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Maneuvering safely through the environment is central to survival of almost all species. The ability to do this depends on learning and remembering locations. This capacity is encoded in the brain by two systems: one using cues outside the organism (distal cues), allocentric navigation, and one using self-movement, internal cues and nearby proximal cues, egocentric navigation. Allocentric navigation involves the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and surrounding structures; in humans this system encodes allocentric, semantic, and episodic memory. This form of memory is assessed in laboratory animals in many ways, but the dominant form of assessment is the Morris water maze (MWM). Egocentric navigation involves the dorsal striatum and connected structures; in humans this system encodes routes and integrated paths and, when overlearned, becomes procedural memory. In this article, several allocentric assessment methods for rodents are reviewed and compared with the MWM. MWM advantages (little training required, no food deprivation, ease of testing, rapid and reliable learning, insensitivity to differences in body weight and appetite, absence of nonperformers, control methods for proximal cue learning, and performance effects) and disadvantages (concern about stress, perhaps not as sensitive for working memory) are discussed. Evidence-based design improvements and testing methods are reviewed for both rats and mice. Experimental factors that apply generally to spatial navigation and to MWM specifically are considered. It is concluded that, on balance, the MWM has more advantages than disadvantages and compares favorably with other allocentric navigation tasks. PMID:25225309

  10. Nutritional Evaluation of NASA's Rodent Food Bar Diet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joyce E.; Yu, Diane S.; Dalton, Bonnie P.

    2000-01-01

    Tests are being conducted on NASA's rodent Food Bar in preparation for long-term use as the rat and mouse diet aboard the International Space Station. Nutritional analyses are performed after the bars are manufactured and then repeated periodically to determine nutritional stability. The primary factors analyzed are protein, ash, fat, fiber, moisture, amino acids, fatty acids, and minerals. Nutrient levels are compared to values published in the National Research Council's dietary requirements for rodents, and also to those contained in several commonly used commercial rodent lab diets. The Food Bar is manufactured from a powdered diet to which moisture is added as it is processed through an extruder. The bars are dipped into potassium sorbate, vacuum-sealed, and irradiated. In order to determine nutrient changes during extrusion and irradiation, the powdered diet, the non-irradiated bars, and the irradiated bars are all analyzed. We have observed lower values for some nutrients (iodine, vitamin K, and iron) in the Food Bars compared with NRC requirements. Many nutrients in the Food Bars are contained at a higher level than levels in the NRC requirements. An additional factor we are investigating is the 26% moisture level in the Food Bars, which drops to about 15% within a week, compared to a stable 10% moisture in many standard lab chow diets. In addition to the nutritional analyses, the food bar is being fed to several strains of rats and mice, and feeding study and necropsy results are being observed (Barrett et al, unpublished data). Information from the nutritional analyses and from the rodent studies will enable us to recommend the formulation that will most adequately meet the rodent Food Bar requirements for long-term use aboard the Space Station.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative study on drainage networks at laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveto, G.; Palma, D.; di Domenico, A.

    2009-04-01

    Although simulated drainage networks at the laboratory scale would represent highly-simplified models of natural drainages, they would provide a significant contribute to the comprehension of the complex dynamics governing the fluvial systems. Laboratory experiments also give the advantage to detect transient growth phases shedding some light on the knowledge of temporal and spatial landform evolution. Perhaps, pioneering laboratory experiments on drainage network evolution were carried out in 1977 at REF (Rainfall Erosion Facility) of Colorado State University by Schumm and co-workers. This study deals with an analysis of physical experiments simulating the evolution and the development of drainage networks. To this purpose, some experiments were carried out at University of Basilicata by using a 1.5 m by 1.5 m box-basin-simulator with an outlet incised in the middle of the downslope-end side. The experimental landscape was made of a weakly cohesive soil mainly constituted by clay and silt. A system of microsprinklers generated an almost uniform artificial precipitation. Simulations were performed at a constant rainfall rate with intensity of 100 mm/h. In total four experiments were carried out. Three of those were conducted by ensuring consistent initial conditions except for the initial landscape planar slope of 9%, 5%, and 0.6%, respectively. The remaining experiment was performed with a landscape slope of 9% again, but with the (surface) base-level coinciding with the base of the outlet (i.e. streams could not erode below the base-level). Despite the central outlet constraint, the generated stream system for the 9% plane exhibited trellis-like drainage patterns with many short tributaries joining the main stream at nearly right angles. For the 5% experiment still sub-parallel drainage patterns were formed but mainly in the centre of the watershed. Channels were clearly shallower than those of the 9% experiment. For the gentler slope of 0.6% dendritic drainage patterns developed with tributaries entering the main channel at acute angles (less than 90Ë? ). Digital elevation models (DEM) of the evolving landscape were achieved through detailed soil surveys with a laser pointer or a laser scanner. Then, the drainage networks were extracted from the DEMs by using the D8 algorithm. Based on the data collected, the scaling properties of the simulated networks are analysed and compared with those of natural basins. Findings are provided mainly in terms of Hortonian laws, fractal dimensions and informational entropy. Scaling properties and space filling tendencies are discussed and peculiar differences between quasi-equilibrium and transient stages are also highlighted. Experimental evidences are also provided on the interaction between the base-level and growing mechanisms.

  12. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies have been conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, (2) experiments on cancer development in animals, and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats have been shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies have been conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels have been shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements have been performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  13. Recent laboratory studies of loudness and annoyance to sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is supporting NASA High-Speed Research Program efforts to develop an updated technology base for future high-speed civil transport aircraft. Part of this effort involves (a) quantification of loudness and annoyance benefits due to sonic boom shaping and (b) determination of boom exposures acceptable to the public. Langley is conducting a series of laboratory studies to investigate in detail the subjective reactions to a wide range of shaped sonic boom signatures and to examine several metrics as estimators of sonic boom subjective effects. Results from several of these studies, as well as results obtained by other investigators, demonstrated that substantial reductions in the loudness of sonic booms can be achieved by careful shaping of the boom signatures. Recent Langley studies extended this work to include: (a) quantification of subjective effects due to booms heard indoors, (b) determination of subjective reactions due to ground-reflected booms, and (c) determination of subjective reactions to simulator reproductions of booms recently at White Sands Missile Range.

  14. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies were conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function; (2) experiments on cancer development in animals; and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats were shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies were conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels were shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements were performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  15. Molecular Carbon in the Galaxy: Laboratory and Observational Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saykally, Richard James

    2003-01-01

    In a collaboration with the Mats Larsson group from Stockholm, we carried out a new measurement of the rate of dissociative recombination of H(sup *, sub j), using a new pulsed supersonic beam source of rotationally cold H(sup *, sub j). This source was first designed and characterized in our lab by IR cavity ringdown spectroscopy, determining a rotationaYtranslationa1 temperature of 20-60K, depending on conditions. This new source was then taken to Stockholm for the recombination rate studies at the CRYRING storage ring. The recombination rate constant measured against temperature yields values consistent with the most recent calculations, whereas previous experimental measurements varied over a range of 10(exp 4) and were poor agreement with theory. This is a crucial achievement for understanding the ion chemistry of diffuse clouds. Moreover, this result in combination with recent observations implies a greatly enhanced (factor of 40) cosmic ray ionization rate in a diffuse cloud (zeta Persei) relative to previous studies. The implications of this are discussed in our recent Nature paper. An enhanced cosmic-ray flux towards zeta Persei inferred from a laboratory study of the H(sup *, sub j)-e(sup -) recombination rate.

  16. Laboratory Study of the Rotational Spectrum of 2-BUTANONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Weaver, Susanna L. Widicus; Shipman, Steven T.

    2012-06-01

    Our recent observations of the Orion-KL region in the ? = 1.3 mm window reveal that ˜55% of the observed transitions cannot be assigned to previously identified molecules. In addition, the strongest unidentified transitions have peak intensities on the order of 7 K. This provides strong evidence that new molecules of astrochemical interest need to be studied in the laboratory in order to compare to interstellar spectra. A starting point for this work is to target complex organic molecules that are structurally-similar to molecules that have already been detected in interstellar environments. We have therefore collected the microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter spectra of 2-butanone [also known as methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), CH_3COCH_2CH_3]. MEK is a likely candidate for detection in the ISM because it contains similar functional groups to known and highly abundant interstellar molecules such as ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone. The microwave spectrum of MEK was acquired with the chirped-pulse waveguide Fourier Transform Microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometer at New College of Florida; and the millimeter and submillimeter spectrum was acquired with the direct absorption flow cell spectrometer at Emory University. We have collected the spectrum of MEK from 8 GHz to 1 THz and assigned the ground vibrational state spectrum of MEK from 8 GHz to 500 GHz using the ERHAM program. We will report here on the laboratory characterization and assignment of the MEK spectrum. We will also report on the analysis of observational lines surveys in the context of the identification of new, complex organic molecules such as MEK.

  17. Microbial colonization of retorted shale in field and laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.E.; McNair, V.M.; Li, S.W.; Garland, T.R.; Wildung, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    The microbial colonization of retorted shale was measured in field lysimeters and laboratory with retorted shale obtained from an above-ground retort operating in the direct heating mode. In field lysimeter studies, total aerobic heterotrophic bacterial colony forming units (cfu), as measured by a selective plating medium in surface horizons of retorted shale and adjacent soils, were similar (3.3 x 10/sup 6/ and 2.7 x 10/sup 6/ bacterial cfu/g dry weight) two months after disposal. However, unlike the soil that exhibited a diverse community, the retorted shale was dominated by a single Micrococcus species that composed 30% of the total bacterial community. After one and two years, the total aerobic heterotrophic bacterial cfu in the retorted shale and soil were again similar; however, no bacterium dominated either community. A core sample from the field lysimeter indicated microbial colonization to a depth of 150 cm after one year. An increased ratio of anaerobic to aerobic heterotrophic bacterial cfu in the deepest sample (120 to 150 cm) implied the development of anaerobic conditions. In the laboratory, aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were shown capable of using, as the sole source of carbon, retorted shale in liquid cultures. Of the added nutritional amendments, PO/sub 4//sup -3/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ and SO/sub 4//sup -2/, only phosphate markedly altered the colonization of retorted shale in liquid culture; shortening the lag phase of colonization from less than three to seven weeks to less than one week and leading to a greater aerobic heterotrophic population over the incubation interval. The addition of phosphate also led to a aerobic heterotrophic bacterial community composed entirely of Micrococcus species.

  18. A human laboratory pilot study with baclofen in alcoholic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Leggio, Lorenzo; Zywiak, William H.; McGeary, John E.; Edwards, Steven; Fricchione, Samuel R.; Shoaff, Jessica R.; Addolorato, Giovanni; Swift, Robert M.; Kenna, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies show that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen may represent a pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence (AD). However, the mechanisms by which baclofen affects drinking are not well characterized; thus this pilot study investigated possible baclofen’s biobehavioral mechanisms. The design was a double-blind controlled randomized human laboratory pilot study. Fourteen non-treatment seeking alcohol-dependent heavy drinking subjects received either baclofen 10 mg t.i.d. or an active placebo (cyproheptadine 2 mg t.i.d., to control for sedation) for a 7-day period. At day 8, participants performed an alcohol cue-reactivity (CR) followed by an alcohol self-administration (ASA). Additionally, we explored possible moderators that might guide future larger studies, i.e. anxiety, family history and onset of alcoholism, and D4 dopamine receptor (DRD4) and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. The main results were a significant effect of baclofen for increasing stimulation (p=.001) and sedation (p<.01). Furthermore, when drinking during the ASA and the 2 days before was analyzed as a composite variable, there was a significant effect of baclofen to reduce alcohol consumption (p<.01). As for the exploratory analyses, baclofen’s effects to increase alcohol sedation and to reduce alcohol consumption were limited to those individuals with DRD4 ?7 repeats (DRD4L). Yet, baclofen’s effects on alcohol consumption were also moderated by 5-HTTLPR LL genotype. In conclusion, baclofen’s ability to reduce alcohol drinking may be related to its effects on the biphasic effects of alcohol, but larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary findings. PMID:23262301

  19. A numerical, laboratory, and field study of riverbed filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racine, C.; Lefebvre, R.; Martel, R.; Paniconi, C.

    2012-04-01

    Riverbed filtration is an appealing alternative to conventional riverbank and surface water intake systems, offering advantages of high flow rates, natural filtering, and undiminished performance under ice conditions. Its proper functioning requires careful study and monitoring of river flow dynamics, subsurface characteristics, and the interactions between these surface water and groundwater components. A research effort has been underway at INRS to develop principles and guidelines for the design, operation, and maintenance of riverbed filtration systems. A pilot system has just been completed in the Montmorency River near Quebec City (Canada). The installation consists of 4 horizontal wells (or drains), each of 20 m length and 30 cm diameter, placed 4 m apart, at a depth of 1.5 m within the riverbed sediments, and in a direction orthogonal to river flow. The housing trench for each drain is 2 m wide and 2.10 m deep and is composed of 90 cm of gravel topped with 70 cm of sifted alluvial sediments and a 50 cm protective layer of pebbles extracted from the sifted sediments. The average annual water level in the river is 1.2 m, while its mean head during low flow periods is 90 cm. The pilot installation is instrumented with multilevel pressure and temperature sensors and several flowmeters for continuous monitoring in both drainage and backwash modes. In gravity drainage (water intake) mode, the yield is expected to exceed the municipal demand criterion of 35 000 m3/d. Backwash operations, needed to unclog the trenches of fine sediments that can accumulate during water intake, are considered critical to maintaining the design performance targets for the system. Prior to construction of the pilot system, flow patterns, pressure responses, and turbidity behavior in both drainage and backwash modes were extensively studied in laboratory (sand column and sand box) and numerical (SEEP2D) experiments. These tests were fundamental to defining the design parameters and instrumentation features of the pilot system. More detailed lab and numerical simulation studies will be undertaken in tandem with the pilot system operation. The presentation will give an overview of the findings from the prior laboratory and numerical experiments and present initial results from the operation of the pilot system.

  20. Behavioral testing in rodent models of orofacial neuropathic and inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Avendaño, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial pain conditions are often very debilitating to the patient and difficult to treat. While clinical interest is high, the proportion of studies performed in the orofacial region in laboratory animals is relatively low, compared with other body regions. This is partly due to difficulties in testing freely moving animals and therefore lack of reliable testing methods. Here we present a comprehensive review of the currently used rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain adapted to the orofacial areas, taking into account the difficulties and drawbacks of the existing approaches. We examine the available testing methods and procedures used for assessing the behavioral responses in the face in both mice and rats and provide a summary of some pharmacological agents used in these paradigms to date. The use of these agents in animal models is also compared with outcomes observed in the clinic. PMID:23139912

  1. Automatic cortical thickness analysis on rodent brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ehlers, Cindy; Crews, Fulton; Niethammer, Marc; Budin, Francois; Paniagua, Beatriz; Sulik, Kathy; Johns, Josephine; Styner, Martin; Oguz, Ipek

    2011-03-01

    Localized difference in the cortex is one of the most useful morphometric traits in human and animal brain studies. There are many tools and methods already developed to automatically measure and analyze cortical thickness for the human brain. However, these tools cannot be directly applied to rodent brains due to the different scales; even adult rodent brains are 50 to 100 times smaller than humans. This paper describes an algorithm for automatically measuring the cortical thickness of mouse and rat brains. The algorithm consists of three steps: segmentation, thickness measurement, and statistical analysis among experimental groups. The segmentation step provides the neocortex separation from other brain structures and thus is a preprocessing step for the thickness measurement. In the thickness measurement step, the thickness is computed by solving a Laplacian PDE and a transport equation. The Laplacian PDE first creates streamlines as an analogy of cortical columns; the transport equation computes the length of the streamlines. The result is stored as a thickness map over the neocortex surface. For the statistical analysis, it is important to sample thickness at corresponding points. This is achieved by the particle correspondence algorithm which minimizes entropy between dynamically moving sample points called particles. Since the computational cost of the correspondence algorithm may limit the number of corresponding points, we use thin-plate spline based interpolation to increase the number of corresponding sample points. As a driving application, we measured the thickness difference to assess the effects of adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure that persist into adulthood and performed t-test between the control and exposed rat groups. We found significantly differing regions in both hemispheres.

  2. A qualitative case study of instructional support for web-based simulated laboratory exercises in online college chemistry laboratory courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Kathleen M.

    This study fills a gap in the research literature regarding the types of instructional support provided by instructors in online introductory chemistry laboratory courses that employ chemistry simulations as laboratory exercises. It also provides information regarding students' perceptions of the effectiveness of that instructional support. A multiple case study methodology was used to carry out the research. Two online introductory chemistry courses were studied at two community colleges. Data for this study was collected using phone interviews with faculty and student participants, surveys completed by students, and direct observation of the instructional designs of instructional support in the online Blackboard web sites and the chemistry simulations used by the participating institutions. The results indicated that the instructors provided multiple types of instructional support that correlated with forms of effective instructional support identified in the research literature, such as timely detailed feedback, detailed instructions for the laboratory experiments, and consistency in the instructional design of lecture and laboratory course materials, including the chemistry lab simulation environment. The students in one of these courses identified the following as the most effective types of instructional support provided: the instructor's feedback, opportunities to apply chemistry knowledge in the chemistry lab exercises, detailed procedures for the simulated laboratory exercises, the organization of the course Blackboard sites and the chemistry lab simulation web sites, and the textbook homework web sites. Students also identified components of instructional support they felt were missing. These included a desire for more interaction with the instructor, more support for the simulated laboratory exercises from the instructor and the developer of the chemistry simulations, and faster help with questions about the laboratory exercises or experimental calculations. Students believed that having this additional instructional support would lead to increased understanding of the laboratory exercises, allowing them to complete them with less difficulty, and giving them increased access to the instructor. Recommendations for the instructors of these two courses include: increased participation in the online course environment, increased emphasis on laboratory safety, and increased emphasis on the differences between simulated and real life chemistry laboratory experiments.

  3. PREDICTING RODENT CARCINOGENICITY OF HALOGENATED HYDROCARBON BY IN VIVO BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forty halogenated hydrocarbons of known rodent carcinogenicity (24 carcinogens, 16 noncarcinogens), including many promoters of carcinogenesis, nongenotoxic carcinogens and hepatocarcinogens were selected for study. he effects of these 40 chemicals on four biochemical assays (hep...

  4. Methods and modeling for the reduced platen compression of cancellous bone in the rodent proximal tibia 

    E-print Network

    Rogers, William Elliott

    2002-01-01

    This study focused on the reduced platen compression (RPC) test of cancellous bone in the rodent proximal tibia. The objective was to improve methods for this mechanical test, specifically in the areas of specimen location, specimen preparation...

  5. COMPARATIVE MICROARRAY EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF SELECTED CANCER RELEVANT GENES IN HYPERTENSIVE RESISTANT VERSUS SUSCEPTIBLE RODENT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypertension and cancer are prevalent diseases. Epidemiological studies suggest that hypertension may increase the long term risk of cancer. Identification of resistance and/or susceptibility genes using rodent models could provide important insights into the management and treat...

  6. Anti-dementia drugs and hippocampal-dependent memory in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Yuede, Carla M.; Dong, Hongxin; Csernansky, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in hippocampal structure and function are characteristics of early Alzheimer's disease (AD). Behavioral tests measuring hippocampal-dependent memory in rodents are often used to evaluate novel treatments for AD and other dementias. In this study, we review the effects of drugs marketed for the treatment of AD, such as the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine and the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid antagonist, memantine, in rodent models of memory impairment. We also briefly describe the effects of novel treatments for cognitive impairment in rodent models of memory impairment, and discuss issues concerning the selection of the animal model and behavioral tests. Suggestions for future research are offered. PMID:17762506

  7. Seed removal by scatter-hoarding rodents: the effects of tannin and nutrient concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2015-04-01

    The mutualistic interaction between scatter-hoarding rodents and seed plants have a long co-evolutionary history. Plants are believed to have evolved traits that influence the foraging behavior of rodents, thus increasing the probability of seed removal and caching, which benefits the establishment of seedlings. Tannin and nutrient content in seeds are considered among the most essential factors in this plant-animal interaction. However, most previous studies used different species of plant seeds, rendering it difficult to tease apart the relative effect of each single nutrient on rodent foraging behavior due to confounding combinations of nutrient contents across seed species. Hence, to further explore how tannin and different nutritional traits of seed affect scatter-hoarding rodent foraging preferences, we manipulated tannin, fat, protein and starch content levels, and also seed size levels by using an artificial seed system. Our results showed that both tannin and various nutrients significantly affected rodent foraging preferences, but were also strongly affected by seed size. In general, rodents preferred to remove seeds with less tannin. Fat addition could counteract the negative effect of tannin on seed removal by rodents, while the effect of protein addition was weaker. Starch by itself had no effect, but it interacted with tannin in a complex way. Our findings shed light on the effects of tannin and nutrient content on seed removal by scatter-hoarding rodents. We therefore, believe that these and perhaps other seed traits should interactively influence this important plant-rodent interaction. However, how selection operates on seed traits to counterbalance these competing interests/factors merits further study. PMID:25625425

  8. Nuclear accident dosimetry studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Buhl, T.E.; Upp, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    Two critical assemblies have been characterized at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) for use in testing nuclear accident dosimeters and related devices. These device, Godiva IV and SHEBA II, have very different characteristics in both operation and emitted neutron energy spectra. The Godiva assembly is a bare metal fast burst device with a hard spectrum. This spectrum can be modified by use of several shields including steel, concrete, and plexiglas. The modified spectra vary in both average neutron energy and in the specific distribution of the neutron energies in the intermediate energy range. This makes for a very favorable test arrangement as the response ratios between different activation foils used in accident dosimeters are significantly altered such as the ratio between gold, copper, and sulfur elements. The SHEBA device is a solution assembly which has both a slow ramp and decay period and a much softer spectrum. The uncertainly introduced in the response of fast decay foils such as indium can therefore be evaluated into the test results. The neutron energy spectrum for each configuration was measured during low power operations with a multisphere system. These measurements were extended to high dose pulsed operation by use of TLDs moderated TLDs, and special activation techniques. The assemblies were used in the testing of several accident dosimetry devices in studies modeled after the Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Studies that were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for about 25 years using the Health Physics Research Reactor. It is our intention to conduct these studies approximately annually for the evaluation of the nuclear accident dosimeter systems currently in use within the DOE, alternative systems used internationally, and new dosimeter designs being developed or considered for field application. Participation in selected studies will be open to all participants.

  9. Oncogene activation in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors: implications for risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Stowers, S.J.; Patterson, R.M.; Maronpot, R.R.; Anderson, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    The validity of rodent tumor end points in assessing the potential hazards of chemical exposure to humans is a somewhat controversial but very important issue since most chemicals are classified as potentially hazardous to humans on the basis of long-term carcinogenesis studies in rodents. The ability to distinguish between genotoxic, cytotoxic, or receptor-mediated promotion effects of chemical treatment would aid in the interpretation of rodent carcinogenesis data. Activated oncogenes in spontaneously occurring and chemically induced rodent tumors were examined and compared as one approach to determine the mechanism by which chemical treatment caused an increased incidence of rodent tumors. Different patterns of activated oncogenes were found not only in spontaneous versus chemically induced mouse liver tumors but also in a variety of spontaneous rat tumors versus chemically induced rat lung tumors. In the absence of cytotoxic effects, it could be argued that the chemicals in question activated protooncogenes by a direct genotoxic mechanism. These results provided a basis for the analysis of activated oncogenes in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors to provide information at a molecular level to aid in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to human risk assessment.

  10. Knowledge Retention for Computer Simulations: A study comparing virtual and hands-on laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croom, John R., III

    The use of virtual laboratories has the potential to change physics education. These low-cost, interactive computer activities interest students, allow for easy setup, and give educators a way to teach laboratory based online classes. This study investigated whether virtual laboratories could replace traditional hands-on laboratories and whether students could retain the same long-term knowledge in virtual laboratories as compared to hands-on laboratories. This study is a quantitative quasi-experiment that used a multiple posttest design to determine if students using virtual laboratories would retain the same knowledge as students who performed hands-on laboratories after 9 weeks. The study was composed of 336 students from 14 school districts. Students had their performances on the laboratories and their retention of the laboratories compared to a series of factors that might have affected their retention using a pretest and two posttests, which were compared using a t test. The results showed no significant difference in short-term learning between the hands-on laboratory groups and virtual laboratory groups. There was, however, a significant difference (p = .005) between the groups in long-term retention; students in the hands-on laboratory groups retained more information than those in the virtual laboratory groups. These results suggest that long-term learning is enhanced when a laboratory contains a hands-on component. Finally, the results showed that both groups of students felt their particular laboratory style was superior to the alternative method. The findings of this study can be used to improve the integration of virtual laboratories into science curriculum.

  11. The Relevance of Rodent-Specific Tumors in Cancer Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory animal species have organs that do not specifically occur in humans and somtimes tumors arise in these organs. The lack of direct site concordance frequently results in significant debate on the human relevance of tumors that arise from rodent specific organs. The re...

  12. Recent Expansion of the Telomeric Complex in Rodents: Two Distinct POT1

    E-print Network

    de Lange, Titia

    Recent Expansion of the Telomeric Complex in Rodents: Two Distinct POT1 Proteins Protect Mouse Telomeres Dirk Hockemeyer,1 Jan-Peter Daniels,1 Hiroyuki Takai,1 and Titia de Lange1, * 1 Laboratory *Contact: delange@mail.rockefeller.edu DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2006.04.044 SUMMARY Human telomeres are protected

  13. Study of driven magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, H.; Hsu, S.; Carter, T.; Kulsrud, R.; Bretz, N.; Jobes, F.; Ono, Yasushi; Perkins, F.

    1998-12-31

    The Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) has been constructed to investigate the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in a well controlled laboratory setting. This device creates an environment satisfying the criteria for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma (S {much_gt} 1, {rho}{sub i} {much_lt} L). The boundary conditions can be controlled externally, and experiments with fully three-dimensional reconnection are now possible. In the initial experiments, the effects of the third vector component of reconnecting fields have been studied. Two distinctively different shapes of neutral sheet current layers, depending on the third component, are identified during driven magnetic reconnection. Without the third component (anti-parallel or null-helicity reconnection), a thin double-Y shaped diffusion region is identified. A neutral sheet current profile is measured accurately to be as narrow as order ion gyro-radius. In the presence of an appreciable third component (co-helicity reconnection), an O-shaped diffusion region appears and grows into a spheromak configuration.

  14. ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), (Edwards, California, USA) has two Lockheed Martin Corporation (Bethesda, Maryland) Earth Research-2 (ER-2) aircraft that serve as high-altitude and long-range flying laboratories. The ER-2 has been utilized to conduct scientific studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, land-use mapping, disaster assessment, preliminary testing and calibration and validation of satellite sensors. The ER-2 aircraft provides experimenters with a wide array of payload accommodation areas with suitable environment control with required electrical and mechanical interfaces. Missions may be flown out of DFRC or from remote bases worldwide. The NASA ER-2 is utilized by a variety of customers, including U.S. Government agencies, civilian organizations, universities, and state governments. The combination of the ER-2 s range, endurance, altitude, payload power, payload volume and payload weight capabilities complemented by a trained maintenance and operations team provides an excellent and unique platform system to the science community.

  15. Rodent neurotoxicity bioassays for screening contaminated Great Lakes fish

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, M.K.; Hoffman, R.; Gerstenberger, S.; Dellinger, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    Standard laboratory rat neurotoxicity protocols were used to study the consequences resulting from the consumption of walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Superior (LS) and the consumption of carp (Cyprinus carpio) from Little Lake Butte des Morte (LLBM) near Oshkosh, Wisconsin, USA. Two 90-d subchronic studies are described, including a 45-d exposure to fish diets using male Sprague-Dawley hooded rats, and a 90-d exposure to fish diets using female rats of the same species. Behavioral alterations were tested using a battery of behavioral tests. In addition, pharmacologic challenges using apomorphine and D-amphetamine were administered to the rats to reveal latent neurotoxic effects. Cumulative fish consumption data were recorded daily, weight gain recorded weekly, and behavior data collected prior to exposure, and on days 7, 14, 55 {+-} 2, 85 {+-} 2. Motor activity data were collected on days 30 {+-} 2, 60 {+-} 2, and 90 {+-} 2 of the feeding protocols. Brain tissue from rodents fed these fish were subsequently analyzed for either mercury (Hg) or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). Mercury concentrations were increased in the brains of the walleye-fed rats, and PCB concentrations ranged from 0.5 nl/L to 10 nl/L in the brains of rats fed carp from LLBM, a Lake Michigan tributary. Adult male rats fed LLBM carp for 45 d exhibited the greatest behavior responses to the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine on the accelerating rotarod, although these differences were not significant. The 90-d exposure of LS walleye or Hg-spiked LS walleye resulted in behavior alterations on tactile startle response and second footsplay. D-Amphetamine challenge caused changes in tactile startle response, second footsplay, and accelerating rotarod performance after consuming walleye diets. Rats fed LLBM carp had altered behavioral responses to apomorphine on the accelerating rotarod.

  16. Photochemical Aging of Organic Aerosols: A Laboratory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Gkatzelis, Georgios I.; Psichoudaki, Magdalini; Louvaris, Evangelos; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2014-05-01

    Organic aerosols (OA) are either emitted directly (primary OA) or formed (secondary OA) in the atmosphere and consist of an extremely complex mixture of thousands of organic compounds. Although the scientific community has put significant effort, in the past few decades, to understand organic aerosol (OA) formation, evolution and fate in the atmosphere, traditional models often fail to reproduce the ambient OA levels. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed, in traditional laboratory chamber experiments, from the gas phase oxidation of known precursors, such as ?-pinene, is semi-volatile and with an O:C ratio of around 0.4. In contrast, OA found in the atmosphere is significantly less volatile, while the O:C ratio often ranges from 0.5 to 1. In conclusion, there is a significant gap of knowledge in our understanding of OA formation and photochemical transformation in the atmosphere. There is increased evidence that homogeneous gas phase aging by OH radicals might be able to explain, at least in part, the significantly higher OA mass loadings observed and also the oxidation state and volatility of OA in the atmosphere. In this study, laboratory chamber experiments were performed to study the role of the continued oxidation of first generation volatile and semi-volatile species by OH radicals in the evolution of the SOA characteristics (mass concentration, volatility, and oxidation state). Ambient air mixtures or freshly formed SOA from ?-pinene ozonolysis were used as the source of organic aerosols and semi-volatile species. The initial mixture of organic aerosols and gas phase species (volatile and semi-volatile) was then exposed to atmospheric concentrations of OH radicals to study the aging of aerosols. Experiments were performed with various OH radical sources (H2O2 or HONO) and under various NOx conditions. A suite of instruments was employed to characterize both the gas and the aerosol phase. A Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) were used to measure the organic aerosol mass production and oxidation degree (O:C ratio) following OH aging. A thermodenuder system was used to measure the volatility distribution change as organic aerosol aged upon continuous oxidation. Organic gas phase species were characterized with a Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) while NOx and O3 were measured with the use of corresponding analyzers. Results from this study show that organic mass production occurs upon exposure to OH radicals indicating that continuous OH aging of semi-volatile is probably responsible for at least some of the gap between observed and modeled OA levels in the atmosphere. Additionally, this chemical aging process leads to a decrease in volatility and an increase in O:C ratio while the level of change in both properties depends on OH exposure. The atmospheric implications of this study are discussed.

  17. Camera Trapping: A Contemporary Approach to Monitoring Invasive Rodents in High Conservation Priority Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Rendall, Anthony R.; Sutherland, Duncan R.; Cooke, Raylene; White, John

    2014-01-01

    Invasive rodent species have established on 80% of the world's islands causing significant damage to island environments. Insular ecosystems support proportionally more biodiversity than comparative mainland areas, highlighting them as critical for global biodiversity conservation. Few techniques currently exist to adequately detect, with high confidence, species that are trap-adverse such as the black rat, Rattus rattus, in high conservation priority areas where multiple non-target species persist. This study investigates the effectiveness of camera trapping for monitoring invasive rodents in high conservation areas, and the influence of habitat features and density of colonial-nesting seabirds on rodent relative activity levels to provide insights into their potential impacts. A total of 276 camera sites were established and left in situ for 8 days. Identified species were recorded in discrete 15 min intervals, referred to as ‘events’. In total, 19 804 events were recorded. From these, 31 species were identified comprising 25 native species and six introduced. Two introduced rodent species were detected: the black rat (90% of sites), and house mouse Mus musculus (56% of sites). Rodent activity of both black rats and house mice were positively associated with the structural density of habitats. Density of seabird burrows was not strongly associated with relative activity levels of rodents, yet rodents were still present in these areas. Camera trapping enabled a large number of rodents to be detected with confidence in site-specific absences and high resolution to quantify relative activity levels. This method enables detection of multiple species simultaneously with low impact (for both target and non-target individuals); an ideal strategy for monitoring trap-adverse invasive rodents in high conservation areas. PMID:24599307

  18. Rearing and Maintaining Midge Cultures (Chironomus tentans) for Laboratory Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, John; Mahadeva, Madhu N.

    1992-01-01

    The life history of the Chironomus tentans can be observed in easily established and maintained laboratory cultures. Projects for the classroom include observing hydration of an egg mass; embryonic development, hatching and larval feeding; larval activity; and mating activity. (MDH)

  19. Analytical study of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    The design specifications of the research laboratory as a Spacelab facility are discussed along with the types of planned experiments. These include cloud formation, freezing and scavenging, and electrical phenomena. A summary of the program conferences is included.

  20. The Study of a Cobalt Complex--A Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehlin, James H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 8-week project involving the synthesis of cobalt compounds. Once synthesized, compounds are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. Background information, laboratory procedures, and results/discussion are provided for three project experiments. (Author/JN)

  1. A laboratory study of the friction behavior of granular materials

    E-print Network

    Frye, Kevin M. (Kevin Michael), 1972-

    2002-01-01

    I report on laboratory experiments designed to investigate the microphysical processes that result in rate- and state-dependent friction behavior and experiments designed to match the boundary conditions used by numerical ...

  2. Case Study- Steam System Improvements at Dupont Automotive Marshall Laboratory 

    E-print Network

    Larkin, A.

    2002-01-01

    Dupont's Marshall Laboratory is an automotive paint research and development facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The campus is comprised of several buildings that are served by Trigen-Philadelphia Energy Corporation's district steam loop...

  3. Influence of Rock Fabric on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation: Laboratory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchits, S. A.; Desroches, J.; Burghardt, J.; Surdi, A.; Whitney, N.

    2014-12-01

    Massive hydraulic fracturing is required for commercial gas production from unconventional reservoirs. These reservoirs are often highly fractured and heterogeneous, which may cause significant fracture complexity and also arrest propagation of hydraulic fractures, leading to production decrease. One of the goals of our study was to investigate the influence of rock fabric features on near-wellbore fracture geometry and complexity. We performed a series of laboratory tests on Niobrara outcrop shale blocks with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 36 inches in a true-triaxial loading frame. Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was applied to monitor hydraulic fracture initiation and dynamics of fracture propagation. After the tests, the shape of the created hydraulic fracture was mapped by goniometry technique. To estimate fracture aperture, particles of different sizes were injected with fracturing fluid. In all tests, AE analysis indicated hydraulic fracture initiation prior to breakdown or the maximum of wellbore pressure. In most tests, AE analysis revealed asymmetrical hydraulic fracture shapes. Post-test analysis demonstrated good correspondence of AE results with the actual 3D shape of the fracture surface map. AE analysis confirmed that in some of these tests, the hydraulic fracture approached one face of the block before the maximum wellbore pressure had been reached. We have found that in such cases the propagation of hydraulic fracture in the opposite direction was arrested by the presence of mineralized interfaces. Mapping the distribution of injected particles confirmed the creation of a narrow-width aperture in the vicinity of pre-existing interfaces, restricting fracture conductivity. Based on the results of our study, we concluded that the presence of planes of weakness, such as mineralized natural fractures, can result in the arrest of hydraulic fracture propagation, or in poor fracture geometries with limited aperture, that in turn could lead to high net pressure and low fracture conductivity, restricted proppant delivery, and decreased production.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect

    Abeln, Terri G.

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  5. Experimental infections by Brucella suis type 4 in Alaskan rodents.

    PubMed

    Miller, L G; Neiland, K A

    1980-10-01

    The susceptibility of nine species of rodents and one species of lagomorph to Brucella suis type 4 was studied experimentally. The rodent species included: guinea pig (Cavia porcellus), Scandinavian lemming (Lemmus lemmus), brown lemming (L. sibiricus), northern red-backed vole (Clethrionomys rutilis), varying lemmings (Dicrostonyx stevensoni and D. rubricatus), yellow-cheeked vole (Microtus xanthognathus), flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) and ground squirrel (Citellus parryii). The lagomorph, Lepus americanus (varying hare), was also studied. All of these species were readily infected by intraperitoneal inoculations of brucellae. Pathologic responses were not marked in most of these species. However, both species of varying lemmings responded dramatically to infections initiated by about as few as two cfu. All individuals of both species that were not killed eventually died from the infection. PMID:7463596

  6. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    E-print Network

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other t...

  7. Pinon Pine Tree Study, Los Alamos National Laboratory: Source document

    SciTech Connect

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    One of the dominant tree species growing within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, lands is the pinon pine (Pinus edulis) tree. Pinon pine is used for firewood, fence posts, and building materials and is a source of nuts for food--the seeds are consumed by a wide variety of animals and are also gathered by people in the area and eaten raw or roasted. This study investigated the (1) concentration of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup tot}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soils (0- to 12-in. [31 cm] depth underneath the tree), pinon pine shoots (PPS), and pinon pine nuts (PPN) collected from LANL lands and regional background (BG) locations, (2) concentrations of radionuclides in PPN collected in 1977 to present data, (3) committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from the ingestion of nuts, and (4) soil to PPS to PPN concentration ratios (CRs). Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H in soils, were not significantly higher (p < 0.10) in soils, PPS, and PPN collected from LANL as compared to BG locations, and concentrations of most radionuclides in PPN from LANL have decreased over time. The maximum net CEDE (the CEDE plus two sigma minus BG) at the most conservative ingestion rate (10 lb [4.5 kg]) was 0.0018 mrem (0.018 {micro}Sv). Soil-to-nut CRs for most radionuclides were within the range of default values in the literature for common fruits and vegetables.

  8. Laboratory studies of free radical reactions in cloudwater

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S. E.; Weinstein-Lloyd, J.

    1989-11-01

    Reactions in cloudwater can be important pathways for chemical transformation of atmospheric trace gases because of high solubility of reagent gases, rapid aqueous-phase kinetics, and large thermodynamic driving force. A key cloudwater reaction is oxidized of dissolved SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. It is thus important to understand processes controlling H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation in the atmosphere by gas- and aqueous-phase reactions of HO{sub 2} free radicals. A concern with models of free radical chemistry in cloudwater is that of the applicability of present chemical kinetic schemes to such complex milieus. This concern arises because, at the low free-radical concentrations expected for cloudwater, reactions of radicals with trace impurities are favored over radical-radical reactions, which dominate at high radical concentrations commonly employed in laboratory investigations. We report initial results of a study in which the rate of change in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration is monitored in synthetic and authentic cloudwater in which HO{sub 2} radicals are produced by {sup 60}Co{gamma} radiolysis at rates comparable to those expected upon transfer of HO{sub 2} from interstitial cloud air to cloudwater. These results indicate that micromolar concentrations of Fe(III) decrease H{sub 2}O{sub 2} yields and can even lead to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} loss rather than formation. Implications on cloud chemistry will be discussed. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Dissociative Electron Attachment to Hydrocarbons. A Laboratory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanska, E.; Mason, N. J.

    2011-05-01

    Laboratory studies of PAHs continue to be essential if we are to interpret the wealth and variety of processes contributing to star formation. In the realm of gas-phase kinetics reactions involving negative ions are being studied to help modellers understand the role of these species in interstellar chemistry. Observations have shown that PAHs molecules are abundant and ubiquitous in the interstellar medium of galaxies, play an important role in its physical and chemical characteristics and form a key link between small hydrocarbon species and large carbonaceous grains. There is therefore considerable interest in the mechanisms by which these molecules and their anions may form. One method is electron induced chemistry within the icy mantles on the surface of dust grains. In particular it has been recently shown that functional group dependence exists in electron attachment processes giving rise to site selective fragmentation of molecules at the C-H, O-H and N-H bonds at energies well beyond the threshold for the breaking of any of these bonds allowing novel forms of chemistry that have little or no activation barriers, such as are necessary in the ISM. In this poster we present the results of recent studies on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to PAHs using an improved version of a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer comprised of a magnetically collimated and low energy pulsed electron gun, a Faraday cup, an effusive molecular beam, a pulsed field ion extraction, a time of flight analyzer and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector consisting of microchannel plate and a phosphor screen. The VMI spectrometer measures the kinetic energy and angular distribution of the fragment anions produced in the dissociative electron attachment process. Kinetic energy measurements provide information on the internal energies of the fragment anions and determine the dissociation limits of the parent negative ion resonant states responsible for the dissociative electron attachment process. Angular distribution measurements provide information about the symmetry of these negative ion resonant states. We shall present the details, results and conclusions of these measurements during the conference for some illustrative hydrocarbons.

  10. The past, present, and future of National Aeronautics and Space Administration spaceflight diet in support of microgravity rodent experiments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gwo-Shing; Tou, Janet C; Yu, Diane; Girten, Beverly E; Cohen, Jacob

    2014-02-01

    Rodents have been the most frequently flown animal model used to study physiological responses to the space environment. In support of future of space exploration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) envisions an animal research program focused on rodents. Therefore, the development of a rodent diet that is suitable for the spaceflight environment including long duration spaceflight is a high priority. Recognizing the importance of nutrition in affecting spaceflight physiological responses and ensuring reliable biomedical and biological science return, NASA developed the nutrient-upgraded rodent food bar (NuRFB) as a standard diet for rodent spaceflight. Depending on future animal habitat hardware and planned spaceflight experiments, modification of the NuRFB or development of a new diet formulation may be needed, particularly for long term spaceflights. Research in this area consists primarily of internal technical reports that are not readily accessible. Therefore, the aims of this contribution are to provide a brief history of the development of rodent spaceflight diets, to review the present diet used in rodent spaceflight studies, and to discuss some of the challenges and potential solutions for diets to be used in future long-term rodent spaceflight studies. PMID:24012282

  11. Laboratory study of smouldering peat fires: dynamics and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadden, R.; Rein, G.

    2012-04-01

    Smouldering combustion of natural fuel layers such as peatlands leads to the largest fires on Earth and posses a possible positive feedback mechanism to climate change. In this work, we use an experimental methodology to study the smouldering combustion of samples of peat under a wide range burning conditions, i.e. different thermal boundary conditions and oxidizer flow rates. This allows the smoulder reaction to be studied under a range of conditions expected in natural peat. This is an important step in translating laboratory studies to real peat fires. Vertical peat samples (30 mm deep and 125 mm in diameter) were ignited by radiation on the top, free surface and a smouldering front allowed to propagate downward against a forced flow of oxidizer.The effect of the external heat flux and oxidizer flow rate on the smoulder reaction is studied through mass loss measurements and analysis of the emissions. A consistent reaction framework is observed across the range of burning conditions studied. Two regimes of smouldering are observed - the first is a period of peat smouldering characterized by high mass loss rate (a function of the thermal boundary conditions, ranging from 4 to 6 g•s-1•m-2) where pyrolysis is significant. In the second regime the char produced by the pyrolysis reactions is oxidized to form ash and the mass loss rate is lower (approximately 1.5 g•s-1•m-2 and less dependent on the thermal boundary conditions). These two regimes represent the global smoulder process. This framework is confirmed by analysis of the sample composition throughout the experiment. CO and CO2 emissions are studied as a function of burning conditions and regimes. The yields (emission factors) of CO and CO2 are 0.12-0.18 and 0.25-0.6 kg•kg-1 during the peat smouldering regime and increase to 0.4 and 2 kg•kg-1 during the char oxidation regime. The CO/CO2 ratio was found to be0.2-0.3. Comparison is made with experiments in which flaming combustion was initiated. It is found that the flux of CO2 increases 3.8 times and CO decreases 0.75 times compared to the corresponding time during smouldering, showing that these modes of combustion are driven by different chemical processes. The CO/CO2 ratio for flaming is less than 0.1. Because flaming is limited to the surface of the peat and smouldering can propagate into the peat, the smouldering phase of the combustion was shown to dominate the CO and CO2 emissions releasing 97% and 85% of these species respectively. Results of FTIR analysis of the combustion products show thathydrocarbons are emitted in greater quantities during the first regime compared to the second. This is the first time that smoulder dynamics and emissions from peat have been quantified in terms of the smouldering conditions. This has resulted in a robust set of data on smoulder dynamics and emissions taking into account a range of possible conditions under which real smouldering fires occur. This is a significant step forward in allowing lab-scale results to be applied in real-scale smouldering fires.

  12. Rhythmic 24 h Variation of Core Body Temperature and Locomotor Activity in a Subterranean Rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti), the Tuco-Tuco

    PubMed Central

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Bicudo, José Eduardo Wilken; Oda, Gisele Akemi; Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The tuco-tuco Ctenomys aff. knighti is a subterranean rodent which inhabits a semi-arid area in Northwestern Argentina. Although they live in underground burrows where environmental cycles are attenuated, they display robust, 24 h locomotor activity rhythms that are synchronized by light/dark cycles, both in laboratory and field conditions. The underground environment also poses energetic challenges (e.g. high-energy demands of digging, hypoxia, high humidity, low food availability) that have motivated thermoregulation studies in several subterranean rodent species. By using chronobiological protocols, the present work aims to contribute towards these studies by exploring day-night variations of thermoregulatory functions in tuco-tucos, starting with body temperature and its temporal relationship to locomotor activity. Animals showed daily, 24 h body temperature rhythms that persisted even in constant darkness and temperature, synchronizing to a daily light/dark cycle, with highest values occurring during darkness hours. The range of oscillation of body temperature was slightly lower than those reported for similar-sized and dark-active rodents. Most rhythmic parameters, such as period and phase, did not change upon removal of the running wheel. Body temperature and locomotor activity rhythms were robustly associated in time. The former persisted even after removal of the acute effects of intense activity on body temperature by a statistical method. Finally, regression gradients between body temperature and activity were higher in the beginning of the night, suggesting day-night variation in thermal conductance and heat production. Consideration of these day-night variations in thermoregulatory processes is beneficial for further studies on thermoregulation and energetics of subterranean rodents. PMID:24454916

  13. Diversity of Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes among small rodents in southwestern Poland.

    PubMed

    Perec-Matysiak, Agnieszka; Bu?kowska-Gawlik, Katarzyna; Kvá?, Martin; Sak, Bohumil; Hildebrand, Joanna; Le?nia?ska, Kinga

    2015-12-15

    Diversity of Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes in wild small rodent populations still remains incomplete and only few molecular studies have been conducted among these hosts. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether small rodents, i.e., Apodemus agrarius, Apodemus flavicollis, Mus musculus and Myodes glareolus act as hosts of E. bieneusi and can play an important role in spore spreading in the environment of south-western Poland. Molecular analyses were conducted to determine pathogen genotypes. A total of 191 fecal and 251 spleen samples collected from 311 rodent individuals were examined for the occurrence of E. bieneusi by PCR amplifying ITS gene. The overall prevalence of E. bieneusi in rodent samples was 38.9%. The nucleotide sequences of ITS region of E. bieneusi revealed the presence a total of 12 genotypes with two being already known, i.e., D and gorilla 1 genotypes. The remaining ten are novel genotypes (WR1-WR10) which segregated into three groups in a neighbor joining phylogeny. This study reports for the first time E. bieneusi occurrence in wild living rodents in Poland and shows extensive genetic diversity within E. bieneusi isolates of rodent origin. PMID:26520234

  14. The effect of area size and predation on the time to extinction of prairie vole populations. simulation studies via SERDYCA: a Spatially-Explicit Individual-Based Model of Rodent Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kostova, T; Carlsen, T

    2003-11-21

    We present a spatially-explicit individual-based computational model of rodent dynamics, customized for the prairie vole species, M. Ochrogaster. The model is based on trophic relationships and represents important features such as territorial competition, mating behavior, density-dependent predation and dispersal out of the modeled spatial region. Vegetation growth and vole fecundity are dependent on climatic components. The results of simulations show that the model correctly predicts the overall temporal dynamics of the population density. Time-series analysis shows a very good match between the periods corresponding to the peak population density frequencies predicted by the model and the ones reported in the literature. The model is used to study the relation between persistence, landscape area and predation. We introduce the notions of average time to extinction (ATE) and persistence frequency to quantify persistence. While the ATE decreases with decrease of area, it is a bell-shaped function of the predation level: increasing for 'small' and decreasing for 'large' predation levels.

  15. Meeting report: Urinary Pathology; sixth Research Triangle Park Rodent Pathology Course.

    PubMed

    Boyle, M C; Boyle, M H

    2013-05-01

    Urinary system toxicity is a significant concern to pathologists in the hazard identification, drug and chemical safety evaluation, and diagnostic service industries worldwide. There are myriad known human and animal urinary system toxicants, and investigatory renal toxicology and pathology is continually evolving. The system-specific Research Triangle Park (RTP) Rodent Pathology Course biennially serves to update scientists on the latest research, laboratory techniques, and debates. The Sixth RTP Rodent Pathology Course, Urinary Pathology, featured experts from the government, pharmaceutical, academic, and diagnostic arenas sharing the state of the science in urinary pathology. Speakers presented on a wide range of topics including background lesions, treatment-related non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions, transgenic rodent models of human disease, diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and molecular analyses. These seminars were accompanied by case presentation sessions focused on usual and unusual lesions, grading schemes, and tumors. PMID:23645617

  16. Interim guidance for minimizing risk for human lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection associated with rodents.

    PubMed

    2005-08-01

    In May 2005, CDC received reports of four organ-transplant recipients with unknown illness. All were discovered to have been infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) via a common organ donor. Epidemiologic investigation traced the source of the virus to a pet hamster purchased by the donor from a local pet store. LCMV testing of other rodents at the pet store revealed three other LCMV-infected rodents (two hamsters and a guinea pig), supplied by a single distributor (distributor A). Preliminary laboratory testing of hamsters from distributor A has identified an infection rate of approximately 3% among the animals sampled. The facility of distributor A is under quarantine until it can be documented as free of LCMV infection. This report provides background information on LCMV and interim guidance for the public on reducing risk for LCMV infection from pet rodents. PMID:16079740

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging of cocaine treated rodents

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Ponnada A.; Ahobila-Vajjula, Pallavi; Ramu, Jaivijay; Herrera, Juan; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Studies in cocaine-dependent human subjects have shown differences in white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) compared to non-drug using controls. It is not known whether the FA differences seen on DTI in white matter regions of cocaine-dependent humans result from a pre-existing predilection for drug use or purely from cocaine abuse. To study the effect of cocaine on brain white matter, DTI was performed on 24 rats after continuous infusion of cocaine or saline for 4 weeks, followed by brain histology. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed 18% decrease in fractional anisotropy (FA) in the splenium of corpus callosum (CC) in cocaine-administered animals relative to saline controls (P = 0.0001). On histology, significant increase in neurofilament expression (125%, P=0.0044) and decrease in myelin basic protein (40%, P = 0.031) was observed in the same region in cocaine-administered animals. This study supports the hypothesis that chronic cocaine use alters white matter integrity in human CC. Unlike humans, where the FA in the genu differed between cocaine users and non-users, the splenium was affected in rats. These differences between rodent and human findings could be due to a several factors that include differences in the brain structure and function between species and/or the dose, timing, and duration of cocaine administration. PMID:19217266

  18. Laboratory studies of heterogeneous processes relevant to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Raina V.

    Heterogeneous (gas-surface) processes may play an important role in both the atmospheric and surface chemistry of Mars. Atmospheric species may be affected by the chemistry and physical properties of the planetary surface and the surface material may be affected by the components and properties of the atmosphere. In this thesis, several laboratory studies are described which experimentally investigate two types of atmosphere-surface systems likely to exist on Mars. First, experiments were performed to better understand the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric methane (CH4) on Mars. Reported CH4 plumes in the atmosphere of Mars are difficult to explain using known chemical or physical processes. The observations imply a strong, present-day source and also a rapid yet unknown CH4 sink. We have investigated the potential role of mineral dust in CH4 variability. First, using a Knudsen cell capable of simulating Martian temperature and pressure conditions, we have studied the adsorption of CH4 to a Martian mineral analog as a function of temperature. An uptake coefficient was determined and then applied to the Martian surface-atmosphere system. Our results suggest that adsorption to soil grains could possibly affect the CH4 mixing ratio on a seasonal time scale especially at mid-latitude regions. Additionally, chemical oxidation of CH4 by oxidants thought to exist in the Martian regolith was studied. The Viking mission in the 1970's found Martian soil was able to oxidize complex organic compounds to CO 2. The identity of the oxidant is unknown, but has been proposed to be either hydrogen peroxide or perchlorate salts. We used a gas chromatograph to determine if simulated Mars soil containing these oxidants was able to oxidize CH4 to CO2. However, no CH4 was oxidized within the detection limit of the instrument and only an upper limit reaction coefficient could be reported. Even these upper limit values suggest CH 4 could not be removed from the Martian atmosphere rapidly enough to cause variability. We have also studied the interactions of another important trace gas on Mars, water vapor, with perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt recently discovered in polar soil. A Raman microscope equipped with an environmental cell was used to study phase transitions of the salts. The relative humidity (RH) at which deliquescence (absorption of water vapor by the solid to become an aqueous solution) and efflorescence (crystallization of the aqueous solution) occur were determined as a function of temperature, hydration state and associated cation. We show that the deliquescence RH for perchlorate salts can be low (˜40% RH for anhydrous sodium perchlorate, for example). Thermodynamics can predict deliquescence; however, the kinetic inhibition of crystallization causes efflorescence to occur at much lower RH values than deliquescence which allows supersaturated salt solutions to exist in a metastable state. Based on the diurnal RH and temperature cycles on Mars, aqueous solutions could be stable or metastable for several hours a day at the Phoenix landing site. The astrobiological implications of potential liquid H2O on Mars are significant.

  19. Use of Insecticide Delivery Tubes for Controlling Rodent-Associated Fleas in a Plague Endemic Region of West Nile, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    BOEGLER, KAREN A.; ATIKU, LINDA A.; MPANGA, JOSEPH TENDO; CLARK, REBECCA J.; DELOREY, MARK J.; GAGE, KENNETH L.; EISEN, REBECCA J.

    2015-01-01

    Plague is a primarily flea-borne rodent-associated zoonosis that is often fatal in humans. Our study focused on the plague-endemic West Nile region of Uganda where affordable means for the prevention of human plague are currently lacking. Traditional hut construction and food storage practices hinder rodent exclusion efforts, and emphasize the need for an inexpensive but effective host-targeted approach for controlling fleas within the domestic environment. Here we demonstrate the ability of an insecticide delivery tube that is made from inexpensive locally available materials to reduce fleas on domestic rodents. Unbaited tubes were treated with either an insecticide alone (fipronil) or in conjunction with an insect growth regulator [(S)-methoprene], and placed along natural rodent runways within participant huts. Performance was similar for both treatments throughout the course of the study, and showed significant reductions in the proportion of infested rodents relative to controls for at least 100 d posttreatment. PMID:26309315

  20. Of mice and women: rodent models of placental malaria.

    PubMed

    Hviid, Lars; Marinho, Claudio R F; Staalsoe, Trine; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2010-08-01

    Pregnant women are at increased malaria risk. The infections are characterized by placental accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IEs) with adverse consequences for mother and baby. Placental IE sequestration in the intervillous space is mediated by variant surface antigens (VSAs) selectively expressed in placental malaria (PM) and specific for chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). In Plasmodium falciparum, these VSA(PM) appear largely synonymous with the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family variant VAR2CSA. As rodent malaria parasites do not possess PfEMP1 homologs, the usefulness of experimental mouse PM models remains controversial. However, many features of murine and human PM are similar, including involvement of VSAs analogous to PfEMP1. It thus appears that rodent model studies can further the understanding of VSA-dependent malaria pathogenesis and immunity. PMID:20605743

  1. The Study of Biobehavioral Rhythms in a Psychology Laboratory Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David L.; Wesselhoft, Theresa

    1998-01-01

    Reports on a laboratory experiment where students measured their heart rate, blood pressure, mood, alertness, and cognitive performance. Measures showed significant circadian heart rhythm variations. They were strongly correlated and peaked at different times. Discusses the implications of this and students' reactions to the experiment. (MJP)

  2. Tethered variable gravity laboratory study: Low gravity process identification report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briccarello, M.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments are described performable in the variable gravity environment, and the related compatible/beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of Fluid Mechanics (static and dynamic), Materials Sciences (Crystal Growth, Metal and Alloy Solidification, Glasses, etc.), and Life Sciences, so as to assess the relevance of a variable G-level laboratory.

  3. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes.

  4. Lunar and Planetary Laboratory studies of Jupiter. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, G. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of Jovian belts, zones and atmospheric features as identified by an analysis of photographs of the planet at the Laboratory. The topics include the circulation of the Jovian atmosphere, the rotation periods of zones and belts, the Great Red Spot shown by methane photographs, and some high altitude photographs of terrestrial atmospheric conditions. Hypothetical mechanisms controlling the atmospheric conditions on Jupiter are considered.

  5. An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise for Studying Kinetics of Batch Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louhi­-Kultanen, Marjatta; Han, Bing; Nurkka, Annikka; Hatakka, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The present work describes an undergraduate laboratory exercise for improving understanding of fundamental phenomena in cooling crystallization. The exercise of nucleation and crystal growth kinetics supports learning of theories and models presented in lectures and calculation exercises. The teaching methodology incorporates precepts the…

  6. REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION STUDY: GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY LABORATORY OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatography laboratory was set up to analyze air samples collected in Teflon bags and stainless steel tanks. Samples were analyzed for total hydrocarbons, methane, CO, and C2-C10 hydrocarbons. A total of 455 samples, including replicates, were analyzed during the summer ...

  7. Rodent outbreaks in Australia: mouse plagues in cereal crops 225 Rodent outbreaks in Australia: mouse

    E-print Network

    Krebs, Charles J.

    Rodent outbreaks in Australia: mouse plagues in cereal crops 225 Rodent outbreaks in Australia: mouse plagues in cereal crops Peter R. Brown, Grant R. Singleton, Roger P. Pech, Lyn A. Hinds, and Charles J. Krebs Mouse plagues have been a feature in cereal cropping areas in southeastern Australia

  8. Distinct Leishmania Species Infecting Wild Caviomorph Rodents (Rodentia: Hystricognathi) from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cássia-Pires, Renata; Boité, Mariana C.; D'Andrea, Paulo S.; Herrera, Heitor M.; Cupolillo, Elisa; Jansen, Ana Maria; Roque, André Luiz R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caviomorph rodents, some of the oldest Leishmania spp. hosts, are widely dispersed in Brazil. Despite both experimental and field studies having suggested that these rodents are potential reservoirs of Leishmania parasites, not more than 88 specimens were analyzed in the few studies of natural infection. Our hypothesis was that caviomorph rodents are inserted in the transmission cycles of Leishmania in different regions, more so than is currently recognized. Methodology We investigated the Leishmania infection in spleen fragments of 373 caviomorph rodents from 20 different species collected in five Brazilian biomes in a period of 13 years. PCR reactions targeting kDNA of Leishmania sp. were used to diagnose infection, while Leishmania species identification was performed by DNA sequencing of the amplified products obtained in the HSP70 (234) targeting. Serology by IFAT was performed on the available serum of these rodents. Principal findings In 13 caviomorph rodents, DNA sequencing analyses allowed the identification of 4 species of the subgenus L. (Viannia): L. shawi, L. guyanensis, L. naiffi, and L. braziliensis; and 1 species of the subgenus L. (Leishmania): L. infantum. These include the description of parasite species in areas not previously included in their known distribution: L. shawi in Thrichomys inermis from Northeastern Brazil and L. naiffi in T. fosteri from Western Brazil. From the four other positive rodents, two were positive for HSP70 (234) targeting but did not generate sequences that enabled the species identification, and another two were positive only in kDNA targeting. Conclusions/Significance The infection rate demonstrated by the serology (51.3%) points out that the natural Leishmania infection in caviomorph rodents is much higher than that observed in the molecular diagnosis (4.6%), highlighting that, in terms of the host species responsible for maintaining Leishmania species in the wild, our current knowledge represents only the “tip of the iceberg.” PMID:25503973

  9. Performance Analysis of Exam Gloves Used for Aseptic Rodent Surgery

    PubMed Central

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP–PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham ‘exertion’ activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP–PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP–PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries. PMID:26045458

  10. Performance analysis of exam gloves used for aseptic rodent surgery.

    PubMed

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-05-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP-PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham 'exertion' activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP-PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP-PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries. PMID:26045458

  11. Allometric relations of neotropical small rodents (Sigmodontinae) in anthropogenic environments.

    PubMed

    Rosalino, Luís M; Martin, Paula S; Gheler-Costa, Carla; Lopes, Paula C; Verdade, Luciano M

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at assessing allometric relationships in the Sigmodontinae rodents (Calomys tener, Akodon cf. montensis, Necromys lasiurus, Oligoryzomys flavescens, and Oligoryzomys nigripes), and morphological variation among different habitats in human-dominated environments in Southeastern Brazil. We captured rodents using pitfall traps placed in Eucalyptus plantations, abandoned pastures, and remnants of secondary native vegetation, and took the following measurements: body mass, total length, body length, left hind foot length, and left ear length. Males were usually larger than females, except in N. lasiurus. There was no intraspecific difference in body condition among habitats, suggesting that Eucalyptus may not have a deleterious effect upon its residents. However, A. cf montensis from Eucalyptus plantations had longer feet than those from other vegetation associations, suggesting a possible adaptive response to the lower cover in the plantation environment, and its consequent higher predation risk, or alternatively that only individuals with greater dispersal ability are found in Eucalyptus plantations. Future studies should investigate a possible co-evolutionary predator-prey relationship, including rapid evolution by Sigmodontinae rodents in anthropogenic landscapes. PMID:23829219

  12. Towards an integrative model of sociality in caviomorph rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Loren D.; Burger, Joseph Robert; Soto-Gamboa, Mauricio; Sobrero, Raúl; Ebensperger, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    In the late 1990s and early 2000s it was recognized that behavioral ecologists needed to study the sociality of caviomorph rodents (New World hystricognaths) before generalizations about rodent sociality could be made. Researchers identified specific problems facing individuals interested in caviomorph sociality, including a lack of information on the proximate mechanisms of sociality, role of social environment in development, and geographical or intraspecific variation in social systems. Since then researchers have described the social systems of many previously understudied species, including some with broad geographical ranges. Researchers have done a good job of determining the role of social environments in development and identifying the costs and benefits of social living. However, relatively little is known about the proximate mechanisms of social behavior and fitness consequences, limiting progress toward the development of integrative (evolutionary-mechanistic) models for sociality. To develop integrative models behavioral ecologists studying caviomorph rodents must generate information on the fitness consequences of different types of social organization, brain mechanisms, and endocrine substrates of sociality. We review our current understanding and future directions for research in these conceptual areas. A greater understanding of disease ecology, particularly in species carrying Old World parasites, is needed before we can identify potential links between social phenotypes, mechanism, and fitness. PMID:22328791

  13. Zoonotic Bartonella species in wild rodents in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Favacho, Alexsandra Rodrigues de Mendonça; Andrade, Marcelle Novaes; de Oliveira, Renata Carvalho; Bonvicino, Cibele Rodrigues; D'Andrea, Paulo Sergio; de Lemos, Elba Regina Sampaio

    2015-01-01

    Several rodent-associated Bartonella species cause disease in humans but little is known about their epidemiology in Brazil. The presence of Bartonella spp. in wild rodents captured in two municipalities of the Mato Grosso do Sul state was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fragments of heart tissue from 42 wild rodents were tested using primers targeting the Bartonella 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region and citrate synthase gltA gene. The wild rodents were identified based on external and cranial morphology and confirmed at species level by mitochondrial DNA (cytochrome B) sequencing and karyotype. Overall, 42.9% (18/42) of the wild rodents were PCR positive for Bartonella spp.: Callomys callosus (04), Cerradomys maracajuensis (04), Hylaeamus megacephalus (01), Necromys lasiurus (06), Nectomys squamipes (01), Oecomys catherinae (01) and Oxymycterus delator (01). Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis was detected in N. lasiurus (46%) and C. callosus (21%) captured in the two study sites. We reported the first molecular detection of B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis in different species of wild rodents collected in the Brazilian territory. Further studies are needed to examine the role of these mammals in the eco-epidemiology of bartonellosis in Brazil. PMID:26344604

  14. Seven Principles of Instructional Content Design for a Remote Laboratory: A Case Study on ERRL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagiltay, N. E.; Aydin, E.; Aydin, C. C.; Kara, A.; Alexandru, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a study of the requirements for developing a remote radio frequency (RF) laboratory for electrical engineering students. It investigates students' preferred usage of the technical content of a state-of-the-art RF laboratory. The results of this study are compared to previous findings, which dealt with other user…

  15. Numerical study of wave effects on groundwater flow and solute transport in a laboratory beach

    E-print Network

    Miller, Richard S.

    reserved. Keywords: Waves Groundwater flow Tracer MARUN numerical model Laboratory beach 1. Introduction In the last two decades, studies have revealed the ground- water system near the coastline is an importantNumerical study of wave effects on groundwater flow and solute transport in a laboratory beach

  16. Commensal Rodents in the City of Buenos Aires: A Temporal, Spatial, and Environmental Analysis at the Whole City Level.

    PubMed

    Cavia, Regino; Muschetto, Emiliano; Cueto, Gerardo Rubén; Suárez, Olga Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Commensal rodents are some of the main vertebrate pests in urban areas; however, knowledge about factors that favor them at large scales is scarce. We studied spatial and temporal variations in rodent infestation levels at the whole city scale using the complaints of rodent sightings and questionnaire surveys to city neighbors. Demographic, socio-economic, and environmental characteristics handled with a geographic information system were evaluated as possible indicators of rodent infestation. The number of rodent sightings was lower in months with low mean temperature with two months time lag and higher in areas with high number of meat and metal industries. Rodent infestation estimated by the questionnaire survey showed spatial autocorrelation defining large areas with similar infestation levels. It decreased when the apartment density increased, while increased when the proportion of area occupied by shantytowns, the density of meat industries, and the proportion of area occupied by moderate urban development increased. Rodent control programs at the whole city level would have better results if public health pest agencies and/or governments will focus the efforts on areas with more precarious conditions as well as the industrial areas in the cold season when have lower rodent abundances. PMID:25681115

  17. Adaptation for rodent pollination in Leucospermum arenarium (Proteaceae) despite rapid pollen loss during grooming

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher Michael; Pauw, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants are adapted for rodent pollination in diverse and intricate ways. This study explores an extraordinary example of these adaptations in the pincushion Leucospermum arenarium (Proteaceae) from South Africa. Methods Live trapping and differential exclusion experiments were used to test the role of rodents versus birds and insects as pollinators. To explore the adaptive significance of geoflory, inflorescences were raised above ground level and seed production was compared. Captive rodents and flowers with artificial stigmas were used to test the effect of grooming on the rate of pollen loss. Microscopy, nectar composition analysis and manipulative experiments were used to investigate the bizarre nectar production and transport system. Key Results Differential exclusion of rodents, birds and insects demonstrated the importance of rodents in promoting seed production. Live trapping revealed that hairy-footed gerbils, Gerbillurus paeba, and striped field mice, Rhabdomys pumilio, both carried L. arenarium pollen on their forehead and rostrum, but much larger quantities ended up in faeces as a result of grooming. Terrarium experiments showed that grooming exponentially diminished the pollen loads that they carried. The nectar of L. arenarium was found to be unusually viscous and to be presented in a novel location on the petal tips, where rodents could access it without destroying the flowers. Nectar was produced inside the perianth, but was translocated to the petal tips via capillary ducts. In common with many other rodent-pollinated plants, the flowers are presented at ground level, but when raised to higher positions seed production was not reduced, indicating that selection through female function does not drive the evolution of geoflory. Conclusions Despite the apparent cost of pollen lost to grooming, L. arenarium has evolved remarkable adaptations for rodent pollination and provides the first case of this pollination system in the genus. PMID:24607723

  18. Molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of tick-borne encephalitis virus in rodents captured in the transdanubian region of Hungary.

    PubMed

    Pintér, Réka; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Gy?z?; Németh, Viktória; Oldal, Miklós; Kemenesi, Gábor; Dallos, Bianka; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection is a common zoonotic disease affecting humans in Europe and Asia. To determine whether TBEV is present in small mammalian hosts in Hungary, liver samples of wild rodents were tested for TBEV RNA. Over a period of 7 years, a total of 405 rodents were collected at five different geographic locations of the Transdanubian region. TBEV nucleic acid was identified in four rodent species: Apodemus agrarius, A. flavicollis, Microtus arvalis, and Myodes glareolus. Out of the 405 collected rodents, 17 small mammals (4.2%) were positive for TBEV. The present study provides molecular evidence and sequence data of TBEV from rodents in Hungary. PMID:25072995

  19. Rodent damage to natural and replanted mountain forest regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heroldová, Marta; Bryja, Josef; Jánová, Eva; Suchomel, Josef; Homolka, Miloslav

    2012-01-01

    Impact of small rodents on mountain forest regeneration was studied in National Nature Reserve in the Beskydy Mountains (Czech Republic). A considerable amount of bark damage was found on young trees (20%) in spring after the peak abundance of field voles (Microtus agrestis) in combination with long winter with heavy snowfall. In contrast, little damage to young trees was noted under high densities of bank voles (Myodes glareolus) with a lower snow cover the following winter. The bark of deciduous trees was more attractive to voles (22% damaged) than conifers (8%). Young trees growing in open and grassy localities suffered more damage from voles than those under canopy of forest stands (?² = 44.04, P < 0.001). Natural regeneration in Nature Reserve was less damaged compared to planted trees (?² = 55.89, P < 0.001). The main factors influencing the impact of rodent species on tree regeneration were open, grassy habitat conditions, higher abundance of vole species, tree species preferences- and snow-cover condition. Under these conditions, the impact of rodents on forest regeneration can be predicted. Foresters should prefer natural regeneration to the artificial plantings. PMID:22666163

  20. Genotypes of pathogenic Leptospira spp isolated from rodents in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Loffler, Sylvia Grune; Pavan, Maria Elisa; Vanasco, Bibiana; Samartino, Luis; Suarez, Olga; Auteri, Carmelo; Romero, Graciela; Brihuega, Bibiana

    2014-04-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world and significant efforts have been made to determine and classify pathogenic Leptospira strains. This zoonosis is maintained in nature through chronic renal infections of carrier animals, with rodents and other small mammals serving as the most important reservoirs. Additionally, domestic animals, such as livestock and dogs, are significant sources of human infection. In this study, a multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to genotype 22 pathogenic Leptospira strains isolated from urban and periurban rodent populations from different regions of Argentina. Three MLVA profiles were identified in strains belonging to the species Leptospira interrogans (serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola); one profile was observed in serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae and two MLVA profiles were observed in isolates of serovars Canicola and Portlandvere. All strains belonging to Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Castellonis exhibited the same MLVA profile. Four different genotypes were isolated from urban populations of rodents, including both mice and rats and two different genotypes were isolated from periurban populations. PMID:24676656

  1. Genotypes of pathogenic Leptospira spp isolated from rodents in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Loffler, Sylvia Grune; Pavan, Maria Elisa; Vanasco, Bibiana; Samartino, Luis; Suarez, Olga; Auteri, Carmelo; Romero, Graciela; Brihuega, Bibiana

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world and significant efforts have been made to determine and classify pathogenic Leptospira strains. This zoonosis is maintained in nature through chronic renal infections of carrier animals, with rodents and other small mammals serving as the most important reservoirs. Additionally, domestic animals, such as livestock and dogs, are significant sources of human infection. In this study, a multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to genotype 22 pathogenic Leptospira strains isolated from urban and periurban rodent populations from different regions of Argentina. Three MLVA profiles were identified in strains belonging to the species Leptospira interrogans (serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola); one profile was observed in serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae and two MLVA profiles were observed in isolates of serovars Canicola and Portlandvere. All strains belonging to Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Castellonis exhibited the same MLVA profile. Four different genotypes were isolated from urban populations of rodents, including both mice and rats and two different genotypes were isolated from periurban populations. PMID:24676656

  2. Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) seeds are dispersed by seed-caching rodents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vander Wall, S. B.; Esque, T.; Haines, D.; Garnett, M.; Waitman, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) is a distinctive and charismatic plant of the Mojave Desert. Although floral biology and seed production of Joshua tree and other yuccas are well understood, the fate of Joshua tree seeds has never been studied. We tested the hypothesis that Joshua tree seeds are dispersed by seed-caching rodents. We radioactively labelled Joshua tree seeds and followed their fates at five source plants in Potosi Wash, Clark County, Nevada, USA. Rodents made a mean of 30.6 caches, usually within 30 m of the base of source plants. Caches contained a mean of 5.2 seeds buried 3-30 nun deep. A variety of rodent species appears to have prepared the caches. Three of the 836 Joshua tree seeds (0.4%) cached germinated the following spring. Seed germination using rodent exclosures was nearly 15%. More than 82% of seeds in open plots were removed by granivores, and neither microsite nor supplemental water significantly affected germination. Joshua tree produces seeds in indehiscent pods or capsules, which rodents dismantle to harvest seeds. Because there is no other known means of seed dispersal, it is possible that the Joshua tree-rodent seed dispersal interaction is an obligate mutualism for the plant.

  3. Navigating actions through the rodent parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) participates in a manifold of cognitive functions, including visual attention, working memory, spatial processing, and movement planning. Given the vast interconnectivity of PPC with sensory and motor areas, it is not surprising that neuronal recordings show that PPC often encodes mixtures of spatial information as well as the movements required to reach a goal. Recent work sought to discern the relative strength of spatial vs. motor signaling in PPC by recording single unit activity in PPC of freely behaving rats during selective changes in either the spatial layout of the local environment or in the pattern of locomotor behaviors executed during navigational tasks. The results revealed unequivocally a predominant sensitivity of PPC neurons to locomotor action structure, with subsets of cells even encoding upcoming movements more than 1 s in advance. In light of these and other recent findings in the field, I propose that one of the key contributions of PPC to navigation is the synthesis of goal-directed behavioral sequences, and that the rodent PPC may serve as an apt system to investigate cellular mechanisms for spatial motor planning as traditionally studied in humans and monkeys. PMID:24860475

  4. A SURVEY OF LABORATORY AND STATISTICAL ISSUES RELATED TO FARMWORKER EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing internally valid, and perhaps generalizable, farmworker exposure studies is a complex process that involves many statistical and laboratory considerations. Statistics are an integral component of each study beginning with the design stage and continuing to the final da...

  5. Case Study: Formal Inspections at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. C.; Welz, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of the California Institute of Technology is a federally funded research and development center operating under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). JPL's charter emphasizes the exploration of the solar system including observations of Earth as well as other stellar systems and extra-solar-system bodies. Within JPL, the Software Product Assurance (SPA) Section helps to ensure the operational integrity of the software within the system. SPA evaluates the operational requirements, the acceptability and readiness of all software, hardware/software interfaces, and the integrity of the completed software before its final release into the operational environment.

  6. Laboratory studies of weakly bound adducts of atmospheric interest

    SciTech Connect

    Wine, P.H.; Nicovich, J.M.; Stickel, R.E.; Hynes, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    It is now well-established that weakly bound adducts, i.e., species whose life-times toward unimolecular decomposition are only fractions of a second under atmospheric conditions, play an important role in tropospheric sulfur chemistry. In this presentation, recent results from our laboratory concerning the existence and atmospheric fates of two such weakly bound species, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}S-OH and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}S-Cl, will be discussed. In addition, evidence for the formation of weakly bound adducts in reactions of chlorine atoms with methyl halides will be presented.

  7. Radiative shocks: An opportunity to study laboratory astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, M.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Ozaki, N.; Ravasio, A.; Rabec le Glohaec, M.; Boireau, L.; Michaut, C.; Bouquet, S.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.; Peyrusse, O.; Batani, D.

    2006-05-15

    In this paper, experimental results on radiative shocks generated by a high power laser in a xenon gas cell are presented. Two sets of experiments have been performed at the Laser pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) laboratory. Several shock parameters were simultaneously measured: shock temperature and velocities, the precursor two-dimensional (2D) time evolution, its electron density, density gradient, and temperature. Data were obtained varying initial conditions for different laser intensities and gas pressures. Comparisons with 1D and 2D radiative hydrodynamic simulations are shown for all measured parameters (shock velocity, shape, radial expansion, and temperature as well as precursor velocity and electron density)

  8. Laboratory Magnetospheric Plasma Studies in LDX and CTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauel, M.; Davis, M.; Garnier, D.; Roberts, M.; Worstell, M.; Kesner, J.

    2012-10-01

    During the past decade, results from the CTX and LDX laboratory dipole plasma experiments have advanced our understanding of magnetized plasma dynamics and shown the influence of magnetic geometry on turbulent transport and high-beta stability. The CTX and LDX devices operate over a wide range of plasma parameters, allow detailed observations spanning global to small spatial scales, and show dynamics relevant to space weather models. Results include slow and fast plasma convection, centrifugal interchange instability and plasma rotation effects, energetic particle and complex wave-particle dynamics, rapid dipolarization in high-beta plasma, intermittent bursty plasma flows, and fascinating plasma turbulence and transport phenomenon. These laboratory magnetosphere experiments confine energetic and relatively collisionless plasma and create unique opportunities for the development and validation of models that help understand turbulent transport in fusion devices and also space weather dynamics. We describe upcoming experiments to investigate (i) turbulence control with electrostatic feedback, (ii) whole-plasma imaging of turbulent dynamics, and (iii) nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of bounded driven dipole plasma.

  9. Laboratory studies of pyroclastic flows that interact with topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B.; Manga, M.

    2012-04-01

    We performed a set of scaled laboratory experiments to simulate pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) using dilute mixtures of warm talc powder in air. The experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of topography on current runout, buoyancy reversal and liftoff, and mass partitioning into buoyant plumes. The densimetric and thermal Richardson, Froude, Stokes, and settling numbers for our experiments match those of PDCs and the laboratory currents are fully turbulent, although the experiments have lower Reynolds numbers than PDCs, thus our experiments are dynamically similar to natural currents. Comparisons of currents traversing flat topography or encountering barriers shows that runout distance is not significantly reduced for currents that traverse barriers with height less than 1.5 times the current thickness, but currents do not pass taller barriers. Buoyancy reversals occur in most currents, resulting in liftoff and generation of a buoyant plume. Liftoff occurs near the maximum runout distance for currents traveling over flat topography, but is focused near or above barriers for currents that encounter barriers. Notably, plume formation above barriers can result in reversal of flow direction downstream of the obstruction as portions of the current flow back and feed the rising plume. Greater than half of the initial particle mass composing the density currents usually partitions into the buoyant plumes; that fraction is greater for currents that liftoff closer to the source, thus topographic barriers increase mass partitioning from currents into buoyant plumes.

  10. Understanding arid environments using fossil rodent middens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, S.; Betancourt, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    American rodent middens have made a more dramatic contribution to understanding past environments and the development of ecological theory than Australian rodent middens. This relates to differences in the natural environment, the landscape histories, the scale and scientific approaches of the researchers. The comparison demonstrates: the power of synoptic perspectives; the value of thorough macrofossil identification in midden analysis and its potential advance in Australia where pollen has dominated analyses, the value of herbaria and reference collections; the potential of environmental databases; the importance of scientific history and 'critical research mass' and; finally, the opportunistic nature of palaeoecological research. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. Chemical carcinogenesis: Too many rodent carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, B.N.; Gold, L.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The administration of chemicals at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in standard animal cancer tests is postulated to increase cell division (mitogenesis), which in turn increases rates of mutagenesis and thus carcinogenesis. The animal data are consistent with this mechanism, because a high proportion{endash}about half{endash}of all chemicals tested (whether natural or synthetic) are indeed rodent carcinogens. The authors conclude that at the low doses of most human exposures, where cell killing does not occur, the hazards to humans of rodent carcinogens may be much lower than is commonly assumed.

  12. Subsite Awareness in Neuropathology Evaluation of National Toxicology Program (NTP) Studies: A Review of Select Neuroanatomical Structures with their Functional Significance in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Deepa B.; Little, Peter B.; Sills, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This review manuscript is designed to serve as an introductory guide in neuroanatomy for toxicologic pathologists evaluating general toxicity studies. The manuscript provides an overview of approximately 50 neuroanatomical subsites and their functional significance across seven coronal sections of the brain. Also reviewed are three sections of the spinal cord, cranial and peripheral nerves (trigeminal and sciatic respectively), and intestinal autonomic ganglia. The review is limited to the evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, as light microscopic evaluation of these sections is an integral part of the first-tier toxicity screening of environmental chemicals, drugs, and other agents. Prominent neuroanatomical sites associated with major neurological disorders are noted. This guide, when used in conjunction with detailed neuroanatomic atlases may aid in an understanding of the significance of functional neuroanatomy, thereby improving the characterization of neurotoxicity in general toxicity and safety evaluation studies. PMID:24135464

  13. Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Obesity, Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, and Associated Hepatic Co-Morbidities: A Comprehensive Review of Human and Rodent Studies

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Martine C.; Kleemann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that drives the ­development of obesity-related co-morbidities such as insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cardiovascular disease. This metabolic inflammation is thought to originate in the adipose tissue, which becomes inflamed and insulin resistant when it is no longer able to expand in response to excess caloric and nutrient intake. The production of inflammatory mediators by dysfunctional adipose tissue is thought to drive the development of more complex forms of disease such as type 2 diabetes and NAFLD. An important factor that may contribute to metabolic inflammation is the cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Increasing evidence suggests that MIF is released by adipose tissue in obesity and that it is also involved in metabolic and inflammatory processes that underlie the development of obesity-related pathologies. This review provides a comprehensive summary of our current knowledge on the role of MIF in obesity, its production by adipose tissue, and its involvement in the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and NAFLD. We discuss the main findings from recent clinical studies in obese subjects and weight-loss intervention studies as well as results from clinical studies in patients with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, we summarize findings from experimental disease models studying the contribution of MIF in obesity and insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic lipid accumulation and fibrosis. Although many of the findings support a pro-inflammatory role of MIF in disease development, recent reports also provide indications that MIF may exert protective effects under certain conditions. PMID:26124760

  14. [Tuberculosis Laboratory Surveillance Network (TuLSA) study group. The first step for national tuberculosis laboratory surveillance: Ankara, 2011].

    PubMed

    Sezen, Figen; Albayrak, Nurhan; Özkara, ?eref; Karagöz, Alper; Alp, Alpaslan; Duyar A?ca, Filiz; ?nan Süer, Asiye; Müderris, Tuba; Ceyhan, ?smail; Durmaz, R?za; Ertek, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    The most effective method for monitoring country-level drug resistance frequency and to implement the necessary control measures is the establishment of a laboratory-based surveillance system. The aim of this study was to summarize the follow up trend of the drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases, determine the load of resistance and evaluate the capacities of laboratories depending on laboratory quality assurance system for the installation work of National Tuberculosis Laboratory Surveillance Network (TuLSA) which has started in Ankara in 2011. TuLSA studies was carried out under the coordination of National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory (NRL) with the participation of TB laboratories and dispensaries. Specimens of TB patients, reported from health institutions, were followed in TB laboratories, and the epidemiological information was collected from the dispensaries. One isolate per patient with the drug susceptibility test (DST) results were sent to NRL from TB laboratories and in NRL the isolates were rechecked with the genotypical (MTBDRplus, Hain Lifescience, Germany) and phenotypical (MGIT 960, BD, USA) DST methods. Molecular epidemiological analysis were also performed by spoligotyping and MIRU/VNTR. Second-line DST was applied to the isolates resistant to rifampin. A total of 1276 patients were reported between January 1st to December 31th 2011, and 335 cases were defined as "pulmonary TB from Ankara province". The mean age of those patients was 43.4 ± 20 years, and 67.5% were male. Three hundred seventeen (94.6%) patients were identified as new cases. The average sample number obtained from pulmonary TB cases was 3.26 ± 2.88, and 229 (68.3%) of them was culture positive. DST was applied to all culture positive isolates; 90.4% (207/229) of cases were susceptible to the five drugs tested (ethambutol, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, rifampicin, streptomycin). Eight (3.5%) of the isolates were multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), while no extensively drug-resistant strains were detected. MDR-TB is likely to occur in 63.3 times more among previously treated cases, and 73.3 times more in legal aliens. The achievement of therapy among pulmonary TB cases was 91.9%. Spoligotyping performed for 221 M.tuberculosis complex isolates, showed that all strains were clustered in nine groups. SIT 41 (105/221; 47.5%) was the most frequent spoligotype detected, and clustering rate based on MIRU-VNTR results were found as 16.3%. All of the clustered strains were sensitive while all of MDR-TB isolates showed specific MIRU-VNTR profiles. In conclusion, TuLSA studies started in Ankara in 2011 and the system is still expanding in the country. Our data obtained with TuLSA have been published as a regional surveillance data in the WHO Global Tuberculosis Report 2011, and as a national surveillance data in Global Tuberculosis Report 2012. PMID:26167815

  15. Dose and time-dependent sub-chronic toxicity study of hydroethanolic leaf extract of Flabellaria paniculata Cav. (Malpighiaceae) in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Akindele, Abidemi J.; Adeneye, Adejuwon A.; Salau, Oluwole S.; Sofidiya, Margaret O.; Benebo, Adokiye S.

    2014-01-01

    Flabellaria paniculata Cav. (Malpighiaceae) is a climbing shrub, the preparations of which are used in the treatment of wounds and ulcers in Nigeria and Ghana. This study investigated the sub-chronic toxicity profile of the hydroethanolic leaf extract of F. paniculata (HLE-FP). HLE-FP was administered p.o. (20, 100, and 500 mg/kg) for 30 and 60 days to different groups of rats. Control animals received 10 ml/kg distilled water. In the group of animals for reversibility study, HLE-FP administration ceased on the 60th day and animals were monitored for a further 15 days. Results showed that oral treatment with HLE-FP for 30 days caused significant (p < 0.05) reductions in weight gain pattern compared to control. These changes were sustained with 60 days treatment. However, no significant (p > 0.05) differences in relative organ weights between control and treatment groups were observed. HLE-FP-treated rats showed significant (p < 0.05) increases in Hb, PCV and RBC on day 30 and significant (p < 0.05) increases in MCV and MCH indices on day 60 compared to control. There were significant (p < 0.05) elevations in serum K+, urea and creatinine compared to control. The liver function tests showed slight but non-significant alterations in relevant parameters when compared to control. Biochemical findings were supported by histopathological observations of vital organs including the kidney and liver. Toxicities observed in respect of kidney function were irreversible at 15 days of stoppage of treatment. In the acute toxicity study, HLE-FP given p.o. caused no lethality at 5000 mg/kg but behavioral manifestations like restlessness, generalized body tremor, feed, and water refusal were observed. The i.p. LD50 was estimated to be 2951.2 mg/kg. Findings in this study showed that HLE-FP is relatively non-toxic on acute exposure and generally safe on sub-chronic administration, but could be deleterious on the kidneys on prolonged oral exposure at a high dose. Thus, caution should be exercised with its long-term usage. PMID:24795634

  16. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies: Donald Bren Hall, Santa Barbara, California

    SciTech Connect

    Nancy Carlisle: NREL

    2004-03-23

    This publication is one of a series of case studies of energy-efficient modern laboratories; it was prepared for "Laboratories for the 21st Century," a joint program of the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. DOE Federal Energy Management Program

  17. A Feasibility Study for Mobile Marketing and Distribution Occupational Laboratories in North Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohns, Donald P.

    A study determined the feasibility of a mobile laboratory for marketing and distribution in North Dakota. It attempted to answer four questions: (1) What types of staffing, equipment, curriculum, and delivery systems are presently being utilized in mobile laboratories throughout the nation? (2) What significant information obtained from mobile…

  18. Laboratory studies of subaqueous debris flows by measurements of pore-fluid pressure and total stress

    E-print Network

    Laboratory studies of subaqueous debris flows by measurements of pore-fluid pressure and total flows is reported where total stress as well as pore pressure transducers were mounted in the bed; hydroplaning; laboratory experiment; pore pressure measurements 1. Introduction Debris flow is an important

  19. LABORATORY-NUMERICAL MODEL COMPARISONS OF CANYON FLOWS: A PARAMETER STUDY.

    E-print Network

    LABORATORY-NUMERICAL MODEL COMPARISONS OF CANYON FLOWS: A PARAMETER STUDY. DON L. BOYER University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8521 PÉRENNE, NICOLAS Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille Bd. Paul Langevin Cite Scientifique ­ 59655 - Villeneuve d'Ascq cedex (France) ABSTRACT An integrated set of laboratory

  20. Laboratory Practices of Beginning Secondary Science Teachers: A Five-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sissy S.; Firestone, Jonah B.; Luft, Julie A.; Weeks, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    During the beginning years of teaching, science teachers develop the knowledge and skills needed to design and implement science laboratories. In this regard, this quantitative study focused on the reported laboratory practices of 61 beginning secondary science teachers who participated in four different induction programs. The results…

  1. Forest rodents provide directed dispersal of Jeffrey pine seeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, J.S.; Wall, S.B.V.; Jenkins, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    Some species of animals provide directed dispersal of plant seeds by transporting them nonrandomly to microsites where their chances of producing healthy seedlings are enhanced. We investigated whether this mutualistic interaction occurs between granivorous rodents and Jeffrey pine (Pinus Jeffreyi) in the eastern Sierra Nevada by comparing the effectiveness of random abiotic seed dispersal with the dispersal performed by four species of rodents: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), yellow-pine and long-eared chipmunks (Tamias amoenus and T. quadrimaculatus), and golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis). We conducted two caching studies using radio-labeled seeds, the first with individual animals in field enclosures and the second with a community of rodents in open forest. We used artificial caches to compare the fates of seeds placed at the range of microsites and depths used by animals with the fates of seeds dispersed abiotically. Finally, we examined the distribution and survival of naturally establishing seedlings over an eight-year period. Several lines of evidence suggested that this community of rodents provided directed dispersal. Animals preferred to cache seeds in microsites that were favorable for emergence or survival of seedlings and avoided caching in microsites in which seedlings fared worst. Seeds buried at depths typical of animal caches (5-25 mm) produced at least five times more seedlings than did seeds on the forest floor. The four species of rodents differed in the quality of dispersal they provided. Small, shallow caches made by deer mice most resembled seeds dispersed by abiotic processes, whereas many of the large caches made by ground squirrels were buried too deeply for successful emergence of seedlings. Chipmunks made the greatest number of caches within the range of depths and microsites favorable for establishment of pine seedlings. Directed dispersal is an important element of the population dynamics of Jeffrey pine, a dominant tree species in the eastern Sierra Nevada. Quantifying the occurrence and dynamics of directed dispersal in this and other cases will contribute to better understanding of mutualistic coevolution of plants and animals and to more effective management of ecosystems in which directed dispersal is a keystone process. ?? 2009 by the Ecological society of America.

  2. Rough-Legged Buzzards, Arctic Foxes and Red Foxes in a Tundra Ecosystem without Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Pokrovsky, Ivan; Ehrich, Dorothée; Ims, Rolf A.; Kondratyev, Alexander V.; Kruckenberg, Helmut; Kulikova, Olga; Mihnevich, Julia; Pokrovskaya, Liya; Shienok, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Small rodents with multi-annual population cycles strongly influence the dynamics of food webs, and in particular predator-prey interactions, across most of the tundra biome. Rodents are however absent from some arctic islands, and studies on performance of arctic predators under such circumstances may be very instructive since rodent cycles have been predicted to collapse in a warming Arctic. Here we document for the first time how three normally rodent-dependent predator species—rough-legged buzzard, arctic fox and red fox – perform in a low-arctic ecosystem with no rodents. During six years (in 2006-2008 and 2011-2013) we studied diet and breeding performance of these predators in the rodent-free Kolguev Island in Arctic Russia. The rough-legged buzzards, previously known to be a small rodent specialist, have only during the last two decades become established on Kolguev Island. The buzzards successfully breed on the island at stable low density, but with high productivity based on goslings and willow ptarmigan as their main prey – altogether representing a novel ecological situation for this species. Breeding density of arctic fox varied from year to year, but with stable productivity based on mainly geese as prey. The density dynamic of the arctic fox appeared to be correlated with the date of spring arrival of the geese. Red foxes breed regularly on the island but in very low numbers that appear to have been unchanged over a long period – a situation that resemble what has been recently documented from Arctic America. Our study suggests that the three predators found breeding on Kolguev Island possess capacities for shifting to changing circumstances in low-arctic ecosystem as long as other small - medium sized terrestrial herbivores are present in good numbers. PMID:25692786

  3. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Soloiu, Valentin

    2012-03-31

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuelsâ?? combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  4. Safety data on 19 vehicles for use in 1?month oral rodent pre-clinical studies: administration of hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin causes renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Healing, Guy; Sulemann, Tabassum; Cotton, Peter; Harris, Jayne; Hargreaves, Adam; Finney, Rowena; Kirk, Sarah; Schramm, Carolin; Garner, Clare; Pivette, Perrine; Burdett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Potential new drugs are assessed in pre-clinical in vivo studies to determine their safety profiles. The drugs are formulated in vehicles suitable for the route of administration and the physicochemical properties of the drug, aiming to achieve optimal exposure in the test species. The availability of safety data on vehicles is often limited (incomplete data, access restricted/private databases). Nineteen potentially useful vehicles that contained new and/or increased concentrations of excipients and for which little safety data have been published were tested. Vehicles were dosed orally once daily to HanWistar rats for a minimum of 28?days and a wide range of toxicological parameters were assessed. Only 30% (w/v) hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin was found unsuitable owing to effects on liver enzymes (AST, ALT and GLDH), urinary volume and the kidneys (tubular vacuolation and tubular pigment). 20% (v/v) oleic acid caused increased salivation and hence this vehicle should be used with caution. As 40% (v/v) tetraethylene glycol affected urinary parameters, its use should be carefully considered, particularly for compounds suspected to impact the renal system and studies longer than 1?month. There were no toxicologically significant findings with 10% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide, 20% (v/v) propylene glycol, 33% (v/v) Miglyol®812, 20% (w/v) Kolliphor®RH40, 10% (w/v) Poloxamer 407, 5% (w/v) polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 or 10% (v/v) Labrafil®M1944. All other vehicles tested caused isolated or low magnitude effects which would not prevent their use. The aim of sharing these data, including adverse findings, is to provide meaningful information for vehicle selection, thereby avoiding repetition of animal experimentation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25959454

  5. Feasibility study of an orbiting laboratory for testing CSI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicos, Andrew S.; Loboda, Gregory G.

    1993-01-01

    A concept for an orbiting laboratory for testing Controls-Structures Integration (CSI) technology is described. The CSI-Star concept reflects a lower cost, higher risk approach. The concept supports demonstration and validation testing for critical CSI technologies at a cost of $20M to $26M with a 1-year reliability of approximately 0.9. The Ball Aerospace QuickStar bus is the carrier for the CSI test article. QuickStar is launched as a secondary payload on the McDonnell Douglas Delta 2. The QuickStar/Delta 2 approach is flight proven. The CSI test article is a 20 foot, 1 Hz, truss beam which is deployed from the QuickStar bus. The test article is well instrumented for quality system identification. The laboratory provides three layers of active control consisting of global vibration suppression along the truss beam, vibration isolation between the beam and instrument platforms, and vibration compensation through the use of gimbaled platforms which point lasers relative to optical sensor targets. The configuration simulates the dynamics of multi-instrument science platforms such as those of the Earth Observation System (EOS) while maintaining strong ties to astrophysics missions such as the Optical Interferometer. Uplink/downlink services and a reprogrammable computer provide flexibility for long-term investigations by members of the CSI community (NASA, DoD, academia, and industry). CSI-Star fills the gap between short-term experiments, which have been conducted primarily on the Shuttle, and future science missions which require the technology. The on-orbit maturity of CSI technology must be established to obtain acceptance by project managers and to promote injection of the technology into future science missions.

  6. Pilot-Scale Fermentation and Laboratory Nutrient Studies on Mixed-Acid Fermentation 

    E-print Network

    Smith, Aaron Douglas

    2011-08-08

    -1 PILOT-SCALE FERMENTATION AND LABORATORY NUTRIENT STUDIES ON MIXED-ACID FERMENTATION A Dissertation by AARON DOUGLAS SMITH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2011 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering PILOT-SCALE FERMENTATION AND LABORATORY NUTRIENT STUDIES ON MIXED-ACID FERMENTATION A Dissertation by AARON DOUGLAS SMITH Submitted...

  7. Dendritic structure varies as a function of eccentricity in V1: a quantitative study of NADPH diaphorase neurons in the diurnal South American rodent agouti, Dasyprocta prymnolopha.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, E G; Freire, M A M; Bahia, C P; Pereira, A; Sosthenes, M C K; Silveira, L C L; Elston, G N; Picanço-Diniz, C W

    2012-08-01

    The cerebral cortex is often described as a composite of repeated units or columns, integrating the same basic circuit. The 'ice-cube' model of cortical organization, and 'canonical' circuit, born from insights into functional architecture, still require systematic comparative data. Here we probed the anatomy of an individual neuronal type within V1 to determine whether or not its dendritic trees are consistent with the 'ice-cube' model and theories of canonical circuits. In a previous report we studied the morphometric variability of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) neurons in the rat auditory, visual and somatosensory primary cortical areas. Our results suggested that the nitrergic cortical circuitry of primary sensory areas are differentially specialized, probably reflecting peculiarities of both habit and behavior of the species. In the present report we specifically quantified the dendritic trees of NADPH-d type I neurons as a function of eccentricity within V1. Individual neurons were reconstructed in 3D, and the size, branching and space-filling of their dendritic trees were correlated with their location within the visuotopic map. We found that NADPH-d neurons became progressively smaller and less branched with progression from the central visual representation to the intermediate and peripheral visual representation. This finding suggests that aspects of cortical circuitry may vary across the cortical mantle to a greater extent that envisaged as natural variation among columns in the 'ice-cube' model. The systematic variation in neuronal structure as a function of eccentricity warrants further investigation to probe the general applicability of columnar models of cortical organization and canonical circuits. PMID:22542676

  8. Space and Context in the Rodent Hippocampal Region

    E-print Network

    Space and Context in the Rodent Hippocampal Region Mark C. Fuhs CMU-CS-06-170 November 2006 School and are sometimes modu- lated by the rodent's speed and direction of travel, leading to the hypothesis that d or to the rodent's task can cause place cells to "remap," or radically change their activity patterns. The first

  9. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  10. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  11. High-level similarity of dentitions in carnivorans and rodents

    E-print Network

    Jernvall, Jukka

    LETTERS High-level similarity of dentitions in carnivorans and rodents Alistair R. Evans1 , Gregory or in summarizing their tooth shapes, yet both carnivorans and rodents possess a comparable spectrum of dietary) analysis of 441 teeth from 81 species of carnivorans and rodents, we show that the surface complexity

  12. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  13. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  14. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  15. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  16. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  17. Circuit Dynamics and Coding Strategies in Rodent Somatosensory Cortex

    E-print Network

    Brumberg, Joshua

    Circuit Dynamics and Coding Strategies in Rodent Somatosensory Cortex DAVID J. PINTO,1,2 JOSHUA C., Joshua C. Brumberg, and Daniel J. Simons. Circuit dynamics and coding strategies in rodent somatosensory and thalamic barreloid neuron responses in rodent somatosensory cortex have indicated an active role for barrel

  18. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  19. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  20. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  1. Effects of a Highway on Mojave Desert Rodent Populations

    E-print Network

    Saltzman, Wendy

    Effects of a Highway on Mojave Desert Rodent Populations THEODORE GARLAND, JR.' and W. GLEN BRADLEY desert Larrea-Ambrosia- Yucca community in southern Nevada. During 12,000 trap nights, 612 rodents is available concerning the effects of roads on desert rodents. Effects of roads on small mammals may

  2. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  3. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  4. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  5. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  6. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  7. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program as outlined in...

  8. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program as outlined in...

  9. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program as outlined in...

  10. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program as outlined in...

  11. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section...Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to...performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program as outlined in...

  12. Hindlimb Suspension (HLS) in Rodents for the Study of Intracranial Pressure, Molecular and Histologic Changes in the Eye, and CSF Production Regulation and Resorption: A Status Report of Two Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theriot, C. A.; Taibbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.; Parsons-Wingerter, P.; Chevez-Barrios, P.; Rivera, A.; Zanello, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    This status report corresponds to two studies tied to an animal experiment being executed at the University of California Davis (Charles Fuller's laboratory). The animal protocol uses the well-documented rat hindlimb suspension (HLS) model, to examine the relationship between cephalic fluid shifts and the regulation of intracranial (ICP) and intraocular (IOP) pressures as well as visual system structure and function. Long Evans rats are subjected to HLS durations of 7, 14, 28 and 90 days. Subgroups of the 90-day animals are studied for recovery periods of 7, 14, 28 or 90 days. All HLS subjects have age-matched cage controls. Various animal cohorts are planned for this study: young males, young females and old males. In addition to the live measures (ICP by telemetry, IOP and retinal parameters by optical coherence tomography) which are shared with the Fuller study, the specific outcomes for this study include: -Gene expression analysis of the retina -Histologic analysis - Analysis of the microvasculature of retina flat mounts by NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) Software. To date, the young male and female cohorts are being completed. Due to the need to keep technical variation to a minimum, the histologic and genomic analyses have been delayed until all samples from each cohort are available and can be processed in a single batch per cohort. The samples received so far correspond to young males sacrificed at 7,14, 28 and 90 days of HLS and at 90 days of recovery; and from young females sacrificed at 7, 14 and 28 of HLS. A complementary study titled: "A gene expression and histologic approach to the study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production and outflow in hindlimb suspended rats" seeks to study the molecular components of CSF production and outflow modulation as a result of HLS, bringing a molecular and histologic approach to investigate genome wide expression changes in the arachnoid villi and choroid plexus of HLS rats compared to rats in normal posture.

  13. Combining Methods in Evaluating Information Systems: Case Study of a Clinical Laboratory Information System

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Bonnie; Duchon, Dennis

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports how quantitative and qualitative methods were combined in a case study of a clinical laboratory information system. The study assessed effects of the system on work in the laboratories, as reported by laboratory technologists seven months post implementation. Primary changes caused by the computer system were increases in the amount of paperwork performed by technologists and improvements in laboratory results reporting. Individual technologists, as well as laboratories, differed in their assessments of the system according to their perceptions of how it affected their jobs. The combination of qualitative and quantitative data led to the development of a theoretical explanatory model of these differences. The paper discusses methodological implications and the need for an approach to evaluating medical computer systems that takes into account the inter-relationships and processes of which the system is a part.

  14. Sleep deprivation and anxiety in humans and rodents-Translational considerations and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Pires, Gabriel Natan; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2015-10-01

    The effects of acute sleep deprivation on anxiety are the focus of controversy in the literature. While clinical research studies on the effects of sleep deprivation seem to show a consistent increase in acute anxiety, rodent studies have produced inconsistent results, with some experiments pointing to anxiogenesis and others to anxiolysis. Such observations impair the translational applicability of rodent models on the paradigm between sleep deprivation and anxiety. Current studies fail in the very basic principle of biomedical translational research: to provide relevant and reliable knowledge from basic experimental science that can be applied in clinical environments. Possible explanations for the disparity between human and animal studies include the accuracy of both human and rodent research, the ability of current behavioral protocols to truly reflect the anxiety response of rodents to sleep deprivation, and the nature of sleep deprivation-induced anxiety in rodents. Based on these hypotheses, we performed a brief overview of the literature on the relationship between sleep deprivation and anxiety and propose a research agenda that could lead to a better understanding of the reasons for the discrepancies found in the literature and provide more reliable data on the translational relationship between sleep deprivation and anxiety. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26376081

  15. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Candidate experiments definition and preliminary concept studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, R. V.; Hollinden, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    The candidate definition studies on the zero-g cloud physics laboratory are covered. This laboratory will be an independent self-contained shuttle sortie payload. Several critical technology areas have been identified and studied to assure proper consideration in terms of engineering requirements for the final design. Areas include chambers, gas and particle generators, environmental controls, motion controls, change controls, observational techniques, and composition controls. This unique laboratory will allow studies to be performed without mechanical, aerodynamics, electrical, or other type techniques to support the object under study. This report also covers the candidate experiment definitions, chambers and experiment classes, laboratory concepts and plans, special supporting studies, early flight opportunities and payload planning data for overall shuttle payload requirements assessments.

  16. Nonhuman gamblers: lessons from rodents, primates, and robots.

    PubMed

    Paglieri, Fabio; Addessi, Elsa; De Petrillo, Francesca; Laviola, Giovanni; Mirolli, Marco; Parisi, Domenico; Petrosino, Giancarlo; Ventricelli, Marialba; Zoratto, Francesca; Adriani, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The search for neuronal and psychological underpinnings of pathological gambling in humans would benefit from investigating related phenomena also outside of our species. In this paper, we present a survey of studies in three widely different populations of agents, namely rodents, non-human primates, and robots. Each of these populations offers valuable and complementary insights on the topic, as the literature demonstrates. In addition, we highlight the deep and complex connections between relevant results across these different areas of research (i.e., cognitive and computational neuroscience, neuroethology, cognitive primatology, neuropsychiatry, evolutionary robotics), to make the case for a greater degree of methodological integration in future studies on pathological gambling. PMID:24574984

  17. Nonhuman gamblers: lessons from rodents, primates, and robots

    PubMed Central

    Paglieri, Fabio; Addessi, Elsa; De Petrillo, Francesca; Laviola, Giovanni; Mirolli, Marco; Parisi, Domenico; Petrosino, Giancarlo; Ventricelli, Marialba; Zoratto, Francesca; Adriani, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The search for neuronal and psychological underpinnings of pathological gambling in humans would benefit from investigating related phenomena also outside of our species. In this paper, we present a survey of studies in three widely different populations of agents, namely rodents, non-human primates, and robots. Each of these populations offers valuable and complementary insights on the topic, as the literature demonstrates. In addition, we highlight the deep and complex connections between relevant results across these different areas of research (i.e., cognitive and computational neuroscience, neuroethology, cognitive primatology, neuropsychiatry, evolutionary robotics), to make the case for a greater degree of methodological integration in future studies on pathological gambling. PMID:24574984

  18. Object Recognition Memory and the Rodent Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR…

  19. Laboratory Studies of Ammonia Ices Relevant to the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meharchand, R. T.; Boulter, J. E.; Baer, C. E.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2004-12-01

    Ammonia ice condensation and cloud formation microphysics are topics of relevance for understanding the atmospheres of the giant planets. Ammonia ices are also considered important components of the icy satellites found in the outer solar system, and are thought to play an important role in their geological activity. Although observational evidence and thermochemical models suggest ammonia clouds in the Jovian atmosphere should be ubiquitous, less than only 1% of Jupiter's atmosphere appears covered by spectrally identifiable ammonia clouds, with a clear preference in turbulent regions.1,2 The paradox of the rather scarce spectroscopic signatures of ammonia clouds and their appearance in turbulent regions suggests that the nascent ammonia clouds may undergo processing that modifies their spectroscopic properties. No relevant laboratory experimental results are available to resolve this problem. Two possible sources of processing that have been suggested in the literature include photochemical solid-state modification (''tanning'') and coating of ammonia particles by other substances present in the stratospheric haze.2,3 We are performing laboratory investigations with the objective to provide information on the photophysical and chemical processes that control the optical properties of the Jovian ammonia clouds. In the experiments, thin ice films of ammonia are coated with organic molecules, such as saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. Preliminary results indicate suppression of the ammonia absorption feature at 2.7 ? m by a thin layer of hydrocarbons. The implications for the spectral signatures of ammonia clouds in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn will be discussed. Funding from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under grant AST-0206270 is gratefully acknowledged. The participation of Rhiannon Meharchand and Christina Baer was made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program under grant PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya and A.-S. Wong, Eos. Trans. 84(46), Fall. Meet. Suppl., Abstract A12A-0072 (2003), and references therein. 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  20. Transmission of Guanarito and Pirital Viruses among Wild Rodents, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, Mary L.; Cajimat, Maria N.B.; Duno, Gloria; Duno, Freddy; Utrera, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Samples from rodents captured on a farm in Venezuela in February 1997 were tested for arenavirus, antibody against Guanarito virus (GTOV), and antibody against Pirital virus (PIRV). Thirty-one (48.4%) of 64 short-tailed cane mice (Zygodontomys brevicauda) were infected with GTOV, 1 Alston’s cotton rat (Sigmodon alstoni) was infected with GTOV, and 36 (64.3%) of 56 other Alston’s cotton rats were infected with PIRV. The results of analyses of field and laboratory data suggested that horizontal transmission is the dominant mode of GTOV transmission in Z. brevicauda mice and that vertical transmission is an important mode of PIRV transmission in S. alstoni rats. The results also suggested that bodily secretions and excretions from most GTOV-infected short-tailed cane mice and most PIRV-infected Alston’s cotton rats may transmit the viruses to humans. PMID:22172205

  1. Laboratory studies on antimycin A as a fish toxicant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Bernard L.; Lennon, Robert E.; Hogan, James W.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid and sand formulations of antimycin A were tested in laboratory waters of various temperature, hardness, pH, and turbidity against 31 species of fresh-water fish of various sizes and life stages. Each formulation of toxicant was lethal under all water conditions to fish eggs, fry, fingerlings, and adult fish. Trouts are the most sensitive and catfishes the least sensitive. Of the 31 species, 24 succumb to 5 p.p.b. or less of the toxicant; only certain catfishes survive 25 p.p.b, The order of toxicity to various species of fish suggests that antimycin has possibilities for selective or partial control of certain unwanted fish. Although toxic to fish under ice, antimycin is more active in warm water than in cold. It is slightly more active in soft water than in hard; it is more active and persists far longer in water at pH 5 to 8 than at pH 9 or 10. It is active on fish in either clear and turbid waters, and it can be detoxified by potassium permanganate, The results contributed to registration of antimycin A in Fintrol-5 formulation as a fish toxicant.

  2. Laboratory studies of Kapton degradation in an oxygen ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented from a preliminary laboratory investigation of the degradation of the widely used polyimide Kapton under oxygen ion bombardment. Recent space shuttle flights have shown that Kapton and some other materials exposed to the apparent ram flow of residual atmosphere (at orbital velocity in low Earth orbit) lose mass and change their optical properties. It was hypothesized that these changes are caused by chemical interaction with atomic oxygen, aided by the 5-eV impact energy of atmospheric oxygen atoms in the ram. The reaction rate under O(+) bombardment seemed to be independent of incident energy over a wide range of energies. Although the flux of thermal ions in this experiment was much greater than the accelerated flux, the observed Kapton degradation was limited to the beam area and ram flow direction. This is consistent with an activation energy above the thermal energies but well below the beam energies. The results reproduce well the material loss, optical changes, SEM surface structure, and ram directionality of the samples returned by the shuttle. These factors, along with the lack of degradation under argon ion bombardment, are convincing evidence for ram flow oxidation as the mechanism of degradation.

  3. Laboratory studies of molecular growth in the Titan ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Thissen, Roland; Vuitton, Veronique; Lavvas, Panayotis; Lemaire, Joel; Dehon, Christophe; Dutuit, Odile; Smith, Mark A; Turchini, Stefano; Catone, Daniele; Yelle, Roger V; Pernot, Pascal; Somogyi, Arpad; Coreno, Marcello

    2009-10-22

    Experimental simulations of the initial steps of the ion-molecule reactions occurring in the ionosphere of Titan were performed at the synchrotron source Elettra in Italy. The measurements consisted of irradiating gas mixtures with a monochromatic photon beam, from the methane ionization threshold at 12.6 eV, up to and beyond the molecular nitrogen dissociative ionization threshold at 24.3 eV. Three gas mixtures of increasing complexity were used: N(2)/CH(4) (0.96/0.04), N(2)/CH(4)/C(2)H(2) (0.96/0.04/0.001), and N(2)/CH(4)/C(2)H(2)/C(2)H(4) (0.96/0.04/0.001/0.001). The resulting ions were detected with a high-resolution (1 T) FT-ICR mass spectrometer as a function of time and VUV photon energy. In order to interpret the experimental results, a Titan ionospheric model was adapted to the laboratory conditions. This model had previously allowed the identification of the ions detected in the Titan upper atmosphere by the ion neutral mass spectrometer (INMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. Comparison between observed and modeled ion densities validates the kinetic model (reactions, rate constants, product branching ratios) for the primary steps of molecular growth. It also reveals differences that we attribute to an intense surface chemistry. This result implies that heterogeneous chemistry on aerosols might efficiently produce HCN and NH(3) in the Titan upper atmosphere. PMID:19769328

  4. Laboratory Studies of Cometary Materials - Continuity Between Asteroid and Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Walker, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory analysis of cometary samples have been enabled by collection of cometary dust in the stratosphere by high altitude aircraft and by the direct sampling of the comet Wild-2 coma by the NASA Stardust spacecraft. Cometary materials are composed of a complex assemblage of highly primitive, unprocessed interstellar and primordial solar system materials as well as a variety of high temperature phases that must have condensed in the inner regions of the protoplanetary disk. These findings support and contradict conclusions of comet properties based solely on astronomical observations. These sample return missions have instead shown that there is a continuity of properties between comets and asteroids, where both types of materials show evidence for primitive and processed materials. Furthermore, these findings underscore the importance and value of direct sample return. There will be great value in comparing the findings of the Stardust cometary coma sample return mission with those of future asteroid surface sample returns OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa II as well as future comet nucleus sample returns.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION AND LABORATORY SOIL TREATABILITY STUDIES FOR CREOSOTE AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL SLUDGES AND CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information is presented from characterization and laboratory treatability phases of a 3-phase study pertaining to on-site treatability potential of soils containing hazardous constituents from wood-treatment waste. Specific information includes: (1) literature assessment of soil...

  6. ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION UTILIZING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AS A SUPPLEMENTAL SOURCE OF OXYGEN: A LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field scale studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using hydrogen peroxide as a supplemental source of oxygen for bioremediation of an aviation gasoline fuel spill. Field samples of aviation gasoline contaminated aquifer material were artificially...

  7. Laboratory studies of the aqueous-phase oxidation of polyols: submicron particles vs. bulk aqueous solution

    E-print Network

    Daumit, Kelly Elizabeth

    Oxidation in the atmospheric aqueous phase (cloud droplets and deliquesced particles) has received recent attention as a potential pathway for the formation of highly oxidized organic aerosol. Most laboratory studies of ...

  8. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-29

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  9. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  10. Earth Planets Space, 53, 539545, 2001 Study of local reconnection physics in a laboratory plasma

    E-print Network

    Ji, Hantao

    Earth Planets Space, 53, 539­545, 2001 Study of local reconnection physics in a laboratory plasma The Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (SGEPSS); The Seismological Society

  11. NASA ER-2: Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows views of the ER-2, NASA's Flying Laboratory for Earth Science Studies and Remote Sensing. The presentation briefly reviews the successes of the ER-2, and what the facility provides.

  12. Historically, laboratory studies of fish locomotion have focused on steady swimming under micro-turbulent conditions

    E-print Network

    Lauder, George V.

    Historically, laboratory studies of fish locomotion have focused on steady swimming under micro across swimming speeds and modes. Still, fish biologists acknowledge that steady swimming through low differences, flow over inanimate structures, and vorticity generated by moving organisms. Fishes swimming

  13. Electric air filtration: theory, laboratory studies, hardware development, and field evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.; Kuhl, W.; Lum, B.; Bogdanoff, A.; Hebard, H.; Hall, M.; Banks, D.; Mazumder, M.; Johnson, J.

    1983-09-01

    We summarize the results of a seven-year research project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop electric air filters that extend the service life of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the nuclear industry. This project was unique to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and it entailed comprehensive theory, laboratory studies, and hardware development. We present our work in three major areas: (1) theory of and instrumentation for filter test methods, (2) theoretical and laboratory studies of electric air filters, and (3) development and evaluation of eight experimental electric air filters.

  14. Partial Rodent Genetic Models for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang; Henter, Ioline D.; Manji, Husseini K.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is a complex clinical phenomenon. This episodic illness comprises at least four features/components: depression, mania, vulnerability to mood swings in euthymic BPD patients, and spontaneous cyclicity in at least some BPD patients. Currently, there is no rodent genetic model capable of encompassing the whole phenotype of BPD exists; however, recent genetic-behavioral studies have delineated partial models for some components of BPD, namely, depression, mania, and vulnerability or resilience to mood swings. p11 knockout (KO), vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) heterozygous KO, and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) KO mice display anhedonia-like symptoms, and treatment with antidepressants rescues this anhedonia-related phenotype. Mutant CLOCK, glutamate receptor 6 (GluR6) KO, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) KO mice exhibit mania-like behavioral clusters referred to as excessive behavioral excitement; at least some of the exhibited behaviors can be rescued through treatment with mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. Neuronal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) overexpressing, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) heterozygous KO, and Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG1) heterozygous KO mice show vulnerability to mood swings. In contrast, neuronal BAG1 overexpressing mice display resilience to mood swings. These mutant mouse strains and the behavioral approaches used to characterize these strains offer an emerging set of research tools for the comprehensive understanding of various components of BPD, and the interrelation of these components at the molecular, cellular, and neuronal circuitry levels. These partial genetic models can also be used as complementary tools to augment other existing behavioral tests and paradigms in drug development for BPD. PMID:25236551

  15. Characterizing Asteroid Thermal Properties through the Laboratory Study of Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, Robert J.; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Opeil, Cyril P.; Britt, Daniel T.

    2015-11-01

    Asteroid thermal diffusivity is critical to understanding its thermal evolution, and thermal inertia determines its behavior under Yarkovsky effects. These properties are both functions of thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and density. Thermal conductivity and heat capacity both vary with temperature, while thermal conductivity and density are strongly influenced by microporosity. Our survey of low-temperature (175K) heat capacities includes more than 130 meteorites, supplemented by precision temperature-sensitive heat capacities for 6 individual samples. Heat capacities (175K) range from 350 J/kgK for unweathered iron meteorites to 530 J/kgK, with most chondrites between 480 and 520 J/kgK. Heat capacities for unweathered ordinary chondrite falls are within 5% of theoretical models, and as a function of temperature fit a theoretical curve of Cp=A+BT+CT(-2)+DT(-0.5) between 77 and 300 K, and are consistent with mineral data between 20 and 300 K. (Values for A,B,C,D vary by meteorite type.)Thermal conductivities are strong functions of porosity and, below 90 K, strong functions of temperature. Laboratory measurements of several meteorites indicate that between 90 and 300 K, most thermal conductivities vary little with temperature. Below 90 K, thermal conductivity drops off strongly as temperature decreases. Above 2% porosity and 90 K, thermal conductivities correlate linearly with the inverse of porosity. Pore geometry and orientation also affects thermal conductivity; thermal conductivity differs noticeably for the same meteorite sample depending on the direction of heat flow.Given these relations and meteorite data, thermal diffusivity and thermal inertia can be derived over a range of porosities and temperatures for most asteroids. We see that porosity greatly influences both thermal diffusivity and thermal inertia. Even as little as 20% porosity can reduce thermal diffusivity by two orders of magnitude from the nonporous case.

  16. Dietary Factors Modulate Helicobacter-Associated Gastric Cancer in Rodent Models

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1982, the global importance of H. pylori-induced disease, particularly in developing countries, remains high. The use of rodent models particularly mice, and the unanticipated usefulness of the gerbil to study H. pylori pathogenesis have been used extensively to study the interactions of the host, the pathogen and the environmental conditions influencing the outcome of persistent H. pylori infection. Dietary factors in humans are increasingly recognized as being important factors in modulating progression and severity of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer. Studies using rodent models to verify and help explain mechanisms whereby various dietary ingredients impact disease outcome should continue to be extremely productive. PMID:24301796

  17. Laboratory infrared studies of molecules of atmospheric and astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, N. N.

    1982-01-01

    Nineteen reprints on the molecular species are compiled. Much of the work was done by using the Doppler-limited resolution provided by diode lasers. The diode laser was used as a source to a grating spectrometer which has been used earlier for high resolution studies. This technique provided many advantages. Wherever possible, the studies have been directed to intensity determinations of infrared bands.

  18. Survey for Hantaviruses, Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus, and Rickettsia spp. in Small Rodents in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Dobler, Gerhard; Markoti?, Alemka; Kurolt, Ivan-Christian; Speck, Stephanie; Habuš, Josipa; Vucelja, Marko; Krajinovi?, Lidija Cvetko; Tadin, Ante; Margaleti?, Josip; Essbauer, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In Croatia, several rodent- and vector-borne agents are endemic and of medical importance. In this study, we investigated hantaviruses and, for the first time, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and Rickettsia spp. in small wild rodents from two different sites (mountainous and lowland region) in Croatia. In total, 194 transudate and tissue samples from 170 rodents (A. flavicollis, n=115; A. agrarius, n=2; Myodes glareolus, n=53) were tested for antibodies by indirect immunoflourescence assays (IIFT) and for nucleic acids by conventional (hantaviruses) and real-time RT-/PCRs (TBEV and Rickettsia spp.). A total of 25.5% (24/94) of the rodents from the mountainous area revealed specific antibodies against hantaviruses. In all, 21.3% (20/94) of the samples from the mountainous area and 29.0% (9/31) from the lowland area yielded positive results for either Puumala virus (PUUV) or Dobrava–Belgrade virus (DOBV) using a conventional RT-PCR. All processed samples (n=194) were negative for TBEV by IIFT or real-time RT-PCR. Serological evidence of rickettsial infection was detected in 4.3% (4/94) rodents from the mountainous region. Another 3.2% (3/94) rodents were positive for Rickettsia spp. by real-time PCR. None of the rodents (n=76) from the lowland area were positive for Rickettsia spp. by real-time PCR. Dual infection of PUUV and Rickettsia spp. was found in one M. glareolus from the mountainous area by RT-PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of Rickettsia spp. in small rodents from Croatia. Phylogenetic analyses of S- and M-segment sequences obtained from the two study sites revealed well-supported subgroups in Croatian PUUV and DOBV. Although somewhat limited, our data showed occurrence and prevalence of PUUV, DOBV, and rickettsiae in Croatia. Further studies are warranted to confirm these data and to determine the Rickettsia species present in rodents in these areas. PMID:24866325

  19. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) Ada performance study report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Eric W.; Stark, Michael E.

    1991-01-01

    The goals of the Ada Performance Study are described. The methods used are explained. Guidelines for future Ada development efforts are given. The goals and scope of the study are detailed, and the background of Ada development in the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) is presented. The organization and overall purpose of each test are discussed. The purpose, methods, and results of each test and analyses of these results are given. Guidelines for future development efforts based on the analysis of results from this study are provided. The approach used on the performance tests is discussed.

  20. Gestational/perinatal chlorpyrifos exposure is not associated with autistic-like behaviors in rodents.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amy Lavin; DeSesso, John M

    2014-07-01

    Although animal models cannot exactly replicate human psychiatric disorders, they may be useful to investigate whether the behaviors associated with certain exposures in animals parallel those observed in people. According to the most current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, autism is diagnosed based on (1) persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction; and (2) the presence of restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests and activities. To address whether developmental chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure was associated with the development of autistic behaviors, a literature search was conducted to identify studies in rats and mice involving gestational or early postnatal exposure to CPF or CPF oxon (CPO, the active metabolite of CPF) and subsequent behavioral testing to assess behaviors related to autism. A total of 13 studies conducted in six different laboratories were identified. Analysis of these studies found that perinatal CPF exposure was generally associated with (1) no effect or increased social communications; (2) no effect or increased social encounters; (3) no effect, reduced stereotypies, or conflicting findings on stereotypic behaviors; and (4) no effect or increased preference for novelty and reduced anxiety in novel environments. These behavioral findings are generally inconsistent with the types of behaviors that would be expected in children with clinical autism. Based on the results of this analysis of rodent model studies involving CPF/CPO exposure, it cannot be concluded that gestational and/or perinatal CPF exposure is likely to be associated with the development of autism-like behaviors in humans. PMID:24861450

  1. FIELD AND LABORATORY OPERATIONS REPORT FOR THE OREGON WETLANDS STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oregon Wetlands Study (OWS) was designed to provide detailed characterizations of natural, created, and restored freshwater wetlands which is located in the urban environment of Portland, Oregon. his document discusses training the elementary, middle and high school teachers ...

  2. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  3. Inertial-fusion-reactor studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    We present results of our reactor studies for inertial-fusion energy production. Design studies of liquid-metal wall chambers have led to reactors that are remarkably simple in design, and that promise long life and low cost. Variants of the same basic design, called HYLIFE, can be used for electricity production, as a fissile-fuel factory, a dedicated tritium breeder, or hybrids of each.

  4. Telencephalic neurocircuitry and synaptic plasticity in rodent spatial learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Pooters, Tine; Van der Jeugd, Ann; Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna; D'Hooge, Rudi

    2015-09-24

    Spatial learning and memory in rodents represent close equivalents of human episodic declarative memory, which is especially sensitive to cerebral aging, neurodegeneration, and various neuropsychiatric disorders. Many tests and protocols are available for use in laboratory rodents, but Morris water maze and radial-arm maze remain the most widely used as well as the most valid and reliable spatial tests. Telencephalic neurocircuitry that plays functional roles in spatial learning and memory includes hippocampus, dorsal striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. Prefrontal-hippocampal circuitry comprises the major associative system in the rodent brain, and is critical for navigation in physical space, whereas interconnections between prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum are probably more important for motivational or goal-directed aspects of spatial learning. Two major forms of synaptic plasticity, namely long-term potentiation, a lasting increase in synaptic strength between simultaneously activated neurons, and long-term depression, a decrease in synaptic strength, have been found to occur in hippocampus, dorsal striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. These and other phenomena of synaptic plasticity are probably crucial for the involvement of telencephalic neurocircuitry in spatial learning and memory. They also seem to play a role in the pathophysiology of two brain pathologies with episodic declarative memory impairments as core symptoms, namely Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Further research emphasis on rodent telencephalic neurocircuitry could be relevant to more valid and reliable preclinical research on these most devastating brain disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25619550

  5. Rickettsia typhi IN RODENTS AND R. felis IN FLEAS IN YUCATÁN AS A POSSIBLE CAUSAL AGENT OF UNDEFINED FEBRILE CASES

    PubMed Central

    PENICHE-LARA, Gaspar; DZUL-ROSADO, Karla; PÉREZ-OSORIO, Carlos; ZAVALA-CASTRO, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi is the causal agent of murine typhus; a worldwide zoonotic and vector-borne infectious disease, commonly associated with the presence of domestic and wild rodents. Human cases of murine typhus in the state of Yucatán are frequent. However, there is no evidence of the presence of Rickettsia typhi in mammals or vectors in Yucatán. The presence of Rickettsia in rodents and their ectoparasites was evaluated in a small municipality of Yucatán using the conventional polymerase chain reaction technique and sequencing. The study only identified the presence of Rickettsia typhi in blood samples obtained from Rattus rattus and it reported, for the first time, the presence of R. felis in the flea Polygenis odiosus collected from Ototylomys phyllotis rodent. Additionally, Rickettsia felis was detected in the ectoparasite Ctenocephalides felis fleas parasitizing the wild rodent Peromyscus yucatanicus. This study’s results contributed to a better knowledge of Rickettsia epidemiology in Yucatán. PMID:25923891

  6. The Distribution and Diversity of Bartonella Species in Rodents and Their Ectoparasites across Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Klangthong, Kewalin; Promsthaporn, Sommai; Leepitakrat, Surachai; Schuster, Anthony L.; McCardle, Patrick W.; Kosoy, Michael; Takhampunya, Ratree

    2015-01-01

    Our study highlights the surveillance of Bartonella species among rodents and their associated ectoparasites (ticks, fleas, lice, and mites) in several regions across Thailand. A total of 619 rodents and 554 pooled ectoparasites (287 mite pools, 62 flea pools, 35 louse pools, and 170 tick pools) were collected from 8 provinces within 4 regions of Thailand. Bandicota indica (279), Rattus rattus (163), and R. exulans (96) were the most prevalent species of rats collected in this study. Real-time PCR assay targeting Bartonella-specific ssrA gene was used for screening and each positive sample was confirmed by PCR using nuoG gene. The prevalence of Bartonella DNA in rodent (around 17%) was recorded in all regions. The highest prevalence of Bartonella species was found in B. savilei and R. rattus with the rate of 35.7% (5/14) and 32.5% (53/163), respectively. High prevalence of Bartonella-positive rodent was also found in B. indica (15.1%, 42/279), and R. norvegicus (12.5%, 5/40). In contrast, the prevalence of Bartonella species in ectoparasites collected from the rats varied significantly according to types of ectoparasites. A high prevalence of Bartonella DNA was found in louse pools (Polyplax spp. and Hoplopleura spp., 57.1%) and flea pools (Xenopsylla cheopis, 25.8%), while a low prevalence was found in pools of mites (Leptotrombidium spp. and Ascoschoengastia spp., 1.7%) and ticks (Haemaphysalis spp., 3.5%). Prevalence of Bartonella DNA in ectoparasites collected from Bartonella-positive rodents (19.4%) was significantly higher comparing to ectoparasites from Bartonella-negative rodents (8.7%). The phylogenetic analysis of 41 gltA sequences of 16 Bartonella isolates from rodent blood and 25 Bartonella-positive ectoparasites revealed a wide range of diversity among Bartonella species with a majority of sequences (61.0%) belonging to Bartonella elizabethae complex (11 rodents, 1 mite pool, and 5 louse pools), while the remaining sequences were identical to B. phoceensis (17.1%, 1 mite pool, 5 louse pools, and 1 tick pool), B. coopersplainensis (19.5%, 5 rodents, 1 louse pool, and 2 tick pools), and one previously unidentified Bartonella species (2.4%, 1 louse pool). PMID:26484537

  7. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  8. FLARE (Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments): A Major Next-Step for Laboratory Studies of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hantao; Bhattacharjee, A.; Prager, S.; Daughton, W.; Bale, Stuart D.; Carter, T.; Crocker, N.; Drake, J.; Egedal, J.; Sarff, J.; Fox, W.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Myers, C.; Ren, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.

    2015-04-01

    A new intermediate-scale plasma experiment, called the Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments or FLARE (flare.pppl.gov), is under construction at Princeton as a joint project by five universities and two national labs to study magnetic reconnection in regimes directly relevant to heliophysical and astrophysical plasmas. The currently existing small-scale experiments have been focusing on the single X-line reconnection process in plasmas either with small effective sizes or at low Lundquist numbers, both of which are typically very large in natural plasmas. These new regimes involve multiple X-lines as guided by a reconnection "phase diagram", in which different coupling mechanisms from the global system scale to the local dissipation scale are classified into different reconnection phases [H. Ji & W. Daughton, Phys. Plasmas 18, 111207 (2011)]. The design of the FLARE device is based on the existing Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) (mrx.pppl.gov) and is to provide experimental access to the new phases involving multiple X-lines at large effective sizes and high Lundquist numbers, directly relevant to magnetospheric, solar wind, and solar coronal plasmas. After a brief summary of recent laboratory results on the topic of magnetic reconnection, the motivating major physics questions, the construction status, and the planned collaborative research especially with heliophysics communities will be discussed.

  9. A LABORATORY STUDY OF ARSENATE REDUCTION BY ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of organic reductants will be explored. Initial studies will focus on molecules possessing alpha-hydroxy carboxylate and phenolate functional groups, organic groups commonly found in reducing environments. Mandelic acid was chosen as the alpha-hydroxy carboxylate sinc...

  10. Global Inter-Laboratory Fecal Source Identification Methods Comparison Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source tracking is key to identifying sources of fecal contamination for remediation as well as risk assessment. Previous intra- and inter-lab studies have investigated the performance of human and cow-associated source tracking markers, as well as library-dependent fecal source ...

  11. Laboratory studies of the cosmic origins of organic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, A. P.; Garrido, M.; Miller, K. A.; Urbain, X.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-11-01

    We are constructing a novel merged-beams apparatus to study the cosmic origins of organic chemistry. With this, we plan to measure reaction rate coefficients of atomic C with molecular ions. Such chemical data is important for astrochemical models and observations of cosmic objects.

  12. Rodent repellents: Preparation and properties of thiouronium compounds and cyclic imides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellack, E.; DeWitt, J.B.

    1954-01-01

    Syntheses and bioassays of cyclic imides and thiouronium compounds were carried out as part of a search for materials capable of preventing rodent damage to packaged commodities. Previous studies had shown that repellent activity was associated with functional groups containing nitrogen and sulfur, and was enhanced by the presence of ionic linkages. Twenty-seven thiouronium compounds and 40 imides, including 1 0 compounds not described previously, were prepared for these tests. Ten imides and 26 thiouronium compounds were repellent under the conditions of test. Information obtained in these studies will be utilized in the development and selection of more effective materials for prevention of rodent damage to foods and other commodities.

  13. Detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in clinical laboratories in Europe--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Manser, M; Granlund, M; Edwards, H; Saez, A; Petersen, E; Evengard, B; Chiodini, P

    2014-01-01

    To determine the routine diagnostic methods used and compare the performance in detection of oocysts of Cryptosporidium species and cysts of Giardia intestinalis in faecal samples by European specialist parasitology laboratories and European clinical laboratories. Two sets of seven formalin-preserved faecal samples, one containing cysts of Giardia intestinalis and the other, containing oocysts of Cryptosporidium, were sent to 18 laboratories. Participants were asked to examine the specimens using their routine protocol for detecting these parasites and state the method(s) used. Eighteen laboratories answered the questionnaire. For detection of Giardia, 16 of them used sedimentation/concentration followed by light microscopy. Using this technique the lower limit of detection of Giardia was 17.2 cysts/mL of faeces in the best performing laboratories. Only three of 16 laboratories used fluorescent-conjugated antibody-based microscopy. For detection of Cryptosporidium acid-fast staining was used by 14 of the 17 laboratories that examined the samples. With this technique the lower limit of detection was 976 oocysts/mL of faeces. Fluorescent-conjugated antibody-based microscopy was used by only five of the 17 laboratories. There was variation in the lower limit of detection of cysts of Giardia and oocysts of Cryptosporidium between laboratories using the same basic microscopic methods. Fluorescent-conjugated antibody-based microscopy was not superior to light microscopy under the conditions of this study. There is a need for a larger-scale multi-site comparison of the methods used for the diagnosis of these parasites and the development of a Europe-wide laboratory protocol based upon its findings. PMID:24033667

  14. How compliant are technicians with universal safety measures in medical laboratories in Croatia? – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Kristina; Zoric, Matea; Pozaic, Petra; Starcic, Jelena; Culjak, Marija; Saracevic, Andrea; Miler, Marijana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This pilot study aimed to investigate the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and compliance to the code of conduct (rules defined in institutional, governmental and professional guidelines) among laboratory technicians in Croatian medical laboratories. In addition, we explored the differences in compliance between participants of different age groups, laboratory ownership and accreditation status. Materials and methods An anonymous and voluntary survey with 15 questions was conducted among Croatian medical laboratory technicians (N = 217). The questions were divided into two groups: demographic characteristics and the use of PPE. The questions of the second part were graded according to the Likert scale (1-4) and an overall score, shown as median and range (min-max), was calculated for each participant. Differences between the overall scores were tested for each group of participants. Results The majority of participants always wear protective clothes at work, 38.7% of them always wear gloves in daily routine, more than 30.0% consume food and almost half of them drink beverages at workplace. A significantly lower overall score was found for participants working in public compared to private laboratories (36 (16-40) vs. 40 (31-40), P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in overall scores for participants of different age groups (P = 0.456) and laboratory accreditation status (P = 0.081). Conclusion A considerable percentage of laboratory technicians in Croatian medical laboratories do not comply with safety measures. Lack of compliance is observed in all personnel regardless laboratory accreditation and participants’ age. However, those working in private laboratories adhere more to the code of conduct. PMID:26526817

  15. Preliminary study: Formaldehyde exposure in laboratories of Sharjah university in UAE

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hafiz Omer

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Laboratory technicians, students, and instructors are at high risk, because they deal with chemicals including formaldehyde. Thus, this preliminary study was conducted to measure the concentration of formaldehyde in the laboratories of the University of Sharjah in UAE. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two air samples were collected and analyzed for formaldehyde using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method 3500. In this method, formaldehyde reacts with chromotropic acid in the presence of sulfuric acid to form a colored solution. The absorbance of the colored solution is read in spectrophotometer at wavelength 580 nm and is proportional to the quantity of the formaldehyde in the solution. Results: For the anatomy laboratory and in the presence of the covered cadaver, the mean concentration of formaldehyde was found to be 0.100 ppm with a range of 0.095–0.105 ppm. Whereas for the other laboratories, the highest mean concentration of formaldehyde was 0.024 ppm in the general microbiology laboratory and the lowest mean concentration of formaldehyde was 0.001 ppm in the environmental health laboratory. The 8-hour (time-weighted average) concentration of formaldehyde was found to be ranging between 0.0003 ppm in environmental health laboratory and 0.026 ppm in the anatomy laboratory. Conclusions: The highest level of concentration of formaldehyde in the presence of the covered cadaver in anatomy laboratory exceeded the recommended ceiling standard established by USA-NIOSH which is 0.1 ppm, but below the ceiling standard established by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists which is 0.3 ppm. Thus, it is recommended that formaldehyde levels should be measured periodically specially during the dissection in the anatomy laboratory, and local exhaust ventilation system should be installed and personal protective equipment such as safety glass and gloves should be available and be used to prevent direct skin or eye contact. PMID:21808499

  16. Genotyping and subtyping of Giardia and Cryptosporidium isolates from commensal rodents in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Wang, R; Zhao, W; Qi, M; Zhao, J; Zhang, L; Li, J; Liu, A

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are two important zoonotic intestinal parasites responsible for diarrhoea in humans and other animals worldwide. Rodents, as reservoirs or carriers of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, are abundant and globally widespread. In the present study, we collected 232 fecal specimens from commensal rodents captured in animal farms and farm neighbourhoods in China. We collected 33 Asian house rats, 168 brown rats and 31 house mice. 6.0% (14/232) and 8.2% (19/232) of these rodents were microscopy-positive for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts, respectively. All 14 Giardia isolates were identified as Giardia duodenalis assemblage G at a minimum of one or maximum of three gene loci (tpi, gdh and bg). By small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequencing, Cryptosporidium parvum (n = 12) and Cryptosporidium muris (n = 7) were identified. The gp60 gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein was successfully amplified and sequenced in nine C. parvum isolates, all of which belonged to the IIdA15G1 subtype. Observation of the same IIdA15G1 subtype in humans (previously) and in rodents (here) suggests that rodents infected with Cryptosporidium have the potential to transmit cryptosporidiosis to humans. PMID:25579244

  17. Calodium hepaticum (Nematoda: Capillariidae) in synanthropic rodents (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) in Eastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Vera Lúcia Coimbra; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Silva, Djane Clarys Baía da; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Maldonado, Arnaldo; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento dos

    2013-01-01

    Calodium hepaticum (syn. Capillaria hepatica) is a trichurid nematode that parasitizes the hepatic parenchyma of rodents and other mammals. Infections in humans are rare, although they have been reported worldwide. A number of factors contribute to the distribution of this zoonosis, particularly the presence of dense populations of rodents associated with relatively poor urban environments, such as those found in parts of the northern Brazilian city of Belém in the eastern Amazon Basin. This study quantified Calodium infections in commensal synanthropic rodents in Belém. Rodents were captured in three neighborhoods characterized by poor public sanitation and the city's highest incidence of human leptospirosis. A total of 50 rodents were captured (26 Rattus rattus and 24 R. norvegicus), and 23 (10 R. rattus and 13 R. norvegicus) presented macroscopic lesions typical of C. hepaticum. Light microscopy of fresh samples and histological specimens permitted the identification of larvae and adult specimens containing numerous eggs with a double-striated shell and bipolar opercula with plugs. This is the first report of C. hepaticum in R. rattus and R. norvegicus from the Amazon Basin, and it shows a considerable risk of transmission to the local human population. PMID:23856730

  18. Genotoxic Changes to Rodent Cells Exposed in Vitro to Tungsten, Nickel, Cobalt and Iron

    PubMed Central

    Bardack, Stephanie; Dalgard, Clifton L.; Kalinich, John F.; Kasper, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten-based materials have been proposed as replacements for depleted uranium in armor-penetrating munitions and for lead in small-arms ammunition. A recent report demonstrated that a military-grade composition of tungsten, nickel, and cobalt induced a highly-aggressive, metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats to simulate a shrapnel wound. The early genetic changes occurring in response to embedded metal fragments are not known. In this study, we utilized two cultured rodent myoblast cell lines, exposed to soluble tungsten alloys and the individual metals comprising the alloys, to study the genotoxic effects. By profiling cell transcriptomes using microarray, we found slight, yet distinct and unique, gene expression changes in rat myoblast cells after 24 h metal exposure, and several genes were identified that correlate with impending adverse consequences of ongoing exposure to weapons-grade tungsten alloy. These changes were not as apparent in the mouse myoblast cell line. This indicates a potential species difference in the cellular response to tungsten alloy, a hypothesis supported by current findings with in vivo model systems. Studies examining genotoxic-associated gene expression changes in cells from longer exposure times are warranted. PMID:24619124

  19. Genotoxic changes to rodent cells exposed in vitro to tungsten, nickel, cobalt and iron.

    PubMed

    Bardack, Stephanie; Dalgard, Clifton L; Kalinich, John F; Kasper, Christine E

    2014-03-01

    Tungsten-based materials have been proposed as replacements for depleted uranium in armor-penetrating munitions and for lead in small-arms ammunition. A recent report demonstrated that a military-grade composition of tungsten, nickel, and cobalt induced a highly-aggressive, metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats to simulate a shrapnel wound. The early genetic changes occurring in response to embedded metal fragments are not known. In this study, we utilized two cultured rodent myoblast cell lines, exposed to soluble tungsten alloys and the individual metals comprising the alloys, to study the genotoxic effects. By profiling cell transcriptomes using microarray, we found slight, yet distinct and unique, gene expression changes in rat myoblast cells after 24 h metal exposure, and several genes were identified that correlate with impending adverse consequences of ongoing exposure to weapons-grade tungsten alloy. These changes were not as apparent in the mouse myoblast cell line. This indicates a potential species difference in the cellular response to tungsten alloy, a hypothesis supported by current findings with in vivo model systems. Studies examining genotoxic-associated gene expression changes in cells from longer exposure times are warranted. PMID:24619124

  20. Dissociated vertical deviation-a clinical and laboratory study.

    PubMed Central

    Helveston, E M

    1980-01-01

    The previously reported nomenclature and clinical characteristics of dissociated vertical deviation have been recorded. The incidence and characteristics of DVD have been determined by evaluation of 1,000 consecutive strabismus or nystagmus patients, and with selected chart study carried out on the 111 DVD patients found in this series. Electro-oculographic studies of selected patients with DVD provided objective evidence of the speed and amplitude of the ocular movements in DVD. Bell phenomenon, strabismus sursoadductorius and the Bielschowsky phenomenon were recorded and compared to clinical findings of strabismus patients with DVD. The technique for the results of surgery for DVD were described. Dissociated vertical deviation was characterized as a component of the overall strabismus picture. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 1 D FIGURE 1 E FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 3 C FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B PMID:7020216

  1. Studying Human Disease Genes in "Caenorhabditis Elegans": A Molecular Genetics Laboratory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox-Paulson, Elisabeth A.; Grana, Theresa M.; Harris, Michelle A.; Batzli, Janet M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists routinely integrate information from various channels to explore topics under study. We designed a 4-wk undergraduate laboratory module that used a multifaceted approach to study a question in molecular genetics. Specifically, students investigated whether "Caenorhabditis elegans" can be a useful model system for studying genes…

  2. Rodent reservoirs of future zoonotic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Barbara A.; Schmidt, John Paul; Bowden, Sarah E.; Drake, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing frequency of zoonotic disease events underscores a need to develop forecasting tools toward a more preemptive approach to outbreak investigation. We apply machine learning to data describing the traits and zoonotic pathogen diversity of the most speciose group of mammals, the rodents, which also comprise a disproportionate number of zoonotic disease reservoirs. Our models predict reservoir status in this group with over 90% accuracy, identifying species with high probabilities of harboring undiscovered zoonotic pathogens based on trait profiles that may serve as rules of thumb to distinguish reservoirs from nonreservoir species. Key predictors of zoonotic reservoirs include biogeographical properties, such as range size, as well as intrinsic host traits associated with lifetime reproductive output. Predicted hotspots of novel rodent reservoir diversity occur in the Middle East and Central Asia and the Midwestern United States. PMID:26038558

  3. Ketene Formation in Interstellar Ices: A Laboratory Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark Josiah

    2013-01-01

    The formation of ketene (H2CCO, ethenone) in polar and apolar ices was studied with in situ 0.8 MeV proton irradiation, far-UVphotolysis, and infrared spectroscopic analyses at 10-20 K. Using isotopically enriched reagents, unequivocal evidencewas obtained for ketene synthesis in H2O-rich and CO2-rich ices, and several reaction products were identified. Results from scavenging experiments suggested that ketene was formed by free-radical pathways, as opposed to acid-base processes or redox reactions. Finally, we use our results to draw conclusions about the formation and stability of ketene in the interstellar medium.

  4. Laboratory Studies of Heterogeneous Chemical Processes of Atmospheric Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct measurements of chemical kinetics parameters for heterogeneous reactions of importance in the stratosphere and the troposphere. It involves the elucidation of the mechanism of the interaction of HCl vapor with ice surfaces, which is the first step in the heterogeneous chlorine activation processes, as well as the investigation of the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of soot particles emitted by biomass and fossil fuels. The techniques being employed include turbulent flow-chemical ionization mass spectrometry and optical ellipsometry, among others.

  5. Evolution of the spermatozoon in muroid rodents.

    PubMed

    Breed, William G

    2005-09-01

    In the rodent superfamily Muroidea, a model for the evolution of sperm form has been proposed in which it is suggested that a hook-shaped sperm head and long tail evolved from a more simple, nonhooked head and short tail in several different subfamilies. To test this model the shape of the sperm head, with particular emphasis on its apical region, and length of sperm tail were matched to a recent phylogeny based on the nucleotide sequence of several protein-coding nuclear genes from 3 families and 10 subfamilies of muroid rodents. Data from the two other myomorph superfamilies, the Dipodoidea and kangaroo rats in the Geomyoidea, were used for an outgroup comparison. In most species in all 10 muroid subfamilies, apart from in the Murinae, the sperm head has a long rostral hook largely composed of acrosomal material, although its length and cross-sectional shape vary across the various subfamilies. Nevertheless, in a few species of various lineages a very different sperm morphology occurs in which an apical hook is lacking. In the outgroups the three species of dipodid rodents have a sperm head that lacks a hook, whereas in the heteromyids an acrosome-containing apical hook is present. It is concluded that, as the hook-shaped sperm head and long sperm tail occur across the muroid subfamilies, as well as in the heteromyid rodents, it is likely to be the ancestral condition within each of the subfamilies with the various forms of nonhooked sperm heads, that are sometimes associated with short tails, being highly derived states. These findings thus argue against a repeated evolution in various muroid lineages of a complex, hook-shaped sperm head and long sperm tail from a more simple, nonhooked sperm head and short tail. An alternative proposal for the evolution of sperm form within the Muroidea is presented in the light of these data. PMID:16037955

  6. Bioremediation of TNT-contaminated soil: A laboratory study

    SciTech Connect

    Widrig, D.L.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1997-06-01

    This research presented a bench-scale investigation of an innovative approach to land farming for the bioremediation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soils. Molasses, which contains sugar, nitrogen, vitamins, and minerals, was used as cosubstrate and this process combines several advantages of conventional land farming with the use of molasses for the biological degradation of TNT and its derivatives. In the optimum treatment, contaminated soil was amended with shredded grass and managed in an operating cycle where it was alternatively flooded with a dilute molasses solution, then drained, passively aerated, and finally tilled when moisture conditions were optimum. Soil TNT concentrations in all treatments receiving molasses were reduced from approximately 4,000-mg/kg levels initially to less than 100 mg/kg in 12 months, and to less than 1 mg/kg in the optimum treatment in this same time. Concentrations of the primary metabolic intermediates and bacterial populations were also tracked. Radiolabeling studies confirmed that the biomass enhanced by the treatments could mineralize approximately 20% of [{sup 14C}] from a contaminant spike after 22 d. A shredded grass amendment in the optimum treatment was shown to increase moisture retention during aeration phases. The results of this bench-scale study are promising with regard to transferring the process to full-scale applications.

  7. Laboratory Study of Magnetorotational Instability (MRI) in a Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Foley, J.; Levinton, F.; Fetroe, B.; Raitses, Y.; Kefeli, J.; Nornberg, M.; Zweben, S.; Yamada, M.

    2007-11-01

    Fast angular momentum transport in accretion disks has been an outstanding problem in astrophysics for more than three decades. Classically estimated transport due to molecular viscosity of a neutral fluid is too small to account for the fast observed accretion rates. The magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been identified as a powerful mechanism to transport angular momentum. Experiments using liquid metal are underway to study the MRI in the incompressible MHD limit. A new frontier in accretion disk research is to explore physics beyond the incompressible MHD. Possible new effects include compressibility, multiple-fluid effects, kinetic effects, ion-neutral collisions, radiation pressure, and dust grains. In order to study some of these effects, a new, small-scale experiment using a helicon plasma has been constructed. A preliminary analysis, addressing the two-fluid or Hall effect based on a local Hall MHD formulation, shows large differences in the growth rate between the cases when magnetic field is parallel and anti-parallel to the rotation axis for the experimentally achieved parameters. This is a clear sign of Hall effects on MRI. The detailed analyses and experimental results will be presented when available.

  8. Nucleobases in Space: Laboratory Studies of Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie; Mattioda, Andy; Bernstein, Max; Sandford, Scott; Hudgins, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs) are heterocyclic aromatics Le., PAHs with carbon atoms replaced by a nitrogen atom. These molecules have been detected in meteorite extracts, and in general these nitrogen heterocycles are of astrobiological interest since this class of molecules include nucleobases, basic components of our nucleic acids. These compounds are predicted to be present in the interstellar medium and in Titan tholin, but have received relatively little attention. We will present spectra and reactions of PANHs, frozen in solid H2O at 12 K, conditions germane to astronomical observations. In contrast to simple PAHs, that do not interact strongly with solid H2O, the nitrogen atoms in PANHs are potentially capable of hydrogen bonding with H20 changing their spectra, complicating their remote detection on the surfaces of icy bodies. Moreover, we have studied the photo-chemistry of these interesting compounds under astrophysical conditions and will use our lab studies to assess a potential interstellar heritage of these compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.

  9. Laboratory Studies in UV and EUV Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Ion Beam Experiment at the Center for Astrophysics is dedicated to the study of ion-electron collision processes of importance in solar physics. The analysis of measurements of Electron Impact Excitation (EIE) from the 3s3p(exp 3)P(exp o) metastable state to the 3s3p(exp 1)P state of Si(2+) was completed during the past year and a paper describing the results is available as a preprint. Our current program is directed at measuring absolute cross sections for dielectronic recombination (DR) and EIE in Si(3+), one of the primary ions used for probing the solar transition region. Our study of DR is particularly concerned with the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the recombination rates. Measurements of silicon ions with charge greater than n=2 have necessitated upgrading the experiment with a new ion source. The new source is also suitable for producing C(2+) beams to be used for measurements of EIE and DR for that system. The source is expected to be capable of producing beams of more highly charged systems as well.

  10. Laboratory Studies of Heterogeneous Chemical Processes of Atmospheric Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct measurements of chemical kinetics parameters for heterogeneous reactions of importance in the stratosphere and the troposphere. It involves the elucidation of the mechanism of the interaction of HC1 vapor with ice surfaces, which is the first step in the heterogeneous chlorine activation processes, as well as the investigation of the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of soot particles emitted by biomass and fossil fuels. The techniques being employed include turbulent flow- chemical ionization mass spectrometry and optical ellipsometry, among others. The next section summarizes our research activities during the first year of the project, and the section that follows consists of the statement of work for the second year.

  11. KETENE FORMATION IN INTERSTELLAR ICES: A LABORATORY STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark J.

    2013-08-20

    The formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO, ethenone) in polar and apolar ices was studied with in situ 0.8 MeV proton irradiation, far-UV photolysis, and infrared spectroscopic analyses at 10-20 K. Using isotopically enriched reagents, unequivocal evidence was obtained for ketene synthesis in H{sub 2}O-rich and CO{sub 2}-rich ices, and several reaction products were identified. Results from scavenging experiments suggested that ketene was formed by free-radical pathways, as opposed to acid-base processes or redox reactions. Finally, we use our results to draw conclusions about the formation and stability of ketene in the interstellar medium.

  12. Laboratory Oscillator Strengths for Studies of Fe-group Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, Elizabeth

    2012-05-01

    Recent decades have seen significant improvement in both the quantity and quality of available oscillator strengths for lines in the first and second spectra of many elements. These improvements have led to an increase in both the precision and accuracy of stellar abundance determinations, which in turn help elucidate outstanding questions in stellar astrophysics. One such outstanding question arises in the study of Fe-group nucleosynthesis in the early Universe. The observed trends of relative Fe-group abundances as a function of stellar metallicity (or age) are seriously discordant ( 1 dex) with Solar values and are difficult to replicate with nucleosynthetic yield calculations and models. These unexplained trends may result from some combination of residual errors in oscillator strengths, non-LTE/3D photospheric effects, and/or poorly understood nuclear physics. To help shed light on these outstanding questions we have returned our focus to the Fe-group atoms and ions, beginning with Mn I and Mn II. The goal of this ongoing work is to provide very accurate ( < ± 0.02 dex) oscillator strengths for Fe-group elements over a wide range of excitation potential for both neutral and singly ionized transitions such that both Saha and Boltzmann equilibrium assumptions can be tested. Abundance studies in metal poor giant and dwarf stars using these oscillator strengths indicate that while the resonance lines of the neutral yield Mn abundances that are too low compared to other neutral and ion transitions, the other transitions all yield consistent Mn abundances and [Mn/Fe] values of -0.70 ± 0.20 dex at metallicities of [Fe/H] = -2.5 ± 0.3. In metal-poor stars, the findings of subsolar Fe-group relative abundances appear to be robust. There is also a pressing need for Fe-group oscillator strengths for transitions in the H-band in support of APOGEE. Current work on Fe I will be described.

  13. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2b: Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkney, Sonia; Fan, Mark; Chan, Katherine; Koczmara, Christine; Colvin, Christopher; Sasangohar, Farzan; Masino, Caterina; Easty, Anthony; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient via infusion pump occurs routinely in health care, but there has been little empirical research examining the risks associated with this practice or ways to mitigate those risks. Objectives To identify the risks associated with multiple IV infusions and assess the impact of interventions on nurses’ ability to safely administer them. Data Sources and Review Methods Forty nurses completed infusion-related tasks in a simulated adult intensive care unit, with and without interventions (i.e., repeated-measures design). Results Errors were observed in completing common tasks associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions, including the following (all values from baseline, which was current practice): setting up and programming multiple primary continuous IV infusions (e.g., 11.7% programming errors) identifying IV infusions (e.g., 7.7% line-tracing errors) managing dead volume (e.g., 96.0% flush rate errors following IV syringe dose administration) setting up a secondary intermittent IV infusion (e.g., 11.3% secondary clamp errors) administering an IV pump bolus (e.g., 11.5% programming errors) Of 10 interventions tested, 6 (1 practice, 3 technology, and 2 educational) significantly decreased or even eliminated errors compared to baseline. Limitations The simulation of an adult intensive care unit at 1 hospital limited the ability to generalize results. The study results were representative of nurses who received training in the interventions but had little experience using them. The longitudinal effects of the interventions were not studied. Conclusions Administering and managing multiple IV infusions is a complex and risk-prone activity. However, when a patient requires multiple IV infusions, targeted interventions can reduce identified risks. A combination of standardized practice, technology improvements, and targeted education is required. PMID:26316919

  14. Hypergravity Effects on Rodent Pregnancy and Parturition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Mills, N. A.; Wade, C. E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    No mammal has yet undergone birth, or parturition, in the microgravity of space. Previous studies (Ronco & Alberts, 2000) have shown that mid-pregnant rat dams exposed to spaceflight (0-g) and landed 48-72 hrs before term successfully delivered robust, healthy offspring Microgravity-exposed dams exhibited twice the expected numbers of labor contractions whereas length of pregnancy, duration of labor, fetal wastage, number of neonates born and litter gender ratios were identical to controls. In the present study, we report the results of rodent pregnancy and parturition at the opposite end of the gravity spectrum, in hypergravity. Dams exposed to either: 1.0-g, 1.5-g, 1.75-g or 2.0-g from Gestational day (G) 11 and throughout the births of their litters had comparable pregnancy and labor durations, fetal wastage, numbers of neonates born and litter Tender ratios. During parturition, hypergravity-exposed dams exhibited significantly fewer labor contractions as compared to 1.0-g controls. Dams that underwent birth in hypergravity had significantly fewer offspring surviving the immediate postpartum period (P1: 1.0-g, 11.92 +/- 2.84; 1.5-g, 10.88 +/- 2.17; 1.75-g, 9.22 +/-1.99; 2.0-g, 8.83 +/- 3.31). Within 24 hrs postpartum, neonatal survival was further diminished in hypergravity [P2: 100% (1.0-g); 96% (1.5-g); 96% (1.75-g); 73% (2.0-g)] and continued to decline (P10: 100%(1.0-g.); 90%(1.5-g); 87%(1.75-g), 40%(2.0-g)]. Neonatal losses stabilized by P5 for the 1.5-g andl.75-g conditions but continued until P9 for the 2.0-g condition. Together, these findings show that postnatal, but not prenatal, survival is compromised following birth in hypergravity, Maternal and neonatal factors that contribute to peri-parturitional vulnerability to altered gravity environments will be discussed.

  15. SEROPREVALENCE OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN RODENTS FROM VARIOUS LOCATIONS IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA.

    PubMed

    Normaznah, Y; Azizah, M A Noor; Azuan, M I Mohd; Latifah, I; Rahmat, S; Nasir, M Amal

    2015-05-01

    Numerous studies have reported the prevalence of toxoplasmosis among Malaysians and various domestic animals; but there is paucity of information on its prevalence among rodents which could potentially contribute to the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii in both domestic and sylvatic fauna. Five hundred twenty-six rodents were captured from six locations in Malaysia and identified to species. Serum samples were collected from these rodents and tested for T.gondii antibodies using an immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT). T.gondii antibodies were found in 5.9% (31/526) of the tested samples. Most of the positive antibodies were from commensal rats: Rattus exulans (9/64, 14.0%), Rattus argentiventer (2/8, 25%), Rattus rattus diardii (10/166, 6.0%) and Rattus tiomanicus (6/215, 2.7%). Only two of the forest rats were positive: Maxomys rajah (1/9, 11.1%) and Rattus bowersi (1/12, 8.3%). Eighteen point one percent of ground squirrels (Tupaia glis) tested (2/11) were positive for antibodies. The highest antibodies titer (1:1024) was found in Rattus exulans followed by T.glis (1:256). Sabak Bernam, Selangor had the highest prevalence (10.8%) followed by Baling, Kedah (5.0%) and Bagan Terap, Selangor (4.0%). None of the serum samples of rodents collected from Gua Musang, Kelantan; Jasin, Malacca; or Labis, Johor were positive. Our study reports for the first time the serologic prevalence of T.gondii antibodies among rodents in Peninsular Malaysia. Further studies are needed to confirm T.gondii infection among wild rodents, such as a bioassay, to assess their potential role in transmission of the parasite. PMID:26521512

  16. Mode of Action Profiles for Pesticide Compounds with Rodent Liver Tumor Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mode of action (MOA) provides a central framework for assessing human relevance of adverse health outcomes observed in nonclinical safety studies. The goal of this study was to characterize MOA profiles for known rodent liver tumorigens identified from a database of pesticides as...

  17. Laboratory studies of thin films representative of atmospheric sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Tara Jean

    Sulfate aerosols are present globally in both the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. These aerosols are of great interest because they have a profound influence on Earth's radiation balance, heterogeneous chemistry, and cloud formation mechanisms throughout the atmosphere. The magnitude of these effects is ultimately determined by the size, phase, and chemical composition of the aerosols themselves. This thesis explores some of the questions that remain concerning the phase of these aerosols under atmospheric conditions and the effects of their chemical composition on heterogeneous chemistry and cloud formation mechanisms. In the upper troposphere, cirrus clouds are thought to form via the homogeneous nucleation of ice out of dilute sulfate aerosols such as ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4). To investigate this, the low-temperature phase behavior of ammonium sulfate films has been studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Experiments performed as a function of increasing relative humidity demonstrate that a phase transition from crystalline (NH 4)2SO4 to a metastable aqueous solution can occur at temperatures below the eutectic at 254 K. However, on occasion, direct deposition of ice from the vapor phase was observed, possibly indicating selective heterogeneous nucleation. In addition to serving as nuclei for cirrus clouds, sulfate aerosols can participate in heterogeneous reactions. The interaction of HNO3 with ammonium sulfate has been investigated as a possible loss mechanism for gas-phase HNO3 using a Knudsen cell reactor coupled with transmission FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that HNO3 reacts with solid ammonium sulfate to produce ammonium nitrate and letovicite at 203 K. Furthermore, this reaction is enhanced as a function of relative humidity from 0 to 41%. In the lower stratosphere, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are important for springtime ozone depletion. The vapor deposition of ice on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) has been studied as a possible formation mechanism for Type 2 PSCs. Results show that SAT is an efficient ice nucleus, requiring a supercooling of just 0.1--1.4 K below the ice frost point. Possible implications of this heterogeneous nucleation mechanism for PSC formation have been examined through use of a microphysical/photochemical model.

  18. Laboratory Studies in UV and EUV Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, William

    2003-01-01

    The Ion Beam Experiment at the Center for Astrophysics is dedicated to the study of ion-electron collision processes of importance in solar physics. A paper describing our most recent measurement 'Absolute cross section for Si(2+)(3s3p(sup 3)Rho (sup 0) yields 3s3p(sup 1)Rho(sup 0)) electron-impact excitation' was published during the past year. Dr. Paul Janzen received his PhD. from the Harvard Physics Department on the basis of this and other work, such as the new electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The ion source is producing stable beams with large currents for our present work on C(2+), and it also produces stable beams with large currents of more highly charged systems, for future work on systems such as O(4+). The past year has been focussed on our current program to measure absolute cross sections for Electron Impact Excitation (EIE) in C(2+), one of the primary ions used for probing the solar transition region. C(2+) beams produced by the ion source have been transported to the interaction region of the experiment, where the collisions are studied, and Visiting Scientist Dr. Adrian Daw is currently collecting data to measure the C(2+)(2s2p(sup 3)Rho(sup 0) yields 2p(sup 2)(sup 3)Rho) EIE cross section as a function of collision energy, under the guidance of Drs. John Kohl, Larry Gardner and Bill Parkinson. Also this year, modifications were made to the ECR ion source in order to produce greater currents of highly charged ions. Testing of the ion source was completed. Modifications were designed to extend the photon detection capabilities of the apparatus to shorter UV wavelengths, or EUV. Following the work on C(2+)(2s2p(sup 3)Pho(sup 0) yields 2p(sup 2)(sup 3)Rho), the extended UV detection capabilities will be used to measure the C(2+)(2s(sup 2)(sup 1)S yields 2s2p(sup 1)Rho(sup 0)) EIE cross section. The EUV modifications complement those of the new ion source, by enabling detection of EUV light generated by high charge state ions and putting us in a position to measure the excitation cross sections for more highly charged ions as well.

  19. Immunohistochemical characterisation of epithelial cells of rodent harderian glands in primary culture

    PubMed Central

    DJERIDANE, YASMINA; SIMONNEAUX, VALERIE; KLOSEN, PAUL; VIVIEN-ROELS, BERTHE; PEVET, PAUL

    1999-01-01

    The aims of the current investigation were (1) to establish an efficient procedure for the isolation of rodent harderian gland cells and to define conditions for maintenance of viable differentiated cells; (2) to compare the in vitro growth pattern of cultured epithelial cells; and (3) to characterise the cultured epithelial cells from 3 rodent species: Wistar rats, Syrian hamsters and Djungarian hamsters. We have established primary culture conditions that permit the maintenance of viable and differentiated secretory cells from adult rodent harderian gland. This study demonstrates that the cell growth pattern is faster in hamsters than in rats and despite morphological changes, epithelial cells reestablish their distinctive (biochemical/metabolic) phenotype as indicated by lipid-containing vacuoles, porphyrin pigment and serotonin and tryptophan hydroxylase labelling. PMID:10634691

  20. A macroecological glance at the structure of late Miocene rodent assemblages from Southwest Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Ana Rosa Gómez; Cantalapiedra, Juan L.; Álvarez-Sierra, M. Ángeles; Fernández, Manuel Hernández

    2014-10-01

    Deep-time perspectives in macroecology are essential with regard to understanding the impact of climate forcing on faunal communities. Using late Miocene rodent faunas (12 to 5 Ma) from two different biogeographical provinces from southwestern Europe, we asked whether the waxing and waning of faunas with dissimilar ecological affinities tracked climate in different ways. The latest middle Miocene featured a fauna dominated by dormice with forest and mixed-habitat affinities. This group declined towards the Upper Miocene. Rodent taxa with the highest values of richness at the beginning of the Upper Miocene are generalists in the southern province and specialists of forested habitats in the northern province. Finally, we identified a third, increasingly significant group of rodents linked to open landscapes towards the end of the Miocene. These three broad ecological groups showed differential responses to a complex set of interconnected circumstances, including the biogeographic structure of the study area and climatic changes throughout time.